WorldWideScience

Sample records for bias stress effects

  1. Impact of bias conditions on electrical stress and ionizing radiation effects in Si-based TFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lili; Gnani, Elena; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Driussi, Francesco; Selmi, Luca; Royer, Cyrille Le; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between electrical stress and ionizing radiation effects is experimentally investigated in Si-based Tunnel Field Effect Transistors (TFETs). In particular, the impact of bias conditions on the performance degradation is discussed. We found that the electrical stress effects in TFETs could not be ignored in radiation tests, since they can possibly overwhelm the radiation-induced degradation. Under this circumstance, the worst-case bias condition for studying radiation effects is not straightforward to be determined when there is an interplay between electrical stress and ionizing radiation effects.

  2. Effects of bias stress on ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors fabricated with organic gate nanodielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sanghyun; Janes, David B.; Lu, Gang; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J.

    2006-11-01

    The effects of bias stress (gate stress or drain stress) on nanowire field-effect transistor (NW-FET) stability were investigated as a function of stress bias and stress time. The n-channel NW-FETs used a nanoscopic self-assembled organic gate insulator, and each device contained a single ZnO nanowire. Before stress, the off current is limited by a leakage current in the 1nA range, which increases as the gate to source bias becomes increasingly negative. The devices also exhibited significant changes in threshold voltage (Vth) and off current over 500 repeated measurement sweeps. The leakage current was significantly reduced after gate stress, but not after drain stress. Vth variations observed upon successive bias sweeps for devices following gate stress or drain stress were smaller than the Vth variation of unstressed devices. These observations suggest that gate stress and drain stress modify the ZnO nanowire-gate insulator interface, which can reduce electron trapping at the surface and therefore reduce the off current levels and variations in Vth. These results confirm that gate and drain stresses are effective means to stabilize device operation and provide high performance transistors with impressive reliabilities.

  3. Effect of Reverse Bias Stress on Leakage Currents and Breakdown Voltages of Solid Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    the processes under reverse bias conditions. In practice, there were instances when, due to unforeseen events, the system operated at conditions when capacitors experience periodically a relatively small reverse bias for some time followed by normal, forward bias conditions. In such a case an assessment should be made on the degree to which these capacitors are degraded by application of low-voltage reverse bias, and whether this degradation can be reversed by normal operating conditions. In this study, reverse currents in different types of tantalum capacitors were monitored at different reverse voltages below 15%VR and temperatures in the range from room to 145 C for up to 150 hours to get better understanding of the degradation process and determine conditions favorable to the unstable mode of operation. The reversibility of RB degradation has been evaluated after operation of the capacitors at forward bias conditions. The effect of reverse bias stress (RBS) on reliability at normal operating conditions was evaluated using highly accelerated life testing at voltages of 1.5VR and 2 VR and by analysis of changes in distributions of breakdown voltages. Possible mechanisms of RB degradation are discussed.

  4. The influence of cognitive biases on psychophysiological vulnerability to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who disproportionately attend to negative aspects of a situation (attention bias), or who unduly interpret ambiguity in a negative manner (interpretive bias) report more psychological ill-effects of stress than those with balanced or positively-skewed inclinations. Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) techniques improve maladaptive biases through implicitly-based association learning, with induced positive biases buffering the future perception of stress. Six experimen...

  5. Effects of stress conditions on the generation of negative bias temperature instability-associated interface traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exponent n of the generation of an interface trap (Nit), which contributes to the power-law negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation, and the exponent's time evolution are investigated by simulations with varying the stress voltage Vg and temperature T. It is found that the exponent n in the diffusion-limited phase of the degradation process is irrelevant to both Vg and T. The time evolution of the exponent n is affected by the stress conditions, which is reflected in the shift of the onset of the diffusion-limited phase. According to the diffusion profiles, the generation of the atomic hydrogen species, which is equal to the buildup of Nit, is strongly correlated with the stress conditions, whereas the diffusion of the hydrogen species shows Vg-unaffected but T-affected relations through the normalized results

  6. The effects of juvenile stress on anxiety, cognitive bias and decision making in adulthood: a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola M Brydges

    Full Text Available Stress experienced in childhood is associated with an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adulthood. These disorders are particularly characterized by disturbances to emotional and cognitive processes, which are not currently fully modeled in animals. Assays of cognitive bias have recently been used with animals to give an indication of their emotional/cognitive state. We used a cognitive bias test, alongside a traditional measure of anxiety (elevated plus maze, to investigate the effects of juvenile stress (JS on adulthood behaviour using a rodent model. During the cognitive bias test, animals were trained to discriminate between two reward bowls based on a stimulus (rough/smooth sandpaper encountered before they reached the bowls. One stimulus (e.g. rough was associated with a lower value reward than the other (e.g. smooth. Once rats were trained, their cognitive bias was explored through the presentation of an ambiguous stimulus (intermediate grade sandpaper: a rat was classed as optimistic if it chose the bowl ordinarily associated with the high value reward. JS animals were lighter than controls, exhibited increased anxiety-like behaviour in the elevated plus maze and were more optimistic in the cognitive bias test. This increased optimism may represent an optimal foraging strategy for these underweight animals. JS animals were also faster than controls to make a decision when presented with an ambiguous stimulus, suggesting altered decision making. These results demonstrate that stress in the juvenile phase can increase anxiety-like behaviour and alter cognitive bias and decision making in adulthood in a rat model.

  7. Effect of top gate bias on photocurrent and negative bias illumination stress instability in dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunji; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Park, Min Sang; Jang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the effect of top gate bias (VTG) on the generation of photocurrent and the decay of photocurrent for back channel etched inverted staggered dual gate structure amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Upon 5 min of exposure of 365 nm wavelength and 0.7 mW/cm2 intensity light with negative bottom gate bias, the maximum photocurrent increases from 3.29 to 322 pA with increasing the VTG from -15 to +15 V. By changing VTG from negative to positive, the Fermi level (EF) shifts toward conduction band edge (EC), which substantially controls the conversion of neutral vacancy to charged one (VO → VO+/VO2+ + e-/2e-), peroxide (O22-) formation or conversion of ionized interstitial (Oi2-) to neutral interstitial (Oi), thus electron concentration at conduction band. With increasing the exposure time, more carriers are generated, and thus, maximum photocurrent increases until being saturated. After negative bias illumination stress, the transfer curve shows -2.7 V shift at VTG = -15 V, which gradually decreases to -0.42 V shift at VTG = +15 V. It clearly reveals that the position of electron quasi-Fermi level controls the formation of donor defects (VO+/VO2+/O22-/Oi) and/or hole trapping in the a-IGZO /interfaces.

  8. Bias-illumination stress effect in thin film transistors with a nitrogen low-doped IZO active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremisin, Alexander B.; Kuznetsov, Sergey N.; Stefanovich, Genrikh B.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of ZnO and IZO moderate nitridation on the performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) has been studied by methods of transfer and capacitance-voltage characteristics, isochronal annealing and computer modeling. Layers of ZnO:N and IZO:N were prepared by reactive sputtering. It is shown that nitridation of the ZnO matrix up to a concentration of 9 at.% results in the deterioration of transistor parameters. However, nitridation of the IZO matrix does not impair a transistor’s static parameters and also provides enhanced performance reproducibility. An additional positive effect is manifested in the electrical stress stability of transistor characteristics at negative bias and positive bias in darkness. Negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of IZO:N structures also causes TFTs’ degradation similar to that for IGZO devices. However, our observations of the NBIS effect have revealed the following important features. Holes trapped under NBIS could not be neutralized by electrons in the channel in the accumulation regime, thus indicating negligible interaction between positively-charged defects and the conduction band. In addition, trapped holes’ depopulation was performed by thermal activation with an isochronal annealing method. An activation energy of ˜0.8 eV was revealed which is interpreted as the energy level of defects above the valence-band maximum. The specified features do not correlate with the assumption of the key role of oxygen vacancies in NBIS that is extensively presented in literature.

  9. Effect of top gate bias on photocurrent and negative bias illumination stress instability in dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eunji; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Park, Min Sang; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr [Advanced Display Research Center and Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-07

    We have studied the effect of top gate bias (V{sub TG}) on the generation of photocurrent and the decay of photocurrent for back channel etched inverted staggered dual gate structure amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Upon 5 min of exposure of 365 nm wavelength and 0.7 mW/cm{sup 2} intensity light with negative bottom gate bias, the maximum photocurrent increases from 3.29 to 322 pA with increasing the V{sub TG} from −15 to +15 V. By changing V{sub TG} from negative to positive, the Fermi level (E{sub F}) shifts toward conduction band edge (E{sub C}), which substantially controls the conversion of neutral vacancy to charged one (V{sub O} → V{sub O}{sup +}/V{sub O}{sup 2+} + e{sup −}/2e{sup −}), peroxide (O{sub 2}{sup 2−}) formation or conversion of ionized interstitial (O{sub i}{sup 2−}) to neutral interstitial (O{sub i}), thus electron concentration at conduction band. With increasing the exposure time, more carriers are generated, and thus, maximum photocurrent increases until being saturated. After negative bias illumination stress, the transfer curve shows −2.7 V shift at V{sub TG} = −15 V, which gradually decreases to −0.42 V shift at V{sub TG} = +15 V. It clearly reveals that the position of electron quasi-Fermi level controls the formation of donor defects (V{sub O}{sup +}/V{sub O}{sup 2+}/O{sub 2}{sup 2−}/O{sub i}) and/or hole trapping in the a-IGZO /interfaces.

  10. Investigating degradation behavior of InGaZnO thin-film transistors induced by charge-trapping effect under DC and AC gate bias stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the degradation mechanism of amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistors under DC and AC gate bias stress. Comparing the degradation behavior at equal accumulated effective stress time, more pronounced threshold voltage shift under AC positive gate bias stress in comparison with DC stress indicates extra electron-trapping phenomenon that occurs in the duration of rising/falling time in pulse. Contrarily, illuminated AC negative gate bias stress exhibits much less threshold voltage shift than DC stress, suggesting that the photo-generated hole does not have sufficient time to drift to the interface of IGZO/gate insulator and causes hole-trapping under AC operation. Since the evolution of threshold voltage fits the stretched-exponential equation well, the different degradation tendencies under DC/AC stress can be attributed to the different electron- and hole-trapping efficiencies, and this is further verified by varying pulse waveform. - Highlights: ► Static and dynamic gate bias stresses are imposed on InGaZnO TFTs. ► Dynamic positive gate bias induces more pronounced threshold voltage shift. ► Static negative-bias illumination stress induces more severe threshold voltage shift. ► Evolution of threshold voltage fits the stretched-exponential equation well

  11. Combination of light-induced effect and gate bias stress in organic phototransistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, R.; Sheets, W. C.; Bezzeccheri, E.; Facchetti, A.; Rubino, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the photoresponse of pentacene-based thin film transistors fabricated with a photocurable polymer insulator was investigated under visible and ultraviolet illumination. A simple model was developed to distinguish a photoconductive and a photovoltaic effect, that is, a direct photocurrent and a current enhancement caused by a threshold voltage shift. The direction of the light-induced threshold translation is affected by measurement conditions (e.g. integration time and voltage range) and is related to the nature of the trap states, specifically those located in the pentacene film near the interface with the polymer. In particular, it was shown that, thanks to this phenomenon, the photosensitivity of the fabricated phototransistors could be modulated by the gate bias applied during illumination.

  12. Effect of indium low doping in ZnO based TFTs on electrical parameters and bias stress stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheremisin, Alexander B., E-mail: acher612@gmail.com; Kuznetsov, Sergey N.; Stefanovich, Genrikh B. [Physico-Technical Department, Petrozavodsk State University, Petrozavodsk 185910 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Some applications of thin film transistors (TFTs) need the bottom-gate architecture and unpassivated channel backside. We propose a simple routine to fabricate indium doped ZnO-based TFT with satisfactory characteristics and acceptable stability against a bias stress in ambient room air. To this end, a channel layer of 15 nm in thickness was deposited on cold substrate by DC reactive magnetron co-sputtering of metal Zn-In target. It is demonstrated that the increase of In concentration in ZnO matrix up to 5% leads to negative threshold voltage (V{sub T}) shift and an increase of field effect mobility (μ) and a decrease of subthreshold swing (SS). When dopant concentration reaches the upper level of 5% the best TFT parameters are achieved such as V{sub T} = 3.6 V, μ = 15.2 cm{sup 2}/V s, SS = 0.5 V/dec. The TFTs operate in enhancement mode exhibiting high turn on/turn off current ratio more than 10{sup 6}. It is shown that the oxidative post-fabrication annealing at 250{sup o}C in pure oxygen and next ageing in dry air for several hours provide highly stable operational characteristics under negative and positive bias stresses despite open channel backside. A possible cause of this effect is discussed.

  13. Gate-bias stress-dependent photoconductive characteristics of multi-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the photoconductive characteristics of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) that were fabricated with mechanically exfoliated multi-layer MoS2 flakes. Upon exposure to UV light, we observed an increase in the MoS2 FET current because of electron–hole pair generation. The MoS2 FET current decayed after the UV light was turned off. The current decay processes were fitted using exponential functions with different decay characteristics. Specifically, a fast decay was used at the early stages immediately after turning off the light to account for the exciton relaxation, and a slow decay was used at later stages long after turning off the light due to charge trapping at the oxygen-related defect sites on the MoS2 surface. This photocurrent decay phenomenon of the MoS2 FET was influenced by the measurement environment (i.e., vacuum or oxygen environment) and the electrical gate-bias stress conditions (positive or negative gate biases). The results of this study will enhance the understanding of the influence of environmental and measurement conditions on the optical and electrical properties of MoS2 FETs. (paper)

  14. Effect of external stress and bias magnetic field on transformation strain of heusler alloy Ni-Mn-Ga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高智勇; 蔡伟; 赵连城; 吴光恒; 陈京兰; 詹文山

    2003-01-01

    The influence of external field(magnetic field and stress field) on the transformation strain of Ni52.9-Mn24.4Ga22.7 single crystal were investigated and its mechanism was also discussed. When thermally martensitictransformation occurs, about 0.25% transformation strain is obtained which may be obviously enhanced to about0. 8% by a 6 000 Oe magnetic bias field. However, the strain decreases by the external compress stress loaded alongthe strain-measured direction. When the external compress stress and bias magnetic field are simultaneously applied,the transformation strain decreases with increasing the magnetic field, which is related to the rearrangement of themartensite variants influenced by the external field.

  15. Effect of top gate potential on bias-stress for dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Minkyu; Um, Jae Gwang; Park, Min Sang; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Jang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    We report the abnormal behavior of the threshold voltage (VTH) shift under positive bias Temperature stress (PBTS) and negative bias temperature stress (NBTS) at top/bottom gate in dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). It is found that the PBTS at top gate shows negative transfer shift and NBTS shows positive transfer shift for both top and bottom gate sweep. The shift of bottom/top gate sweep is dominated by top gate bias (VTG), while bottom gate bias (VBG) is less effect than VTG. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profile provides the evidence of In metal diffusion to the top SiO2/a-IGZO and also the existence of large amount of In+ under positive top gate bias around top interfaces, thus negative transfer shift is observed. On the other hand, the formation of OH- at top interfaces under the stress of negative top gate bias shows negative transfer shift. The domination of VTG both on bottom/top gate sweep after PBTS/NBTS is obviously occurred due to thin active layer.

  16. For whom the bell tolls: Neurocognitive individual differences in the acute stress-reduction effects of an attention bias modification game for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis-Tiwary, Tracy A; Egan, Laura J; Babkirk, Sarah; Denefrio, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of attention bias modification training (ABMT) for anxiety is debated, in part because individual differences in task engagement and pre-training threat bias impact training efficacy. In the present study, an engaging, gamified ABMT mobile application, or "app," was utilized in 42 (21 females) trait-anxious adults. EEG was recorded during pre- and post-training threat bias assessment to generate scalp-recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) reflecting neurocognitive responses to threat. Following app play (ABMT versus placebo), subjective anxiety and stress responses (observed and self-reported) were measured. ABMT, versus placebo, resulted in improved behavioral performance during the stress task for females, and in potentiation of the N2 ERP to threat for males, suggesting increased attention control. Training groups did not differ in self-reported anxiety. ABMT also resulted in improved performance during the stress task among those evidencing specific pre-training ERP responses: decreased P1, suggesting less attention allocation, but potentiated N170, suggesting enhanced attention selection and discrimination. Differences in behavioral threat bias did not moderate training effects. Results suggest that efficient allocation of attention to threat combined with enhanced discrimination between threat and non-threat may facilitate stress-reduction effects of ABMT. Targeting neurocognitive responses to threat to personalize ABMT and develop more effective methods of treatment delivery, such as gamification, are discussed. PMID:26745621

  17. Attention Bias Variability and Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Iacoviello, Brian M.; Wu, Gang; Abend, Rany; Murrough, James W.; Feder, Adriana; Fruchter, Eyal; Levinstein, Yoav; Wald, Ilan; Bailey, Christopher R.; Pine, Daniel S.; Neumeister, Alexander; Bar-Haim, Yair; Charney, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive theories implicate information-processing biases in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Results of attention-bias studies in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been inconsistent, suggesting biases towards and away from threat. Within-subject variability of attention biases in posttraumatic patients may be a useful marker for attentional control impairment and the development of posttrauma symptoms. This study reports 2 experiments investigating threat-related attention biases,...

  18. Effect of Reverse Substrate Bias on Degradation of Ultra-Thin Gate-Oxide n-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors under Different Stress Modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yao; XU Ming-Zhen; TAN Chang-Hua

    2005-01-01

    @@ Degradation of ultra-thin gate-oxide n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with the halo structure has been studied under different stress modes with a reverse substrate bias. The device degradation under the same stress mode with different reverse substrate voltages has been characterized by monitoring the substrate current in a stressing process, which follows a simple power law. When the gate voltage is less than the critical value, the device degradation will first decrease and then increase with the increasing reverse sub strate voltage, otherwise, the device degradation will increase continuously. The critical value can be obtained by measuring the substrate current variation with the increases of reverse substrate voltage and gate voltage. The experimental results indicate that the stress mode with enhanced injection efficiency and smaller device degradation can be obtained when the gate voltage is less than the critical value with a proper reverse substratevoltage chosen.

  19. Enhance the lifetime and bias stress reliability in organic vertical transistor by UV/Ozone treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Cheng; Chang, Ming-Yu; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Meng, Hsin-Fei; Chao, Yu-Chiang

    In this paper, we use UV/Ozone treatment to improve the lifetime and bias stress reliability of organic transistor with vertical channel. Even if vertical organic transistor exhibits better bias stress reliability than organic field effect transistor (OFET) due to bulk conduction mechanism, poor lifetime performance is still a challenge. Adding octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) to treat the vertical channel can reduce the trapping state and hence improve the bias stress ability. However, off-current is much higher after 6 days and lifetime performance is degraded. On the other hand, after 4000-s on-state bias stress, stable output current and on/off current ratio are demonstrated by using UV/Ozone to treat vertical channels. Threshold voltage shift is only -0.02 V which is much smaller than OFET with the same organic semiconductor material. Furthermore, the output current is also an order enhanced. Nevertheless, unlike device with OTS treatment, no obvious degradation is observed for UV/Ozone treated devices even after 170 days. With UV/Ozone treatment, the output current, bias stress reliability and lifetime were all improved. It makes vertical transistor become a promising device for the further application in display technology and flexible electronics.

  20. Effect of direct current sputtering power on the behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors under negative bias illumination stress: A combination of experimental analyses and device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan, E-mail: khs3297@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jozeph [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byung Du [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Suk, E-mail: khs3297@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-23

    The effect of direct current sputtering power of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) on the performance and stability of the corresponding thin-film transistor devices was studied. The field effect mobility increases as the IGZO sputter power increases, at the expense of device reliability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). Device simulation based on the extracted sub-gap density of states indicates that the field effect mobility is improved as a result of the number of acceptor-like states decreasing. The degradation by NBIS is suggested to be induced by the formation of peroxides in IGZO rather than charge trapping.

  1. Negative bias-and-temperature stress-assisted activation of oxygen-vacancy hole traps in 4H-silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use hybrid-functional density functional theory-based Charge Transition Levels (CTLs) to study the electrical activity of near-interfacial oxygen vacancies located in the oxide side of 4H-Silicon Carbide (4H-SiC) power Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). Based on the “amorphousness” of their local atomic environment, oxygen vacancies are shown to introduce their CTLs either within (permanently electrically active) or outside of (electrically inactive) the 4H-SiC bandgap. The “permanently electrically active” centers are likely to cause threshold voltage (Vth) instability at room temperature. On the other hand, we show that the “electrically inactive” defects could be transformed into various “electrically active” configurations under simultaneous application of negative bias and high temperature stresses. Based on this observation, we present a model for plausible oxygen vacancy defects that could be responsible for the recently observed excessive worsening of Vth instability in 4H-SiC power MOSFETs under high temperature-and-gate bias stress. This model could also explain the recent electrically detected magnetic resonance observations in 4H-SiC MOSFETs

  2. Negative bias-and-temperature stress-assisted activation of oxygen-vacancy hole traps in 4H-silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettisserry, D. P., E-mail: deva@umd.edu, E-mail: neil@umd.edu; Goldsman, N., E-mail: deva@umd.edu, E-mail: neil@umd.edu; Akturk, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lelis, A. J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We use hybrid-functional density functional theory-based Charge Transition Levels (CTLs) to study the electrical activity of near-interfacial oxygen vacancies located in the oxide side of 4H-Silicon Carbide (4H-SiC) power Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). Based on the “amorphousness” of their local atomic environment, oxygen vacancies are shown to introduce their CTLs either within (permanently electrically active) or outside of (electrically inactive) the 4H-SiC bandgap. The “permanently electrically active” centers are likely to cause threshold voltage (V{sub th}) instability at room temperature. On the other hand, we show that the “electrically inactive” defects could be transformed into various “electrically active” configurations under simultaneous application of negative bias and high temperature stresses. Based on this observation, we present a model for plausible oxygen vacancy defects that could be responsible for the recently observed excessive worsening of V{sub th} instability in 4H-SiC power MOSFETs under high temperature-and-gate bias stress. This model could also explain the recent electrically detected magnetic resonance observations in 4H-SiC MOSFETs.

  3. Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO2 structure using fast I-V measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO2 n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (Vt) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, Vt shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting HfxZr1−xO2 as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect

  4. Effect of bias voltage on microstructure of DC magnetron sputtered Al coatings on uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Xue-chao; WANG Xiao-lin; LANG Ding-mu; DONG Ping

    2004-01-01

    The effect of different bias voltages on microstructure of Al coatings on uranium was investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray stress analyzer, respectively. The results indicate that the microstructure is influenced strongly by bias voltage. At low bias voltages, especially at -100 V, the structure of Al coatings is more densely packed than that at high bias voltages of - 300 V and - 400 V,where the structure looks like open dentritic. On the whole, the peak (111) orientation is predominant with the increase of bias voltage, but at -400 V, the diffractive intensity of main peaks (111) and (200) is close to the standard reference. The residual stress on Al coatings surface is small, which has a change from tensile to compressive stress with the increase of bias voltage.

  5. Bias stress instability involving subgap state transitions in a-IGZO Schottky barrier diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huimin; Wu, Chenfei; Lu, Hai; Xu, Weizong; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fangfang; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-10-01

    Vertical Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) with either a top or bottom Schottky contact are fabricated by controlling the oxygen partial pressure during a-IGZO deposition. Although Au electrodes are employed for both Schottky and Ohmic contacts, it is found that Schottky contacts are preferentially formed on a-IGZO film in lower oxygen vacancy concentrations. The effect of negative bias stress on device performance is studied. The Schottky barrier height and series resistance of the a-IGZO SBD are found to increase upon negative bias stress, which is correlated with a reduction of the trap state and background carrier concentration within the a-IGZO film. A physical model based on subgap state transitions from ionized V\\text{O}2+ states to neutralized V O states is proposed to explain the observed electrical instability behavior.

  6. Effect of substrate bias on negative bias temperature instability of ultra-deep sub-micro p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Yan-Rong; Hao Yue; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hu Shi-Gang

    2009-01-01

    The effect of substrate bias on the degradation during applying a negative bias temperature (NBT) stress is studied in this paper. With a smaller gate voltage stress applied, the degradation of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) is enhanced, and there comes forth an inflexion point. The degradation pace turns larger when the substrate bias is higher than the inflexion point. The substrate hot holes can be injected into oxide and generate additional oxide traps, inducing an inflexion phenomenon. When a constant substrate bias stress is applied, as the gate voltage stress increases, an inflexion comes into being also. The higher gate voltage causes the electrons to tunnel into the substrate from the poly, thereby generating the electron-hole pairs by impact ionization. The holes generated by impact ionization and the holes from the substrate all can be accelerated to high energies by the substrate bias. More additional oxide traps can be produced, and correspondingly, the degradation is strengthened by the substrate bias. The results of the alternate stress experiment show that the interface traps generated by the hot holes cannot be annealed, which is different from those generated by common holes.

  7. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The role of education in the process of socioeconomic attainment is a topic of long standing interest to sociologists and economists. Recently there has been growing interest not only in estimating the average causal effect of education on outcomes such as earnings, but also in estimating how...... causal effects might vary over individuals or groups. In this paper we point out one of the under-appreciated hazards of seeking to estimate heterogeneous causal effects: conventional selection bias (that is, selection on baseline differences) can easily be mistaken for heterogeneity of causal effects...

  8. Negative Bias Temperature Instability "Recovery" under Negative Stress Voltage with Different Oxide Thicknesses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yan-Rong; MA Xiao-Hua; HAO Yue; ZHU Min-Bo; TIAN Wen-Chao; ZHANG Yue

    2011-01-01

    Different phenomena are observed under negative gate voltage stress which is smaller than the previous degradation stress in PMOSFETs with different oxide thicknesses. We adopt the real time method to make a point of the drain current to study the degradation and recovery of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI). For the device with thin oxide, recovery phenomenon appears when smaller negative voltage stress was applied, due to the more influencing oxide charges detrapping effects than the interface states. For the device with thick oxide, not recovery but degradation phenomenon comes forth. As many charges are trapped in the deeper position and higher energy level in the oxide, these charges can not be detrapped. Therefore, the effect of the charge detrapping is smaller than that of the interface states in the thick oxide. The degradation presents itself during the 'recovery' time.

  9. Drain bias effect on the instability of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We fabricated amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) in a top gate structure on a glass substrate. We investigated the effect of drain bias on the instability of the device. Although the device showed highly stable characteristics under both positive and negative gate bias stress, it showed significant degradation in the transfer characteristics under drain bias stress. The degradation phenomena are somewhat similar to those of negative gate bias illumination stress (NBIS). In the case of NBIS, degradation mechanisms have been confused between two kinds of illustrations, one of which is hole trapping in the gate insulator and the other is an increase of electron density in the active layer. Our experimental results revealed that the degradation mechanism of drain bias stress is closer to the latter mechanism of NBIS in amorphous oxide TFTs. - Highlights: ► Drain bias also degrades amorphous oxide thin film transistors. ► Increase of electron density near the drain junction occurs under drain bias stress. ► Oxygen vacancies can be ionized through the impingement of fast electrons

  10. Placebo effect studies are susceptible to response bias and to other types of biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin G

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of placebo are often challenging to conduct and interpret. The history of placebo shows that assessment of its clinical significance has a real potential to be biased. We analyze and discuss typical types of bias in studies on placebo....

  11. Exchange bias effect in epitaxial manganites superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, María Elena; Prieto, Pedro; Campillo, Gloria; Baca, Eval; Berger, Andreas; Hoffmann, Axel; Haberkorn, N.; Guimpel, Julio

    2003-03-01

    Epitaxial [La_2/3Ca_1/3MnO_3/La_1/3Ca_2/3MnO_3]N multilayers were grown in-situ on (001)-SrTiO3 substrates by a high oxygen pressure sputtering process. Superlattices containing N bilayers between 14 and 18 were prepared keeping the thickness of 20 unit cells (uc) for the antiferromagnetic La_1/3Ca_2/3MnO3 (AF-LCMO) constant and varying the thickness for the ferromagnetic La_2/3Ca_1/3MnO3 (F-LCMO) in the range from 2 to 20 uc. Below 120 K the field cooling (FC) loops are shifted towards negative fields, evidencing an exchange biasing mechanism in all samples. The temperature dependence of H_EB exhibits an exponential decrease with temperature below the blocking temperature for all samples. For ferromagnetic layer thickness t larger than 5 uc, all H_EB * t vs. temperature T data fall onto one universal line which indicates that the internal physical processes in the anti-ferromagnetic layers, which are responsible for the exchange bias effect, are the same in all samples and independent from the ferromagnetic layer thickness. This work has been partially supported by COLCIENCIAS project 1106-05-11458, CT-046-2002.

  12. A stabilized, high stress self-biasing shape memory alloy actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, B.; Zhou, Y. N.; Khan, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    A shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator that is biased internally would not need an external bias to achieve multiple actuation cycles. This would reduce cost, complexity and weight compared to standard one-way SMAs. The self-biasing actuators that have been developed to date have a lack of geometric and actuation stability. The current study developed a self-biasing NiTi actuator using a laser based vaporization process to alter the bulk composition of different regions. The martensitic laser processed NiTi region was the actuator, and un-processed austenitic base metal region was the internal bias. It was discovered that the laser processed region of the self-biasing actuator was unstable during high stress thermomechanical cycling due to the coarse grained microstructure. Cold-working of the half martensitic and half austenitic component resulted in similar deformation characteristics to single phase NiTi, which enabled the formation of a uniform nanocrystalline microstructure in both regions. When thermomechanically cycled 6000 times under stresses ranging from 180 to 400 MPa, it was discovered that this treated self-biasing actuator exhibited the stabilization behavior of traditional one-way actuators. This behavior was due to the uniform nanocrystalline microstructure, which impeded dislocation activity and ensured minimal plastic deformation.

  13. When bias binds: Effect of implicit outgroup bias on ingroup affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby-Senghor, Drew S; Sinclair, Stacey; Smith, Colin Tucker

    2015-09-01

    We tested a novel process we term implicit homophily in which perceivers' implicit outgroup bias shapes their affiliative responses toward ingroup targets with outgroup friends as a function of perceived similarity. Across 4 studies, we tested implicit homophily in the context of racial groups. We found that White participants with higher implicit anti-Black bias reported less affiliative responses toward White targets with Black friends compared with White targets with White friends, and this effect persisted above and beyond the effects of implicit pro-White bias and explicit racial bias (Studies 1-3). We further found evidence that this relationship between implicit anti-Black bias and affiliation exists because participants infer how comfortable targets are around outgroup members (Preliminary Study) and use this information to infer similarity on this dimension (Studies 1-3). Our findings also suggested that stigma transference and expectancy violation were not viable alternative mediators (Preliminary Study and Study 1). Finally, women's implicit anti-Black bias predicted their likelihood of having Facebook friends with Black friends, providing ecological and behavioral evidence of implicit homophily (Study 4). Implications for research on stigma by association, extended contact, affiliation, and network formation are discussed. PMID:26280842

  14. Perceived stress and risk of ischemic heart disease: causation or bias?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Kristensen, Tage S; Prescott, Eva;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether the commonly recognized link between stress and cardiovascular disease is causal or the result of reporting bias. The objective of this study was to address the association between perceived stress and first incidence of ischemic heart disease and to evaluate...... the suggested reporting bias by addressing subdiagnoses of ischemic heart disease separately. METHODS: The 11,839 men and women who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study were at baseline (1981-1983) asked about their stress level. The participants were followed in nationwide registries until the year...... 2000, and fewer than 0.1% were lost to follow-up. During follow-up, 2316 individuals were diagnosed with ischemic heart disease. RESULTS: High levels of stress were associated with slightly higher risk of incident ischemic heart disease in both women (hazard ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1...

  15. Long-term changes in cognitive bias and coping response as a result of chronic unpredictable stress during adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren eChaby

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals that experience adverse events in early life often have life-long changes to their physiology and behavior. Long-term effects of stress during early life have been studied extensively, but less attention has been given to the consequences of negative experiences solely during the adolescent phase. Adolescence is a particularly sensitive period of life when regulation of the glucocorticoid stress hormone response matures and specific regions in the brain undergo considerable change. Aversive experiences during this time might, therefore, be expected to generate long-term consequences for the adult phenotype. Here we investigated the long-term effects of exposure to chronic unpredictable stress during adolescence on adult decision making, coping response, cognitive bias, and exploratory behavior in rats. Rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (e.g. isolation, crowding, cage tilt were compared to control animals that were maintained in standard, predictable conditions throughout development. Unpredictable stress during adolescence resulted in a suite of long-term behavioral and cognitive changes including a negative cognitive bias (F1,12 = 5.000, P < 0.05, altered coping response (T1,14 = 2.216, P = 0.04, and accelerated decision making (T1,14 = 3.245, P = 0.01. Exposure to chronic stress during adolescence also caused a short-term increase in boldness behaviors; in a novel object test 15 days after the last stressor, animals exposed to chronic unpredictable stress had decreased latencies to leave a familiar shelter and approach a novel object (T1,14 = 2.240, P = 0.04; T1,14 = 2.419, P = 0.03, respectively. The results showed that stress during adolescence has long-term impacts on behavior and cognition that affect the interpretation of ambiguous stimuli, behavioral response to adverse events, and how animals make decisions. Stress during adolescence also induced short-term changes in the way animals moved around a novel environment.

  16. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong Woo; Nathan, Arokia; Barquinha, Pedro; Pereira, Luís; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Cobb, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH) in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We attribute this to charge trapping/detrapping and charge migration within the gate dielectric. We emphasize the fundamental difference between trapping/detrapping events occurring at the semiconductor/dielectric interface and those occurring at gate/dielectric interface, and show that charge migration is essential to explain the first anomaly. We model charge migration in terms of the non-instantaneous polarization density. The second type of anomaly is negative VTH shift under high positive bias stress, with logarithmic evolution in time. This can be argued as electron-donating reactions involving H2O molecules or derived species, with a reaction rate exponentially accelerated by positive gate bias and exponentially decreased by the number of reactions already occurred.

  17. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We attribute this to charge trapping/detrapping and charge migration within the gate dielectric. We emphasize the fundamental difference between trapping/detrapping events occurring at the semiconductor/dielectric interface and those occurring at gate/dielectric interface, and show that charge migration is essential to explain the first anomaly. We model charge migration in terms of the non-instantaneous polarization density. The second type of anomaly is negative VTH shift under high positive bias stress, with logarithmic evolution in time. This can be argued as electron-donating reactions involving H2O molecules or derived species, with a reaction rate exponentially accelerated by positive gate bias and exponentially decreased by the number of reactions already occurred.

  18. The distinct effects of internalizing weight bias: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Rebecca L; Puhl, Rebecca M

    2016-06-01

    Both experiencing and internalizing weight bias are associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes, but internalization may be a more potent predictor of these outcomes. The current study aimed to differentiate between causal effects of experiencing versus internalizing weight bias on emotional responses and psychological well-being. Adults with overweight/obesity (N=260) completed an online experiment in which they were randomly assigned to focus on either the experience or internalization of weight bias, and completed measures of affect, self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction. Results indicated that the Internalization condition led to more negative affect, less positive affect, and lower self-esteem than the Experience condition. The Internalization condition also led to heightened body dissatisfaction among men, but not women. These findings suggest that weight bias internalization may be a stronger predictor of poor mental and physical health than experiences alone, and carry implications for developing weight bias interventions. PMID:26927688

  19. Electrical, optical, and material characterizations of blue InGaN light emitting diodes submitted to reverse-bias stress in water vapor condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate degradation of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) under reverse-bias operations in water vapor and dry air. To examine failure origins, electrical characterizations including current-voltage, breakdown current profiles, optical measurement, and multiple material analyses were performed. Our findings indicate that the diffusion of indium atoms in water vapor can expedite degradation. Investigation of reverse-bias stress can help provide insight into the effects of water vapor on LEDs

  20. Unified nonequilibrium dynamical theory for exchange bias and training effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Kai-Cheng; Liu Bang-Gui

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the exchange bias and training effect in the ferromagnetie/antiferromagnetic (FM/AF)heterostructures using a unified Monte Carlo dynamical approach. The magnetization of the uncompensated AF layer is still open after the first field cycling is finished. Our simulated results show obvious shift of hysteresis loops (exchange bias) and cycling dependence of exchange bias (training effect) when the temperature is below 45 K. The exchange bias field decreases with decreasing cooling rate or increasing temperature and the number of the field cycling. Essentially,these two effects can be explained on the basis of the microscopical coexistence of both reversible and irreversible moment reversals of the AF domains. Our simulations are useful to understand the real magnetization dynamics of such magnetic heterostructures.

  1. Sex-biased dispersal promotes adaptive parental effects

    OpenAIRE

    Franc Alain; Revardel Emmanuelle; Petit Rémy J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In heterogeneous environments, sex-biased dispersal could lead to environmental adaptive parental effects, with offspring selected to perform in the same way as the parent dispersing least, because this parent is more likely to be locally adapted. We investigate this hypothesis by simulating varying levels of sex-biased dispersal in a patchy environment. The relative advantage of a strategy involving pure maternal (or paternal) inheritance is then compared with a strategy ...

  2. Effects of constant voltage and constant current stress in PCBM:P3HT solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cester, Andrea; Rizzo, Aldo; Bazzega, A.;

    2015-01-01

    The aimof this work is the investigation of forward and reverse bias stress effects, cell self-heating and annealing in roll coated organic solar cells with PCBM:P3HT active layer. In reverse bias stress cells show a constant degradation over time. In forward current stress cells alternate degrad...

  3. Ferromagnetic behavior and exchange bias effect in akaganeite nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadic, Marin, E-mail: marint@vinca.rs [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Science, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Milosevic, Irena; Motte, Laurence [Laboratoire CSPBAT, UMR 7244 CNRS Université Paris 13, 93017 Bobigny Cedex (France); Kralj, Slavko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Saboungi, Marie-Louise [CNRS, University of Orleans, F-45071 Orleans 2 (France); IMPMC, Sorbonne Univ-UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, IRD UMR 206, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-05-04

    We report ferromagnetic-like properties and exchange bias effect in akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanorods. They exhibit a Néel temperature T{sub N} = 259 K and ferromagnetic-like hysteresis behavior both below and above T{sub N}. An exchange bias effect is observed below T{sub N} and represents an interesting behavior for akaganeite nanorods. These results are explained on the basis of a core-shell structure in which the core has bulk akaganeite magnetic properties (i.e., antiferromagnetic ordering) while the shell exhibits a disordered spin state. Thus, the nanorods show ferromagnetic properties and an exchange bias effect at the same time, increasing their potential for use in practical applications.

  4. Josephson effects in an alternating current biased transition edge sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Gottardi, Luciano; Akamatsu, Hiroki; van der Kuur, Jan; Bruijn, Marcel P; Hartog, Roland H den; Hijmering, Richard; Khosropanah, Pourya; Lambert, Colin; van der Linden, Anton J; Ridder, Marcel L; Suzuki, Toyo; Gao, Jan R

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental evidence of the ac Josephson effect in a transition edge sensor (TES) operating in a frequency domain multiplexer and biased by ac voltage at MHz frequencies. The effect is observed by measuring the non-linear impedance of the sensor. The TES is treated as a weakly linked superconducting system and within the resistively shunted junction model framework. We provide a full theoretical explanation of the results by finding the analytic solution of the non-inertial Langevian equation of the system and calculating the non-linear response of the detector to a large ac bias current in the presence of noise.

  5. Biases from omitted risk effects in standard gamble utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Robin

    2004-07-01

    Utilities elicited under the "probability equivalence" version of the standard gamble procedure systematically exaggerate the utility increments of expensive health interventions that bring the recipient towards full health. Switching to the alternative "certainty equivalence" version would introduce the reverse bias. The biases arise from anticipated pre- and post-decision risk effects that expected utility theory omits. To include these risk effects, partition the future by changes in knowledge into: (1) pre-choice periods; (2) the pre-outcome future before the chosen act's outcome becomes known; and (3) the more distant post-outcome future, when that outcome will have become known. PMID:15587695

  6. Improving positive and negative bias illumination stress stability in parylene passivated IGZO transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiazadeh, Asal; Gomes, Henrique L.; Barquinha, Pedro; Martins, Jorge; Rovisco, Ana; Pinto, Joana V.; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-08-01

    The impact of a parylene top-coating layer on the illumination and bias stress instabilities of indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) is presented and discussed. The parylene coating substantially reduces the threshold voltage shift caused by continuous application of a gate bias and light exposure. The operational stability improves by 75%, and the light induced instability is reduced by 35%. The operational stability is quantified by fitting the threshold voltage shift with a stretched exponential model. Storage time as long as 7 months does not cause any measurable degradation on the electrical performance. It is proposed that parylene plays not only the role of an encapsulation layer but also of a defect passivation on the top semiconductor surface. It is also reported that depletion-mode TFTs are less sensitive to light induced instabilities. This is attributed to a defect neutralization process in the presence of free electrons.

  7. Interfacial spin cluster effects in exchange bias systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R., E-mail: rc548@york.ac.uk; Vallejo-Fernandez, G.; O' Grady, K. [Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-07

    In this work, the effect of exchange bias on the hysteresis loop of CoFe is observed. The evolution of the coercivities and the shift of the hysteresis loop during the annealing process has been measured for films deposited on NiCr and Cu seed layers. Through comparison of the as deposited and field annealed loops, it is clear that for an exchange biased material, the two coercivities are due to different reversal processes. This behaviour is attributed to spin clusters at the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface, which behave in a similar manner to a fine particle system.

  8. Protopathic bias in observational studies on statin effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Huupponen, Risto; Ruokoniemi, Päivi; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja

    2009-01-01

    Protopathic bias in observational studies on statin effectiveness phone: +350-40-3552901 (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, University of Turku - 20014 - Turku - FINLAND (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio - POB 1627 - 70211 - Kuopio - FINLAND (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, University of T...

  9. Investigation of the instability of low-temperature poly-silicon thin film transistors under a negative bias temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Mi; Jeong, Kwang-Seok; Yun, Ho-Jin; Yang, Seung-Dong; Lee, Sang-Youl; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we analyzed and correlated the hysteresis characteristics and instability under negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) stress in p-channel low-temperature poly-silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Positive V TH shifts were observed under the NBTI stress. The hysteresis does not appear to be affected by the NBTI stress; however, when the VG stress voltage is -40 V at 100°C, the hysteresis increases as the stress time increases and V TH shifts with sub-threshold slope (SS) degradation. The hysteresis may increase under the extreme stress condition due to the generation of trap-states.

  10. Memory effect versus exchange bias for maghemite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeem, K., E-mail: kashif.nadeem@iiu.edu.pk [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, International Islamic University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Krenn, H. [Institute of Physics, Karl-Franzens University Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Szabó, D.V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temperature dependence of memory and exchange bias effects and their dependence on each other in maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles by using magnetization studies. Memory effect in zero field cooled process in nanoparticles is a fingerprint of spin-glass behavior which can be due to i) surface disordered spins (surface spin-glass) and/or ii) randomly frozen and interacting nanoparticles core spins (super spin-glass). Temperature region (25–70 K) for measurements has been chosen just below the average blocking temperature (T{sub B}=75 K) of the nanoparticles. Memory effect (ME) shows a non-monotonous behavior with temperature. It shows a decreasing trend with decreasing temperature and nearly vanishes below 30 K. However it also decreased again near the blocking temperature of the nanoparticles e.g., 70 K. Exchange bias (EB) in these nanoparticles arises due to core/shell interface interactions. The EB increases sharply below 30 K due to increase in core/shell interactions, while ME starts vanishing below 30 K. We conclude that the core/shell interface interactions or EB have not enhanced the ME but may reduce it in these nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We studied the T-dependent memory and exchange bias (EB) effects in maghemite nanoparticles. • EB causes spin-canting at the core/shell interface which may reduces the memory effect (ME). • Interface interactions does not increase the ME in these nanoparticles.

  11. Investigation of bias radiation effect on PV cell measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Chan, Joanne; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells are photo-electrical devices that convert light energy directly into electricity through the photovoltaic effect. PV cell assemblies are used to make solar modules employed in a variety of ways ranging from space applications to domestic energy consumption. Characterisation and performance testing of PV cells are critical to the development of PV technologies and growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed, its energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested against globally recognised metrological standards. The differential spectral responsivity (DSR) measurement is one of the primary methods for calibrating reference PV cells. This is done by calculating its spectral responsivities through measuring the AC short-circuit current produced by a PV cell under a modulated monochromatic radiation and different levels of steady-state broadband bias light radiation. It is observed that different types of bias light source will produce different signal-to-noise levels and significantly influence measurement accuracy. This paper aims to investigate the noise sources caused by different types of bias light sources (e.g. xenon arc and tungsten-halogen lamps) and the relevant measurement uncertainties so as to propose a guideline for selection of bias light source which can improve the signal-to-noise level and measurement uncertainty. The DSRs of the PV cells are measured using a commercial DSR measurement system under different levels of bias radiation from 0 to 1 kWm-2. The data analysis and uncertainty evaluation are presented in this paper using experimental data and mathematical tools.

  12. Effect of bias voltage on microstructure and mechanical properties of arc evaporated (Ti, Al)N hard coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Aliaj; N Syla; S Avdiaj; T Dilo

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, authors report on the effect that substrate bias voltage has on the microstructure and mechanical properties of (Ti, Al)N hard coatings deposited with cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) technique. The coatings were deposited from a Ti0.5Al0.5 powder metallurgical target in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere at three different bias voltages: UB = −25, −50 and −100 V. The coatings were characterized in terms of compositional, microstructural and mechanical properties. Microstructure of the coatings was investigated with the aid of X-ray diffraction in glancing angle mode, which revealed information on phase composition, crystallite size, stress-free lattice parameter and residual stress. Mechanical properties were deduced from nano-indentation measurements. The residual stress in all the coatings was compressive and increased with increasing bias voltage in a manner similar to that reported in literature for Ti–Al–N coatings deposited with CAE. The bias voltage was also found to significantly influence the phase composition and crystallite size. At −25 V bias voltage the coating was found in single phase fcc-(Ti, Al)N and with relatively large crystallites of ∼9 nm. At higher bias voltages (−50 and −100 V), the coatings were found in dual phase fcc-(Ti, Al)N and fcc-AlN and the size of crystallites reduced to approximately 5 nm. The reduction of crystallite size and the increase of compressive residual stress with increasing bias voltage both contributed to an increase in hardness of the coatings.

  13. Genetic Diversity through the Looking Glass: Effect of Enrichment Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dunbar, J.; White, S.; Forney, L

    1997-01-01

    The effect of enrichment bias on the diversity of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D)-degrading (2,4-D(sup+)) bacteria recovered from soil was evaluated by comparing the diversity of isolates obtained by direct plating to the diversity of isolates obtained from 85 liquid batch cultures. By the two methods, a total of 159 isolates were purified from 1 g of soil and divided into populations based on repeated extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints. Approximately 42% of...

  14. Flat-roof phenomenon of dynamic equilibrium phase in the negative bias temperature instability effect on a power MOSFET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the static negative bias temperature (NBT) stress on a p-channel power metal—oxide—semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated by experiment and simulation. The time evolution of the negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation has the trend predicted by the reaction—diffusion (R—D) model but with an exaggerated time scale. The phenomena of the flat-roof section are observed under various stress conditions, which can be considered as the dynamic equilibrium phase in the R—D process. Based on the simulated results, the variation of the flat-roof section with the stress condition can be explained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5.1015 ions s-1 m-2 (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20-350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas.

  16. The effect of academic stress and attachment stress on stress-eaters and stress-undereaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Michael; Ten Eycke, Kayla; Kosmerly, Stacey; Robinson, Adele Lafrance; Stillar, Amanda; Van Blyderveen, Sherry

    2016-05-01

    It is well established that stress is related to changes in eating patterns. Some individuals are more likely to increase their overall food intake under conditions of stress, whereas others are more likely to consume less food when stressed. Attachment style has been linked to disordered eating and eating disorders; however, comparisons of eating behaviors under attachment versus other types of stress have yet to be explored. The present laboratory study examined the eating patterns in self-identified stress-undereaters and stress-eaters under various types of stress. More specifically, the study examined the effects of academic and attachment stress on calorie, carbohydrate and sugar consumption within these two groups. Under the guise of critiquing student films, university students viewed either one of two stress-inducing videos (academic stress or attachment stress, both designed to be emotionally arousing) or a control video (designed to be emotionally neutral), and their food intake was recorded. Results demonstrated that the video manipulations were effective in inducing stress. Differential patterns of eating were noted based on group and stress condition. Specifically, stress-undereaters ate fewer calories, carbohydrates and sugars than stress-eaters in the academic stress condition, but not in the attachment stress or control condition. Findings suggest that specific types of stressors may influence eating behaviors differently.

  17. Investigation of negative bias temperature instability dependence on fin width of silicon-on-insulator-fin-based field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Chadwin D., E-mail: chadwin.young@utdallas.edu; Wang, Zhe [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Neugroschel, Arnost [Department of Electrical and Computer Enginering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Majumdar, Kausik; Matthews, Ken; Hobbs, Chris [SEMATECH, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The fin width dependence of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) of double-gate, fin-based p-type Field Effect Transistors (FinFETs) fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers was investigated. The NBTI degradation increased as the fin width narrowed. To investigate this phenomenon, simulations of pre-stress conditions were employed to determine any differences in gate oxide field, fin band bending, and electric field profile as a function of the fin width. The simulation results were similar at a given gate stress bias, regardless of the fin width, although the threshold voltage was found to increase with decreasing fin width. Thus, the NBTI fin width dependence could not be explained from the pre-stress conditions. Different physics-based degradation models were evaluated using specific fin-based device structures with different biasing schemes to ascertain an appropriate model that best explains the measured NBTI dependence. A plausible cause is an accumulation of electrons that tunnel from the gate during stress into the floating SOI fin body. As the fin narrows, the sidewall device channel moves in closer proximity to the stored electrons, thereby inducing more band bending at the fin/dielectric interface, resulting in a higher electric field and hole concentration in this region during stress, which leads to more degradation. The data obtained in this work provide direct experimental proof of the effect of electron accumulation on the threshold voltage stability in FinFETs.

  18. Improvement in reliability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors with Teflon/SiO2 bilayer passivation under gate bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Tseng, Fan-Ping; Li, Bo-Jyun; Lin, Yu-Zuo; Wang, Shea-Jue; Lee, Win-Der; Huang, Bohr-Ran

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with Teflon/SiO2 bilayer passivation prepared under positive and negative gate bias stresses (PGBS and NGBS, respectively) was investigated. Heavier electrical degradation was observed under PGBS than under NGBS, indicating that the environmental effects under PGBS are more evident than those under NGBS. The device with bilayer passivation under PGBS shows two-step degradation. The positive threshold voltage shifts during the initial stressing period (before 500 s), owing to the charges trapped in the gate insulator or at the gate insulator/a-IGZO active layer interface. The negative threshold voltage shift accompanies the increase in subthreshold swing (SS) for the continuous stressing period (after 500 s) owing to H2O molecules from ambience diffused within the a-IGZO TFTs. It is believed that Teflon/SiO2 bilayer passivation can effectively improve the reliability of the a-IGZO TFTs without passivation even though the devices are stressed under gate bias.

  19. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5·1015 ions s−1 m−2 (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20–350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas

  20. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas (CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5·10{sup 15} ions s{sup −1} m{sup −2} (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20–350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas.

  1. Reliability tests of electroless barriers against copper diffusion under bias-temperature stress with n- and p-type substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Fujishima, Shota; Yamashita, Makoto; Mitsumori, Akiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the similarity and difference of substrate conduction type in the time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) tests for the barrier integrity against Cu diffusion under bias-temperature stress (BTS), the TDDB reliability of electroless NiB and CoWP/NiB was determined by metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) structures on n-type Si (n-Si) substrates, and the test results were compared with those using p-type Si (p-Si) substrates. The TDDB results and mechanism were observed to be qualitatively the same as Cu diffusion for both conduction types. However, the TDDB lifetime using p-Si was found to be potentially shorter because of the reverse bias conditions than that using n-Si under the forward bias conditions.

  2. No effects of psychosocial stress on intertemporal choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Haushofer

    Full Text Available Intertemporal choices - involving decisions which trade off instant and delayed outcomes - are often made under stress. It remains unknown, however, whether and how stress affects intertemporal choice. We subjected 142 healthy male subjects to a laboratory stress or control protocol, and asked them to make a series of intertemporal choices either directly after stress, or 20 minutes later (resulting in four experimental groups. Based on theory and evidence from behavioral economics and cellular neuroscience, we predicted a bidirectional effect of stress on intertemporal choice, with increases in impatience or present bias immediately after stress, but decreases in present bias or impatience when subjects are tested 20 minutes later. However, our results show no effects of stress on intertemporal choice at either time point, and individual differences in stress reactivity (changes in stress hormone levels over time are not related to individual differences in intertemporal choice. Together, we did not find support for the hypothesis that psychosocial laboratory stressors affect intertemporal choice.

  3. Channel length dependence of negative-bias-illumination-stress in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the dependence of Negative-Bias-illumination-Stress (NBIS) upon channel length, in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The negative shift of the transfer characteristic associated with NBIS decreases for increasing channel length and is practically suppressed in devices with L = 100-μm. The effect is consistent with creation of donor defects, mainly in the channel regions adjacent to source and drain contacts. Excellent agreement with experiment has been obtained by an analytical treatment, approximating the distribution of donors in the active layer by a double exponential with characteristic length LD ∼ Ln ∼ 10-μm, the latter being the electron diffusion length. The model also shows that a device with a non-uniform doping distribution along the active layer is in all equivalent, at low drain voltages, to a device with the same doping averaged over the active layer length. These results highlight a new aspect of the NBIS mechanism, that is, the dependence of the effect upon the relative magnitude of photogenerated holes and electrons, which is controlled by the device potential/band profile. They may also provide the basis for device design solutions to minimize NBIS

  4. Channel length dependence of negative-bias-illumination-stress in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Jae Gwang; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr [Advanced Display Research Center, Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Migliorato, Piero [Advanced Display Research Center, Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-21

    We have investigated the dependence of Negative-Bias-illumination-Stress (NBIS) upon channel length, in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The negative shift of the transfer characteristic associated with NBIS decreases for increasing channel length and is practically suppressed in devices with L = 100-μm. The effect is consistent with creation of donor defects, mainly in the channel regions adjacent to source and drain contacts. Excellent agreement with experiment has been obtained by an analytical treatment, approximating the distribution of donors in the active layer by a double exponential with characteristic length L{sub D} ∼ L{sub n} ∼ 10-μm, the latter being the electron diffusion length. The model also shows that a device with a non-uniform doping distribution along the active layer is in all equivalent, at low drain voltages, to a device with the same doping averaged over the active layer length. These results highlight a new aspect of the NBIS mechanism, that is, the dependence of the effect upon the relative magnitude of photogenerated holes and electrons, which is controlled by the device potential/band profile. They may also provide the basis for device design solutions to minimize NBIS.

  5. Posttraumatic stress and attentional bias towards cancer-related stimuli in parents of children recently diagnosed with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cernvall, Martin; Hovén, Emma; Ljungman, Lisa; Ljungman, Gustaf; Carlbring, Per; von Essen, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) are related to attentional bias towards cancer-related stimuli among parents of children recently diagnosed with cancer. Methods: Sixty-two parents completed questionnaires measuring PTSS, depression, and anxiety and the emotional Stroop task via the Internet. The emotional Stroop task included cancer-related words, cardiovascular disease-related words, and neutral words. Results: Participants were split in two groups bas...

  6. Fluid simulation of the bias effect in inductive/capacitive discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu-Ru [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Wilrijk, BE-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Gao, Fei; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian, E-mail: ynwang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bogaerts, Annemie [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Wilrijk, BE-2610 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Computer simulations are performed for an argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a capacitive radio-frequency bias power, to investigate the bias effect on the discharge mode transition and on the plasma characteristics at various ICP currents, bias voltages, and bias frequencies. When the bias frequency is fixed at 13.56 MHz and the ICP current is low, e.g., 6 A, the spatiotemporal averaged plasma density increases monotonically with bias voltage, and the bias effect is already prominent at a bias voltage of 90 V. The maximum of the ionization rate moves toward the bottom electrode, which indicates clearly the discharge mode transition in inductive/capacitive discharges. At higher ICP currents, i.e., 11 and 13 A, the plasma density decreases first and then increases with bias voltage, due to the competing mechanisms between the ion acceleration power dissipation and the capacitive power deposition. At 11 A, the bias effect is still important, but it is noticeable only at higher bias voltages. At 13 A, the ionization rate is characterized by a maximum at the reactor center near the dielectric window at all selected bias voltages, which indicates that the ICP power, instead of the bias power, plays a dominant role under this condition, and no mode transition is observed. Indeed, the ratio of the bias power to the total power is lower than 0.4 over a wide range of bias voltages, i.e., 0–300 V. Besides the effect of ICP current, also the effect of various bias frequencies is investigated. It is found that the modulation of the bias power to the spatiotemporal distributions of the ionization rate at 2 MHz is strikingly different from the behavior observed at higher bias frequencies. Furthermore, the minimum of the plasma density appears at different bias voltages, i.e., 120 V at 2 MHz and 90 V at 27.12 MHz.

  7. Fluid simulation of the bias effect in inductive/capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulations are performed for an argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a capacitive radio-frequency bias power, to investigate the bias effect on the discharge mode transition and on the plasma characteristics at various ICP currents, bias voltages, and bias frequencies. When the bias frequency is fixed at 13.56 MHz and the ICP current is low, e.g., 6 A, the spatiotemporal averaged plasma density increases monotonically with bias voltage, and the bias effect is already prominent at a bias voltage of 90 V. The maximum of the ionization rate moves toward the bottom electrode, which indicates clearly the discharge mode transition in inductive/capacitive discharges. At higher ICP currents, i.e., 11 and 13 A, the plasma density decreases first and then increases with bias voltage, due to the competing mechanisms between the ion acceleration power dissipation and the capacitive power deposition. At 11 A, the bias effect is still important, but it is noticeable only at higher bias voltages. At 13 A, the ionization rate is characterized by a maximum at the reactor center near the dielectric window at all selected bias voltages, which indicates that the ICP power, instead of the bias power, plays a dominant role under this condition, and no mode transition is observed. Indeed, the ratio of the bias power to the total power is lower than 0.4 over a wide range of bias voltages, i.e., 0–300 V. Besides the effect of ICP current, also the effect of various bias frequencies is investigated. It is found that the modulation of the bias power to the spatiotemporal distributions of the ionization rate at 2 MHz is strikingly different from the behavior observed at higher bias frequencies. Furthermore, the minimum of the plasma density appears at different bias voltages, i.e., 120 V at 2 MHz and 90 V at 27.12 MHz

  8. Isotopic bias effects in resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is developing into a useful method for isotope ratio measurements with high selectivity and sensitivity of the technique for a large number of elements. The sensitivity of the technique relies on a number of experimental factors. Of primary importance is the proper coupling of the tunable laser output with the atomization source, which is most often a thermal filament. Use of pulsed thermal atomization can also improve efficiency. An increase in temporal efficiency can be achieved by using a continuous wave (CW) laser coupled to a continuous atomization source. CW lasers, in general, therefore must be tightly focused to saturate the ionization step in a resonance ionization process. However, this results in a lowered efficiency due to geometrical factors. The accuracy of isotope ratio measurements is also influenced by the choice of laser system for RIMS. The combination of isotope shifts and the analyte element with the spectral output of the laser will result in wavelength-dependant bias effects which must be controlled to obtain optimum analytical results. This problem has been studied and the results for both pulsed and CW lasers are given. (author)

  9. Effects of Biases in Domain Wall Network Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, J R C C C; Martins, C J A P

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of various types of biased domain wall networks in the early universe. We carry out larger numerical simulations than currently available in the literature and provide a more detailed study of the decay of these networks, in particular by explicitly measuring velocities in the simulations. We also use the larger dynamic range of our simulations to test previously suggested decay laws for these networks, including an ad-hoc phenomenological fit to earlier simulations and a decay law obtained by Hindmarsh through analytic arguments. We find the latter to be in good agreement with simulations in the case of a biased potential, but not in the case of biased initial conditions.

  10. Sustainability of teacher expectation bias effects on long-term student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Hester; Bosker, R.J.; Van der Werf, M.P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we address the relationship between teacher expectation bias and student characteristics, its effect on long-term student performance, and the development of this effect over time. Expectation bias was defined as the difference between observed and predicted teacher expectation. The

  11. Sex Stereotyping and Bias: Their Origin and Effects. Training Module IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Reeve; Gonzales, Frank, Ed.

    The origin and effects of sex stereotyping and bias is the subject of this training module. It guides trainers through the activities and lessons necessary to aid education personnel in identifying sources and effects of sex stereotyping and bias in the classroom setting and in society as a whole. Seven activities are described and materials,…

  12. Investigating the effect of externalizing perspectives on cognitives biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Fredrik Huitfeldt; Hicks, David L., David

    2007-01-01

    of intelligence analysis. We propose that complexity of maintaining multiple different perspectives the same data is one of the reasons for this. We further propose that a tool that facillitates the externalization multiple perspectives would reduce these biases and hence increase the overall quality...... the number of attacks that “get through”. There are many subproblems of this main problem, one of which is that relative quality of the intelligence analysis is too low [39, We observe that the analysts suffer from cognitive biases, and we assume that this is one of the reasons behind “low” quality...... of intelligence analyses....

  13. Negative Interpretation Bias Mediates the Effect of Social Anxiety on State Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, Courtney; Amir, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models of social anxiety predict that interpretation bias mediates the relationship between level of social anxiety and state anxiety in response to social-evaluative threat. We tested this prediction in 67 socially anxious undergraduates. Participants completed self-report measures of social anxiety and interpretation bias, and two days later they completed an impromptu speech. Mediational analyses supported the hypothesis that interpretation bias mediates the effect of social anxi...

  14. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    the reason for change in effective stress coefficient under stress. Our model suggests that change in effective stress coefficient will be higher at uniaxial stress condition than at hydrostatic condition. We derived equations from the original definition of Biot to estimate effective stress coefficient from......The effective stress coefficient, introduced by Biot, is used for predicting effective stress or pore pressure in the subsurface. It is not a constant value. It is different for different types of sediment and it is stress dependent. We used a model, based on contact between the grains to describe...... one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...

  15. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M.M.; Fabricius, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    The effective stress coefficient, introduced by Biot, is used for predicting effective stress or pore pressure in the subsurface. It is not a constant value. It is different for different types of sediment and it is stress dependent. We used a model, based on contact between the grains to describe...... the reason for change in effective stress coefficient under stress. Our model suggests that change in effective stress coefficient will be higher at uniaxial stress condition than at hydrostatic condition. We derived equations from the original definition of Biot to estimate effective stress coefficient from...... one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...

  16. Friendship Network in the Classroom: Parents Bias and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landini, Fabio; Montinari, Natalia; Pin, Paolo;

    We interview both parents and their children enrolled in six primary schools in the district of Treviso (Italy). We study the structural differences between the children network of friends reported by children and the one elicited asking their parents. We find that the parents’ network has a bias...

  17. Improvement in the electrical performance and bias-stress stability of dual-active-layered silicon zinc oxide/zinc oxide thin-film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Rong; Zhao, Gao-Wei; Lai, Pai-To; Yao, Ruo-He

    2016-08-01

    Si-doped zinc oxide (SZO) thin films are deposited by using a co-sputtering method, and used as the channel active layers of ZnO-based TFTs with single and dual active layer structures. The effects of silicon content on the optical transmittance of the SZO thin film and electrical properties of the SZO TFT are investigated. Moreover, the electrical performances and bias-stress stabilities of the single- and dual-active-layer TFTs are investigated and compared to reveal the effects of the Si doping and dual-active-layer structure. The average transmittances of all the SZO films are about 90% in the visible light region of 400 nm–800 nm, and the optical band gap of the SZO film gradually increases with increasing Si content. The Si-doping can effectively suppress the grain growth of ZnO, revealed by atomic force microscope analysis. Compared with that of the undoped ZnO TFT, the off-state current of the SZO TFT is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude and it is 1.5 × 10‑12 A, and thus the on/off current ratio is increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In summary, the SZO/ZnO TFT with dual-active-layer structure exhibits a high on/off current ratio of 4.0 × 106 and superior stability under gate-bias and drain-bias stress. Projected supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61076113 and 61274085), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province (Grant No. 2016A030313474), and the University Development Fund (Nanotechnology Research Institute, Grant No. 00600009) of the University of Hong Kong, China.

  18. Are proxy interviews associated with biased earnings reports? Marital status and gender effects of proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Christopher R; Kim, Changhwan

    2013-03-01

    Social science findings routinely rely on proxy-reported economic data in household surveys. A typical assumption is that this information is not biased compared to self-reports, but empirical findings on the issue are mixed. Using a dataset that links workers in the 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation to their W-2 tax records, we estimate the effects of reporting status (proxy vs. self) on the magnitude and direction of measurement bias in earnings data and explore whether these effects are heterogeneous across gender and marital status. A slight downward bias in proxy-reported earnings is observed; however, these effects are associated with demographic variables. For married workers, proxies do not contribute substantial bias in earnings measurement regardless of the target respondent's gender. However, for single female workers, proxy interviews are a significant source of downward bias in earnings estimates. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:23347491

  19. The Effect of Rater Training on Reducing Social Style Bias in Peer Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a quasiexperimental control group design in a university setting to test the effect of a rater-training program on reducing social style bias in intragroup peer evaluations after controlling for ability based on GPA. Comparison of rating scores of the test group to the control group indicated minimal social style rating bias in…

  20. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  1. Tropical Atlantic biases and their relation to surface wind stress and terrestrial precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Ingo [Research Institute for Global Change, JAMSTEC, Yokohama (Japan); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Xie, Shang-Ping [University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); Wittenberg, Andrew T. [NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Masumoto, Yukio [Research Institute for Global Change, JAMSTEC, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Most coupled general circulation models (GCMs) perform poorly in the tropical Atlantic in terms of climatological seasonal cycle and interannual variability. The reasons for this poor performance are investigated in a suite of sensitivity experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) coupled GCM. The experiments show that a significant portion of the equatorial SST biases in the model is due to weaker than observed equatorial easterlies during boreal spring. Due to these weak easterlies, the tilt of the equatorial thermocline is reduced, with shoaling in the west and deepening in the east. The erroneously deep thermocline in the east prevents cold tongue formation in the following season despite vigorous upwelling, thus inhibiting the Bjerknes feedback. It is further shown that the surface wind errors are due, in part, to deficient precipitation over equatorial South America and excessive precipitation over equatorial Africa, which already exist in the uncoupled atmospheric GCM. Additional tests indicate that the precipitation biases are highly sensitive to land surface conditions such as albedo and soil moisture. This suggests that improving the representation of land surface processes in GCMs offers a way of improving their performance in the tropical Atlantic. The weaker than observed equatorial easterlies also contribute remotely, via equatorial and coastal Kelvin waves, to the severe warm SST biases along the southwest African coast. However, the strength of the subtropical anticyclone and along-shore winds also play an important role. (orig.)

  2. Exchange bias-like effect in TbFeAl induced by atomic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Strydom, André M.

    2016-05-01

    The exchange bias-like effect observed in the intermetallic compound TbFeAl, which displays a magnetic phase transition at T^hc ≈ 198 \\text{K} and a second one at T^lc ≈ 154 \\text{K} , is reported. Jump-like features are observed in the isothermal magnetization, M (H) , at 2 K which disappear above 8 K. The field-cooled magnetization isotherms below 10 K show loop shifts that are reminiscent of exchange bias, also supported by the training effect. A significant coercive field, Hc ≈ 1.5 \\text{T} at 2 K, is observed in TbFeAl which, after an initial increase, shows a subsequent decrease with temperature. The exchange bias field, H eb , shows a slight increase and a subsequent leveling off with temperature. It is argued that the inherent crystallographic disorder among Fe and Al and the high magnetocrystalline anisotropy related to Tb3+ lead to the exchange bias effect. TbFeAl has been recently reported to show the magnetocaloric effect and the present discovery of exchange bias makes this compound a multifunctional one. The result obtained on TbFeAl generalizes the observation of exchange bias in crystallographically disordered materials and gives impetus for the search for materials with exchange bias induced by atomic disorder.

  3. Effective bias and potentials in steady-state quantum transport: A NEGF reverse-engineering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Daniel; Verdozzi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Using non-equilibrium Green's functions combined with many-body perturbation theory, we have calculated steady-state densities and currents through short interacting chains subject to a finite electric bias. By using a steady-state reverse-engineering procedure, the effective potential and bias which reproduce such densities and currents in a non-interacting system have been determined. The role of the effective bias is characterised with the aid of the so-called exchange-correlation bias, recently introduced in a steady-state density-functional- theory formulation for partitioned systems. We find that the effective bias (or, equivalently, the exchange-correlation bias) depends strongly on the interaction strength and the length of the central (chain) region. Moreover, it is rather sensitive to the level of many-body approximation used. Our study shows the importance of the effective/exchange-correlation bias out of equilibrium, thereby offering hints on how to improve the description of density- functional-theory based approaches to quantum transport.

  4. Effects of electrode biasing in STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Nakajima, Masaru; Rohollahi, Akbar; McColl, David; Adegun, Joseph; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira

    2015-11-01

    STOR-M is an iron-core, limiter based tokamak with major and minor radii of 46cm and 12 cm, respectively. Recently, electrode biasing experiments have been carried to study the improved confinement. For this purpose we have developed a DC power supply which can be gated by a high power SCR. The rectangular SS electrode has a height of 10 cm, a width of 2 cm and a thickness of 0.2 cm. The radial position of the electrode throughout the experiments is kept around 4mm inside the limiter in the plasma edge region. After application of positive bias with voltages between +90 V to +110 V during the plasma discharge current flat top with slightly higher edge-qa (nearly 5 to 6), noticeable increment of average plasma density and soft x-ray intensity along the central chord have been observed. No distinguishable change in H α emission has been measured. These phenomena may be attributed to improved confinement formed at the inner region but not at the edge. In the upcoming experimental campaign, Ion Doppler spectroscopy will be used to measure possible velocity shear inside the inner plasma region. Edge plasma pressure gradient will also be measured using Langmuir probes. Detailed experimental results will be presented.

  5. Biases in rhythmic sensorimotor coordination: effects of modality and intentionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debats, Nienke B; Ridderikhoff, Arne; de Boer, Betteco J; Peper, C Lieke E

    2013-08-01

    Sensorimotor biases were examined for intentional (tracking task) and unintentional (distractor task) rhythmic coordination. The tracking task involved unimanual tracking of either an oscillating visual signal or the passive movements of the contralateral hand (proprioceptive signal). In both conditions the required coordination patterns (isodirectional and mirror-symmetric) were defined relative to the body midline and the hands were not visible. For proprioceptive tracking the two patterns did not differ in stability, whereas for visual tracking the isodirectional pattern was performed more stably than the mirror-symmetric pattern. However, when visual feedback about the unimanual hand movements was provided during visual tracking, the isodirectional pattern ceased to be dominant. Together these results indicated that the stability of the coordination patterns did not depend on the modality of the target signal per se, but on the combination of sensory signals that needed to be processed (unimodal vs. cross-modal). The distractor task entailed rhythmic unimanual movements during which a rhythmic visual or proprioceptive distractor signal had to be ignored. The observed biases were similar as for intentional coordination, suggesting that intentionality did not affect the underlying sensorimotor processes qualitatively. Intentional tracking was characterized by active sensory pursuit, through muscle activity in the passively moved arm (proprioceptive tracking task) and rhythmic eye movements (visual tracking task). Presumably this pursuit afforded predictive information serving the coordination process.

  6. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment

  7. Bias dependence of synergistic radiation effects induced by electrons and protons on silicon bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Yang, Jianqun; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi

    2015-06-01

    Bias dependence on synergistic radiation effects caused by 110 keV electrons and 170 keV protons on the current gain of 3DG130 NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is studied in this paper. Experimental results indicate that the influence induced by 170 keV protons is always enhancement effect during the sequential irradiation. However, the influence induced by 110 keV electrons on the BJT under various bias cases is different during the sequential irradiation. The transition fluence of 110 keV electrons is dependent on the bias case on the emitter-base junction of BJT.

  8. Empirical evidence of bias in treatment effect estimates in controlled trials with different interventions and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Lesley; Egger, Matthias; Gluud, Lise Lotte;

    2008-01-01

    To examine whether the association of inadequate or unclear allocation concealment and lack of blinding with biased estimates of intervention effects varies with the nature of the intervention or outcome....

  9. Effects of frequency of pulsed substrate bias on structure and properties of silicon-doped diamond-like carbon films by plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the effects of the frequency of pulsed substrate bias on the structure and properties of Si-doped diamond-like carbon (Si-DLC) films deposited by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using CH4, Ar, and monomethylsilane (CH3SiH3) as the Si source. The Si/(Si + C) ratios in the Si-DLC films deposited using pulsed bias were higher than that of the dc-biased Si-DLC film, and the Si fraction increased with decreasing frequency. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that Si–C, Si–Hn, and C–Hn bonds in the Si-DLC films increased with decreasing frequency. The internal stress decreased as the frequency decreased, which is probably due to the increase in Si–C, Si–Hn, and C–Hn bonds in the films. It was found that the wear rate of the pulse-biased Si-DLC film deposited at the highest frequency in this study is comparable to that of the dc-biased, undoped DLC film. Furthermore, the friction coefficient of the former is about one third of that of the latter. - Highlights: • The tribological properties of Si-doped films were improved at higher frequencies. • The internal stress of Si-doped films was lowered at lower frequencies. • The adhesion of pulse-biased films was improved at lower frequencies

  10. Impact of back-gate bias on the hysteresis effect in partially depleted SOI MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Jie-Xin; Chen Jing; Zhou Jian-Hua; Wu Qing-Qing; Chai Zhan; Yu Tao; Wang Xi

    2012-01-01

    The hysteresis effect in the output characteristics,originating from the floating body effect,has been measured in partially depleted(PD)silicon-on-insulator(SOl)MOSFETs at different back-gate biases.ID hysteresis has been developed to clarify the hysteresis characteristics.The fabricated devices show the positive and negative peaks in the ID hysteresis.The experimental results show that the ID hysteresis is sensitive to the back gate bias in 0.13μm PD SOI MOSFETs and does not vary monotonously with the back-gate bias.Based on the steady-state Shoclley-Read Hall(SRH)recombination theory,we have successfully interpreted the impact of the back-gate bias on the hysteresis effect in PD SOl MOSFETs.

  11. The effects of food-related attentional bias training on appetite and food intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Charlotte A.; Rogers, Peter J.; Etchells, Katie A.; Houstoun, Katie V. E.; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Obese and overweight individuals show a marked attentional bias to food cues. Food-related attentional bias may therefore play a causal role in over-eating. To test this possibility, the current study experimentally manipulated attentional bias towards food using a modified version of the visual probe task in which cake-stationery item image pairs were presented for 500 ms each. Participants (N = 60) were either trained to attend to images of cake, trained to avoid images of cake, or assigned to a no-training control group. Hunger was measured before and after the training. Post-training, participants were given the opportunity to consume cake as well as a non-target food (crisps) that was not included in the training. There was weak evidence of an increase in attentional bias towards cake in the attend group only. We found no selective effects of the training on hunger or food intake, and little evidence for any gender differences. Our study suggests that attentional bias for food is particularly ingrained and difficult to modify. It also represents a first step towards elucidating the potential functional significance of food-related attentional biases and the lack of behavioural effects is broadly consistent with single-session attentional training studies from the addiction literature. An alternative hypothesis, that attentional bias represents a noncausal proxy for the motivational impact of appetitive stimuli, is considered. PMID:24025548

  12. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification Interventions for Substance Addictions: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Robin N.; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Cognitive bias modification (CBM) interventions, presumably targeting automatic processes, are considered particularly promising for addictions. We conducted a meta-analysis examining randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBM for substance addiction outcomes. Methods Studies were identified through systematic searches in bibliographical databases. We included RCTs of CBM interventions, alone or in combination with other treatments, for any type of addiction. We examined trial risk of bias, publication bias and possible moderators. Effects sizes were computed for post-test and follow-up, using a random-effects model. We grouped outcome measures and reported results for addiction (all related measures), craving and cognitive bias. Results We identified 25 trials, 18 for alcohol problems, and 7 for smoking. At post-test, there was no significant effect of CBM for addiction, g = 0.08 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.18) or craving, g = 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.16), but there was a significant, moderate effect on cognitive bias, g = 0.60 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.79). Results were similar for alcohol and smoking outcomes taken separately. Follow-up addiction outcomes were reported in 7 trials, resulting in a small but significant effect of CBM, g = 0.18 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.32). Results for addiction and craving did not differ by substance type, sample type, delivery setting, bias targeted or number of sessions. Risk of bias was high or uncertain in most trials, for most criteria considered. Meta-regression analyses revealed significant inverse relationships between risk of bias and effect sizes for addiction outcomes and craving. The relationship between cognitive bias and respectively addiction ESs was not significant. There was consistent evidence of publication bias in the form of funnel plot asymmetry. Conclusions Our results cast serious doubts on the clinical utility of CBM interventions for addiction problems, but sounder methodological trials are necessary before

  13. Top-gate zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors with high bias and environmental stress stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, M.; Theisen, M.; Behrendt, A.; Görrn, P.; Riedl, T. [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany)

    2014-06-23

    Top gated metal-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) provide two benefits compared to their conventional bottom-gate counterparts: (i) The gate dielectric may concomitantly serve as encapsulation layer for the TFT channel. (ii) Damage of the dielectric due to high-energetic particles during channel deposition can be avoided. In our work, the top-gate dielectric is prepared by ozone based atomic layer deposition at low temperatures. For ultra-low gas permeation rates, we introduce nano-laminates of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} as dielectrics. The resulting TFTs show a superior environmental stability even at elevated temperatures. Their outstanding stability vs. bias stress is benchmarked against bottom-gate devices with encapsulation.

  14. Top-gate zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors with high bias and environmental stress stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, M.; Theisen, M.; Behrendt, A.; Görrn, P.; Riedl, T.

    2014-06-01

    Top gated metal-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) provide two benefits compared to their conventional bottom-gate counterparts: (i) The gate dielectric may concomitantly serve as encapsulation layer for the TFT channel. (ii) Damage of the dielectric due to high-energetic particles during channel deposition can be avoided. In our work, the top-gate dielectric is prepared by ozone based atomic layer deposition at low temperatures. For ultra-low gas permeation rates, we introduce nano-laminates of Al2O3/ZrO2 as dielectrics. The resulting TFTs show a superior environmental stability even at elevated temperatures. Their outstanding stability vs. bias stress is benchmarked against bottom-gate devices with encapsulation.

  15. Top-gate zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors with high bias and environmental stress stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Top gated metal-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) provide two benefits compared to their conventional bottom-gate counterparts: (i) The gate dielectric may concomitantly serve as encapsulation layer for the TFT channel. (ii) Damage of the dielectric due to high-energetic particles during channel deposition can be avoided. In our work, the top-gate dielectric is prepared by ozone based atomic layer deposition at low temperatures. For ultra-low gas permeation rates, we introduce nano-laminates of Al2O3/ZrO2 as dielectrics. The resulting TFTs show a superior environmental stability even at elevated temperatures. Their outstanding stability vs. bias stress is benchmarked against bottom-gate devices with encapsulation.

  16. Enhanced stability against bias-stress of metal-oxide thin film transistors deposited at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, M.; Goerrn, P.; Riedl, T. [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-St. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Weimann, T.; Hinze, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-09-19

    Transparent zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. Compared to reference devices with a channel deposited at room temperature and subsequently annealing at 400 deg. C, a substantially enhanced stability against bias stress is evidenced for devices with in-situ substrate heating during deposition (400 deg. C). A reduced density of sub-gap defect states in TFT channels prepared with in-situ substrate heating is found. Concomitantly, a reduced sensitivity to the adsorption of ambient gases is evidenced for the in-situ heated devices. This finding is of particular importance for an application as driver electronics for organic light emitting diode displays.

  17. Enhanced stability against bias-stress of metal-oxide thin film transistors deposited at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, M.; Görrn, P.; Weimann, T.; Hinze, P.; Riedl, T.

    2011-09-01

    Transparent zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. Compared to reference devices with a channel deposited at room temperature and subsequently annealing at 400 °C, a substantially enhanced stability against bias stress is evidenced for devices with in-situ substrate heating during deposition (400 °C). A reduced density of sub-gap defect states in TFT channels prepared with in-situ substrate heating is found. Concomitantly, a reduced sensitivity to the adsorption of ambient gases is evidenced for the in-situ heated devices. This finding is of particular importance for an application as driver electronics for organic light emitting diode displays.

  18. Origin of degradation phenomenon under drain bias stress for oxide thin film transistors using IGZO and IGO channel layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Jun Yong; Kang, Youngho; Yang, Shinhyuk; Ryu, Ho-Jun; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Han, Seungwu; Yoon, Sung-Min

    2015-01-20

    Top-gate structured thin film transistors (TFTs) using In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) and In-Ga-O (IGO) channel compositions were investigated to reveal a feasible origin for degradation phenomenon under drain bias stress (DBS). DBS-driven instability in terms of V(TH) shift, deviation of the SS value, and increase in the on-state current were detected only for the IGZO-TFT, in contrast to the IGO-TFT, which did not demonstrate V(TH) shift. These behaviors were visually confirmed via nanoscale transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy observations. To understand the degradation mechanism, we performed ab initio molecular dynamic simulations on the liquid phases of IGZO and IGO. The diffusivities of Ga and In atoms were enhanced in IGZO, confirming the degradation mechanism to be increased atomic diffusion.

  19. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration, and the Mediating Role of Shame Processing Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sippel, Lauren M.; Marshall, Amy D.

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may produce internal “threats to the self,” which generate shame. Shame is theoretically and empirically linked to intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration. We examined relations among PTSD, cognitive processing of shame-relevant information, and IPV perpetration. Forty-seven community participants completed an emotional Stroop task with shame-relevant and neutral words. Stimuli were presented supraliminally (i.e., until vocal response) and subliminall...

  20. The impact of threat of shock on the framing effect and temporal discounting: executive functions unperturbed by acute stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Joe Robinson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and stress-related disorders constitute a large global health burden, but are still poorly understood. Prior work has demonstrated clear impacts of stress upon basic cognitive function: biasing attention towards unexpected and potentially threatening information and instantiating a negative affective bias. However, the impact that these changes have on higher-order, executive, decision-making processes is unclear. In this study we examined the impact of a translational within-subjects stress induction (threat of unpredictable shock on two well-established executive decision-making biases: the framing effect (N=83, and temporal discounting (N=36. In both studies, we demonstrate a clear subjective effects of stress, and b clear executive decision-making biases but c no impact of stress on these decision-making biases. Indeed, Bayes factor analyses confirmed substantial preference for decision-making models that did not include stress. We posit that while stress may induce subjective mood change and alter low-level perceptual and action processes (Robinson et al., 2013b, some higher-level executive processes remain unperturbed by these impacts. As such, although stress can induce a transient affective biases and altered mood, these need not result in poor financial decision-making.

  1. The Biased Effect of Aggregated and Disaggregated Income Taxation on Investment Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Fochmann; Dirk Kiesewetter; Abdolkarim Sadrieh

    2010-01-01

    Income taxation may not only affect investment behavior by distorting payoffs, it may also have a more subtle, psychological effect, by biasing investors' perceptions of the financial consequences. In a laboratory experiment that allows us to vary the taxation method, while keeping the financial outcomes constant, we find clear evidence that aggregated income taxation (comparable to profit taxation) with complete loss deduction induces a sustained bias towards more risk-taking, while disaggre...

  2. The effect of cognitive bias modification training on memory of emotional words in anxious children

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Hiu-wing, Sharon.; 黃曉穎.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research had demonstrated cognitive biases towards threatening stimuli in anxious individuals, such as in attention, interpretation and memory. The present study aimed to examine the differences in memory-related information processing between anxious and nonanxious children and the effectiveness of a Cognitive-Bias Modification (CBM) based positive training in altering these differences. The study adopted a directed forgetting paradigm, where children with anxiety disorders (N=12) ...

  3. Defending or challenging the status quo : Effects of position on biased perceptions of opponents

    OpenAIRE

    Bäck, Emma; Lindholm, Torun

    2009-01-01

    People want to maintain status quo. Most prior research concern groups with real status differences. Pro/con status quo position may itself carry status information. Three studies explored the effects of pro/con status quo position on biased perceptions of others. Challengers were more biased, regardless of real status differences. Supporting summary The default ideological position is status quo maintaining (Skitka et al. 2002). Most prior research concerns groups with real status difference...

  4. Tensile effective stresses in hydrocarbon storage caverns

    CERN Document Server

    Djizanne, Hippolyte; Brouard, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    The "no-tensile effective stress" criterion is discussed. It is proven that effective tensile stresses can be generated at a cavern wall after a rapid increase or decrease in pressure. The Etzel K-102 test, performed in Germany more than 20 years ago, is revisited using the notion of effective tensile stresses.

  5. Tensile effective stresses in hydrocarbon storage caverns

    OpenAIRE

    Djizanne, Hippolyte; Berest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    International audience The "no-tensile effective stress" criterion is discussed. It is proven that effective tensile stresses can be generated at a cavern wall after a rapid increase or decrease in pressure. The Etzel K-102 test, performed in Germany more than 20 years ago, is revisited using the notion of effective tensile stresses.

  6. Alcohol-cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias in underage college-student drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jason J; Monti, Peter M; Colwill, Ruth M

    2015-06-01

    The effect of alcohol-cue exposure on eliciting craving has been well documented, and numerous theoretical models assert that craving is a clinically significant construct central to the motivation and maintenance of alcohol-seeking behavior. Furthermore, some theories propose a relationship between craving and attention, such that cue-induced increases in craving bias attention toward alcohol cues, which, in turn, perpetuates craving. This study examined the extent to which alcohol cues induce craving and bias attention toward alcohol cues among underage college-student drinkers. We designed within-subject cue-reactivity and visual-probe tasks to assess in vivo alcohol-cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias on 39 undergraduate college drinkers (ages 18-20). Participants expressed greater subjective craving to drink alcohol following in vivo cue exposure to a commonly consumed beer compared with water exposure. Furthermore, following alcohol-cue exposure, participants exhibited greater attentional biases toward alcohol cues as measured by a visual-probe task. In addition to the cue-exposure effects on craving and attentional bias, within-subject differences in craving across sessions marginally predicted within-subject differences in attentional bias. Implications for both theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25243832

  7. Alcohol-cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias in underage college-student drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jason J; Monti, Peter M; Colwill, Ruth M

    2015-06-01

    The effect of alcohol-cue exposure on eliciting craving has been well documented, and numerous theoretical models assert that craving is a clinically significant construct central to the motivation and maintenance of alcohol-seeking behavior. Furthermore, some theories propose a relationship between craving and attention, such that cue-induced increases in craving bias attention toward alcohol cues, which, in turn, perpetuates craving. This study examined the extent to which alcohol cues induce craving and bias attention toward alcohol cues among underage college-student drinkers. We designed within-subject cue-reactivity and visual-probe tasks to assess in vivo alcohol-cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias on 39 undergraduate college drinkers (ages 18-20). Participants expressed greater subjective craving to drink alcohol following in vivo cue exposure to a commonly consumed beer compared with water exposure. Furthermore, following alcohol-cue exposure, participants exhibited greater attentional biases toward alcohol cues as measured by a visual-probe task. In addition to the cue-exposure effects on craving and attentional bias, within-subject differences in craving across sessions marginally predicted within-subject differences in attentional bias. Implications for both theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. High-end climate change impact on European water availability and stress: exploring the presence of biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Papadimitriou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate models project a much more substantial warming than the 2 °C target making higher end scenarios increasingly plausible. Freshwater availability under such conditions is a key issue of concern. In this study, an ensemble of Euro-CORDEX projections under RCP8.5 is used to assess the mean and low hydrological states under +4 °C of global warming for the European region. Five major European catchments were analyzed in terms of future drought climatology and the impact of +2 vs. +4 °C global warming was investigated. The effect of bias correction of the climate model outputs and the observations used for this adjustment was also quantified. Projections indicate an intensification of the water cycle at higher levels of warming. Even for areas where the average state may not considerably be affected, low flows are expected to reduce leading to changes in the number of dry days and thus drought climatology. The identified increasing or decreasing runoff trends are substantially intensified when moving from the +2 to the +4 °C of global warming. Bias correction resulted in an improved representation of the historical hydrology. It is also found that the selection of the observational dataset for the application of the bias correction has an impact on the projected signal that could be of the same order of magnitude to the selection of the RCM.

  9. Cognitive biases in processing infant emotion by women with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder in pregnancy or after birth: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rebecca; Ayers, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal psychological problems such as post-natal depression are associated with poor mother-baby interaction, but the reason for this is not clear. One explanation is that mothers with negative mood have biased processing of infant emotion. This review aimed to synthesise research on processing of infant emotion by pregnant or post-natal women with anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Systematic searches were carried out on 11 electronic databases using terms related to negative affect, childbirth and perception of emotion. Fourteen studies were identified which looked at the effect of depression, anxiety and PTSD on interpretation of infant emotional expressions (k = 10), or reaction times when asked to ignore emotional expressions (k = 4). Results suggest mothers with depression and anxiety are more likely to identify negative emotions (i.e., sadness) and less accurate at identifying positive emotions (i.e., happiness) in infant faces. Additionally, women with depression may disengage faster from positive and negative infant emotional expressions. Very few studies examined PTSD (k = 2), but results suggest biases towards specific infant emotions may be influenced by characteristics of the traumatic event. The implications of this research for mother-infant interaction are explored. PMID:25472032

  10. EFFECTIVE STRESS AND STRAIN IN FINITE DEFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周喆; 秦伶俐; 黄文彬; 王红卫

    2004-01-01

    Whether the concept of effective stress and strain in elastic-plastic theory is still valid under the condition of finite deformation was mainly discussed. The uni-axial compression experiments in plane stress and plane strain states were chosen for study. In the two kinds of stress states, the stress- strain curve described by logarithm strain and rotated Kirchhoff stress matches the experiments data better than the curves defined by other stressstrain description.

  11. Traumatic stress: effects on the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Bremner, J Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Brain areas implicated in the stress response include the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Traumatic stress can be associated with lasting changes in these brain areas. Traumatic stress is associated with increased cortisol and norepinephrine responses to subsequent stressors. Antidepressants have effets on the hippocampus that counteract the effects of stress. Findings from animal studies have been extended to patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) showing smaller h...

  12. Social support moderates stress effects on depression

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingmin; Cai, Lin; Qian, Jing; Peng, Jiaxi

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the moderator effect of social support on the relationship between stress and depression of university students. A total of 632 undergraduate students completed the measures of perceived stress, perceived social support, and depression. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that social support moderated the association between stress and depression. Undergraduate students with high stress reported higher scores in depression than those with low stress with low social sup...

  13. Impurity effects on electrical conductivity of doped bilayer graphene in the presence of a bias voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Lotfi; H Rezania; B Arghavaninia; M Yarmohammadi

    2016-01-01

    We address the electrical conductivity of bilayer graphene as a function of temperature, impurity concentration, and scattering strength in the presence of a finite bias voltage at finite doping, beginning with a description of the tight-binding model using the linear response theory and Green’s function approach. Our results show a linear behavior at high doping for the case of high bias voltage. The effects of electron doping on the electrical conductivity have been studied via changing the electronic chemical potential. We also discuss and analyze how the bias voltage affects the temperature behavior of the electrical conductivity. Finally, we study the behavior of the electrical conductivity as a function of the impurity concentration and scattering strength for different bias voltages and chemical potentials respectively. The electrical conductivity is found to be monotonically decreasing with impurity scattering strength due to the increased scattering among electrons at higher impurity scattering strength.

  14. The effect of dc bias on the poled states in PNZST antiferroelectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect on the polarization of antiferroelectric (AFE) PNZST ((Pb,Nb)(Zr,Sn,Ti)O3) thin films by ε-E (dc bias field) cycles was studied. It was shown that in these films the AFE ordering is destroyed by the application of a dc electrical field bias along the surface normal direction. After removing the dc bias the film relaxes slowly back to the initial AFE state. This phenomenon is dependent on the film thickness. The relaxation time decreases with increasing film thickness. With increasing storage time of the sample after removing the dc bias at room temperature or heat treatment above the Curie temperature, the AFE ordering can return. From the characteristics of hysteresis loops and ε-E behaviours, we can ascertain that this phenomenon could be attributed to the difference in the poled volume at the interfaces between the electrode and the film

  15. Effects of substrate bias on structure and mechanical properties of (AlCrNbSiTiV)N coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlCrNbSiTiV nitride films were deposited by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and the effects of substrate bias on the chemical composition, structure and mechanical properties of the deposited films were investigated. AlCrNbSiTiV nitride films exhibit a single FCC NaCl-type structure and have the stoichiometric nitride ratio of (Al, Cr, Nb, Si, Ti, V)50N50. The deposition rate decreases with increasing substrate bias due to resputtering effects and densification of films, which also leads to less obvious columnar structure, reduced grain size, smaller surface roughness and transition of preferred orientation from the (1 1 1) plane to the (2 0 0) plane. The nitride film deposited at -100 V exhibits the maximum compressive stress around 4.5 GPa and attains a peak hardness and an elastic modulus of 42 GPa and 350 GPa, respectively, which fall in the superhard grade. Moreover, the film keeps its hardness at the superhard grade even after its residual compressive stress was partially released by annealing at 1073 K for 5 h. The structural evolution mechanism and strengthening mechanism are both discussed.

  16. EFFECTS OF ROCK BEHAVIOR AND STRESS CONDITIONON FIELD STRESS DETERMINATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.H.(Steve)Zou

    1995-01-01

    Non-consistency of stress results is often observed during field measurements. In some cases, even the measurements are made at the same location in a massive rockmass, the results can vary widely. In order to solve the problem, extensive research has been carried out to study the major factors which may affect stress determination. They include the rock behaviour and the stress state. For rocks showing non-isotropic behaviour, the values of Young's modulus and Poisson ratio vary with the orientation of loading and measurement. Stress condition in the rock affects the rock behaviour. Furthermore, the loading condition on rock samples during laboratory tests is different from in the field and therefore the determined elastic constants may not represent the field condition. In general, the Young's modulus may depend on the orientation, the loading path, the stress magnitude and the stress ratio. This paper examines in detail the effects of those factors, especially for rocks showing transversely isotropic behaviour. It is found that the discrepancy of stress results from fieldts in this type of rock is mainly due to over simplification of the rock behavior and inadequate use of elastic constants of the rock during stress calculation. A case study is given, which indicates the significance of these factors and demonstrates the proper procedure for stress calculation from

  17. Effects of substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power on the structural and tribological properties of carbon nitride coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: wangpf@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takeno, Takanori [Laboratory of Nanointerface Engineering, Division of Mechanical Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-1, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Fontaine, Julien [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systèmes, UMR 5513 – CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Bâtiment H10, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Écully Cedex (France); Aono, Masami [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8686 (Japan); Adachi, Koshi [Laboratory of Nanointerface Engineering, Division of Mechanical Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-1, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Miki, Hiroyuki [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-3, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takagi, Toshiyuki [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Effects of substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power on the structural and tribological properties of carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) coatings are investigated. CN{sub x} coatings are fabricated by a hybrid coating process with the combination of radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) and DC magnetron sputtering at various substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power in the order of −400 V 200 W, −400 V 100 W, −800 V 200 W, and −800 V 100 W. The deposition rate, N/C atomic ratio, and hardness of CN{sub x} coatings as well as friction coefficient of CN{sub x} coating sliding against AISI 52100 pin in N{sub 2} gas stream decrease, while the residual stress of CN{sub x} coatings increases with the increase of substrate bias voltage and the decrease of target sputtering power. The highest hardness measured under single stiffness mode of 15.0 GPa and lowest residual stress of 3.7 GPa of CN{sub x} coatings are obtained at −400 V 200 W, whereas the lowest friction coefficient of 0.12 of CN{sub x} coatings is achieved at −800 V 100 W. Raman and XPS analysis suggest that sp{sup 3} carbon bonding decreases and sp{sup 2} carbon bonding increases with the variations in substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power. Optical images and Raman characterization of worn surfaces confirm that the friction behavior of CN{sub x} coatings is controlled by the directly sliding between CN{sub x} coating and steel pin. Therefore, the reduction of friction coefficient is attributed to the decrease of sp{sup 3} carbon bonding in the CN{sub x} coating. It is concluded that substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power are effective parameters for tailoring the structural and tribological properties of CN{sub x} coatings. - Highlights: • Various CN{sub x} coatings are produced using a unique hybrid coating process. • Structural and tribological properties of CN{sub x} coatings are investigated. • The lowest friction

  18. The effects of self-focus on attentional biases in social anxiety:An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judah, Matt R; Grant, DeMond M; Carlisle, Nancy B

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive theories of social anxiety disorder suggest that biased attention plays a key role in maintaining symptoms. These biases include self-focus and attention to socially threatening stimuli in the environment. The goal of this study was to utilize ERPs that are elicited by a change detection task to examine biases in selective attention (i.e., N2pc) and working memory maintenance (i.e., contralateral delay activity; CDA). Additionally, the effect of self-focus was examined using false heart rate feedback. In support of the manipulation, self-focus cues resulted in greater self-reported self-consciousness and task interference, enhanced anterior P2 amplitude and reduced SPN amplitude. Moreover, P2 amplitude for self-focus cues was correlated with reduced task performance for socially anxious subjects only. The difference in P2 amplitude between self-focus and standard cues was correlated with social anxiety independent of depression. As hypothesized, socially anxious participants (n = 20) showed early selection and maintenance of disgust faces relative to neutral faces as indicated by the N2pc and CDA components. Nonanxious controls (n = 22) did not show these biases. During self-focus cues, controls showed marginal evidence of biased selection for disgust faces, whereas socially anxious subjects showed no bias in this condition. Controls showed an ipsilateral delay activity after being cued to attend to one hemifield. Overall, this study supports early and persistent attentional bias for social threat in socially anxious individuals. Furthermore, self-focus may disrupt these biases. These findings and supplementary data are discussed in light of cognitive models of social anxiety disorder, recent empirical findings, and treatment.

  19. Finale furioso: referee-biased injury times and their effects on home advantage in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Dennis; Strauss, Bernd; Heuer, Andreas; Rubner, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The role of referees has become a central issue in the investigation of home advantage. The main aim of this study was a thorough examination of the referee bias concerning injury time in football, which is currently seen as an important example for the assertion that referees contribute to home advantage. First, we use archival data from the German Bundesliga (seasons 2000/2001-2010/2011) to confirm the existence of an asymmetry in the allocation of injury time. We show this asymmetry to be a bias by ruling out hitherto remaining alternative explanations (effect = 18 s, P team leads in the game compared to a draw (effect = 21 s, P = 0.004, R2(adj) = 0.06). Third, the quantitative benefit of home or away teams in goals and points due to these biases is assessed. Overall, referee decisions on injury time indeed reveal biases, but they do not contribute to the home advantage, that is, there is no significant effect on goals scored by the teams. The qualitative findings (a new bias on injury time) as well as the quantitative findings (no overall effect) shed new light on the role of referees for home advantage.

  20. Relative Age Effect in Elite Sports: Methodological Bias or Real Discrimination?

    CERN Document Server

    Delorme, Nicolas; Raspaud, Michel; 10.1080/17461390903271584

    2010-01-01

    Sport sciences researchers talk about a relative age effect when they observe a biased distribution of elite athletes' birthdates, with an over-representation of those born at the beginning of the competitive year and an under-representation of those born at the end. Using the whole sample of the French male licensed soccer players (n = 1,831,524), our study suggests that there could be an important bias in the statistical test of this effect. This bias could in turn lead to falsely conclude to a systemic discrimination in the recruitment of professional players. Our findings question the accuracy of past results concerning the existence of this effect at the elite level.

  1. Impact of substrate bias on radiation-inducededge effects in MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhi-Yuan; Liu Zhang-Li; Shao-Hua; Zhang Zheng-Xuan; Ning Bing-Xu; Chen Ming; Bi Da-Wei; Zou Shi-Chang

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of gamma-ray irradiiation on the Shallow-Trench Isolation (STI) leakage currents in 180-nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology.No hump effect in the subthreshold region is observed after irradiation,which is considered to be due to the thin STI corner oxide thickness.A negative substrate bias could effectively suppress the STI leakage,but it also impairs the device characteristics.The three-dimensional simulation is introduced to understand the impact of substrate bias.Moreover,we propose a simple method for extracting the best substrate bias value,which not only eliminates the STI leakage but also has the least impact on the device characteristics.

  2. Effects of Nicotine and Nicotine Expectancy on Attentional Bias for Emotional Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sally; Attwood, Angela S.; Munafò, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nicotine’s effects on mood are thought to enhance its addictive potential. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicotine on affect regulation have not been reliably demonstrated in human laboratory studies. We investigated the effects of abstinence (experiment one), and nicotine challenge and expectancy (experiment two) on attentional bias towards facial emotional stimuli differing in emotional valence. Methods In experiment one, 46 nicotine-deprived smokers were randomized to either continue to abstain from smoking or to smoke immediately before testing. In experiment two, 96 nicotine deprived smokers were randomized to smoke a nicotinized or denicotinized cigarette and to be told that the cigarette did or did not contain nicotine. In both experiments participants completed a visual probe task, where positively valenced (happy) and negatively valenced (sad) facial expressions were presented, together with neutral facial expressions. Results In experiment one, there was evidence of an interaction between probe location and abstinence on reaction time, indicating that abstinent smokers showed an attentional bias for neutral stimuli. In experiment two, there was evidence of an interaction between probe location, nicotine challenge and expectation on reaction time, indicating that smokers receiving nicotine, but told that they did not receive nicotine, showed an attentional bias for emotional stimuli. Conclusions Our data suggest that nicotine abstinence appears to disrupt attentional bias towards emotional facial stimuli. These data provide support for nicotine’s modulation of attentional bias as a central mechanism for maintaining affect regulation in cigarette smoking. PMID:25335948

  3. Exchange bias effect in spin glass CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changming; Tian, Zhaoming; Wang, Liguang; Yuan, Songliu, E-mail: yuansl@hust.edu.cn

    2015-11-01

    CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are about 5.4 nm in diameter synthesized by a hydrothermal technique. Magnetization measurements reveal that the nanoparticles exhibit a spin glass behavior below glass transition temperature. Signature of memory effect is clear in reheating curve where the step-like shape increasing with the increase of temperature is recovered after cooling process. Magnetic relaxation is performed to prove memory effect. Ageing effect is also detected in CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles to verify the spin glass behavior. As temperature decreases to 5 K, which is far below the glass transition temperature, exchange bias effect can be observed clearly accompanied with a shift in field-cooled hysteresis loop. As particle size decreases to 5.4 nm, spin glass behavior appears due to the increased spin disorder effect. The spin glass phase providing a pinning force from some frozen spins to the rotatable spins gives the key to explain the exchange bias effects. - Highlights: • Existence of spin glass phase is verified in CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Exchange bias effect with a shift in field-cooled loop is observed at 5 K. • It is proved that exchange bias effect is originated from the spin glass phase.

  4. Photocurrent Effect in Reverse-Biased p-n Silicon Waveguides in Communication Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong; XU Chao; WANG Wan-Jun; ZHOU Qiang; HAO Yin-Lei; YANG Jian-Yi; WANG Ming-Hua; JIANG Xiao-Qing

    2011-01-01

    The photocurrent effect in reverse biased p-n silicon waveguides at wavelength 1550nm is experimentally investigated.The photocurrent,which is mainly related to surface-state absorption,defect-state absorption and/or two-photon absorption,is more than 0.08 μA/mm under 8 V reverse biasing and 0.75 mW irradiation.The responsivity of a silicon waveguide with length of 4500 μm achieves 0.S mA/W.Moreover,the enhancement of the photocurrent effect under the electric field is discussed.

  5. Abnormal Threshold Voltage Shifts in P-Channel Low-Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistors Under Negative Bias Temperature Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Sub; Choi, Pyung Ho; Baek, Do Hyun; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Choi, Byoung Deog

    2015-10-01

    In this research, we have investigated the instability of P-channel low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (LTPS TFTs) with double-layer SiO2/SiNx dielectrics. A negative gate bias temperature instability (NBTI) stress was applied and a turn-around behavior phenomenon was observed in the Threshold Voltage Shift (Vth). A positive threshold voltage shift occurs in the first stage, resulting from the negative charge trapping at the SiNx/SiO2 dielectric interface being dominant over the positive charge trapping at dielectric/Poly-Si interface. Following a stress time of 7000 s, the Vth switches to the negative voltage direction, which is "turn-around" behavior. In the second stage, the Vth moves from -1.63 V to -2 V, overwhelming the NBTI effect that results in the trapping of positive charges at the dielectric/Poly-Si interface states and generating grain-boundary trap states and oxide traps. PMID:26726370

  6. Effect of biasing on plasma rotation in the edge of IR-T1 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Arvin, R.; Gheydi, M.; Nikmohammadi, A. [Plasma physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O.Box: 14665-768 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorshid, P.; Bolourian, H. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Electrode biasing experiments were carried out on the IR-T1 Tokamak. The effects of radial electric field (Er) on plasma fluid velocity and magnetic island rotation investigated by a Mach/Langmuir electric probe and an array of 12 Mirnov coils. The Results have shown a change in the fluid velocity during biasing regime. References: [1] Van Oost G. et al. 2001 Czech. J. of Phys. 51 957; [2] Effect of Plasma Biasing on Suppression of Electrostatic Fluctuation in the Edge Region of STP-3(M) Reversed Field Pinch J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 74 (2005) pp.605-612; [3] Weynants R. R. and Van Oost G. 1993 Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 35 B177. (authors)

  7. Fluency and belief bias in deductive reasoning: new indices for old effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippas, Dries; Handley, Simon J; Verde, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Models based on signal detection theory (SDT) have occupied a prominent role in domains such as perception, categorization, and memory. Recent work by Dube et al. (2010) suggests that the framework may also offer important insights in the domain of deductive reasoning. Belief bias in reasoning has traditionally been examined using indices based on raw endorsement rates-indices that critics have claimed are highly problematic. We discuss a new set of SDT indices fit for the investigation belief bias and apply them to new data examining the effect of perceptual disfluency on belief bias in syllogisms. In contrast to the traditional approach, the SDT indices do not violate important statistical assumptions, resulting in a decreased Type 1 error rate. Based on analyses using these novel indices we demonstrate that perceptual disfluency leads to decreased reasoning accuracy, contrary to predictions. Disfluency also appears to eliminate the typical link found between cognitive ability and the effect of beliefs on accuracy. Finally, replicating previous work, we demonstrate that cognitive ability leads to an increase in reasoning accuracy and a decrease in the response bias component of belief bias. PMID:25009515

  8. Fluency and belief bias in deductive reasoning: New indices for old effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dries eTrippas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Models based on signal detection theory (SDT have occupied a prominent role in domains such as perception, categorisation, and memory. Recent work by Dube et al. (2010 suggests that the framework may also offer important insights in the domain of deductive reasoning. Belief bias in reasoning has traditionally been examined using indices based on raw endorsement rates – indices that critics have claimed are highly problematic. We discuss a new set of SDT indices fit for the investigation belief bias and apply them to new data examining the effect of perceptual disfluency on belief bias in syllogisms. In contrast to the traditional approach, the SDT indices do not violate important statistical assumptions, resulting in a decreased Type 1 error rate. Based on analyses using these novel indices we demonstrate that disfluency leads to decreased reasoning accuracy, contrary to predictions. Disfluency also appears to eliminate the typical link found between cognitive ability and the effect of beliefs on accuracy. Finally, replicating previous work, we demonstrate that cognitive ability leads to an increase in reasoning accuracy and a decrease in the response bias component of belief bias.

  9. Galaxy bias and its effects on the Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kushal T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Seo, Hee -Jong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Eckel, Jonathan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Metchnik, Marc [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Pinto, Philip [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Xu, Xiaoying [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-05-31

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b < 3), we do not detect any shift in the acoustic scale relative to the no-bias case, typically 0.10% ± 0.10%. However, the most biased HOD models (b > 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% ± 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1σ systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.

  10. Selection bias in evaluating of influenza vaccine effectiveness: a lesson from an observational study of elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Wakaba; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Mizuno, Yaichi; Suzuki, Kanzo; Kase, Tetsuo; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fujieda, Megumi; Maeda, Akiko; Hirota, Yoshio

    2008-11-25

    Selection bias is of critical concern in the study of influenza vaccine effectiveness when using an observational study design. This bias is attributable to the inherently different characteristics between vaccinees and non-vaccinees. The differences, which are related both to vaccination and signs of clinical disease as an outcome, may lead to erroneous estimation of the effectiveness. In this report, we describe how selection bias among elderly nursing home residents may lead to a spurious interpretation of the protective effect of influenza vaccine. Our results should be a lesson in the importance of regarding selection bias when assessing influenza vaccine effectiveness.

  11. Galaxy Bias and its Effects on the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Kushal T; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Metchnik, Marc; Pinto, Philip; Xu, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% \\pm 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at ne...

  12. Effect of Barrier Width on Bias-Dependent Tunnelling in Ferromagnetic Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei-Fei; XIAO Ming-Wen; LI Zheng-Zhong; HU An; XU Wang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We present a finite temperature theory for bias-dependent tunnelling in ferromagnetic tunnelling junctions. The effects of the barrier width d on the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) and its sign change behaviour are discussed with this theory. Numerical results show that both the zero-bias TMR and the critical voltage Vc at which the TMR changes its sign decrease with the increasing barrier width for a considerably thick barrier junction. Furthermore, it is found that a minimum exists in the curve of Vc versus d if a composite junction is under oxidized.

  13. Effect of cognitive biases on human-robot interaction: a case study of robot's misattribution

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Mriganka; Murray, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model for developing long-term human-robot interactions and social relationships based on the principle of 'human' cognitive biases applied to a robot. The aim of this work is to study how a robot influenced with human ‘misattribution’ helps to build better human-robot interactions than unbiased robots. The results presented in this paper suggest that it is important to know the effect of cognitive biases in human characteristics and interactions in order to better u...

  14. The effects of assembly bias on cosmological inference from galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McEwen, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL) and galaxy clustering is a promising route to measuring the amplitude of matter clustering and testing modified gravity theories of cosmic acceleration. Halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling can extend the approach down to nonlinear scales, but galaxy assembly bias could introduce systematic errors by causing the HOD to vary with large scale environment at fixed halo mass. We investigate this problem using the mock galaxy catalogs created by Hearin & Watson (2013, HW13), which exhibit significant assembly bias because galaxy luminosity is tied to halo peak circular velocity and galaxy colour is tied to halo formation time. The preferential placement of galaxies (especially red galaxies) in older halos affects the cutoff of the mean occupation function $\\langle N_\\text{cen}(M_\\text{min}) \\rangle$ for central galaxies, with halos in overdense regions more likely to host galaxies. The effect of assembly bias on the satellite galaxy HOD is minimal. We intro...

  15. Effects of divertor plate biasing on radial and poloidal edge fluxes in the TdeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The divertor plates of TdeV, a tokamak with a double-null divertor and closed divertor chambers, have been electrically biased with respect to the walls. The paper discusses the resulting effects on the edge electron density profile, on the neutral pressures and impurity fluxes in the main vacuum chamber and the divertor chambers, and on the plasma flow to the divertors. As a function of the bias voltage, which was varied between - 180 V and + 160 V, the electron density scrape-off width and the wall impurity influxes increase monotonically; the flows to the top and bottom divertors vary strongly, in qualitative agreement with an E-vector x B-vector/B2 rotation, but not symmetrically. With negative biasing, the electrostatic barrier and the rotation combine to give a strong improvement of the divertor efficiency. (author). 30 refs, 10 figs

  16. Effects of DC bias voltages on the RF-excited plasma-tissue interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Jiafeng; Chen, Chen; Rong, Mingzhe; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-10-01

    We present in this study how DC bias voltage impacts on the fluxes of reactive species on the skin tissue by means of a plasma-tissue interaction model. The DC bias voltage inputs less than 2% of the total discharge power, and hence it has little influence on the whole plasma characteritics including the volume-averaged densities of reactive species and the heating effect. However, it pushes the plasma bulk towards the skin surface, which significantly changes the local plasma characteristics in the vicinity of the skin surface, and in consequence remarkably enhances the flux densities of reactive species on the skin tissue. With the consideration of plasma dosage and heat damage on the skin tissue, DC bias voltage is a better approach compared with the common approach of increasing the plasma power. Since the DC voltage is easy to apply on the human body, it is a promising approach for use in clincial applications.

  17. Size-dependent effects in exchange-biased planar Hall effect sensor crosses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad;

    2011-01-01

    Exchange-biased planar Hall effect magnetic field sensor crosses with arm width w have been studied as function of w. For large values of w, the magnetic behavior is hysteresis-free and follows the single domain Stoner-Wohlfarth model. When w is decreased, hysteresis is observed in the sensor...... response. For intermediate values of w, the magnetization reversal takes place in two steps, and for small values of w, the magnetization reversal takes place in a single step. Based on electrical measurements, magnetic force microscopy, and micromagnetic simulations, the observations are explained...... by an increasing magnetic shape anisotropy of the arms of the cross. We propose a simple analytical model that captures the essential physics of the observations and parameterizes the effects of the cross-shape on the central part of the cross. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3561364]...

  18. Towards a de-biased social psychology: The effects of ideological perspective go beyond politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, David C

    2015-01-01

    Reasonable conservatives are in short supply and will not arrive to save social psychology any time soon. The field needs to save itself through de-biasing. The effects of a liberal worldview permeate and distort discussion of many topics that are not overtly political, including behavioral genetics and evolutionary psychology, the fundamental attribution error, and the remarkably persistent consistency controversy.

  19. Bias-dependent contact resistance in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molinari, A.; Gutiérrez, I.; Hulea, I.N.; Russo, S.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a systematic study of the bias-dependent contact resistance in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors with Ni, Co, Cu, Au, and Pt electrodes. They show that the reproducibility in the values of contact resistance strongly depends on the metal, ranging from a factor of 2 f

  20. Contamination, potential bias and humidity effects on electrical performance and corrosion reliability of electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten S.;

    2015-01-01

    with their influence on electrical performance of electronics. The effect of the type of laminate’s solder mask on the formation of water film and droplets was investigated for two different types: smooth glossy and rough matte sur-face finishes of the solder mask. The impact of potential bias on the electrical re...

  1. Polymer Electro-optic Modulator Linear Bias Using the Thermo-optic Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-Qiang; CHEN Chang-Ming; LI Xiao-Dong; WANG Xi-Bin; YANG Tian-Fu; ZHANG Da-Ming; WANG Fei; XIE Zhi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-rectangular waveguide polymer Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) electro-optic (EO) modulator based on an organic/inorganic hybrid material with thermal bias control is fabricated and demonstrated. Linear bias for the modulator is obtained through thermo-optic effect. The optical output is adjusted by changing phase difference between the two arms of the M-Z interferometer. A power consumption of 16.1 mW for π phase change is observed owing to the application of silica cladding. This approach is proved to be effective to suppress direct current drift in polymer EO modulators.%A quasi-rectangular waveguide polymer Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) electro-optic (EO) modulator based on an organic/inorganic hybrid material with thermal bias control is fabricated and demonstrated.Linear bias for the modulator is obtained through thermo-optic effect.The optical output is adjusted by changing phase difference between the two arms of the M-Z interferometer.A power consumption of 16.1 m W for π phase change is observed owing to the application of silica cladding.This approach is proved to be effective to suppress direct current drift in polymer EO modulators.

  2. Effects of sertraline, duloxetine, vortioxetine, and idazoxan in the rat affective bias test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Louise Konradsen; Haubro, Kia; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    lead to improved mood. Objectives Using two conventional antidepressants, sertraline and duloxetine, we aimed to forward the characterization of a newly developed affective bias test (ABT) for rats. Further, we examined the effect of vortioxetine, a recently approved antidepressant, and the α2...

  3. Scrape-off layer biasing, currents, and electric field effects in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a brief report on a workshop with this title held after the 10th International Plasma-Surface Interaction Conference, that was held 6-8 April, 1992, in Borrego Springs, California. Emphasis was on the effect of biasing the scrape-off layer. Theoretical and experimental work was presented. 1 tab

  4. Exchange-biased planar Hall effect sensor optimized for biosensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Freitas, S.C.; Freitas, P.P.;

    2008-01-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of exchange-biased Permalloy planar Hall effect sensor crosses with a fixed active area of w x w = 40 x 40 mu m(2) and Permalloy thicknesses of t = 20, 30, and 50 nm. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well...

  5. A Simulation Study of the Effects of Ability Range Restriction on IRT Item Bias Detection Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Gary J.; Park, Dong-Gun

    The effects of variations in degree of range restriction and different subgroup sample sizes on the validity of several item bias detection procedures based on Item Response Theory (IRT) were investigated in a simulation study. The degree of range restriction for each of two subpopulations was varied by cutting the specified subpopulation ability…

  6. Hostile Attributional Bias, Negative Emotional Responding, and Aggression in Adults: Moderating Effects of Gender and Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Pan; Coccaro, Emil F.; Jacobson, Kristen C

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the main effects of hostile attributional bias (HAB) and negative emotional responding on a variety of aggressive behaviors in adults, including general aggression, physical aggression, relational aggression, and verbal aggression. Effects of both externalizing (anger) and internalizing (embarrassment/upset) negative emotions were considered. In addition, the moderating roles of gender and impulsivity on the effects of HAB and negative emotional responding were expl...

  7. The effects of reality television on weight bias: an examination of The Biggest Loser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domoff, Sarah E; Hinman, Nova G; Koball, Afton M; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Carhart, Victoria L; Baik, Kyoung D; Carels, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Weight-loss reality shows, a popular form of television programming, portray obese individuals and their struggles to lose weight. While the media is believed to reinforce obesity stereotypes and contribute to weight stigma, it is not yet known whether weight-loss reality shows have any effect on weight bias. The goal of this investigation was to examine how exposure to 40-min of The Biggest Loser impacted participants' levels of weight bias. Fifty-nine participants (majority of whom were white females) were randomly assigned to either an experimental (one episode of The Biggest Loser) or control (one episode of a nature reality show) condition. Levels of weight bias were measured by the Implicit Associations Test (IAT), the Obese Person Trait Survey (OPTS), and the Anti-fat Attitudes scale (AFA) at baseline and following the episode viewing (1 week later). Participants in The Biggest Loser condition had significantly higher levels of dislike of overweight individuals and more strongly believed that weight is controllable after the exposure. No significant condition effects were found for implicit bias or traits associated with obese persons. Exploratory analyses examining moderation of the condition effect by BMI and intention to lose weight indicated that participants who had lower BMIs and were not trying to lose weight had significantly higher levels of dislike of overweight individuals following exposure to The Biggest Loser compared to similar participants in the control condition. These results indicate that anti-fat attitudes increase after brief exposure to weight-loss reality television. PMID:22240725

  8. Reduction of Pavlovian Bias in Schizophrenia: Enhanced Effects in Clozapine-Administered Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Albrecht

    Full Text Available The negative symptoms of schizophrenia (SZ are associated with a pattern of reinforcement learning (RL deficits likely related to degraded representations of reward values. However, the RL tasks used to date have required active responses to both reward and punishing stimuli. Pavlovian biases have been shown to affect performance on these tasks through invigoration of action to reward and inhibition of action to punishment, and may be partially responsible for the effects found in patients. Forty-five patients with schizophrenia and 30 demographically-matched controls completed a four-stimulus reinforcement learning task that crossed action ("Go" or "NoGo" and the valence of the optimal outcome (reward or punishment-avoidance, such that all combinations of action and outcome valence were tested. Behaviour was modelled using a six-parameter RL model and EEG was simultaneously recorded. Patients demonstrated a reduction in Pavlovian performance bias that was evident in a reduced Go bias across the full group. In a subset of patients administered clozapine, the reduction in Pavlovian bias was enhanced. The reduction in Pavlovian bias in SZ patients was accompanied by feedback processing differences at the time of the P3a component. The reduced Pavlovian bias in patients is suggested to be due to reduced fidelity in the communication between striatal regions and frontal cortex. It may also partially account for previous findings of poorer "Go-learning" in schizophrenia where "Go" responses or Pavlovian consistent responses are required for optimal performance. An attenuated P3a component dynamic in patients is consistent with a view that deficits in operant learning are due to impairments in adaptively using feedback to update representations of stimulus value.

  9. Reduction of Pavlovian Bias in Schizophrenia: Enhanced Effects in Clozapine-Administered Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Matthew A; Waltz, James A; Cavanagh, James F; Frank, Michael J; Gold, James M

    2016-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia (SZ) are associated with a pattern of reinforcement learning (RL) deficits likely related to degraded representations of reward values. However, the RL tasks used to date have required active responses to both reward and punishing stimuli. Pavlovian biases have been shown to affect performance on these tasks through invigoration of action to reward and inhibition of action to punishment, and may be partially responsible for the effects found in patients. Forty-five patients with schizophrenia and 30 demographically-matched controls completed a four-stimulus reinforcement learning task that crossed action ("Go" or "NoGo") and the valence of the optimal outcome (reward or punishment-avoidance), such that all combinations of action and outcome valence were tested. Behaviour was modelled using a six-parameter RL model and EEG was simultaneously recorded. Patients demonstrated a reduction in Pavlovian performance bias that was evident in a reduced Go bias across the full group. In a subset of patients administered clozapine, the reduction in Pavlovian bias was enhanced. The reduction in Pavlovian bias in SZ patients was accompanied by feedback processing differences at the time of the P3a component. The reduced Pavlovian bias in patients is suggested to be due to reduced fidelity in the communication between striatal regions and frontal cortex. It may also partially account for previous findings of poorer "Go-learning" in schizophrenia where "Go" responses or Pavlovian consistent responses are required for optimal performance. An attenuated P3a component dynamic in patients is consistent with a view that deficits in operant learning are due to impairments in adaptively using feedback to update representations of stimulus value. PMID:27044008

  10. Phase separation and exchange bias effect in Ca doped EuCrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rare-earth chromites have attracted increasing interests in recent years, as a member of a few single-phase multiferroic materials. We studied the structure and magnetic property of a series of Ca-doped EuCrO3 samples by using X-ray powder diffraction and Physical Property Measurement System. Phase separation, rotation of magnetization in M(T) curve and exchange bias effect have been identified. The Eu0.7Ca0.3CrO3 polycrystalline sample may be intrinsically phase-separated, with Cr3+-rich, Cr4+-rich canted antiferromagnetic regions surrounded by spin glass-like frustrated phase, resulting in several magnetic features including: (1) a broad and slow increase of M(T) curve with the decrease of temperature; (2) rotation of magnetization with increasing cooling field; (3) exchange bias and glassy magnetism. The rotation of magnetization is ascribed to the rotation of the moment of Cr4+-rich regions, arising from the competition between exchange coupling energy and magnetostatic energy. The exchange bias effect suggests the formation of weak ferromagnetic unidirectional anisotropy during field cooling, due to the exchange coupling among weak ferromagnetic domains and surrounding spin glass-like regions. This result helps understanding the interaction among different magnetic domains and phases in a complex system. - Highlights: • Exchange bias effect and glassy magnetism were observed in Eu0.7Ca0.3CrO3. • Rotation of the moments of Cr4+-rich regions result in the rotation of magnetization in M(T) curve. • Spin glass-like regions contribute to the observed exchange bias effect

  11. Phase separation and exchange bias effect in Ca doped EuCrO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dongmei, E-mail: dmdeng@shu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Wang, Xingyu; Zheng, Jiashun; Qian, Xiaolong [Department of Physics and Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Yu, Dehong; Sun, Dehui [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Jing, Chao [Department of Physics and Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu, Bo [Analysis and Measurement Center and Laboratory for Microstructures of Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Kang, Baojuan; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang [Department of Physics and Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2015-12-01

    The rare-earth chromites have attracted increasing interests in recent years, as a member of a few single-phase multiferroic materials. We studied the structure and magnetic property of a series of Ca-doped EuCrO{sub 3} samples by using X-ray powder diffraction and Physical Property Measurement System. Phase separation, rotation of magnetization in M(T) curve and exchange bias effect have been identified. The Eu{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CrO{sub 3} polycrystalline sample may be intrinsically phase-separated, with Cr{sup 3+}-rich, Cr{sup 4+}-rich canted antiferromagnetic regions surrounded by spin glass-like frustrated phase, resulting in several magnetic features including: (1) a broad and slow increase of M(T) curve with the decrease of temperature; (2) rotation of magnetization with increasing cooling field; (3) exchange bias and glassy magnetism. The rotation of magnetization is ascribed to the rotation of the moment of Cr{sup 4+}-rich regions, arising from the competition between exchange coupling energy and magnetostatic energy. The exchange bias effect suggests the formation of weak ferromagnetic unidirectional anisotropy during field cooling, due to the exchange coupling among weak ferromagnetic domains and surrounding spin glass-like regions. This result helps understanding the interaction among different magnetic domains and phases in a complex system. - Highlights: • Exchange bias effect and glassy magnetism were observed in Eu{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CrO{sub 3}. • Rotation of the moments of Cr{sup 4+}-rich regions result in the rotation of magnetization in M(T) curve. • Spin glass-like regions contribute to the observed exchange bias effect.

  12. Long-term changes in cognitive bias and coping response as a result of chronic unpredictable stress during adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Braithwaite

    2013-01-01

    Animals that experience adverse events in early life often have life-long changes to their physiology and behavior. Long-term effects of stress during early life have been studied extensively, but less attention has been given to the consequences of negative experiences solely during the adolescent phase. Adolescence is a particularly sensitive period of life when regulation of the glucocorticoid “stress” hormone response matures and specific regions in the brain undergo considerable change. ...

  13. Exchange bias effect in BiFeO3-NiO nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Kaushik; Sarkar, Babusona; Dev Ashok, Vishal; Das, Kajari; Sinha Chaudhuri, Sheli; Mitra, Amitava; De, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic BiFeO3 nanocrystals of average size 11 nm were used to form nanocomposites (x)BiFeO3/(100 - x)NiO, x = 0, 20, 40, 50, 60, 80, and 100 by simple solvothermal process. The ferromagnetic BiFeO3 nanocrystals embedded in antiferromagnetic NiO nanostructures were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope studies. The modification of cycloidal spin structure of bulk BiFeO3 owing to reduction in particle size compared to its spin spiral wavelength (62 nm) results in ferromagnetic ordering in pure BiFeO3 nanocrystals. High Neel temperature (TN) of NiO leads to significant exchange bias effect across the BiFeO3/NiO interface at room temperature. A maximum exchange bias field of 123.5 Oe at 300 K for x = 50 after field cooling at 7 kOe has been observed. The exchange bias coupling causes an enhancement of coercivity up to 235 Oe at 300 K. The observed exchange bias effect originates from the exchange coupling between the surface uncompensated spins of BiFeO3 nanocrystals and NiO nanostructures.

  14. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification Interventions for Substance Addictions: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristea, Ioana; Kok, Robin; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Cognitive bias modification (CBM) interventions, presumably targeting automatic processes, are considered particularly promising for addictions. We conducted a meta-analysis examining randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBM for substance addiction outcomes. Methods Studies...... = 0.08 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.18) or craving, g = 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.16), but there was a significant, moderate effect on cognitive bias, g = 0.60 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.79). Results were similar for alcohol and smoking outcomes taken separately. Follow-up addiction outcomes were reported in 7 trials......, resulting in a small but significant effect of CBM, g = 0.18 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.32). Results for addiction and craving did not differ by substance type, sample type, delivery setting, bias targeted or number of sessions. Risk of bias was high or uncertain in most trials, for most criteria considered. Meta...

  15. Exchange bias effect in BiFeO{sub 3}-NiO nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Kaushik; Sarkar, Babusona; Dev Ashok, Vishal; Das, Kajari; De, S. K., E-mail: msskd@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association For the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Sinha Chaudhuri, Sheli [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Mitra, Amitava [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 7 (India)

    2014-01-07

    Ferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals of average size 11 nm were used to form nanocomposites (x)BiFeO{sub 3}/(100 − x)NiO, x = 0, 20, 40, 50, 60, 80, and 100 by simple solvothermal process. The ferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals embedded in antiferromagnetic NiO nanostructures were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope studies. The modification of cycloidal spin structure of bulk BiFeO{sub 3} owing to reduction in particle size compared to its spin spiral wavelength (62 nm) results in ferromagnetic ordering in pure BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals. High Neel temperature (T{sub N}) of NiO leads to significant exchange bias effect across the BiFeO{sub 3}/NiO interface at room temperature. A maximum exchange bias field of 123.5 Oe at 300 K for x = 50 after field cooling at 7 kOe has been observed. The exchange bias coupling causes an enhancement of coercivity up to 235 Oe at 300 K. The observed exchange bias effect originates from the exchange coupling between the surface uncompensated spins of BiFeO{sub 3} nanocrystals and NiO nanostructures.

  16. Exchange bias effect in composites of cuo nanoparticles and nanosilica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan Saha, Dhriti [MLS Professor' s Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kumar Nandi, Arun [Polymer Science Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chakravorty, Dipankar, E-mail: mlsdc@iacs.res.in [MLS Professor' s Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Nanodimensional silica based glass containing iron ions was prepared within the compressed pellet of CuO nanoparicles. The nanocomposite material showed exchange bias effect. This effect arose due to ferromagnetic iron doped CuO phase and antiferromagnetic CuO interface formation within the nanocomposite during the synthesis process. Coercive field as a function of temperature was fitted with Arhenius–Neel equation and extracted blocking temperature was 511 K. The value of effective anisotropy constant for the nanocomposite was found to be 3.64x10{sup 5} erg/cc. - Highlights: • Nanoglass comprising SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was grown with pores of CuO nanoparticle compacts. • CuO (AFM)-core and Fe doped CuO (FM) shell were formed during synthesis. • The nanocomposite material showed exchange bias effect.

  17. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, K. M.; Barquinha, P. M. C.; Martins, R. F. P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M. J.; Flewitt, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and analysed using the thermalization energy concept. The peak energy barrier to defect conversion is extracted to be 0.75 eV and the attempt-to-escape frequency is extracted to be 107 s-1. These values are in remarkable agreement with measurements in a-IGZO TFTs under negative gate bias illumination stress (NBIS) reported recently (Flewitt and Powell, J. Appl. Phys. 115, 134501 (2014)). This suggests that the same physical process is responsible for both PBS and NBIS, and supports the oxygen vacancy defect migration model that the authors have previously proposed.

  18. Contamination, potential bias and humidity effects on electrical performance and corrosion reliability of electronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the interactions between flux contamination, humidity and po-tential bias and their effect on corrosion reliability. Water layer formation on laminate surfaces and behavior of different solder flux chemistries with humid conditions have been studied, together with their influence on electrical performance of electronics. The effect of the type of laminate’s solder mask on the formation of water film and droplets was investigated for two different types: smooth glossy and ...

  19. Are Real Effects of Credit Supply Overestimated? Bias from Firms' Current Situation and Future Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Kleemann, Michael; Wiegand, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This paper advocates for incorporating timely measures of firms' current situation and future expectations when disentangling real effects of credit supply from demand-side factors. Identification of supply-side effects in firm-level analyses often relies on balance sheet variables to control for firm heterogeneity. While balance sheets mirror past business, bias from contemporaneous and forward-looking firm-side factors may persist.Using German firm-level survey data from 2003 to 2011, we sh...

  20. Cognitive biases in processing infant emotion by women with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder in pregnancy or after birth: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, R; Ayers, S

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal psychological problems such as post-natal depression are associated with poor mother-baby interaction, but the reason for this is not clear. One explanation is that mothers with negative mood have biased processing of infant emotion. This review aimed to synthesise research on processing of infant emotion by pregnant or post-natal women with anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Systematic searches were carried out on 11 electronic databases using terms relat...

  1. Prejudice and the Plate: Effects of Weight Bias in Nutrition Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldt, Jonathon P; Guillory, Jamie E; Gay, Geri K

    2016-01-01

    As millions of people turn to social media for health information, better understanding the factors that guide health-related judgments and perceptions in this context is imperative. We report on two Web experiments (n>400 total) examining the power of society's widespread weight bias and related stereotypes to influence nutrition judgments in social media spaces. In Experiment 1, meals were judged as lower in nutritional quality when the person who recommended them (the source) was depicted as obese rather than of normal weight, an effect mediated by stereotypic beliefs about the source as a generally unhealthy person. Experiment 2 replicated this effect, which--notably--remained significant when controlling for objective nutritional information (calories and fat content). Results highlight spillover effects of weight bias that extend beyond person perception to color impressions of objects (here, food) that are associated with stigmatized attributes. Implications for everyday nutrition judgments and public health are considered. PMID:26327139

  2. Food stress causes sex-specific maternal effects in mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Life history theory predicts that females should produce few large eggs under food stress and many small eggs when food is abundant. We tested this prediction in three female-biased size-dimorphic predatory mites feeding on herbivorous spider mite prey: Phytoseiulus persimilis, a specialized spider mite predator; Neoseiulus californicus, a generalist preferring spider mites; Amblyseius andersoni, a broad diet generalist. Irrespective of predator species and offspring sex, most females laid only one small egg under severe food stress. Irrespective of predator species, the number of female but not male eggs decreased with increasing maternal food stress. This sex-specific effect was probably due to the higher production costs of large female than small male eggs. The complexity of the response to the varying availability of spider mite prey correlated with the predators' degree of adaptation to this prey. Most A. andersoni females did not oviposit under severe food stress, whereas N. californicus and P. persimilis did oviposit. Under moderate food stress, only P. persimilis increased its investment per offspring, at the expense of egg number, and produced few large female eggs. When prey was abundant, P. persimilis decreased the female egg sizes at the expense of increased egg numbers, resulting in a sex-specific egg size/number trade-off. Maternal effects manifested only in N. californicus and P. persimilis. Small egg size correlated with the body size of daughters but not sons. Overall, our study provides a key example of sex-specific maternal effects, i.e. food stress during egg production more strongly affects the sex of the large than the small offspring.

  3. Food stress causes sex-specific maternal effects in mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Life history theory predicts that females should produce few large eggs under food stress and many small eggs when food is abundant. We tested this prediction in three female-biased size-dimorphic predatory mites feeding on herbivorous spider mite prey: Phytoseiulus persimilis, a specialized spider mite predator; Neoseiulus californicus, a generalist preferring spider mites; Amblyseius andersoni, a broad diet generalist. Irrespective of predator species and offspring sex, most females laid only one small egg under severe food stress. Irrespective of predator species, the number of female but not male eggs decreased with increasing maternal food stress. This sex-specific effect was probably due to the higher production costs of large female than small male eggs. The complexity of the response to the varying availability of spider mite prey correlated with the predators' degree of adaptation to this prey. Most A. andersoni females did not oviposit under severe food stress, whereas N. californicus and P. persimilis did oviposit. Under moderate food stress, only P. persimilis increased its investment per offspring, at the expense of egg number, and produced few large female eggs. When prey was abundant, P. persimilis decreased the female egg sizes at the expense of increased egg numbers, resulting in a sex-specific egg size/number trade-off. Maternal effects manifested only in N. californicus and P. persimilis. Small egg size correlated with the body size of daughters but not sons. Overall, our study provides a key example of sex-specific maternal effects, i.e. food stress during egg production more strongly affects the sex of the large than the small offspring. PMID:26089530

  4. Some general effects of strong high-frequency excitation: stiffening, biasing, and smoothening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical high-frequency (HF) excitation provides a working principle behind many industrial and natural applications and phenomena. This paper concerns three particular effects of HF excitation, that may change the apparent characteristics of mechanical systems: 1) stiffening, by which the appa......Mechanical high-frequency (HF) excitation provides a working principle behind many industrial and natural applications and phenomena. This paper concerns three particular effects of HF excitation, that may change the apparent characteristics of mechanical systems: 1) stiffening, by which...... the apparent linear stiffness associated with an equilibrium is changed, along with derived quantities such as stability and natural frequencies; 2) Biasing, by which the system is biased towards a particular state, static or dynamic, which does not exist or is unstable in the absence of the HF excitation...

  5. The continuous end-state comfort effect: weighted integration of multiple biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, Oliver; Butz, Martin V

    2012-05-01

    The grasp orientation when grasping an object is frequently aligned in anticipation of the intended rotation of the object (end-state comfort effect). We analyzed grasp orientation selection in a continuous task to determine the mechanisms underlying the end-state comfort effect. Participants had to grasp a box by a circular handle-which allowed for arbitrary grasp orientations-and then had to rotate the box by various angles. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed both that the rotation's direction considerably determined grasp orientations and that end-postures varied considerably. Experiments 3 and 4 further showed that visual stimuli and initial arm postures biased grasp orientations if the intended rotation could be easily achieved. The data show that end-state comfort but also other factors determine grasp orientation selection. A simple mechanism that integrates multiple weighted biases can account for the data. PMID:21499901

  6. Low-bias negative differential resistance effect in armchair graphene nanoribbon junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Suchun [Department of Physics, Center for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Gan, Chee Kwan [Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Son, Young-Woo [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Feng, Yuan Ping [Department of Physics, Center for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Quek, Su Ying, E-mail: phyqsy@nus.edu.sg [Department of Physics, Center for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2015-01-05

    Graphene nanoribbons with armchair edges (AGNRs) have bandgaps that can be flexibly tuned via the ribbon width. A junction made of a narrower AGNR sandwiched between two wider AGNR leads was recently reported to possess two perfect transmission channels close to the Fermi level. Here, we report that by using a bias voltage to drive these transmission channels into the gap of the wider AGNR lead, we can obtain a negative differential resistance (NDR) effect. Owing to the intrinsic properties of the AGNR junctions, the on-set bias reaches as low as ∼0.2 V and the valley current almost vanishes. We further show that such NDR effect is robust against details of the atomic structure of the junction, substrate, and whether the junction is made by etching or by hydrogenation.

  7. Gate/drain bias-induced degradation effects in TFTs fabricated in unhydrogenated SPC polycrystalline silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of the parameters of n-channel thin film transistors (TFTs) in unhydrogenated solid phase crystallized polysilicon films under gate and drain direct-current bias stresses was investigated. The density of states in these films was evaluated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and a larger density of localized states below the bottom of the conduction band was correlated with poorer electrical parameters. The TFT threshold voltage exhibited an initial negative shift attributed to hole trapping and turnaround to positive shift under VGS stress, attributed to electron trapping in the oxide and at stress-induced interface states, with logarithmic stressing time dependence. The subthreshold slope and the electron mobility also exhibited logarithmic degradation. Stress-induced trap creation at the interface and in the polysilicon active layer was inferred as the main cause of these shifts. When a VDS stress is combined with the VGS stress bias the Vth turnaround is suppressed and parameter degradation is enhanced, indicating an increase in stress-induced trap creation and electron trapping, in correlation with the increase of stressing current IDS

  8. Predicting the synergy of multiple stress effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liess, Matthias; Foit, Kaarina; Knillmann, Saskia; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Liess, Hans-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Toxicants and other, non-chemical environmental stressors contribute to the global biodiversity crisis. Examples include the loss of bees and the reduction of aquatic biodiversity. Although non-compliance with regulations might be contributing, the widespread existence of these impacts suggests that for example the current approach of pesticide risk assessment fails to protect biodiversity when multiple stressors concurrently affect organisms. To quantify such multiple stress effects, we analysed all applicable aquatic studies and found that the presence of environmental stressors increases individual sensitivity to toxicants (pesticides, trace metals) by a factor of up to 100. To predict this dependence, we developed the “Stress Addition Model” (SAM). With the SAM, we assume that each individual has a general stress capacity towards all types of specific stress that should not be exhausted. Experimental stress levels are transferred into general stress levels of the SAM using the stress-related mortality as a common link. These general stress levels of independent stressors are additive, with the sum determining the total stress exerted on a population. With this approach, we provide a tool that quantitatively predicts the highly synergistic direct effects of independent stressor combinations. PMID:27609131

  9. The quantum approach to human reasoning does explain the belief-bias effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vol, E D

    2013-01-01

    Based on the ideas of quantum physics and dual-process theory of human reasoning that takes into account two primary mechanisms of reasoning : 1) deductive rational thinking and 2) intuitive heuristic judgment, we proposed the "quantum" approach to practical human logic that allows one to specify the most distinctive peculiarities in activity of two reasoning systems mentioned above and in addition to describe phenomenologically well-established experimentally belief-bias effect.

  10. Observation of an atomic exchange bias effect in DyCo4 film

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Chen; Dieter Lott; Florin Radu; Fadi Choueikani; Edwige Otero; Philippe Ohresser

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental important and technologically widely employed exchange bias effect occurs in general in bilayers of magnetic thin films consisting of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers where the hard magnetization behavior of an antiferromagnetic thin film causes a shift in the magnetization curve of a soft ferromagnetic film. The minimization of the single magnetic grain size to increase the storage density and the subsequent demand for magnetic materials with very high magnetic anis...

  11. Effective population size does not predict codon usage bias in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Michael D; Dean, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Synonymous codons are not used at equal frequency throughout the genome, a phenomenon termed codon usage bias (CUB). It is often assumed that interspecific variation in the intensity of CUB is related to species differences in effective population sizes (N e), with selection on CUB operating less efficiently in species with small N e. Here, we specifically ask whether variation in N e predicts differences in CUB in mammals and report two main findings. First, across 41 mammalian genomes, CUB ...

  12. Alcohol Cue Exposure Effects on Craving and Attentional Bias in Underage College Student Drinkers

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Jason J.; Monti, Peter M.; Colwill, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of alcohol cue exposure on eliciting craving has been well documented and numerous theoretical models assert that craving is a clinically significant construct central to the motivation and maintenance of alcohol-seeking behavior. Furthermore, some theories propose a relationship between craving and attention, such that cue-induced increases in craving bias attention towards alcohol cues, which in turn perpetuates craving. This study examined the extent to which alcohol cues induce...

  13. Volunteer bias in sex research :effects of variable stimuli content and intrusiveness of measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, Mary Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies of volunteer bias in sex research found that volunteers for such studies differed from nonâ volunteers in terms of reporting increased heterosexual experience; more liberal attitudes toward sex; increased exposure to commercialized erotica; and an increase in sexual trauma. The object of this study was to investigate the effects that varying the stimuli content (i.e. heterosexual vs gay male vs lesbian) of films used in sexual arousal studies would have on volunteer rate an...

  14. Thermophysical Property Estimation by Transient Experiments: The Effect of a Biased Initial Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Scarpa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of thermophysical properties of materials in dynamic experiments can be conveniently performed by the inverse solution of the associated heat conduction problem (IHCP. The inverse technique demands the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution within the material. As only a limited number of temperature sensors (or no sensor at all are arranged inside the test specimen, the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution is affected by some uncertainty. This uncertainty, together with other possible sources of bias in the experimental procedure, will propagate in the estimation process and the accuracy of the reconstructed thermophysical property values could deteriorate. In this work the effect on the estimated thermophysical properties due to errors in the initial temperature distribution is investigated along with a practical method to quantify this effect. Furthermore, a technique for compensating this kind of bias is proposed. The method consists in including the initial temperature distribution among the unknown functions to be estimated. In this way the effect of the initial bias is removed and the accuracy of the identified thermophysical property values is highly improved.

  15. Enhanced effects of combined cognitive bias modification and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy on social anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Butler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether combined cognitive bias modification for interpretative biases (CBM-I and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (C-CBT can produce enhanced positive effects on interpretation biases and social anxiety. Forty socially anxious students were randomly assigned into two conditions, an intervention group (positive CBM-I + C-CBT or an active control (neutral CBM-I + C-CBT. At pre-test, participants completed measures of social anxiety, interpretative bias, cognitive distortions, and social and work adjustment. They were exposed to 6 × 30 min sessions of web-based interventions including three sessions of either positive or neutral CBM-I and three sessions of C-CBT, one session per day. At post-test and two-week follow-up, participants completed the baseline measures. A combined positive CBM-I + C-CBT produced less negative interpretations of ambiguous situations than neutral CBM-I + C-CBT. The results also showed that both positive CBM-I + C-CBT and neutral CBM-I + C-CBT reduced social anxiety and cognitive distortions as well as improving work and social adjustment. However, greater effect sizes were observed in the positive CBM-I + C-CBT condition than the control. This indicates that adding positive CBM-I to C-CBT enhanced the training effects on social anxiety, cognitive distortions, and social and work adjustment compared to the neutral CBM-I + C-CBT condition.

  16. Does attention redirection contribute to the effectiveness of attention bias modification on social anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nisha; Yu, Hongyu; Qian, Mingyi; Li, Songwei

    2015-12-01

    Attention bias modification (ABM) is designed to modify threat-related attention bias and thus alleviate anxiety. The current research examined whether consistently directing attention towards targeted goals per se contributes to ABM efficacy. We randomly assigned 68 non-clinical college students with elevated social anxiety to non-valence-specific attend-to-geometrics (AGC), attention modification (AMC), or attention control (ACC) conditions. We assessed subjective, behavioral, and physiological reactivity to a speech task and self-reported social anxiety symptoms. After training, participants in the AMC exhibited an attention avoidance from threat, and those in the AGC responded more rapidly toward targeted geometrics. There was a significant pre- to post-reduction in subjective speech distress across groups, but behavioral and physiological reactivity to speech, as well as self-report social anxiety symptoms, remained unchanged. These results lead to questions concerning effectiveness of ABM training for reducing social anxiety. Further examination of the current ABM protocol is required.

  17. The effects of impurity doping on the optical properties of biased bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Hamed; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    We address the optical conductivity of doped AA-stacked bilayer graphene in the presence of a finite bias voltage at finite temperature. The effect of scattering by dilute charged impurities is discussed in terms of the self-consistent Born approximation. Green's function approach has been implemented to find the behavior of optical conductivity of bilayer graphene within linear response theory. We have found the frequency dependence of optical conductivity for different values of concentration and scattering strength of dopant impurity. Also the dependence of optical conductivity on the impurity concentration and bias voltage has been investigated in details. A peak appears in the plot of optical conductivity versus impurity concentration for different values of chemical potential. Furthermore we find optical conductivity reduces with frequency for any impurity concentration and scattering strength.

  18. Observation of an atomic exchange bias effect in DyCo4 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Lott, Dieter; Radu, Florin; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental important and technologically widely employed exchange bias effect occurs in general in bilayers of magnetic thin films consisting of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers where the hard magnetization behavior of an antiferromagnetic thin film causes a shift in the magnetization curve of a soft ferromagnetic film. The minimization of the single magnetic grain size to increase the storage density and the subsequent demand for magnetic materials with very high magnetic anisotropy requires a system with high HEB. Here we report an extremely high HEB of 4 Tesla observed in a single amorphous DyCo4 film close to room temperature. The origin of the exchange bias can be associated with the variation of the magnetic behavior from the surface towards the bulk part of the film revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism techniques utilizing the bulk sensitive transmission and the surface sensitive total electron yield modes. The competition between the atomic exchange coupling in the single film and the Zeeman interaction lead to an intrinsic exchanged coupled system and the so far highest exchange bias effect HEB = 4 Tesla reported in a single film, which is accommodated by a partial domain wall formation.

  19. Syntactic flexibility and planning scope: The effect of verb bias on advance planning during sentence recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje evan de Velde

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In sentence production, grammatical advance planning scope depends on contextual factors (e.g., time pressure, linguistic factors (e.g., ease of structural processing, and cognitive factors (e.g., production speed. The present study tests the influence of the availability of multiple syntactic alternatives (i.e., syntactic flexibility on the scope of advance planning during the recall of Dutch dative phrases. We manipulated syntactic flexibility by using verbs with a strong bias or a weak bias towards one structural alternative in sentence frames accepting both verbs (e.g., strong/weak bias: De ober schotelt/serveert de klant de maaltijd [voor] 'The waiter dishes out/serves the customer the meal'. To assess lexical planning scope, we varied the frequency of the first post-verbal noun (N1, Experiment 1 or the second post-verbal noun (N2, Experiment 2. In each experiment, 36 speakers produced the verb phrases in a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP paradigm. On each trial, they read a sentence presented one word at a time, performed a short distractor task, and then saw a sentence preamble (e.g., De ober… which they had to complete to form the presented sentence. Onset latencies were compared using linear mixed effects models. N1 frequency did not produce any effects. N2 frequency only affected sentence onsets in the weak verb bias condition and especially in slow speakers. These findings highlight the dependency of planning scope during sentence recall on the grammatical properties of the verb and the frequency of post-verbal nouns. Implications for utterance planning in everyday speech are discussed.

  20. Comparison of composition and atomic structure of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistor before and after positive bias temperature stress by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis is performed on indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors to determine the crystal structure of the material. The relative elemental concentrations of indium, gallium, zinc and oxygen were quantified and analyzed using energy dispersive spectroscopy before and after subjection to positive gate bias temperature stress at 80 °C. Notable changes in the concentration of oxygen in the device channel were observed along with a reduced concentration of the elements indium, gallium and zinc after electrical stressing. We speculate this relative reduction in metal concentration could be attributed to the outdiffusion of metal ions from the channel region into the surrounding thermal oxide and the increase in the oxygen concentration in the stressed device is related to electric field assisted adsorption of oxygen from the ambient. (paper)

  1. Direct testing of the biasing effect of manipulations of endolymphatic pressure on cochlear mechanical function

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage, Eric; Avan, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The history of cochlear mechanical investigations has been carried out in two largely separate sets of endeavours; those interested in auditory processing in animal models and those interested in the origin of adverse vestibular symptoms in humans. In respect of the first, mechanical vibratory data is considered pathological and not representative of pristine behaviour if it departs from the reigning model of sharp tuning and high hearing sensitivity. Conversely, when the description of the pathological behaviour is the focus, fluid movements responsible for hearing loss and vestibular symptoms dominate. Yet both extensive sets of data possess a common factor now being reconsidered for its potential to shed light on the mechanisms in general. The common factor is a mechanical bias — the departure of cochlear epithelial membranes from their usual resting position. In both cases the bias modulates hearing sensitivity and distorts tuning characteristics. Indeed several early sets of guinea pig mechanical data were dismissed as "pathological" when in hindsight, the primary effect influencing the data was not loss of outer hair cell function per se, but a mechanical bias unknowingly introduced in process of making the measurement. Such biases in the displacement of the basilar membrane from its position are common, and may be caused by low-frequency sounds (topically including infrasound) or by variations in fluid volume in the chambers particularly applying the case of endolymphatic hydrops. Most biases are quantified in terms of visualisation of fluid volume change, electric potential changes and otoacoustic emissions. Notably many previous studies have also searched for raised pressures with negative results. Yet these repeated findings are contrary to the widespread notion that, at least when homeostasis is lost, it is a rise in endolymphatic pressure which is responsible for membrane rupture and Meniere's attacks. This current investigation in Mongolian gerbils

  2. Effect of sputtering pressure on residual stress in Ni films using energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for determining the residual stress in thin films using energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was investigated. The effect of the sputtering pressure on the residual stress in dc magnetron sputtered Ni films was studied in greater detail using this approach. The behavior reported suggested the possibility of controlling or influencing the sign and/or magnitude of the residual stress. In addition, the stress variation with increasing negative bias voltage is also presented. In the range studied, between -15 and -150 V, residual stress is always tensile

  3. Age and response bias: evidence from the strength-based mirror effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Amy H; Aue, William; Kılıç, Aslı

    2014-10-01

    Performance in episodic memory is determined both by accurate retrieval from memory and by decision processes. A substantial body of literature suggests slightly poorer episodic memory accuracy for older than younger adults; however, age-related changes in the decision mechanisms in memory have received much less attention. Response bias, the willingness to endorse an item as remembered, is an important decision factor that contributes to episodic memory performance, and therefore understanding age-related changes in response bias is critical to theoretical development. We manipulate list strength in order to investigate two aspects of response bias. First, we evaluate whether criterion placement in episodic memory differs for older and younger adults. Second, we ask whether older adults have the same degree of flexibility to adjust the criterion in response to task demands as younger adults. Participants were tested on weakly and strongly encoded lists where word frequency (Experiment 1) or similarity between targets and foils (Experiment 2) was manipulated. Both older and younger adults had higher hit rates and lower false-alarm rates for strong lists than for weak lists (i.e., a strength-based mirror effect). Older adults were more conservative (less likely to endorse an item as studied) than younger adults, and we found no evidence that older and younger adults differ in their ability to flexibly adjust their criterion based on the demands of the task. PMID:24386987

  4. Effects of doping and bias voltage on the screening in AAA-stacked trilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Yawar; Moradian, Rostam; Shirzadi Tabar, Farzad

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the static polarization of AAA-stacked trilayer graphene (TLG) and study its screening properties within the random phase approximation (RPA) in all undoped, doped and biased regimes. We find that the static polarization of undoped AAA-stacked TLG is a combination of the doped and undoped single-layer graphene static polarization. This leads to an enhancement of the dielectric background constant along a Thomas-Fermi screening with the Thomas-Fermi wave vector which is independent of carrier concentrations and a 1/r3 power law decay for the long-distance behavior of the screened Coulomb potential. We show that effects of a bias voltage can be taken into account by a renormalization of the interlayer hopping energy to a new bias-voltage-dependent value, indicating screening properties of AAA-stacked TLG can be tuned electrically. We also find that screening properties of doped AAA-stacked TLG, when μ exceeds √{2}γ, are similar to that of doped SLG only depending on doping. While for μ<√{2}γ, its screening properties are combination of SLG and AA-stacked bilayer graphene screening properties and they are determined by doping and the interlayer hopping energy.

  5. Effective population size does not predict codon usage bias in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michael D; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Synonymous codons are not used at equal frequency throughout the genome, a phenomenon termed codon usage bias (CUB). It is often assumed that interspecific variation in the intensity of CUB is related to species differences in effective population sizes (N e), with selection on CUB operating less efficiently in species with small N e. Here, we specifically ask whether variation in N e predicts differences in CUB in mammals and report two main findings. First, across 41 mammalian genomes, CUB was not correlated with two indirect proxies of N e (body mass and generation time), even though there was statistically significant evidence of selection shaping CUB across all species. Interestingly, autosomal genes showed higher codon usage bias compared to X-linked genes, and high-recombination genes showed higher codon usage bias compared to low recombination genes, suggesting intraspecific variation in N e predicts variation in CUB. Second, across six mammalian species with genetic estimates of N e (human, chimpanzee, rabbit, and three mouse species: Mus musculus, M. domesticus, and M. castaneus), N e and CUB were weakly and inconsistently correlated. At least in mammals, interspecific divergence in N e does not strongly predict variation in CUB. One hypothesis is that each species responds to a unique distribution of selection coefficients, confounding any straightforward link between N e and CUB. PMID:25505518

  6. Exchange bias effect in spin glass CoCr2O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changming; Tian, Zhaoming; Wang, Liguang; Yuan, Songliu

    2015-11-01

    CoCr2O4 nanoparticles are about 5.4 nm in diameter synthesized by a hydrothermal technique. Magnetization measurements reveal that the nanoparticles exhibit a spin glass behavior below glass transition temperature. Signature of memory effect is clear in reheating curve where the step-like shape increasing with the increase of temperature is recovered after cooling process. Magnetic relaxation is performed to prove memory effect. Ageing effect is also detected in CoCr2O4 nanoparticles to verify the spin glass behavior. As temperature decreases to 5 K, which is far below the glass transition temperature, exchange bias effect can be observed clearly accompanied with a shift in field-cooled hysteresis loop. As particle size decreases to 5.4 nm, spin glass behavior appears due to the increased spin disorder effect. The spin glass phase providing a pinning force from some frozen spins to the rotatable spins gives the key to explain the exchange bias effects.

  7. Effect of Nickel Concentration on Bias Reliability and Thermal Stability of Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated by Ni-Metal-Induced Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Hui; Sermon Wu, YewChung; Huang, Jung-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Ni-metal-induced crystallization (MIC) of amorphous Si (α-Si) has been employed to fabricate low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Although the high leakage current is a major issue in the performance of conventional MIC-TFTs since Ni contamination induces deep-level state traps, it can be greatly improved by using well-known technologies to reduce Ni contamination. However, for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display applications, the bias reliability and thermal stability are major concerns especially when devices are operated under a hot carrier condition and in a high-temperature environment. It will be interesting to determine how the bias reliability and thermal stability are affected by the reduction of Ni concentration. In the study, the effect of Ni concentration on bias reliability and thermal stability was investigated. We found that a device exhibited high immunity against hot-carrier stress and elevated temperatures. These findings demonstrated that reducing the Ni concentration in MIC films was also beneficial for bias reliability and thermal stability.

  8. Objects in Kepler's Mirror May be Larger Than They Appear: Bias and Selection Effects in Transiting Planet Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Gaidos, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Statistical analyses of large surveys for transiting planets such as the Kepler mission must account for systematic errors and biases. Transit detection depends not only on the planet's radius and orbital period, but also on host star properties. Thus, a sample of stars with transiting planets may not accurately represent the target population. Moreover, targets are selected using criteria such as a limiting apparent magnitude. These selection effects, combined with uncertainties in stellar radius, lead to biases in the properties of transiting planets and their host stars. We quantify possible biases in the Kepler survey. First, Eddington bias produced by a steep planet radius distribution and uncertainties in stellar radius results in a 15-20% overestimate of planet occurrence. Second, the magnitude limit of the Kepler target catalog induces Malmquist bias towards large, more luminous stars and underestimation of the radii of about one third of candidate planets, especially those larger than Neptune. Third,...

  9. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  10. The effect of thermal bias on the spin-state manipulation in a quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jia, E-mail: jialiu@imust.cn [School of Mathematics, Physics and Biological Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Key Laboratory of Integrated Exploitation of Bayan Obo Multi-Metal Resources IMUST, Baotou 014010 (China); Cheng, Jie; Wang, Song [School of Mathematics, Physics and Biological Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China)

    2014-10-01

    The control of the single electronic state in a quantum dot (QD) by magnetic field in the presence of thermal bias was investigated with a master equation method. Results show that the qubits for information processing can be realized by tuning the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field. In addition, the temperature difference between the source (S) and drain (D) leads, a thermal-spin effect, which is inevitable in practical devices, can also be counteracted with magnetic field. Our results have important implications for quantum information processing.

  11. Temperature effects in exchange-biased planar Hall sensors for bioapplications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Freitas, S.C.;

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of exchange biased planar Hall effect sensors is investigated between T = −10 and 70 °C. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well and that the temperature coefficient of the low-field sensitivity at T = 25 °C is 0.32%/°C. A procedure...... for temperature correction by use of a reference sensor is demonstrated. Consequences for magnetic biosensing are exemplified with calculations on M-280 Dynabeads®....

  12. Effect of Ta addition of co-sputtered amorphous tantalum indium zinc oxide thin film transistors with bias stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dae-Ho; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Park, Si-Nae; Sung, Shi-Joon; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we have fabricated thin film transistors (TFTs) using amorphous tantalum indium zinc oxide (a-TaInZnO) channels by the co-sputtering process. The effects of incorporating tantalum on the InZnO material were investigated using Hall-effect measurement results, and electrical characteristics. We also found that the carrier densities of thin films and the transistor on-off currents were greatly influenced by the composition of tantalum addition. Ta ions have strong affinity to oxygen and so suppress the formation of free electron carriers inthin films; they play an important role in enhancing the electrical characteristic due to their high oxygen bonding ability. The electrical characteristics of the optimized TFTs shows a field effect mobility of 3.67 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), a threshold voltage of 1.28 V, an on/off ratio of 1.1 x 10(8), and a subthreshold swing of 480 mV/dec. Under gate bias stress conditions, the TaInZnO TFTs showed lower shift in threshold voltage shifts. PMID:25958492

  13. Threading dislocation movement in AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors under high temperature reverse bias stressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasangka, W. A.; Syaranamual, G. J.; Made, R. I.; Thompson, C. V.; Gan, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations are known to be associated with both physical and electrical degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). We have observed threading dislocation movement toward the gate-edges in AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMT under high reverse bias stressing. Stressed devices have higher threading dislocation densities (i.e. ˜5 × 109/cm2) at the gate-edges, as compared to unstressed devices (i.e. ˜2.5 × 109/cm2). Dislocation movement correlates well with high tensile stress (˜1.6 GPa) at the gate-edges, as seen from inverse piezoelectric calculations and x-ray synchrotron diffraction residual stress measurements. Based on Peierls stress calculation, we believe that threading dislocations move via glide in / { 1 1 ¯ 00 } and / { 1 1 ¯ 01 } slip systems. This result illustrates the importance of threading dislocation mobility in controlling the reliability of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMTs.

  14. Threading dislocation movement in AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors under high temperature reverse bias stressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Sasangka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dislocations are known to be associated with both physical and electrical degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs. We have observed threading dislocation movement toward the gate-edges in AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMT under high reverse bias stressing. Stressed devices have higher threading dislocation densities (i.e. ∼5 × 109/cm2 at the gate-edges, as compared to unstressed devices (i.e. ∼2.5 × 109/cm2. Dislocation movement correlates well with high tensile stress (∼1.6 GPa at the gate-edges, as seen from inverse piezoelectric calculations and x-ray synchrotron diffraction residual stress measurements. Based on Peierls stress calculation, we believe that threading dislocations move via glide in 〈 11 2 ¯ 0 〉 / { 1 1 ¯ 00 } and 〈 11 2 ¯ 0 〉 / { 1 1 ¯ 01 } slip systems. This result illustrates the importance of threading dislocation mobility in controlling the reliability of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMTs.

  15. Judgement bias in goats (Capra hircus): investigating the effects of human grooming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Animal emotional states can be investigated by evaluating their impact on cognitive processes. In this study, we used a judgement bias paradigm to determine if short-term positive human-animal interaction (grooming) induced a positive affective state in goats. We tested two groups of goats and trained them to discriminate between a rewarded and a non-rewarded location over nine training days. During training, the experimental group (n = 9) was gently groomed by brushing their heads and backs for five min over 11 days (nine training days, plus two testing days, total time 55 min). During training, the control group (n = 10) did not experience any direct interaction with the experimenter, but was kept unconstrained next to him for the same period of time. After successful completion of the training, the responses (latency time) of the two groups to reach ambiguous locations situated between the two reference locations (i.e., rewarded/non-rewarded) were compared over two days of testing. There was not a positive bias effect after the animals had been groomed. In a second experiment, 10 goats were tested to investigate whether grooming induced changes in physiological activation (i.e., heart rate and heart rate variability). Heart rate increased when goats were groomed compared to the baseline condition, when the same goats did not receive any contact with the experimenter. Also, subjects did not move away from the experimenter, suggesting that the grooming was positively accepted. The very good care and the regular positive contacts that goats received from humans at the study site could potentially account for the results obtained. Good husbandry outcomes are influenced by animals’ perception of the events and this is based on current circumstances, past experiences and individual variables. Taking into account animals’ individual characteristics and identifying effective strategies to induce positive emotions could increase the understanding and reliability of

  16. Effects of sertraline, duloxetine, vortioxetine, and idazoxan in the rat affective bias test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Louise Konradsen; Haubro, Kia; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Affective biases seemingly play a crucial role for the onset and development of depression. Acute treatment with monoamine-based antidepressants positively influence emotional processing, and an early correction of biases likely results in repeated positive experiences that ultimately...

  17. Nonlinear cosmological consistency relations and effective matter stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' ' Enrico Fermi' ' , Piazza del Viminale 1, I-00184 Rome (Italy); Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Kunz, Martin, E-mail: guillermo.ballesteros@pd.infn.it, E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@unige.ch, E-mail: rajeev.jain@unige.ch, E-mail: martin.kunz@unige.ch [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, Quai E. Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland)

    2012-05-01

    We propose a fully nonlinear framework to construct consistency relations for testing generic cosmological scenarios using the evolution of large scale structure. It is based on the covariant approach in combination with a frame that is purely given by the metric, the normal frame. As an example, we apply this framework to the ΛCDM model, by extending the usual first order conditions on the metric potentials to second order, where the two potentials start to differ from each other. We argue that working in the normal frame is not only a practical choice but also helps with the physical interpretation of nonlinear dynamics. In this frame, effective pressures and anisotropic stresses appear at second order in perturbation theory, even for ''pressureless'' dust. We quantify their effect and compare them, for illustration, to the pressure of a generic clustering dark energy fluid and the anisotropic stress in the DGP model. Besides, we also discuss the effect of a mismatch of the potentials on the determination of galaxy bias.

  18. Social Anxiety-Linked Attention Bias to Threat Is Indirectly Related to Post-Event Processing Via Subjective Emotional Reactivity to Social Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çek, Demet; Sánchez, Alvaro; Timpano, Kiara R

    2016-05-01

    Attention bias to threat (e.g., disgust faces) is a cognitive vulnerability factor for social anxiety occurring in early stages of information processing. Few studies have investigated the relationship between social anxiety and attention biases, in conjunction with emotional and cognitive responses to a social stressor. Elucidating these links would shed light on maintenance factors of social anxiety and could help identify malleable treatment targets. This study examined the associations between social anxiety level, attention bias to disgust (AB-disgust), subjective emotional and physiological reactivity to a social stressor, and subsequent post-event processing (PEP). We tested a mediational model where social anxiety level indirectly predicted subsequent PEP via its association with AB-disgust and immediate subjective emotional reactivity to social stress. Fifty-five undergraduates (45% female) completed a passive viewing task. Eye movements were tracked during the presentation of social stimuli (e.g., disgust faces) and used to calculate AB-disgust. Next, participants gave an impromptu speech in front of a video camera and watched a neutral video, followed by the completion of a PEP measure. Although there was no association between AB-disgust and physiological reactivity to the stressor, AB-disgust was significantly associated with greater subjective emotional reactivity from baseline to the speech. Analyses supported a partial mediation model where AB-disgust and subjective emotional reactivity to a social stressor partially accounted for the link between social anxiety levels and PEP. PMID:27157031

  19. Defending or Challenging the Status Quo: Position Effects on Biased Intergroup Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma A. Bäck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The default ideological position is status quo maintaining, and challenging the status quo is associated with increased efforts and risks. Nonetheless, some people choose to challenge the status quo. Therefore, to challenge the status quo should imply a strong belief in one’s position as the correct one, and thus efforts may be undertaken to undermine the position of others. Study 1 (N = 311 showed that challengers undermined, by ascribing more externality and less rationality, the position of defenders to a larger extent than defenders did of challengers’ position. Studies 2 (N = 135 and 3 (N = 109 tested if these effects were driven by the implied minority status of the challenging position. Results revealed no effects of experimentally manipulated numerical status, but challengers were again more biased than defenders. Study 3 also revealed that challengers felt more negatively toward their opponents (possibly due to greater social identification with like-minded others, and these negative emotions in turn predicted biased attributions. Results are important as they add to the understanding of how intergroup conflict may arise, providing explanations for why challengers are less tolerant of others’ point of view.

  20. Biasing field effects on electronic properties in halogenated phenylene ethynylene oligomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper results from ab initio simulations of the electronic structure properties of a class of halogenated phenylene ethynylene oligomers (OPE) are presented. These molecular species are investigated because of their suitable properties for application as single-molecule switches in the future emerging molecular electronic devices. Combined Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory approach is applied to investigate the biasing field effects on the relevant electronic properties, such as potential energy of the ground states, potential barrier height, localization of frontier molecular orbitals and the HOMO-LUMO gap. Special attention is also paid on the effects of substitution of the hydrogen atoms in the central phenyl ene ring of basic OPE molecule with halogen atoms. The analyses of the obtained results undoubtedly show that the biasing field has a strong impact on the potential barrier height, transition probabilities and band gap. Halogenation of the central phenylene ring does not have such a strong influence on the aforementioned properties, but it could be a useful way for fine tuning of some of the properties, especially the potential barrier height, enabling control of the torsional stochastic switching, inherent for the studied species. (Author)

  1. The effect of deadtime and electronic transients on the predelay bias in neutron coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Goddard, Braden; Stewart, Scott

    2016-04-01

    In neutron coincidence counting using the shift register autocorrelation technique, a predelay is inserted before the opening of the (R+A)-gate. Operationally the purpose of the predelay is to ensure that the (R+A)- and A-gates have matched effectiveness, otherwise a bias will result when the difference between the gates is used to calculate the accidentals corrected net reals coincidence rate. The necessity for the predelay was established experimentally in the early practical development and deployment of the coincidence counting method. The choice of predelay for a given detection system is usually made experimentally, but even today long standing traditional values (e.g., 4.5 μs) are often used. This, at least in part, reflects the fact that a deep understanding of why a finite predelay setting is needed and how to control the underlying influences has not been fully worked out. In this paper we attempt to gain some insight into the problem. One aspect we consider is the slowing down, thermalization, and diffusion of neutrons in the detector moderator. The other is the influence of deadtime and electronic transients. These may be classified as non-ideal detector behaviors because they are not included in the conventional model used to interpret measurement data. From improved understanding of the effect of deadtime and electronic transients on the predelay bias in neutron coincidence counting, the performance of both future and current coincidence counters may be improved.

  2. Effect of biased feedback on motor imagery learning in BCI-teleoperation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam eAlimardani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feedback design is an important issue in motor imagery BCI systems. Regardless, to date it has not been reported how feedback presentation can optimize co-adaptation between a human brain and such systems. This paper assesses the effect of realistic visual feedback on users’ BC performance and motor imagery skills. We previously developed a tele-operation system for a pair of humanlike robotic hands and showed that BCI control of such hands along with first-person perspective visual feedback of movements can arouse a sense of embodiment in the operators. In the first stage of this study, we found that the intensity of this ownership illusion was associated with feedback presentation and subjects’ performance during BCI motion control. In the second stage, we probed the effect of positive and negative feedback bias on subjects’ BCI performance and motor imagery skills. Although the subject specific classifier, which was set up at the beginning of experiment, detected no significant change in the subjects’ online performance, evaluation of brain activity patterns revealed that subjects’ self-regulation of motor imagery features improved due to a positive bias of feedback and a possible occurrence of ownership illusion. Our findings suggest that in general training protocols for BCIs, manipulation of feedback can play an important role in the optimization of subjects’ motor imagery skills.

  3. Marijuana's acute effects on cognitive bias for affective and marijuana cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R; Kahler, Christopher W; Rohsenow, Damaris J; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S

    2015-10-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana's ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On 2 separate days, regular marijuana users (N = 89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and 2 experimental tasks: pleasantness rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the pleasantness rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources toward marijuana-specific and negatively valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels. PMID:26167716

  4. The generalizability of gender bias: Testing the effects of contextual, explicit, and implicit sexism on labor arbitration decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Erik J; Deason, Grace; Borgida, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Decades of social-psychological research show that gender bias can result from features of the social context and from individual-level psychological predispositions. Do these sources of bias impact legal decisions, which are frequently made by people subject to factors that have been proposed to reduce bias (training and accountability)? To answer the question, we examined the potential for 3 major social-psychological theories of gender bias (role-congruity theory, ambivalent sexism, and implicit bias) to predict outcomes of labor arbitration decisions. In the first study, undergraduate students and professional arbitrators made decisions about 2 mock arbitration cases in which the gender of the employee-grievants was experimentally manipulated. Student participants' decisions showed the predicted gender bias, whereas the decisions of experienced professionals did not. Individual-level attitudes did not predict the extent of the observed bias and accountability did not attenuate it. In the second study, arbitrators' explicit and implicit gender attitudes were significant predictors of their decisions in published cases. The laboratory and field results suggest that context, expertise, and implicit and explicit attitudes are relevant to legal decision-making, but that laboratory experiments alone may not fully capture the nature of their effect on legal professionals' decisions in real cases. PMID:26030450

  5. Acute Effects of Intoxication and Arousal on Approach/Avoidance Biases Toward Sexual Risk Stimuli in Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Jeffrey S; Maisto, Stephen A; Wray, Tyler B; Emery, Noah N

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the effects of alcohol intoxication and physiological arousal on cognitive biases toward erotic stimuli and condoms. Ninety-seven heterosexual men were randomized to 1 of 6 independent conditions in a 2 (high arousal or control) × 3 (alcohol target BAC = 0.08, placebo, or juice control) design and then completed a variant of the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). The AAT assessed reaction times toward approaching and avoiding erotic stimuli and condoms with a joystick. Consistent with hypotheses, the alcohol condition exhibited an approach bias toward erotic stimuli, whereas the control and placebo groups exhibited an approach bias toward condom stimuli. Similarly, the participants in the high arousal condition exhibited an approach bias toward erotic stimuli and the low arousal control condition exhibited an approach bias toward condoms. The results suggest that acute changes in intoxication and physiological arousal independently foster biased responding toward sexual stimuli and these biases are associated with sexual risk intentions. PMID:25808719

  6. Effects of long-term meditation practice on attentional biases towards emotional faces: An eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, S V; Korenyok, V V; Reva, N V; Tumyalis, A V; Loktev, K V; Aftanas, L I

    2015-01-01

    Attentional biases towards affective stimuli reflect an individual balance of appetitive and aversive motivational systems. Vigilance in relation to threatening information reflects emotional imbalance, associated with affective and somatic problems. It is known that meditation practice significantly improves control of attention, which is considered to be a tool for adaptive emotional regulation. In this regard, the main aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of meditation on attentional bias towards neutral and emotional facial expressions. Eyes were tracked while 21 healthy controls and 23 experienced meditators (all males) viewed displays consisting of four facial expressions (neutral, angry, fearful and happy) for 10 s. Measures of biases in initial orienting and maintenance of attention were assessed. No effects were found for initial orienting biases. Meditators spent significantly less time viewing angry and fearful faces than control subjects. Furthermore, meditators selectively attended to happy faces whereas control subjects showed attentional biases towards both angry and happy faces. In sum we can conclude that long-term meditation practice adaptively affects attentional biases towards motivationally significant stimuli and that these biases reflect positive mood and predominance of appetitive motivation. PMID:25109832

  7. The generalizability of gender bias: Testing the effects of contextual, explicit, and implicit sexism on labor arbitration decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Erik J; Deason, Grace; Borgida, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Decades of social-psychological research show that gender bias can result from features of the social context and from individual-level psychological predispositions. Do these sources of bias impact legal decisions, which are frequently made by people subject to factors that have been proposed to reduce bias (training and accountability)? To answer the question, we examined the potential for 3 major social-psychological theories of gender bias (role-congruity theory, ambivalent sexism, and implicit bias) to predict outcomes of labor arbitration decisions. In the first study, undergraduate students and professional arbitrators made decisions about 2 mock arbitration cases in which the gender of the employee-grievants was experimentally manipulated. Student participants' decisions showed the predicted gender bias, whereas the decisions of experienced professionals did not. Individual-level attitudes did not predict the extent of the observed bias and accountability did not attenuate it. In the second study, arbitrators' explicit and implicit gender attitudes were significant predictors of their decisions in published cases. The laboratory and field results suggest that context, expertise, and implicit and explicit attitudes are relevant to legal decision-making, but that laboratory experiments alone may not fully capture the nature of their effect on legal professionals' decisions in real cases.

  8. Determinants and Valuation Effects of the Home Bias in European Banks' Sovereign Debt Portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Horváth, Bálint; Huizinga, Harry; Ioannidou, Vasso

    2015-01-01

    We document that large European banks hold sovereign debt portfolios heavily biased toward domestic government debt. This bias is stronger if the sovereign is risky and shareholder rights are strong, as evidence of a risk-shifting explanation of the home bias. In addition, the bias is stronger if the sovereign is risky and the government has positive ownership in the bank, as evidence of a government pressure channel. The home bias is positively valued by the stock market, as reflected by a p...

  9. Mental Health on the Go: Effects of a Gamified Attention Bias Modification Mobile Application in Trait Anxious Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy A Dennis; O’Toole, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the use of mobile technology to deliver mental health services has grown in light of the economic and practical barriers to treatment. Yet, research on alternative delivery strategies that are more affordable, accessible, and engaging is in its infancy. Attention bias modification training (ABMT), has potential to reduce treatment barriers as a mobile intervention for stress and anxiety, but the degree to which ABMT can be embedded in a mobile gaming format and its potential for t...

  10. Just like a woman? Effects of gender-biased perceptions of friendship network brokerage on attributions and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, R. A.; Kilduff, M.

    2014-01-01

    Do women face bias in the social realm in which they are purported to excel? Across two different studies (one organizational and one comprising MBA teams), we examined whether the friendship networks around women tend to be systematically misperceived and whether there were effects of these misperceptions on the women themselves and their teammates. Thus, we investigated the possibility (hitherto neglected in the network literature) that biases in friendship networks are triggered not just b...

  11. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: The Mean Stress Effect in Metallic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study involved the utilization of the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) method to demonstrate the mean stress dependence of the thermoelastic constant. Titanium and nickel base alloys, commonly employed in aerospace gas turbines, were the materials of interest. The repeatability of the results was studied through a statistical analysis of the data. Although the mean stress dependence was well established, the ability to confidently quantify it was diminished by the experimental variations. If calibration of the thermoelastic response to mean stress can be successfully implemented, it is feasible to use the relationship to determine a structure's residual stress state.

  12. Effects of work stress and home stress on autonomic nervous function in Japanese male workers

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Eri; IWATA, Toyoto; Murata, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic imbalance is one of the important pathways through which psychological stress contributes to cardiovascular diseases/sudden death. Although previous studies have focused mainly on stress at work (work stress), the association between autonomic function and stress at home (home stress) is still poorly understood. The purpose was to clarify the effect of work/home stress on autonomic function in 1,809 Japanese male workers. We measured corrected QT (QTc) interval and QT index on the e...

  13. Effect of Bias Correction of Satellite-Rainfall Estimates on Runoff Simulations at the Source of the Upper Blue Nile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Habib

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerous evaluation studies indicated that satellite-rainfall products are contaminated with significant systematic and random errors. Therefore, such products may require refinement and correction before being used for hydrologic applications. In the present study, we explore a rainfall-runoff modeling application using the Climate Prediction Center-MORPHing (CMORPH satellite rainfall product. The study area is the Gilgel Abbay catchment situated at the source basin of the Upper Blue Nile basin in Ethiopia, Eastern Africa. Rain gauge networks in such area are typically sparse. We examine different bias correction schemes applied locally to the CMORPH product. These schemes vary in the degree to which spatial and temporal variability in the CMORPH bias fields are accounted for. Three schemes are tested: space and time-invariant, time-variant and spatially invariant, and space and time variant. Bias-corrected CMORPH products were used to calibrate and drive the Hydrologiska Byråns Vattenbalansavdelning (HBV rainfall-runoff model. Applying the space and time-fixed bias correction scheme resulted in slight improvement of the CMORPH-driven runoff simulations, but in some instances caused deterioration. Accounting for temporal variation in the bias reduced the rainfall bias by up to 50%. Additional improvements were observed when both the spatial and temporal variability in the bias was accounted for. The rainfall bias was found to have a pronounced effect on model calibration. The calibrated model parameters changed significantly when using rainfall input from gauges alone, uncorrected, and bias-corrected CMORPH estimates. Changes of up to 81% were obtained for model parameters controlling the stream flow volume.

  14. Effect of substrate bias in nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films with embedded nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kumar, Sushil; Ishpal,; Srivastava, A.K.; Chouksey, Abhilasha; Tripathi, R.K.; Basu, A. [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer a-C: N films having nanoparticles were deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc (FCJCA) technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of negative substrate bias on the properties of a-C: N films embedded with nanoparticles have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of a-C: N films deposited by FCJCA technique have been compared with ta-C: N films deposited by FCVA process. - Abstract: The properties of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C: N) films with embedded nanoparticles, deposited using a filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique, are reported. X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal an amorphous structure, but on closer examination the presence of clusters of nanocarbon single crystals with d-spacing close to diamond cubic-phase have also been identified. The effect of substrate bias on the microstructure, conductivity, activation energy, optical band gap, optical constants, residual stress, hardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, percentage elastic recovery and density of states of a-C: N films have been studied and the properties obtained are found to depend on the substrate bias.

  15. Experience of automation failures in training: effects on trust, automation bias, complacency and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Chavaillaz, Alain; Wastell, David

    2016-06-01

    This work examined the effects of operators' exposure to various types of automation failures in training. Forty-five participants were trained for 3.5 h on a simulated process control environment. During training, participants either experienced a fully reliable, automatic fault repair facility (i.e. faults detected and correctly diagnosed), a misdiagnosis-prone one (i.e. faults detected but not correctly diagnosed) or a miss-prone one (i.e. faults not detected). One week after training, participants were tested for 3 h, experiencing two types of automation failures (misdiagnosis, miss). The results showed that automation bias was very high when operators trained on miss-prone automation encountered a failure of the diagnostic system. Operator errors resulting from automation bias were much higher when automation misdiagnosed a fault than when it missed one. Differences in trust levels that were instilled by the different training experiences disappeared during the testing session. Practitioner Summary: The experience of automation failures during training has some consequences. A greater potential for operator errors may be expected when an automatic system failed to diagnose a fault than when it failed to detect one.

  16. Experience of automation failures in training: effects on trust, automation bias, complacency and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Chavaillaz, Alain; Wastell, David

    2016-06-01

    This work examined the effects of operators' exposure to various types of automation failures in training. Forty-five participants were trained for 3.5 h on a simulated process control environment. During training, participants either experienced a fully reliable, automatic fault repair facility (i.e. faults detected and correctly diagnosed), a misdiagnosis-prone one (i.e. faults detected but not correctly diagnosed) or a miss-prone one (i.e. faults not detected). One week after training, participants were tested for 3 h, experiencing two types of automation failures (misdiagnosis, miss). The results showed that automation bias was very high when operators trained on miss-prone automation encountered a failure of the diagnostic system. Operator errors resulting from automation bias were much higher when automation misdiagnosed a fault than when it missed one. Differences in trust levels that were instilled by the different training experiences disappeared during the testing session. Practitioner Summary: The experience of automation failures during training has some consequences. A greater potential for operator errors may be expected when an automatic system failed to diagnose a fault than when it failed to detect one. PMID:26374396

  17. Exchange bias effect in Fe films deposited on Si(100) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhong; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Takenaka, Masato; Akinaga, Hiro [Nanotechnology Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ofuchi, Hironori [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    The crystal structure and exchange bias effect in Fe films deposited on Si(100) substrates have been investigated. X-ray diffraction and fluorescence-extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements reveal that the as-deoposited Fe films are polycrystalline with a preferred (110) texture. In addition, we observe a shift in the magnetic hysteresis loop of Fe films deposited on Si(100) where there is existance of a thin oxidized layer. By comparison, for Fe film deposited on Si(100) lacking the oxidized layer, it does not exhibit any features of shift in the magnetic hysteresis loop. We postulate the effect results from a coupling between the ferromagnetic Fe film and the antiferromagnetic Fe oxide that forms spontaneously in the interface. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. The effects of social stress and cortisol responses on the preconscious selective attention to social threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Karin; Bakvis, Patricia; Hermans, Erno J; van Pelt, Johannes; van Honk, Jack

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of social stress and stress-induced cortisol on the preconscious selective attention to social threat. Twenty healthy participants were administered a masked emotional Stroop task (comparing color-naming latencies for angry, neutral and happy faces) in conditions of rest and social stress. Stress was induced by means of the Trier social stress test. Based on the stress-induced increase in cortisol levels, participants were allocated post hoc (median-split) to a high and low responders group. In contrast to low responders, high responders showed a negative or avoidant attentional bias to threat (i.e. shorter latencies for angry than neutral faces) in the rest condition. Most importantly, although low responders became avoidant, the high responders became vigilant to the angry faces after stress induction. There were no such effects for happy faces. Our findings are in line with previous studies in both animals and humans, that associate high glucocorticoid stress-responsiveness with diminished avoidance and prolonged freezing reactions during stress. PMID:17030399

  19. Greater physiological and behavioral effects of interrupted stress pattern compared to daily restraint stress in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Repeated stress can trigger a range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety. The propensity to develop abnormal behaviors after repeated stress is related to the severity, frequency and number of stressors. However, the pattern of stress exposure may contribute to the impact of stress. In addition, the anxiogenic nature of repeated stress exposure can be moderated by the degree of coping that occurs, and can be reflected in homotypic habituation to the repeated stress. However, expectations are not clear when a pattern of stress presentation is utilized that diminishes habituation. The purpose of these experiments is to test whether interrupted stress exposure decreases homotypic habituation and leads to greater effects on anxiety-like behavior in adult male rats. We found that repeated interrupted restraint stress resulted in less overall homotypic habituation compared to repeated daily restraint stress. This was demonstrated by greater production of fecal boli and greater corticosterone response to restraint. Furthermore, interrupted restraint stress resulted in a lower body weight and greater adrenal gland weight than daily restraint stress, and greater anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Control experiments demonstrated that these effects of the interrupted pattern could not be explained by differences in the total number of stress exposures, differences in the total number of days that the stress periods encompased, nor could it be explained as a result of only the stress exposures after an interruption from stress. These experiments demonstrate that the pattern of stress exposure is a significant determinant of the effects of repeated stress, and that interrupted stress exposure that decreases habituation can have larger effects than a greater number of daily stress exposures. Differences in the pattern of stress exposure are therefore an important factor to consider when predicting the severity of the effects of repeated

  20. Expectancy of Stress-Reducing Aromatherapy Effect and Performance on a Stress-Sensitive Cognitive Task

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Chamine; Oken, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Stress-reducing therapies help maintain cognitive performance during stress. Aromatherapy is popular for stress reduction, but its effectiveness and mechanism are unclear. This study examined stress-reducing effects of aromatherapy on cognitive function using the go/no-go (GNG) task performance and event related potentials (ERP) components sensitive to stress. The study also assessed the importance of expectancy in aromatherapy actions. Methods. 81 adults were randomized to 3 aroma...

  1. Increasing electric vehicle policy efficiency and effectiveness by reducing mainstream market bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) provide an opportunity for reducing energy use and emissions in the transportation sector. Currently, a number of federal policies are in place to incentivize deployment of PEVs to mainstream consumers with demographics and vehicle attribute preferences most common to today's new vehicle purchasers. This article argues that policies intending to give PEVs a foothold in the market should not focus on mainstream consumers and should instead focus on niche markets—specifically carsharing and postal fleets—and early adopters including green consumers. Two arguments can be made in support of eliminating the mainstream market bias of current policies toward a policy of cultivating niche markets. The first is efficiency: so far PEV policies featuring a mainstream market bias have proven to be inefficient and costly. The second is effectiveness: it is becoming increasingly evident that PEV policies would be more effective in achieving potential societal benefits if they focused on early adopters and niche markets using such approaches as strategic niche management, accessible loans and financing, and appropriately targeted incentives. PEV policies focused on early adopters and niche markets would create complementary system effects that will lead to increased PEV market penetration and realization of intended societal benefits. - Highlights: • We argue that U.S. electric vehicle policies are inefficient and ineffective. • We introduce “mainstream consumer bias” as an explanation for policy deficiencies. • We propose an alternative policy agenda to address some of these policy problems. • Proposed policy options include strategic niche management, targeted R and D and incentives, and loans

  2. Stress distribution and effective stress intensity factor of a blunt crack after dislocation emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱才富; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    2000-01-01

    The stress fields induced by a dislocation and its image dislocations around a narrow elliptic void are formulated. Based on the solution, the stress distribution and effective stress intensity factor of a blunt (elliptic) crack were calculated under mode I constant loading. The results show that a dislocation-free zone (DFZ) is formed after dislocation emission. There exists a second stress peak in the DFZ except a stress peak at the blunt crack tip. With an increase in the applied stress intensity factor Kla or the friction stress T, of the material, the DFZ size and the peak stress at the crack tip decrease, but the peak stress in the DFZ and the effective stress intensity factor Klf presiding at the crack tip increase. Because of dislocation shielding effects, shielding ratio Kla/Klf increases with increasing Kla, but it decreases with increasing Tf.

  3. Stress distribution and effective stress intensity factor of a blunt crack after dislocation emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The stress fields induced by a dislocation and its image dislocations around a narrow elliptic void are formulated. Based on the solution, the stress distribution and effective stress intensity factor of a blunt (elliptic) crack were calculated under mode I constant loading. The results show that a dislocation-free zone (DFZ) is formed after dislocation emission. There exists a second stress peak in the DFZ except a stress peak at the blunt crack tip. With an increase in the applied stress intensity factor KIa or the friction stress τf of the material, the DFZ size and the peak stress at the crack tip decrease, but the peak stress in the DFZ and the effective stress intensity factor KIf presiding at the crack tip increase. Because of dislocation shielding effects, shielding ratio KIa/KIf increases with increasing KIa}, but it decreases with increasing τf.

  4. Bootstrap Co-integration Rank Testing: The Effect of Bias-Correcting Parameter Estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaliere, Giuseppe; Taylor, A. M. Robert; Trenkler, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate bootstrap-based methods for bias-correcting the first-stage parameter estimates used in some recently developed bootstrap implementations of the co-integration rank tests of Johansen (1996). In order to do so we adapt the framework of Kilian (1998) which estimates the bias in the original parameter estimates using the average bias in the corresponding parameter esti- mates taken across a large number of auxiliary bootstrap replications. A number of possible imp...

  5. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.;

    2012-01-01

    and vice versa. However, as the effective stress working on the rock decreases with increased effective stress coefficient, the reduction of elastic region will have less effect on pore collapse strength if we consider the change in the effective stress coefficient. This finding will help estimate a more......, as this process could affect the grain contact cement. If this happens, the effective stress at the grain contacts in a reservoir will change according to the effective stress principle of Biot. In a p′-q space for failure analysis, we observed that a higher effective stress coefficient reduces the elastic region...

  6. Geometric effects on stress wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K L; Trim, M W; Horstemeyer, M F; Lee, N; Williams, L N; Liao, J; Rhee, H; Prabhu, R

    2014-02-01

    The present study, through finite element simulations, shows the geometric effects of a bioinspired solid on pressure and impulse mitigation for an elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material. Because of the bioinspired geometries, stress wave mitigation became apparent in a nonintuitive manner such that potential real-world applications in human protective gear designs are realizable. In nature, there are several toroidal designs that are employed for mitigating stress waves; examples include the hyoid bone on the back of a woodpecker's jaw that extends around the skull to its nose and a ram's horn. This study evaluates four different geometries with the same length and same initial cross-sectional diameter at the impact location in three-dimensional finite element analyses. The geometries in increasing complexity were the following: (1) a round cylinder, (2) a round cylinder that was tapered to a point, (3) a round cylinder that was spiraled in a two dimensional plane, and (4) a round cylinder that was tapered and spiraled in a two-dimensional plane. The results show that the tapered spiral geometry mitigated the greatest amount of pressure and impulse (approximately 98% mitigation) when compared to the cylinder regardless of material type (elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic) and regardless of input pressure signature. The specimen taper effectively mitigated the stress wave as a result of uniaxial deformational processes and an induced shear that arose from its geometry. Due to the decreasing cross-sectional area arising from the taper, the local uniaxial and shear stresses increased along the specimen length. The spiral induced even greater shear stresses that help mitigate the stress wave and also induced transverse displacements at the tip such that minimal wave reflections occurred. This phenomenon arose although only longitudinal waves were introduced as the initial boundary condition (BC). In nature, when shearing occurs within or between materials

  7. Stress effects in twisted highly birefringent fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    1994-03-01

    Hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial longitudinal strain effects in twisted highly birefringent optical fibers have been investigated from the point of the Marcuse mode-coupling theory. The problem is analyzed in terms of local normal modes of the ideal fiber and in the limit of weak twist, where large linear birefringence dominates over twist effect, and therefore twist coupling between local modes is not effective. The authors present the results of birefringence measurements in highly birefringent bow-tie fibers influenced simultaneously by hydrostatic pressure up to 100 MPa and twisting the result for highly birefringent elliptical-core fibers influenced by uniaxial longitudinal strain up to 4000 (mu) (epsilon) and twisting effect. The birefringence measurement method is based on twist-induced effects and has been successfully applied in a stress environment. The experiment was conducted with a specially designed stress generating device that makes it possible to simultaneously generate various mechanical perturbations such as hydrostatic and radial pressure, axial strain and twist, allowing study of their influence on mode propagation in optical fibers. A comparison with theoretical results as well as with pervious experimental data on stress influence on the beat length parameter in highly birefringent fibers is also provided.

  8. Stress Matters: Effects of Anticipated Lexical Stress on Silent Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Mara; Clifton, Charles, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from two eye-tracking studies designed to investigate the role of metrical prosody in silent reading. In Experiment 1, participants read stress-alternating noun-verb or noun-adjective homographs (e.g. "PREsent", "preSENT") embedded in limericks, such that the lexical stress of the homograph, as determined by context,…

  9. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strong...

  10. Studies on effect of stress preconditioning in restrain stress-induced behavioral alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajneet; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2010-02-01

    Stress preconditioning has been documented to confer on gastroprotective effects on stress-induced gastric ulcerations. However, the effects of prior exposure of stress preconditioning episodes on stress-induced behavioral changes have not been explored yet. Therefore the present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of stress preconditioning in immobilization stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats. The rats were subjected to restrain stress by placing in restrainer (5.5 cm in diameter and 18 cm in length) for 3.5 h. Stress preconditioning was induced by subjecting the rats to two cycles of restraint and restrain-free periods of 15 min each. Furthermore, a similar type of stress preconditioning was induced using different time cycles of 30 and 45 min. The extent and severity of the stress-induced behavioral alterations were assessed using different behavioral tests such as hole-board test, social interaction test, open field test, and actophotometer. Restrain stress resulted in decrease in locomotor activity, frequency of head dips and rearing in hole board, line crossing and rearing in open field, and decreased following and increased avoidance in social interaction test. Stress preconditioning with two cycles of 15, 30 or 45 min respectively, did not attenuate stress-induced behavioral changes to any extent. It may be concluded that stress preconditioning does not seem to confer any protective effect in modulating restrain stress-induced behavioral alterations.

  11. Stress Effects on Mood, HPA Axis, and Autonomic Response: Comparison of Three Psychosocial Stress Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Grace E.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Brunyé, Tad T.; Taylor, Holly A.; Kanarek, Robin B.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive experimental psychology research has attempted to parse the complex relationship between psychosocial stress, mood, cognitive performance, and physiological changes. To do so, it is necessary to have effective, validated methods to experimentally induce psychosocial stress. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is the most commonly used method of experimentally inducing psychosocial stress, but it is resource intensive. Less resource intense psychosocial stress tasks include the Socia...

  12. Bias, Accuracy, and Impact of Indirect Genetic Effects in Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz-Powell, Debby; Woolliams, J. A.; Bijma, P.; Pong-Wong, R.; Bermingham, M. L.; Doeschl-Wilson, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Selection for improved host response to infectious disease offers a desirable alternative to chemical treatment but has proven difficult in practice, due to low heritability estimates of disease traits. Disease data from field studies is often binary, indicating whether an individual has become infected or not following exposure to an infectious disease. Numerous studies have shown that from this data one can infer genetic variation in individuals’ underlying susceptibility. In a previous study, we showed that with an indirect genetic effect (IGE) model it is possible to capture some genetic variation in infectivity, if present, as well as in susceptibility. Infectivity is the propensity of transmitting infection upon contact with a susceptible individual. It is an important factor determining the severity of an epidemic. However, there are severe shortcomings with the Standard IGE models as they do not accommodate the dynamic nature of disease data. Here we adjust the Standard IGE model to (1) make expression of infectivity dependent on the individuals’ disease status (Case Model) and (2) to include timing of infection (Case-ordered Model). The models are evaluated by comparing impact of selection, bias, and accuracy of each model using simulated binary disease data. These were generated for populations with known variation in susceptibility and infectivity thus allowing comparisons between estimated and true breeding values. Overall the Case Model provided better estimates for host genetic susceptibility and infectivity compared to the Standard Model in terms of bias, impact, and accuracy. Furthermore, these estimates were strongly influenced by epidemiological characteristics. However, surprisingly, the Case-Ordered model performed considerably worse than the Standard and the Case Models, pointing toward limitations in incorporating disease dynamics into conventional variance component estimation methodology and software used in animal breeding. PMID

  13. When Biased Language Use Is Associated with Bullying and Dominance Behavior: The Moderating Effect of Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; DiGiovanni, Craig D.

    2010-01-01

    Biased language related to sexual orientation is used frequently among students and is related to prominent social concerns such as bullying. Prejudice toward gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals also has been examined among adolescents, but separately from these behaviors. This study tested whether biased language use was…

  14. Biased Allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Stuart J; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large group of integral membrane proteins that transduce extracellular signals from a wide range of agonists into targeted intracellular responses. Although the responses can vary depending on the category of G-proteins activated by a particular receptor, responses were also found to be triggered by interactions of the receptor with β-arrestins. It was subsequently discovered that for the same receptor molecule (e.g., the β-adrenergic receptor), some agonists have a propensity to specifically favor responses by G-proteins, others by β-arrestins, as has now been extensively studied. This feature of the GPCR system is known as biased agonism and is subject to various interpretations, including agonist-induced conformational change versus selective stabilization of preexisting active conformations. Here, we explore a complete allosteric framework for biased agonism based on alternative preexisting conformations that bind more strongly, but nonexclusively, either G-proteins or β-arrestins. The framework incorporates reciprocal effects among all interacting molecules. As a result, G-proteins and β-arrestins are in steric competition for binding to the cytoplasmic surface of either the G-protein-favoring or β-arrestin-favoring GPCR conformation. Moreover, through linkage relations, the strength of the interactions of G-proteins or β-arrestins with the corresponding active conformation potentiates the apparent affinity for the agonist, effectively equating these two proteins to allosteric modulators. The balance between response alternatives can also be influenced by the physiological concentrations of either G-proteins or β-arrestins, as well as by phosphorylation or interactions with positive or negative allosteric modulators. The nature of the interactions in the simulations presented suggests novel experimental tests to distinguish more fully among alternative mechanisms. PMID:27602718

  15. Proton radiation effect of NPN-input operational amplifier under different bias conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPN-input bipolar operational amplifiers LM741 were irradiated with 60Co γ-ray, 3 MeV protons and 10 MeV protons respectively at different biases to investigating the proton radiation response of the NPN-input operational amplifier. The comparison of protons with 60Co γ-rays showed that the proton radiation mainly induced ionization damage in LM741. Under different bias conditions, the radiation sensitivity is different; zero biased devices show more radiation sensitivity in the input biased current than forward biased devices. Supply current (±Icc) is another parameter that is sensitive to proton radiation, 60Co γ-ray, 3 MeV and 10 MeV proton irradiation would induce a different irradiation response in ±Icc, which is caused by different ionization energy deposition and displacement energy deposition of 60Co γ-ray, 3 MeV and 10 MeV proton irradiation. (paper)

  16. Stress Management Strategies for Students: The Immediate Effects of Yoga, Humor, and Reading on Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Denise; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Stiskal, Doreen; Simpkins, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Health science programs can be demanding and difficult for many students, leading to high levels of stress. High levels of stress can have a negative effect on students and subsequently the practicing clinician. Research suggests that yoga, humor, and reading are simple, effective methods to help reduce stress. To date no research…

  17. Effects of bias on dynamics of an AC-driven two-electron quantum-dot molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Min; Duan Su-Qing; Zhao Xian-Geng; Liu Cheng-Shi

    2005-01-01

    The effects of bias on the dynamical localization of two interacting electrons in a pair of coupled quantum dots driven by external AC fields have been numerically investigated. With an effective two-site model and Floquet formalism,the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is numerically solved and the Pmin, the minimum of the population evolution of the initial state within a certain time period, is used to quantify the degree of the dynamical localization. Results indicate that the bias can change the energy of the initial state and break the dynamical symmetry of the system with a pure AC field. And the amplitude of the AC field with dynamical localization phenomenon changes with bias. All the numerical results are explained by the perturbation theory and two-level approximation.

  18. Objects in Kepler's Mirror May be Larger Than They Appear: Bias and Selection Effects in Transiting Planet Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analyses of large surveys for transiting planets such as the Kepler mission must account for systematic errors and biases. Transit detection depends not only on the planet's radius and orbital period, but also on host star properties. Thus, a sample of stars with transiting planets may not accurately represent the target population. Moreover, targets are selected using criteria such as a limiting apparent magnitude. These selection effects, combined with uncertainties in stellar radius, lead to biases in the properties of transiting planets and their host stars. We quantify possible biases in the Kepler survey. First, Eddington bias produced by a steep planet radius distribution and uncertainties in stellar radius results in a 15%-20% overestimate of planet occurrence. Second, the magnitude limit of the Kepler target catalog induces Malmquist bias toward large, more luminous stars and underestimation of the radii of about one-third of candidate planets, especially those larger than Neptune. Third, because metal-poor stars are smaller, stars with detected planets will be very slightly (target average. Fourth, uncertainties in stellar radii produce correlated errors in planet radius and stellar irradiation. A previous finding, that highly irradiated giants are more likely to have "inflated" radii, remains significant, even accounting for this effect. In contrast, transit depth is negatively correlated with stellar metallicity even in the absence of any intrinsic correlation, and a previous claim of a negative correlation between giant planet transit depth and stellar metallicity is probably an artifact.

  19. A FIBER-BRIDGING MODEL WITH STRESS GRADIENT EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙毅; 李涛

    2000-01-01

    Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China)ABSTRACT: A fiber-bridging model with stress gradient effects is proposed for unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites. The stress gradient terms are introduced by solving a micromechanical model under a non-uniform stress loading. It is shown that the stress gradient effect is significant on both the fiber-bridging stress distribution and the value of the critical load of fiber failure.

  20. When Does Stress Help or Harm? The Effects of Stress Controllability and Subjective Stress Response on Stroop Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Roselinde Kaiser Henderson; Snyder, Hannah R.; Tina eGupta; Banich, Marie T

    2012-01-01

    The ability to engage in goal-directed behavior despite exposure to stress is critical to resilience. Questions of how stress can impair or improve behavioral functioning are important in diverse settings, from athletic competitions to academic testing. Previous research suggests that controllability is a key factor in the impact of stress on behavior: learning how to control stressors buffers people from the negative effects of stress on subsequent cognitively demanding tasks. In addition, r...

  1. Selection Bias, Vote Counting, and Money-Priming Effects: A Comment on Rohrer, Pashler, and Harris (2015) and Vohs (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    When a series of studies fails to replicate a well-documented effect, researchers might be tempted to use a “vote counting” approach to decide whether the effect is reliable—that is, simply comparing the number of successful and unsuccessful replications. Vohs’s (2015) response to the absence of money priming effects reported by Rohrer, Pashler, and Harris (2015) provides an example of this approach. Unfortunately, vote counting is a poor strategy to assess the reliability of psychological findings because it neglects the impact of selection bias and questionable research practices. In the present comment, we show that a range of meta-analytic tools indicate irregularities in the money priming literature discussed by Rohrer et al. and Vohs, which all point to the conclusion that these effects are distorted by selection bias, reporting biases, or p-hacking. This could help to explain why money-priming effects have proven unreliable in a number of direct replication attempts in which biases have been minimized through preregistration or transparent reporting. Our major conclusion is that the simple proportion of significant findings is a poor guide to the reliability of research and that preregistered replications are an essential means to assess the reliability of money-priming effects. PMID:27077759

  2. Selection bias, vote counting, and money-priming effects: A comment on Rohrer, Pashler, and Harris (2015) and Vohs (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Hardwicke, Tom E; Shanks, David R

    2016-05-01

    When a series of studies fails to replicate a well-documented effect, researchers might be tempted to use a "vote counting" approach to decide whether the effect is reliable-that is, simply comparing the number of successful and unsuccessful replications. Vohs's (2015) response to the absence of money priming effects reported by Rohrer, Pashler, and Harris (2015) provides an example of this approach. Unfortunately, vote counting is a poor strategy to assess the reliability of psychological findings because it neglects the impact of selection bias and questionable research practices. In the present comment, we show that a range of meta-analytic tools indicate irregularities in the money priming literature discussed by Rohrer et al. and Vohs, which all point to the conclusion that these effects are distorted by selection bias, reporting biases, or p-hacking. This could help to explain why money-priming effects have proven unreliable in a number of direct replication attempts in which biases have been minimized through preregistration or transparent reporting. Our major conclusion is that the simple proportion of significant findings is a poor guide to the reliability of research and that preregistered replications are an essential means to assess the reliability of money-priming effects.

  3. Selection bias, vote counting, and money-priming effects: A comment on Rohrer, Pashler, and Harris (2015) and Vohs (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Hardwicke, Tom E; Shanks, David R

    2016-05-01

    When a series of studies fails to replicate a well-documented effect, researchers might be tempted to use a "vote counting" approach to decide whether the effect is reliable-that is, simply comparing the number of successful and unsuccessful replications. Vohs's (2015) response to the absence of money priming effects reported by Rohrer, Pashler, and Harris (2015) provides an example of this approach. Unfortunately, vote counting is a poor strategy to assess the reliability of psychological findings because it neglects the impact of selection bias and questionable research practices. In the present comment, we show that a range of meta-analytic tools indicate irregularities in the money priming literature discussed by Rohrer et al. and Vohs, which all point to the conclusion that these effects are distorted by selection bias, reporting biases, or p-hacking. This could help to explain why money-priming effects have proven unreliable in a number of direct replication attempts in which biases have been minimized through preregistration or transparent reporting. Our major conclusion is that the simple proportion of significant findings is a poor guide to the reliability of research and that preregistered replications are an essential means to assess the reliability of money-priming effects. PMID:27077759

  4. Tunnel design considering stress release effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Van-hung DAO

    2009-01-01

    In tunnel design,the determination of installation time and the stiffness of supporting structures is very important to the tunnel stability.This study used the convergence-confinement method to determine the stress and displacement of the tunnel while considering the counter-pressure curve of the ground base,the stress release effect,and the interaction between the tunnel lining and the rock surrounding the tunnel chamber.The results allowed for the determination of the installation time,distribution and strength of supporting structures.This method was applied to the intake tunnel in the Ban Ve Hydroelectric Power Plant,in Nghe An Province,Vietnam.The results show that when a suitable displacement u0 ranging from 0.0865 m to 0.0919 m occurrs,we can install supporting structures that satisfy the stability and economical requirements.

  5. Judging the implications of a concession: Conversational distance and belief bias effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Robert B; Sierra, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    An arguer's position at a given point in an argument can be characterized as a set of commitments. The present study considers the perceptions of ordinary language users about the implications of making a concession for the contents of the conceder's commitment set. In particular, we examine two sources of influence on such lay perceptions-conversational distance (i.e., the number of turns separating the concession from commitments incurred earlier in the argument) and an individual's prior beliefs regarding the content of the argument. Across two studies, college students were administered an argument task assessing the extent to which a concession by the protagonist of an argument on the last move indicated changes to other commitments incurred earlier in the argument. Results indicated that participants were more likely to judge a concession as indicating a change in prior commitments if (a) the commitment was incurred later in the argument than earlier, and (b) the participant disagreed with the protagonists' thesis in the argument. In addition, performance on deductive reasoning tasks predicted individual differences in the conversational distance effect, but not the belief bias effect. PMID:26183024

  6. Quantum Hall effect and semiconductor-to-semimetal transition in biased black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shengjun; van Veen, Edo; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Roldán, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum Hall effect of two-dimensional electron gas in black phosphorus in the presence of perpendicular electric and magnetic fields. In the absence of a bias voltage, the external magnetic field leads to a quantization of the energy spectrum into equidistant Landau levels, with different cyclotron frequencies for the electron and hole bands. The applied voltage reduces the band gap, and eventually a semiconductor-to-semimetal transition takes place. This nontrivial phase is characterized by the emergence of a pair of Dirac points in the spectrum. As a consequence, the Landau levels are not equidistant anymore but follow the ɛn∝√{n B } characteristic of Dirac crystals as graphene. By using the Kubo-Bastin formula in the context of the kernel polynomial method, we compute the Hall conductivity of the system. We obtain a σx y∝2 n quantization of the Hall conductivity in the gapped phase (standard quantum Hall effect regime) and a σx y∝4 (n +1 /2 ) quantization in the semimetallic phase, characteristic of Dirac systems with nontrivial topology.

  7. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, A.; Vermijs, G.; Solignac, A.; Koo, J.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-03-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  8. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, A; Vermijs, G; Solignac, A; Koo, J; Kohlhepp, J T; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface. PMID:26940861

  9. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, L.; Joels, M.; Roozendaal, B.; Wolf, O.T.; Oitzl, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may affect learning and memory processes. Less clear is the exact nature of these stress effects on memory: both enhancing and impairing effects have been reported. These opposite effects may be explained if the different time courses of stress hormone, in

  10. Stress effects on memory : An update and integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, Lars; Joels, Marian; Roozendaal, Benno; Wolf, Oliver T.; Oitzl, Melly S.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may affect learning and memory processes. Less clear is the exact nature of these stress effects on memory: both enhancing and impairing effects have been reported. These opposite effects may be explained if the different time courses of stress hormone, in

  11. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  12. Substrate bias effects on collector resistance in SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors on thin film silicon-on-insulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiao-Bo; Zhang He-Ming; Hu Hui-Yong; Qu Jiang-Tao

    2011-01-01

    An analytical expression for the collector resistance of a novel vertical SiGe heteroj unction bipolar transistor (HBT)on thin film silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is obtained with the substrate bias effects being considered. The resistance is found to decrease slowly and then quickly and to have kinks with the increase of the substrate-collector bias, which is quite different from that of a conventional bulk HBT. The model is consistent with the simulation result and the reported data and is useful to the frequency characteristic design of 0.13 μm millimeter-wave SiGe SOI BiCMOS devices.

  13. Reversible and irreversible temperature-induced changes in exchange-biased planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, G.; Lundtoft, N.C.; Østerberg, F.W.;

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes of planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors upon exposure to temperatures between 25° C and 90°C. From analyses of the sensor response vs. magnetic fields we extract the exchange bias field Hex, the uniaxial anisotropy field HK and the anisotropic...... magnetoresistance (AMR) of the exchange biased thin film at a given temperature and by comparing measurements carried out at elevated temperatures T with measurements carried out at 25° C after exposure to T, we can separate the reversible from the irreversible changes of the sensor. The results are not only...... relevant for sensor applications but also demonstrate the method as a useful tool for characterizing exchange-biased thin films....

  14. The role of attentional bias in the effect of food advertising on actual food intake among children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Folkvord; D.J. Anschütz; R.W. Wiers; M. Buijzen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the potential moderating role of attentional bias (i.e., gaze duration, number of fixations, latency of initial fixation) in the effect of advergames promoting energy-dense snacks on children's snack intake. A randomized between-subject design was conducted with 92 children who p

  15. The Evaluation of Bias of the Weighted Random Effects Model Estimators. Research Report. ETS RR-11-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yue; Stokes, Lynne; Harris, Ian; Wang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of parameters of random effects models from samples collected via complex multistage designs is considered. One way to reduce estimation bias due to unequal probabilities of selection is to incorporate sampling weights. Many researchers have been proposed various weighting methods (Korn, & Graubard, 2003; Pfeffermann, Skinner, Holmes,…

  16. Empirical evidence of bias in treatment effect estimates in controlled trials with different interventions and outcomes: meta-epidemiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, L.; Egger, M.; Gluud, L.L.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the association of inadequate or unclear allocation concealment and lack of blinding with biased estimates of intervention effects varies with the nature of the intervention or outcome. DESIGN: Combined analysis of data from three meta-epidemiological studies based o...

  17. Measuring treatment and scale bias effects by linear regression in the analysis of OHI-S scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B J

    1977-05-01

    A linear regression model is presented for estimating unbiased treatment effects from OHI-S scores. An example is given to illustrate an analysis and to compare results of an unbiased regression estimator with those based on a biased simple difference estimator.

  18. An Exploration Based Cognitive Bias Test for Mice: Effects of Handling Method and Stereotypic Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Janja; Jeremy D Bailoo; Melotti, Luca; Rommen, Jonas; Würbel, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural tests to assess affective states are widely used in human research and have recently been extended to animals. These tests assume that affective state influences cognitive processing, and that animals in a negative affective state interpret ambiguous information as expecting a negative outcome (displaying a negative cognitive bias). Most of these tests however, require long discrimination training. The aim of the study was to validate an exploration based cognitive bias test, usin...

  19. The skill bias effect of technological and organisational change : evidence and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Piva, Mariacristina; Santarelli, Enrico; Vivarelli, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Previous empirical literature has shown that technological change can be considered the main cause of the skill bias (increase in the number of high skilled workers) exhibited by manufacturing employment in developed countries over the last decades. However, recent papers have also introduced the "Skill Biased Organisational Change" hypothesis. We estimate a SUR model for a sample of 400 Italian manufacturing firms, showing that the upskilling is more a function of the reorganisational strate...

  20. The Skill Bias Effect of Technological and Organisational Change: Evidenceand Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Piva, M.; E. Santarelli; M. Vivarelli

    2003-01-01

    Previous empirical literature has shown that technological change can be considered the main cause of the skill bias (increase in the number of high skilled workers) exhibited by manufacturing employment in developed countries over the last decades. However, recent papers have also introduced the “Skill Biased Organisational Change” hypothesis. We estimate a SUR model for a sample of 400 Italian manufacturing firms, showing that the upskilling is more a function of the reorganisational strate...

  1. Internal and External Attentional Biases in Social Anxiety: The Effect of Effortful Control

    OpenAIRE

    Whitmore, Maria J

    2006-01-01

    Two cognitive processes have been proposed to play a role in social anxiety: self-focused attention and threat perception bias. Mansell, Clark, and Ehlers (2003) devised a novel dot-probe paradigm to simultaneously measure on-line attention to internal and external events among socially anxious adults. Their results indicated that high speech anxious individuals show an internal attention bias specific to a social threat condition. They did not find any differences between groups in a no-...

  2. CONSUMER VALUATION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS AND THE EFFECT OF INFORMATION BIAS

    OpenAIRE

    Vanwechel, Tamara; Wachenheim, Cheryl J.; Schuck, Eric C.; Lambert, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Bid prices were elicited for standard-label cookies, muffins, and potato chips and those identified as not including genetically modified (GM) ingredients using an experimental auction. Including a statement that the product did not include GM ingredients increased bids over those offered for standard-label products. Providing negative-biased information about the impact of GM crops on the environment increased the risk participants associated with GM foods, and positive-biased information de...

  3. The effect of cathode bias (field effect) on the surface leakage current of CdZnTe detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Chen, C.M.H.; Cook, W.R.;

    2003-01-01

    Surface resistivity is an important parameter of multi-electrode CZT detectors such as coplanar-grid, strip, or pixel detectors. Low surface resistivity results in a high leakage current and affects the charge collection efficiency in the areas near contacts. Thus, it is always desirable to have...... the surface resistivity of the detector as high as possible. In the past the most significant efforts were concentrated to develop passivation techniques for CZT detectors. However, as we found, the field-effect caused by a bias applied on the cathode can significantly reduce the surface resistivity even...... though the detector surface was carefully passivated. In this paper we illustrate that the field-effect is a common feature of the CZT multi-electrode detectors, and discuss how to take advantage of this effect to improve the surface resistivity of CZT detectors....

  4. Effect of percent non-detects on estimation bias in censored distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Lennox, W. C.; Panu, U. S.

    2004-09-01

    Uniqueness of the problem surrounding non-detects has been a concern alike to researchers and statisticians dealing with summary statistics while analyzing censored data. To incorporate non-detects in the estimation process, a simple substitution by the MDL (method detection limit) and the maximum likelihood estimation method are routinely implemented as standard methods by US-EPA laboratories. In situations where numerical standards are set at or near the MDL by regulatory agencies, it is prudent and important to closely investigate both the variability in test measurements and the estimation bias, because an inference based on biased estimates could entail significant liabilities. Variability is understood to be not only inevitable but also an inherent and integral part of any chemical analysis or test. In situations where regulatory agencies fail to account for the inherently present variability of test measurements, there is a need for regulated facilities to seek remedial action merely as a consequence of inadequate statistical procedure. This paper utilizes a mathematical approach to derive the bias functions and resulting bias curves are developed to investigate the censored samples from a variety of probability distributions such as normal, log-normal, gamma, and Gumbel distributions. Finally, the bias functions and bias curves are also compared to the results obtained by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Estimating the effect of nonresponse bias in a survey of hospital organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily F; Hardy, Maryann; Snaith, Beverly

    2013-09-01

    Nonresponse bias in survey research can result in misleading or inaccurate findings and assessment of nonresponse bias is advocated to determine response sample representativeness. Four methods of assessing nonresponse bias (analysis of known characteristics of a population, subsampling of nonresponders, wave analysis, and linear extrapolation) were applied to the results of a postal survey of U.K. hospital organizations. The purpose was to establish whether validated methods for assessing nonresponse bias at the individual level can be successfully applied to an organizational level survey. The aim of the initial survey was to investigate trends in the implementation of radiographer abnormality detection schemes, and a response rate of 63.7% (325/510) was achieved. This study identified conflicting trends in the outcomes of analysis of nonresponse bias between the different methods applied and we were unable to validate the continuum of resistance theory as applied to organizational survey data. Further work is required to ensure established nonresponse bias analysis approaches can be successfully applied to organizational survey data. Until then, it is suggested that a combination of methods should be used to enhance the rigor of survey analysis. PMID:23908382

  6. The effect of bias voltage on the morphology and wettability of plasma deposited titanium oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yan; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    Hydrophobic and hydrophilic films with titanium oxide inside were grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF--PECVD) on glass substrates. Bias voltage was used as an assistant for the deposition process. And a comparison was made between with and without the bias voltage. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP-Ti (OC 3H 7) 4) was used as the precursor compound. Film wettability was tested by water contact angle measurement (CAM). The water contact angle (WAC) of the film deposited in plasma without biased voltage was greater than 145°, while the WAC of the film deposited in plasma with biased voltage was less than 30°. The morphology of the deposited films was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that the films grown without bias voltage were covered with lots of nano grain and pores, but the surface of the films deposition with bias voltage was much dense. The chemical structure and property of the deposited films were analyzed by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while the plasma phase was investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES).

  7. Sex-specific effects of a parasite evolving in a female-biased host population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duneau David

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Males and females differ in many ways and might present different opportunities and challenges to their parasites. In the same way that parasites adapt to the most common host type, they may adapt to the characteristics of the host sex they encounter most often. To explore this hypothesis, we characterized host sex-specific effects of the parasite Pasteuria ramosa, a bacterium evolving in naturally, strongly, female-biased populations of its host Daphnia magna. Results We show that the parasite proliferates more successfully in female hosts than in male hosts, even though males and females are genetically identical. In addition, when exposure occurred when hosts expressed a sexual dimorphism, females were more infected. In both host sexes, the parasite causes a similar reduction in longevity and leads to some level of castration. However, only in females does parasite-induced castration result in the gigantism that increases the carrying capacity for the proliferating parasite. Conclusions We show that mature male and female Daphnia represent different environments and reveal one parasite-induced symptom (host castration, which leads to increased carrying capacity for parasite proliferation in female but not male hosts. We propose that parasite induced host castration is a property of parasites that evolved as an adaptation to specifically exploit female hosts.

  8. Height bias and scale effect induced by antenna gravitational deformations in geodetic VLBI data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravitational deformations on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models in geodetic VLBI data analysis, estimates of the antenna reference point positions are shifted upward by 8.9 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To simulate the impact of antenna gravitational deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects of the simulations are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3, 73] mm and a net scale increase of 0.3-0.8 ppb. The height bias is larger than random errors of VLBI position estimates, implying the possibility of significant scale distortions related to antenna gravitational deformations. This demonstrates the need to precisely measure gravitational deformations of other VLBI telescopes, to derive their precise SPV models and to apply them in routine geodetic data analysis.

  9. Predicting bee community responses to land-use changes: Effects of geographic and taxonomic biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Adriana; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Aizen, Marcelo A.; Albrecht, Matthias; Basset, Yves; Bates, Adam; Blake, Robin J.; Boutin, Céline; Bugter, Rob; Connop, Stuart; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Cunningham, Saul A.; Darvill, Ben; Diekötter, Tim; Dorn, Silvia; Downing, Nicola; Entling, Martin H.; Farwig, Nina; Felicioli, Antonio; Fonte, Steven J.; Fowler, Robert; Franzén, Markus; Goulson, Dave; Grass, Ingo; Hanley, Mick E.; Hendrix, Stephen D.; Herrmann, Farina; Herzog, Felix; Holzschuh, Andrea; Jauker, Birgit; Kessler, Michael; Knight, M. E.; Kruess, Andreas; Lavelle, Patrick; Le Féon, Violette; Lentini, Pia; Malone, Louise A.; Marshall, Jon; Pachón, Eliana Martínez; McFrederick, Quinn S.; Morales, Carolina L.; Mudri-Stojnic, Sonja; Nates-Parra, Guiomar; Nilsson, Sven G.; Öckinger, Erik; Osgathorpe, Lynne; Parra-H, Alejandro; Peres, Carlos A.; Persson, Anna S.; Petanidou, Theodora; Poveda, Katja; Power, Eileen F.; Quaranta, Marino; Quintero, Carolina; Rader, Romina; Richards, Miriam H.; Roulston, T’ai; Rousseau, Laurent; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Samnegård, Ulrika; Schellhorn, Nancy A.; Schüepp, Christof; Schweiger, Oliver; Smith-Pardo, Allan H.; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stout, Jane C.; Tonietto, Rebecca K.; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M.; Verboven, Hans A. F.; Vergara, Carlos H.; Verhulst, Jort; Westphal, Catrin; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Purvis, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentative; most data are from North America and Western Europe, overrepresenting bumblebees and raising concerns that model results may not be generalizable to other regions and taxa. To assess whether the geographic and taxonomic biases of data could undermine effectiveness of models for conservation policy, we have collated from the published literature a global dataset of bee diversity at sites facing land-use change and intensification, and assess whether bee responses to these pressures vary across 11 regions (Western, Northern, Eastern and Southern Europe; North, Central and South America; Australia and New Zealand; South East Asia; Middle and Southern Africa) and between bumblebees and other bees. Our analyses highlight strong regionally-based responses of total abundance, species richness and Simpson's diversity to land use, caused by variation in the sensitivity of species and potentially in the nature of threats. These results suggest that global extrapolation of models based on geographically and taxonomically restricted data may underestimate the true uncertainty, increasing the risk of ecological surprises. PMID:27509831

  10. Predicting bee community responses to land-use changes: Effects of geographic and taxonomic biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Adriana; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Aizen, Marcelo A; Albrecht, Matthias; Basset, Yves; Bates, Adam; Blake, Robin J; Boutin, Céline; Bugter, Rob; Connop, Stuart; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Cunningham, Saul A; Darvill, Ben; Diekötter, Tim; Dorn, Silvia; Downing, Nicola; Entling, Martin H; Farwig, Nina; Felicioli, Antonio; Fonte, Steven J; Fowler, Robert; Franzén, Markus; Goulson, Dave; Grass, Ingo; Hanley, Mick E; Hendrix, Stephen D; Herrmann, Farina; Herzog, Felix; Holzschuh, Andrea; Jauker, Birgit; Kessler, Michael; Knight, M E; Kruess, Andreas; Lavelle, Patrick; Le Féon, Violette; Lentini, Pia; Malone, Louise A; Marshall, Jon; Pachón, Eliana Martínez; McFrederick, Quinn S; Morales, Carolina L; Mudri-Stojnic, Sonja; Nates-Parra, Guiomar; Nilsson, Sven G; Öckinger, Erik; Osgathorpe, Lynne; Parra-H, Alejandro; Peres, Carlos A; Persson, Anna S; Petanidou, Theodora; Poveda, Katja; Power, Eileen F; Quaranta, Marino; Quintero, Carolina; Rader, Romina; Richards, Miriam H; Roulston, T'ai; Rousseau, Laurent; Sadler, Jonathan P; Samnegård, Ulrika; Schellhorn, Nancy A; Schüepp, Christof; Schweiger, Oliver; Smith-Pardo, Allan H; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stout, Jane C; Tonietto, Rebecca K; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M; Verboven, Hans A F; Vergara, Carlos H; Verhulst, Jort; Westphal, Catrin; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Purvis, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentative; most data are from North America and Western Europe, overrepresenting bumblebees and raising concerns that model results may not be generalizable to other regions and taxa. To assess whether the geographic and taxonomic biases of data could undermine effectiveness of models for conservation policy, we have collated from the published literature a global dataset of bee diversity at sites facing land-use change and intensification, and assess whether bee responses to these pressures vary across 11 regions (Western, Northern, Eastern and Southern Europe; North, Central and South America; Australia and New Zealand; South East Asia; Middle and Southern Africa) and between bumblebees and other bees. Our analyses highlight strong regionally-based responses of total abundance, species richness and Simpson's diversity to land use, caused by variation in the sensitivity of species and potentially in the nature of threats. These results suggest that global extrapolation of models based on geographically and taxonomically restricted data may underestimate the true uncertainty, increasing the risk of ecological surprises. PMID:27509831

  11. The effect of research-based instruction in introductory physics on a common cognitive bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Ross K.; Bates, Simon P.; Parker, Jonathan; Usoskina, Evguenia

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a paper at last year's PERC conference, in which Rebello [1] compared students' individual and cohort mean score estimations with their actual assessment scores, we present results of a study in which students in an introductory physics class were asked to predict their scores on two assessments, one delivered at the start of the course (pre-instruction) and one at the end of the course (post-instruction). Our results show that, pre-instruction, the academically strongest students tend to underestimate their score slightly, whereas the weakest overestimate their performance significantly, consistent with the findings of Rebello and demonstrating a well-known cognitive bias (the Dunning-Kruger effect). Post-instruction, we find that the ability of the original weakest quartile cohort to accurately predict their own assessment score has improved significantly, but a flux of students between quartiles from one assessment to the other reveals that the least able students continue to over-estimate their performance, but with a reduced mean discrepancy. We discuss the implications these results have for instruction and for development of enhanced metacognition amongst physics students.

  12. EEG biofeedback improves attentional bias in high trait anxiety individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Sijuan; Lin, Guiping; Sun, Peng; Wang, Tinghuai

    2013-01-01

    Background Emotion-related attentional bias is implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback can obviously improve the anxiety disorders and reduce stress level, and can also enhance attention performance in healthy subjects. The present study examined the effects and mechanisms of EEG biofeedback training on the attentional bias of high trait anxiety (HTA) individuals toward negative stimuli. Results Event-related potentials were rec...

  13. Simulation of Electron Energy Spectra of a Biased Paracentric Hemispherical Deflection Analyzer as a Function of Entry Bias: Effects of Misalignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sise

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a biased paracentric hemispherical deflection analyzer (HDA, including fringing fields and their effect on focusing and energy resolution, is investigated using numerical methods. Electron energy spectra are calculated for three entry positions R0=84 mm, 100 mm, and 112 mm and compared with the recent experimental measurements. In both experiment and calculation, the two different paracentric entry positions R0=84 mm and R0=112 mm, on either side of the mean radius of 100 mm, are found to have a base energy resolution of about two times better than the conventional centric entry position R0=100 mm. In order to explain the discrepancies (6–30% between the simulated and the experimental resolutions the focusing characteristics are further investigated for different displacements of the input lens (ΔR0 with respect to the entry position R0 and the tilted input beam axis by αshift in the dispersive direction. We have found that the blame does not in fact lie with the theory and we have shown that the input lens may have been misaligned in the experiment. Slight misalignments affect both the true energy resolution measurement and the transmission of the beam.

  14. Effects of stress on dietary preference and intake are dependent on access and stress sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Teegarden, Sarah L.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies support a link between stress and the increased consumption of palatable foods. However, there has been a noted lack of genetic models to examine predisposing factors of overweight, obesity, and binge eating, particularly the role that stress sensitivity might play in the development of these conditions. We have examined the effects of chronic stress exposure on macronutrient choice preferences in a genetic mouse model of stress sensitivity (corticotropin-releasing factor recep...

  15. Modeling the Effects of Stress: An Approach to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    Stress is an integral element of the operational conditions experienced by combat medics. The effects of stress can compromise the performance of combat medics who must reach and treat their comrades under often threatening circumstances. Examples of these effects include tunnel vision, loss of motor control, and diminished hearing, which can result in an inability to perceive further danger, satisfactorily treat the casualty, and communicate with others. While many training programs strive to recreate this stress to aid in the experiential learning process, stress inducement may not always be feasible or desired. In addition, live simulations are not always a practical, convenient, and repeatable method of training. Instead, presenting situational training on a personal computer is proposed as an effective training platform in which the effects of stress can be addressed in a different way. We explore the cognitive and motor effects of stress, as well as the benefits of training for mitigating these effects in real life. While many training applications focus on inducing stress in order to "condition" the stress response, the author explores the possibilities of modeling stress to produce a similar effect. Can presenting modeled effects of stress help prepare or inoculate soldiers for stressful situations in which they must perform at a high level? This paper investigates feasibility of modeling stress and describes the preliminary design considerations of a combat medic training system that utilizes this method of battlefield preparation.

  16. Kink effect in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by electrical stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xiao-Hua; Ma Ji-Gang; Yang Li-Yuan; He Qiang; Jiao Ying; Ma Ping; Hao Yue

    2011-01-01

    The kink effect is studied in an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor by measuring DC performance during fresh, short-term stress and recovery cycle with negligible degradation. Vdg plays an assistant role in detrapping electrons and short-term stress results in no creation of new category traps but an increase in number of active traps.A possible mechanism is proposed that electrical stress supplies traps with the electric field for activation and when device is under test field-assisted hot-electrons result in electrons detrapping from traps, thus deteriorating the kink effect. In addition, experiments show that the impact ionization is at a relatively low level, which is not the dominant mechanism compared with trapping effect. We analyse the complicated link between the kink effect and stress bias through groups of electrical stress states: Vds = 0-state, off-state, on-state (on-state with low voltage, high-power state,high field state). Finlly, a conclusion is drawn that electric field brings about more severe kink effect than hot electrons.With the assistance of electric field, hot electrons tend to be possible to modulate the charges in deep-level trap.

  17. Using the DC self-bias effect for simultaneous ion-electron beam generation in space thruster applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-10-01

    In this work we discuss ways to use the self-bias effect for broad ion-electron beam generation and present recent experimental results. In asymmetrical systems the self-bias effect leads to rectification of the applied RF voltage to a DC voltage dropped across the space charge sheath near to the electrode having smaller area. Thus, continuous ion acceleration is possible towards the smaller electrode with periodical electron extraction due to the RF plasma potential oscillations. We propose a new concept of neutralizer-free gridded space thruster called NEPTUNE. In this concept, the RF electrodes in contact with the plasma are replaced by a two-grid system such that ``the smaller electrode'' is now the external grid. The grids are biased with RF power across a capacitor. This allows to locate RF space charge sheath between the acceleration grids while still keeping the possibility of a DC self-bias generation. Here we present first proof-of-concept of the NEPTUNE thruster prototype and give basic parameters spacing for such thruster. Comparison of the main parameters of the beam generated using RF and a classical ``DC with neutralizer'' acceleration method shows several advantages of the NEPTUNE concept. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within the 7th European Community Framework (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  18. Scale dependence of halo and galaxy bias: Effects in real space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Scoccimarro, Román; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2007-03-01

    We examine the scale dependence of dark matter halo and galaxy clustering on very large scales (0.01language of the “halo model.” The halo-halo clustering term is propagated into the nonlinear regime using “1-loop” perturbation theory and a nonlinear halo bias model. Galaxies are then inserted into haloes through the halo occupation distribution. We show that, with nonlinear bias parameters derived from simulations, this model produces predictions that are qualitatively in agreement with our numerical results. We then use it to show that the power spectra of red and blue galaxies depend differently on scale, thus underscoring the fact that proper modeling of nonlinear bias parameters will be crucial to derive reliable cosmological constraints. In addition to showing that the bias on very large scales is not simply linear, the model also shows that the halo-halo and halo-dark matter spectra do not measure precisely the same thing. This complicates interpretation of clustering in terms of the stochasticity of bias. However, because the shot-noise correction is nontrivial, evidence for this in the simulations is marginal.

  19. Effect of bias condition on heavy ion radiation in bipolar junction transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chao-Ming; Li Xing-Ji; Geng Hong-Bin; Yang De-Zhuang; He Shi-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic degradations in a silicon NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) of 3DG142 type are examined under irradiation with 40-MeV chlorine (Cl) ions under forward,grounded,and reverse bias conditions,respectively.Different electrical parameters are in-situ measured during the exposure under each bias condition.From the experimental data,a larger variation of base current (IB) is observed after irradiation at a given value of base-emitter voltage (VBE),while the collector current is slightly affected by irradiation at a given VBE.The gain degradation is affected mostly by the behaviour of the base current.From the experimental data,the variation of current gain in the case of forward bias is much smaller than that in the other conditions.Moreover,for 3DG142 BJT,the current gain degradation in the case of reverse bias is more severe than that in the grounded case at low fluence,while at high fluence,the gain degradation in the reverse bias case becomes smaller than that in the grounded case.

  20. Effect of bias condition on heavy ion radiation in bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Ming; Li, Xing-Ji; Geng, Hong-Bin; Yang, De-Zhuang; He, Shi-Yu

    2012-08-01

    The characteristic degradations in a silicon NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) of 3DG142 type are examined under irradiation with 40-MeV chlorine (Cl) ions under forward, grounded, and reverse bias conditions, respectively. Different electrical parameters are in-situ measured during the exposure under each bias condition. From the experimental data, a larger variation of base current (IB) is observed after irradiation at a given value of base-emitter voltage (VBE), while the collector current is slightly affected by irradiation at a given VBE. The gain degradation is affected mostly by the behaviour of the base current. From the experimental data, the variation of current gain in the case of forward bias is much smaller than that in the other conditions. Moreover, for 3DG142 BJT, the current gain degradation in the case of reverse bias is more severe than that in the grounded case at low fluence, while at high fluence, the gain degradation in the reverse bias case becomes smaller than that in the grounded case.

  1. The effect of job stress on smoking and alcohol consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Azagba, Sunday; Sharaf, Mesbah F

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of job stress on two key health risk-behaviors: smoking and alcohol consumption, using data from the Canadian National Population Health Survey. Findings in the extant literature are inconclusive and are mainly based on standard models which can model differential responses to job stress only by observed characteristics. However, the effect of job stress on smoking and drinking may largely depend on unobserved characteristics such as: self control, stress-coping...

  2. Brillouin/Raman compensation of the Kerr-effect-induced bias in a nonlinear ring laser gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhang; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Ken; Ye, Weimin; Zeng, Chun; Ji, Jiarong

    2013-04-01

    In this Letter, the beat frequency at rest of a ring laser gyroscope with nonlinear effects is discussed in detail. Even without an additional intensity-stabilizing system, the random nullshift bias induced by the Kerr effect is compensated by the phase shift associated with the stimulated Brillouin/Raman scattering. And the nonlinear stimulated scattering also serves as the gain mechanism of the gyroscope. And thus the influence of the fluctuation of the injected pump intensity on the beat frequency is eliminated.

  3. Perceived stress and self-esteem mediate the effects of work-related stress on depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Kyeong-Sook

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and self-esteem on work-related stress and depression. Two hundred and eighty-four Korean nurses participated in the study. The participants completed four questionnaires, including the Korean short version of the occupational stress scale, the perceived stress scale, the Rosenberg self-esteem scale and the Beck depression inventory. Structural equation modelling was used to determine the relationships among work-related stress, perceived stress, self-esteem, and depression. Work-related stress was positively associated with depression. Perceived stress was inversely related to self-esteem and positively associated with work-related stress and depression, respectively. Self-esteem was negatively associated with work-related stress and depression. Structural equation modelling revealed that self-esteem and perceived stress fully mediate the relationship between work-related stress and depression. Future studies should further investigate the effect of psychological characteristics on work-related stress and symptoms of depression.

  4. An Exploration Based Cognitive Bias Test for Mice: Effects of Handling Method and Stereotypic Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Janja; Bailoo, Jeremy D; Melotti, Luca; Rommen, Jonas; Würbel, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural tests to assess affective states are widely used in human research and have recently been extended to animals. These tests assume that affective state influences cognitive processing, and that animals in a negative affective state interpret ambiguous information as expecting a negative outcome (displaying a negative cognitive bias). Most of these tests however, require long discrimination training. The aim of the study was to validate an exploration based cognitive bias test, using two different handling methods, as previous studies have shown that standard tail handling of mice increases physiological and behavioural measures of anxiety compared to cupped handling. Therefore, we hypothesised that tail handled mice would display a negative cognitive bias. We handled 28 female CD-1 mice for 16 weeks using either tail handling or cupped handling. The mice were then trained in an eight arm radial maze, where two adjacent arms predicted a positive outcome (darkness and food), while the two opposite arms predicted a negative outcome (no food, white noise and light). After six days of training, the mice were also given access to the four previously unavailable intermediate ambiguous arms of the radial maze and tested for cognitive bias. We were unable to validate this test, as mice from both handling groups displayed a similar pattern of exploration. Furthermore, we examined whether maze exploration is affected by the expression of stereotypic behaviour in the home cage. Mice with higher levels of stereotypic behaviour spent more time in positive arms and avoided ambiguous arms, displaying a negative cognitive bias. While this test needs further validation, our results indicate that it may allow the assessment of affective state in mice with minimal training-a major confound in current cognitive bias paradigms. PMID:26154309

  5. An Exploration Based Cognitive Bias Test for Mice: Effects of Handling Method and Stereotypic Behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janja Novak

    Full Text Available Behavioural tests to assess affective states are widely used in human research and have recently been extended to animals. These tests assume that affective state influences cognitive processing, and that animals in a negative affective state interpret ambiguous information as expecting a negative outcome (displaying a negative cognitive bias. Most of these tests however, require long discrimination training. The aim of the study was to validate an exploration based cognitive bias test, using two different handling methods, as previous studies have shown that standard tail handling of mice increases physiological and behavioural measures of anxiety compared to cupped handling. Therefore, we hypothesised that tail handled mice would display a negative cognitive bias. We handled 28 female CD-1 mice for 16 weeks using either tail handling or cupped handling. The mice were then trained in an eight arm radial maze, where two adjacent arms predicted a positive outcome (darkness and food, while the two opposite arms predicted a negative outcome (no food, white noise and light. After six days of training, the mice were also given access to the four previously unavailable intermediate ambiguous arms of the radial maze and tested for cognitive bias. We were unable to validate this test, as mice from both handling groups displayed a similar pattern of exploration. Furthermore, we examined whether maze exploration is affected by the expression of stereotypic behaviour in the home cage. Mice with higher levels of stereotypic behaviour spent more time in positive arms and avoided ambiguous arms, displaying a negative cognitive bias. While this test needs further validation, our results indicate that it may allow the assessment of affective state in mice with minimal training-a major confound in current cognitive bias paradigms.

  6. Nonlinear excitation kinetics of biased quantum wells. Coherent dynamical screening effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe a strongly nonlinear process of ultrafast photoexcitation of a biased quantum well. This process is governed by coherent dynamical screening, where the instantaneously polarized photoexcited carriers screen initial bias field. This results in a dynamic modification of the...... bandstructure of the quantum well, which is totally coherent with the temporal intensity distribution of the excitation laser pulse. We developed a time-resolved theoretical model of coherent dynamical screening, which predicts interesting fundamental consequences, such as nonlinear absorption and ultra...

  7. Effect of collector bias current on the linearity of common-emitter BJT amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a Volterra series, an explicit formula is derived for the connection between input 3rd-order intercept point and collector bias current (ICQ) in a common-emitter bipolar junction transistor amplifier. The analysis indicates that the larger ICQ is, the more linear the amplifier is. Furthermore, this has been verified by experiment. This study also integrates a method called dynamic bias current for expanding the dynamic range of an LNA (low noise amplifier) as an application of the analysis result obtained above. IMR3 (3rd-order intermodulation rate) is applied to evaluate the LNA's performance with and without adopting this method in this study. (semiconductor devices)

  8. Phosphorus stress effects on assimilation of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to investigate alterations in uptake and assimilation of NO3- by phosphorus-stressed plants. Young tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum [L.], cv NC 2326) growing in solution culture were derived of an external phosphorus (P) supply for 12 days. On selected days, plants were exposed to 15NO3- during the 12 hour light period to determine changes in NO3- assimilation as the P deficiency progressed. Decreased whole-plant growth was evident after 3 days of P deprivation and became more pronounced with time, but root growth was unaffected until after day 6. Uptake of 15NO3- per gram root dry weight and translocation of absorbed 15NO3- out of the root were noticeably restricted in -P plants by day 3, and effects on both increased in severity with time. Whole-plant reduction of 15NO3- and 15N incorporation into insoluble reduced-N in the shoot decreased after day 3. Although the P limitation was associated with a substantial accumulation of amino acids in the shoot, there was no indication of excessive accumulation of soluble reduced-15N in the shoot during the 12 hour 15NO3- exposure periods. The results indicate that alterations in NO3- transport processes in the root system are the primary initial responses limiting synthesis of shoot protein in P-stressed plants. Elevated amino acid levels evidently are associated with enhanced degradation of protein rather than inhibition of concurrent protein synthesis

  9. The functional activity and effective connectivity of pulvinar are modulated by individual differences in threat-related attentional bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakamata, Yuko; Sato, Eisuke; Komi, Shotaro; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Izawa, Shuhei; Murayama, Norio; Hanakawa, Takashi; Inoue, Yusuke; Tagaya, Hirokuni

    2016-01-01

    The pulvinar is important in selective attention, particularly to visual stimuli under the focus of attention. However, the pulvinar is assumed to process emotional stimuli even outside the focus of attention, because of its tight connection with the amygdala. We therefore investigated how unattended emotional stimuli affect the pulvinar and its effective connectivity (EC) while considering individual differences in selective attention. fMRI in 41 healthy human subjects revealed that the amygdala, but not the pulvinar, more strongly responded to unattended fearful faces than to unattended neutral faces (UF > UN), although we observed greater EC from the pulvinar to the amygdala. Interestingly, individuals with biased attention toward threat (i.e., attentional bias) showed significantly increased activity (UF > UN) and reduced grey matter volume in the pulvinar. These individuals also exhibited stronger EC from the pulvinar to the attention-related frontoparietal network (FPN), whereas individuals with greater attentional control showed more enhanced EC from the pulvinar to the amygdala, but not the FPN (UF > UN). The pulvinar may filter unattended emotional stimuli whose sensitivity depends on individual threat-related attentional bias. The connectivity patterns of the pulvinar may thus be determined based on individual differences in threat-related attentional bias and attentional control. PMID:27703252

  10. Expectancy of stress-reducing aromatherapy effect and performance on a stress-sensitive cognitive task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamine, Irina; Oken, Barry S

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Stress-reducing therapies help maintain cognitive performance during stress. Aromatherapy is popular for stress reduction, but its effectiveness and mechanism are unclear. This study examined stress-reducing effects of aromatherapy on cognitive function using the go/no-go (GNG) task performance and event related potentials (ERP) components sensitive to stress. The study also assessed the importance of expectancy in aromatherapy actions. Methods. 81 adults were randomized to 3 aroma groups (active experimental, detectable, and undetectable placebo) and 2 prime subgroups (prime suggesting stress-reducing aroma effects or no-prime). GNG performance, ERPs, subjective expected aroma effects, and stress ratings were assessed at baseline and poststress. Results. No specific aroma effects on stress or cognition were observed. However, regardless of experienced aroma, people receiving a prime displayed faster poststress median reaction times than those receiving no prime. A significant interaction for N200 amplitude indicated divergent ERP patterns between baseline and poststress for go and no-go stimuli depending on the prime subgroup. Furthermore, trends for beneficial prime effects were shown on poststress no-go N200/P300 latencies and N200 amplitude. Conclusion. While there were no aroma-specific effects on stress or cognition, these results highlight the role of expectancy for poststress response inhibition and attention. PMID:25802539

  11. Expectancy of Stress-Reducing Aromatherapy Effect and Performance on a Stress-Sensitive Cognitive Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Chamine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Stress-reducing therapies help maintain cognitive performance during stress. Aromatherapy is popular for stress reduction, but its effectiveness and mechanism are unclear. This study examined stress-reducing effects of aromatherapy on cognitive function using the go/no-go (GNG task performance and event related potentials (ERP components sensitive to stress. The study also assessed the importance of expectancy in aromatherapy actions. Methods. 81 adults were randomized to 3 aroma groups (active experimental, detectable, and undetectable placebo and 2 prime subgroups (prime suggesting stress-reducing aroma effects or no-prime. GNG performance, ERPs, subjective expected aroma effects, and stress ratings were assessed at baseline and poststress. Results. No specific aroma effects on stress or cognition were observed. However, regardless of experienced aroma, people receiving a prime displayed faster poststress median reaction times than those receiving no prime. A significant interaction for N200 amplitude indicated divergent ERP patterns between baseline and poststress for go and no-go stimuli depending on the prime subgroup. Furthermore, trends for beneficial prime effects were shown on poststress no-go N200/P300 latencies and N200 amplitude. Conclusion. While there were no aroma-specific effects on stress or cognition, these results highlight the role of expectancy for poststress response inhibition and attention.

  12. Static and dynamic effective stress coefficient of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2012-01-01

    stress coefficient is thus relevant for studying reservoir deformation and for evaluating 4D seismic for the correct pore pressure prediction. The static effective stress coefficient n is estimated from mechanical tests and is highly relevant for effective stress prediction because it is directly related...... to mechanical strain in the elastic stress regime. The corresponding dynamic effective stress coefficient α is easy to estimate from density and velocity of acoustic (elastic) waves. We studied n and α of chalk from the reservoir zone of the Valhall field, North Sea, and found that n and α vary...

  13. Are hungry sheep more pessimistic? The effects of food restriction on cognitive bias and the involvement of ghrelin in its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Else; Ferguson, Drewe; Lee, Caroline

    2014-01-17

    Food restriction is considered to be a welfare issue in extensively reared animals. However, the effects of food restriction on the affective state, and its physiological regulation, are unknown. In Experiment 1, we aimed to assess the effects of increased plasma concentrations of acyl-ghrelin on judgement bias (an indicator of affective states) by fasting sheep for 24h or by ghrelin administration. In Experiment 2, we aimed to assess the effects of chronic food restriction on judgement bias and attention bias towards a food-related cue. For the judgement bias test, sheep were trained in an arena to approach a positive location cue associated with conspecifics and not approach a negative location cue associated with a dog. Three non-trained, non-reinforced ambiguous location cues were situated between the positive and negative locations. Attention bias towards a food-related cue was assessed by placing an empty food bucket against the wall of the arena halfway between the entry point and the positive location. In Experiment 1, sheep were divided into three treatments; 24h fast, ghrelin administration or control. Judgement bias, locomotor activity and plasma cortisol concentrations were assessed. The ghrelin treated group tended to express a more pessimistic bias compared to the control group (Pfood-related cue was presented, LF ewes took longer to reach the positive location (Pfood restriction alters judgement bias and attention bias towards a food-related cue which may indicate altered affective states of sheep. PMID:24096007

  14. The Effects of Sample Selection Bias on Racial Differences in Child Abuse Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ards, Sheila; Chung, Chanjin; Myers, Samuel L., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Data from the National Incidence Study (NIS) of Child Abuse and Neglect suggest no racial difference in child maltreatment, although there are more black children within the child welfare population. This study found selection bias in the NIS design caused by the exclusion of family, friends, and neighbors that resulted in differences in NIS cases…

  15. The Effect of Colour and Size on Attentional Bias to Alcohol-Related Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil R.; McCann, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Attentional bias plays an important role in the development and maintenance of alcohol addiction, and has often been measured with a visual probe task, where reaction times are compared for probes replacing either a substance-related cue or a neutral cue. Systematic low-level differences between image classes are a potential cause of low internal…

  16. Effect of affect on social cost bias in social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitran, S.; Hofmann, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive model of social anxiety disorder (SAD) assumes that cognitive biases are important maintaining factors of the disorder. Research and theory have highlighted the impact of cognitive self-regulatory processes on affect, but have not sufficiently focused on the influence of affect on self

  17. Preference-Inconsistent Recommendations: An Effective Approach for Reducing Confirmation Bias and Stimulating Divergent Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, Christina; Buder, Jurgen; Cress, Ulrike; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2012-01-01

    The Web is a perfect backdrop for opinion formation as a multitude of different opinions is publicly available. However, the different opinions often remain unexploited: Learners prefer preference-consistent over preference-inconsistent information, a phenomenon called confirmation bias. Two experiments were designed to test whether technologies…

  18. Controllable substrate bias voltages effectively tailoring nanocomposite Nb–B–Al–O film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Na [Energy & Materials Engineering Centre, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dlei0008@126.com [Energy & Materials Engineering Centre, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Li, Xifei, E-mail: xfli2011@hotmail.com [Energy & Materials Engineering Centre, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Li, Dejun, E-mail: dejunli@mail.tjnu.edu.cn [Energy & Materials Engineering Centre, College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Wan, Rongxin; Gu, Hanqing [Tianjin Institute of Urological Surgery, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2015-07-05

    Graphical abstract: Nb–B–Al–O nanocomposite films were synthesized by multi-target magnetron co-sputtering. Different substrate bias voltages can influence properties of obtained nanocomposite films. The maximum hardness at −160 V bias also showed the better thermostability and oxidation resistance properties at 300 °C in the air. More significantly, the TEM images and XRD results of the nanocomposite films at different bias obviously interpreted the change in mechanical properties, which provides a powerful inspiration to better understand the strategies to improve these films’ engineering applications. - Highlights: • The films were prepared by multi-target magnetron co-sputtering. • The structure and properties were influenced obviously by substrate bias voltages. • Maximum hardness and modulus at −160 V were higher than monolithic films. • The film at −160 V also showed better thermostability and oxidation resistance. - Abstract: The nanocomposite Nb–B–Al–O films based on NbB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were successfully deposited on Si substrate via multi-target magnetron co-sputtering method. The influences of substrate bias on microstructure, mechanical, thermostability and oxidation resistance properties of the films were investigated in detail. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed to study the structural properties such as crystallinity, binding energy and chemical composition of as-prepared films. The combination of monocrystalline NbB{sub 2} (1 0 0) texture and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1 1 3) crystal plane affected the mechanical properties of the films at different bias voltages. The best crystallization appeared at −160 V. The maximum hardness (23.4 GPa) and elastic modulus (274.5 GPa) of the films were obtained at optimal substrate bias of −160 V. The hardest film at −160 V also showed the better

  19. Effect of a Stress Management Class: One Year Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Addison W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Graduate and undergraduate students showed a reduction in anxiety during a 16-week course designed to include information on the causes and effects of stress as well as practical techniques for stress management. A follow-up study showed that the students were still successfully using the stress management techniques a year later. (RM)

  20. Is Terzaghi’s effective stress a stress variable under seepage conditions?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷国辉; 赵仲辉; 吴宏伟

    2015-01-01

    From the continuum mechanics perspective, an attempt was made to clarify the role of Terzaghi’s effective stress in the theoretical analysis of saturated soil subjected to seepage. The necessity of performing a coupled hydromechanical analysis to solve the seepage−deformation interaction problem was illustrated by examining the equations of static equilibrium among the effective stress, seepage force, pore-water pressure and total stress. The conceptual definition of stress variable that satisfies the principles of continuum mechanics is applied in the coupled hydromechanical analysis. It is shown that Terzaghi’s effective stress is in fact not a stress variable under seepage conditions, and the seepage force acting on the soil skeleton cannot be viewed as a body force. This offers a clue to the underlying cause of a paradox between the real Pascal’s hydrostatic state and the hydrostatic state predicted by a class of continuum hydromechanical theories.

  1. Effect of Sample Configuration on Droplet-Particles of TiN Films Deposited by Pulse Biased Arc Ion Plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui Zhao; Guoqiang Lin; Jinquan Xiao; Chuang Dong; Lishi Wen

    2009-01-01

    Orthogonal experiments are used to design the pulsed bias related parameters, including bias magnitude, duty cycle and pulse frequency, during arc ion deposition of TiN films on stainless steel substrates in the case of samples placing normal to the plasma flux. The effect of these parameters on the amount and the size distribution of droplet-particles are investigated, and the results have provided sufficient evidence for the physical model, in which particles reduction is due to the case that the particles are negatively charged and repulsed from negative pulse electric field. The effect of sample configuration on amount and size distribution of the particles are analyzed. The results of the amount and size distribution of the particles are compared to those in the case of samples placing parallel to the plasma flux.

  2. A Comparison of Cognitive Bias Modification for Interpretation and Computerized Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Effects on Anxiety, Depression, Attentional Control, and Interpretive Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Jennifer O.; Mackintosh, Bundy; Dunn, Barnaby D.; Mathews, Andrew; Dalgleish, Tim; Hoppitt, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (cCBT) and cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I) both have demonstrated efficacy in alleviating social anxiety, but how they compare with each other has not been investigated. The present study tested the prediction that both interventions would reduce anxiety relative to a…

  3. Effects of drought stress on growth and yield of barley

    OpenAIRE

    H. Samarah, Nezar

    2005-01-01

    International audience Barley (Hordeum vulgare) grown in Mediterranean regions undergoes drought stress during the grain-filling period. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effect of drought stress on grain growth and yield of barley. Plants were exposed to three drought treatments at the beginning of grain filling: (1) well-watered at 100% field capacity, (2) mild drought stress at 60% field capacity, and (3) severe drought stress at 20% field capacity until grain maturity....

  4. THE DELAYED EFFECTS OF CHRONIC UNPREDICTABLE STRESS ON ANXIETY MEASURES

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszewich, Leslie; Karney, Jared J.; Carter, Samantha R.; Janasik, Steven P.; O’Brien, Johanna L.; Friedman, Ross D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has found that exposure to unpredictable stress can augment anxiety in humans and animals. The appearance of anxiety symptoms in humans frequently develop after stress exposure has terminated, but few rodent studies have systematically examined the delayed anxiogenic effects of unpredictable stress. Therefore, the current study investigated whether anxiety-like behaviors in rats would increase at several time intervals following exposure to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)...

  5. Hardening rate under reverse loading in 316 L: back stress and effective stress evolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, C.; Guillemer-Neel, C.; Feaugas, X. [UTC, Compiegne (France). Lab. Roberval

    2001-09-01

    The Bauschinger effect has been investigated in a low stacking fault energy f.c.c. alloy. Reverse hardening rate is discussed in terms of internal stresses evolutions as a function of reverse straining. A distinction is made between short-range (effective stress) and long-range (back stresses) elastic interactions. Moreover the back stress is partitioned into intra-granular and inter-granular components. The evolutions of all stress components are directly related to the modification of dislocation densities and distributions in grains (over 50 grains). Back stress evolution is explained by heterogeneous dislocation patterns dissolution and formation of new ones with opposite polarization. This dissolution is promoted by both components of the back stress which enhance reverse slip and cross-slip under reverse straining. But only the cross-slip can induce plastic strain irreversibility and then permanent softening. The effective stress evolution results from a competition between latent hardening, dislocations emission at wall/channel interface and annihilation process. After stress reversal, the observed transient softening results from the evolution of dislocation distribution and density, in particular from the dissolution of the polarized structures (walls, cells) developed during pre-straining. The permanent softening occurs at reverse plastic strains higher than 2% when the initial heterogeneous dislocation structures are re-established by reverse loading. This permanent softening is mainly associated with the intra-granular back stress. (orig.)

  6. Hardening rate under reverse loading in 316 L: back stress and effective stress evolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bauschinger effect has been investigated in a low stacking fault energy f.c.c. alloy. Reverse hardening rate is discussed in terms of internal stresses evolutions as a function of reverse straining. A distinction is made between short-range (effective stress) and long-range (back stresses) elastic interactions. Moreover the back stress is partitioned into intra-granular and inter-granular components. The evolutions of all stress components are directly related to the modification of dislocation densities and distributions in grains (over 50 grains). Back stress evolution is explained by heterogeneous dislocation patterns dissolution and formation of new ones with opposite polarization. This dissolution is promoted by both components of the back stress which enhance reverse slip and cross-slip under reverse straining. But only the cross-slip can induce plastic strain irreversibility and then permanent softening. The effective stress evolution results from a competition between latent hardening, dislocations emission at wall/channel interface and annihilation process. After stress reversal, the observed transient softening results from the evolution of dislocation distribution and density, in particular from the dissolution of the polarized structures (walls, cells) developed during pre-straining. The permanent softening occurs at reverse plastic strains higher than 2% when the initial heterogeneous dislocation structures are re-established by reverse loading. This permanent softening is mainly associated with the intra-granular back stress. (orig.)

  7. Effects of nuclear radiation on a high-reliability silicon power diode. 4: Analysis of reverse bias characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on the reverse bias electrical characteristics of one hundred silicon power diodes were investigated. On a percentage basis, the changes in reverse currents were large but, due to very low initial values, this electrical characteristic was not the limiting factor in use of these diodes. These changes were interpreted in terms of decreasing minority carrier lifetimes as related to generation-recombination currents. The magnitudes of reverse voltage breakdown were unaffected by irradiation.

  8. Evaluating treatment effectiveness under model misspecification: a comparison of targeted maximum likelihood estimation with bias-corrected matching

    OpenAIRE

    Kreif, N.; Gruber, S.; Radice, Rosalba; Grieve, R; J S Sekhon

    2014-01-01

    Statistical approaches for estimating treatment effectiveness commonly model the endpoint, or the propensity score, using parametric regressions such as generalised linear models. Misspecification of these models can lead to biased parameter estimates. We compare two approaches that combine the propensity score and the endpoint regression, and can make weaker modelling assumptions, by using machine learning approaches to estimate the regression function and the propensity score. Targeted maxi...

  9. The effect of Arabian Sea optical properties on SST biases and the South Asian summer monsoon in a coupled GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A.G.; Joshi, M.; Robertson, E.S.; Woolnough, S.J. [University of Reading, NCAS-Climate, Walker Institute for Climate System Research, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    This study examines the effect of seasonally varying chlorophyll on the climate of the Arabian Sea and South Asian monsoon. The effect of such seasonality on the radiative properties of the upper ocean is often a missing process in coupled general circulation models and its large amplitude in the region makes it a pertinent choice for study to determine any impact on systematic biases in the mean and seasonality of the Arabian Sea. In this study we examine the effects of incorporating a seasonal cycle in chlorophyll due to phytoplankton blooms in the UK Met Office coupled atmosphere-ocean GCM HadCM3. This is achieved by performing experiments in which the optical properties of water in the Arabian Sea - a key signal of the semi-annual cycle of phytoplankton blooms in the region - are calculated from a chlorophyll climatology derived from Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) data. The SeaWiFS chlorophyll is prescribed in annual mean and seasonally-varying experiments. In response to the chlorophyll bloom in late spring, biases in mixed layer depth are reduced by up to 50% and the surface is warmed, leading to increases in monsoon rainfall during the onset period. However when the monsoons are fully established in boreal winter and summer and there are strong surface winds and a deep mixed layer, biases in the mixed layer depth are reduced but the surface undergoes cooling. The seasonality of the response of SST to chlorophyll is found to depend on the relative depth of the mixed layer to that of the anomalous penetration depth of solar fluxes. Thus the inclusion of the effects of chlorophyll on radiative properties of the upper ocean acts to reduce biases in mixed layer depth and increase seasonality in SST. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Vicarious Fear Learning on Children’s Heart Rate Responses and Attentional Bias for Novel Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Gemma; Field, Andy P.; Askew, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Research with children has shown that vicarious learning can result in changes to 2 of Lang’s (1968) 3 anxiety response systems: subjective report and behavioral avoidance. The current study extended this research by exploring the effect of vicarious learning on physiological responses (Lang’s final response system) and attentional bias. The study used Askew and Field’s (2007) vicarious learning procedure and demonstrated fear-related increases in children’s cognitive, behavioral, and physiol...

  11. Influence of effective stress on swelling pressure of expansive soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baille Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume change and shear strength behaviour of soils are controlled by the effective stress. Recent advances in unsaturated soil mechanics have shown that the effective stress as applicable to unsaturated soils is equal to the difference between the externally applied stress and the suction stress. The latter can be established based on the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the soil. In the present study, the evolution of swelling pressure in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was investigated. Comparisons were made between magnitudes of applied suction, suction stress, and swelling pressure.

  12. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  13. Stress effects on mood, HPA axis, and autonomic response: comparison of three psychosocial stress paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Grace E; Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Taylor, Holly A; Kanarek, Robin B

    2014-01-01

    Extensive experimental psychology research has attempted to parse the complex relationship between psychosocial stress, mood, cognitive performance, and physiological changes. To do so, it is necessary to have effective, validated methods to experimentally induce psychosocial stress. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is the most commonly used method of experimentally inducing psychosocial stress, but it is resource intensive. Less resource intense psychosocial stress tasks include the Socially Evaluative Cold Pressor Task (SECPT) and a computerized mental arithmetic task (MAT). These tasks effectively produce a physiological and psychological stress response and have the benefits of requiring fewer experimenters and affording data collection from multiple participants simultaneously. The objective of this study was to compare the magnitude and duration of these three experimental psychosocial stress induction paradigms. On each of four separate days, participants completed either a control non-stressful task or one of the three experimental stressors: the TSST, SECPT, or MAT. We measured mood, working memory performance, salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase (AA), and heart rate. The TSST and SECPT exerted the most robust effects on mood and physiological measures. TSST effects were generally evident immediately post-stress as well as 10- and 20-minutes after stress cessation, whereas SECPT effects were generally limited to the duration of the stressor. The stress duration is a key determinant when planning a study that utilizes an experimental stressor, as researchers may be interested in collecting dependent measures prior to stress cessation. In this way, the TSST would allow the investigator a longer window to administer tasks of interest.

  14. Effect of pretreatment bias on the nucleation and growth mechanisms of ultrananocrystalline diamond films via bias-enhanced nucleation and growth: An approach to interfacial chemistry analysis via chemical bonding mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pretreatment bias on the nucleation and growth mechanisms of the ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films on the Si substrate via bias-enhanced nucleation and bias-enhanced growth (BEN-BEG) was investigated using cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, chemical bonding mapping, and Raman spectroscopy. The mirror-polished substrate surface showed the formation of a triangular profile produced by a dominant physical sputtering mechanism induced by ion bombardment of ions from the hydrogen plasma accelerated toward the substrate due to biasing and a potential hydrogen-induced chemical reaction component before synthesizing the UNCD films. The BEN-BEG UNCD films grown on the Si substrate with biased and unbiased pretreatments in the hydrogen plasma were compared. In the case of the bias-pretreated substrate, the SiC phases were formed at the peaks of the Si surface triangular profile due to the active unsaturated Si bond and the enhanced local electrical field. The UNCD grains grew preferentially at the peaks of the triangular substrate surface profile and rapidly covered the amorphous carbon (a-C) and oriented graphite phases formed in the valley of the surface profile. In the case of the substrate with unbiased pretreatment, the SiC phases were formed via the reactions between the hydrocarbon species and the active Si atoms released from the substrate with assistance of the hydrogen plasma. The UNCD grains nucleated on the nucleating sites consisting of the SiC, a-C, and graphite phases. Growth mechanisms for the BEN-BEG UNCD films on both Si substrates were proposed to elucidate the different nucleation processes. Applying bias on the Si substrate pretreated in the hydrogen plasma optimized the nucleation sites for growth of UNCD grains, resulting in the low content of the nondiamond phases in UNCD films

  15. Experimental Modification of Interpretation Bias about Animal Fear in Young Children: Effects on Cognition, Avoidance Behavior, Anxiety Vulnerability, and Physiological Responding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J.; Field, Andy P.; Muris, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of experimentally modifying interpretation biases for children's cognitions, avoidance behavior, anxiety vulnerability, and physiological responding. Sixty-seven children (6-11 years) were randomly assigned to receive a positive or negative interpretation bias modification procedure to induce interpretation…

  16. Effect of alcohol on risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: causality, bias, or a bit of both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Emberson

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan R Emberson, Derrick A BennettClinical Trial Service Unit, Richard Doll Building, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKAbstract: Epidemiological studies of middle-aged populations generally find the relationship between alcohol intake and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke to be either U- or J-shaped. This review describes the extent that these relationships are likely to be causal, and the extent that they may be due to specific methodological weaknesses in epidemiological studies. The consistency in the vascular benefit associated with moderate drinking (compared with non-drinking observed across different studies, together with the existence of credible biological pathways, strongly suggests that at least some of this benefit is real. However, because of biases introduced by: choice of reference categories; reverse causality bias; variations in alcohol intake over time; and confounding, some of it is likely to be an artefact. For heavy drinking, different study biases have the potential to act in opposing directions, and as such, the true effects of heavy drinking on vascular risk are uncertain. However, because of the known harmful effects of heavy drinking on non-vascular mortality, the problem is an academic one. Studies of the effects of alcohol consumption on health outcomes should recognise the methodological biases they are likely to face, and design, analyse and interpret their studies accordingly. While regular moderate alcohol consumption during middle-age probably does reduce vascular risk, care should be taken when making general recommendations about safe levels of alcohol intake. In particular, it is likely that any promotion of alcohol for health reasons would do substantially more harm than good. Keywords: alcohol, coronary heart disease, stroke

  17. EFFECT OF WORKPLACE STRESS ON JOB PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the relationship between workplace stress and job performance. A survey method was employed to gather self-administered questionnaires from executive and non-executive employees of a leading private investment bank in Peninsular Malaysia. The outcomes of SmartPLS path model analysis of the data showed two important findings: firstly, physiological stress was positively and significantly correlated with job performance. Secondly, psychological stress was positively and significantly correlated with job performance. This finding reveals that physiological and psychological stresses act as important predictors of job performance in the studied organization. The paper provides discussion, implications and conclusion.

  18. Effects of self-enhancement bias on perception of supervisory feedback in counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Nan Hee

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how the self-enhancement bias of beginning counselors affects their perceptions of negative feedback in counseling supervision. It was predicted that the self-enhancement bias of beginning counselors would help lower the perceived threat of a counseling supervision, and lower perceived threat would mediate positive interpretation of the feedback in a negative feedback condition. In Korea, 203 volunteer beginning counselors (M = 30.2 yr., SD = 6.7) were shown a videotaped counseling supervision session in which a counseling supervisor delivered either largely positive or largely negative feedback to a beginning counselor. After viewing the tape, these beginning counselors rated their perceptions of the supervision setting and feedback as ego-threatening. Results were consistent with predictions.

  19. When does stress help or harm? The effects of stress controllability and subjective stress response on Stroop performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselinde Kaiser Henderson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to engage in goal-directed behavior despite exposure to stress is critical to resilience. Questions of how stress can impair or improve behavioral functioning are important in diverse settings, from athletic competitions to academic testing to clinical therapy. Previous research suggests that controllability is a key factor in the impact of stress on behavior: learning how to control stressors buffers people from the negative effects of stress on subsequent cognitively demanding tasks. In addition, research suggests that the impact of stress on cognitive functioning depends on an individual’s response to stressors: moderate responses to stress can lead to improved performance while extreme (high or low responses can lead to impaired performance. The present studies tested the hypothesis that 1 learning to behaviorally control stressors leads to improved performance on a test of general executive functioning, the color-word Stroop, and that 2 this improvement emerges specifically for people who report moderate (subjective responses to stress. Experiment 1: Stroop performance, measured before and after a stress manipulation, was compared across groups of undergraduate participants (n=109. People who learned to control a noise stressor and received accurate performance feedback demonstrated reduced Stroop interference compared with people exposed to uncontrollable noise stress and feedback indicating an exaggerated rate of failure. In the group who learned behavioral control, those who reported moderate levels of stress showed the greatest reduction in Stroop interference. In contrast, in the group exposed to uncontrollable events, self-reported stress failed to predict performance. Experiment 2: In a second sample (n=90, we specifically investigated the role of controllability by keeping the rate of failure feedback constant across groups. In the group who learned behavioral control, those who reported moderate levels of stress

  20. Effect of Diffusion Limitations on Multianalyte Determination from Biased Biosensor Response

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Baronas; Juozas Kulys; Algirdas Lančinskas; Antanas Žilinskas

    2014-01-01

    The optimization-based quantitative determination of multianalyte concentrations from biased biosensor responses is investigated under internal and external diffusion-limited conditions. A computational model of a biocatalytic amperometric biosensor utilizing a mono-enzyme-catalyzed (nonspecific) competitive conversion of two substrates was used to generate pseudo-experimental responses to mixtures of compounds. The influence of possible perturbations of the biosensor signal, due to a white n...

  1. Mothers' Body Perception Biased to Obesity and its Effects on Nursing Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Yakura,Noriko; Kasagi,Tsunakiyo; Hiroe,Kaori

    1997-01-01

    Many women who have dieted in adolescence seem to become mothers without correcting their obesity-biased perceptions of the body. This study estimated the number of such mothers and analyzed the problems in their nursing: 1496 mothers to 790 babies aged 4 months and 706 children aged 18 months completed questionnaires addressing mothers' images of their own and their children's body, mothers' behaviors to reduce children's weight, their behavior patterns and mothers' experiences to reduce the...

  2. Fluency and belief bias in deductive reasoning: new indices for old effects

    OpenAIRE

    DriesTrippas

    2014-01-01

    Models based on signal detection theory (SDT) have occupied a prominent role in domains such as perception, categorization, and memory. Recent work by Dube et al. (2010) suggests that the framework may also offer important insights in the domain of deductive reasoning. Belief bias in reasoning has traditionally been examined using indices based on raw endorsement rates—indices that critics have claimed are highly problematic. We discuss a new set of SDT indices fit for the investigation belie...

  3. An Exploration Based Cognitive Bias Test for Mice: Effects of Handling Method and Stereotypic Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Janja; Bailoo, Jeremy Davidson; Melotti, Luca; Rommen, Jonas; Würbel, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural tests to assess affective states are widely used in human research and have recently been extended to animals. These tests assume that affective state influences cognitive processing, and that animals in a negative affective state interpret ambiguous information as expecting a negative outcome (displaying a negative cognitive bias). Most of these tests however, require long discrimination training. The aim of the study was to validate an exploration based cognitive ...

  4. Effects of prism adaptation on motor-intentional spatial bias in neglect

    OpenAIRE

    Fortis, Paola; Chen, Peii; Goedert, Kelly M.; Barrett, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Prism adaptation may alleviate some symptoms of spatial neglect. However, the mechanism through which this technique works is still unclear. The current study investigated whether prism adaptation differentially affects dysfunction in perceptual-attentional “where” versus motor-intentional “aiming” bias. Five neglect patients performed a line bisection task in which lines were viewed under both normal and right-left reversed viewing conditions, allowing for the fractionation of “where” and “a...

  5. Resistance to Early-Life Stress in Mice: Effects of Genetic Background and Stress Duration

    OpenAIRE

    Savignac, Hélène M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Early-life stress can induce marked behavioral and physiological impairments in adulthood including cognitive deficits, depression, anxiety, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. Although robust rat models of early-life stress exist there are few established effective paradigms in the mouse. Genetic background and protocol parameters used are two critical variables in such model development. Thus we investigated the impact of two different early-life stress protocols in two commonly used inbred m...

  6. Effect of Mechanical Stresses on Characteristics of Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of compressive mechanical stresses on chip solid tantalum capacitors is investigated by monitoring characteristics of different part types under axial and hydrostatic stresses. Depending on part types, an exponential increase of leakage currents was observed when stresses exceeded 10 MPa to 40 MPa. For the first time, reversible variations of leakage currents (up to two orders of magnitude) with stress have been demonstrated. Mechanical stresses did not cause significant changes of AC characteristics of the capacitors, whereas breakdown voltages measured during the surge current testing decreased substantially indicating an increased probability of failures of stressed capacitors in low impedance applications. Variations of leakage currents are explained by a combination of two mechanisms: stress-induced scintillations and stress-induced generation of electron traps in the tantalum pentoxide dielectric.

  7. Effects of model chemistry and data biases on stratospheric ozone assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Coy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The innovations or observation minus forecast (O–F residuals produced by a data assimilation system provide a convenient metric of evaluating global analyses. In this study, O–F statistics from the Global Ozone Assimilation Testing System (GOATS are used to examine how ozone assimilation products and their associated O–F statistics depend on input data biases and ozone photochemistry parameterizations (OPP. All the GOATS results shown are based on a 6-h forecast and analysis cycle using observations from SBUV/2 (Solar Backscatter UltraViolet instrument-2 during September–October 2002. Results show that zonal mean ozone analyses are more independent of observation biases and drifts when using an OPP, while the mean ozone O–Fs are more sensitive to observation drifts when using an OPP. In addition, SD O–Fs (standard deviations are reduced in the upper stratosphere when using an OPP due to a reduction of forecast model noise and to increased covariance between the forecast model and the observations. Experiments that changed the OPP reference state to match the observations by using an "adaptive" OPP scheme reduced the mean ozone O–Fs at the expense of zonal mean ozone analyses being more susceptible to data biases and drifts. Additional experiments showed that the upper boundary of the ozone DAS can affect the quality of the ozone analysis and therefore should be placed well above (at least a scale height the region of interest.

  8. Synergistic effect of bias and target currents for magnetron sputtered MoS2-Ti composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In terms of modification of the properties of MoS2-Ti composite films, especially tribological properties, significant advances have recently been recorded. However, the commercially production of MoS2-Ti composite films is still limited, because the production of desirable MoS2-Ti composite coating is only possible by using closed field unbalanced magnetron systems and by the selection of convenient deposition parameters. This requirement has focused the researchers' attention on optimization of deposition parameters. This study is concentrating on the effect of the bias voltage and the target currents for MoS2-Ti composite films deposited by pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). It is found that the bias and the target currents clearly affect the mechanical, structural and tribological properties of MoS2-Ti films.

  9. Synergistic effect of bias and target currents for magnetron sputtered MoS{sub 2}-Ti composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelbuel, Ferhat; Efeoglu, Ihsan [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-07-01

    In terms of modification of the properties of MoS{sub 2}-Ti composite films, especially tribological properties, significant advances have recently been recorded. However, the commercially production of MoS{sub 2}-Ti composite films is still limited, because the production of desirable MoS{sub 2}-Ti composite coating is only possible by using closed field unbalanced magnetron systems and by the selection of convenient deposition parameters. This requirement has focused the researchers' attention on optimization of deposition parameters. This study is concentrating on the effect of the bias voltage and the target currents for MoS{sub 2}-Ti composite films deposited by pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). It is found that the bias and the target currents clearly affect the mechanical, structural and tribological properties of MoS{sub 2}-Ti films.

  10. Synthesis and exchange bias effect of CoFe2O4/CoO composite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite ceramics composed of the ferrimagnetic (FM) CoFe2O4 and the antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoO were synthesized by using the chemical combustion method. The characterization measurements including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis show that CoFe2O4 nano-particles are embedded in CoO matrix. The magnetic measurements show that the hysteresis loops display a small negative exchange bias field (He) of 106 Oe as the ceramic is cooled to 10 K in an applied field of 10,000 Oe. Furthermore, the magnetic parameters including coercivity, remanence, and He show clear dependence on temperature and the applied magnetic field in the cooling procedures. This exchange bias effect is ascribed to the exchange coupling at the FM/AFM interfaces.

  11. Substrate-bias effect on the breakdown characteristic in a new silicon high-voltage device structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qi; Wang Weidong; Zhao Qiuming; Wei Xueming

    2012-01-01

    A novel silicon double-RESURF LDMOS structure with an improved breakdown characteristic by substrate bias technology (SB) is reported.The P-type epitaxial layer is embedded between an N-type drift region and an N-type substrate to block the conduction path in the off-state and change the distributions of the bulk electric field.The substrate bias strengthens the charge share effect of the drift region near the source,and the vertical electric field peak under the drain is decreased,which is especially helpful in improving the vertical breakdown voltage in a lateral power device with a thin drift region.The numerical results by MEDICI indicate that the breakdown voltage of the proposed device is increased by 97% compared with a conventional LDMOS,while maintaining a low on-resistance.

  12. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wustite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite

  13. Analytical performance specifications for changes in assay biasbias) for data with logarithmic distributions as assessed by effects on reference change values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Lund, Flemming; Fraser, Callum G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The distributions of within-subject biological variation are usually described as coefficients of variation, as are analytical performance specifications for bias, imprecision and other characteristics. Estimation of specifications required for reference change values is traditionally...... performance specifications for reference change value, with combination of Δbias and CVA based on log-Gaussian distributions of CVI as natural logarithms. The model was tested using plasma prolactin and glucose as examples. RESULTS: Analytical performance specifications for reference change value generated...... using the new model based on log-Gaussian distributions were practically identical with the traditional model based on Gaussian distributions. CONCLUSION: The traditional and simple to apply model used to generate analytical performance specifications for reference change value, based on the use...

  14. Equivalent circuit model of converse magnetoelectric effect for the tri-layer magnetoelectric laminates with thermal and stress loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Li, Meng-Han; Liu, Hui; Cui, Xiao-Le

    2015-12-01

    For the converse magnetoelectric coupling effect of the piezoelectric/magnetostrictive/piezoelectric tri-layer symmetric magnetoelectric laminates, based on the nonlinear thermo-magneto-mechanical constitutive equations of the giant magnetostrictive materials and the thermo-electro-mechanical constitutive equations of the piezoelectric materials, according to Newton's second law and the magnetic circuit theorem, an equivalent circuit is established. Then an expression of the converse magnetoelectric coefficient describing nonlinear thermo-magneto-electro-mechanical coupling is established. The curve of the nonlinear converse magnetoelectric coefficient versus the bias magnetic field, is predicted effectively by the expression, and the predictions are in good agreement with the experimental result both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, the model can predict the complex influences of the bias magnetic field, the stress and the ambient temperature on the converse magnetoelectric coefficient. It can be found from these predictions that the converse magnetoelectric coefficient decreases with the increasing temperature and increases with the increasing tensile stress. Under the common effect of the ambient temperature and the stress, it is also found that the converse magnetoelectric coefficient changes sharply with the ambient temperature when the tensile stress is applied on the laminates, but it has a good stability of temperature when a large compressive stress is applied. Therefore, this work contributes to the researches on the giant converse magnetoelectric coefficient and the designs of magnetoelectric devices based on the converse magnetoelectric coupling.

  15. Discussion and prediction on decreasing flow stress scale effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on crystal plasticity theory and surface layer model, relation of flow stress to billet dimension and grain size was built,and rationality of derived relation was verified with tensile tests of different size billets. With derived expressions, relation of decreasing flow stress scale effect to billet dimension, grain size as well as billet shape was discussed and predicted. The results show that flow stress is proportional to billet size; with decrease of grain size, flow stress is less influenced by billet dimension. When both cross section area and grain size are same, flow stress decrease of rectangular section billet or sheet is larger than that of circular section billet.

  16. The effect of anticipatory psychosocial stress on frontal executive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Olga, Wudarczyk

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has found that stress hormone cortisol affects cognition, especially those cognitive abilities associated with the areas of the brain abundant in glucocorticoid receptors (e.g. Lupien & McEwen, 1997). Most studies have shown negative effects of induced stress on the functions associated with the hippocampus. Less research has investigated the effects of stress on executive functions, associated with the frontal lobes, also rich in glucocorticoid receptors. The evidence of th...

  17. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  18. Low-stress and high-stress singing have contrasting effects on glucocorticoid response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy eFancourt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Performing music in public is widely recognised as a potentially stress-inducing activity. However, despite the interest in music performance as an acute psychosocial stressor, there has been relatively little research on the effects of public performance on the endocrine system. This study examined the impact of singing in a low-stress performance situation and a high-stress live concert on levels of glucocorticoids (cortisol and cortisone in 15 professional singers. The results showed a significant decrease in both cortisol and cortisone across the low-stress condition, suggesting that singing in itself is a stress-reducing (and possibly health-promoting activity, but significant increases across the high-stress condition. This is the first study to demonstrate that singing affects glucocorticoid responses and that these responses are modulated by the conditions of performance.

  19. Effects of orthostasis on endocrine responses to psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nater, Urs M; Ditzen, Beate; Strahler, Jana; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-12-01

    Standardized psychological procedures have been designed to induce physiological stress responses. However, the impact of standing (orthostasis) on the physiological reaction after psychological stress remains unclear. The purpose of the current analysis was to examine and quantify the relative contribution of orthostasis to the physiological stress response by comparing a "standing with stress" to a "standing without stress" condition. We investigated the effect of standing with and without stress on responses of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary (SAM) system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis using a standardized psychosocial stress protocol (Trier Social Stress Test) and a non-stress condition in a repeated measures design. Subjects (N=30) were exposed to both conditions in randomized order and had to maintain a standing, upright position for 10minutes. In the "standing with stress" condition, significant increases in repeatedly assessed plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP), as well as in saliva cortisol were found, while in the "standing without stress" condition, no significant changes in plasma epinephrine and saliva cortisol were observed. Calculations of the relative contribution of orthostasis to physiological stress responses revealed that 25.61% of the NE increase, 82.94% of the EP increase, and 68.91% of the cortisol increase, could be attributed to psychosocial stress adjusted for the effects of orthostasis and basal endocrine output. Although these results are indicative for a marked endocrine reaction that is caused by psychosocial stress alone, our findings show that the contribution of orthostasis must be taken into account when interpreting endocrine data collected in a psychosocial stress test.

  20. High-end climate change impact on European runoff and low flows - exploring the effects of forcing biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Lamprini V.; Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Grillakis, Manolis G.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-05-01

    Climate models project a much more substantial warming than the 2 °C target under the more probable emission scenarios, making higher-end scenarios increasingly plausible. Freshwater availability under such conditions is a key issue of concern. In this study, an ensemble of Euro-CORDEX projections under RCP8.5 is used to assess the mean and low hydrological states under +4 °C of global warming for the European region. Five major European catchments were analysed in terms of future drought climatology and the impact of +2 °C versus +4 °C global warming was investigated. The effect of bias correction of the climate model outputs and the observations used for this adjustment was also quantified. Projections indicate an intensification of the water cycle at higher levels of warming. Even for areas where the average state may not considerably be affected, low flows are expected to reduce, leading to changes in the number of dry days and thus drought climatology. The identified increasing or decreasing runoff trends are substantially intensified when moving from the +2 to the +4° of global warming. Bias correction resulted in an improved representation of the historical hydrology. It is also found that the selection of the observational data set for the application of the bias correction has an impact on the projected signal that could be of the same order of magnitude to the selection of the Global Climate Model (GCM).

  1. Effects of controllable vs. uncontrollable stress on circadian temperature rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, G J; Bauman, R A; Pastel, R H; Myatt, C A; Closser-Gomez, E; D'Angelo, C P

    1991-03-01

    The effects of sustained stress on body temperature were investigated in rats implanted with mini-transmitters that permitted remote measurement of body temperature. Temperature was first monitored during control conditions. Following the control period, rats were either shaped to avoid/escape signalled around-the-clock intermittent footshock (controllable stress) or yoked to the controlling rats such that the controlling rat and the yoked rat received shock of the same duration, but only the controlling rat could terminate shock by pulling a ceiling chain. Under control conditions, rats demonstrated regular rhythms in body temperature which averaged 1 degree higher during the 12-h dark cycle than the light cycle. Stress disrupted the rhythm and markedly decreased the night-day difference in temperature, especially in the yoked rats in which almost no difference between light and dark cycle temperature was seen. The disruption was most marked for the first days of stress. A regular temperature rhythm was reestablished following about 5 days of stress although the stress condition continued. Leverpressing for food was also affected by the stress conditions with both stress groups leverpressing less than controls and the uncontrollable stress group pressing less than the controllable stress group. These data offer additional evidence of the increased pathophysiological effects of uncontrollable as compared to controllable stress.

  2. Embodying an outgroup: the role of racial bias and the effect of multisensory processing in somatosensory remapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eFini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We come to understand other people’s physical and mental states by re-mapping their bodily states onto our sensorimotor system. This process, also called somatosensory resonance, is an essential ability for social cognition and is stronger when observing ingroup than outgroup members. Here we investigated, first, whether implicit racial bias constrains somatosensory resonance, and second, whether increasing the ingroup/outgroup perceived physical similarity results in an increase in the somatosensory resonance for outgroup members. We used the Visual Remapping of Touch effect as an index of individuals’ ability in resonating with the others, and the Implicit Association Test to measure racial bias. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to detect near-threshold tactile stimuli delivered to their own face while viewing either an ingroup or an outgroup face receiving a similar stimulation. Our results showed that individuals’ tactile accuracy when viewing an outgroup face being touched was negatively correlated to their implicit racial bias. In Experiment 2, participants received the Interpersonal Multisensory Stimulation (IMS while observing an outgroup member. IMS has been found to increase the perceived physical similarity between the observer’s and the observed body. We tested whether such increase in ingroup/outgroup perceived physical similarity increased the remapping ability for outgroup members. We found that after sharing IMS experience with an outgroup member, tactile accuracy when viewing touch on outgroup faces increased. Interestingly, participants with stronger implicit bias against the outgroup showed larger positive change in the remapping. We conclude that shared multisensory experiences might represent one key way to improve our ability to resonate with others by overcoming the boundaries between ingroup and outgroup categories.

  3. Overcoming the effects of stress on reactor operator performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Xuhong; Wei Li; Zhao Bingquan [Tsinghua Univ., Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Training Center, Beijing (China)

    2003-03-01

    Reactor operators may be exposed to significant levels of stress during plant emergencies and their performance may be affected by the stress. This paper first identified the potential sources of stress in the nuclear power plant, then discussed the ways in which stress is likely to affect the reactor operators, and finally identified several training approaches for reducing or eliminating stress effects. The challenges for effective stress reducing training may seem daunting, yet the challenges are real and must be addressed. This paper reviewed researches in training design, knowledge and skill acquisition, and training transfer point to a number of strategies that can be used to address these challenges and lead to more effective training and development. (author)

  4. Abnormal positive bias stress instability of In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistors with low-temperature Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Hong; Yu, Ming-Jiue; Lin, Ruei-Ping; Hsu, Chih-Pin; Hou, Tuo-Hung, E-mail: thhou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electronics Engineering and Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-18

    Low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gate dielectric in amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistors fabricated at temperatures below 120 °C. The devices exhibited a negligible threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub T}) during negative bias stress, but a more pronounced ΔV{sub T} under positive bias stress with a characteristic turnaround behavior from a positive ΔV{sub T} to a negative ΔV{sub T}. This abnormal positive bias instability is explained using a two-process model, including both electron trapping and hydrogen release and migration. Electron trapping induces the initial positive ΔV{sub T}, which can be fitted using the stretched exponential function. The breakage of residual AlO-H bonds in low-temperature ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is triggered by the energetic channel electrons. The hydrogen atoms then diffuse toward the In–Ga–Zn–O channel and induce the negative ΔV{sub T} through electron doping with power-law time dependence. A rapid partial recovery of the negative ΔV{sub T} after stress is also observed during relaxation.

  5. DC bias effect on alternating current electrical conductivity of poly(ethylene terephthalate)/alumina nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, Pravin N.; Deshpande, Vineeta D.

    2016-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposites based on metal oxide (ceramic) nanoparticles are a new class of materials with unique properties and designed for various applications such as electronic device packaging, insulation, fabrication and automotive industries. Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/alumina (Al2O3) nanocomposites with filler content between 1 wt% and 5 wt% were prepared by melt compounding method using co-rotating twin screw extruder and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and precision LCR meter techniques. The results revealed that proper uniform dispersion at lower content up to 2 wt% of nano-alumina observed by using TEM. Aggregation of nanoparticles was observed at higher content of alumina examined by using SEM and TEM. The frequency dependences of the alternating current (AC) conductivity (σAC) of PET/alumina nanocomposites on the filler content and DC bias were investigated in the frequency range of 20Hz - 1MHz. The results showed that the AC and direct current (DC) conductivity increases with increasing DC bias and nano-alumina content upto 3 wt%. It follows the Jonscher's universal power law of solids. It revealed that σAC of PET/alumina nanocomposites can be well characterized by the DC conductivity (σDC), critical frequency (ωc), critical exponent of the power law (s). Roll of DC bias potential led to an increase of DC conductivity (σDC) due to the creation of additional conducting paths with the polymer nanocomposites and percolation behavior achieved through co-continuous morphology.

  6. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: possible synergistic effect of stress hyperglycemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress on the renal tubules has been implicated as a mechanism of injury in both stress hyperglycemia and contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of these effects has a synergistic effect on accentuating renal tubular apoptosis and therefore increasing the risk of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  7. Virtual Cathodes near small electrodes biased near the plasma potential and its effects on Langmuir probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg

    2015-09-01

    Movable small (3cm x 3.8cm) plates biased near the plasma potential are immersed in a filament discharge in a multi-dipole chamber. The plates are small (Aplate /Achamber collection of an electrode in the presence of the virtual cathode, and was experimentally investigated by comparing I-V characteristics of the small plate and a 0.6cm diameter Langmuir probe. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under the Grant and Contract No. DE-FG02-97ER54437.

  8. Are hungry sheep more pessimistic? The effects of food restriction on cognitive bias and the involvement of ghrelin in its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Else; Ferguson, Drewe; Lee, Caroline

    2014-01-17

    Food restriction is considered to be a welfare issue in extensively reared animals. However, the effects of food restriction on the affective state, and its physiological regulation, are unknown. In Experiment 1, we aimed to assess the effects of increased plasma concentrations of acyl-ghrelin on judgement bias (an indicator of affective states) by fasting sheep for 24h or by ghrelin administration. In Experiment 2, we aimed to assess the effects of chronic food restriction on judgement bias and attention bias towards a food-related cue. For the judgement bias test, sheep were trained in an arena to approach a positive location cue associated with conspecifics and not approach a negative location cue associated with a dog. Three non-trained, non-reinforced ambiguous location cues were situated between the positive and negative locations. Attention bias towards a food-related cue was assessed by placing an empty food bucket against the wall of the arena halfway between the entry point and the positive location. In Experiment 1, sheep were divided into three treatments; 24h fast, ghrelin administration or control. Judgement bias, locomotor activity and plasma cortisol concentrations were assessed. The ghrelin treated group tended to express a more pessimistic bias compared to the control group (P<0.1), and plasma cortisol concentrations tended to be increased (P<0.1). In Experiment 2, sheep were subjected to a high feeding level (HF) or low feeding level (LF) for 7days. The LF group tended to show a more optimistic judgement bias (P<0.1). When the food-related cue was presented, LF ewes took longer to reach the positive location (P<0.001), spent longer with their head inside the bucket (P<0.001) and more time interacting with the bucket (P<0.01). This study provides preliminary evidence that food restriction alters judgement bias and attention bias towards a food-related cue which may indicate altered affective states of sheep.

  9. Effect of Thermal Stress on Cardiac Function

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body heating decreases pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and cerebral vascular conductance, and causes an inotropic shift in the Frank-Starling curve. Whole-body cooling increases pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and cerebral vascular conductance without changing systolic function. These and other data indicate factors affecting cardiac function may mechanistically contribute to syncope during heat stress and improvements in orthostatic tolerance during cold stress.

  10. The Effects of Halo Assembly Bias on Self-Calibration in Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-08-07

    Self-calibration techniques for analyzing galaxy cluster counts utilize the abundance and the clustering amplitude of dark matter halos. These properties simultaneously constrain cosmological parameters and the cluster observable-mass relation. It was recently discovered that the clustering amplitude of halos depends not only on the halo mass, but also on various secondary variables, such as the halo formation time and the concentration; these dependences are collectively termed 'assembly bias'. Applying modified Fisher matrix formalism, we explore whether these secondary variables have a significant impact on the study of dark energy properties using the self-calibration technique in current (SDSS) and the near future (DES, SPT, and LSST) cluster surveys. The impact of the secondary dependence is determined by (1) the scatter in the observable-mass relation and (2) the correlation between observable and secondary variables. We find that for optical surveys, the secondary dependence does not significantly influence an SDSS-like survey; however, it may affect a DES-like survey (given the high scatter currently expected from optical clusters) and an LSST-like survey (even for low scatter values and low correlations). For an SZ survey such as SPT, the impact of secondary dependence is insignificant if the scatter is 20% or lower but can be enhanced by the potential high scatter values introduced by a highly-correlated background. Accurate modeling of the assembly bias is necessary for cluster self-calibration in the era of precision cosmology.

  11. Simplicity and Specificity in Language: Domain-General Biases Have Domain-Specific Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Kirby, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which the linguistic system-its architecture, the representations it operates on, the constraints it is subject to-is specific to language has broad implications for cognitive science and its relation to evolutionary biology. Importantly, a given property of the linguistic system can be "specific" to the domain of language in several ways. For example, if the property evolved by natural selection under the pressure of the linguistic function it serves then the property is domain-specific in the sense that its design is tailored for language. Equally though, if that property evolved to serve a different function or if that property is domain-general, it may nevertheless interact with the linguistic system in a way that is unique. This gives a second sense in which a property can be thought of as specific to language. An evolutionary approach to the language faculty might at first blush appear to favor domain-specificity in the first sense, with individual properties of the language faculty being specifically linguistic adaptations. However, we argue that interactions between learning, culture, and biological evolution mean any domain-specific adaptations that evolve will take the form of weak biases rather than hard constraints. Turning to the latter sense of domain-specificity, we highlight a very general bias, simplicity, which operates widely in cognition and yet interacts with linguistic representations in domain-specific ways. PMID:26793132

  12. Simplicity and Specificity in Language: Domain general biases have domain specific effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eCulbertson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which the linguistic system—its architecture, the representations it operates on, the constraints it is subject to—is specific to language has broad implications for cognitive science and its relation to evolutionary biology. Importantly, a given property of the linguistic system can be specific to the domain of language in several ways. For example, if the property evolved by natural selection under the pressure of the linguistic function it serves then the property is domain­-specific in the sense that its design is tailored for language. Equally though, if that property evolved to serve a different function or if that property is domain-general, it may nevertheless interact with the linguistic system in a way that is unique. This gives a second sense in which a property can be thought of as specific to language. An evolutionary approach to the language faculty might at first blush appear to favor domain­-specificity in the first sense, with individual properties of the language faculty being specifically linguistic adaptations. However, we argue that interactions between learning, culture and biological evolution mean any domain-specific adaptations that evolve will take the form of weak biases rather than hard constraints. Turning to the latter sense of domain-specificity, we highlight a very general bias, simplicity, which operates widely in cognition and yet interacts with linguistic representations in a domain-­specific way.

  13. Effect of pulsed bias on TiO2 thin films prepared on silicon by arc ion plating and simulation of pulsed plasma sheath dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric TiO2 thin films were fabricated on p-(100) Si substrates by arc ion plating. A pulsed substrate bias ranging from 0 V to − 900 V was applied to investigate the effect of pulsed bias on phase structure and growth of the films. Phase, microstructure, and growth morphology of TiO2 films prepared at different bias voltages were evaluated with grazing incident x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that pulsed bias exerts an evident influence on phase structure and growth morphology. High substrate bias facilitates the formation of rutile phase, a (220) preferred orientation is observed in TiO2 films obtained at − 900 V. AFM images show that pulsed substrate bias exerts a strong influence on the growth of TiO2 films. With increasing bias voltage, the film is initially composed of tiny surface islands separated by shallow boundaries, then of large and spiky surface islands isolated by deep boundaries. Correspondingly, surface roughness increases from 1.1 nm at 0 V to 3.8 nm at − 900 V. To explain the phenomena observed in this study, pulsed plasma sheath model was used to simulate the ion sheath dynamics. By analyzing experimental and simulated results, it can be concluded that film growth and property relate close to ion density and energy in the sheath, which is dominantly governed by negative substrate bias.

  14. Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a potent modulator of learning and memory processes. Although there have been a few attempts in the literature to explain the diversity of effects (including facilitating, impairing, and lack of effects described for the impact of stress on memory function according to single classification criterion, they have proved insufficient to explain the whole complexity of effects. Here, we review the literature in the field of stress and memory interactions according to five selected classifying factors (source of stress, stressor duration, stressor intensity, stressor timing with regard to memory phase, and learning type in an attempt to develop an integrative model to understand how stress affects memory function. Summarizing on those conditions in which there was enough information, we conclude that high stress levels, whether intrinsic (triggered by the cognitive challenge or extrinsic (induced by conditions completely unrelated to the cognitive task, tend to facilitate Pavlovian conditioning (in a linear-asymptotic manner, while being deleterious for spatial/explicit information processing (which with regard to intrinsic stress levels follows an inverted U-shape effect. Moreover, after reviewing the literature, we conclude that all selected factors are essential to develop an integrative model that defines the outcome of stress effects in memory processes. In parallel, we provide a brief review of the main neurobiological mechanisms proposed to account for the different effects of stress in memory function. Glucocorticoids were found as a common mediating mechanism for both the facilitating and impairing actions of stress in different memory processes and phases. Among the brain regions implicated, the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex were highlighted as critical for the mediation of stress effects.

  15. [STRESS AND INFARCT LIMITING EFFECTS OF EARLY HYPOXIC PRECONDITIONING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishmanov, Yu B; Maslov, L N; Sementsov, A S; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tsibulnikov, S Yu

    2015-09-01

    It was established that early hypoxic preconditioning is an adaptive state different from eustress and distress. Hypoxic preconditioning has the cross effects, increasing the tolerance of the heart to ischemia-reperfusion and providing antiulcerogenic effect during immobilization stress.

  16. Nature-Based Stress Management Course for Individuals at Risk of Adverse Health Effects from Work-Related Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg Jr., Gunnar; Vega-Matuszczyk, Josefa; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management cont...

  17. The effects of stress on nuclear power plant operational decision making and training approaches to reduce stress effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational personnel may be exposed to significant levels of stress during unexpected changes in plant state an plant emergencies. The decision making that identifies operational actions, which is strongly determined by procedures, may be affected by stress, and performance may be impaired. ER report analyzes potential effects of stress in nuclear power plant (NPP) settings, especially in the context of severe accident management (SAM). First, potential sources of stress in the NPP setting are identified. This analysis is followed by a review of the ways in which stress is likely to affect performance, with an emphasis on performance of cognitive skills that are linked to operational decision making. Finally, potential training approaches for reducing or eliminating stress effects are identified. Several training approaches have the potential to eliminate or mitigate stress effects on cognitive skill performance. First, the use of simulated events for training can reduce the novelty and uncertainty that can lead to stress and performance impairments. Second, training to make cognitive processing more efficient and less reliant on attention and memory resources can offset the reductions in these resources that occur under stressful conditions. Third, training that targets crew communications skills can reduce the likelihood that communications will fail under stress

  18. The effects of stress on nuclear power plant operational decision making and training approaches to reduce stress effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumaw, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    Operational personnel may be exposed to significant levels of stress during unexpected changes in plant state an plant emergencies. The decision making that identifies operational actions, which is strongly determined by procedures, may be affected by stress, and performance may be impaired. ER report analyzes potential effects of stress in nuclear power plant (NPP) settings, especially in the context of severe accident management (SAM). First, potential sources of stress in the NPP setting are identified. This analysis is followed by a review of the ways in which stress is likely to affect performance, with an emphasis on performance of cognitive skills that are linked to operational decision making. Finally, potential training approaches for reducing or eliminating stress effects are identified. Several training approaches have the potential to eliminate or mitigate stress effects on cognitive skill performance. First, the use of simulated events for training can reduce the novelty and uncertainty that can lead to stress and performance impairments. Second, training to make cognitive processing more efficient and less reliant on attention and memory resources can offset the reductions in these resources that occur under stressful conditions. Third, training that targets crew communications skills can reduce the likelihood that communications will fail under stress.

  19. Effects of Stress and MDMA on Hippocampal Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Georg F.; Johnson, Bethann N.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a substituted amphetamine and popular drug of abuse. Its mood-enhancing short-term effects may prompt its consumption under stress. Clinical studies indicate that MDMA treatment may mitigate the symptoms of stress disorders such as posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). On the other hand, repeated administration of MDMA results in persistent deficits in markers of serotonergic (5-HT) nerve terminals that have been viewed as indicative of 5-HT neuro...

  20. Glucocorticoid Hyper- and Hypofunction: Stress Effects on Cognition and Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeansok J.; Haller, József

    2007-01-01

    It is now well documented that both increased and decreased stress responses can profoundly affect cognition and behavior. This mini review presents possible neural mechanisms subserving stress effects on memory and aggression, particularly focusing on glucocorticoid (GC) hyper- and hypofunction. First, uncontrollable stress impedes hippocampal memory and long-term potentiation (LTP). Because the hippocampus is important for the stability of long-term memory and because LTP has qualities desi...

  1. Training Effect and Hysteretic Behaviour of Angular Dependence of Exchange Bias in Co/IrMn Bilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; DU Jun; BAI Xiao-Jun; YOU Biao; ZHANG Wei; HU An

    2009-01-01

    @@ The training effect and the hysteresis behaviour of the angular dependence of exchange bias are extensively investigated upon the variation of the IrMn layer thickness tIrMn in a series of Co/IrMn bilayers. When tIrMn is very small, both of them are negligible. Then they increase very sharply with increasing tIrMn and then reach maxima at almost the same value of tIrMn. Finally they both decrease when tIrMn is further increased. The similar variation trends suggest that these phenomena arise from irreversible change of antiferromagnet spin orientations, according to the thermal activation model.

  2. Male-Biased Autosomal Effect of 16p13.11 Copy Number Variation in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tropeano; Joo Wook Ahn; Dobson, Richard J. B.; Gerome Breen; James Rucker; Abhishek Dixit; Pal, Deb K; Peter McGuffin; Anne Farmer; White, Peter S.; Joris Andrieux; Evangelos Vassos; Caroline Mackie Ogilvie; Sarah Curran; Collier, David A

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) at chromosome 16p13.11 have been associated with a range of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, ADHD, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. Significant sex differences in prevalence, course and severity have been described for a number of these conditions but the biological and environmental factors underlying such sex-specific features remain unclear. We tested the burden and the possible sex-biased effect of CNVs at 16p13.11 in a sample of 10,397 ...

  3. Temporary amygdala inhibition reduces stress effects in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalooei, Jila Rezaeian; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Khosravi, Maryam; Bahari, Zahra; Hatef, Boshra; Mohammadi, Alireza; Nicaeili, Fateme; Eftekhari, Fateme; Ghamari, Fateme; Hadipour, Mohamadmehdi; Kaka, Gholamreza

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated the effect of temporary inhibition of amygdala in response to metabolic changes caused by stress in female mice. Unilateral and bilateral amygdala cannulation was carried out, and after a week of recovery, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into the mice amygdalae five minutes before the induction of stress. A communication box was employed to induce stress for four consecutive days and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, weight changes, and anorexia were measured as stress-induced metabolic changes. Results demonstrated that stress, increases stress, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, weight, food, and water intake. Temporary inhibition of the amygdala slightly decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations, but did not fully reduce the effect of stress. The bilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride to the amygdala reduced the effect of stress and reduced water intake and weight. Unilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride into the left and right amygdala reduced food intake. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the left side and right side of amygdala nuclei play a different role in metabolic responses in stress. PMID:27489731

  4. Effect of Surface Topography on Stress Concentration Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhengkun; LIAO Ridong

    2015-01-01

    Neuber rule and Arola-Ramulu model are widely used to predict the stress concentration factor of rough specimens. However, the height parameters and effective valley radius used in these two models depend strongly on the resolution of the roughness-measuring instruments and are easily introduce measuring errors. Besides, it is difficult to find a suitable parameter to characterize surface topography to quantitatively describe its effect on stress concentration factor. In order to overcome these disadvantages, profile moments are carried out to characterize surface topography, surface topography is simulated by superposing series of cosine components, the stress concentration factors of different micro cosine-shaped surface topographies are investigated by finite element analysis. In terms of micro cosine-shaped surface topography, an equation using the second profile moment to estimate the stress concentration factor is proposed, predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% error compared with the results of finite element analysis, which are more accurate than other models. Moreover, the proposed equation is applied to the real surface topography machined by turning. Predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% of the maximum stress concentration factors and about 5% of the effective stress concentration factors estimated from the finite element analysis for three levels of turning surface topographies under different simulated scales. The proposed model is feasible in predicting the stress concentration factors of real machined surface topographies.

  5. Judgement heuristics and bias in evidence interpretation: The effects of computer generated exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of multi-media applications, trial presentation software and computer generated exhibits (CGE) has raised questions as to the potential impact of the use of presentation technology on juror decision making. A significant amount of the commentary on the manner in which CGE exerts legal influence is largely anecdotal; empirical examinations too are often devoid of established theoretical rationalisations. This paper will examine a range of established judgement heuristics (for example, the attribution error, representativeness, simulation), in order to establish their appropriate application for comprehending legal decisions. Analysis of both past cases and empirical studies will highlight the potential for heuristics and biases to be restricted or confounded by the use of CGE. The paper will conclude with some wider discussion on admissibility, access to justice, and emerging issues in the use of multi-media in court. PMID:26341308

  6. Effect of stress inoculation training on the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Fahimeh; Kashani, Parisa; Moghimian, Maryam; Shakour, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a broad group (over 270 types) of diseases. This disease, like other chronic diseases, occurs in all ages and ethnic groups, and is considered as a major health problem. Stress is one of the most important psychological factors influencing the occurrence of physical diseases, and can lead to severe anxiety, depression, and negative effects on health. It can also make individuals vulnerable to physical diseases, and in the long term, leads to death. This study was conducted to determine the effect of inoculation training on stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 as a clinical trial with convenient random sampling of patients from the chemotherapy clinic of Seyed Al-Shohada hospital of Isfahan. Forty patients with cancer who were eligible for the study were randomly assigned to either case or control group. The case and control groups had the same treatment plans, and the only difference was stress inoculation training administered in the case group, which was composed of eight 90-min sessions over 8 weeks. Data were collected using Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales 42 (DASS-42) questionnaire and demographic questionnaire, and analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and t-test in SPSS. Results: The results showed that there was a significant difference between case and control groups in terms of stress, anxiety, and depression (P < 0.001). Stress inoculation training reduced stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Conclusions: Stress inoculation training significantly reduced stress, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, teaching this skill and the strategies of coping with stress is recommended for these patients, in addition to medicational treatment. PMID:26120337

  7. Effective stress law for the permeability of a limestone

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash; Guédon, Sylvine; Martineau, François

    2008-01-01

    The effective stress law for the permeability of a limestone is studied experimentally by performing constant head permeability tests in a triaxial cell with different conditions of confining pressure and pore pressure. Test results have shown that a pore pressure increase and a confining pressure decrease both result in an increase of the permeability, and that the effect of the pore pressure change on the variation of the permeability is more important than the effect of a change of the confining pressure. A power law is proposed for the variation of the permeability with the effective stress. The permeability effective stress coefficient increases linearly with the differential pressure and is greater than one as soon the differential pressure exceeds few bars. The test results are well reproduced using the proposed permeability-effective stress law. A conceptual pore-shell model based on a detailed observation of the microstructure of the studied limestone is proposed. This model is able to explain the ex...

  8. Effects of prenatal stress on vulnerability to stress in prepubertal and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fride, E; Dan, Y; Feldon, J; Halevy, G; Weinstock, M

    1986-01-01

    This study investigated the hypotheses that unpredictable prenatal stress has effects on the offspring, similar to those induced by perinatal administration of glucocorticoids and increases the vulnerability to stressful situations at adulthood. Rats were exposed to random noise and light stress throughout pregnancy. Offspring were tested for the development of spontaneous alternation behavior (SA) and at adulthood, their response to novel or aversive situations, open field, extinction and punishment following acquisition of an appetitive response and two-way active avoidance, were assessed. In prenatally stressed rats, the development of SA was significantly delayed. On repeated exposure to an open field they were less active; control rats had elevated plasma corticosterone (CCS) on days 2 and 4 of open field exposure, while prenatally stressed rats had significantly raised plasma CCS after each exposure (days 1-8). Furthermore, punishment-induced suppression of an appetitive response was enhanced. Acquisition of active avoidance was faciliated in female but reduced in male prenatally stressed offspring. It is suggested that random prenatal noise and light stress may cause impairment of development of hippocampal function which lasts into adulthood. This impairment is manifested as an increase in vulnerability and a decrease in habituation to stressful stimuli. PMID:3774900

  9. Stress effects in meso-porous silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysenko, V.; Populaire, C.; Remaki, B.; Barbier, D. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR-5511 CNRS, INSA de Lyon, 7, avenue Jean Capelle, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Champagnon, B. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de Materiaux Luminescents, UMR-5620 CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon I, 43 boulevard 11 novembre 1918, Bat. Lippmann, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Artmann, H.; Pannek, T. [Robert Bosch GmbH, FV/FLD, Postfach 10 60 50, 70049 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Mechanisms of strain and stress appearing in as-prepared and treated meso-porous silicon nanostructures are described. Stress effects induced by nano-pores filling with ethanol and capping of the porous nanostructures are observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy and discussed in details. Strong correlations between macroscopic and nanoscale stresses as well as with earlier X-ray measurements are found. Influence of stress on thermal properties of meso-porous silicon nanostructures is demonstrated. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    The measurement issue is the key issue in the literature on trade policy-induced agri-cultural price incentive bias. This paper introduces a general equilibrium effective rate of protection (GE-ERP) measure, which extends and generalizes earlier partial equilibrium nominal protection measures....... For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  11. Prenatal stress and its effect on infant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizink, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this dissertation the effect of prenatal maternal stress on infant development and behavior is discussed. In a prospective longitudinal study of 170 nulliparous women, data was gatheren on the maternal stress level three times during pregnancy by means of questionnaires and endocrinologic p

  12. Effect of Huzikang-duannaibao on piglets' ablactation stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Shenglin; Jiang Zhengyun

    2003-01-01

    Piglets' alactation-stress with diarrhea as a main symptom is a serious problem in pig farming. The experiment indicates that the complex premix additive Huzikang-duannaibao can be used to control ablactation-stress syndromes and its effects are better than that of the common antibiotic ligomycin.

  13. Effects of Stress and MDMA on Hippocampal Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg F. Weber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a substituted amphetamine and popular drug of abuse. Its mood-enhancing short-term effects may prompt its consumption under stress. Clinical studies indicate that MDMA treatment may mitigate the symptoms of stress disorders such as posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD. On the other hand, repeated administration of MDMA results in persistent deficits in markers of serotonergic (5-HT nerve terminals that have been viewed as indicative of 5-HT neurotoxicity. Exposure to chronic stress has been shown to augment MDMA-induced 5-HT neurotoxicity. Here, we examine the transcriptional responses in the hippocampus to MDMA treatment of control rats and rats exposed to chronic stress. MDMA altered the expression of genes that regulate unfolded protein binding, protein folding, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity, and neuropeptide signaling. In stressed rats, the gene expression profile in response to MDMA was altered to affect sensory processing and responses to tissue damage in nerve sheaths. Subsequent treatment with MDMA also markedly altered the genetic responses to stress such that the stress-induced downregulation of genes related to the circadian rhythm was reversed. The data support the view that MDMA-induced transcriptional responses accompany the persistent effects of this drug on neuronal structure/function. In addition, MDMA treatment alters the stress-induced transcriptional signature.

  14. NEGATIVE EFFECT OF METALLOID STRESS ON WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marína Maglovski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As belongs to heavy metals and its accumulation in plants, besides damaging the organism itself, represents a potential health risk to animal and human consumers. Therefore, contamination of soils and waters with this compound is a serious environmental problem. In this work we focused on investigating a negative impact of As on selected parameters of growth of wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Genoveva grown in hydropony. In the stage of first assimilation leaves we applied a solution of heavy metal (1 mg.kg-1 As3+ on wheat plants. For plants grown under hydropony conditions we observed different plant parameters such as length, weight, amount of fresh and dry biomass. Further we analyzed accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and products membrane lipid peroxidation as indicators of oxidative stress. In addition to these we also measured the content of photosynthetic pigments, maximal quantum yield and proline in plant tissue. Our data indicate reduction of the biomass of shoots forthcoming as a result of exposure of stressed plants to As. Decline of biomass accumulation was accompanied by increase of hydrogen peroxide in plant tissue. In contrast, level of lipid peroxidation was suppressed in stressed shoots. Contents of photosynthetic pigments soundly decreased. Interestingly, fluorescence (Fp=Fm in stressed wheat shoots increased. Similarly in tested shoots the content of proline was increased. The results indicate that the applied dose of As has a negative impact on the growth and photosynthetic performance of stressed plants. A better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for As resistance and toxicity in plants requires further investigation.

  15. Stress hormones and abiotic stresses have different effects on antioxidants in maize lines with different sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellos, T; Tímár, I; Szilágyi, V; Szalai, G; Galiba, G; Kocsy, G

    2008-09-01

    The effect of stress hormones and abiotic stress treatments on reactive oxygen species and on antioxidants was compared in two maize (Zea mays L.) lines (Penjalinan and Z7) having different stress tolerance. Following treatment with abscisic acid, salicylic acid or hydrogen peroxide, the amount of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides increased, while after osmotic stress or cultivation in continuous darkness, the levels were unchanged or decreased. The higher amount of lipid peroxides in Penjalinan indicated its greater sensitivity compared to Z7. The level of the examined antioxidants was increased by nearly all treatments. Glutathione and cysteine contents were higher after salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide and polyethylene glycol treatments and lower after application of abscisic acid, NaCl and growth in darkness in Z7 than in Penjalinan. The activity of glutathione reductase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione S-transferase was higher after almost all treatments in Z7. The expression of the glutathione synthetase (EC 6.3.2.3) gene was not affected by the treatments, while the level of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (EC 6.3.2.2) and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) transcripts increased after most treatments. The two stress hormones and the stress treatments resulted in different changes in antioxidant levels in the two maize lines, which indicates the specific, stress tolerance-dependent response of plants to the various growth regulators and adverse environmental effects that were examined. PMID:18761495

  16. Simulation study on fluctuant flow stress scale effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Yu; YU Hu-ping; RUAN Xue-yu

    2006-01-01

    Crystal plasticity theory was used to simulate upsetting tests of different dimensions and grain size micro copper cylinders in this study on the fluctuant flow stress scale effect. Results showed that with the decrease of billet grain quantity, flow stress fluctuation is not always increased, but there is a maximum. Through this study, the fluctuant flow stress scale effect can be understood deeper, and relevant necessary information was obtained for further prediction and control of this scale effect and to design the microforming process and die.

  17. The role of attentional bias in the effect of food advertising on actual food intake among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkvord, Frans; Anschütz, Doeschka J; Wiers, Reinout W; Buijzen, Moniek

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the potential moderating role of attentional bias (i.e., gaze duration, number of fixations, latency of initial fixation) in the effect of advergames promoting energy-dense snacks on children's snack intake. A randomized between-subject design was conducted with 92 children who played an advergame that promoted either energy-dense snacks or nonfood products. Eye movements and reaction times to food and nonfood cues were recorded to assess attentional bias during playtime using eye-tracking methods. Children could eat freely after playing the game. The results showed that playing an advergame containing food cues increased total intake. Furthermore, children with a higher gaze duration for the food cues ate more of the advertised snacks. In addition, children with a faster latency of initial fixation to the food cues ate more in total and ate more of the advertised snacks. The number of fixations on the food cues did not increase actual snack intake. Food advertisements are designed to grab attention, and this study shows that the extent to which a child's attention is directed to a food cue increases the effect of the advertisement. PMID:25451582

  18. Effects of Referral Bias on Estimates of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression and Regression Rates in a 3-State Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, William Christopher; Cachay, Edward Rafael; Agmas, Wollelaw; Jackson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study aim is to compare anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) progression and regression rates in a cytology inception cohort to estimates based on the subcohort referred for ≥1 high-resolution anoscopies (HRAs). A cytology-based retrospective cohort was assembled including the anal cytology histories and invasive anal cancer (IAC) outcomes of all HIV-infected adults under care between 2001 and 2012. A 3-state Markov model (400, and to have HSIL at baseline and thereafter. They also had more anal cytology examinations (median 6 vs 3) and longer follow-up (median 5.5 vs 3.6 years). State transition rates were overestimated in the HRA subcohort relative to inception cohort, but the degree of discordance varied by transition: for effects on the effects of HRA-triage bias may be relevant to estimates of AIN state transitions from other cohorts subject to referral bias. PMID:26334910

  19. Exchange bias effect in polycrystalline NiO/NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Cabral, A.J. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Naturais, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, PA (Brazil); Peña Serna, J.; Rache Salles, B.; Novak, M.A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pinto, A.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha Remédios, C.M. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Naturais, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, PA (Brazil)

    2015-05-05

    Highlights: • Antiferromagnetic NiO/ferrimagnetic NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide composites. • Grains are well faceted, indicating that the specimen was well crystallized. • The micrographs suggests that NiO and NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} may be stuck to each other. • EB effect in NiO/NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide composites. • EB effect increases with the amount of NiO. - Abstract: Calcination of aqueous solutions formed by different molar ratios between the nickel and manganese chlorides led to the formation of antiferromagnetic NiO/ferrimagnetic NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide composites, as determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique and Rietveld refinement. Low temperature zero field cooled and field cooled magnetic hysteresis cycles show an exchange bias effect, presumably due to interaction at the interfaces between the antiferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic materials.

  20. Differential effects of stress and glucocorticoids on adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Gould, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Stress is known to inhibit neuronal growth in the hippocampus. In addition to reducing the size and complexity of the dendritic tree, stress and elevated glucocorticoid levels are known to inhibit adult neurogenesis. Despite the negative effects of stress hormones on progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus, some experiences which produce robust increases in glucocorticoid levels actually promote neuronal growth. These experiences, including running, mating, enriched environment living, and intracranial self-stimulation, all share in common a strong hedonic component. Taken together, the findings suggest that rewarding experiences buffer progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus from the negative effects of elevated stress hormones. This chapter considers the evidence that stress and glucocorticoids inhibit neuronal growth along with the paradoxical findings of enhanced neuronal growth under rewarding conditions with a view toward understanding the underlying biological mechanisms.

  1. The biasing effect of the "sexually violent predator" label on legal decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurich, Nicholas; Gongola, Jennifer; Krauss, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Public fear has driven legislation designed to identify and exclude sexual offenders from society, culminating in sexually violent predator (SVP) statutes, in which a sex offender who has served his prison sentence is hospitalized indefinitely if a jury determines that he is likely to reoffend as a result of a mental disorder. Jurors rarely vote not to commit a previously-convicted sex offender as an SVP. This study tests whether the mere label of "sexually violent predator" affects these legal decisions. Venire jurors (n=161) were asked to decide whether an individual who had been incarcerated for 16years should be released on parole. The individual was either labeled as a.) a sexually violent predator or b.) a convicted felon, and all other information was identical between the conditions. Jurors were over twice as likely to deny parole to the SVP compared to the felon, even though they did not consider him any more dangerous or any more likely to reoffend. Demographic variables did not moderate this finding. However, jurors' desire to 'get revenge' and to 'make the offender pay', as measured by Gerber and Jackson's (2013) Just Deserts Scale, did significantly relate to decisions to deny parole. These findings suggest that jurors' decisions in SVP hearings are driven by legally impermissible considerations, and that the mere label of "sexually violent predator" induces bias into the decision making process. PMID:27206709

  2. Effect of Diffusion Limitations on Multianalyte Determination from Biased Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romas Baronas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimization-based quantitative determination of multianalyte concentrations from biased biosensor responses is investigated under internal and external diffusion-limited conditions. A computational model of a biocatalytic amperometric biosensor utilizing a mono-enzyme-catalyzed (nonspecific competitive conversion of two substrates was used to generate pseudo-experimental responses to mixtures of compounds. The influence of possible perturbations of the biosensor signal, due to a white noise- and temperature-induced trend, on the precision of the concentration determination has been investigated for different configurations of the biosensor operation. The optimization method was found to be suitable and accurate enough for the quantitative determination of the concentrations of the compounds from a given biosensor transient response. The computational experiments showed a complex dependence of the precision of the concentration estimation on the relative thickness of the outer diffusion layer, as well as on whether the biosensor operates under diffusion- or kinetics-limited conditions. When the biosensor response is affected by the induced exponential trend, the duration of the biosensor action can be optimized for increasing the accuracy of the quantitative analysis.

  3. Effects of differential wavefront sensor bias drifts on high contrast imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Sadakuni, Naru; Palmer, David W; Poyneer, Lisa A; Max, Claire E; Savransky, Dmitry; Thomas, Sandrine J; Cardwell, Andrew; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Rantakyrö, Fredrik; Serio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility, extreme adaptive optics (AO), coronagraphic instrument, currently being integrated onto the 8-meter Gemini South telescope, with the ultimate goal of directly imaging extrasolar planets. To achieve the contrast required for the desired science, it is necessary to quantify and mitigate wavefront error (WFE). A large source of potential static WFE arises from the primary AO wavefront sensor (WFS) detector's use of multiple readout segments with independent signal chains including on-chip preamplifiers and external amplifiers. Temperature changes within GPI's electronics cause drifts in readout segments' bias levels, inducing an RMS WFE of 1.1 nm and 41.9 nm over 4.44 degrees Celsius, for magnitude 4 and 11 stars, respectively. With a goal of $<$2 nm of static WFE, these are significant enough to require remedial action. Simulations imply a requirement to take fresh WFS darks every 2 degrees Celsius of temperature change, for a magnitude 6 star; similarly, for...

  4. The effect of connectives on the selection of arguments: implicit consequentiality bias for the connective "but".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigalleau, François; Guerry, Michèle; Granjon, Lionel

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies about the implicit causality of inter-personal verbs showed a symmetric implicit consequentiality bias for psychological verbs. This symmetry is less clear for action verbs because the verbs assigning the implicit cause to the object argument (e.g. "Peter protected John because he was in danger.") tend to assign the implicit consequence to the same argument (e.g. "Peter protected John so he was not hurt."). We replicated this result by comparing continuations of inter-personal events followed by a causal connective "because" or a consequence connective "so". Moreover, we found similar results when the consequence connective was replaced by a contrastive connective "but". This result was confirmed in a second experiment where we measured the time required to imagine a consistent continuation for a fragment finishing with "but s/he ...". The results were consistent with a contrastive connective introducing a denial of a consequence of the previous event. The results were consistent with a model suggesting that thematic roles and connectives can predict preferred co-reference relations. PMID:23982891

  5. Principle of effective stress in variably saturated porous media (editorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, N.; Khalili, N.; Nikooee, E.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    This editorial highlights the motivations, historic perspectives, future prospects, and some details of the technical contents of the special issue on Principle of Effective Stress in Variably Saturated Porous Media.

  6. Effect of the Mechanical and Thermal Stresses of Rotating Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik M. Ali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating blades are the important parts in gas turbines. Hence, an accurate mathematical estimation (F.E.M of the stresses and deformations characteristics was required in the design applications to avoid failure. In recent year’s there are researchers interest in the effect of temperature on solid bodies has greatly increased, The main of this study investigated the thermal and rotational effects. So, the thermal stresses due to high pressure and temperature are studies, also determine the steady state stresses and deformations of rotating blades due to mechanical effect. Many parameters such as thickness and centre of rotating are investigated in this paper. The study results can ensure good recommendation for the effect of the mechanical and thermal stresses of rotary blades.

  7. Resistance to early-life stress in mice: effects of genetic background and stress duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene M. Savignac

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress can induce marked behavioural and physiological impairments in adulthood including cognitive deficits, depression, anxiety and gastrointestinal dysfunction. Although robust rat models of early-life stress exist there are few established effective paradigms in the mouse. Genetic background and protocol parameters used are two critical variables in such model development.Thus we investigated the impact of two different early-life stress protocols in two commonly used inbred mouse strains. C57BL/6 and innately anxious BALB/c male mice were maternally deprived 3 hrs daily, either from postnatal day 1 to 14 (Protocol 1 or 6 to 10 (Protocol 2. Animals were assessed in adulthood for cognitive performance (spontaneous alternation behaviour test, anxiety (open field, light/dark box and elevated plus maze tests and depression-related behaviours (forced swim test in addition to stress-sensitive physiological changes. Overall, the results showed that early-life stressed mice from both strains displayed good cognitive ability and no elevations in anxiety. However, paradoxical changes occurred in C57BL/6 mice as the longer protocol (protocol 1 decreased anxiety in the light-dark box and increased exploration in the elevated plus maze. In BALB/c mice there were also limited effects of maternal separation with both separation protocols inducing reductions in stress-induced defecation and protocol 1 reducing the colon length. These data suggest that, independent of stress duration, mice from both strains were on the whole resilient to the maladaptive effects of early-life stress. Thus maternal-separation models of brain-gut axis dysfunction should rely on either different stressor protocols or other strains of mice.

  8. Cognitive biases to healthy and unhealthy food words predict change in BMI

    OpenAIRE

    Calitri, R.; Pothos, E. M.; Tapper, K; Brunstrom, J M; Rogers, P J

    2010-01-01

    The current study explored the predictive value of cognitive biases to food cues (assessed by emotional Stroop and dot probe tasks) on weight change over a 1-year period. This was a longitudinal study with undergraduate students (N = 102) living in shared student accommodation. After controlling for the effects of variables associated with weight (e.g., physical activity, stress, restrained eating, external eating, and emotional eating), no effects of cognitive bias were found with the dot pr...

  9. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  10. Stretching the stress boundary: Linking air pollution health effects to a neurohormonal stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-12-01

    Inhaled pollutants produce effects in virtually all organ systems in our body and have been linked to chronic diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's and diabetes. A neurohormonal stress response (referred to here as a systemic response produced by activation of the sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis) has been implicated in a variety of psychological and physical stresses, which involves immune and metabolic homeostatic mechanisms affecting all organs in the body. In this review, we provide new evidence for the involvement of this well-characterized neurohormonal stress response in mediating systemic and pulmonary effects of a prototypic air pollutant - ozone. A plethora of systemic metabolic and immune effects are induced in animals exposed to inhaled pollutants, which could result from increased circulating stress hormones. The release of adrenal-derived stress hormones in response to ozone exposure not only mediates systemic immune and metabolic responses, but by doing so, also modulates pulmonary injury and inflammation. With recurring pollutant exposures, these effects can contribute to multi-organ chronic conditions associated with air pollution. This review will cover, 1) the potential mechanisms by which air pollutants can initiate the relay of signals from respiratory tract to brain through trigeminal and vagus nerves, and activate stress responsive regions including hypothalamus; and 2) the contribution of sympathetic and HPA-axis activation in mediating systemic homeostatic metabolic and immune effects of ozone in various organs. The potential contribution of chronic environmental stress in cardiovascular, neurological, reproductive and metabolic diseases, and the knowledge gaps are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu.

  11. Effects of Cadmium Stress on the Quality of Rice Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan; CHEN; Hui; FANG; Ying; ZHANG; Yuanyuan; FAN

    2013-01-01

    Germination and hydroponic experiments are performed on rice seeds growing in soils treated with Cd stress,with rice seeds of the same variety that is not treated with Cd stress as a control,to study the effects of Cd stress on quality of rice seeds.The results have shown that:(1)Cd stress reduces the thousand grain weight of rice seeds,and higher Cd content means lower thousand grain weight;(2)The germination vigor and germination percentage of rice seeds under Cd stress as well as theirα-amylase activity andβ-amylase activity are all lower than those of the control.They decreases as the Cd stress increases;(3)For rice seeds under Cd stress,the height,fresh and dry weight of seedlings,as well as the chlorophyll content,photosynthetic rate and content of soluble protein of their leaves are all lower than those of the control.This indicates that Cd stress has certain effects on the germination and growth of the rice seeds.

  12. Cohesive stresses and size effect in quasi-brittle materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V E Saouma; D Natekar

    2002-08-01

    A novel approach to the derivation of Ba$\\breve{z}$ant’s size effect law is presented. Contrarily to the original Lagrangian derivation which hinged on energetic consideration, a Newtonian approach based on local stress intensity factors is presented. Through this approach, it is shown that Ba$\\breve{z}$ant’s size effect law is the first (and dominant) term in a series expansion for the nominal stress. Furthermore, analytical expressions for are derived for selected specimen geometries.

  13. Cellular effects of swim stress in the dorsal raphe nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Lynn G.; Pan, Yu-Zhen; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Rani, Shobha; Nunan, John D.; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2007-01-01

    Swim stress regulates forebrain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in a complex manner and its effects are initiated in the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of swim stress on the physiology of DRN neurons in conjunction with 5-HT immunohistochemistry. Basic membrane properties, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor-mediated responses and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured using whole-cell patch clamp technique...

  14. Differential effect of aneuploidy on the X chromosome and genes with sex-biased expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Johnson, Adam F; Li, Jilong; Lambdin, Aaron S; Cheng, Jianlin; Birchler, James A

    2013-10-01

    Global analysis of gene expression via RNA sequencing was conducted for trisomics for the left arm of chromosome 2 (2L) and compared with the normal genotype. The predominant response of genes on 2L was dosage compensation in that similar expression occurred in the trisomic compared with the diploid control. However, the male and female trisomic/normal expression ratio distributions for 2L genes differed in that females also showed a strong peak of genes with increased expression and males showed a peak of reduced expression relative to the opposite sex. For genes in other autosomal regions, the predominant response to trisomy was reduced expression to the inverse of the altered chromosomal dosage (2/3), but a minor peak of increased expression in females and further reduced expression in males were also found, illustrating a sexual dimorphism for the response to aneuploidy. Moreover, genes with sex-biased expression as revealed by comparing amounts in normal males and females showed responses of greater magnitude to trisomy 2L, suggesting that the genes involved in dosage-sensitive aneuploid effects also influence sex-biased expression. Each autosomal chromosome arm responded to 2L trisomy similarly, but the ratio distributions for X-linked genes were distinct in both sexes, illustrating an X chromosome-specific response to aneuploidy.

  15. A probability model for evaluating the bias and precision of influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates from case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, M; An, Q; Foppa, I M; Shay, D K; Ferdinands, J M; Orenstein, W A

    2015-05-01

    As influenza vaccination is now widely recommended, randomized clinical trials are no longer ethical in many populations. Therefore, observational studies on patients seeking medical care for acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) are a popular option for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE). We developed a probability model for evaluating and comparing bias and precision of estimates of VE against symptomatic influenza from two commonly used case-control study designs: the test-negative design and the traditional case-control design. We show that when vaccination does not affect the probability of developing non-influenza ARI then VE estimates from test-negative design studies are unbiased even if vaccinees and non-vaccinees have different probabilities of seeking medical care against ARI, as long as the ratio of these probabilities is the same for illnesses resulting from influenza and non-influenza infections. Our numerical results suggest that in general, estimates from the test-negative design have smaller bias compared to estimates from the traditional case-control design as long as the probability of non-influenza ARI is similar among vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. We did not find consistent differences between the standard errors of the estimates from the two study designs.

  16. Substrate biasing effect on the physical properties of reactive RF-magnetron-sputtered aluminum oxide dielectric films on ITO glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling Yan; Cao, Hong Tao; Liu, Quan; Jiang, Ke Min; Liu, Zhi Min; Zhuge, Fei; Deng, Fu Ling

    2014-02-26

    High dielectric constant (high-k) Al2O3 thin films were prepared on ITO glasses by reactive RF-magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The effect of substrate bias on the subband structural, morphological, electrode/Al2O3 interfacial and electrical properties of the Al2O3 films is systematically investigated. An optical method based on spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement and modeling is adopted to probe the subband electronic structure, which facilitates us to vividly understand the band-tail and deep-level (4.8-5.0 eV above the valence band maximum) trap states. Well-selected substrate biases can suppress both the trap states due to promoted migration of sputtered particles, which optimizes the leakage current density, breakdown strength, and quadratic voltage coefficient of capacitance. Moreover, high porosity in the unbiased Al2O3 film is considered to induce the absorption of atmospheric moisture and the consequent occurrence of electrolysis reactions at electrode/Al2O3 interface, as a result ruining the electrical properties. PMID:24490685

  17. The effects of size and orientation on magnetic properties and exchange bias in Co3O4 mesoporous nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, R.; Wang, J. Q.; Chen, Z. X.; Li, W. X.; Dou, S. X.

    2011-04-01

    Co3O4 mesoporous nanowires with average single crystalline grain sizes of about 8 nm, 12nm, 25 nm, and 45 nm were synthesized by sintering of microwave-assisted hydrothermal processed belt-Co(OH)2 precursors at 300-500 °C for 2 h. Microstructure analysis was conducted by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission SEM (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) to confirm the composition, structure, and orientation in the nanowires. Systematic magnetic measurements have also been conducted on the nanowires. It was found that the size and orientation have significant effects on the magnetic and exchange bias properties. The interesting finding was made that room temperature ferromagnetism appeared at 350 °C in the high orientation samples. Systematic comparison and analysis of the relationships among the grain size, microstructure, orientation (texture), surface electric structure (O vacancies), and defects with magnetic properties (ferromagnetism, coercive field, exchange bias, etc.) are presented in this work.

  18. Theoretical investigation of exchange bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhi-Jie; Wang Huai-Yu; Ding Ze-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The exchange bias of bilayer magnetic films consisting of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in an uncompensated case is studied by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory.The effects of the layer thickness and temperature and the interfacial coupling strength on the exchange bias HE are investigated. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM layer thickness and temperature is qualitatively in agreement with experimental results. When temperature varies, both the coercivity HC and HE decrease with the temperature increasing. For each FM thickness, there exists a least AFM thickness in which the exchange bias occurs,which is called pinning thickness.

  19. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts’...

  20. Effects of through-thickness stress assumptions on residual stress measurements in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The three normal stresses have been measured by neutron diffraction for girth welded rings cut from linepipe in a number of thicknesses. The welds are manual metal arc cellulosic electrode welds made in X70 linepipe, these were measured at 5 through thickness positions at 19 locations (from the center of the weld up to 35 mm away from the weld) with a spatial resolution of 1 mm3. The assumption of zero through thickness stress is a common one in thin walled tubes such as these, however there may be significant local through-thickness stresses depending on the welding technique. These local effects, and the change in measured stresses if these are included, are discussed. (authors)

  1. Age related effects in children taking the computerized assessment of response bias and word memory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, John C; Dinkins, Juliet P; Allen, Lyle M; Kuroski, Katherine

    2003-06-01

    The assessment of effort is a fundamental component of test performance analysis, since effort determines whether a psychological evaluation is valid. The assessment of effort in children has proven problematic. This may be related to the variable and inconsistent nature of children's developing self-regulatory systems, and the fact that measures commonly used to assess effort were standardized on adults. If one uses effort measures designed for adults to assess children, then one must presume that the maintenance of effort in children is comparable to the same behavior in adults. However, because children's executive functioning, including their abilities to self-regulate, attend, concentrate, and to engage in various cognitive activities improve with time (Barkley, 1997, pp. 209-234), our hypothesis is that young children's effort regulation is dissimilar to that of adults, and the presumption of similarity is implausible. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age is a significant influence upon young children's performances on the Computerized Assessment of Response Bias (CARB) and Word Memory Test (WMT). Statistical analysis suggests that younger children (those under 10 years of age) tended to produce poorer performance on these instruments. Younger children's scores differed significantly from children ages 10 and older. Children 11 years and older produced CARB and WMT results similar to adult participants, suggesting a viability for adult normative comparisons with children in this age range. The current investigation concluded that children's maintenance of effort appears to be significantly related to age and reading ability level. Consequently, the use of current adult-based norms with the CARB and WMT, without regard for a child's developmental status and other contextual factors such as the child's ability to read, appears ill-advised especially with children under 11 years of age. PMID:12815513

  2. Study on the bias-dependent effects of proton-induced damage in CdZnTe radiation detectors using ion beam induced charge microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Na; Guo, Rongrong; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    The influence of damage induced by 2MeV protons on CdZnTe radiation detectors is investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) in irradiated region is found to be degraded above a fluence of 3.3×10(11)p/cm(2) and the energy spectrum is severely deteriorated with increasing fluence. Moreover, CCE maps obtained under the applied biases from 50V to 400V suggests that local radiation damage results in significant degradation of CCE uniformity, especially under low bias, i. e., 50V and 100V. The CCE nonuniformity induced by local radiation damage, however, can be greatly improved by increasing the detector applied bias. This bias-dependent effect of 2MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe detectors is attributed to the interaction of electron cloud and radiation-induced displacement defects. PMID:27399802

  3. Study on glow discharge effects on catalyst films for growing aligned carbon nanofibers in negative bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aligned carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) were grown on silicon substrates coated with NiFe catalyst films by negative bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The growth and structure of the aligned carbon nanofibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the aligned carbon nanofibers could be synthesized after the glow discharge appears when the negative bias is higher than a certain value, while they are bent if the glow discharge does not appear. Furthermore, the diameters of the aligned carbon nanofibers are reduced and their lengths are increased with increasing the negative bias. It is shown that the glow discharge resulting from the negative bias plays an important role in the growth of aligned carbon nanofibers. Here, the effects of the glow discharge on the growth and structure of the aligned carbon nanofibers are discussed

  4. Effect of hydrogen on stress corrosion cracking of copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie QIAO

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior and susceptibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of pure copper were studied. SCC susceptibility of pure copper in a 1 M NaNO2 solution was increased by pre-charged hydrogen. The effect of hydrogen on the sus-ceptibility is more obvious in the low stress region due to the longer fracture time, which resulted in a longer time for more hydrogen to diffuse toward the crack tip. Synergistic effects of hydrogen and stress on corrosion and SCC pro-cesses were discussed. The results showed that an inter-action between stress and hydrogen at the crack tip could increase the anodic dissolution rate remarkably.

  5. Stress Ratio Effect on Ratcheting Behavior of AISI 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya Bharathi, K.; Dutta, K.

    2016-02-01

    Ratcheting is known as accumulation of plastic strain during asymmetric cyclic loading of metallic materials under non-zero mean stress. This phenomenon reduces fatigue life of engineering materials and thus limits the life prediction capacity of Coffin-Manson relationship. This study intends to investigate the ratcheting behavior in AISI 4340 steel which is mainly used for designing of railway wheel sets, axles, shafts, aircraft components and other machinery parts. The effect of stress ratio on the ratcheting behaviour in both annealed and normalised conditions were investigated for investigated steel. Ratcheting tests were done at different stress ratios of -0.4, -0.6 and -0.8. The results showed that the material responds to hardening behavior and nature of strain accumulation is dependent on the magnitude of stress ratio. The post ratcheted samples showed increase in tensile strength and hardness which increases with increasing stress ratio and these variations in tensile properties are correlated with the induced cyclic hardening.

  6. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  7. Effect of yoga on academic performance in relation to stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauts Amit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Academic performance is concerned with the quantity and quality of learning attained in a subject or group of subjects after a long period of instruction. Excessive stress hampers students′ performance. Improvement in academic performance and alertness has been reported in several yogic studies. Aims and Objectives: The main objective of the study was to assess the effect of yoga on academic performance in relation to stress. Materials and Methods: The study started with 800 adolescent students; 159 high-stress students and 142 low-stress students were selected on the basis of scores obtained through Stress Battery. Experimental group and control group were given pre test in three subjects, i.e., Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. A yoga module consisting of yoga asanas, pranayama, meditation, and a value orientation program was administered on experimental group for 7 weeks. The experimental and control groups were post-tested for their performance on the three subjects mentioned above. Results: The results show that the students, who practiced yoga performed better in academics. The study further shows that low-stress students performed better than high-stress students, meaning thereby that stress affects the students′ performance.

  8. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  9. The nondiscriminating heart: lovingkindness meditation training decreases implicit intergroup bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoona; Gray, Jeremy R; Dovidio, John F

    2014-06-01

    Although meditation is increasingly accepted as having personal benefits, less is known about the broader impact of meditation on social and intergroup relations. We tested the effect of lovingkindness meditation training on improving implicit attitudes toward members of 2 stigmatized social outgroups: Blacks and homeless people. Healthy non-Black, nonhomeless adults (N = 101) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: 6-week lovingkindness practice, 6-week lovingkindness discussion (a closely matched active control), or waitlist control. Decreases in implicit bias against stigmatized outgroups (as measured by Implicit Association Test) were observed only in the lovingkindness practice condition. Reduced psychological stress mediated the effect of lovingkindness practice on implicit bias against homeless people, but it did not mediate the reduced bias against Black people. These results suggest that lovingkindness meditation can improve automatically activated, implicit attitudes toward stigmatized social groups and that this effect occurs through distinctive mechanisms for different stigmatized social groups. PMID:23957283

  10. Effect of ground stress on hydraulic fracturing of methane well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Chun-zhi; MAO Xian-biao; MIAO Xie-xing; WANG Peng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the coal reservoirs in China are of low-permeability, so hydraulic fracturing is widely used to improve the permeability in the extraction of gas by ground drilling. The ground stress around the well was analyzed by using theory of elasticity. The pressure when the well fractured is formulated and the effect of ground stress on pressure is discussed. The effect of ground-stress-differences on hydraulic fracturing was analyzed by using the numerical software RFPA2D-Flow in reference to the tectonic stress in Jincheng coal area. The results show that: 1) the position where initial fracture appears is random and fracture branches emerge when the fractures expand if ground stresses in any two directions within a horizontal plane are equal; 2) otherwise, the fractures expand in general along the direction of maximum ground stress and the critical pressure decreases with increasing ground-stress-differences and 3) the preferred well-disposition pattern is diamond shaped. The preferred well spacing is 250 m×300 m. This study can provide a reference for the design of wells.

  11. Effect of Stress on Transformer Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Gandhi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Power transformers use Kraft paper as insulation in the electrical windings present in the core, which is immersed in oil. In service, the temperature of the windings of core will go to 750C to 850C. If the transformer is over loaded, then the temperature can exceed upto 100°C causing the cellulose chains in the paper to cleave at an accelerated rate, which results in the degradation of mechanical strength and performance of the insulation. The Degree of Polymerization (DP will also decrease. If proper action will not take, this can lead to failure of the transformer and disruption to electricity supply and large economic losses to the operating utility. Transformer condition should be maintained because of its importance to electricity network. The life of transformer depends on the life of the oil impregnated paper insulation system to greater extent. Degradation of the cellulose insulation is an irreversible process. After thermal degradation of the paper winding, Furfuraldehyde (FFA is the chemical compound, which is released into the oil from paper. The concentration of FFA has been directly related to the condition of the paper insulation. In the present paper an experimental investigation has been made to evaluate the degradation of transformer oil contaminated by nano-particles of pine wood under accelerated thermal and electrical stress and results are correlated with breakdown strength, density & interfacial tension of the pure oil. The contaminated oil samples are tested at electric stress of 2.0 kV, 3.0 kV, 4.0 kV & 5.0 kV for 24, 48, 72 & 96 hours simultaneously.

  12. Tunable exchange bias-like effect in patterned hard-soft two-dimensional lateral composites with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A., E-mail: ahierro@fc.up.pt; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnología—CINN (CSIC—Universidad de Oviedo—Principado de Asturias), Parque Tecnológico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Teixeira, J. M. [IN-IFIMUP, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Vélez, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2014-09-08

    Patterned hard-soft 2D magnetic lateral composites have been fabricated by e-beam lithography plus dry etching techniques on sputter-deposited NdCo{sub 5} thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic behavior is strongly thickness dependent due to the interplay between out-of-plane anisotropy and magnetostatic energy. Thus, the spatial modulation of thicknesses leads to an exchange coupled system with hard/soft magnetic regions in which rotatable anisotropy of the thicker elements provides an extra tool to design the global magnetic behavior of the patterned lateral composite. Kerr microscopy studies (domain imaging and magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry) reveal that the resulting hysteresis loops exhibit a tunable exchange bias-like shift that can be switched on/off by the applied magnetic field.

  13. Testing the BIAS map model: the positive effects of perceiving weakness and harmony in powerful out-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echebarria-Echabe, Agustin

    2013-01-01

    Two experimental studies were used to test predictions derived from the BIAS map model. While the first experiment manipulated the perception of power in the out-group (the USA), the second manipulated the perceived harmony of the relationships between this out-group and the participants' own national group. The results confirmed the hypotheses derived from the model. The manipulation of power affected the perception of competence, thus affecting emotions and behavioral dispositions towards out-group members. The manipulation of perceived harmony of intergroup interests had a similar effect, but was not mediated by changes in the attribution of competence, but of warmth. Attitudes did not play a significant role in the prediction of emotions and behavioral intentions.

  14. Per capita interactions and stress tolerance drive stress-induced changes in biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Jan M; Janssen, Colin R; Sabbe, Koen; De Laender, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stress changes the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functions, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Because species interactions shape biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships, changes in per capita interactions under stress (as predicted by the stress gradient hypothesis) can be an important driver of stress-induced changes in these relationships. To test this hypothesis, we measure productivity in microalgae communities along a diversity and herbicide gradient. On the basis of additive partitioning and a mechanistic community model, we demonstrate that changes in per capita interactions do not explain effects of herbicide stress on the biodiversity-productivity relationship. Instead, assuming that the per capita interactions remain unaffected by stress, causing species densities to only change through differences in stress tolerance, suffices to predict the stress-induced changes in the biodiversity-productivity relationship and community composition. We discuss how our findings set the stage for developing theory on how environmental stress changes biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions. PMID:27534986

  15. Effects of Substrate Bias on the Hardness and Resistivity of Reactively Sputtered TaN and TiN Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junqing; Arshi, Nishat

    2016-06-01

    TaN and TiN films are being widely used as conductive layers in electronic devices or protective coatings on metal surfaces. Among various deposition methods, reactive magnetron sputtering is preferred partly due to its ability to control the energy of the depositing ions by applying different substrate bias voltages. In this study, TaN and TiN films were deposited on Si/SiO2 substrates by using direct current magnetron sputtering technique with 370 W target power at 1.9 mTorr and under different substrate biases. The effects of the substrate bias on both the resistivity and the hardness of the deposited TaN and TiN films were investigated. The phase and composition of the deposited films were investigated by x-ray diffraction, the resistivity was measured by a four-point probe, and the hardness was obtained by nano-indentation. For TaN films, the use of substrate bias not only increased the hardness but also increased the resistivity. Moreover, the formation of the Ta3N5 phase at the -300 V substrate bias significantly increased the TaN film resistivity. For TiN films, the optimum resistivity (minimum) of 19.5 µΩ-cm and the hardness (maximum) of 31.5 GPa were achieved at the -100 V substrate bias. Since the phase changes occurred in both the TaN and the TiN films at higher substrate biases and these phase changes negatively affected the resistivity or hardness property of the films, the substrate bias should not significantly exceed -100 V.

  16. Therapeutic effects of stress-programmed lymphocytes transferred to chronically stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinert, Rachel B; Haeri, Mitra H; Lehmann, Michael L; Herkenham, Miles

    2016-10-01

    Our group has recently provided novel insights into a poorly understood component of intercommunication between the brain and the immune system by showing that psychological stress can modify lymphocytes in a manner that may boost resilience to psychological stress. To demonstrate the influence of the adaptive immune system on mood states, we previously showed that cells from lymph nodes of socially defeated mice, but not from unstressed mice, conferred anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects and elevated hippocampal cell proliferation when transferred into naïve lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice. In the present study, we asked whether similar transfer could be anxiolytic and antidepressant when done in animals that had been rendered anxious and depressed by chronic psychological stress. First, we demonstrated that lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice and their wild-type C57BL/6 mouse counterparts had similar levels of affect normally. Second, we found that following chronic (14days) restraint stress, both groups displayed an anxious and depressive-like phenotype and decreased hippocampal cell proliferation. Third, we showed that behavior in the open field test and light/dark box was normalized in the restraint-stressed Rag2(-/-) mice following adoptive transfer of lymph node cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing donor mice previously exposed to chronic (14days) of social defeat stress. Cells transferred from unstressed donor mice had no effect on behavior. Immunolabeling of GFP+ cells confirmed that tissue engraftment had occurred at 14days after transfer. We found GFP+ lymphocytes in the spleen, lymph nodes, blood, choroid plexus, and meninges of the recipient Rag2(-/-) mice. The findings suggest that the adaptive immune system may play a key role in promoting recovery from chronic stress. The data support using lymphocytes as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety states. PMID:27109071

  17. Behavioural and Neuroendocrine Effects of Stress in Salmonid Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Øverli, Øyvind

    2001-01-01

    Stress can affect several behavioural patterns, such as food intake and the general activity level of an animal. The central monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine are important in the mediation of both behavioural and neuroendocrine stress effects. This thesis describes studies of two salmonid fish model systems: Fish that become socially dominant or subordinate when reared in pairs, and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genetically selected for high (HR) and l...

  18. Effect of yoga on academic performance in relation to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kauts Amit; Sharma Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Background: Academic performance is concerned with the quantity and quality of learning attained in a subject or group of subjects after a long period of instruction. Excessive stress hampers students′ performance. Improvement in academic performance and alertness has been reported in several yogic studies. Aims and Objectives: The main objective of the study was to assess the effect of yoga on academic performance in relation to stress. Materials and Methods: The study started ...

  19. Occupational stress and effective coping strategies in nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Akangbe, Ifeoluwa; Tetteh, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Nursing has been characterized as a high health risk profession due to the very heavy stressors common to the job. The study aimed at producing a descriptive information on occupational stress among nurses and effective coping strategies used in handling work-related stress. Research questions were formulated to assist the writers in meeting their objective during the research process. Narrative literature review methodology was used to answer the set research questions. The study was co...

  20. Prenatal stress and its effect on infant development

    OpenAIRE

    Huizink, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this dissertation the effect of prenatal maternal stress on infant development and behavior is discussed. In a prospective longitudinal study of 170 nulliparous women, data was gatheren on the maternal stress level three times during pregnancy by means of questionnaires and endocrinologic parameters (Cortisol, ACTH). After birth, the infants were examined up to the age of 8 months with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and their behavior was rated by observation and by maternal repor...

  1. Trans-generational effects of prenatal stress in quail

    OpenAIRE

    Guibert, Floriane; Lumineau, Sophie; Kotrschal, Kurt; Möstl, Erich; Richard-Yris, Marie-Annick; Houdelier, Cécilia

    2013-01-01

    The prenatal environment is a source of phenotypic variability influencing the animal's characteristics. Prenatal stress affects not only the development of offspring, but also that of the following generation. Such effects have been best documented in mammals but can also be observed in birds, suggesting common processes across phylogenetic orders. We found previously that Japanese quail females stressed during laying produced offspring with higher fearfulness, probably related to modulation...

  2. Epigenetic Effect of Chronic Stress on Dopamine Signaling and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Moriam; Mahbub E. Sobhani

    2013-01-01

    Because of the complex causal factors leading to depression, epigenetics is of considerable interest for the understanding effect of stress in depression. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter important in many physiological functions, including motor control, mood, and the reward pathway. These factors lead many drugs to target Dopamine receptors in treating depressive disorders. In this review, we try to portray how chronic stress as an epigenetic factor changes the gene regulation pattern by ...

  3. Investigating The Effect Of Job Stress On Performance Of Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Oyungerel Altangerel; Wang Ruimei; Ehsan Elahi; Bayandalai Dash

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study is conducted to investigate the effect of job stress on job performance. A random sampling technique is used to collect primary data of 120 employees of four telecommunication companies of Mongolia i.e. Mobicom Unitel Skytel and G-mobile. A well-structured questionnaire is utilized to collect relevant data descriptive and logistic analysis is used to estimate and describe the findings of results. It is found that work overload is major reason of stress among employees and ...

  4. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Joëls, Marian; Roozendaal, Benno; Wolf, Oliver T; Oitzl, Melly S

    2012-08-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may affect learning and memory processes. Less clear is the exact nature of these stress effects on memory: both enhancing and impairing effects have been reported. These opposite effects may be explained if the different time courses of stress hormone, in particular catecholamine and glucocorticoid, actions are taken into account. Integrating two popular models, we argue here that rapid catecholamine and non-genomic glucocorticoid actions interact in the basolateral amygdala to shift the organism into a 'memory formation mode' that facilitates the consolidation of stressful experiences into long-term memory. The undisturbed consolidation of these experiences is then promoted by genomic glucocorticoid actions that induce a 'memory storage mode', which suppresses competing cognitive processes and thus reduces interference by unrelated material. Highlighting some current trends in the field, we further argue that stress affects learning and memory processes beyond the basolateral amygdala and hippocampus and that stress may pre-program subsequent memory performance when it is experienced during critical periods of brain development.

  5. Effect of reporting bias on meta-analyses of drug trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, Beth; Lundh, Andreas; Bero, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of including unpublished trial outcome data obtained from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the results of meta-analyses of drug trials.......To investigate the effect of including unpublished trial outcome data obtained from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the results of meta-analyses of drug trials....

  6. Opposite Effects of Early-Life Competition and Developmental Telomere Attrition on Cognitive Biases in Juvenile European Starlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bateson

    Full Text Available Moods are enduring affective states that we hypothesise should be affected by an individual's developmental experience and its current somatic state. We tested whether early-life adversity, induced by manipulating brood size, subsequently altered juvenile European starlings' (Sturnus vulgaris decisions in a judgment bias task designed to provide a cognitive measure of mood. We predicted that starlings from larger broods, specifically those that had experienced more nest competitors larger than themselves would exhibit reduced expectation of reward, indicative of a 'pessimistic', depression-like mood. We used a go/no-go task, in which 30 starlings were trained to probe a grey card disc associated with a palatable mealworm hidden underneath and avoid a different shade of grey card disc associated with a noxious quinine-injected mealworm hidden underneath. Birds' response latencies to the trained stimuli and also to novel, ambiguous stimuli intermediate between these were subsequently tested. Birds that had experienced greater competition in the nest were faster to probe trained stimuli, and it was therefore necessary to control statistically for this difference in subsequent analyses of the birds' responses to the ambiguous stimuli. As predicted, birds with more, larger nest competitors showed relatively longer latencies to probe ambiguous stimuli, suggesting reduced expectation of reward and a 'pessimistic', depression-like mood. However, birds with greater developmental telomere attrition--a measure of cellular aging associated with increased morbidity and reduced life-expectancy that we argue could be used as a measure of somatic state--showed shorter latencies to probe ambiguous stimuli. This would usually be interpreted as evidence for a more positive or 'optimistic' affective state. Thus, increased competition in the nest and poor current somatic state appear to have opposite effects on cognitive biases. Our results lead us to question

  7. Opposite Effects of Early-Life Competition and Developmental Telomere Attrition on Cognitive Biases in Juvenile European Starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Melissa; Emmerson, Michael; Ergün, Gökçe; Monaghan, Pat; Nettle, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Moods are enduring affective states that we hypothesise should be affected by an individual's developmental experience and its current somatic state. We tested whether early-life adversity, induced by manipulating brood size, subsequently altered juvenile European starlings' (Sturnus vulgaris) decisions in a judgment bias task designed to provide a cognitive measure of mood. We predicted that starlings from larger broods, specifically those that had experienced more nest competitors larger than themselves would exhibit reduced expectation of reward, indicative of a 'pessimistic', depression-like mood. We used a go/no-go task, in which 30 starlings were trained to probe a grey card disc associated with a palatable mealworm hidden underneath and avoid a different shade of grey card disc associated with a noxious quinine-injected mealworm hidden underneath. Birds' response latencies to the trained stimuli and also to novel, ambiguous stimuli intermediate between these were subsequently tested. Birds that had experienced greater competition in the nest were faster to probe trained stimuli, and it was therefore necessary to control statistically for this difference in subsequent analyses of the birds' responses to the ambiguous stimuli. As predicted, birds with more, larger nest competitors showed relatively longer latencies to probe ambiguous stimuli, suggesting reduced expectation of reward and a 'pessimistic', depression-like mood. However, birds with greater developmental telomere attrition--a measure of cellular aging associated with increased morbidity and reduced life-expectancy that we argue could be used as a measure of somatic state--showed shorter latencies to probe ambiguous stimuli. This would usually be interpreted as evidence for a more positive or 'optimistic' affective state. Thus, increased competition in the nest and poor current somatic state appear to have opposite effects on cognitive biases. Our results lead us to question whether increased

  8. Body-bias effect in a GaN Schottky barrier MOSFET fabricated on a silicon (111) substrate with an ITO source/drain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Ju; Kim, Dong-Seok; Yun, Jun-Yeon; Lee, Jung-Hee; Hahm, Sung-Ho; Sung, Sang-Yun; Heo, Young-Woo [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    We fabricated a GaN Schottky barrier metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (SB-MOSFET) by using indium tin oxide (ITO) films as the source/drain and the gate electrodes, and we checked for the body bias effect after forming an Ohmic contact to the substrate. The body bias results exhibit an abnormal effect; i.e., the threshold voltage was decreased by a reverse body bias. In order to find the mechanism for that, we characterized the UV photo response of no-gated MOSFET used as a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) diode with and without annealing for the passivation oxide between the source and the drain regions. The leakage current of the back-to-back Schottky diode was significantly improved after passivation annealing, but the UV/visible rejection characteristics were worse.

  9. Trauma, attentional biases, and revictimization among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Elizabeth; Segal, Caroline; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with previous histories of trauma are at increased risk for subsequent victimization and the development of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety disorders. Attentional biases to threat-related stimuli are thought to impact one's ability to recognize future risk in his or her environment and may explain high rates of revictimization. Although the literature has identified three possible types of attentional biases among victims of trauma (i.e., interference, facilitation, and avoidance), findings are mixed. The current study examined attentional biases to threats among a sample of men and women with no, some, and multiple incident interpersonal and non-interpersonal trauma histories. It was hypothesized that those with multiple incident interpersonal trauma histories would demonstrate an interference effect (i.e., slower response times to threat-related words). Participants (N = 309) were 18- to 29-year-old college students. Self-report measures assessed trauma history, posttraumatic stress, and other psychological sequelae. Attentional biases were assessed using a dot probe computer task. Contrary to hypotheses, no significant differences in response times in the presence of threat-related words or neutral words were found among groups. Results suggest that multiple traumatized individuals do not exhibit attentional bias to threats compared to individuals with some or no trauma. PMID:25734365

  10. Cognitive biases to healthy and unhealthy food words predict change in BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calitri, Raff; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Tapper, Katy; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Rogers, Peter J

    2010-12-01

    The current study explored the predictive value of cognitive biases to food cues (assessed by emotional Stroop and dot probe tasks) on weight change over a 1-year period. This was a longitudinal study with undergraduate students (N = 102) living in shared student accommodation. After controlling for the effects of variables associated with weight (e.g., physical activity, stress, restrained eating, external eating, and emotional eating), no effects of cognitive bias were found with the dot probe. However, for the emotional Stroop, cognitive bias to unhealthy foods predicted an increase in BMI whereas cognitive bias to healthy foods was associated with a decrease in BMI. Results parallel findings in substance abuse research; cognitive biases appear to predict behavior change. Accordingly, future research should consider strategies for attentional retraining, encouraging individuals to reorient attention away from unhealthy eating cues. PMID:20379149

  11. Effects of chronic stress on sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, G J; Pastel, R H; Bauman, R A; Meininger, G R; Maughan, K R; Robinson, T N; Wright, W L; Covington, P S

    1995-02-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of chronic stress on sleep using a rodent paradigm of around-the-clock signalled intermittent foot shock in which some rats can pull a chain to avoid/escape shock while another group of rats is yoked to the first group. We measured sleep using telemetry; four-channel EEG was collected 24 h/day in rats during 2 prestress days; days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 during chronic stress; and 3 poststress days. States of REM sleep, non-REM (NREM) sleep, and waking were scored for each 15-s period of the EEG recordings. During the prestress period, rats slept (REM plus NREM) 55% of available time during the light hours and 34% of the dark hours with the remainder represented by waking. On the first day of stress, total sleep and, especially REM sleep, decreased markedly. By the second day of stress, only REM sleep in the controllable stress group (but not the uncontrollable stress group) was still significantly decreased compared to prestress levels, and REM sleep returned to baseline levels by day 7 of stress. The recovery of sleep quantity was accomplished by increased sleep during the dark hours, resulting in a long-lasting disruption of normal circadian sleep patterning.

  12. Effective stress law for anisotropic double porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying; CHEN Mian; ZHANG Guangqing

    2004-01-01

    An effective stress law is derived analytically to describe the effect of pore (fracture pore and matrix-block pore) fluid pressure on the linearly elastic response of anisotropic saturated dual-porous rocks, which exhibit anisotropy. For general anisotropy the difference between the effective stress and the applied stress is not hydrostatic simply multiplied by Biot coefficient. The effective stress law involves four constants for transversely isotropic response; these constants can be expressed in terms of the moduli of the single porous material, double porous material and of the solid material. These expressions are simplified considerably when the anisotropy is structural rather than intrinsic, i.e. in the case of an isotropic solid material with an anisotropic pore structure. In this case the effective stress law involves grain bulk modulus, four moduli and two compliances of the porous material for transverse isotropy. The law reduces, in the case of isotropic response, to that suggested by Li Shuiquan (2001). And reduction to the single-porosity (derived analytically by Carroll (1979)) is presented to demonstrate the conceptual consistency of the proposed law.

  13. Biased Estimation of Violent Video Game Effects on Aggression: Contributing Factors and Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Jens; Rothmund, Tobias; Gollwitzer, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the understanding of media violence effects, it is crucial to extend knowledge about factors that threaten the validity of such effects in empirical research. Research artifacts can be expected when participants are (a) aware of a scientist’s hypothesis, (b) motivated to confirm or disconfirm the hypothesis, and (c) capable of manipulating their responses in line with their motivation. Based on social identity theory (SIT) and self-categorization theory (SCT), we assumed...

  14. Practical investigation of the gate bias effect on the reverse recovery behavior of the body diode in power MOSFETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Poulsen, Kristian; Petersen, Lars Press; Ouyang, Ziwei;

    2014-01-01

    . A selection of 60V devices for synchronous rectification are compared for their suitability for gate bias, while a selection of 600V devices are compared for the efficacy of gate bias for the zero voltage transition converter application. The results show that many of the tested devices benefit from greatly...

  15. Bias explains most of the parent-of-origin effect on breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Janet R; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Aalfs, Cora M; Rookus, Matti A; Adank, Muriel A; van der Hout, Annemarie H; van Asperen, Christi J; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Jager, Agnes; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Mourits, Marian J; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paternal transmission of a BRCA mutation has been reported to increase the risk of breast cancer in offspring more than when the mutation is maternally inherited. As this effect might be caused by referral bias, the aim of this study was to assess the parent-of-origin effect of the BRCA1

  16. The impact of stress on tumor growth: peripheral CRF mediates tumor-promoting effects of stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Efstathios N

    2010-09-01

    effect. Moreover, antalarmin suppressed neoangiogenesis in 4T1 tumors in vivo. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating that peripheral CRF, at least in part, mediates the tumor-promoting effects of stress and implicates CRF in SMAD2 and β-catenin expression.

  17. The relationship between level of autistic traits and local bias in the context of the McGurk effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta eUjiie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The McGurk effect is a well-known illustration that demonstrates the influence of visual information on hearing in the context of speech perception. Some studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD display abnormal processing of audio-visual speech integration, while other studies showed contradictory results. Based on the dimensional model of ASD, we administered two analog studies to examine the link between level of autistic traits, as assessed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ, and the McGurk effect among a sample of university students. In the first experiment, we found that autistic traits correlated negatively with fused (McGurk responses. Then, we manipulated presentation types of visual stimuli to examine whether the local bias toward visual speech cues modulated individual differences in the McGurk effect. The presentation included four types of visual images, comprising no image, mouth only, mouth and eyes, and full face. The results revealed that global facial information facilitates the influence of visual speech cues on McGurk stimuli. Moreover, individual differences between groups with low and high levels of autistic traits appeared when the full-face visual speech cue with an incongruent voice condition was presented. These results suggest that individual differences in the McGurk effect might be due to a weak ability to process global facial information in individuals with high levels of autistic traits.

  18. Antidepressant and anti-stress effects of curcumin inmice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingXU; Bao-shanKU; Hai-yanYAO; Yong-heZHANG; Xue-junLI

    2004-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow colouring agent contained in the rhizome of Curcuma Longa (turmeric), has a wide array of pharmacological and biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating and anticarcinogenic effects. In this study, curcumin was examined for the antidepressant and anti-stress effects in forced swimming,

  19. Effects of RSA Feedback on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the anxiety disorders with particularly debilitating effects due to flashbacks and hypervigilance in daily life. Treatments commonly focus upon either pharmacological or psychotherapeutic modalities, but there is often a need to merge both of these approaches to deal effectively with the somatic, as…

  20. Testing for potential contextual bias effects during the verification stage of the ACE-V methodology when conducting fingerprint comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenburg, Glenn; Champod, Christophe; Wertheim, Pat

    2009-05-01

    This study was conducted to assess if fingerprint specialists could be influenced by extraneous contextual information during a verification process. Participants were separated into three groups: a control group (no contextual information was given), a low bias group (minimal contextual information was given in the form of a report prompting conclusions), and a high bias group (an internationally recognized fingerprint expert provided conclusions and case information to deceive this group into believing that it was his case and conclusions). A similar experiment was later conducted with laypersons. The results showed that fingerprint experts were influenced by contextual information during fingerprint comparisons, but not towards making errors. Instead, fingerprint experts under the biasing conditions provided significantly fewer definitive and erroneous conclusions than the control group. In contrast, the novice participants were more influenced by the bias conditions and did tend to make incorrect judgments, especially when prompted towards an incorrect response by the bias prompt.

  1. The effect of heart motion on parameter bias in dynamic cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic cardiac SPECT can be used to estimate kinetic rate parameters which describe the wash-in and wash-out of tracer activity between the blood and the myocardial tissue. These kinetic parameters can in turn be correlated to myocardial perfusion. There are, however, many physical aspects associated with dynamic SPECT which can introduce errors into the estimates. This paper describes a study which investigates the effect of heart motion on kinetic parameter estimates. Dynamic SPECT simulations are performed using a beating version of the MCAT phantom. The results demonstrate that cardiac motion has a significant effect on the blood, tissue, and background content of regions of interest. This in turn affects estimates of wash-in, while it has very little effect on estimates of wash-out. The effect of cardiac motion on parameter estimates appears not to be as great as effects introduced by photon noise and geometric collimator response. It is also shown that cardiac motion results in little extravascular contamination of the left ventricle blood region of interest

  2. Stress effects in two modified lead zirconate titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of ferroelectric ceramics with compositions Pb/sub 0.99/Nb/sub 0.02/(Zr/sub 0.95/Ti/sub 0.05/)/sub 0.98/O3 and Pb/sub 0.97/La/sub 0.02/(Zr/sub 0.92/Ti/sub 0.08/)O3 have been studied as functions of both hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial stress. Measurements of ultrasonic velocity and sample strains have been made in order to characterize unpoled samples. Both materials have pressure-induced ferroelectric (FE) to antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transitions at approx.0.2 GPa of hydrostatic pressure. Under uniaxial-stress conditions two effects are observed: rotation of FE domains and the FE--AFE phase transition. These effects are separately resolved by the measurements, even though they occur in overlapping stress regions. The domain reorientation responses of the two materials appear to be nearly identical, but the FE--AFE transition begins at lower stress levels for the Nb-doped material. This is presumably due to that material transforming into the orthorhombic (PbZrO3) phase, whereas the La-doped material transforms into the tetragonal AFE phase. The phase transition is spread over a broad range of uniaxial stress for each material and is not nearly complete by 0.6 GPa, the highest stress level attainable. Possible implications of the results for shock-wave studies of FE ceramics are briefly discussed

  3. Quantum Stress Tensor Fluctuations and their Physical Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, L H

    2007-01-01

    We summarize several aspects of recent work on quantum stress tensor fluctuations and their role in driving fluctuations of the gravitational field. The role of correlations and anticorrelations is emphasized. We begin with a review of the properties of the stress tensor correlation function. We next consider some illuminating examples of non-gravitational effects of stress tensors fluctuations, specifically fluctuations of the Casimir force and radiation pressure fluctuations. We next discuss passive fluctuations of spacetime geometry and some of their operational signatures. These include luminosity fluctuations, line broadening, and angular blurring of a source viewed through a fluctuating gravitational field. Finally, we discuss the possible role of quantum stress tensor fluctuations in the early universe, especially in inflation. The fluctuations of the expansion of a congruence of comoving geodesics grows during the inflationary era, due to non-cancellation of anticorrelations that would have occurred i...

  4. [The effect of stressor experiences and optimism upon stress responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonan, K; Sonoda, A

    1994-10-01

    The present studies investigated whether or not optimism/pessimism is a cognitive mediator of future depression for people who have experienced many negative life events. Subjects were administered optimism scales, stress response scales at Time 1. They then completed the stressor scale and stress response scales at Time 2, about six weeks later. The results showed the interaction of stressor experiences and optimistic diathesis: Subjects who have higher stressor experiences and higher stable and global explanatory style for negative events showed higher depressive responses. Other indices of optimistic diathesis--Life Orientation, Cognitive Style, and Internality dimension of Attributional Style--did not produce this interaction effect. Moreover, this interaction did not appear in the psychological stress response other than depression. These results were consistent with diathesis-stress model of depression. PMID:7861687

  5. Charge movement in a GaN-based hetero-structure field effect transistor structure with carbon doped buffer under applied substrate bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooth, Alexander, E-mail: a.pooth@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); IQE (Europe) Ltd., Pascal Close, St. Mellons, Cardiff CF3 0LW (United Kingdom); Uren, Michael J.; Cäsar, Markus; Kuball, Martin [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Martin, Trevor [IQE (Europe) Ltd., Pascal Close, St. Mellons, Cardiff CF3 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    Charge trapping and transport in the carbon doped GaN buffer of a GaN-based hetero-structure field effect transistor (HFET) has been investigated under both positive and negative substrate bias. Clear evidence of redistribution of charges in the carbon doped region by thermally generated holes is seen, with electron injection and capture observed during positive bias. Excellent agreement is found with simulations. It is shown that these effects are intrinsic to the carbon doped GaN and need to be controlled to provide reliable and efficient GaN-based power HFETs.

  6. The effects of stress intensity and stress type on inbreeding depression in Silene vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandner, Tobias Michael; Matthies, Diethart

    2016-06-01

    Inbreeding depression (ID) is generally assumed to increase under stressful conditions, but a number of studies have found the opposite pattern, that is that crossed offspring were more capable of exploiting benign conditions. Alternatively, the phenotypic variation hypothesis predicts that not stress intensity, but enhanced phenotypic variation in an environment leads to increased ID. We subjected inbred and crossed offspring of Silene vulgaris to drought, simulated herbivory, copper contamination, and two levels of nutrient deficiency and shade. In contrast to the predominant expectation, most stress treatments decreased inbreeding depression. With increasing nutrient limitation, ID decreased strongly, whereas under increasing shade ID did not change. These differences may be due to purging in the population of origin where conditions are nutrient-poor and dry, but not shaded. In contrast to the greenhouse experiment, ID was higher in a field site than in a more benign common garden. However, the predictions of the phenotypic variation hypothesis were met in both the greenhouse and the field versus garden experiment. The results suggest that there may be no general relationship between ID and stress intensity, but specific effects of stress type and the novelty and variability of the environment. PMID:27110935

  7. Physical attractiveness biases in ratings of employment suitability: tracking down the "beauty is beastly" effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stefanie K; Podratz, Kenneth E; Dipboye, Robert L; Gibbons, Ellie

    2010-01-01

    The "what is beautiful is good" heuristic suggests that physically attractive persons benefit from their attractiveness in a large range of situations, including perceptions of employment suitability. Conversely, the "beauty is beastly" effect suggests that attractiveness can be detrimental to women in certain employment contexts, although these findings have been less consistent than those for the "what is beautiful is good" effect. The current research seeks to uncover situations in which beauty might be detrimental for female applicants. In two studies, we found that attractiveness can be detrimental for women applying for masculine sex-typed jobs for which physical appearance is perceived as unimportant. PMID:20575336

  8. Phantom Behavioral Assimilation Effects : Systematic Biases in Social Comparison Choice Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Seaton, Marjorie; Kuyper, Hans; Dumas, Florence; Huguet, Pascal; Regner, Isabelle; Buunk, Abraham P.; Monteil, Jean-Marc; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2010-01-01

    Consistent with social comparison theory (SCT), Blanton, Buunk, Gibbons, and Kuyper (1999) and Huguet, Dumas, Monteil, and Genestoux (2001) found that students tended to choose comparison targets who slightly outperformed them (i.e., upward comparison choices), and this had a beneficial effect on su

  9. An Investigation of Biases and Framing Effects for Risk Analysis: An Information Technology Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    An elusive and problematic theme of risk management has been managers' ability to effectively measure information technology (IT) risk in terms of degree of impact and probability of occurrence. The background of this problem delves deep into the rational understanding of probability, expected value, economic behavior, and subjective judgment.…

  10. Avoiding the Approach Trap: A Response Bias Theory of the Emotional Stroop Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chajut, Eran; Mama, Yaniv; Levy, Leora; Algom, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In the laboratory, people classify the color of emotion-laden words slower than they do that of neutral words, the emotional Stroop effect. Outside the laboratory, people react to features of emotion-laden stimuli or threatening stimuli faster than they do to those of neutral stimuli. A possible resolution to the conundrum implicates the…

  11. Sex bias in infectious disease epidemiology: patterns and processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guerra-Silveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infectious disease incidence is often male-biased. Two main hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. The physiological hypothesis (PH emphasizes differences in sex hormones and genetic architecture, while the behavioral hypothesis (BH stresses gender-related differences in exposure. Surprisingly, the population-level predictions of these hypotheses are yet to be thoroughly tested in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: For ten major pathogens, we tested PH and BH predictions about incidence and exposure-prevalence patterns. Compulsory-notification records (Brazil, 2006-2009 were used to estimate age-stratified ♂:♀ incidence rate ratios for the general population and across selected sociological contrasts. Exposure-prevalence odds ratios were derived from 82 published surveys. We estimated summary effect-size measures using random-effects models; our analyses encompass ∼0.5 million cases of disease or exposure. We found that, after puberty, disease incidence is male-biased in cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, pulmonary tuberculosis, leptospirosis, meningococcal meningitis, and hepatitis A. Severe dengue is female-biased, and no clear pattern is evident for typhoid fever. In leprosy, milder tuberculoid forms are female-biased, whereas more severe lepromatous forms are male-biased. For most diseases, male bias emerges also during infancy, when behavior is unbiased but sex steroid levels transiently rise. Behavioral factors likely modulate male-female differences in some diseases (the leishmaniases, tuberculosis, leptospirosis, or schistosomiasis and age classes; however, average exposure-prevalence is significantly sex-biased only for Schistosoma and Leptospira. CONCLUSIONS: Our results closely match some key PH predictions and contradict some crucial BH predictions, suggesting that gender-specific behavior plays an overall secondary role in generating sex bias. Physiological differences, including

  12. Divertor plate biasing effects on particle recycling and power loss distribution in TdeV during lower hybrid current drive and heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results concerning the influence of negative biasing of the divertor plates on particle recycling and on power loss distribution in single null discharges of TdeV during lower hybrid (LH) current drive and heating experiments are presented. The beneficial effects of negative biasing of the divertor plates, such as the ability to control power and particle fluxes in the SOL, remain effective in the presence of auxiliary heating and current drive. Up to 0.7 MW of auxiliary power were injected in these experiments. With a negative biasing of 150 V, and the ExB flow vector pointing towards the outer divertor chamber, a roughly 2 fold increase in the divertor pressure and the radiation from the divertor region is observed. ((orig.))

  13. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  14. Investigating the effect of anxiety sensitivity, gender and negative interpretative bias on the perception of chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Edmund; Hamid, Rayhana; Hamid, Shahid; Ellery, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    Research suggests that anxiety sensitivity may be an important component in the negative response to pain sensations, especially those with cardiopulmonary origin. Furthermore, there is experimental evidence to suggest that such effects may be stronger in women than men. The primary aim of the current investigation was to determine the relative roles that anxiety sensitivity and gender have on the pain reports of patients referred to a hospital clinic with chest pain. A total of 78 female and 76 male adults were recruited on entry to a Rapid Access Medical Clinic. All patients had been referred with chest pain, and were administered a range of pain and anxiety measures prior to diagnosis. Results indicate that males were more likely to receive a diagnosis of cardiac chest pain, whereas females were more likely to receive a diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. Additionally, anxiety sensitivity was related to pain in women but not men. Finally, evidence was found for the mediating effect of negative interpretative bias on the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and pain. However, this mediating effect was only found in women. These results not only confirm that anxiety sensitivity is related to greater negative pain responses in women, but that this may be due to an increased tendency to negatively interpret sensations.

  15. The Labor Market Effects of Skill-biased Technological Change in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Ali Marouani; Björn Nilsson

    2014-01-01

    (english) During the last half-century, the evolution of educational attainment among Malaysians has been spectacular, and current enrollment rates suggest this progression will continue, albeit at a slower pace. Such a transformation of the educational attainment of labor should bring about macroeconomic effects such as wage compression, sectoral shifts and/or high skill un- employment, unless compensatory mechanisms exist. This article examines the impact of this evolution using a dynamic g...

  16. Multistable syllables as enacted percepts: A source of an asymmetric bias in the verbal transformation effect

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Marc; Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Abry, Christian; Cathiard, Marie-Agnes; Loevenbruck, Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Perceptual changes are experienced during rapid and continuous repetition of a speech form, leading to an auditory illusion known as the verbal transformation effect. Although verbal transformations are considered to reflect mainly the perceptual organization and interpretation of speech, the present study was designed to test whether or not speech production constraints may participate in the emergence of verbal representations. With this goal in mind, we examined whether variations in the a...

  17. Marijuana’s Acute Effects on Cognitive Bias for Affective and Marijuana Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; McGeary, John E.; Knopik, Valerie S.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana’s ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7–3.0 % delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affec...

  18. Effect of baclofen on morphine-induced conditioned place preference, extinction, and stress-induced reinstatement in chronically stressed mice

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Shanshan; Quan, Wuxing; Xu QI; Su, Zhiqiang; Yang, Shanshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objective A stress-induced increase in excitability can result from a reduction in inhibitory neurotransmission. Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission is an effective treatment for drug seeking and relapse. This study investigated whether baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, had an impact on morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), extinction, and stress-induced relapse in chronically stressed mice. Methods Chronic stress was induced by restra...

  19. Effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sleep quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Signe; Würtzen, Hanne; Steding-Jessen, Marianne;

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep disturbance is high among cancer patients, and the sleep problems tend to last for years after the end of treatment. As part of a large randomized controlled clinical trial (the MICA trial, NCT00990977) of the effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on psycholo......The prevalence of sleep disturbance is high among cancer patients, and the sleep problems tend to last for years after the end of treatment. As part of a large randomized controlled clinical trial (the MICA trial, NCT00990977) of the effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR...

  20. Investigation of temperature effect on stress of flexspline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项青; 尹征南

    2014-01-01

    The effect of temperature loading on the stress of a flexspline is investigated. Based on the geometric and mechanical characteristics of the harmonic gear flexspline, a circular thin shell model is presented in this paper. The theoretical solution for the flexspline under different displacement loads and different temperature fields is derived. Meanwhile, an impact factor formula, which reflects the effect of the temperatures of the inner and outer surfaces of the flexspline on the stress of the flexspline, is presented. Finally, numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM) are adopted to verify the corresponding conclusions.

  1. The effect of occupational stress, psychological stress and burnout on employee performance: Evidence from banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Hashemnia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation on the effects of occupational stress, psychological stress as well as job burnout on women’s employee performance in city of Karaj, Iran. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and distributes it among all female employees who worked for Bank Maskan in this city. In our survey, employee performance consists of three parts of interpersonal performance, job performance as well as organizational performance. Cronbach alpha has been used to verify the overall questionnaire, all components were within acceptable levels, and the implementation of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test has indicated that the data were not normally distributed. Using Spearman correlation ratio as well as regression techniques, the study has determined that while psychological stress influenced significantly on all three components of employee performance including interpersonal performance, job performance as well as organizational performance, the effect on job performance was greater than the other components. In addition, occupational stress only influences on organizational as well as interpersonal performance. Finally, employee burnout has no impact on any components of employee performance.

  2. Male-biased autosomal effect of 16p13.11 copy number variation in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tropeano

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs at chromosome 16p13.11 have been associated with a range of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, ADHD, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. Significant sex differences in prevalence, course and severity have been described for a number of these conditions but the biological and environmental factors underlying such sex-specific features remain unclear. We tested the burden and the possible sex-biased effect of CNVs at 16p13.11 in a sample of 10,397 individuals with a range of neurodevelopmental conditions, clinically referred for array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH; cases were compared with 11,277 controls. In order to identify candidate phenotype-associated genes, we performed an interval-based analysis and investigated the presence of ohnologs at 16p13.11; finally, we searched the DECIPHER database for previously identified 16p13.11 copy number variants. In the clinical referral series, we identified 46 cases with CNVs of variable size at 16p13.11, including 28 duplications and 18 deletions. Patients were referred for various phenotypes, including developmental delay, autism, speech delay, learning difficulties, behavioural problems, epilepsy, microcephaly and physical dysmorphisms. CNVs at 16p13.11 were also present in 17 controls. Association analysis revealed an excess of CNVs in cases compared with controls (OR = 2.59; p = 0.0005, and a sex-biased effect, with a significant enrichment of CNVs only in the male subgroup of cases (OR = 5.62; p = 0.0002, but not in females (OR = 1.19, p = 0.673. The same pattern of results was also observed in the DECIPHER sample. Interval-based analysis showed a significant enrichment of case CNVs containing interval II (OR = 2.59; p = 0.0005, located in the 0.83 Mb genomic region between 15.49-16.32 Mb, and encompassing the four ohnologs NDE1, MYH11, ABCC1 and ABCC6. Our data confirm that duplications and deletions at 16p13

  3. Effect of Particle Size on Shear Stress of Magnetorheological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjit Sarkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological fluids (MRF, known for their variable shear stress contain magnetisable micrometer-sized particles (few micrometer to 200 micrometers in a nonmagnetic carrier liquid. To avoid settling of particles, smaller sized (3-10 micrometers particles are preferred, while larger sized particles can be used in MR brakes, MR clutches, etc. as mechanical stirring action in those mechanisms does not allow particles to settle down. Ideally larger sized particles provide higher shear stress compared to smaller sized particles. However there is need to explore the effect of particle sizes on the shear stress. In the current paper, a comparison of different particle sizes on MR effect has been presented. Particle size distributions of iron particles were measured using HORIBA Laser Scattering Particle Size Distribution Analyser. The particle size distribution, mean sizes and standard deviations have been presented. The nature of particle shapes has been observed using scanning electron microscopy. To explore the effect of particle sizes, nine MR fluids containing small, large and mixed sized carbonyl iron particles have been synthesized. Three concentrations (9%, 18% and 36% by volume for each size of particles have been used. The shear stresses of those MRF samples have been measured using ANTON PAAR MCR-102 Rheometer. With increase in volume fraction of iron particles, the MR fluids synthesized using “mixed sized particles” show better shear stress compared to the MR fluids containing “smaller sized spherical shaped particles” and “larger sized flaked shaped particles” at higher shear rate.

  4. Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

  5. Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) on Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an established program shown to reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. MBSR is believed to alter emotional responding by modifying cognitive–affective processes. Given that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by emotional and attentional biases as well as distorted negative self-beliefs, we examined MBSR-related changes in the brain-behavior indices of emotional reactivity and regulation of negative self-beliefs in patients ...

  6. Effective Stress Concept in Unsaturated Soils :Clarification and Validation of an Unified Framework.

    OpenAIRE

    Nuth, M.; Laloui, L.

    2008-01-01

    The effective stress principle, conventionally applied in saturated soils, is reviewed for constitutive modelling purposes. The assumptions for the applicability of Terzaghi’s single effective stress are recalled and its advantages are inventoried. The possible stress frameworks applicable to unsaturated soil modelling are reassessed in a comparative manner, specifically the Bishop’s single effective stress, the independent stress variables approach and the generalized stress framework. ...

  7. Effect of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Adults at Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Jenni; Thomas, Jolene; Kranz, Amelia; Vun, Simon; Miller, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes initiate the first stage of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Flavonoid consumption has been related to significantly improved flow-mediated dilation and blood pressure. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms are thought to be involved. The effect of flavonoids on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, in at risk individuals is yet to be reviewed. Systematic literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SCOPUS databases. Randomised controlled trials in a Western country providing a food-based flavonoid intervention to participants with one or two modifiable risk factors for CVD measuring a marker of OS and/or inflammation, were included. Reference lists were hand-searched. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess study quality. The search strategy retrieved 1248 articles. Nineteen articles meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Eight studies were considered at low risk of bias. Cocoa flavonoids provided to Type 2 diabetics and olive oil flavonoids to mildly-hypertensive women reduced OS and inflammation. Other food sources had weaker effects. No consistent effect on OS and inflammation across patients with varied CVD risk factors was observed. Study heterogeneity posed a challenge for inter-study comparisons. Rigorously designed studies will assist in determining the effectiveness of flavonoid interventions for reducing OS and inflammation in patients at risk of CVD. PMID:27649255

  8. Effect of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Adults at Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Suen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS and inflammatory processes initiate the first stage of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Flavonoid consumption has been related to significantly improved flow-mediated dilation and blood pressure. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms are thought to be involved. The effect of flavonoids on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, in at risk individuals is yet to be reviewed. Systematic literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SCOPUS databases. Randomised controlled trials in a Western country providing a food-based flavonoid intervention to participants with one or two modifiable risk factors for CVD measuring a marker of OS and/or inflammation, were included. Reference lists were hand-searched. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess study quality. The search strategy retrieved 1248 articles. Nineteen articles meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Eight studies were considered at low risk of bias. Cocoa flavonoids provided to Type 2 diabetics and olive oil flavonoids to mildly-hypertensive women reduced OS and inflammation. Other food sources had weaker effects. No consistent effect on OS and inflammation across patients with varied CVD risk factors was observed. Study heterogeneity posed a challenge for inter-study comparisons. Rigorously designed studies will assist in determining the effectiveness of flavonoid interventions for reducing OS and inflammation in patients at risk of CVD.

  9. Effect of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Adults at Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Jenni; Thomas, Jolene; Kranz, Amelia; Vun, Simon; Miller, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes initiate the first stage of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Flavonoid consumption has been related to significantly improved flow-mediated dilation and blood pressure. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms are thought to be involved. The effect of flavonoids on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, in at risk individuals is yet to be reviewed. Systematic literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SCOPUS databases. Randomised controlled trials in a Western country providing a food-based flavonoid intervention to participants with one or two modifiable risk factors for CVD measuring a marker of OS and/or inflammation, were included. Reference lists were hand-searched. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess study quality. The search strategy retrieved 1248 articles. Nineteen articles meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Eight studies were considered at low risk of bias. Cocoa flavonoids provided to Type 2 diabetics and olive oil flavonoids to mildly-hypertensive women reduced OS and inflammation. Other food sources had weaker effects. No consistent effect on OS and inflammation across patients with varied CVD risk factors was observed. Study heterogeneity posed a challenge for inter-study comparisons. Rigorously designed studies will assist in determining the effectiveness of flavonoid interventions for reducing OS and inflammation in patients at risk of CVD. PMID:27649255

  10. Study of stress, self-esteem and depression in medical students and effect of music on perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baste, Vrushali S; Gadkari, Jayashree V

    2014-01-01

    Medical students are exposed to many stressors and if stress is perceived negatively or becomes excessive can affect academic performance and health adversely. The objective of this study was to assess stress, predominant stressor and effect of music on perceived stress. 90 undergraduate students were selected randomly. A written questionnaire about personal information, stressful factors, ways to cope up stress, Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) and 'Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology' self-rated 16 (QIDS-SR-16) was given.45.6% Students had mild stress, 7.7% students had moderate stress and 1.1% students had severe stress. Academic factors were the predominant cause of stress in most students, followed by physical, social and emotional. On Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) 85.6% students had high self-esteem and on QIDS-SR16 50% students had depression. Effect of music on perceived stress was statistically significant. Medical curriculum is associated with increased stress in students. Music can be used as simple, inexpensive and effective therapy for stress. PMID:25906616

  11. Study of stress, self-esteem and depression in medical students and effect of music on perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baste, Vrushali S; Gadkari, Jayashree V

    2014-01-01

    Medical students are exposed to many stressors and if stress is perceived negatively or becomes excessive can affect academic performance and health adversely. The objective of this study was to assess stress, predominant stressor and effect of music on perceived stress. 90 undergraduate students were selected randomly. A written questionnaire about personal information, stressful factors, ways to cope up stress, Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) and 'Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology' self-rated 16 (QIDS-SR-16) was given.45.6% Students had mild stress, 7.7% students had moderate stress and 1.1% students had severe stress. Academic factors were the predominant cause of stress in most students, followed by physical, social and emotional. On Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) 85.6% students had high self-esteem and on QIDS-SR16 50% students had depression. Effect of music on perceived stress was statistically significant. Medical curriculum is associated with increased stress in students. Music can be used as simple, inexpensive and effective therapy for stress.

  12. Theoretical analysis and an improvement method of the bias effect on the linearity of RF linear power amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tuo; Chen Hongyi; Qian Dahong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Gummel-Poon model of BJT, the change of the DC bias as a function of the AC input signal in RF linear power amplifiers is theoretically derived, so that the linearity of different DC bias circuits can be interpreted and compared. According to the analysis results, a quantitative adaptive DC bias circuit is proposed,which can improve the linearity and efficiency. From the simulation and test results, we draw conclusions on how to improve the design of linear power amplifier.

  13. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätsyri, Jari; Kinnunen, Teemu; Kusumoto, Kenta; Oittinen, Pirkko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Television viewers’ attention is increasingly more often divided between television and “second screens”, for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking. PMID:27144385

  14. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Kätsyri

    Full Text Available Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

  15. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätsyri, Jari; Kinnunen, Teemu; Kusumoto, Kenta; Oittinen, Pirkko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking. PMID:27144385

  16. Non-depletion floating layer in SOI LDMOS for enhancing breakdown voltage and eliminating back-gate bias effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhi; Li Wei; Li Ping

    2013-01-01

    A non-depletion floating layer silicon-on-insulator (NFL SOI) lateral double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) is proposed and the NFL-assisted modulated field (NFLAMF) principle is investigated in this paper.Based on this principle,the floating layer can pin the potential for modulating bulk field.In particular,the accumulated high concentration of holes at the bottom of the NFL can efficiently shield the electric field of the SOI layer and enhance the dielectric field in the buried oxide layer (BOX).At variation of back-gate bias,the shielding charges of NFL can alsoeliminate back-gate effects.The simulated results indicate that the breakdown voltage (BV) is increased from 315 V to 558 V compared to the conventional reduced surface field (RESURF) SOI (CSOI) LDMOS,yielding a 77% improvement.Furthermore,due to the field shielding effect of the NFL,the device can maintain the same breakdown voltage of 558 V with a thinner BOX to resolve the thermal problem in an SOI device.

  17. Confirmation of a Star Formation Bias in Type Ia Supernova Distances and its Effect on Measurement of the Hubble Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Rigault, M; Kowalski, M; Copin, Y; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Baugh, D; Bongard, S; Boone, K; Buton, C; Chen, J; Chotard, N; Fakhouri, H K; Feindt, U; Fagrelius, P; Fleury, M; Fouchez, D; Gangler, E; Hayden, B; Kim, A G; Leget, P -F; Lombardo, S; Nordin, J; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Runge, K; Rubin, D; Saunders, C; Smadja, G; Sofiatti, C; Suzuki, N; Tao, C; Weaver, B A

    2014-01-01

    Previously we used the Nearby Supernova Factory sample to show that SNe~Ia having locally star-forming environments are dimmer than SNe~Ia having locally passive environments.Here we use the \\constitution\\ sample together with host galaxy data from \\GALEX\\ to independently confirm that result. The effect is seen using both the SALT2 and MLCS2k2 lightcurve fitting and standardization methods, with brightness differences of $0.094 \\pm 0.037\\ \\mathrm{mag}$ for SALT2 and $0.155 \\pm 0.041\\ \\mathrm{mag}$ for MLCS2k2 with $R_V=2.5$. When combined with our previous measurement the effect is $0.094 \\pm 0.025\\ \\mathrm{mag}$ for SALT2. If the ratio of these local SN~Ia environments changes with redshift or sample selection, this can lead to a bias in cosmological measurements. We explore this issue further, using as an example the direct measurement of $H_0$. \\GALEX{} observations show that the SNe~Ia having standardized absolute magnitudes calibrated via the Cepheid period--luminosity relation using {\\textit{HST}} orig...

  18. Electron Transport in Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistor under Bias and Gate Voltages: Isochemical Potential Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeonghun; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-07-01

    Zigzag graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) of narrow width has a moderate energy gap in its antiferromagnetic ground state. So far, first-principles electron transport calculations have been performed using nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) method combined with density functional theory (DFT). However, the commonly practiced bottom-gate control has not been studied computationally due to the need to simulate an electron reservoir that fixes the chemical potential of electrons in the zGNR and electrodes. Here, we present the isochemical potential scheme to describe the top/back-gate effect using external potential. Then, we examine the change in electronic state under the modulation of chemical potential and the subsequent electron transport phenomena in zGNR transistor under substantial top-/back-gate and bias voltages. The gate potential can activate the device states resulting in a boosted current. This gate-controlled current-boosting could be utilized for designing novel zGNR field effect transistors (FETs). PMID:27299184

  19. Effects of Stress on Corrosion in a Molten Salt Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdzis, Samuel; Manos, Dennis; Cooke, William

    Molten salt is often used as a heat transfer and energy storage fluid in concentrating solar power plants. Despite its suitable thermal properties, molten salt can present challenges in terms of corrosion. Previous studies have focused extensively on mass loss due to molten salt-induced corrosion. In contrast, we have investigated how corrosion begins and how it changes the surface of stainless steel. Samples of alloys including 304 and 316 stainless steel were exposed to the industry-standard NaNO3-KNO3 (60%-40% by weight) mixture at temperatures over 500°C and then analyzed using Hirox, SEM, and TOF-SIMS. We compare the corrosion at grain boundaries to that within single grain surfaces, showing the effect of the increased internal stresses and the weakened passivation layer. Also, we have examined the enhanced corrosion of samples under mechanical stress, simulating the effects of thermal stresses in a power plant.

  20. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, and irritability. People under chronic stress get more frequent and severe viral infections, such ...

  1. Effect of bias voltage on tunneling mechanism in Co40Fe40B20/MgO/Co40Fe40B20 pseudo-spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Mustafa; Öksüzoğlu, Ramis Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    Bias voltage dependence of tunneling mechanism has been systematically investigated in Co40Fe40B20 (2.1 nm)/MgO (2 nm)/Co40Fe40B20 (1.7 nm) pseudo-spin valve magnetic tunnel junction deposited using the combination of the pulsed DC unbalanced magnetron and RF magnetron sputtering techniques. Structural investigations revealed polycrystalline and partially (001) oriented growth of CoFeB/MgO(001) MTJ with similar low interface roughness on both side of the MgO barrier. The junction with a 25×25 μm2 area indicates a giant tunnel magnetoresistance in the order of 505% at room temperature. The magnetoresistance ratio decreases with increasing applied bias voltage ranging from 0.5 to 1.8 V. Reasonable values for barrier thickness and heights were obtained using the combination of Brinkman and Gundlach models, including average barrier height and symmetry. Both barrier parameters and the tunneling mechanism vary in dependence of applied bias voltage. The tunneling mechanism indicates a change from direct to the FN tunneling, especially when reaching high bias voltages. Effect of the tunneling mechanism on the bias dependence of the magnetoresistance was also discussed.

  2. Effects of aging on hemispheric asymmetry in inferior frontal cortex activity during belief-bias syllogistic reasoning: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Takeo; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2010-07-11

    The belief-bias effect in syllogistic reasoning refers to the tendency for subjects to be erroneously biased when logical conclusions are incongruent with beliefs about the world. This study examined age-related differences in inferior frontal cortex (IFC) activity associated with belief-bias reasoning using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The subjects were 32 older (mean age, 68.53 years) and 32 young adult volunteers (mean age, 21.50 years). They performed belief-congruent and incongruent reasoning trials while right and left IFC activities were being measured by NIRS. Behavioral analysis found that older adults exhibited a larger belief-bias than young adults. NIRS analysis showed that the right IFC was more activated than the left IFC in young adults, while there was no significant hemispheric difference in older adults. On correlation analysis, there was a significant positive correlation between reasoning accuracy and IFC activation in both hemispheres for older adults, while in young adults, the correlation was significant only in the right hemisphere. These correlation patterns suggest that the right IFC is critical for resolving conflicting reasoning in young adults, but that older adults may further recruit the left IFC to compensate for the age-related decline in the inhibitory control functions. Thus, we demonstrate, for the first time, age-related differences in neural activity associated with belief-bias reasoning.

  3. Effects of hemin and thermal stress exposure on JWA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming; CHEN Rui; LI Aiping; ZHOU Jianwei

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the expression of JWA after hemin and (or) thermal stress exposure,we treated K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia cells) cells with different doses of hemin and thermal stress using different exposure times.The expression of JWA protein was determined by Western blot analysis.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine JWA mRNA expression.JWA promoter transcription activity analysis was performed by chloramphenicol acetyl transferase-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (CAT-ELISA).The expression of JWA protein was significantly increased by up to (3.23 +0.57) folds compared to the control in K562 cells after hemin treatment (50 μM for one week),and a similar pattern was observed in the cells after treatment with thermal stress (42℃) for 2 hours [increased by (8.00+ 1.73) folds].The expression of JWA mRNA was also significantly elevated by up to (1.37 + 0.06)folds in K562 cells treated with hemin (30 μM for 48 hours),and a similar regulatory pattern [increased by (1.87±0.13)folds] was observed with thermal stress exposure (42℃) for 30 minutes.However,a combined antagonistic effect was observed in the treatment of K562 cells with hemin (30 μM,48 h) followed by thermal stress (42℃,30 min).CAT-ELISA further confirmed that either hemin or thermal stress treatment could up-regulate JWA transcription activity,however,the effects could be counteracted partly by treatment with a combination of both.Hemin and thermal stress might regulate JWA expression via distinct intracellular signal transduction pathways.

  4. CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects: Bias estimates using ground-based Raman lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e., the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study, uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE are estimated using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars at midlatitude and tropical sites. We find that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50% at the two ARM sites. The undetected aerosol is likely the consequence of random noise in CALIPSO measurements and therefore will affect global observations as well. This suggests that the global aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak. Also examined is the impact of the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e., the lidar ratio) whose value CALIPSO retrievals must assume to obtain the aerosol extinction profile. It is shown that if CALIPSO can reproduce the climatological value of the lidar ratio at a given location, then the aerosol DRE there can be accurately calculated (within about 3%).

  5. The effects of osmotic stress on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, W J; Parmar, N; Hunt, C J

    1985-05-01

    The effect of osmotic stress on human platelets was investigated at 0, 25, and 37 degrees C. The osmolality of the suspending plasma was decreased by adding water or increased by adding sodium chloride or sucrose. After 5 min, isotonicity was restored by dilution with an excess of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. After centrifugation, the platelets were resuspended in autologous plasma and then incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C before assaying the active transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the hypotonic stress response. Anisosmotic conditions had a greater effect on the extent of volume reversal in the hypotonic stress test than on 5-HT uptake. At 25 degrees C, only moderate degrees of hypotonicity (0.25 osmol/kg) or hypertonicity (0.59 osmol/kg) were sufficient to depress the hypotonic stress response. In general, platelets tolerated departures from isotonic conditions better at 0 degree C than at the higher temperatures. Furthermore, at 0 and 25 degrees C approximately equiosmolal concentrations of sucrose and sodium chloride depressed the hypotonic stress response to similar extents, but at 37 degrees C high osmolalities (greater than 2 osmol/kg) were tolerated better when the additive was sucrose than when it was sodium chloride. Platelets shrank when subjected to hyperosmotic conditions, but their discoid shape and the peripheral band of microtubules were maintained. PMID:3980588

  6. Effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking quantitative resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 in PWR primary water, the authors have studied the effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloys 600 and 690, in high temperature water. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 degrees C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours or 24,000 hours. From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked Alloys of thermally treated 690 have the excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. Further, in this paper, the planning of stress corrosion cracking test for weld joints and weld metal of Alloy 600 is described

  7. Exchange bias effect and glassy-like behavior of EuCrO3 and CeCrO3 nano-powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, M.; Kremer, R. K.; Trudel, S.; Razavi, F. S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic properties of nano-sized EuCrO3 and CeCrO3 powders, synthesized by a solution combustion method, were investigated using DC/AC magnetization measurements. An exchange bias effect, magnetization irreversibility and AC susceptibility dispersion in these samples provided evidence for the presence of the spin disorder magnetic phase. The exchange bias phenomenon, which is assigned to the exchange coupling between the glassy-like shell and canted antiferromagnetic core, showed the opposite sign in EuCrO3 and CeCrO3 at low temperatures, suggesting different exchange interactions at the interfaces in these compounds. We also observed a sign reversal of exchange bias in CeCrO3 at different temperatures.

  8. Exchange bias effect and glassy-like behavior of EuCrO{sub 3} and CeCrO{sub 3} nano-powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, M., E-mail: maryam.taheri@brocku.ca; Razavi, F. S. [Department of Physics, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1 (Canada); Kremer, R. K. [Department of Physics, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1 (Canada); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Trudel, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-28

    The magnetic properties of nano-sized EuCrO{sub 3} and CeCrO{sub 3} powders, synthesized by a solution combustion method, were investigated using DC/AC magnetization measurements. An exchange bias effect, magnetization irreversibility and AC susceptibility dispersion in these samples provided evidence for the presence of the spin disorder magnetic phase. The exchange bias phenomenon, which is assigned to the exchange coupling between the glassy-like shell and canted antiferromagnetic core, showed the opposite sign in EuCrO{sub 3} and CeCrO{sub 3} at low temperatures, suggesting different exchange interactions at the interfaces in these compounds. We also observed a sign reversal of exchange bias in CeCrO{sub 3} at different temperatures.

  9. Study of the oxygen and substrate bias effects on the defect structure of reactive sputter-deposited SnOx films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of oxygen and substrate bias on the defect structure of reactive sputter-deposited SnOx films were investigated. Samples were analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission electron diffraction (TED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The oxygen played an important role in the film growth and surface morphology. TEM, TED and XRD showed that increasing of the oxygen partial pressure leads to the formation of films with different crystal phases. The void sizes also depended on oxygen partial pressure. The positron lifetimes and their relative intensities depended on the void concentration, the partial annealing of the vacancies and oxidation of SnO to SnOx. This investigation also showed that the mechanical strength of the films obtained at negative substrate bias is higher and the concentration of vacancy defects is smaller, than in the films, prepared without substrate bias. (author)

  10. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…

  11. Impact of bias discrepancy and amino acid usage on estimates of the effective number of codons used in a gene, and a test for selection on codon usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The effective number of codons (Nc) used in a gene is one of the most commonly used measures of synonymous codon usage bias, owing much of its popularity to the fact that it is species independent and that simulation studies have shown that it is less dependent of gene length than other measures....... literature that exists for Buchnera sp. APS and Borrelia burgdorferi....

  12. Site Measurement of Surrounding Rock Pressure and Analysis of Structure Stress of Large-span Bias-pressured Shallow Tunnels%大跨浅埋偏压隧道围压实测及结构受力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江磊; 侯哲生; 吴海卫

    2015-01-01

    大跨浅埋偏压隧道由于其非对称的受力条件,易引发结构变形与开裂等突出问题,近年来越来越受工程技术界的重视。以邢汾高速公路邢台段后偏梁大跨度隧道浅埋偏压段为例,通过实测围岩压力,根据荷载结构法的基本原理,利用 ANSYS 软件对其结构受力特性进行数值分析,得到结论:实测的围岩压力分布和偏压的地形之间具有较为一致的对应性,即围岩压力受地形的影响显著;二衬总应力受轴力引起的应力影响较小,主要受弯矩引起的应力控制,整个拱圈范围内最危险的部位是在受围岩压力最大的左侧拱肩处;随着二衬厚度的变化,二衬总应力在不同的部位均发生相应变化,但变化幅度均不大。相关研究结论为后续类似大跨浅埋偏压隧道的合理设计与施工提供参考依据。%The asymmetrical stress condition of the Large-span bias-pressured shallow tunnels can cause many problems easily ,such as structural deformation and cracking .These problems have attracted more and more attentions from engi-neering and technology research field in recent years .The Houpianliang large-span bias-pressured shallow tunnel in Xing-tai section of Xingtai - Fenyang highway was taken as an example to numerically analyze the mechanical characteristics of the structure by adopting ANSYS ,according to the data of site measurement of surrounding rock pressure and the princi -ple of load structure method .The results indicate that :the actual measured surrounding rock pressure is consistent with the bias terrain ,which means the surrounding rock pressure is influenced by topography significantly ;the total stress of the second lining is mainly controlled by the stress from bending moment and is less influenced by the stress from axial force ,the weakest part within the scope of the arch ring is the left spandrel which is subject to maximum pressure ;with the change of the

  13. The Effects of Acute Stress on Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    KUBİLAY, Ayşegül

    2002-01-01

    The physiological effects of acute stressors (transport, handling, netting and confinement) on rainbow trout in an aquaculture system were investigated. Serum cortisol level, serum glucose and lysozyme activity were determined in rainbow trout stressed by acute stressors, and compared with those of unstressed (control) fish. Serum cortisol, glucose levels and lysozyme activity were significantly higher(P

  14. Stress and its effects on horses reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal M. AboEl-Maaty

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A total of 90 mares and horses were subjected to blood sampling for determining the effect of management (farm, reproductive condition, sex, age, breed and month of the year during breeding on circulating levels of cortisol and sex hormones. Blood samples were collected from December to the following June from four farms. Blood sera underwent testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and cortisol assaying using ELISA kits. Cortisol levels were significantly low in lactating mares during their foal heat but significantly high levels were recorded in both repeat breeder mares and horses used for racing. High and significant testosterone and estradiol levels were recorded in both stallions used for breeding especially after semen collection and early pregnant mares. Similar testosterone levels were recorded in both early pregnant mares and racing horses but high levels were recorded in stallions. Estradiol was high in both early pregnant and mares with endometritis but the highest levels were observed in stallions. Horses held in private farms had high cortisol levels compared to those of governmental farms. In contrast to mares, horses had low cortisol and high estradiol levels. Cortisol levels were high from April to June (Spring and early summer compared to its levels from December to March (Winter. Arab horses had low cortisol compared to native and imported foreign breeds. In conclusion, environmental condition, exercise, breed, management and the purpose of raising horses all are affecting its cortisol levels.

  15. Effect of intermediate principal stress on strength of soft rock under complex stress states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宗源; 廖红建; 党发宁

    2014-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of conventional and true triaxial tests for soft rock materials using the three-dimensional finite difference code FLAC3D were presented. A hexahedral element and a strain hardening/softening constitutive model based on the unified strength theory (UST) were used to simulate both the consolidated-undrained (CU) triaxial and the consolidated-drained (CD) true triaxial tests. Based on the results of the true triaxial tests simulation, the effect of the intermediate principal stress on the strength of soft rock was investigated. Finally, an example of an axial compression test for a hard rock pillar with a soft rock interlayer was analyzed using the two-dimensional finite difference code FLAC. The CD true triaxial test simulations for diatomaceous soft rock suggest the peak and residual strengths increase by 30%when the effect of the intermediate principal stress is taken into account. The axial compression for a rock pillar indicated the peak and residual strengths increase six-fold when the soft rock interlayer approached the vertical and the effect of the intermediate principal stress is taken into account.

  16. Effects of Different Sweet Cherry Rootstocks and Drought Stress on

    OpenAIRE

    KÜÇÜKYUMUK, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Relation between drought stress, genotypic differences and nutrients are important in plant growth. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of different sweet cherry rootstocks grown in 50-liter pots and drought stress on nutrient (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, and Cu) concentrations of leaves. In this study 0900 Ziraat sweet cherry variety grafted on five different rootstocks (P. mahaleb, Mazzard, Gisela-6, MaxMa 14, CAB 6) were used. Four irrigation treatments (control or 100%, 75%, 50...

  17. Stress in Irish dentists: developing effective coping strategies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogers, Cathryn

    2012-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the need to recognise occupation-specific risk factors contributing to stress and burnout. As health professionals, it is important for dentists to recognise the symptoms and the effects of stress on physical, psychological and professional well being. This article reviews the relevant scientific evidence, and provides practical cognitive psychological measures to guide improved well-being for dentists. Any stigma-related factors need to be acknowledged and addressed for the wellbeing of dentists and their patients, and the dental profession is well placed to provide leadership on this issue. Peer support is central to meeting this challenge.

  18. Brief communication: Effect of size biases in the coefficient of variation on assessing intraspecific variability in the prosimian skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulwood, Ethan L; Kramer, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the effect of a measurement size bias in coefficients of variation on the evaluation of intraspecific skeletal variability in a sample of eight prosimian species (Eulemur fulvus, Hapalemur griseus, Lemur catta, Varecia variegata, Galago senegalensis, Otolemur crassicaudatus, Nycticebus coucang, and Tarsius syrichta). Measurements with smaller means were expected to have higher coefficients of variation (CVs) due to the impact of instrumental precision on the ability to assess variability. This was evaluated by testing for a negative correlation between CVs and means in the total sample, within each species, and within each measurement, and by testing for the leveraging impact of small measurements on the significance of comparisons of variability between regions of the prosimian skeleton. Three comparisons were made: cranial versus postcranial variability, epiphysis versus diaphysis variability, and forelimb versus hindlimb variability. CVs were significantly negatively correlated with means within the total sample (r(2) = 0.208, P < 0.0001) and within each species. CVs and means were significantly correlated within only three of the measurements, which may reflect the relatively low body size range of the species studied. As predicted by the higher variability of smaller measurements, removing the smallest measurements from comparisons of variable classes containing measurements of different mean magnitudes pushed the comparisons below significance. These results indicate caution should be exercised when using CVs to assess variability across sets of measurements with different means.

  19. Effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroki; Oshiro, Misaki; Namba, Mari; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). Fifteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist under two thermal conditions: Heat Stress and normothermic Time Control. The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Under the Heat Stress condition, SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (1st), early in heat stress (2nd), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C (3rd) and ~2.0°C (4th), and after heat stress (5th). In the Time Control condition, SEPs were measured at the same time intervals as those in the Heat Stress condition. The peak latencies and amplitudes of SEPs did not change early in heat stress. However, the latencies of P14, N20, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, and P22 at Fz were significantly shorter in the 4th session than in the 1st session. Furthermore, the peak amplitudes of P25 and N60 at C4', and P22 and N30 at Fz decreased with increases in body temperature. On the other hand, under the Time Control condition, no significant differences were observed in the amplitudes or latencies of any component of SEPs. These results suggested that the conduction velocity of the ascending somatosensory input was accelerated by increases in body temperature, and hyperthermia impaired the neural activity of cortical somatosensory processing. PMID:26468258

  20. Sociocultural behavior, sex-biased admixture, and effective population sizes in Central African Pygmies and non-Pygmies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdu, Paul; Becker, Noémie S A; Froment, Alain; Georges, Myriam; Grugni, Viola; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Hombert, Jean-Marie; Van der Veen, Lolke; Le Bomin, Sylvie; Bahuchet, Serge; Heyer, Evelyne; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Sociocultural phenomena, such as exogamy or phylopatry, can largely determine human sex-specific demography. In Central Africa, diverging patterns of sex-specific genetic variation have been observed between mobile hunter-gatherer Pygmies and sedentary agricultural non-Pygmies. However, their sex-specific demography remains largely unknown. Using population genetics and approximate Bayesian computation approaches, we inferred male and female effective population sizes, sex-specific migration, and admixture rates in 23 Central African Pygmy and non-Pygmy populations, genotyped for autosomal, X-linked, Y-linked, and mitochondrial markers. We found much larger effective population sizes and migration rates among non-Pygmy populations than among Pygmies, in agreement with the recent expansions and migrations of non-Pygmies and, conversely, the isolation and stationary demography of Pygmy groups. We found larger effective sizes and migration rates for males than for females for Pygmies, and vice versa for non-Pygmies. Thus, although most Pygmy populations have patrilocal customs, their sex-specific genetic patterns resemble those of matrilocal populations. In fact, our results are consistent with a lower prevalence of polygyny and patrilocality in Pygmies compared with non-Pygmies and a potential female transmission of reproductive success in Pygmies. Finally, Pygmy populations showed variable admixture levels with the non-Pygmies, with often much larger introgression from male than from female lineages. Social discrimination against Pygmies triggering complex movements of spouses in intermarriages can explain these male-biased admixture patterns in a patrilocal context. We show how gender-related sociocultural phenomena can determine highly variable sex-specific demography among populations, and how population genetic approaches contrasting chromosomal types allow inferring detailed human sex-specific demographic history.