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Sample records for bias favors protein

  1. Teaching accreditation exams reveal grading biases favor women in male-dominated disciplines in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Thomas; Hillion, Mélina

    2016-07-29

    Discrimination against women is seen as one of the possible causes behind their underrepresentation in certain STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) subjects. We show that this is not the case for the competitive exams used to recruit almost all French secondary and postsecondary teachers and professors. Comparisons of oral non-gender-blind tests with written gender-blind tests for about 100,000 individuals observed in 11 different fields over the period 2006-2013 reveal a bias in favor of women that is strongly increasing with the extent of a field's male-domination. This bias turns from 3 to 5 percentile ranks for men in literature and foreign languages to about 10 percentile ranks for women in math, physics, or philosophy. These findings have implications for the debate over what interventions are appropriate to increase the representation of women in fields in which they are currently underrepresented. PMID:27471301

  2. The Bias in Favor of Venture Capital Finance in U.S. Entrepreneurial Education: At the Expense of Trade Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Thomas; LeMire, Steven; Silvernagel, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The authors examine whether U.S. college-level entrepreneurship education demonstrates a bias favoring venture capital (VC) financing while marginalizing trade credit financing, and the resulting impact on entrepreneurship students. A sample of U.S. business textbooks and survey data from entrepreneurship students reveals a significant bias toward…

  3. Bias tradeoffs in the creation and analysis of protein-protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Gillis, Jesse; Ballouz, Sara; Pavlidis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Networks constructed from aggregated protein-protein interaction data are commonplace in biology. But the studies these data are derived from were conducted with their own hypotheses and foci. Focusing on data from budding yeast present in BioGRID, we determine that many of the downstream signals present in network data are significantly impacted by biases in the original data. We determine the degree to which selection bias in favor of biologically interesting bait proteins goes down with st...

  4. TRAF4 is a novel phosphoinositide-binding protein modulating tight junctions and favoring cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Rousseau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4 is frequently overexpressed in carcinomas, suggesting a specific role in cancer. Although TRAF4 protein is predominantly found at tight junctions (TJs in normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs, it accumulates in the cytoplasm of malignant MECs. How TRAF4 is recruited and functions at TJs is unclear. Here we show that TRAF4 possesses a novel phosphoinositide (PIP-binding domain crucial for its recruitment to TJs. Of interest, this property is shared by the other members of the TRAF protein family. Indeed, the TRAF domain of all TRAF proteins (TRAF1 to TRAF6 is a bona fide PIP-binding domain. Molecular and structural analyses revealed that the TRAF domain of TRAF4 exists as a trimer that binds up to three lipids using basic residues exposed at its surface. Cellular studies indicated that TRAF4 acts as a negative regulator of TJ and increases cell migration. These functions are dependent from its ability to interact with PIPs. Our results suggest that TRAF4 overexpression might contribute to breast cancer progression by destabilizing TJs and favoring cell migration.

  5. Prediction of Protein Secondary Structures From Conformational Biases

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Cieplak, Marek; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2002-01-01

    We use LINUS, a procedure developed by Srinivasan and Rose, to provide a physical interpretation of and to predict the secondary structures of proteins. The secondary structure type at a given site is identified by the largest conformational bias during short time simulations. We examine the rate of successful prediction as a function of temperature and the interaction window. At high temperatures, there is a large propensity for the establishment of $\\beta$-strands whereas $\\alpha$-helices a...

  6. WWOX protein expression varies among ovarian carcinoma histotypes and correlates with less favorable outcome

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    Liu Jinsong

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The putative tumor suppressor WWOX gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site 16D (FRA16D at chromosome area 16q23.3-24.1. This region is a frequent target for loss of heterozygosity and chromosomal rearrangement in ovarian, breast, hepatocellular, prostate carcinomas and other neoplasias. The goal of these studies was to evaluate WWOX protein expression levels in ovarian carcinomas to determine if they correlated with clinico-pathological parameters, thus providing additional support for WWOX functioning as a tumor suppressor. Methods We performed WWOX protein expression analyses by means of immunobloting and immunohistochemistry on normal ovaries and specific human ovarian carcinoma Tissue Microarrays (n = 444. Univariate analysis of clinical-pathological parameters based on WWOX staining was determined by χ2 test with Yates' correction. The basic significance level was fixed at p Results Immunoblotting analysis from normal ovarian samples demonstrated consistently strong WWOX expression while 37% ovarian carcinomas showed reduced or undetectable WWOX protein expression levels. The immunohistochemistry of normal human ovarian tissue sections confirmed strong WWOX expression in ovarian surface epithelial cells and in epithelial inclusion cysts within the cortex. Out of 444 ovarian carcinoma samples analyzed 30% of tumors showed lack of or barely detectable WWOX expression. The remaining ovarian carcinomas (70% stained moderately to strongly positive for this protein. The two histotypes showing significant loss of WWOX expression were of the Mucinous (70% and Clear Cell (42% types. Reduced WWOX expression demonstrated a significant association with clinical Stage IV (FIGO (p = 0.007, negative Progesterone Receptor (PR status (p = 0.008 and shorter overall survival (p = 0.03. Conclusion These data indicate that WWOX protein expression is highly variable among ovarian carcinoma histotypes. It was also observed that subsets

  7. WWOX protein expression varies among ovarian carcinoma histotypes and correlates with less favorable outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The putative tumor suppressor WWOX gene spans the common chromosomal fragile site 16D (FRA16D) at chromosome area 16q23.3-24.1. This region is a frequent target for loss of heterozygosity and chromosomal rearrangement in ovarian, breast, hepatocellular, prostate carcinomas and other neoplasias. The goal of these studies was to evaluate WWOX protein expression levels in ovarian carcinomas to determine if they correlated with clinico-pathological parameters, thus providing additional support for WWOX functioning as a tumor suppressor. We performed WWOX protein expression analyses by means of immunobloting and immunohistochemistry on normal ovaries and specific human ovarian carcinoma Tissue Microarrays (n = 444). Univariate analysis of clinical-pathological parameters based on WWOX staining was determined by χ2 test with Yates' correction. The basic significance level was fixed at p < 0.05. Immunoblotting analysis from normal ovarian samples demonstrated consistently strong WWOX expression while 37% ovarian carcinomas showed reduced or undetectable WWOX protein expression levels. The immunohistochemistry of normal human ovarian tissue sections confirmed strong WWOX expression in ovarian surface epithelial cells and in epithelial inclusion cysts within the cortex. Out of 444 ovarian carcinoma samples analyzed 30% of tumors showed lack of or barely detectable WWOX expression. The remaining ovarian carcinomas (70%) stained moderately to strongly positive for this protein. The two histotypes showing significant loss of WWOX expression were of the Mucinous (70%) and Clear Cell (42%) types. Reduced WWOX expression demonstrated a significant association with clinical Stage IV (FIGO) (p = 0.007), negative Progesterone Receptor (PR) status (p = 0.008) and shorter overall survival (p = 0.03). These data indicate that WWOX protein expression is highly variable among ovarian carcinoma histotypes. It was also observed that subsets of ovarian tumors demonstrated loss of WWOX

  8. Hsp70 biases the folding pathways of client proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Ashok; Rosenzweig, Rina; Bouvignies, Guillaume; Kay, Lewis E

    2016-05-17

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) family of chaperones bind cognate substrates to perform a variety of different processes that are integral to cellular homeostasis. Although detailed structural information is available on the chaperone, the structural features of folding competent substrates in the bound form have not been well characterized. Here we use paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR spectroscopy to probe the existence of long-range interactions in one such folding competent substrate, human telomere repeat binding factor (hTRF1), which is bound to DnaK in a globally unfolded conformation. We show that DnaK binding modifies the energy landscape of the substrate by removing long-range interactions that are otherwise present in the unbound, unfolded conformation of hTRF1. Because the unfolded state of hTRF1 is only marginally populated and transiently formed, it is inaccessible to standard NMR approaches. We therefore developed a (1)H-based CEST experiment that allows measurement of PREs in sparse states, reporting on transiently sampled conformations. Our results suggest that DnaK binding can significantly bias the folding pathway of client substrates such that secondary structure forms first, followed by the development of longer-range contacts between more distal parts of the protein. PMID:27140645

  9. Biased and g protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie;

    2014-01-01

    -switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of "classic" redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a......Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor...... absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro...

  10. No accelerated rate of protein evolution in male-biased Drosophila pseudoobscura genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Metta, Muralidhar; Gudavalli, Rambabu; Gibert, Jean-Michel; Schlotterer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic traits are often subject to diversifying selection. Genes with a male-biased gene expression also are probably affected by sexual selection and have a high rate of protein evolution. We used SAGE to measure sex-biased gene expression in Drosophila pseudoobscura. Consistent with previous results from D. melanogaster, a larger number of genes were male biased (402 genes) than female biased (138 genes). About 34% of the genes changed the sex-related expression pattern between ...

  11. Reactibodies generated by kinetic selection couple chemical reactivity with favorable protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Ivan; Carletti, Eugénie; Kurkova, Inna; Nachon, Florian; Nicolet, Yvain; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Débat, Hélène; Avalle, Bérangère; Belogurov, Alexey A; Kuznetsov, Nikita; Reshetnyak, Andrey; Masson, Patrick; Tonevitsky, Alexander G; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Makarov, Alexander A; Friboulet, Alain; Tramontano, Alfonso; Gabibov, Alexander

    2011-09-20

    Igs offer a versatile template for combinatorial and rational design approaches to the de novo creation of catalytically active proteins. We have used a covalent capture selection strategy to identify biocatalysts from within a human semisynthetic antibody variable fragment library that uses a nucleophilic mechanism. Specific phosphonylation at a single tyrosine within the variable light-chain framework was confirmed in a recombinant IgG construct. High-resolution crystallographic structures of unmodified and phosphonylated Fabs display a 15-Å-deep two-chamber cavity at the interface of variable light (V(L)) and variable heavy (V(H)) fragments having a nucleophilic tyrosine at the base of the site. The depth and structure of the pocket are atypical of antibodies in general but can be compared qualitatively with the catalytic site of cholinesterases. A structurally disordered heavy chain complementary determining region 3 loop, constituting a wall of the cleft, is stabilized after covalent modification by hydrogen bonding to the phosphonate tropinol moiety. These features and presteady state kinetics analysis indicate that an induced fit mechanism operates in this reaction. Mutations of residues located in this stabilized loop do not interfere with direct contacts to the organophosphate ligand but can interrogate second shell interactions, because the H3 loop has a conformation adjusted for binding. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters along with computational docking support the active site model, including plasticity and simple catalytic components. Although relatively uncomplicated, this catalytic machinery displays both stereo- and chemical selectivity. The organophosphate pesticide paraoxon is hydrolyzed by covalent catalysis with rate-limiting dephosphorylation. This reactibody is, therefore, a kinetically selected protein template that has enzyme-like catalytic attributes. PMID:21896761

  12. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by Treg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of Treg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic Treg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing Treg cells in SMAR1−/− mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic Treg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining Treg physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in Treg cells. • SMAR1−/− Treg cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1−/− mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain Treg phenotype that controls colitis

  13. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  14. Eukaryotic evolutionary transitions are associated with extreme codon bias in functionally-related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Hudson

    Full Text Available Codon bias in the genome of an organism influences its phenome by changing the speed and efficiency of mRNA translation and hence protein abundance. We hypothesized that differences in codon bias, either between-species differences in orthologous genes, or within-species differences between genes, may play an evolutionary role. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the genome-wide codon bias in six species that occupy vital positions in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life. We acquired the entire protein coding sequences for these organisms, computed the codon bias for all genes in each organism and explored the output for relationships between codon bias and protein function, both within- and between-lineages. We discovered five notable coordinated patterns, with extreme codon bias most pronounced in traits considered highly characteristic of a given lineage. Firstly, the Homo sapiens genome had stronger codon bias for DNA-binding transcription factors than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, whereas the opposite was true for ribosomal proteins--perhaps underscoring transcriptional regulation in the origin of complexity. Secondly, both mammalian species examined possessed extreme codon bias in genes relating to hair--a tissue unique to mammals. Thirdly, Arabidopsis thaliana showed extreme codon bias in genes implicated in cell wall formation and chloroplast function--which are unique to plants. Fourthly, Gallus gallus possessed strong codon bias in a subset of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins--perhaps reflecting the enhanced bioenergetic efficiency in birds that co-evolved with flight. And lastly, the G. gallus genome had extreme codon bias for the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor--which may help to explain their spontaneous recovery from deafness. We propose that extreme codon bias in groups of genes that encode functionally related proteins has a pathway-level energetic explanation.

  15. Codon Bias Patterns of E. coli’s Interacting Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Dilucca, Maddalena; Cimini, Giulio; Semmoloni, Andrea; Deiana, Antonio; Giansanti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codons, i.e., DNA nucleotide triplets coding for the same amino acid, are used differently across the variety of living organisms. The biological meaning of this phenomenon, known as codon usage bias, is still controversial. In order to shed light on this point, we propose a new codon bias index, CompAI, that is based on the competition between cognate and near-cognate tRNAs during translation, without being tuned to the usage bias of highly expressed genes. We perform a genome-wid...

  16. Sampling Realistic Protein Conformations Using Local Structural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelryck, Thomas Wim; Kent, John T.; Krogh, A.

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of protein structure from sequence remains a major unsolved problem in biology. The most successful protein structure prediction methods make use of a divide-and-conquer strategy to attack the problem: a conformational sampling method generates plausible candidate structures, which......-reaching implications for protein structure prediction, determination, simulation, and design....

  17. Probing heterotrimeric G protein activation: applications to biased ligands.

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Colette; Saulière, Aude; Galandrin, Ségolène; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) drive numerous signaling pathways involved in the regulation of a broad range of physiologic processes. Today, they represent the largest target for modern drugs development with potential application in all clinical fields. Recently, the concept of “ligand-directed trafficking” has led to a conceptual revolution in pharmacological theory, thus opening new avenues for drug discovery. Accordingly, GPCRs do not function as simple on-off switch bu...

  18. G-Protein/β-Arrestin-Linked Fluctuating Network of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors for Predicting Drug Efficacy and Bias Using Short-Term Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu Ichikawa; Kazushi Fujimoto; Atsushi Yamada; Susumu Okazaki; Kazuto Yamazaki

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and bias of signal transduction induced by a drug at a target protein are closely associated with the benefits and side effects of the drug. In particular, partial agonist activity and G-protein/β-arrestin-biased agonist activity for the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, the family with the most target proteins of launched drugs, are key issues in drug discovery. However, designing GPCR drugs with appropriate efficacy and bias is challenging because the dynamic mechanism ...

  19. Biases in the experimental annotations of protein function and their effect on our understanding of protein function space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoes, Alexandra M; Ream, David C; Thorman, Alexander W; Babbitt, Patricia C; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing functional annotation of proteins relies upon the work of curators to capture experimental findings from scientific literature and apply them to protein sequence and structure data. However, with the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, a small number of experimental studies dominate the functional protein annotations collected in databases. Here, we investigate just how prevalent is the "few articles - many proteins" phenomenon. We examine the experimentally validated annotation of proteins provided by several groups in the GO Consortium, and show that the distribution of proteins per published study is exponential, with 0.14% of articles providing the source of annotations for 25% of the proteins in the UniProt-GOA compilation. Since each of the dominant articles describes the use of an assay that can find only one function or a small group of functions, this leads to substantial biases in what we know about the function of many proteins. Mass-spectrometry, microscopy and RNAi experiments dominate high throughput experiments. Consequently, the functional information derived from these experiments is mostly of the subcellular location of proteins, and of the participation of proteins in embryonic developmental pathways. For some organisms, the information provided by different studies overlap by a large amount. We also show that the information provided by high throughput experiments is less specific than those provided by low throughput experiments. Given the experimental techniques available, certain biases in protein function annotation due to high-throughput experiments are unavoidable. Knowing that these biases exist and understanding their characteristics and extent is important for database curators, developers of function annotation programs, and anyone who uses protein function annotation data to plan experiments. PMID:23737737

  20. Alteration in cardiac uncoupling proteins and eNOS gene expression following high-intensity interval training in favor of increasing mechanical efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahi, Ali Asghar; Shekarfroush, Shahnaz; Rahimi, Mostafa; Jalali, Amirhossain; Khoshbaten, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): High-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases energy expenditure and mechanical energy efficiency. Although both uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) affect the mechanical efficiency and antioxidant capacity, their effects are inverse. The aim of this study was to determine whether the alterations of cardiac UCP2, UCP3, and eNOS mRNA expression following HIIT are in favor of increased mechanical efficiency or decreased oxidative stress. Mat...

  1. Intergroup bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility. PMID:11752497

  2. Are Fit Indices Biased in Favor of Bi-Factor Models in Cognitive Ability Research?: A Comparison of Fit in Correlated Factors, Higher-Order, and Bi-Factor Models via Monte Carlo Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant B. Morgan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bi-factor confirmatory factor models have been influential in research on cognitive abilities because they often better fit the data than correlated factors and higher-order models. They also instantiate a perspective that differs from that offered by other models. Motivated by previous work that hypothesized an inherent statistical bias of fit indices favoring the bi-factor model, we compared the fit of correlated factors, higher-order, and bi-factor models via Monte Carlo methods. When data were sampled from a true bi-factor structure, each of the approximate fit indices was more likely than not to identify the bi-factor solution as the best fitting. When samples were selected from a true multiple correlated factors structure, approximate fit indices were more likely overall to identify the correlated factors solution as the best fitting. In contrast, when samples were generated from a true higher-order structure, approximate fit indices tended to identify the bi-factor solution as best fitting. There was extensive overlap of fit values across the models regardless of true structure. Although one model may fit a given dataset best relative to the other models, each of the models tended to fit the data well in absolute terms. Given this variability, models must also be judged on substantive and conceptual grounds.

  3. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders. PMID:26302653

  4. Evaluation of colorimetric assays for analyzing reductively methylated proteins: Biases and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Pamlea N; Macnaughtan, Megan A

    2015-12-15

    Colorimetric protein assays, such as the Coomassie blue G-250 dye-binding (Bradford) and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assays, are commonly used to quantify protein concentration. The accuracy of these assays depends on the amino acid composition. Because of the extensive use of reductive methylation in the study of proteins and the importance of biological methylation, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of lysyl methylation on the Bradford and BCA assays. Unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were analyzed using the absorbance at 280 nm to standardize the concentrations. Using model compounds, we demonstrate that the dimethylation of lysyl ε-amines does not affect the proteins' molar extinction coefficients at 280 nm. For the Bradford assay, the responses (absorbance per unit concentration) of the unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were similar, with a slight decrease in the response upon methylation. For the BCA assay, the responses of the reductively methylated proteins were consistently higher, overestimating the concentrations of the methylated proteins. The enhanced color formation in the BCA assay may be due to the lower acid dissociation constants of the lysyl ε-dimethylamines compared with the unmodified ε-amine, favoring Cu(II) binding in biuret-like complexes. The implications for the analysis of biologically methylated samples are discussed. PMID:26342307

  5. Emphasizing the role of Wnt5a protein expression to predict favorable outcome after radical prostatectomy in patients with low-grade prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wnt5a, a member of non-canonical wingless-related MMTV integration site family is a secreted glycoprotein that plays important roles in development and disease. Recent studies have shown that Wnt5a protein levels are up-regulated in prostate cancer, but contrasting reports exist on the role of Wnt5a to predict outcome after radical prostatectomy in patients with localized prostate cancer. Our group has recently shown that preserved high protein expression of Wnt5a in prostate cancer is associated with longer relapse-free time after radical prostatectomy. The present tissue microarray study emphasizes the role of Wnt5a protein expression in a different, well-defined, and independent cohort consisting of 312 prostate cancer patients. Kaplan–Meier curves plotted between Wnt5a expression and time to biochemical recurrence revealed that in low-grade prostate cancer, patients with preserved high-Wnt5a protein levels in their tumor cells have a lower risk of recurrence after radical prostatectomy compared to patients with low-Wnt5a protein expression. When Wnt5a protein expression was added to a Cox regression multivariate analysis, both Wnt5a protein expression and surgical margin status independently predict biochemical free survival. Herein we confirm Wnt5a positivity as a prognostic factor and show that preserved overexpression of Wnt5a protein is associated with increased time to biochemical recurrence in localized low-grade prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy. Our results emphasize that Wnt5a can be used as a predictive biomarker, and favoring the view of Wnt5a as a future therapeutic target in prostate cancer patients with tumor cells displaying low expression of Wnt5a

  6. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  7. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Deng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9 in tRNAArg(UCU and tRNAGlu(UUC and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell.

  8. Research of Stability of Sesame Favor Compound Protein Beverage%芝麻风味复合蛋白饮料稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立

    2014-01-01

    芝麻风味复合蛋白饮料是新兴的健康饮品,其稳定性和良好的风味体现是产品成功的关键。本文为了研制风味接受度较高,体系较稳定的芝麻风味复合蛋白饮料,探讨了不同稳定剂对体系稳定性的影响。通过单因素实验、正交试验,对芝麻风味复合蛋白饮料的产品稳定性进行了研究。实验以4.8%全脂奶粉加0.65%大豆分离蛋白,配合添加0.1%芝麻主剂。以蔗糖、阿斯巴甜、安塞蜜作为复合甜味物质。以瓜尔豆胶、k-卡拉胶、微晶纤维素(MCC)和蔗糖酯为复合稳定体系。以乳香精和芝麻香精(比例1∶2)总量0.06%为调香方案。均质温度65~70℃,压力25MPa,杀菌温度121℃,10min,研制出稳定性较高、风味体现较好的芝麻风味复合蛋白饮料。结果显示:在稳定性上,瓜尔豆胶、k-卡拉胶、MCC配合使用对产品的稳定性有较好的影响,通过正交试验优选出稳定剂瓜尔豆胶、k-卡拉胶、MCC最佳配合为:0.03%、0.03%、0.15%,影响度大小顺序为MC>k-卡拉胶>瓜尔豆胶。%Sesame favor compound protein beverage is a new kind of health drink. It's stability and favor are the keys to the its successful production. This paper aims to research on the sesame favor compound protein beverage of high acceptance and high stability,and discuss the effects of different stabilizers on the system stability of the product via single factor experiment and orthogonal experiment. The optimal formula of sesame favor compound protein beverage is combined with 4.8% of whole milk powder,0.65% soy protein isolate and 0.1% sesame as main raw materials, saccharose,Aspartame and acesulfame as compound sweet materials,guar gum,K-carrageen,MCC and sucrose ester as compound stability system,and 0.06% milk fragrance and sesame fragrance(ratio of 1∶2)as fragrance. The temperature is between 65℃and 70℃. The pressure is 25 MPa. The sterilization temperature is

  9. Comparative proteomics reveals a significant bias toward alternative protein isoforms with conserved structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; del Pozo, Angela; Frankish, Adam; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Harrow, Jennifer; Ashman, Keith; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2012-09-01

    Advances in high-throughput mass spectrometry are making proteomics an increasingly important tool in genome annotation projects. Peptides detected in mass spectrometry experiments can be used to validate gene models and verify the translation of putative coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we have identified peptides that cover 35% of the genes annotated by the GENCODE consortium for the human genome as part of a comprehensive analysis of experimental spectra from two large publicly available mass spectrometry databases. We detected the translation to protein of "novel" and "putative" protein-coding transcripts as well as transcripts annotated as pseudogenes and nonsense-mediated decay targets. We provide a detailed overview of the population of alternatively spliced protein isoforms that are detectable by peptide identification methods. We found that 150 genes expressed multiple alternative protein isoforms. This constitutes the largest set of reliably confirmed alternatively spliced proteins yet discovered. Three groups of genes were highly overrepresented. We detected alternative isoforms for 10 of the 25 possible heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, proteins with a key role in the splicing process. Alternative isoforms generated from interchangeable homologous exons and from short indels were also significantly enriched, both in human experiments and in parallel analyses of mouse and Drosophila proteomics experiments. Our results show that a surprisingly high proportion (almost 25%) of the detected alternative isoforms are only subtly different from their constitutive counterparts. Many of the alternative splicing events that give rise to these alternative isoforms are conserved in mouse. It was striking that very few of these conserved splicing events broke Pfam functional domains or would damage globular protein structures. This evidence of a strong bias toward subtle differences in CDS and likely conserved cellular function and structure is remarkable and

  10. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Liam M.; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 “prebiotic” α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a “foldable set”—that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides?...

  11. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affiba Florance Kouassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb. Three-dimensional (3D models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB entry code: 4U0J, the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp. First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94, which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4. Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  12. Modeling the two-hybrid detector: experimental bias on protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibius, Karin B; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-10-01

    This work was done to investigate the two-hybrid experiment for finding protein-protein interactions to explain the asymmetry found in the experimental data, and to help screen the data for high confidence interactions. By looking at the bait-prey experimental setup the resulting protein interaction network can be examined as a directed network (bait --> prey). We have investigated two possible scenarios for the asymmetry in the directed network by developing a biochemical model for the protein-DNA and protein-protein bindings inside the living yeast. One scenario assumes a background activity of bait proteins acting even without the prey, the other scenario explores the asymmetry in the chemistry associated with the bait being automatically located in the right position on the DNA. We conclude that the latter model gives the best description of the observed asymmetry. PMID:17557786

  13. Biases in the Experimental Annotations of Protein Function and Their Effect on Our Understanding of Protein Function Space

    OpenAIRE

    Schnoes, Alexandra M.; Ream, David C; Thorman, Alexander W.; Babbitt, Patricia C; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing functional annotation of proteins relies upon the work of curators to capture experimental findings from scientific literature and apply them to protein sequence and structure data. However, with the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, a small number of experimental studies dominate the functional protein annotations collected in databases. Here we investigate just how prevalent is the "few articles -- many proteins" phenomenon. We examine the experimentally val...

  14. Dengue-2 Structural Proteins Associate with Human Proteins to Produce a Coagulation and Innate Immune Response Biased Interactome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Luis RB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus infection is a public health threat to hundreds of millions of individuals in the tropical regions of the globe. Although Dengue infection usually manifests itself in its mildest, though often debilitating clinical form, dengue fever, life-threatening complications commonly arise in the form of hemorrhagic shock and encephalitis. The etiological basis for the virus-induced pathology in general, and the different clinical manifestations in particular, are not well understood. We reasoned that a detailed knowledge of the global biological processes affected by virus entry into a cell might help shed new light on this long-standing problem. Methods A bacterial two-hybrid screen using DENV2 structural proteins as bait was performed, and the results were used to feed a manually curated, global dengue-human protein interaction network. Gene ontology and pathway enrichment, along with network topology and microarray meta-analysis, were used to generate hypothesis regarding dengue disease biology. Results Combining bioinformatic tools with two-hybrid technology, we screened human cDNA libraries to catalogue proteins physically interacting with the DENV2 virus structural proteins, Env, cap and PrM. We identified 31 interacting human proteins representing distinct biological processes that are closely related to the major clinical diagnostic feature of dengue infection: haemostatic imbalance. In addition, we found dengue-binding human proteins involved with additional key aspects, previously described as fundamental for virus entry into cells and the innate immune response to infection. Construction of a DENV2-human global protein interaction network revealed interesting biological properties suggested by simple network topology analysis. Conclusions Our experimental strategy revealed that dengue structural proteins interact with human protein targets involved in the maintenance of blood coagulation and innate anti

  15. Does biased gene conversion influence polymorphism in the circumsporozoite protein-encoding gene of Plasmodium vivax?

    OpenAIRE

    Arnot, D E; Barnwell, J W; Stewart, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Variation between North Korean and Latin American isolates in the circumsporozoite (CS) protein encoding gene of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax was studied. Polymorphic positions are confined to the central tandemly repeated sequences. Nucleotide substitutions in the tandem repeats produce variants; these substituted positions within the repeat array tend to be conserved between genes. The North Korean CS gene has a short insertion after the repeats encoding a 4-amino acid repeat...

  16. Cell-type-specific repression by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 is biased toward long genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris M; Okaty, Benjamin W; Arnson, Hannah A; Kato, Saori; Dani, Vardhan S; Nelson, Sacha B

    2014-09-17

    Mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) cause Rett syndrome and related autism spectrum disorders (Amir et al., 1999). MeCP2 is believed to be required for proper regulation of brain gene expression, but prior microarray studies in Mecp2 knock-out mice using brain tissue homogenates have revealed only subtle changes in gene expression (Tudor et al., 2002; Nuber et al., 2005; Jordan et al., 2007; Chahrour et al., 2008). Here, by profiling discrete subtypes of neurons we uncovered more dramatic effects of MeCP2 on gene expression, overcoming the "dilution problem" associated with assaying homogenates of complex tissues. The results reveal misregulation of genes involved in neuronal connectivity and communication. Importantly, genes upregulated following loss of MeCP2 are biased toward longer genes but this is not true for downregulated genes, suggesting MeCP2 may selectively repress long genes. Because genes involved in neuronal connectivity and communication, such as cell adhesion and cell-cell signaling genes, are enriched among longer genes, their misregulation following loss of MeCP2 suggests a possible etiology for altered circuit function in Rett syndrome. PMID:25232122

  17. Handling Gifts, Gratuities, and Favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, Nick; Jones, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The twelfth in a series of articles featuring the principles of the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics focuses on the acceptance by professors of gratuities, gifts, or favors that might impair or appear to impair professional judgment. (LRW)

  18. Sex-biased transcription enhancement by a 5' tethered Gal4-MOF histone acetyltransferase fusion protein in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belikoff Esther J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In male Drosophila melanogaster, the male specific lethal (MSL complex is somehow responsible for a two-fold increase in transcription of most X-linked genes, which are enriched for histone H4 acetylated at lysine 16 (H4K16ac. This acetylation requires MOF, a histone acetyltransferase that is a component of the MSL complex. MOF also associates with the non-specific lethal or NSL complex. The MSL complex is bound within active genes on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias. In contrast, the NSL complex is enriched at promoter regions of many autosomal and X-linked genes in both sexes. In this study we have investigated the role of MOF as a transcriptional activator. Results MOF was fused to the DNA binding domain of Gal4 and targeted to the promoter region of UAS-reporter genes in Drosophila. We found that expression of a UAS-red fluorescent protein (DsRed reporter gene was strongly induced by Gal4-MOF. However, DsRed RNA levels were about seven times higher in female than male larvae. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes showed that Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on the X chromosome in male but not female nuclei. However, in female nuclei that express MSL2, Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on polytene chromosomes but DsRed expression was reduced. Mutation of conserved active site residues in MOF (Glu714 and Cys680 reduced HAT activity in vitro and UAS-DsRed activation in Drosophila. In the presence of Gal4-MOF, H4K16ac levels were enriched over UAS-lacZ and UAS-arm-lacZ reporter genes. The latter utilizes the constitutive promoter from the arm gene to drive lacZ expression. In contrast to the strong induction of UAS-DsRed expression, UAS-arm-lacZ expression increased by about 2-fold in both sexes. Conclusions Targeting MOF to reporter genes led to transcription enhancement and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16. Histone acetyltransferase activity was required for the full transcriptional

  19. FAVORED ZODIAC FOR CELEBRITY BIRTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah M. Adel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To find any favored zodiac sign for celebrity births, a sample of 100 celebrities were randomly selected from people of different walks of life. The sample contained politicians, natural scientists, social scientists, Authors of literary works, social workers, humanitarian workers, business personnel, sports icons, singers, actors, actresses, etc. etc. from history and from the current time. The zodiac signs for the celebrities were found from their known dates of births. In the analysis of data, zodiac signs and the number of celebrities were represented as the independent x and the dependent y variables, respectively. For academic interests for the 9th grade high school juniors (at the time of the project performance, the co-authors of this article, as well as for the potentially illustrative uses in high school mathematics textbooks, bar and scatter plots were made, the line of best-fit and the equation of the line were found, probabilities of occurrences of celebrities for each of the zodiac signs were calculated and the correlation coefficients between the variables were determined for the sample. It was found that the zodiac Aquarius has the largest number of celebrities in the sample and that the two variables are moderately correlated. The sample sizes which were increased to 200 and then 300. By including another 100 more celebrities to find if the trend remains unchanged. In all the three cases, Aquarius turned out to be the zodiac when most of the celebrities are born.

  20. Hindsight Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roese, Neal J; Vohs, Kathleen D

    2012-09-01

    Hindsight bias occurs when people feel that they "knew it all along," that is, when they believe that an event is more predictable after it becomes known than it was before it became known. Hindsight bias embodies any combination of three aspects: memory distortion, beliefs about events' objective likelihoods, or subjective beliefs about one's own prediction abilities. Hindsight bias stems from (a) cognitive inputs (people selectively recall information consistent with what they now know to be true and engage in sensemaking to impose meaning on their own knowledge), (b) metacognitive inputs (the ease with which a past outcome is understood may be misattributed to its assumed prior likelihood), and (c) motivational inputs (people have a need to see the world as orderly and predictable and to avoid being blamed for problems). Consequences of hindsight bias include myopic attention to a single causal understanding of the past (to the neglect of other reasonable explanations) as well as general overconfidence in the certainty of one's judgments. New technologies for visualizing and understanding data sets may have the unintended consequence of heightening hindsight bias, but an intervention that encourages people to consider alternative causal explanations for a given outcome can reduce hindsight bias. PMID:26168501

  1. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...

  2. A Pharmacological Primer of Biased Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen1, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    Biased agonism is one of the fastest growing topics in G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology; moreover, biased agonists are used in the clinic today: carvedilol (Coreg®) is a biased agonist of beta-adrenergic receptors. However, there is a general lack of understanding of biased agonism when compared to traditional pharmacological terminology. Therefore, this review is designed to provide a basic introduction to classical pharmacology as well as G protein-coupled receptor signal transductio...

  3. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyuan eJiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy stable isotopic forms of lysine and arginine (SILAC and infected cells with reovirus strain T3D. Cells were harvested at 24 hours post-infection. Heavy-labeled infected and light-labeled mock-infected cells were mixed together 1:1. Cells were then divided into cytosol and nuclear fractions and each fraction analyzed, both by standard 2D-HPLC/MS, and also after each fraction had been reacted with a random hexapeptide library (Proteominer® beads to attempt to enrich for low-abundance cellular proteins. A total of 2736 proteins were identified by 2 or more peptides at >99% confidence, of which 66 were significantly up-regulated and 67 were significantly down-regulated. Up-regulated proteins included those involved in antimicrobial and antiviral responses, GTPase activity, nucleotide binding, interferon signaling, and enzymes associated with energy generation. Down-regulated proteins included those involved in cell and biological adhesion, regulation of cell proliferation, structural molecule activity, and numerous molecular binding activities. Comparisons of the r2 correlations, degree of dataset overlap, and numbers of peptides detected suggest that non-biased enrichment approaches may not provide additional data to allow deeper quantitative and comparative mining of complex proteomes.

  4. Codelivery of Envelope Protein in Alum with MVA Vaccine Induces CXCR3-Biased CXCR5+ and CXCR5- CD4 T Cell Responses in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Smita S; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Victor, Blandine; Gomez, Rosy; Basu, Rahul; Hong, Jung Joo; Labranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Villinger, Francois; Moss, Bernard; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-08-01

    The goal of an HIV vaccine is to generate robust and durable protective Ab. Vital to this goal is the induction of CD4(+) T follicular helper (TFH) cells. However, very little is known about the TFH response to HIV vaccination and its relative contribution to magnitude and quality of vaccine-elicited Ab titers. In this study, we investigated these questions in the context of a DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara SIV vaccine with and without gp140 boost in aluminum hydroxide in rhesus macaques. In addition, we determined the frequency of vaccine-induced CD4(+) T cells coexpressing chemokine receptor, CXCR5 (facilitates migration to B cell follicles) in blood and whether these responses were representative of lymph node TFH responses. We show that booster modified vaccinia virus Ankara immunization induced a distinct and transient accumulation of proliferating CXCR5(+) and CXCR5(-) CD4 T cells in blood at day 7 postimmunization, and the frequency of the former but not the latter correlated with TFH and B cell responses in germinal centers of the lymph node. Interestingly, gp140 boost induced a skewing toward CXCR3 expression on germinal center TFH cells, which was strongly associated with longevity, avidity, and neutralization potential of vaccine-elicited Ab response. However, CXCR3(+) cells preferentially expressed the HIV coreceptor CCR5, and vaccine-induced CXCR3(+)CXCR5(+) cells showed a moderate positive association with peak viremia following SIV251 infection. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that vaccine regimens that elicit CXCR3-biased TFH cell responses favor Ab persistence and avidity but may predispose to higher acute viremia in the event of breakthrough infections. PMID:26116502

  5. Potato: A Favorable Crop for Plant Molecular Farming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Kumar G B; Ganapathi T R; Bapat V A

    2006-01-01

    Potato is one of the important food crops with a high yield potential and nutritional value. It has been used extensively for molecular farming to produce vaccines, antibodies and industrial enzymes. It has several desirable attributes as a favorable crop for the production of recombinant proteins. Potato tubers were employed for bulk production of recombinant antibodies. Vaccine production in potato has progressed to human clinical trials. Human milk proteins were successfully expressed in potato tubers. Potato hairy roots offer as another attractive system for the production of useful recombinant proteins both as intra cellular and secreted forms. This review describes the use of potato as a prospective host for plant molecular farming.

  6. Magnetic survey for identifying favorable zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This survey describes the ability of magnetic methods in identifying the zone conductor associated with mineral magnetite, pyrite, ilmenite and pyrrhotite. Large magnetic anomalies strongly influenced by the induction of ferromagnetic mineral. From the 2D modeling results can be interpreted that the favorable zone associated with the mineral magnetite, pyrite, ilmenite and pyrrhotite. This model obtained favorable dimensions of the width of between 50 to 75 meters, thickness of between 67 to 75 meters and a depth of 12 meters. (author)

  7. Postmating sexual selection favors males that sire offspring with low fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, T.; Foged, Anne; Schilling, Nadia;

    2009-01-01

    Despite the costs of mating, females of most taxa mate with multiple males. Polyandrous females are hypothesized to gain genetic benefits for their offspring, but this assumes paternity bias favoring male genotypes that enhance offspring viability. We determined net male genetic effects on female...

  8. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  9. Generation Favorable Institutional Configuration Regional Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Zinovievna Solodilova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the theoretical issues of creating an enabling business environment, which is the base platform for the successful development of entrepreneurship in the regions. Provides A definition of a favorable institutional configuration of the regional business environment, which refers to forms of implementing the basic institutions and other regional institutions, taking into account existing regional system of formal and informal interaction between economic actors. States that despite the measures taken, the landscape of the Russian business community in terms of regions, remains uneven, with different indices of investment and business attractiveness, there is differentiation in business conditions in the regions with similar natural and geographical conditions and resource potential, which is primarily determined by , differences in the institutional configuration of the regional business environment and quality of interaction among the business community of the region. Hypothesis about the impossibility of creating a favorable business environment, institutional configurations at the same time in all regions of the country, as well as its limited duration. Conducted theoretical and probabilistic analysis of the parameters of creating an enabling institutional configuration of the business environment in the Russian regions. Grounded approach whereby institutional configuration of regional business environment, may be subject to management and control actions through targeted by the regional authorities can accept the specified (favorable to the business community parameters. The necessity of planning and effective management of a favorable institutional configuration of the business environment by regional authorities to increase the period of its existence.

  10. Generation Favorable Institutional Configuration Regional Business Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Zinovievna Solodilova; Rustam Ilkamovich Malikov; Konstantin Yevgenevich Grishin

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the theoretical issues of creating an enabling business environment, which is the base platform for the successful development of entrepreneurship in the regions. Provides A definition of a favorable institutional configuration of the regional business environment, which refers to forms of implementing the basic institutions and other regional institutions, taking into account existing regional system of formal and informal interaction between economic actors. Sta...

  11. Arousal-biased competition in perception and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Mather, Mara; Sutherland, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Our everyday surroundings besiege us with information. The battle is for a share of our limited attention and memory, with the brain selecting the winners and discarding the losers. Previous research shows that both bottom-up and top-down factors bias competition in favor of high priority stimuli. We propose that arousal during an event increases this bias both in perception and in long-term memory of the event. Arousal-biased competition theory provides specific predictions about when arousa...

  12. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Devin G.; Price, Joseph; Wolfers, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  13. Cotranslational folding of deeply knotted proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Proper folding of deeply knotted proteins has a very low success rate even in structure-based models which favor formation of the native contacts but have no topological bias. By employing a structure-based model, we demonstrate that cotranslational folding on a model ribosome may enhance the odds to form trefoil knots for protein YibK without any need to introduce any non-native contacts. The ribosome is represented by a repulsive wall that keeps elongating the protein. On-ribosome folding p...

  14. Is there gender bias in nursing research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, Denise F; Beck, Cheryl Tatano

    2008-10-01

    Using data from a consecutive sample of 259 studies published in four leading nursing research journals in 2005-2006, we examined whether nurse researchers favor females as study participants. On average, 75.3% of study participants were female, and 38% of studies had all-female samples. The bias favoring female participants was statistically significant and persistent. The bias was observed regardless of funding source, methodological features, and other participant and researcher characteristics, with one exception: studies that had male investigators had more sex-balanced samples. When designing studies, nurse researchers need to pay close attention to who will benefit from their research and to whether they are leaving out a specific group about which there is a gap in knowledge. PMID:18324681

  15. Constraints on Assembly Bias from Galaxy Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Zentner, Andrew R; Bosch, Frank C van den; Lange, Johannes U; Villarreal, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the newly-introduced decorated Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model using SDSS DR7 measurements of projected galaxy clustering or r-band luminosity threshold samples. The decorated HOD is a model for the galaxy-halo connection that augments the HOD by allowing for the possibility of galaxy assembly bias: galaxy luminosity may be correlated with dark matter halo properties besides mass, Mvir. We demonstrate that it is not possible to rule out galaxy assembly bias using DR7 measurements of galaxy clustering alone. Moreover, galaxy samples with Mr < -20 and Mr < -20.5 favor strong central galaxy assembly bias. These samples prefer scenarios in which high-concentration are more likely to host a central galaxy relative to low-concentration halos of the same mass. We exclude zero assembly bias with high significance for these samples. Satellite galaxy assembly bias is significant for the faintest sample, Mr < -19. We find no evidence for assembly bias in the Mr < -21 sample. Assembly bi...

  16. Recursive bias estimation for high dimensional smoothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzner-lober, Eric [UHB, FRANCE; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA

    2008-01-01

    In multivariate nonparametric analysis, sparseness of the covariates also called curse of dimensionality, forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to biased smoothers. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose to iteratively correct the bias initial estimator by an estimate of the latter obtained by smoothing the residuals. We examine in detail the convergence of the iterated procedure for classical smoothers and relate our procedure to L{sub 2}-Boosting. We apply our method to simulated and real data and show that our method compares favorably with existing procedures.

  17. Lagrangian bias in the local bias model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often assumed that the halo-patch fluctuation field can be written as a Taylor series in the initial Lagrangian dark matter density fluctuation field. We show that if this Lagrangian bias is local, and the initial conditions are Gaussian, then the two-point cross-correlation between halos and mass should be linearly proportional to the mass-mass auto-correlation function. This statement is exact and valid on all scales; there are no higher order contributions, e.g., from terms proportional to products or convolutions of two-point functions, which one might have thought would appear upon truncating the Taylor series of the halo bias function. In addition, the auto-correlation function of locally biased tracers can be written as a Taylor series in the auto-correlation function of the mass; there are no terms involving, e.g., derivatives or convolutions. Moreover, although the leading order coefficient, the linear bias factor of the auto-correlation function is just the square of that for the cross-correlation, it is the same as that obtained from expanding the mean number of halos as a function of the local density only in the large-scale limit. In principle, these relations allow simple tests of whether or not halo bias is indeed local in Lagrangian space. We discuss why things are more complicated in practice. We also discuss our results in light of recent work on the renormalizability of halo bias, demonstrating that it is better to renormalize than not. We use the Lognormal model to illustrate many of our findings

  18. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strong...

  19. Ingroup-Outgroup Bias in Contagious Yawning by Chimpanzees Supports Link to Empathy

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Matthew W.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Humans favor others seen as similar to themselves (ingroup) over people seen as different (outgroup), even without explicitly stated bias. Ingroup-outgroup bias extends to involuntary responses, such as empathy for pain. However, empathy biases have not been tested in our close primate relatives. Contagious yawning has been theoretically and empirically linked to empathy. If empathy underlies contagious yawning, we predict that subjects should show an ingroup-outgroup bias by yawning more in ...

  20. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews two different approaches that have been proposed to tackle the problems of model bias with the Kalman filter: the use of a colored noise model and the implementation of a separate bias filter. Both filters are implemented with and without feedback of the bias into the model state...... illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    OpenAIRE

    KevinM.Coombs

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy st...

  2. 19 CFR 200.735-105 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 200.735-105...-105 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no employee may solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan,...

  3. 11 CFR 7.20 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Special Commission Employees § 7.20 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. Except as provided at 11 CFR... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 7.20 Section... a gift, gratuity, loan, entertainment, or favor for himself or herself, or for another...

  4. 25 CFR 700.519 - Gifts, entertainment and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment and favors. 700.519 Section 700.519... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.519 Gifts, entertainment and favors. (a) Acceptance of gratuities, including gifts, entertainment and favors, (no matter how innocently tendered or received) from those...

  5. 22 CFR 1203.735-305 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-305....735-305 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a..., gratuity, loan, entertainment, or favor for the employee or another person, particularly one with whom...

  6. Sampler bias -- Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This documents Phase 1 determinations on sampler induced bias for four sampler types used in tank characterization. Each sampler, grab sampler or bottle-on-a-string, auger sampler, sludge sampler and universal sampler, is briefly discussed and their physical limits noted. Phase 2 of this document will define additional testing and analysis to further define Sampler Bias

  7. Biased representation of homothetic preferences on homogeneous sets

    OpenAIRE

    Le Menestrel, Marc; LEMAIRE, Bertrand

    2004-01-01

    In the homogeneous case of one-dimensional objects, we show that any preference relation that is positive and homothetic can be represented by a quantitative utility function and unique bias. This bias may favor or disfavor the preference for an object. In the first case, preferences are complete but not transitive and an object may be preferred even when its utility is lower. In the second case, preferences are asymmetric and transitive but not negatively transitive and it may not be suffici...

  8. Protein kinase clk/STY is differentially regulated during erythroleukemia cell differentiation: a bias toward the skipped splice variant characterizes postcommitment stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana GARC(I)A-SACRIST(A)N; María J.FERN(A)NDEZ-NESTOSA; Pablo HERN(A)NDEZ; Jorge B.SCHVARTZMAN; Dora B.KRIMER

    2005-01-01

    Clk/STY is a LAMMER protein kinase capable to phosphorylate serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins that modulate premRNA splicing.Clk/STY alternative splicing generates transcripts encoding a full-length kinase and a truncated catalytically inactive protein.Here we showed that clk/STY,as well as other members of the family (e.g.clk2,clk3 and clk4),are up-regulated during HMBA-induced erythroleukemia cell differentiation.mRNAs coding for the full-length and the truncated forms were responsible for the overall increased expression.In clk/STY,however,a switch was observed for the ratio of the two alternative spliced products.In undifferentiated cells the full-length transcript was more abundant whereas the transcript encoding for the truncated form predominated at latter stages of differentiation.Surprisingly,overexpression of clk/STY did not alter the splicing switch upon differentiation in MEL cells.These results suggest that clk/STY might contribute to control erythroid differentiation by a mechanism that implicates a balance between these two isoforms.

  9. Enhanced Th1-biased immune efficacy of porcine circovirus type 2 Cap-protein-based subunit vaccine when coadministered with recombinant porcine IL-2 or GM-CSF in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Lu, Yuehua; Liu, Dan; Wei, Yanwu; Guo, Longjun; Wu, Hongli; Huang, Liping; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Changming

    2015-02-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) capsid (Cap) protein is the primary protective antigen responsible for inducing PCV2-specific protective immunity, so it is a desirable target for the development of recombinant subunit vaccines to prevent PCV2-associated diseases. Interleukin 2 (IL-2) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), used as immune adjuvants, have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of certain antigens or vaccines in various experimental models. In this study, five different subunit vaccines (the PCV2-Cap, Cap-PoIL-2, PCV2-Cap + PoIL-2, Cap-PoGM-CSF, and PCV2-Cap + PoGM-CSF vaccines) were prepared based on baculovirus-expressed recombinant proteins. The immunogenicity of these vaccines was evaluated to identify the immunoenhancement by PoIL-2 and PoGM-CSF of the Cap-protein-based PCV2 subunit vaccine in mice. The PCV2-Cap + PoIL-2, Cap-PoGM-CSF, PCV2-Cap + PoGM-CSF, and PCV2-Cap vaccines induced significantly higher levels of PCV2-specific antibodies than the Cap-PoIL-2 vaccine, whereas there was no apparent difference between these four vaccines. Our results indicate that neither PoIL-2 nor PoGM-CSF had effect on the enhancement of the humoral immunity induced by the PCV2-Cap vaccine. Furthermore, the PCV2-Cap + PoIL-2, Cap-PoGM-CSF, and PCV2-Cap + PoGM-CSF vaccines elicited stronger lymphocyte proliferative responses and greater IL-2 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secretion. This suggests that PoIL-2 and PoGM-CSF substantially augmented the Th1-biased immune response to the PCV2-Cap vaccine. Following challenge, the viral loads in the lungs of the PCV2-Cap + PoIL-2-, Cap-PoGM-CSF-, and PCV2-Cap + PoGM-CSF-treated groups were dramatically lower than those in the Cap-PoIL-2- and PCV2-Cap-treated groups, indicating that the three vaccines induced stronger protective effects against challenge. These findings show that PoIL-2 and PoGM-CSF essentially enhanced the Th1-biased protective efficacy of the

  10. Harassment, Bias, and Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welliver, Paul W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a new principle which has been added to the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics regarding discrimination, harassment, and bias. An example is presented which illustrates a violation of a professional colleague's rights. (LRW)

  11. Simulating publication bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    censoring: selection by the size of estimate; SR3 selects the optimal combination of fit and size; and SR4 selects the first satisficing result. The last four SRs are steered by priors and result in bias. The MST and the FAT-PET have been developed for detection and correction of such bias. The simulations...... are made by data variation, while the model is the same. It appears that SR0 generates narrow funnels much at odds with observed funnels, while the other four funnels look more realistic. SR1 to SR4 give the mean a substantial bias that confirms the prior causing the bias. The FAT-PET MRA works well...

  12. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  13. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Anil V; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  14. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    that the agricultural price incentive bias generally perceived to exist during the 1980s was largely eliminated during the 1990s. Results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of agricultural bias. Our comprehensive...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  15. Publication bias in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Carl V

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publication bias, as typically defined, refers to the decreased likelihood of studies' results being published when they are near the null, not statistically significant, or otherwise "less interesting." But choices about how to analyze the data and which results to report create a publication bias within the published results, a bias I label "publication bias in situ" (PBIS. Discussion PBIS may create much greater bias in the literature than traditionally defined publication bias (the failure to publish any result from a study. The causes of PBIS are well known, consisting of various decisions about reporting that are influenced by the data. But its impact is not generally appreciated, and very little attention is devoted to it. What attention there is consists largely of rules for statistical analysis that are impractical and do not actually reduce the bias in reported estimates. PBIS cannot be reduced by statistical tools because it is not fundamentally a problem of statistics, but rather of non-statistical choices and plain language interpretations. PBIS should be recognized as a phenomenon worthy of study – it is extremely common and probably has a huge impact on results reported in the literature – and there should be greater systematic efforts to identify and reduce it. The paper presents examples, including results of a recent HIV vaccine trial, that show how easily PBIS can have a large impact on reported results, as well as how there can be no simple answer to it. Summary PBIS is a major problem, worthy of substantially more attention than it receives. There are ways to reduce the bias, but they are very seldom employed because they are largely unrecognized.

  16. Information-aggregation bias

    OpenAIRE

    Goodfriend, Marvin

    1991-01-01

    Aggregation in the presence of data-processing lags distorts the information content of data, violating orthogonality restrictions that hold at the individual level. Though the phenomenon is general, it is illustrated here for the life-cycle-permanent-income model. Cross-section and pooled-panel data induce information-aggregation bias akin to that in aggregate time series. Calculations show that information aggregation can seriously bias tests of the life-cycle model on aggregate time series...

  17. International Bias Detected in Judging Gymnastic Competition at the 1984 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorge, Charles J.; Scheer, John K.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of gymnastics judges scores of their own and other countries' gymnasts' performance during the 1984 Olympic Games indicated that the judges were biased in favor of their own country's gymnasts. (Author/CB)

  18. Biased causal inseparable game

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  19. Human Neuropeptide S Receptor Is Activated via a Gαq Protein-biased Signaling Cascade by a Human Neuropeptide S Analog Lacking the C-terminal 10 Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Lu, Bin; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Gang; Lai, Xiangru; Zang, Jiashu; Shi, Ying; Liu, Dongxiang; Han, Feng; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    Human neuropeptide S (NPS) and its cognate receptor regulate important biological functions in the brain and have emerged as a future therapeutic target for treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases. The human NPS (hNPS) receptor has been shown to dually couple to Gαs- and Gαq-dependent signaling pathways. The human NPS analog hNPS-(1-10), lacking 10 residues from the C terminus, has been shown to stimulate Ca(2+)mobilization in a manner comparable with full-length hNPSin vitrobut seems to fail to induce biological activityin vivo Here, results derived from a number of cell-based functional assays, including intracellular cAMP-response element (CRE)-driven luciferase activity, Ca(2+)mobilization, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, show that hNPS-(1-10) preferentially activates Gαq-dependent Ca(2+)mobilization while exhibiting less activity in triggering Gαs-dependent CRE-driven luciferase activity. We further demonstrate that both Gαq- and Gαs-coupled signaling pathways contribute to full-length hNPS-mediated activation of ERK1/2, whereas hNPS-(1-10)-promoted ERK1/2 activation is completely inhibited by the Gαqinhibitor UBO-QIC but not by the PKA inhibitor H89. Moreover, the results of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of hNPS-(1-13) indicated that residues Lys(11)and Lys(12)are structurally crucial for the hNPS receptor to couple to Gαs-dependent signaling. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that hNPS-(1-10) is a biased agonist favoring Gαq-dependent signaling. It may represent a valuable chemical probe for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of human NPS receptor-directed signalingin vivo. PMID:26865629

  20. Gender Bias in Tax Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Janet Gale Stotsky

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of gender bias in tax systems. Gender bias takes both explicit and implicit forms. Explicit gender bias is found in many personal income tax systems. Several countries, especially those in Western Europe, have undertaken to eliminate explicit gender bias in recent years. It is more difficult to identify implicit gender bias, since this depends in large part on value judgments as to desirable social and economic behavior. Implicit gender bias has also been a targ...

  1. Professional Human Service Occupation Biases Represented in General Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael W.; Johnson, Erica J.; Wikler, Jeremiah

    2009-01-01

    We examined the coverage given by General Psychology textbooks, representing 8 major commercial publishers, regarding the professions of psychology, counseling, marriage & family therapy, and social workers. Of the 24 textbooks assessed, we found substantial bias favoring the coverage of psychology. While 25% of the texts mentioned social workers,…

  2. Vowel bias in Danish word-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored whether the phonological bias favoring consonants found in French-learning infants and children when learning new words (Havy & Nazzi, 2009; Nazzi, 2005) is language-general, as proposed by Nespor, Peña and Mehler (2003), or varies across languages, perhaps as a function...... of the phonological or lexical properties of the language in acquisition. To do so, we used the interactive word-learning task set up by Havy and Nazzi (2009), teaching Danish-learning 20-month-olds pairs of phonetically similar words that contrasted either on one of their consonants or one of their...... one or two phonological features were changed. The implication of these findings is that the phonological biases found in early lexical processing are not language-general but develop during language acquisition, depending on the phonological or lexical properties of the native language....

  3. 11 CFR 7.8 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Constitution and in section 7342 of title 5, United States Code. (e) Neither this section nor 11 CFR 7.7... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 7.8 Section 7... Employees or Commissioners § 7.8 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) A Commissioner or employee of...

  4. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., entertainment, and favors. Pursuant to paragraph (b) of 5 CFR 735.202, the following exceptions to the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 905.735-202 Section 905.735-202 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA...

  5. 18 CFR 706.202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment..., entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an employee shall not solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan, or...

  6. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-202..., entertainment, and favors. (a) Acceptance prohibited. Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this..., entertainment, loan, or any other thing of monetary value, from a person who: (1) Has, or is seeking to...

  7. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment....303 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section a..., entertainment, or favor for himself or another person, particularly one with whom he has family, business,...

  8. Analysis of the synonymous codon usage bias in recently emerged enterovirus D68 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karniychuk, Uladzimir U

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the codon usage pattern of a pathogen and relationship between pathogen and host's codon usage patterns has fundamental and applied interests. Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen with a potentially high public health significance. In the present study, the synonymous codon usage bias of 27 recently emerged, and historical EV-D68 strains was analyzed. In contrast to previously studied enteroviruses (enterovirus 71 and poliovirus), EV-D68 and human host have a high discrepancy between favored codons. Analysis of viral synonymous codon usage bias metrics, viral nucleotide/dinucleotide compositional parameters, and viral protein properties showed that mutational pressure is more involved in shaping the synonymous codon usage bias of EV-D68 than translation selection. Computation of codon adaptation indices allowed to estimate expression potential of the EV-D68 genome in several commonly used laboratory animals. This approach requires experimental validation and may provide an auxiliary tool for the rational selection of laboratory animals to model emerging viral diseases. Enterovirus D68 genome compositional and codon usage data can be useful for further pathogenesis, animal model, and vaccine design studies. PMID:27364082

  9. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    The measurement issue is the key issue in the literature on trade policy-induced agri-cultural price incentive bias. This paper introduces a general equilibrium effective rate of protection (GE-ERP) measure, which extends and generalizes earlier partial equilibrium nominal protection measures....... For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  10. Plasmodium falciparum induces a Th1/Th2 disequilibrium, favoring the Th1-type pathway, in the human placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Fievet, Nadine; Moussa, M.; Tami, G.; Maubert, B.; Cot, Michel; Deloron, P.; Chaouat, G.

    2001-01-01

    During pregnancy, a local and systemic Th2 bias of maternal immunity favors Th1-dependent infections such as malaria. This study measured cytokines secreted in cultures of chorionic villi, placental blood cells (PBC), and serum in term placentas from 88 malaria-infected and -noninfected Cameroon women. Interleukin (IL)-2 and-4 were consistently low ; IL-1Beta, IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-Beta2 were highest in PBC cultures. Malar...

  11. Why Koreans are More Likely to Favor "Apology," While Americans are More Likely to Favor "Thank You"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Eun; Park, Hee Sun

    2011-01-01

    Two studies investigated whether apologies or thanks are preferred in asking favors in the United States and Korea, and how this relates to perceptions of reduction in positive and negative face threats. In the first study (n = 224), participants composed an e-mail message where a favor was asked. In the second (n = 807), participants completed…

  12. Familiar smiling faces in Alzheimer’s disease: Understanding the positivity-related recognition bias

    OpenAIRE

    Werheid, Katja; McDonald, Rebecca S.; Simmons-Stern, Nicholas; Ally, Brandon A.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has revealed a recognition bias favoring positive faces and other stimuli in older compared to younger adults. However, it is yet unclear whether this bias reflects an age-related preference for positive emotional stimuli, or an affirmatory bias used to compensate for episodic memory deficits. To follow up this point, the present study examined recognition of emotional faces and current mood state in patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy controls. Expecting low...

  13. Candidate SNP Markers of Gender-Biased Autoimmune Complications of Monogenic Diseases Are Predicted by a Significant Change in the Affinity of TATA-Binding Protein for Human Gene Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Mikhail P.; Arkova, Olga; Rasskazov, Dmitry; Ponomarenko, Petr; Savinkova, Ludmila; Kolchanov, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Some variations of human genome [for example, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] are markers of hereditary diseases and drug responses. Analysis of them can help to improve treatment. Computer-based analysis of millions of SNPs in the 1000 Genomes project makes a search for SNP markers more targeted. Here, we combined two computer-based approaches: DNA sequence analysis and keyword search in databases. In the binding sites for TATA-binding protein (TBP) in human gene promoters, we found candidate SNP markers of gender-biased autoimmune diseases, including rs1143627 [cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis (double prevalence among women)]; rs11557611 [demyelinating diseases (thrice more prevalent among young white women than among non-white individuals)]; rs17231520 and rs569033466 [both: atherosclerosis comorbid with related diseases (double prevalence among women)]; rs563763767 [Hughes syndrome-related thrombosis (lethal during pregnancy)]; rs2814778 [autoimmune diseases (excluding multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis) underlying hypergammaglobulinemia in women]; rs72661131 and rs562962093 (both: preterm delivery in pregnant diabetic women); and rs35518301, rs34166473, rs34500389, rs33981098, rs33980857, rs397509430, rs34598529, rs33931746, rs281864525, and rs63750953 (all: autoimmune diseases underlying hypergammaglobulinemia in women). Validation of these predicted candidate SNP markers using the clinical standards may advance personalized medicine. PMID:27092142

  14. Social Capital and Social Quilts: Network Patterns of Favor Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Matthew O.; Tomas Rodriguez-Barraquer; Xu Tan

    2012-01-01

    We examine the informal exchange of favors in societies such that any two individuals interact too infrequently to sustain exchange, but such that the social pressure of the possible loss of multiple relationships can sustain exchange. Patterns of exchange that are locally enforceable and renegotiation-proof necessitate that all links are "supported": any two individuals exchanging favors have a common friend. In symmetric settings, such robust networks are "social quilts": tree-like unions o...

  15. Topological Bias in Distance-Based Phylogenetic Methods: Problems with Over- and Underestimated Genetic Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhua Xia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available I show several types of topological biases in distance-based methods that use the least-squares method to evaluate branch lengths and the minimum evolution (ME or the Fitch-Margoliash (FM criterion to choose the best tree. For a 6-species tree, there are two tree shapes, one with three cherries (a cherry is a pair of adjacent leaves descending from the most recent common ancestor, and the other with two. When genetic distances are underestimated, the 3-cherry tree shape is favored with either the ME or FM criterion. When the genetic distances are overestimated, the ME criterion favors the 2-cherry tree, but the direction of bias with the FM criterion depends on whether negative branches are allowed, i.e. allowing negative branches favors the 3-cherry tree shape but disallowing negative branches favors the 2-cherry tree shape. The extent of the bias is explored by computer simulation of sequence evolution.

  16. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiwok, Vojtěch, E-mail: spiwokv@vscht.cz; Oborský, Pavel; Králová, Blanka [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, Prague 6 166 28 (Czech Republic); Pazúriková, Jana [Institute of Computer Science, Masaryk University, Botanická 554/68a, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Křenek, Aleš [Institute of Computer Science, Masaryk University, Botanická 554/68a, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Center CERIT-SC, Masaryk Univerzity, Šumavská 416/15, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-21

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable.

  17. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable

  18. Temperature trend biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  19. Biased Range Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Dujmovic, Vida; Morin, Pat

    2008-01-01

    A data structure, called a biased range tree, is presented that preprocesses a set S of n points in R^2 and a query distribution D for 2-sided orthogonal range counting queries. The expected query time for this data structure, when queries are drawn according to D, matches, to within a constant factor, that of the optimal decision tree for S and D. The memory and preprocessing requirements of the data structure are O(n log n).

  20. Low Frequency Biasing

    OpenAIRE

    Kadelbach, Irmgard

    2003-01-01

    Die Elektrocochleographie (EcoG) ist eine der vielversprechendsten Methoden, cochleäre Dysfunktionen mit objektiver Diagnostik zu verifizieren. Erweitert durch das Prinzip des Biasings, also der gleichzeitigen Präsentation von Testtönen in einen niederfrequenten 52-Hz-Sinusdauerton, läßt sich die Funktion der Cochlea und eine möglicherweise pathologische Arbeitsweise aufdecken. In der Auswertung der Amplituden des Summationspotentials (SP), des cochleären Mikrophonpotentials (CM) und des Summ...

  1. Photoconductivity of biased graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Freitag, Marcus; Low, Tony; Xia, Fengnian; Avouris, Phaedon

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for optoelectronic applications such as photodetectors, terahertz imagers, and plasmonic devices. The origin of photoresponse in graphene junctions has been studied extensively and is attributed to either thermoelectric or photovoltaic effects. In addition, hot carrier transport and carrier multiplication are thought to play an important role. Here we report the intrinsic photoresponse in biased but otherwise homogeneous graphene. In this classic photoconduct...

  2. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Ian M.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A.; Smith, Jessi L.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists are trained to evaluate and interpret evidence without bias or subjectivity. Thus, growing evidence revealing a gender bias against women—or favoring men—within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) settings is provocative and raises questions about the extent to which gender bias may contribute to women’s underrepresentation within STEM fields. To the extent that research illustrating gender bias in STEM is viewed as convincing, the culture of science can begin to address the bias. However, are men and women equally receptive to this type of experimental evidence? This question was tested with three randomized, double-blind experiments—two involving samples from the general public (n = 205 and 303, respectively) and one involving a sample of university STEM and non-STEM faculty (n = 205). In all experiments, participants read an actual journal abstract reporting gender bias in a STEM context (or an altered abstract reporting no gender bias in experiment 3) and evaluated the overall quality of the research. Results across experiments showed that men evaluate the gender-bias research less favorably than women, and, of concern, this gender difference was especially prominent among STEM faculty (experiment 2). These results suggest a relative reluctance among men, especially faculty men within STEM, to accept evidence of gender biases in STEM. This finding is problematic because broadening the participation of underrepresented people in STEM, including women, necessarily requires a widespread willingness (particularly by those in the majority) to acknowledge that bias exists before transformation is possible. PMID:26460001

  3. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Ian M; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A; Smith, Jessi L

    2015-10-27

    Scientists are trained to evaluate and interpret evidence without bias or subjectivity. Thus, growing evidence revealing a gender bias against women-or favoring men-within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) settings is provocative and raises questions about the extent to which gender bias may contribute to women's underrepresentation within STEM fields. To the extent that research illustrating gender bias in STEM is viewed as convincing, the culture of science can begin to address the bias. However, are men and women equally receptive to this type of experimental evidence? This question was tested with three randomized, double-blind experiments-two involving samples from the general public (n = 205 and 303, respectively) and one involving a sample of university STEM and non-STEM faculty (n = 205). In all experiments, participants read an actual journal abstract reporting gender bias in a STEM context (or an altered abstract reporting no gender bias in experiment 3) and evaluated the overall quality of the research. Results across experiments showed that men evaluate the gender-bias research less favorably than women, and, of concern, this gender difference was especially prominent among STEM faculty (experiment 2). These results suggest a relative reluctance among men, especially faculty men within STEM, to accept evidence of gender biases in STEM. This finding is problematic because broadening the participation of underrepresented people in STEM, including women, necessarily requires a widespread willingness (particularly by those in the majority) to acknowledge that bias exists before transformation is possible. PMID:26460001

  4. Detection of stimulus displacements across saccades is capacity-limited and biased in favor of the saccade target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Irwin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinal image displacements caused by saccadic eye movements are generally unnoticed. Recent theories have proposed that perceptual stability across saccades depends on a local evaluation process centered on the saccade target object rather than on remapping and evaluating the positions of all objects in a display. In 3 experiments we examined whether objects other than the saccade target also influence perceptual stability by measuring displacement detection thresholds across saccades for saccade targets and a variable number of non-saccade objects. We found that the positions of multiple objects are maintained across saccades, but with variable precision, with the saccade target object having priority in the perception of displacement, most likely because it is the focus of attention before the saccade and resides near the fovea after the saccade. The perception of displacement of objects that are not the saccade target is affected by acuity limitations, attentional limitations, and limitations on memory capacity. Unlike previous studies that have found that a postsaccadic blank improves the detection of displacement direction across saccades, we found that postsaccadic blanking hurt the detection of displacement per se by increasing false alarms. Overall, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that visual working memory underlies the perception of stability across saccades.

  5. Vowel bias in Danish word-learning: processing biases are language-specific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored whether the phonological bias favoring consonants found in French-learning infants and children when learning new words (Havy & Nazzi, 2009; Nazzi, 2005) is language-general, as proposed by Nespor, Peña, & Mehler (2003), or varies across languages, perhaps as a function...... of the phonological or lexical properties of the language in acquisition. To do so, we used the interactive word learning task set up by Havy & Nazzi (2009), teaching Danish-learning 20-month-olds pairs of phonetically similar words that contrasted either on one of their consonants or one of their...... one or two phonological features were changed. The implication of these findings is that the phonological biases found in early lexical processing are not language-general but develop during language acquisition, depending on the phonological or lexical properties of the native language....

  6. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  7. Test Bias and the Elimination of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of test bias are discussed: content bias, atmosphere bias, and use bias. Use bias is considered the most important. Tests reflect the bias in society, and eliminating test bias means eliminating racism and sexism in society. A six-stage model to eliminate racism and sexism is presented. (Author)

  8. The most-favored nation rule in club enlargement negotiation

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin L.-C. Lai

    2008-01-01

    We study the effects of the Most-Favored Nation rule in an applicant's negotiation to join a club. When the applicant has to carry out a series of bilateral bargains with the existing members, we find that there are two effects of the MFN rule, viz. the hardened bargainer effect and the free-rider effect. The former effect tends to favor the applicant, while the latter effect tends to hurt the applicant. We find that the free-rider effect is stronger the more asymmetric are the members. The h...

  9. Favorable Policy for Foreign Investors in Dagang Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mingfa

    1995-01-01

    @@ Apart from series kinds of good products, advanced techniques, convenient communications and electric power and water supply in Dagand Oilfield, foreign investors who have investment in New Industrial Area of Dagang Oilfield will enjoy the same favourable policies as Tianjin Economic Develoment Zone. Main favorable policies are follows:

  10. Codon Bias and Mutability in HIV Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Waelbroeck, H

    1997-01-01

    A survey of the patterns of synonymous codon preferences in the HIV env gene reveals a relation between the codon bias and the mutability requirements in different regions in the protein. At hypervariable regions in $gp120$, one finds a greater proportion of codons that tend to mutate non-synonymously, but to a target that is similar in hydrophobicity and volume. We argue that this strategy results from a compromise between the selective pressure placed on the virus by the induced immune response, which favours amino acid substitutions in the complementarity determining regions, and the negative selection against missense mutations that violate structural constraints of the env protein.

  11. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L Kalla

    Full Text Available The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens' access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit "crowd-sourced" information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world's most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit's survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active.

  12. Cotranslational folding of deeply knotted proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proper folding of deeply knotted proteins has a very low success rate even in structure-based models which favor formation of the native contacts but have no topological bias. By employing a structure-based model, we demonstrate that cotranslational folding on a model ribosome may enhance the odds to form trefoil knots for protein YibK without any need to introduce any non-native contacts. The ribosome is represented by a repulsive wall that keeps elongating the protein. On-ribosome folding proceeds through a a slipknot conformation. We elucidate the mechanics and energetics of its formation. We show that the knotting probability in on-ribosome folding is a function of temperature and that there is an optimal temperature for the process. Our model often leads to the establishment of the native contacts without formation of the knot. (paper)

  13. Cotranslational folding of deeply knotted proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Proper folding of deeply knotted proteins has a very low success rate even in structure-based models which favor formation of the native contacts but have no topological bias. By employing a structure-based model, we demonstrate that cotranslational folding on a model ribosome may enhance the odds to form trefoil knots for protein YibK without any need to introduce any non-native contacts. The ribosome is represented by a repulsive wall that keeps elongating the protein. On-ribosome folding proceeds through a a slipknot conformation. We elucidate the mechanics and energetics of its formation. We show that the knotting probability in on-ribosome folding is a function of temperature and that there is an optimal temperature for the process. Our model often leads to the establishment of the native contacts without formation of the knot.

  14. Cotranslational folding of deeply knotted proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Chwastyk, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Proper folding of deeply knotted proteins has a very low success rate even in structure-based models which favor formation of the native contacts but have no topological bias. By employing a structure-based model, we demonstrate that cotranslational folding on a model ribosome may enhance the odds to form trefoil knots for protein YibK without any need to introduce any non-native contacts. The ribosome is represented by a repulsive wall that keeps elongating the protein. On-ribosome folding proceeds through a a slipknot conformation. We elucidate the mechanics and energetics of its formation. We show that the knotting probability in on-ribosome folding is a function of temperature and that there is an optimal temperature for the process. Our model often leads to the establishment of the native contacts without formation of the knot.

  15. Exchange bias theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on the exchange bias (EB) phenomenon has witnessed a flurry of activity during recent years, which stems from its use in magnetic sensors and as stabilizers in magnetic reading heads. EB was discovered in 1956 but it attracted only limited attention until these applications, closely related to giant magnetoresistance, were developed during the last decade. In this review, I initially give a short introduction, listing the most salient experimental results and what is required from an EB theory. Next, I indicate some of the obstacles in the road towards a satisfactory understanding of the phenomenon. The main body of the text reviews and critically discusses the activity that has flourished, mainly during the last 5 years, in the theoretical front. Finally, an evaluation of the progress made, and a critical assessment as to where we stand nowadays along the road to a satisfactory theory, is presented

  16. Measuring nonlocal Lagrangian peak bias

    CERN Document Server

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2013-01-01

    In the Lagrangian approach to halo clustering, nonlocal bias can be generated either in the initial conditions or by the subsequent gravitational motions. Here, we investigate nonlocal Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We reformulate this approach in order to explicitly take into account the variable describing the crossing of the collapse barrier. This enables us to write down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the nonlocal ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we extend the 1-point cross-correlation technique of Musso, Paranjape & Sheth (2012) to bias contributions that are chi-squared distributed. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before applying it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order nonlocal bias factors predicted by the excursion s...

  17. Bias and population structure in the actuation of sound change

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, James

    2015-01-01

    Why do human languages change at some times, and not others? We address this longstanding question from a computational perspective, focusing on the case of sound change. Sound change arises from the pronunciation variability ubiquitous in every speech community, but most such variability does not lead to change. Hence, an adequate model must allow for stability as well as change. Existing theories of sound change tend to emphasize factors at the level of individual learners promoting one outcome or the other, such as channel bias (which favors change) or inductive bias (which favors stability). Here, we consider how the interaction of these biases can lead to both stability and change in a population setting. We find that population structure itself can act as a source of stability, but that both stability and change are possible only when both types of bias are active, suggesting that it is possible to understand why sound change occurs at some times and not others as the population-level result of the inte...

  18. Design integration of favorable geometry, structural support and containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In designs for fissile processes at Savannah River site, different approaches have been used to provide engineered margins of safety for criticality with containment and seismic resistance as additional requirements. These requirements are frequently at odds in engineered systems. This paper proposes a plan to take advantage of vessels with favorable geometry to provide seismic resistance and to support a glovebox for containment. Thin slab tanks, small diameter pencil tanks, annular tanks, and other novel designs have been used for criticality safety. The requirement for DBE seismic resistance and rigid control of dimensions leads the designer to consider annular tanks for meeting these requirements. The high strength of annular tanks may logically be used to support secondary containment. Hands-on access to all instruments, piping etc. within containment can be provided through gloveports, thus a specialized glovebox. This paper examines the advantages of using an annular tank design to provide favorable geometry, structural support and containment

  19. HOW MUCH FAVORABLE SELECTION IS LEFT IN MEDICARE ADVANTAGE?

    OpenAIRE

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Mary Price; J. Michael McWilliams; John Hsu; Thomas McGuire

    2015-01-01

    The health economics literature contains two models of selection, one with endogenous plan characteristics to attract good risks and one with fixed plan characteristics; neither model contains a regulator. Medicare Advantage, a principal example of selection in the literature, is, however, subject to anti-selection regulations. Because selection causes economic inefficiency and because the historically favorable selection into Medicare Advantage plans increased government cost, the effectiven...

  20. Coevolution of robustness, epistasis, and recombination favors asexual reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of sexual reproduction remains one of the most perplexing phenomena in evolutionary biology. The deterministic mutation hypothesis postulates that sexual reproduction will be advantageous under synergistic epistasis, a condition in which mutations cause a greater reduction in fitness when combined than would be expected from their individual effects. The inverse condition, antagonistic epistasis, correspondingly is predicted to favor asexual reproduction. To assess this hypothe...

  1. Children in Foster Care and the Development of Favorable Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Healey, Cynthia V.; Fisher, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Young foster children have invariably faced a variety of risks that are strongly linked to long-term deficits in functioning across multiple developmental domains. Despite these risks, however, some children demonstrate more favorable outcomes and exhibit adaptation and the development of assets. In the present study, the relationship of early childhood factors (e.g., maltreatment history, placement history, parenting practices, environmental stress, developmental status, and attachment behav...

  2. Menor valor: ¿oferta más favorable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Alirio Ramírez Rusinque

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available La más importante transformación establecida por la Ley 1150 de 2007 en la contratación estatal radicó en la determinación del menor valor como la oferta más favorable para las entidades estatales, cuando se trate de la adquisición o suministro de bienes y servicios de características técnicas uniformes y de común utilización. Por ello, reviste de gran importancia realizar un análisis desde el punto de vista jurídico y normativo, que permita establecer si la mutación sufrida al concepto de oferta más favorable trajo consigo los fines perseguidos por la reforma, o en su defecto fue perjudicial la solución, al afectar el deber de selección objetiva, los principios de la contratación estatal de igualdad, eficacia, transparencia, planeación y equilibrio financiero del contrato y el principio constitucional de la libre competencia. Para de esta forma establecer si el modelo del menor valor como criterio de la oferta más favorable resulta eficiente jurídicamente en el campo de la contratación estatal, y si las reglas establecidas en la actualidad permiten el desarrollo armónico del sistema establecido por la Ley 1150 de 2007.

  3. Gender anomalies in stated preference surveys – are biases really gender dependent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2010-01-01

    The potential for a number of common but severe biases in stated preference method surveys being gender dependent has been largely overlooked in the literature. In this paper we summarize results from three Choice Experiment studies that find evidence in favor of gender differences in vulnerability...... to biases. Specifically, the results indicate that women are more susceptible to starting point bias than men, while men are more susceptible to hypothetical bias than women. This seems to be interrelated with women inherently being more uncertain than men when choosing from a choice set. Furthermore......, we set up a novel theoretical model, which provides an explanation for gender specific susceptibility to biases. We conclude that biases can indeed be gender dependent. Hence, researchers should not simply disregard potential gender differences, but rather take them into account and examine the...

  4. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  5. Professors in Core Science Fields Are Not Always Biased against Women: Evidence from France

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Breda; Son Thierry Ly

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the link between how male-dominated a field is, and gender bias against women in this field. Taking the entrance exam of a French higher education institution as a natural experiment, we find that evaluation is actually biased in favor of females in more male-dominated subjects (e.g., math, philosophy) and in favor of males in more female-dominated subjects (e.g., literature, biology), inducing a rebalancing of gender ratios between students recruited for research careers in sc...

  6. A Selective Emotional Decision-Making Bias Elicited by Facial Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Furl; Shannon Gallagher; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2012-01-01

    Emotional and social information can sway otherwise rational decisions. For example, when participants decide between two faces that are probabilistically rewarded, they make biased choices that favor smiling relative to angry faces. This bias may arise because facial expressions evoke positive and negative emotional responses, which in turn may motivate social approach and avoidance. We tested a wide range of pictures that evoke emotions or convey social information, including animals, words...

  7. Radio-frequency properties of stacked long Josephson junctions with nonuniform bias current distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filatrella, G; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1999-01-01

    We have numerically investigated the behavior of stacks of long Josephson junctions considering a nonuniform bias profile. In the presence of a microwave field the nonuniform bias, which favors the formation of fluxons, can give rise to a change of the sequence of radio-frequency induced steps. The...... amplitude of the steps is enhanced when the external frequency matches the fluxon shuttling regime. ©1999 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder

    OpenAIRE

    Handley, Ian M.; BROWN, ELIZABETH R.; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A.; Smith, Jessi L.

    2015-01-01

    Ever-growing empirical evidence documents a gender bias against women and their research—and favoring men—in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Our research examined how receptive the scientific and public communities are to experimental evidence demonstrating this gender bias, which may contribute to women’s underrepresentation within STEM. Results from our three experiments, using general-public and university faculty samples, demonstrated that men evaluate the...

  9. High nevus counts confer a favorable prognosis in melanoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ribero, Simone; Davies, John R; Requena, Celia; Carrera, Cristina; Glass, Daniel; Rull, Ramon; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Vilalta, Antonio; Alos, Lucia; Soriano, Virtudes; Quaglino, Pietro; Traves, Victor; Newton-Bishop, Julia A; Nagore, Eduardo; Malvehy, Josep

    2015-01-01

    A high number of nevi is the most significant phenotypic risk factor for melanoma and is in part genetically determined. The number of nevi decreases from middle age onward but this senescence can be delayed in patients with melanoma. We investigated the effects of nevus number count on sentinel node status and melanoma survival in a large cohort of melanoma cases. Out of 2,184 melanoma cases, 684 (31.3%) had a high nevus count (>50). High nevus counts were associated with favorable progno...

  10. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  11. The Uneasy Case for Favoring Long-Term Shareholders

    OpenAIRE

    Jesse M. Fried

    2015-01-01

    This paper challenges a persistent and pervasive view in corporate law and corporate governance: that a firm’s managers should favor long-term shareholders over short-term shareholders, and maximize long-term shareholders’ returns rather than the short-term stock price. Underlying this view is a strongly-held intuition that taking steps to increase long-term shareholder returns will generate a larger economic pie over time. But this intuition, I show, is flawed. Long-term shareholders, like s...

  12. Observations favor the crossing of phantom divide lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using three different parameterized dark energy models, we reconstruct the properties of dark energy from the latest 397 Sne Ia, CMB and BAO with the present matter density, Ωm0, given prior. We find that, when Ωm0 is not small, for example, Ωm0 = 0.28 or 0.32, an evolving dark energy with a crossing of phantom divide line is favored and this conclusion seems to be model independent. We also find that the evolving properties of dark energy become more and more evident with the increase of Ωm0 given prior.

  13. Are priors responsible for cosmology favoring additional neutrino species?

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X; Sherwin, Blake D; Verde, Licia

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that both recent cosmological data and the results of flavor oscillation experiments (MiniBooNE and LSND) lend support to the existence of low-mass sterile neutrinos. The cosmological data appear to weakly favor additional forms of radiation in the Universe, beyond photons and three standard neutrino families. We reconsider the cosmological evidence by making the resulting confidence intervals on the additional effective neutrino species as prior-independent as possible. We find that, once the prior-dependence is removed, the latest cosmological data show no evidence for deviations from the standard number of neutrino species.

  14. Structural centrosome aberrations favor proliferation by abrogating microtubule-dependent tissue integrity of breast epithelial mammospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerch, D; Nigg, E A

    2016-05-01

    Structural centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in early stage carcinomas, but their role in malignant transformation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the impact of overexpression of Ninein-like protein (Nlp) on the architecture of polarized epithelia in three-dimensional mammospheres. When Nlp was overexpressed to levels resembling those seen in human tumors, it formed striking centrosome-related bodies (CRBs), which sequestered Ninein and affected the kinetics of microtubule (MT) nucleation and release. In turn, the profound reorganization of the MT cytoskeleton resulted in mislocalization of several adhesion and junction proteins as well as the tumor suppressor Scribble, resulting in the disruption of epithelial polarity, cell-cell interactions and mammosphere architecture. Remarkably, cells harboring Nlp-CRBs displayed an enhanced proliferative response to epidermal growth factor. These results demonstrate that structural centrosome aberrations cause not only the disruption of epithelial polarity but also favor overproliferation, two phenotypes typically associated with human carcinomas. PMID:26364601

  15. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  16. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  17. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  18. Reticulate evolution is favored in influenza niche switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Eric J; Hill, Nichola J; Zabilansky, Justin; Yuan, Kyle; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-05-10

    Reticulate evolution is thought to accelerate the process of evolution beyond simple genetic drift and selection, helping to rapidly generate novel hybrids with combinations of adaptive traits. However, the long-standing dogma that reticulate evolutionary processes are likewise advantageous for switching ecological niches, as in microbial pathogen host switch events, has not been explicitly tested. We use data from the influenza genome sequencing project and a phylogenetic heuristic approach to show that reassortment, a reticulate evolutionary mechanism, predominates over mutational drift in transmission between different host species. Moreover, as host evolutionary distance increases, reassortment is increasingly favored. We conclude that the greater the quantitative difference between ecological niches, the greater the importance of reticulate evolutionary processes in overcoming niche barriers. PMID:27114508

  19. Cognitive biases and language universals

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Language universals have been longly attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive, though non language-specific, biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of color naming patterns, and producing results in accurate agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate thoroughly the role of a cognitive bias in the framework of this model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias can influence the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show also that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the uniforming pressure of the cognitive bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces. We believe that our simulations can help to shed light on the possible mechanisms at work in the evol...

  20. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  1. Ingroup-outgroup bias in contagious yawning by chimpanzees supports link to empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew W; de Waal, Frans B M

    2011-01-01

    Humans favor others seen as similar to themselves (ingroup) over people seen as different (outgroup), even without explicitly stated bias. Ingroup-outgroup bias extends to involuntary responses, such as empathy for pain. However, empathy biases have not been tested in our close primate relatives. Contagious yawning has been theoretically and empirically linked to empathy. If empathy underlies contagious yawning, we predict that subjects should show an ingroup-outgroup bias by yawning more in response to watching ingroup members yawn than outgroup. Twenty-three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from two separate groups watched videos of familiar and unfamiliar individuals yawning or at rest (control). The chimpanzees yawned more when watching the familiar yawns than the familiar control or the unfamiliar yawns, demonstrating an ingroup-outgroup bias in contagious yawning. These results provide further empirical support that contagious yawning is a measure of empathy, which may be useful for evolutionary biology and mental health. PMID:21494669

  2. Ingroup-outgroup bias in contagious yawning by chimpanzees supports link to empathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Campbell

    Full Text Available Humans favor others seen as similar to themselves (ingroup over people seen as different (outgroup, even without explicitly stated bias. Ingroup-outgroup bias extends to involuntary responses, such as empathy for pain. However, empathy biases have not been tested in our close primate relatives. Contagious yawning has been theoretically and empirically linked to empathy. If empathy underlies contagious yawning, we predict that subjects should show an ingroup-outgroup bias by yawning more in response to watching ingroup members yawn than outgroup. Twenty-three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes from two separate groups watched videos of familiar and unfamiliar individuals yawning or at rest (control. The chimpanzees yawned more when watching the familiar yawns than the familiar control or the unfamiliar yawns, demonstrating an ingroup-outgroup bias in contagious yawning. These results provide further empirical support that contagious yawning is a measure of empathy, which may be useful for evolutionary biology and mental health.

  3. Detecting and Punishing Unconscious Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Tetlock, Philip E; Gregory Mitchell; L. Jason Anastasopoulos

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental results demonstrating how ideology shapes evaluations of technology aimed at detecting unconscious biases: (1) liberals supported use of the technology to detect unconscious racism but not unconscious anti-Americanism, whereas conservatives showed the reverse pattern, (2) liberals and conservatives opposed punishing individuals for unconscious bias but supported punishing organizations failing to use the technology to root out, respectively, racism or anti-Americanism,...

  4. The intentionality bias and schizotypy

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, James W.; Pope, A.

    2014-01-01

    The “intentionality bias” refers to our automatic tendency to judge other people's actions to be intentional. In this experiment we extended research on this effect in two key ways. First, we developed a novel nonlinguistic task for assessing the intentionality bias. This task used video stimuli of ambiguous movements. Second, we investigated the relationship between the strength of this bias and schizotypy (schizophrenia-like symptoms in healthy individuals). Our results showed that the inte...

  5. Do author-suggested reviewers rate submissions more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers? A study on atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ratings in journal peer review can be affected by sources of bias. The bias variable investigated here was the information on whether authors had suggested a possible reviewer for their manuscript, and whether the editor had taken up that suggestion or had chosen a reviewer that had not been suggested by the authors. Studies have shown that author-suggested reviewers rate manuscripts more favorably than editor-suggested reviewers do. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Reviewers' ratings on three evaluation criteria and the reviewers' final publication recommendations were available for 552 manuscripts (in total 1145 reviews that were submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an interactive open access journal using public peer review (authors' and reviewers' comments are publicly exchanged. Public peer review is supposed to bring a new openness to the reviewing process that will enhance its objectivity. In the statistical analysis the quality of a manuscript was controlled for to prevent favorable reviewers' ratings from being attributable to quality instead of to the bias variable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results agree with those from other studies that editor-suggested reviewers rated manuscripts between 30% and 42% less favorably than author-suggested reviewers. Against this backdrop journal editors should consider either doing without the use of author-suggested reviewers or, if they are used, bringing in more than one editor-suggested reviewer for the review process (so that the review by author-suggested reviewers can be put in perspective.

  6. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  7. Bias and design in software specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Pablo A.; Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1990-01-01

    Implementation bias in a specification is an arbitrary constraint in the solution space. Presented here is a model of bias in software specifications. Bias is defined in terms of the specification process and a classification of the attributes of the software product. Our definition of bias provides insight into both the origin and the consequences of bias. It also shows that bias is relative and essentially unavoidable. Finally, we describe current work on defining a measure of bias, formalizing our model, and relating bias to software defects.

  8. A model for codon position bias in RNA editing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, T; Liu, Tsunglin; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    RNA editing can be crucial for the expression of genetic information via inserting, deleting, or substituting a few nucleotides at specific positions in an RNA sequence. Within coding regions in an RNA sequence, editing usually occurs with a certain bias in choosing the positions of the editing sites. In the mitochondrial genes of {\\it Physarum polycephalum}, many more editing events have been observed at the third codon position than at the first and second, while in some plant mitochondria the second codon position dominates. Here we propose an evolutionary model that explains this bias as the basis of selection at the protein level. The model predicts a distribution of the three positions rather close to the experimental observation in {\\it Physarum}. This suggests that the codon position bias in {\\it Physarum} is mainly a consequence of selection at the protein level.

  9. Negativity Bias in Dangerous Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jing; Qu, Weina; Sun, Xianghong; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral and cognitive characteristics of dangerous drivers differ significantly from those of safe drivers. However, differences in emotional information processing have seldom been investigated. Previous studies have revealed that drivers with higher anger/anxiety trait scores are more likely to be involved in crashes and that individuals with higher anger traits exhibit stronger negativity biases when processing emotions compared with control groups. However, researchers have not explored the relationship between emotional information processing and driving behavior. In this study, we examined the emotional information processing differences between dangerous drivers and safe drivers. Thirty-eight non-professional drivers were divided into two groups according to the penalty points that they had accrued for traffic violations: 15 drivers with 6 or more points were included in the dangerous driver group, and 23 drivers with 3 or fewer points were included in the safe driver group. The emotional Stroop task was used to measure negativity biases, and both behavioral and electroencephalograph data were recorded. The behavioral results revealed stronger negativity biases in the dangerous drivers than in the safe drivers. The bias score was correlated with self-reported dangerous driving behavior. Drivers with strong negativity biases reported having been involved in mores crashes compared with the less-biased drivers. The event-related potentials (ERPs) revealed that the dangerous drivers exhibited reduced P3 components when responding to negative stimuli, suggesting decreased inhibitory control of information that is task-irrelevant but emotionally salient. The influence of negativity bias provides one possible explanation of the effects of individual differences on dangerous driving behavior and traffic crashes. PMID:26765225

  10. Schematic for efficient computation of GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra of genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Ahsan Z; Venu Gopal, T; Bhattacharya, C

    2012-01-01

    Selection of synonymous codons for an amino acid is biased in protein translation process. This biased selection causes repetition of synonymous codons in structural parts of genome that stands for high N/3 peaks in DNA spectrum. Period-3 spectral property is utilized here to produce a 3-phase network model based on polyphase filterbank concepts for derivation of codon bias spectra (CBS). Modification of parameters in this model can produce GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra. Complete schematic in LabVIEW platform is presented here for efficient and parallel computation of GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra of genomes alongwith results of CBS patterns. We have performed the correlation coefficient analysis of GC, GC3, and AT3 bias spectra with codon bias patterns of CBS for biological and statistical significance of this model. PMID:22368390

  11. Favorable Outcome in Open Globe Injuries with Low OTS Score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cillino Giovanni; Ferraro Lucia; Casuccio Alessandra; Cillino Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.Open globe eye injuries can have profound social and economic consequences. Here, we describe two cases of war and outdoor activity open globe eye injury where, despite a low OTS score,.current microsurgical technology allowed for a favorable outcome.Case report 1: A 33-year-old Libyan soldier had been treated for an open-globe grenade blast trauma to his left eye, which showed light perception and OTS score 2..He had undergone a lensectomy and PPV with silicone oil tamponade. Surgical treatment included scleral buckling,.cornea trephination, tem-porary Eckardt keratoprosthesis, PPV revision, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and corneal grafting. Six months later, his VA was improved to 20 / 70.Case report 2:.A 35-year-old man presented with a corneal laceration in his left eye from a meat skewer,.with marked hypotony and LP..After primary corneal wound closure,.B-scan ultrasonography revealed massive vitreous hemorrhage (OTS score 2). The patient underwent open cataract extraction with IOL implantation, 23 gauge PPV, laser photocoagulation of the retinochoroidal laceration, and a gas tamponade. After three weeks,.the patient underwent a 2nd 23G PPV due to a fibrinous reaction. Six month later, the patients exhibited 20 /25 VA.Conclusion:.These cases confirm that even for patients with a low OTS and poor visual prognosis,.an up-to-date surgery protocol may achieve visual results adequate for leading an autonomous daily life. (Eye Science 2014; 29:170-173)

  12. Ecological conditions favoring budding in colonial organisms under environmental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Nakamaru

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a topic of great interest in ecology. Many organisms adopt one of two distinct dispersal tactics at reproduction: the production of small offspring that can disperse over long distances (such as seeds and spawned eggs, or budding. The latter is observed in some colonial organisms, such as clonal plants, corals and ants, in which (superorganisms split their body into components of relatively large size that disperse to a short distance. Contrary to the common dispersal viewpoint, short-dispersal colonial organisms often flourish even in environments with frequent disturbances. In this paper, we investigate the conditions that favor budding over long-distance dispersal of small offspring, focusing on the life history of the colony growth and the colony division ratio. These conditions are the relatively high mortality of very small colonies, logistic growth, the ability of dispersers to peacefully seek and settle unoccupied spaces, and small spatial scale of environmental disturbance. If these conditions hold, budding is advantageous even when environmental disturbance is frequent. These results suggest that the demography or life history of the colony underlies the behaviors of the colonial organisms.

  13. Competition favors elk over beaver in a riparian willow ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.W.; Peinetti, H.R.; Coughenour, M.C.; Johnson, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Beaver (Castor spp.) conservation requires an understanding of their complex interactions with competing herbivores. Simulation modeling offers a controlled environment to examine long-term dynamics in ecosystems driven by uncontrollable variables. We used a new version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model to investigate beaver (C. Canadensis) and elk (Cervus elapses) competition for willow (Salix spp.). We initialized the model with field data from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA, to simulate a 4-ha riparian ecosystem containing beaver, elk, and willow. We found beaver persisted indefinitely when elk density was or = 30 elk km_2. The loss of tall willow preceded rapid beaver declines, thus willow condition may predict beaver population trajectory in natural environments. Beaver were able to persist with slightly higher elk densities if beaver alternated their use of foraging sites in a rest-rotation pattern rather than maintained continuous use. Thus, we found asymmetrical competition for willow strongly favored elk over beaver in a simulated montane ecosystem. Finally, we discuss application of the SAVANNA model and mechanisms of competition relative to beaver persistence as metapopulations, ecological resistance and alternative state models, and ecosystem regulation.

  14. Uranium favorability of part of the Raleigh Quadrangle, North Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part of the Raleigh, North Carolina, 10 by 20 quadrangle was evaluated to identify geologic environments favorable for uranium. Tabular sandstone deposits may occur in the Triassic basins where the Cumnock Formation interfingers with the Sanford Formation. The uranium deposits may have formed where humic and fulvic acids were expelled from lacustrine sediments to form tabular humate deposits. Later, uranium could have been concentrated and fixed when uranium-bearing ground water passed through the humate in the sandstone. Uranium may also have been precipitated in reducing environments associated with organic debris in the Pekin and Sanford Formations away from the borders of the Cumnock Formation. Analysis of water collected from wells near Corinth suggests uranium may have concentrated along fractures and faults which may be more permeable than the sediments themselves. No uranium occurrences are known in the Triassic basins, but they may have been leached during saprolitization. Water wells in quartz monzonite south of Lillington contain anomalous amounts of uranium, and the quartz monzonite contains anomalous amounts of U3O8. The quartz monzonite may contain orthomagmatic deposits, and allogenic deposits may have formed in the surrounding area. Further work in the quadrangle must include geochemical and radon analyses and studies of hydrology and paleohydrology

  15. Disorders of compulsivity: a common bias towards learning habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V; Derbyshire, K; Rück, C; Irvine, M A; Worbe, Y; Enander, J; Schreiber, L R N; Gillan, C; Fineberg, N A; Sahakian, B J; Robbins, T W; Harrison, N A; Wood, J; Daw, N D; Dayan, P; Grant, J E; Bullmore, E T

    2015-03-01

    Why do we repeat choices that we know are bad for us? Decision making is characterized by the parallel engagement of two distinct systems, goal-directed and habitual, thought to arise from two computational learning mechanisms, model-based and model-free. The habitual system is a candidate source of pathological fixedness. Using a decision task that measures the contribution to learning of either mechanism, we show a bias towards model-free (habit) acquisition in disorders involving both natural (binge eating) and artificial (methamphetamine) rewards, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This favoring of model-free learning may underlie the repetitive behaviors that ultimately dominate in these disorders. Further, we show that the habit formation bias is associated with lower gray matter volumes in caudate and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Our findings suggest that the dysfunction in a common neurocomputational mechanism may underlie diverse disorders involving compulsion. PMID:24840709

  16. On the bias of BFS

    CERN Document Server

    Kurant, Maciej; Thiran, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Breadth First Search (BFS) and other graph traversal techniques are widely used for measuring large unknown graphs, such as online social networks. It has been empirically observed that an incomplete BFS is biased toward high degree nodes. In contrast to more studied sampling techniques, such as random walks, the precise bias of BFS has not been characterized to date. In this paper, we quantify the degree bias of BFS sampling. In particular, we calculate the node degree distribution expected to be observed by BFS as a function of the fraction of covered nodes, in a random graph $RG(p_k)$ with a given degree distribution $p_k$. Furthermore, we also show that, for $RG(p_k)$, all commonly used graph traversal techniques (BFS, DFS, Forest Fire, and Snowball Sampling) lead to the same bias, and we show how to correct for this bias. To give a broader perspective, we compare this class of exploration techniques to random walks that are well-studied and easier to analyze. Next, we study by simulation the effect of gr...

  17. Gender and Racial Biases: Evidence from Child Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Baccara, Mariagiovanna; Collard-Wexler, Allan; Felli, Leonardo; Yariv, Leeat

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a new data set on domestic child adoption to document the preferences of potential adoptive parents over born and unborn babies relinquished for adoption by their birth mothers. We show that adoptive parents exhibit significant biases in favor of girls and against African-American babies. A non-African-American baby relinquished for adoption attracts the interest of potential adoptive parents with probability 11.5% if it is a girl and 7.9% if it is a boy. As for race, a non-Af...

  18. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  19. Patients with Spinal Cord Injuries Favor Administration of Methylprednisolone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Rosenbluth, Jeffrey; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) for treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has been associated with both benefits and adverse events. MPSS administration was the standard of care for acute SCI until recently when its use has become controversial. Patients with SCI have had little input in the debate, thus we sought to learn their opinions regarding administration of MPSS. A summary of the published literature to date on MPSS use for acute SCI was created and adjudicated by 28 SCI experts. This summary was then emailed to 384 chronic SCI patients along with a survey that interrogated the patients’ neurological deficits, communication with physicians and their views on MPSS administration. 77 out of 384 patients completed the survey. 28 respondents indicated being able to speak early after injury and of these 24 reported arriving at the hospital within 8 hours of injury. One recalled a physician speaking to them about MPSS and one patient reported choosing whether or not to receive MPSS. 59.4% felt that the small neurological benefits associated with MPSS were ‘very important’ to them (p<0.0001). Patients had ‘little concern’ for potential side-effects of MPSS (p = 0.001). Only 1.4% felt that MPSS should not be given to SCI patients regardless of degree of injury (p<0.0001). This is the first study to report SCI patients’ preferences regarding MPSS treatment for acute SCI. Patients favor the administration of MPSS for acute SCI, however few had input into whether or not it was administered. Conscious patients should be given greater opportunity to decide their treatment. These results also provide some guidance regarding MPSS administration in patients unable to communicate. PMID:26789007

  20. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  1. On the halo velocity bias

    CERN Document Server

    Biagetti, Matteo; Kehagias, Alex; Riotto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently shown that any halo velocity bias present in the initial conditions does not decay to unity, in agreement with predictions from peak theory. However, this is at odds with the standard formalism based on the coupled fluids approximation for the coevolution of dark matter and halos. Starting from conservation laws in phase space, we discuss why the fluid momentum conservation equation for the biased tracers needs to be modified in accordance with the change advocated in Baldauf, Desjacques & Seljak (2014). Our findings indicate that a correct description of the halo properties should properly take into account peak constraints when starting from the Vlasov-Boltzmann equation.

  2. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  3. Charcoal kiln relicts - a favorable site for tree growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Allan; Hirsch, Florian; van der Maaten, Ernst; Takla, Melanie; Räbiger, Christin; Cruz Garcia, Roberto; Schneider, Anna; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soils with incompletely combusted organic material (aka 'black carbon') are considered fertile for plant growth. Considerable enrichment of soils with black carbon is known from Chernozems, from anthropogenic induced altering of soils like the 'Terra Preta' in South America (e.g. Glaser, 2001), and from charcoal kiln relicts. Recent studies have reported a high spatial frequency of charcoal kiln relicts in the Northeastern German lowlands (Raab et al., 2015), which today are often overgrown by forest plantations. In this context the question arises whether these sites are favorable for tree growth. Here we compare the performance of 22 Pinus sylvestris individuals - a commonly used tree species in forestry - growing on charcoal kiln relicts with 22 control trees. Growth performance (height growth and diameter growth) of the trees was determined using dendrochronological techniques, i.e. standard ring-width measurements were undertaken on each two cores per tree and tree height was measured in the field. Several other wood properties such as annual wood density, average resin content, as well as wood chemistry were analyzed. Our results indicate that trees growing on charcoal kiln relicts grow significantly less and have a significantly lower wood density in comparison with control trees. Specific chemical components such as Manganese as well as resin contents were significantly higher in kiln trees. These results highlight that tree growth on charcoal kiln relicts is actually hampered instead of enhanced. Possibly this is a combined effect of differing physical soil properties which alter soil water accessibility for plants and differing chemical soil properties which may negatively affect tree growth either if toxic limits are surpassed or if soil nutrient availability is decreased. Additional soil analyses with respect to soil texture and soil chemistry shall reveal further insight into this hypothesis. Given the frequent distribution of charcoal kiln relicts in

  4. Favorable prognostic value of SOCS2 and IGF-I in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins comprise a protein family, which has initially been described as STAT induced inhibitors of the Jak/Stat pathway. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that SOCS proteins are also implicated in cancer. The STAT5 induced IGF-I acts as an endocrine and para/autocrine growth and differentiation factor in mammary gland development. Whereas high levels of circulating IGF-I have been associated with increased cancer risk, the role of autocrine acting IGF-I is less clear. The present study is aimed to elucidate the clinicopathological features associated with SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, CIS and IGF-I expression in breast cancer. We determined the mRNA expression levels of SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, CIS and IGF-I in 89 primary breast cancers by reverse transcriptase PCR. SOCS2 protein expression was further evaluated by immuno-blot and immunohistochemistry. SOCS2 expression inversely correlated with histopathological grade and ER positive tumors exhibited higher SOCS2 levels. Patients with high SOCS2 expression lived significantly longer (108.7 vs. 77.7 months; P = 0.015) and high SOCS2 expression proved to be an independent predictor for good prognosis (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.23 – 0.91, P = 0.026). In analogy to SOCS2, high IGF-I expression was an independent predictor for good prognosis in the entire patient cohort. In the subgroup of patients with lymph-node negative disease, high IGF-I was a strong predictor for favorable outcome in terms of overall survival and relapse free survival (HR = 0.075, 95% CI 0.014 – 0.388, P = 0.002). This is the first report on the favorable prognostic value of high SOCS2 expression in primary mammary carcinomas. Furthermore a strong association of high IGF-I expression levels with good prognosis was observed especially in lymph-node negative patients. Our results suggest that high expression of the STAT5 target genes SOCS2 and IGF-I is a feature of differentiated and less malignant tumors

  5. Favorable prognostic value of SOCS2 and IGF-I in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxenbichler Günter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins comprise a protein family, which has initially been described as STAT induced inhibitors of the Jak/Stat pathway. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that SOCS proteins are also implicated in cancer. The STAT5 induced IGF-I acts as an endocrine and para/autocrine growth and differentiation factor in mammary gland development. Whereas high levels of circulating IGF-I have been associated with increased cancer risk, the role of autocrine acting IGF-I is less clear. The present study is aimed to elucidate the clinicopathological features associated with SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, CIS and IGF-I expression in breast cancer. Methods We determined the mRNA expression levels of SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, CIS and IGF-I in 89 primary breast cancers by reverse transcriptase PCR. SOCS2 protein expression was further evaluated by immuno-blot and immunohistochemistry. Results SOCS2 expression inversely correlated with histopathological grade and ER positive tumors exhibited higher SOCS2 levels. Patients with high SOCS2 expression lived significantly longer (108.7 vs. 77.7 months; P = 0.015 and high SOCS2 expression proved to be an independent predictor for good prognosis (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.23 – 0.91, P = 0.026. In analogy to SOCS2, high IGF-I expression was an independent predictor for good prognosis in the entire patient cohort. In the subgroup of patients with lymph-node negative disease, high IGF-I was a strong predictor for favorable outcome in terms of overall survival and relapse free survival (HR = 0.075, 95% CI 0.014 – 0.388, P = 0.002. Conclusion This is the first report on the favorable prognostic value of high SOCS2 expression in primary mammary carcinomas. Furthermore a strong association of high IGF-I expression levels with good prognosis was observed especially in lymph-node negative patients. Our results suggest that high expression of the STAT5 target genes SOCS2 and IGF

  6. Microturbulence measurements during divertor biasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a bias voltage to a neutralization plate of the upper divertor with respect to the vacuum chamber in the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) influences the plasma well inside the separatrix. In particular, the unbiased Ohmic poloidal rotation edge velocity measured by visible spectroscopy is found to be in the electron diamagnetic drift direction (2-3 km/s) and increases by a factor of two for Vbias = 100 V. This coincides with a major reduction of the microturbulence signal at low frequencies (50 kHz -1 -1), as determined from coherent laser scattering measurements. One possible explanation is that the turbulence signal is simply Doppler shifted to frequencies outside the accessible range. This scenario is, however, difficult to reconcile with some observations. Another explanation invokes a reduction of the turbulence level. The variation of the turbulence signal as a function of the applied bias voltage can indeed be reproduced with a theoretical model based on radial and poloidal decorrelation mechanisms, the latter corresponding to poloidal velocity shear stabilization. This model also explains the observed steepening of the k-spectrum decay during biasing. Biasing also modifies the electron density profile inside the separatrix. These changes of nabla ne cannot explain the behaviour of microturbulence behaviour, when explained in terms of stabilization, would agree with the plasma maintaining a steeper electron density gradient. (author). 17 refs, 9 figs

  7. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Thomas, T.; Berkum, van E.C.; Arem, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  8. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.2 < |η| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presented. We also highlight the advantage of these triggers for particle correlation analyses. (author)

  9. Observer Biases in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    Presents three student exercises that demonstrate common perceptual errors described in social psychological literature: actor-observer effect, false consensus bias, and priming effects. Describes methods to be followed and gives terms, sentences, and a story to be used in the exercises. Suggests discussion of the bases and impact of such…

  10. Stereotype Formation : Biased by Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences ill the extent its which social groups have previously been predictive elf behavioral or physical properties Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness o

  11. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    show that optimism difference between the two groups is more than twice as much in firms with poor information environment than in firms with better information environment. We argue that poor information environment pose greater information asymmetries to foreign analysts regarding local firms...... relative to local analysts. As a result, we expect them to be less optimistic in their recommendations relative to local analysts. However, for firms with better information environment, foreign analysts face less information asymmetries. As a result, they are relatively more optimistic (less pessimistic......Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts...

  12. A selective emotional decision-making bias elicited by facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furl, Nicholas; Gallagher, Shannon; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2012-01-01

    Emotional and social information can sway otherwise rational decisions. For example, when participants decide between two faces that are probabilistically rewarded, they make biased choices that favor smiling relative to angry faces. This bias may arise because facial expressions evoke positive and negative emotional responses, which in turn may motivate social approach and avoidance. We tested a wide range of pictures that evoke emotions or convey social information, including animals, words, foods, a variety of scenes, and faces differing in trustworthiness or attractiveness, but we found only facial expressions biased decisions. Our results extend brain imaging and pharmacological findings, which suggest that a brain mechanism supporting social interaction may be involved. Facial expressions appear to exert special influence over this social interaction mechanism, one capable of biasing otherwise rational choices. These results illustrate that only specific types of emotional experiences can best sway our choices. PMID:22438936

  13. A selective emotional decision-making bias elicited by facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Furl

    Full Text Available Emotional and social information can sway otherwise rational decisions. For example, when participants decide between two faces that are probabilistically rewarded, they make biased choices that favor smiling relative to angry faces. This bias may arise because facial expressions evoke positive and negative emotional responses, which in turn may motivate social approach and avoidance. We tested a wide range of pictures that evoke emotions or convey social information, including animals, words, foods, a variety of scenes, and faces differing in trustworthiness or attractiveness, but we found only facial expressions biased decisions. Our results extend brain imaging and pharmacological findings, which suggest that a brain mechanism supporting social interaction may be involved. Facial expressions appear to exert special influence over this social interaction mechanism, one capable of biasing otherwise rational choices. These results illustrate that only specific types of emotional experiences can best sway our choices.

  14. On The Origins of Gender Human Capital Gaps: Short and Long Term Consequences of Teachers’ Stereotypical Biases

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Lavy; Edith Sand

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the effect of primary school teachers’ gender biases on boys’ and girls’ academic achievements during middle and high school and on the choice of advanced level courses in math and sciences during high school. For identification, we rely on the random assignments of teachers and students to classes in primary schools. Our results suggest that teachers’ biases favoring boys have an asymmetric effect by gender— positive effect on boys’ achievements and negative effect...

  15. Can Sex-Undifferentiated Teacher Expectations Mask an Influence of Sex Stereotypes? Alternative Forms of Sex Bias in Teacher Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Chalabaev, Aïna; Sarrazin, Philippe; Trouilloud, David; Jussim, Lee

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated different forms of sex bias in teacher expectations relative to gymnastics performance. First, a laboratory experiment including 163 physical education teachers confirmed that stereotypes favorable to boys may influence teacher expectations in gymnastics. Next, a naturalistic study involving 15 teachers and 422 students showed that teachers expected no sex differences even though girls performed higher than boys. However, this sex bias was due to the reliance on non...

  16. 45 CFR 73.735-503 - Criminal provisions relating to gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., entertainment, and favors. 73.735-503 Section 73.735-503 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-503 Criminal provisions relating to gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) The law provides criminal penalties for...

  17. 49 CFR 805.735-5 - Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by Members or employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by... Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by Members or employees. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs..., any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan, or any other thing of monetary value, from a...

  18. Soluble OX40L favors tumor rejection in CT26 colon carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O; Yuzhakova, Diana V; Ryumina, Alina P; Druzhkova, Irina N; Sharonov, George V; Kotlobay, Alexey A; Zagaynova, Elena V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Shirmanova, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    OX40 receptor-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) populate tumors and suppress a variety of immune cells, posing a major obstacle for cancer immunotherapy. Different ways to functionally inactivate Tregs by triggering OX40 receptor have been suggested, including anti-OX40 antibodies and Fc:OX40L fusion proteins. To investigate whether the soluble extracellular domain of OX40L (OX40Lexo) is sufficient to enhance antitumor immune response, we generated an OX40Lexo-expressing CT26 colon carcinoma cell line and studied its tumorigenicity in immunocompetent BALB/c and T cell deficient nu/nu mice. We found that soluble OX40L expressed in CT26 colon carcinoma favors the induction of an antitumor response which is not limited just to cells co-expressing EGFP as an antigenic determinant, but also eliminates CT26 cells expressing another fluorescent protein, KillerRed. Tumor rejection required the presence of T lymphocytes, as indicated by the unhampered tumor growth in nu/nu mice. Subsequent re-challenge of tumor-free BALB/c mice with CT26 EGFP cells resulted in no tumor growth, which is indicative of the formation of immunological memory. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from mice that successfully rejected CT26 OX40Lexo EGFP tumors to naïve mice conferred 100% resistance to subsequent challenge with the CT26 EGFP tumor. PMID:27203665

  19. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns between dipteran and hymenopteran sequenced genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon bias is a phenomenon of non-uniform usage of codons whereas codon context generally refers to sequential pair of codons in a gene. Although genome sequencing of multiple species of dipteran and hymenopteran insects have been completed only a few of these species have been analyzed for codon usage bias. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use bioinformatics approaches to analyze codon usage bias and codon context patterns in a genome-wide manner among 15 dipteran and 7 hymenopteran insect species. Results show that GAA is the most frequent codon in the dipteran species whereas GAG is the most frequent codon in the hymenopteran species. Data reveals that codons ending with C or G are frequently used in the dipteran genomes whereas codons ending with A or T are frequently used in the hymenopteran genomes. Synonymous codon usage orders (SCUO vary within genomes in a pattern that seems to be distinct for each species. Based on comparison of 30 one-to-one orthologous genes among 17 species, the fruit fly Drosophila willistoni shows the least codon usage bias whereas the honey bee (Apis mellifera shows the highest bias. Analysis of codon context patterns of these insects shows that specific codons are frequently used as the 3'- and 5'-context of start and stop codons, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Codon bias pattern is distinct between dipteran and hymenopteran insects. While codon bias is favored by high GC content of dipteran genomes, high AT content of genes favors biased usage of synonymous codons in the hymenopteran insects. Also, codon context patterns vary among these species largely according to their phylogeny.

  20. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect|when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preferenc...

  1. A quantum exchange bias model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of the exchange bias phenomenon is investigated on the basis of a quantum mechanical model. In particular, the mechanisms that determine the magnetic structure in the vicinity of an antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic interface are reexamined. This way we establish how the breaking of translational invariance modifies quantum spin fluctuations. It is found that non-uniform fluctuations induce uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet, which in turn give rise to a dipole field that couples to the magnetization of the ferromagnet. This coupling yields an exchange bias field that is of the order of magnitude of the one observed experimentally. A net surface magnetization should also be experimentally observable in a clean antiferromagnetic surface

  2. Variable-bias coin tossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alice is a charismatic quantum cryptographer who believes her parties are unmissable; Bob is a (relatively) glamorous string theorist who believes he is an indispensable guest. To prevent possibly traumatic collisions of self-perception and reality, their social code requires that decisions about invitation or acceptance be made via a cryptographically secure variable-bias coin toss (VBCT). This generates a shared random bit by the toss of a coin whose bias is secretly chosen, within a stipulated range, by one of the parties; the other party learns only the random bit. Thus one party can secretly influence the outcome, while both can save face by blaming any negative decisions on bad luck. We describe here some cryptographic VBCT protocols whose security is guaranteed by quantum theory and the impossibility of superluminal signaling, setting our results in the context of a general discussion of secure two-party computation. We also briefly discuss other cryptographic applications of VBCT

  3. Cosmological Evolution of Linear Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Basilakos, S; Basilakos, Spyros; Plionis, Manolis

    2000-01-01

    Using linear perturbation theory and the Friedmann-Lemaitre solutions of the cosmological field equations, we derive analytically a second-order differential equation for the evolution of the linear bias factor, b(z), between the background matter and a mass-tracer fluctuation field. We find b(z) to be a strongly dependent function of redshift in all cosmological models. Comparing our analytical solution with the semi-analytic model of Mo & White, which utilises the Press-Schechter formalism and the gravitationally induced evolution of clustering, we find an extremely good agreement even at large redshifts, once we normalize to the same bias value at two different epochs, one of which is the present. Furthermore, our analytic b(z) function agrees well with the outcome of N-body simulations even up to large redshifts.

  4. Probability biases as Bayesian inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre; C. R. Martins

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will show how several observed biases in human probabilistic reasoning can be partially explained as good heuristics for making inferences in an environment where probabilities have uncertainties associated to them. Previous results show that the weight functions and the observed violations of coalescing and stochastic dominance can be understood from a Bayesian point of view. We will review those results and see that Bayesian methods should also be used as part of the explanation behind other known biases. That means that, although the observed errors are still errors under the be understood as adaptations to the solution of real life problems. Heuristics that allow fast evaluations and mimic a Bayesian inference would be an evolutionary advantage, since they would give us an efficient way of making decisions. %XX In that sense, it should be no surprise that humans reason with % probability as it has been observed.

  5. Jets in minimum bias physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussion was made on a phenomenological evidence to support the hypothesis that several new phenomena observed in low psub(t) physics are due to the presence of low-x QCD jets in minimum bias physics. The phenomena we examine are KNO scaling violations, growth of with multiplicity and rise of the non-single diffractive part of the total cross-section. We have discussed the importance of low-x hard parton scattering in minimum bias events and pointed out its connection to both KNO scaling violations as well as to the observed growth of with multiplicity in inclusive pion distributions. The contribution of these mini-jets to the total cross-section has been calculated and a model for the transverse energy distribution characterizing any event accompanied by jets has been presented. (author)

  6. Orai1 Expression Is Closely Related with Favorable Prognostic Factors in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Kim, Ji-Hee; Oh, Sung-Soo; Lee, Mi-Ra; Jung, Jae Hung; Chung, Hyun Chul; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Eom, Minseob

    2016-06-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca(2+)) entry (SOCE) is the principal Ca(2+) entry route in non-excitable cells, including cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that Orai1 and STIM1, the molecular components of SOCE, are involved in tumorigenesis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). However, a clinical relevance of Orai1 and STIM1 expression in CCRCC has been ill-defined. Here, we investigated the expression of Orai1 and STIM1 in CCRCC, and compared their expression with clinico-pathological parameters of CCRCC and the patients' outcome. Immunohistochemical staining for Orai1 and STIM1 was performed on 126 formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue of CCRCC and western blot analysis for Orai1 was performed on the available fresh tissue. The results were compared with generally well-established clinicopathologic prognostic factors in CCRCC and patient survival. Membrane protein Orai1 is expressed in the nuclei in CCRCC, whereas STIM1 shows the cytosolic expression pattern in immunohistochemical staining. Orai1 expression level is inversely correlated with CCRCC tumor grade, whereas STIM1 expression level is not associated with tumor grade. The higher Orai1 expression is significantly associated with lower Fuhrman nuclear grade, pathologic T stage, and TNM stage and with favorable prognosis. The expression level of STIM1 is not correlated with CCRCC grade and clinical outcomes. Orai1 expression in CCRCC is associated with tumor progression and with favorable prognostic factors. These results suggest that Orai1 is an attractive prognostic marker and therapeutic target for CCRCC. PMID:27247496

  7. Girl child and gender bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, D P

    1995-01-01

    This article identifies gender bias against female children and youth in India. Gender bias is based on centuries-old religious beliefs and sayings from ancient times. Discrimination is reflected in denial or ignorance of female children's educational, health, nutrition, and recreational needs. Female infanticide and selective abortion of female fetuses are other forms of discrimination. The task of eliminating or reducing gender bias will involve legal, developmental, political, and administrative measures. Public awareness needs to be created. There is a need to reorient the education and health systems and to advocate for gender equality. The government of India set the following goals for the 1990s: to protect the survival of the girl child and practice safe motherhood; to develop the girl child in general; and to protect vulnerable girl children in different circumstances and in special groups. The Health Authorities should monitor the laws carefully to assure marriage after the minimum age, ban sex determination of the fetus, and monitor the health and nutrition of pre-school girls and nursing and pregnant mothers. Mothers need to be encouraged to breast feed, and to breast feed equally between genders. Every village and slum area needs a mini health center. Maternal mortality must decline. Primary health centers and hospitals need more women's wards. Education must be universally accessible. Enrollments should be increased by educating rural tribal and slum parents, reducing distances between home and school, making curriculum more relevant to girls, creating more female teachers, and providing facilities and incentives for meeting the needs of girl students. Supplementary income could be provided to families for sending girls to school. Recreational activities must be free of gender bias. Dowry, sati, and devdasi systems should be banned. PMID:12158019

  8. Investigating Endogeneity Bias in Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Liu; Thomas Otter; Greg M. Allenby

    2007-01-01

    The use of adaptive designs in conjoint analysis has been shown to lead to an endogeneity bias in part-worth estimates using sampling experiments. In this paper, we re-examine the endogeneity issue in light of the likelihood principle. The likelihood principle asserts that all relevant information in the data about model parameters is contained in the likelihood function. We show that, once the data are collected, adhering to the likelihood principle leads to analysis where endogeneity become...

  9. Competition and Commercial Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    BLASCO, A.; F. Sobbrio

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on commercial media bias (i.e., advertisers influence over media accuracy) and then introduces a simple model to summarize the main elements of the theoretical literature. The analysis provides three main policy insights for media regulators: i) Media regulators should target their monitoring efforts towards news contents upon which advertisers are likely to share similar preferences; ii) In advertising industries characterized by high correlation in ...

  10. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Aram Galstyan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective proba...

  11. Molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in the Drosophila ananassae subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baines John F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes with sex-biased expression often show rapid molecular evolution between species. Previous population genetic and comparative genomic studies of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans revealed that male-biased genes have especially high rates of adaptive evolution. To test if this is also the case for other lineages within the melanogaster group, we investigated gene expression in D. ananassae, a species that occurs in structured populations in tropical and subtropical regions. We used custom-made microarrays and published microarray data to characterize the sex-biased expression of 129 D. ananassae genes whose D. melanogaster orthologs had been classified previously as male-biased, female-biased, or unbiased in their expression and had been studied extensively at the population-genetic level. For 43 of these genes we surveyed DNA sequence polymorphism in a natural population of D. ananassae and determined divergence to the sister species D. atripex and D. phaeopleura. Results Sex-biased expression is generally conserved between D. melanogaster and D. ananassae, with the majority of genes exhibiting the same bias in the two species. However, about one-third of the genes have either gained or lost sex-biased expression in one of the species and a small proportion of genes (~4% have changed bias from one sex to the other. The male-biased genes of D. ananassae show evidence of positive selection acting at the protein level. However, the signal of adaptive protein evolution for male-biased genes is not as strong in D. ananassae as it is in D. melanogaster and is limited to genes with conserved male-biased expression in both species. Within D. ananassae, a significant signal of adaptive evolution is also detected for female-biased and unbiased genes. Conclusions Our findings extend previous observations of widespread adaptive protein evolution to an independent Drosophila lineage, the D. ananassae subgroup. However, the rate

  12. Generalization of the FRAM's Bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fixed-Energy Response-Function Analysis with Multiple Efficiency (FRAM) code was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the gamma-ray spectrometry of the isotopic composition of plutonium, uranium, and other actinides. Its reported uncertainties of the results come from the propagation of the statistics in the peak areas only. No systematic error components are included in the reported uncertainties. We have done several studies and found that the FRAM's statistical precision can be reasonably represented by its reported uncertainties. The FRAM's biases or systematic uncertainties can come from a variety of sources and can be difficult to determine. We carefully examined the FRAM analytical results of the archival plutonium data and of the data specifically acquired for this isotopic uncertainty analysis project and found the relationship between the bias and other parameters. We worked out the equations representing the biases of the measured isotopes from each measurement using the internal parameters in the spectrum such as peak resolution and shape, region of analysis, and burnup (for plutonium) or enrichment (for uranium)

  13. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  14. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  15. Moderate intra-group bias maximizes cooperation on interdependent populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbing Tang

    Full Text Available Evolutionary game theory on spatial structures has received increasing attention during the past decades. However, the majority of these achievements focuses on single and static population structures, which is not fully consistent with the fact that real structures are composed of many interactive groups. These groups are interdependent on each other and present dynamical features, in which individuals mimic the strategy of neighbors and switch their partnerships continually. It is however unclear how the dynamical and interdependent interactions among groups affect the evolution of collective behaviors. In this work, we employ the prisoner's dilemma game to investigate how the dynamics of structure influences cooperation on interdependent populations, where populations are represented by group structures. It is found that the more robust the links between cooperators (or the more fragile the links between cooperators and defectors, the more prevalent of cooperation. Furthermore, theoretical analysis shows that the intra-group bias can favor cooperation, which is only possible when individuals are likely to attach neighbors within the same group. Yet, interestingly, cooperation can be even inhibited for large intra-group bias, allowing the moderate intra-group bias maximizes the cooperation level.

  16. Recursive bias estimation for high dimensional regression smoothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [AGROSUP, FRANCE; Matzner - Lober, Eric [UNIV OF RENNES, FRANCE

    2009-01-01

    In multivariate nonparametric analysis, sparseness of the covariates also called curse of dimensionality, forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to biased smoother. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose to iteratively correct of the bias initial estimator by an estimate of the latter obtained by smoothing the residuals. We examine in details the convergence of the iterated procedure for classical smoothers and relate our procedure to L{sub 2}-Boosting, For multivariate thin plate spline smoother, we proved that our procedure adapts to the correct and unknown order of smoothness for estimating an unknown function m belonging to H({nu}) (Sobolev space where m should be bigger than d/2). We apply our method to simulated and real data and show that our method compares favorably with existing procedures.

  17. GENDER-SPECIFIC EXPRESSION OF β1 INTEGRIN OF VERY-LATE ANTIGEN-4 IN MYELIN BASIC PROTEIN-PRIMED T CELLS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GENDER BIAS IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Brahmachari, Saurav; Pahan, Kalipada

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is higher in females than males. However the underlying mechanism behind this gender difference is poorly understood. Because the presence of neuroantigen-primed T cells in the CNS is necessary to initiate the neuroinflammatory cascade of MS, we first investigated how these T cells interacted with astroglia, major resident glial cells of the CNS. Interestingly, we found that myelin basic protein-primed T cells from female and castrated male mice, but not f...

  18. The relationship between codon usage bias and cold resistant genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is based on synonymous codon usage which has been well-known as a feature that affects typical expression level of protein in an organism. Different organisms prefer different codons for same amino acid and this is called Codon Usage Bias (CUB). The codon usage directly affects the level or even direction of changes in protein expression in responses to environmental stimuli. Cold stress is a major abiotic factor that limits the agricultural productivity of plants. In the recent study CUB has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana cold resistant and housekeeping genes and their homologs in rice (Oryza sativa) to understand the cold stress and housekeeping genes relation with CUB. Six cold resistant and three housekeeping genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and their homologs in rice, were subjected to CUB analysis. The three cold resistant genes (DREB1B, RCI and MYB15) showed more than 50% (52%, 61% and 66% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. On the other hand three cold resistant genes (MPK3, ICE1 and ZAT12) showed less than 50% (38%, 38% and 47% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. The three housekeeping genes (Actin, Tubulin and Ubiquitin) showed 76% similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. This study will help to manage the plant gene expression through codon optimization under the cold stress. (author)

  19. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  20. Bias in Absolute Magnitude Determination from Parallaxes

    OpenAIRE

    Feast, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Relations are given for the correction of bias when mean absolute magnitudes are derived by the method of reduced parallaxes. The bias in the case of the derivation of the absolute magnitudes of individual objects is also considered.

  1. Galaxy peculiar velocities and evolution-bias

    OpenAIRE

    Percival, Will; Schafer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Galaxy bias can be split into two components: a formation-bias based on the locations of galaxy creation, and an evolution-bias that details their subsequent evolution. In this letter we consider evolution-bias in the peaks model. In this model, galaxy formation takes place at local maxima in the density field, and we analyse the subsequent peculiar motion of these galaxies in a linear model of structure formation. The peak restriction yields differences in the velocity distribution and corre...

  2. Unlearning Implicit Social Biases During Sleep **

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Antony, James W.; Creery, Jessica D.; Vargas, Iliana M.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.; Paller, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    Although people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counter-stereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one ty...

  3. Selection bias in rheumatic disease research

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hyon K.; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa; Niu, Jingbo; Danaei, Goodarz; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of rheumatic conditions and their sequelae is crucial for reducing the substantial worldwide burden of these diseases. However, the validity of such research can be threatened by sources of bias, including confounding, measurement and selection biases. In this Review, we discuss potentially major issues of selection bias—a type of bias frequently overshadowed by other bias and feasibility issues, despite being equally or more p...

  4. Readdressing gender bias in the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory-short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Paula L; Mullis, Ann K

    2002-12-01

    The short form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI) was evaluated for gender bias. The authors replicated a study by L. Francis and D. James (1998) and administered the SEI to 361 middle and high school students (146 boys, 2l5 girls). They found that gender bias existed in 6 of the 25 items on the SEI, with 5 of those items favoring boys. Because recent literature indicates that male and female adolescents experience problems in different areas of their lives, the authors suggest that researchers consider such differences when selecting items for a standardized measure. PMID:12495227

  5. Debt Bias in Corporate Income Taxation and the Costs of Banking Crises

    OpenAIRE

    Langedijk, Sven; Nicodème, Gaëtan; Pagano, Andrea; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Corporate income taxation (CIT) in most countries favors debt over equity financing, leading to over-indebtedness. This problem is particularly acute for the financial sector. We estimate financial-stability benefits of eliminating this debt bias. We estimate the long-run effects of CIT on bank leverage and, using a Vasicek-based model of banking crisis losses, we find that eliminating this debt bias could reduce public finance losses in the range of 30 to 70%. These results hold even for con...

  6. Spallation neutron source RF cavity bias system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spallation Neutron Source r.f. cavity bias system is described under the topic headings: bias system, r.f. cavity, cables, d.c. bias power supply, transistor regulator and control system. Calculation of 4 core 300 mm solid aluminium cable inductance, coaxial shunt frequency response and transistor regulator computed frequency response, are discussed in appendices 1-3. (U.K.)

  7. Begging the Question: Is Critical Thinking Biased?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Kal

    1995-01-01

    Discusses whether critical thinking is biased, examining what is meant by critical thinking and bias and what the consequences are for addressing bias in different ways. The paper responds to the three previous papers in the critical thinking symposium in this issue of the journal. (SM)

  8. Outcome-Reporting Bias in Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigott, Therese D.; Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Williams, Ryan T.; Canada, Dericka D.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome-reporting bias occurs when primary studies do not include information about all outcomes measured in a study. When studies omit findings on important measures, efforts to synthesize the research using systematic review techniques will be biased and interpretations of individual studies will be incomplete. Outcome-reporting bias has been…

  9. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays.Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias,especially the media bias.They studied the media bias from different perspectives,such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX,the bias on the venerable group,the bias on women and so on.The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  10. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays. Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias, especially the media bias. They studied the media bias from different perspectives, such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX, the bias on the venerable group, the bias on women and so on. The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  11. What is biased efficacy? Defining the relationship between intrinsic efficacy and free energy coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaran, H Ongun; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Costa, Tommaso

    2014-12-01

    A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is only biologically active when associated with a transduction protein, but it can also switch function by interacting with different types of transduction proteins. Biased agonism arises when the ligand induces the receptor to engage distinct transduction proteins with different efficacies. We briefly review the concept of ligand efficacy, from the classical empirical idea to the current mechanistic views of allosteric regulation in proteins. A combination of these theoretically distinct ideas and methodologies allows us to distinguish true ligand bias from divergences of signalling caused by the system. We also demonstrate a rigorous mathematical connection between the intrinsic efficacy of classical receptor theory and the energetic effect that makes a ligand capable of stabilizing receptor-transducer association in the ternary complex model. This relationship unifies different definitions of efficacy and provides a rational basis for quantifying biased agonism. PMID:25448316

  12. Challenges in bias correcting climate change simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraun, Douglas; Shepherd, Ted; Zappa, Giuseppe; Gutierrez, Jose; Widmann, Martin; Hagemann, Stefan; Richter, Ingo; Soares, Pedro; Mearns, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Biases in climate model simulations - if these are directly used as input for impact models - will introduce further biases in subsequent impact simulations. In response to this issue, so-called bias correction methods have been developed to post-process climate model output. These methods are now widely used and a crucial component in the generation of high resolution climate change projections. Bias correction is conceptually similar to model output statistics, which has been successfully used for several decades in numerical weather prediction. Yet in climate science, some authors outrightly dismiss any form of bias correction. Starting from this seeming contradiction, we highlight differences between the two contexts and infer consequences and limitations for the applicability of bias correction to climate change projections. We first show that cross validation approaches successfully used to evaluate weather forecasts are fundamentally insufficient to evaluate climate change bias correction. We further demonstrate that different types of model mismatches with observations require different solutions, and some may not sensibly be mitigated. In particular we consider the influence of large-scale circulation biases, biases in the persistence of weather regimes, and regional biases caused by an insufficient representation of the flow-topography interaction. We conclude with a list of recommendations and suggestions for future research to reduce, to post-process, and to cope with climate model biases.

  13. Unlearning Implicit Social Biases During Sleep **

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Antony, James W.; Creery, Jessica D.; Vargas, Iliana M.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.; Paller, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    Although people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counter-stereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one type of training. Corresponding bias reductions were fortified in comparison to the social bias not externally reactivated during sleep. This advantage remained one week later, the magnitude of which was associated with time in slow-wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep after training. We conclude that memory reactivation during sleep enhances counter-stereotype training, and that maintaining a bias reduction is sleep-dependent. PMID:26023137

  14. Distraction from emotional information reduces biased judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lench, Heather C; Bench, Shane W; Davis, Elizabeth L

    2016-06-01

    Biases arising from emotional processes are some of the most robust behavioural effects in the social sciences. The goal of this investigation was to examine the extent to which the emotion regulation strategy of distraction could reduce biases in judgement known to result from emotional information. Study 1 explored lay views regarding whether distraction is an effective strategy to improve decision-making and revealed that participants did not endorse this strategy. Studies 2-5 focused on several established, robust biases that result from emotional information: loss aversion, desirability bias, risk aversion and optimistic bias. Participants were prompted to divert attention away from their feelings while making judgements, and in each study this distraction strategy resulted in reduced bias in judgement relative to control conditions. The findings provide evidence that distraction can improve choice across several situations that typically elicit robustly biased responses, even though participants are not aware of the effectiveness of this strategy. PMID:25787937

  15. Explaining the discrepancy between intentions and actions: the case of hypothetical bias in contingent valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajzen, Icek; Brown, Thomas C; Carvajal, Franklin

    2004-09-01

    An experiment was designed to account for intention-behavior discrepancies by applying the theory of planned behavior to contingent valuation. College students (N = 160) voted in hypothetical and real payment referenda to contribute $8 to a scholarship fund. Overestimates of willingness to pay in the hypothetical referendum could not be attributed to moderately favorable latent dispositions. Instead, this hypothetical bias was explained by activation of more favorable beliefs and attitudes in the context of a hypothetical rather than a real referendum. A corrective entreaty was found to eliminate this bias by bringing beliefs, attitudes, and intentions in line with those in the real payment situation. As a result, the theory of planned behavior produced more accurate prediction of real payment when participants were exposed to the corrective entreaty. PMID:15359015

  16. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator. PMID:25442953

  17. Bias-induced stress transitions in sputtered TiN films

    OpenAIRE

    Kattelus, H. P.; Tandon, J. L.; Sala, C; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1986-01-01

    We report on intrinsic stress properties of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride films deposited under different conditions. By proper selection of processing parameters, films with low stress can be obtained. Unstressed film formation is favored by low substrate bias voltage, high pressure, or use of heavy sputtering gases. Stress relief is, however, accompanied by an increase in resistivity and a decrease in film density. As a result of these changes the effectiveness of such titanium nitri...

  18. Skill Biased Technological Change and Rising Wage Inequality: Some Problems and Puzzles

    OpenAIRE

    David Card; John E. DiNardo

    2002-01-01

    The rise in wage inequality in the U.S. labor market during the 1980s is usually attributed to skill-biased technical change (SBTC), associated with the development of personal computers and related information technologies. We review the evidence in favor of this hypothesis, focusing on the implications of SBTC for economy-wide trends in wage inequality, and for the evolution of wage differentials between various groups. A fundamental problem for the SBTC hypothesis is that wage inequality s...

  19. Decisional impairments in cocaine addiction, reward bias, and cortical oscillation “unbalance”

    OpenAIRE

    Balconi M; Finocchiaro R

    2015-01-01

    Michela Balconi, Roberta Finocchiaro Research Unit in Affective and Social Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy Abstract: A vast amount of research has suggested that subjects with substance use disorder (SUD) might have difficulty making advantageous decisions that opt in favor of a longer-term, larger reward than an immediate, smaller reward. The current research explored the impact of reward bias and cortical frontal asymmetry (lef...

  20. Decisional impairments in cocaine addiction, reward bias, and cortical oscillation “unbalance”

    OpenAIRE

    Balconi, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Michela Balconi, Roberta Finocchiaro Research Unit in Affective and Social Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy Abstract: A vast amount of research has suggested that subjects with substance use disorder (SUD) might have difficulty making advantageous decisions that opt in favor of a longer-term, larger reward than an immediate, smaller reward. The current research explored the impact of reward bias and cortical frontal asymmetry (lef...

  1. Decisional impairments in cocaine addiction, reward bias, and cortical oscillation “unbalance”

    OpenAIRE

    Balconi, Michela; Finocchiaro, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    A vast amount of research has suggested that subjects with substance use disorder (SUD) might have difficulty making advantageous decisions that opt in favor of a longer-term, larger reward than an immediate, smaller reward. The current research explored the impact of reward bias and cortical frontal asymmetry (left lateralization effect) in SUD in response to a decisional task (Iowa Gambling Task). Fifty SUD participants and 40 controls (CG) were tested using the Iowa Gambling Task. Electrop...

  2. Selection bias in rheumatic disease research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyon K.; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa; Niu, Jingbo; Danaei, Goodarz; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of rheumatic conditions and their sequelae is crucial for reducing the substantial worldwide burden of these diseases. However, the validity of such research can be threatened by sources of bias, including confounding, measurement and selection biases. In this Review, we discuss potentially major issues of selection bias—a type of bias frequently overshadowed by other bias and feasibility issues, despite being equally or more problematic—in key areas of rheumatic disease research. We present index event bias (a type of selection bias) as one of the potentially unifying reasons behind some unexpected findings, such as the ‘risk factor paradox’—a phenomenon exemplified by the discrepant effects of certain risk factors on the development versus the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also discuss potential selection biases owing to differential loss to follow-up in RA and OA research, as well as those due to the depletion of susceptibles (prevalent user bias) and immortal time bias. The lesson remains that selection bias can be ubiquitous and, therefore, has the potential to lead the field astray. Thus, we conclude with suggestions to help investigators avoid such issues and limit the impact on future rheumatology research. PMID:24686510

  3. The Extracellular Surface of the GLP-1 Receptor Is a Molecular Trigger for Biased Agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, Denise; Reynolds, Christopher A; Smith, Kevin J; Mobarec, Juan C; Koole, Cassandra; Savage, Emilia E; Pabreja, Kavita; Simms, John; Sridhar, Rohan; Furness, Sebastian G B; Liu, Mengjie; Thompson, Philip E; Miller, Laurence J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2016-06-16

    Ligand-directed signal bias offers opportunities for sculpting molecular events, with the promise of better, safer therapeutics. Critical to the exploitation of signal bias is an understanding of the molecular events coupling ligand binding to intracellular signaling. Activation of class B G protein-coupled receptors is driven by interaction of the peptide N terminus with the receptor core. To understand how this drives signaling, we have used advanced analytical methods that enable separation of effects on pathway-specific signaling from those that modify agonist affinity and mapped the functional consequence of receptor modification onto three-dimensional models of a receptor-ligand complex. This yields molecular insights into the initiation of receptor activation and the mechanistic basis for biased agonism. Our data reveal that peptide agonists can engage different elements of the receptor extracellular face to achieve effector coupling and biased signaling providing a foundation for rational design of biased agonists. PMID:27315480

  4. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    construction costs, which account for the majority of total project costs. Second are the forecasts of travel time savings, which account for the majority of total project benefits. The latter of these is, inter alia, determined by forecasts of travel demand, which we shall use as a proxy for the forecasting......Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts of...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...

  5. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Del Vicario, Michela; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM...

  6. Social reward shapes attentional biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present study, I examine whether positive social feedback can similarly influence attentional bias. The results show that stimuli previously associated with a high probability of positive social feedback elicit value-driven attentional capture, much like stimuli associated with extrinsic rewards. Unlike with extrinsic rewards, however, such stimuli also influence task-specific motivation. My findings offer a potential mechanism by which social reward shapes the information that we prioritize when perceiving the world around us. PMID:25941868

  7. 45 CFR 73.735-502 - Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment... GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-502 Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) An employee may accept a gift, gratuity,...

  8. 45 CFR 73.735-501 - Prohibited acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibited acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and... ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-501 Prohibited acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in §§ 73.735-502 and 73.735-506, an employee shall...

  9. Self-portraits: smartphones reveal a side bias in non-artists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bruno

    Full Text Available According to surveys of art books and exhibitions, artists prefer poses showing the left side of the face when composing a portrait and the right side when composing a self-portrait. However, it is presently not known whether similar biases can be observed in individuals that lack formal artistic training. We collected self-portraits by naïve photographers who used the iPhone™ front camera, and confirmed a right side bias in this non-artist sample and even when biomechanical constraints would have favored the opposite. This result undermines explanations based on posing conventions due to artistic training or biomechanical factors, and is consistent with the hypothesis that side biases in portraiture and self-portraiture are caused by biologically- determined asymmetries in facial expressiveness.

  10. Investigation of Biases and Compensatory Strategies Using a Probabilistic Variant of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Alexis B; Phillips, Matthew E; Zaldivar, Andrew; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) evaluates a subject's ability to shift to a new pattern of behavior in response to the presentation of unexpected negative feedback. The present study introduces a novel version of the traditional WCST by integrating a probabilistic component into its traditional rule shifting to add uncertainty to the task, as well as the option to forage for information during any particular trial. These changes transformed a task that is trivial for neurotypical individuals into a challenging environment useful for evaluating biases and compensatory strategizing. Sixty subjects performed the probabilistic WCST at four uncertainty levels to determine the effect of uncertainty on subject performance and strategy. Results revealed that increasing the level of uncertainty during a run of trials correlated with a reduction in rational strategizing in favor of both random choice and information foraging, evoking biases and suboptimal strategies such as satisfaction of search, negativity bias, and probability matching. PMID:26834686

  11. On-Line "Chat Room" Tutorials—An Unusual Gender Bias in Computer Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1999-09-01

    Research into gender bias in attitudes, access, and effectiveness associated with computers has produced conflicting results, resulting in conflicting opinions as to whether a technological gender gap favoring male students exists. No previous study, however, has ever demonstrated a preference for female use of a particular computer application. This work describes gender differences in the use of on-line ("chat room") tutorials by non-traditional chemistry students enrolled in distance learning sections of a general chemistry course. Higher percentages of female students participated in the on-line tutorials and they participated with greater frequency than male students. Furthermore, the correlation between frequency of participation and course performance was higher among the female students. Various explanations for this unusual gender bias are offered, and the conclusion that the diversity of computer applications available today requires that research into gender bias refrain from viewing the computer as a single entity is supported.

  12. Symmetry as Bias: Rediscovering Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a rational reconstruction of Einstein's discovery of special relativity, validated through an implementation: the Erlanger program. Einstein's discovery of special relativity revolutionized both the content of physics and the research strategy used by theoretical physicists. This research strategy entails a mutual bootstrapping process between a hypothesis space for biases, defined through different postulated symmetries of the universe, and a hypothesis space for physical theories. The invariance principle mutually constrains these two spaces. The invariance principle enables detecting when an evolving physical theory becomes inconsistent with its bias, and also when the biases for theories describing different phenomena are inconsistent. Structural properties of the invariance principle facilitate generating a new bias when an inconsistency is detected. After a new bias is generated. this principle facilitates reformulating the old, inconsistent theory by treating the latter as a limiting approximation. The structural properties of the invariance principle can be suitably generalized to other types of biases to enable primal-dual learning.

  13. Quantum Criticality in the Biased Dicke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanjie; Zhang, Guofeng; Fan, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The biased Dicke model describes a system of biased two-level atoms coupled to a bosonic field, and is expected to produce new phenomena that are not present in the original Dicke model. In this paper, we study the critical properties of the biased Dicke model in the classical oscillator limits. For the finite-biased case in this limit, We present analytical results demonstrating that the excitation energy does not vanish for arbitrary coupling. This indicates that the second order phase transition is avoided in the biased Dicke model, which contrasts to the original Dicke model. We also analyze the squeezing and the entanglement in the ground state, and find that a finite bias will strongly modify their behaviors in the vicinity of the critical coupling point. PMID:26786239

  14. Cognitive Biases and Nonverbal Cue Availability in Detecting Deception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Judee K.; Blair, J. Pete; Strom, Renee E.

    2008-01-01

    In potentially deceptive situations, people rely on mental shortcuts to help process information. These heuristic judgments are often biased and result in inaccurate assessments of sender veracity. Four such biases--truth bias, visual bias, demeanor bias, and expectancy violation bias--were examined in a judgment experiment that varied nonverbal…

  15. Coexpression of SFRP1 and WIF1 as a prognostic predictor of favorable outcomes in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiyong; Zhong, XiaoMing; Gao, Jun; Song, Rongfeng; Wu, Hongyu; Zi, Shuming; Yang, Shijie; Du, Peng; Cui, Long; Yang, Chun; Li, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal tumorigenesis is ascribed to the activity of Wnt signaling pathway in a ligand-independent manner mainly through APC and CTNNB1 gene mutations and in a ligand-dependent manner through low expression of Wnt inhibitors such as WNT inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) and secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1). In this study we found that WIF1 protein expression was increased and SFRP1 was decreased significantly in CRC tissue versus normal tissue, and high expression of WIF1 was associated with big tumor diameters and deep invasion, and loss of SFRP1 expression was associated with the left lesion site, deep invasion, and high TNM stage. Among the four expression patterns (WIF+/SFRP1+, WIF+/SFRP1-, WIF-/SFRP1+, and WIF-/SFRP1-) only coexpression of WIF1 and SFRP1 (WIF+/SFRP1+) was associated with favorable overall survival, together with low TNM stage, as an independent prognostic factor as shown in a multivariate survival model. The results indicated that WIF1 seemed to play an oncogenic role, while SFRP1 seemed to play an oncosuppressive role although both of them are secreted Wnt antagonists. Coexpression of SFRP1 and WIF1, rather than SFRP1 or WIF1 alone, could be used, together with low TNM stage, as a prognostic predictor of favorable outcomes in CRC. PMID:24949429

  16. Coexpression of SFRP1 and WIF1 as a Prognostic Predictor of Favorable Outcomes in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal tumorigenesis is ascribed to the activity of Wnt signaling pathway in a ligand-independent manner mainly through APC and CTNNB1 gene mutations and in a ligand-dependent manner through low expression of Wnt inhibitors such as WNT inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1 and secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1. In this study we found that WIF1 protein expression was increased and SFRP1 was decreased significantly in CRC tissue versus normal tissue, and high expression of WIF1 was associated with big tumor diameters and deep invasion, and loss of SFRP1 expression was associated with the left lesion site, deep invasion, and high TNM stage. Among the four expression patterns (WIF+/SFRP1+, WIF+/SFRP1−, WIF−/SFRP1+, and WIF−/SFRP1− only coexpression of WIF1 and SFRP1 (WIF+/SFRP1+ was associated with favorable overall survival, together with low TNM stage, as an independent prognostic factor as shown in a multivariate survival model. The results indicated that WIF1 seemed to play an oncogenic role, while SFRP1 seemed to play an oncosuppressive role although both of them are secreted Wnt antagonists. Coexpression of SFRP1 and WIF1, rather than SFRP1 or WIF1 alone, could be used, together with low TNM stage, as a prognostic predictor of favorable outcomes in CRC.

  17. Coexpression of SFRP1 and WIF1 as a Prognostic Predictor of Favorable Outcomes in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiyong; Zhong, XiaoMing; Gao, Jun; Song, Rongfeng; Wu, Hongyu; Zi, Shuming; Yang, Shijie; Du, Peng; Cui, Long; Yang, Chun; Li, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal tumorigenesis is ascribed to the activity of Wnt signaling pathway in a ligand-independent manner mainly through APC and CTNNB1 gene mutations and in a ligand-dependent manner through low expression of Wnt inhibitors such as WNT inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) and secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1). In this study we found that WIF1 protein expression was increased and SFRP1 was decreased significantly in CRC tissue versus normal tissue, and high expression of WIF1 was associated with big tumor diameters and deep invasion, and loss of SFRP1 expression was associated with the left lesion site, deep invasion, and high TNM stage. Among the four expression patterns (WIF+/SFRP1+, WIF+/SFRP1−, WIF−/SFRP1+, and WIF−/SFRP1−) only coexpression of WIF1 and SFRP1 (WIF+/SFRP1+) was associated with favorable overall survival, together with low TNM stage, as an independent prognostic factor as shown in a multivariate survival model. The results indicated that WIF1 seemed to play an oncogenic role, while SFRP1 seemed to play an oncosuppressive role although both of them are secreted Wnt antagonists. Coexpression of SFRP1 and WIF1, rather than SFRP1 or WIF1 alone, could be used, together with low TNM stage, as a prognostic predictor of favorable outcomes in CRC. PMID:24949429

  18. Publication Bias in Methodological Computational Research

    OpenAIRE

    Anne-Laure Boulesteix; Veronika Stierle; Alexander Hapfelmeier

    2015-01-01

    The problem of publication bias has long been discussed in research fields such as medicine. There is a consensus that publication bias is a reality and that solutions should be found to reduce it. In methodological computational research, including cancer informatics, publication bias may also be at work. The publication of negative research findings is certainly also a relevant issue, but has attracted very little attention to date. The present paper aims at providing a new formal framework...

  19. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficie...

  20. Exponential Growth Bias and Financial Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Almenberg, Johan; Gerdes, Christer

    2011-01-01

    The tendency to underestimate the future value of a variable growing at a constant rate, an example of exponential growth bias, has been linked to household financial decision making. We show that exponential growth bias and standard measures of financial literacy are negatively correlated in a representative sample of Swedish adults. Since financial literacy is linked to household decision making, our results indicate that examining the relationship between exponential growth bias and househ...

  1. Voter Confirmation Bias and Electoral Accountability

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the implications of an important cognitive bias in information processing, confirmation bias, in a political agency setting. In the baseline two-period case where only the politician’s actions are observable before the election, we show that when voters have this bias, it decreases pandering by the incumbent, and can raise voter welfare as a consequence. This result is robust in several directions, including to the case where the voter can also observe payoffs with some p...

  2. BUSINESS LEADERSHIP BIASES: ANDROCENTRISM, ETHNOCENTRISM AND CHRONOCENTRISM

    OpenAIRE

    SOFICA Aurelian; NEGRUTA Adina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to explore the unconscious biases that accompany the business leadership icons. The main objectives of the paper are: to look for evidence of leadership biases on ground of gender (androcentrism), ethnicity (ethnocentrism) and age (cronocentrism); to look for potential reasons behind the biases and for potential effects at the organizational and social level. The article confirms some of the evidence from various international empirical or theoretical studies, and prop...

  3. Childhood Obesity: Issues of Weight Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Washington, Reginald L.

    2011-01-01

    Although the effects of obesity on children's physical health are well documented, the social consequences of obesity are less well described and may not be addressed in intervention programs. Weight bias may take several forms. It may result in teasing and discrimination and may affect employment and educational opportunities. Health care providers may limit care of overweight or obese children. The media promote weight bias in multiple ways. Some parents are biased against their obese child...

  4. δ-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements on a number of δ-biased samples having different electrical and geometrical parameters.

  5. Weak coin flipping with small bias

    CERN Document Server

    Kerenidis, I; Kerenidis, Iordanis; Nayak, Ashwin

    2002-01-01

    This note presents a quantum protocol that demonstrates that_weak_ coin flipping with bias approximately 0.239, less than 1/4, is possible. A bias of 1/4 was the smallest known, and followed from the strong coin flipping protocol of [Ambainis 2001]. Protocols with yet smaller bias, approximately 0.207, have independently been discovered [Ambainis 2001, Spekkens and Rudolph 2002]. We also present an alternative strong coin flipping protocol with bias 1/4 with analysis simpler than that of [Ambainis 2001].

  6. Bias-correction in vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the properties of various methods for bias-correcting parameter estimates in both stationary and non-stationary vector autoregressive models. First, we show that two analytical bias formulas from the existing literature are in fact identical. Next, based on a detailed simulation study...... improvement over ordinary least squares. We pay special attention to the risk of pushing an otherwise stationary model into the non-stationary region of the parameter space when correcting for bias. Finally, we consider a recently proposed reduced-bias weighted least squares estimator, and we find that it...

  7. Goos-Hänchen-like shift in biased silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bang-Shan; Wang, Yu; Lou, Yi-Yi

    2016-04-01

    We have theoretically studied the Goos-Hänchen-like shift of spinor-unpolarized beams tunneling through various gate-biased silicene nanostructures. Following the stationary-phase method, lateral displacement in single-, dual-, and multiple-gated silicene systems has been systematically demonstrated. It is shown for simple single-gated silicene that lateral displacement can be generally enhanced by Fabry-Perot interference, and near the transition point turning on the evanescent mode a very large lateral shift could be observed. For the dual-gated structure, we have also shown the crucial role of localized modes like quantum well states in enhancing the beam lateral displacement, while for the multiple gate-biased systems the resulting superlattice subbands are also favorable for lateral displacement enhancement. Importantly, including the degeneracy-broken mechanisms such as gate-field and magnetic modulations, a fully spinor-resolved beam can be distinguished from the rest counterparts by aligning the incident beam with a proper spinor-resolved transition point, localized state, and subband, all of which can be flexibly modulated via electric means, offering the very desirable strategies to achieve the fully spinor-polarized beam for functional electronic applications.

  8. Social desirability bias in reporting of holiday season healthfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Byrd, Elizabeth S; Dominick, S R; Wolf, Christopher A; Acharya, Lalatendu

    2016-12-01

    Respondents participating in survey or interview based research often tend to give answers that put themselves in a favorable light, displaying social desirability bias (SDB). Understanding the susceptibility of individuals to underreport their perceived unhealthy holiday behaviors or over report holiday behaviors they perceive as healthy has important implications for health promotion and health policy surrounding the holiday season. This study examines SDB specific to the reporting of holiday food consumption and health-related behaviors. An online survey of 620 U.S. consumers was utilized to collect data in which SDB was accounted for via indirect questioning. The online survey was conducted by Purdue University from November 17-19, 2014. Up to 64% of respondents displayed SDB for the eight holiday health statements studied. Respondents over the age of 45 and without children more frequently displayed social desirability bias. Respondents who displayed SDB with respect to acceptable health related holiday food consumption behaviors may be more susceptible to social pressures surrounding other consumption decision making. Understanding SDB in health and behavior reporting, in particular for the traditionally challenging, in terms of health outcomes, holiday season is critical for health practitioners as they seek to promote healthy behaviors. PMID:27453811

  9. TIMP-3 expression associates with malignant behaviors and predicts favorable survival in HCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Gu

    Full Text Available The tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs are proteins that specifically inhibit the proteolytic activity of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. TIMP-3, the only member of the TIMPs that can tightly bind to the extracellular matrix, has been identified as a unique tumor suppressor that demonstrates the ability to inhibit tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. This study aimed to detect the expression of TIMP-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and investigate the association between TIMP-3 expression and its clinicopathological significance in HCC patients. In the current study, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blotting of HCC cell lines and one-step quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qPCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC analyses in HCC tissues were performed, to characterize the TIMP-3 expression. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses were utilized to evaluate the prognosis of 101 HCC patients. The results showed that the expression of TIMP-3 in HCC was significantly decreased relative to that of non-cancerous cells and tissues. Furthermore, the TIMP-3 expression was statistically associated with malignant behaviors of HCC, including portal vein invasion (p = 0.036 and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.030. Cox regression analysis revealed that TIMP-3 expression was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (p = 0.039 and overall survival (p = 0.049. These data indicate that TIMP-3 expression is a valuable prognostic biomarker for HCC and that TIMP-3 expression suggests a favorable prognosis for HCC patients.

  10. Measurement bias and multidimensionality; an illustration of bias detection in multidimensonal measurement models

    OpenAIRE

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.; Dolan, C. V.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted factor analysis can be used to investigate measurement bias. A prerequisite for the detection of measurement bias through factor analysis is the correct specification of the measurement model. We applied restricted factor analysis to two subtests of a Dutch cognitive ability test. These two examples serve to illustrate the relationship between multidimensionality and measurement bias. We conclude that measurement bias implies multidimensionality, whereas multidimensionality shows u...

  11. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  12. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Koshelet, V.;

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the...

  13. Production bias and cluster annihilation: Why necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Trinkaus, H.; Woo, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    the primary cluster density is high. Therefore, a sustained high swelling rate driven by production bias must involve the annihilation of primary clusters at sinks. A number of experimental observations which are unexplainable in terms of the conventional dislocation bias for monointerstitials is...

  14. A simple model for biased divertors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachambre, J.-L.; Quirion, B.; Gunn, J.; Boucher, C.; Stansfield, B.; Gauvreau, J.-L. [Centre canadien de fusion magnetique, 1804, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    Ionization near the target plate is shown to play an important role in biasing experiments. Our previous SOL model, which calculates the induced radial electric field, is found to be inadequate to treat the new divertor geometry of TdeV. When recycling is included via the measured D{sub {alpha}} emission near the plate, the upgraded model correctly reproduces all the observed electric currents and fields during biasing in the new divertor configuration. A simple divertor model using this calculated field has been developed to simulate the evolution of the divertor ion and neutral parameters under the action of neutralization plate biasing. Using a 1D adiabatic fluid model for the divertor ions, a 1D convective representation for the SOL neutrals and a 0D calculation for the plenum pressure, this divertor model satisfactorily simulates most of the TdeV biasing experiments at all biasing voltages and all toroidal field directions at low line-averaged densities. The weaker agreement at high densities is largely a consequence of the crudeness of the general divertor physics rather than of the deficiency of the biasing physics implemented in the model. The model is finally used to explain the polarity asymmetries observed in divertor efficiencies during biasing, and to demonstrate that no mechanism other than plate current saturation is required to interpret the saturation of toroidal rotation observed in the SOL at large biasing voltages of either polarity. (author)

  15. Understanding Implicit Bias: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The desire to ensure the best for children is precisely why educators should become aware of the concept of implicit bias: the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Operating outside of our conscious awareness, implicit biases are pervasive, and they can challenge even the most…

  16. Biases in Children's and Adults' Moral Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Nina L.; Derbyshire, Stuart W. G.; Guttentag, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined biases in children's (5/6- and 7/8-year-olds) and adults' moral judgments. Participants at all ages judged that it was worse to produce harm when harm occurred (a) through action rather than inaction (omission bias), (b) when physical contact with the victim was involved (physical contact principle), and (c) when the harm…

  17. Racially Biased Policing: Determinants of Citizen Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzer, Ronald; Tuch, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    The current controversy surrounding racial profiling in America has focused renewed attention on the larger issue of racial bias by the police. Yet little is known about the extent of police racial bias and even less about public perceptions of the problem. This article analyzes recent national survey data on citizens' views of and reported…

  18. How Many Hindsight Biases Are There?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Hartmut; Nestler, Steffen; von Collani, Gernot; Fischer, Volkhard

    2008-01-01

    The answer is three: questioning a conceptual default assumption in hindsight bias research, we argue that the hindsight bias is not a unitary phenomenon but consists of three separable and partially independent subphenomena or components, namely, memory distortions, impressions of foreseeability and impressions of necessity. Following a detailed…

  19. Attention bias modification: the Emperor's new suit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelkamp Paul MG

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A series of primarily laboratory-based studies found attention bias modification in socially anxious participants to lead to reduced anxiety. It is argued that the failure to replicate the positive results of attention bias modification in the study of Carlbring et al. may be due to reasons other than the application through the Internet. A number of controlled studies failed to replicate the positive effects of attention bias modification in clinically rather than subclinically socially anxious subjects. Given the lack of robust evidence for attention bias modification in clinically socially anxious individuals, the author is inclined to consider attention bias modification as 'the Emperor's new suit'. Results achieved with regular Internet-based treatments for social anxiety disorder based on cognitive therapy and exposure methods are much better than those achieved with attention bias modification procedures delivered 'face to face' in clinically distressed participants. Given the lack of robust evidence for attention bias modification in clinical samples, there is no need yet to investigate the implementation of attention bias modification through the Internet. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-244X/12/66

  20. EVIDENCE OF NATIONALISTIC BIAS IN MUAYTHAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony D. Myers

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available MuayThai is a combat sport with a growing international profile but limited research conducted into judging practices and processes. Problems with judging of other subjectively judged combat sports have caused controversy at major international tournaments that have resulted in changes to scoring methods. Nationalistic bias has been central to these problems and has been identified across a range of sports. The aim of this study was to examine nationalistic bias in MuayThai. Data were collected from the International Federation of MuayThai Amateur (IFMA World Championships held in Almaty, Kazakhstan September 2003 and comprised of tournament results from 70 A-class MuayThai bouts each judged by between five and nine judges. Bouts examined featured 62 competitors from 21 countries and 25 judges from 11 countries. Results suggested that nationalistic bias was evident. The bias observed equated to approximately one round difference between opposing judges over the course of a bout (a mean of 1.09 (SE=0.50 points difference between judges with opposing affilations. The number of neutral judges used meant that this level of bias generally did not influence the outcome of bouts. Future research should explore other ingroup biases, such as nearest neighbour bias and political bias as well as investigating the feasibility adopting an electronic scoring system

  1. A biased ligand for OXE-R uncouples Gα and Gβγ signaling within a heterotrimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blättermann, Stefanie; Peters, Lucas; Ottersbach, Philipp Aaron;

    2012-01-01

    Differential targeting of heterotrimeric G protein versus β-arrestin signaling are emerging concepts in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research and drug discovery, and biased engagement by GPCR ligands of either β-arrestin or G protein pathways has been disclosed. Herein we report on a new mec...

  2. Galaxy Bias in Quintessence Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    Basilakos, S

    2003-01-01

    We derive the evolution of the linear bias factor, $b(z)$, in cosmological models driven by an exotic fluid with an equation of state: $p_{x}=w\\rho_{x}$, where $-1\\le w<0$ (quintessence). Our aim is to put constrains on different cosmological and biasing models by combining the recent observational clustering results of optical ({\\em 2dF}) galaxies (Hawkings et al.) with those predicted by the models. We find that our bias model when fitted to the {\\em 2dF} clustering results predicts different bias evolution for different values of $w$. The models that provide the weak biasing ($b_{\\circ} \\sim 1.1$) of optical galaxies found in many recent observational studies are flat, $\\Omega_{\\rm m}=0.3$ with $w\\le -0.9$. These models however, predict a weak redshift evolution of $b(z)$, not corroborated by N-body simulations.

  3. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  4. Implicit Social Biases in People With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Elina; Stanley, Damian; Nair, Remya; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    Implicit social biases are ubiquitous and are known to influence social behavior. A core diagnostic criterion of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is abnormal social behavior. We investigated the extent to which individuals with ASD might show a specific attenuation of implicit social biases, using Implicit Association Tests (IATs) involving social (gender, race) and nonsocial (nature, shoes) categories. High-functioning adults with ASD showed intact but reduced IAT effects relative to healthy control participants. We observed no selective attenuation of implicit social (vs. nonsocial) biases in our ASD population. To extend these results, we supplemented our healthy control data with data collected from a large online sample from the general population and explored correlations between autistic traits and IAT effects. We observed no systematic relationship between autistic traits and implicit social biases in our online and control samples. Taken together, these results suggest that implicit social biases, as measured by the IAT, are largely intact in ASD. PMID:26386014

  5. Geothermal Favorability Map Derived From Logistic Regression Models of the Western United States (favorabilitysurface.zip)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a surface showing relative favorability for the presence of geothermal systems in the western United States. It is an average of 12 models that correlates...

  6. Integrated Theoretical Framework for a Homeowner's Decision in Favor of an Innovative Residential Heating System

    OpenAIRE

    Michelsen , Carl Christian; Madlener, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Insight into the homeowner’s adoption decisions in favor of a specific innovative residential heating system (RHS) helps us to understand and assess the dynamics of the adoption and diffusion of such technological systems as a “social” phenomenon. This phenomenon emerges from the individual decisions of a set of heterogeneous actors on the market. In our research, we develop an integrated theoretical framework for assessing a homeowner’s adoption decision in favor of a specific innovative RHS...

  7. Uranium favorability of late Eocene through Pliocene rocks of the South Texas Coastal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, J.V.; Thomas, N.G.; Brogdon, L.D.; Jones, C.A.; Martin, T.S.

    1977-02-01

    The results of a subsurface uranium favorability study of Tertiary rocks (late Eocene through Pliocene) in the Coastal Plain of South Texas are given. In ascending order, these rock units include the Yegua Formation, Jackson Group, Frio Clay, Catahoula Tuff, Oakville Sandstone, and Goliad Sand. The Vicksburg Group, Anahuac Formation, and Fleming Formation were not considered because they have unfavorable lithologies. The Yegua Formation, Jackson Group, Frio Clay, Catahoula Tuff, Oakville Sandstone, and Goliad Sand contain sandstones that may be favorable uranium hosts under certain environmental and structural conditions. All except the Yegua are known to contain ore-grade uranium deposits. Yegua and Jackson sandstones are found in strand plain-barrier bar systems that are aligned parallel to depositional and structural strike. These sands grade into shelf muds on the east, and lagoonal sediments updip toward the west. The lagoonal sediments in the Jackson are interrupted by dip-aligned fluvial systems. In both units, favorable areas are found in the lagoonal sands and in sands on the updip side of the strand-plain system. Favorable areas are also found along the margins of fluvial systems in the Jackson. The Frio and Catahoula consist of extensive alluvial-plain deposits. Favorable areas for uranium deposits are found along the margins of the paleo-channels where favorable structural features and numerous optimum sands are present. The Oakville and Goliad Formations consist of extensive continental deposits of fluvial sandstones. In large areas, these fluvial sandstones are multistoried channel sandstones that form very thick sandstone sequences. Favorable areas are found along the margins of the channel sequences. In the Goliad, favorable areas are also found on the updip margin of strand-plain sandstones where there are several sandstones of optimum thickness.

  8. Immortal Time Bias: A Frequently Unrecognized Threat to Validity in the Evaluation of Postoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of immortal time bias on observational cohort studies of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) and the effectiveness of sequential landmark analysis to account for this bias. Methods and Materials: First, we reviewed previous studies of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to determine how frequently this bias was considered. Second, we used SEER to select three tumor types (glioblastoma multiforme, Stage IA–IVM0 gastric adenocarcinoma, and Stage II–III rectal carcinoma) for which prospective trials demonstrated an improvement in survival associated with PORT. For each tumor type, we calculated conditional survivals and adjusted hazard ratios of PORT vs. postoperative observation cohorts while restricting the sample at sequential monthly landmarks. Results: Sixty-two percent of previous SEER publications evaluating PORT failed to use a landmark analysis. As expected, delivery of PORT for all three tumor types was associated with improved survival, with the largest associated benefit favoring PORT when all patients were included regardless of survival. Preselecting a cohort with a longer minimum survival sequentially diminished the apparent benefit of PORT. Conclusions: Although the majority of previous SEER articles do not correct for it, immortal time bias leads to altered estimates of PORT effectiveness, which are very sensitive to landmark selection. We suggest the routine use of sequential landmark analysis to account for this bias.

  9. Statistical framework for estimating GNSS bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, Juha; Coster, Anthea J.; Rideout, William C.; Erickson, Philip J.; Norberg, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) non-ionospheric differential time delay bias. The biases are estimated by examining differences of measured line-integrated electron densities (total electron content: TEC) that are scaled to equivalent vertical integrated densities. The spatiotemporal variability, instrumentation-dependent errors, and errors due to inaccurate ionospheric altitude profile assumptions are modeled as structure functions. These structure functions determine how the TEC differences are weighted in the linear least-squares minimization procedure, which is used to produce the bias estimates. A method for automatic detection and removal of outlier measurements that do not fit into a model of receiver bias is also described. The same statistical framework can be used for a single receiver station, but it also scales to a large global network of receivers. In addition to the Global Positioning System (GPS), the method is also applicable to other dual-frequency GNSS systems, such as GLONASS (Globalnaya Navigazionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema). The use of the framework is demonstrated in practice through several examples. A specific implementation of the methods presented here is used to compute GPS receiver biases for measurements in the MIT Haystack Madrigal distributed database system. Results of the new algorithm are compared with the current MIT Haystack Observatory MAPGPS (MIT Automated Processing of GPS) bias determination algorithm. The new method is found to produce estimates of receiver bias that have reduced day-to-day variability and more consistent coincident vertical TEC values.

  10. Do patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease present an own-age bias in face recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolon, Catherine; Louche, Aurore; Gély-Nargeot, Marie-Christine; Raffard, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Face perception depends both on the face and on the individual who perceives it. Some factors such as gender, ethnicity or age may influence face perception processing. For instance, recognition memory for faces of one's own age group is often superior to memory for other-age group faces. This bias is known as the Own-Age-Bias (OAB). OAB has been extensively studied in healthy subjects. However, to our knowledge, no article has been published on elder adults suffering from Alzheimer Disease (AD). Therefore, the present research aimed at studying the OAB in patients with AD in comparison with healthy old adults and healthy young adults. Sixty participants were included: 20 young adults, 20 healthy old adults, and 20 elder patients who met NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable AD. Participants performed an age estimation task followed by a face recognition task. Indeed, for each photograph, subjects were asked to say if the face looked young or old and to give a yes/no judgment of familiarity (after an encoding phase). Participants also completed a questionnaire assessing their frequency of contact with young and old adults. Although estimates of sensitivity indicated no age bias in AD patients, when memory bias was corrected according to their performance we found evidence in favor of an OAB in this group. Both healthy groups presented an OAB, in particular when the corrected memory bias was considered. However, no significant correlations were found between their frequency of contact with young/older people and the number of correctly identified faces, false alarms, sensitivity and corrected memory bias. Therefore, although AD patients present a deficit in face-memory, they still present memory bias towards same-age group faces when their difficulties in face memory are controlled. PMID:26176647

  11. Hotspots of biased nucleotide substitutions in human genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Berglund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes that have experienced accelerated evolutionary rates on the human lineage during recent evolution are candidates for involvement in human-specific adaptations. To determine the forces that cause increased evolutionary rates in certain genes, we analyzed alignments of 10,238 human genes to their orthologues in chimpanzee and macaque. Using a likelihood ratio test, we identified protein-coding sequences with an accelerated rate of base substitutions along the human lineage. Exons evolving at a fast rate in humans have a significant tendency to contain clusters of AT-to-GC (weak-to-strong biased substitutions. This pattern is also observed in noncoding sequence flanking rapidly evolving exons. Accelerated exons occur in regions with elevated male recombination rates and exhibit an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the genomic average. We next analyzed genes with significantly elevated ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous rates of base substitution (dN/dS along the human lineage, and those with an excess of amino acid replacement substitutions relative to human polymorphism. These genes also show evidence of clusters of weak-to-strong biased substitutions. These findings indicate that a recombination-associated process, such as biased gene conversion (BGC, is driving fixation of GC alleles in the human genome. This process can lead to accelerated evolution in coding sequences and excess amino acid replacement substitutions, thereby generating significant results for tests of positive selection.

  12. Forecast Bias Correction: A Second Order Method

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The difference between a model forecast and actual observations is called forecast bias. This bias is due to either incomplete model assumptions and/or poorly known parameter values and initial/boundary conditions. In this paper we discuss a method for estimating corrections to parameters and initial conditions that would account for the forecast bias. A set of simple experiments with the logistic ordinary differential equation is performed using an iterative version of a first order version of our method to compare with the second order version of the method.

  13. Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Rose Skaksen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally l...... information aboutfuture labour requirements, as the relative importance of these industries must be expectedto grow, thereby reinforcing the shift in demand for skilled labour.JEL Classification: J24, J31, L6Keywords: skill-biased technological change, Danish industries...

  14. Inter- and intraspecific variation in Drosophila genes with sex-biased expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lena; Grath, Sonja; von Heckel, Korbinian; Parsch, John

    2012-01-01

    Genes with sexually dimorphic expression (sex-biased genes) often evolve rapidly and are thought to make an important contribution to reproductive isolation between species. We examined the molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in Drosophila melanogaster and D. ananassae, which represent two independent lineages within the melanogaster group. We find that strong purifying selection limits protein sequence variation within species, but that a considerable fraction of divergence between species can be attributed to positive selection. In D. melanogaster, the proportion of adaptive substitutions between species is greatest for male-biased genes and is especially high for those on the X chromosome. In contrast, male-biased genes do not show unusually high variation within or between populations. A similar pattern is seen at the level of gene expression, where sex-biased genes show high expression divergence between species, but low divergence between populations. In D. ananassae, there is no increased rate of adaptation of male-biased genes, suggesting that the type or strength of selection acting on sex-biased genes differs between lineages. PMID:22315698

  15. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T N; Gregory, Karen J; Tosh, Dilip K; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A; May, Lauren T

    2016-07-01

    Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias "fingerprints" for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N(6) or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. PMID:27136943

  16. Persistency of priors-induced bias in decision behavior and the fMRI signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KathleenHansen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that people take advantage of prior knowledge to bias decisions. To investigate this phenomenon behaviorally and in the brain, we acquired fMRI data while human subjects viewed ambiguous abstract shapes and decided whether a shape was of Category A (smoother or B (bumpier. The decision was made in the context of one of two prior knowledge cues, 80/20 and 50/50. The 80/20 cue indicated that upcoming shapes had an 80% probability of being of one category, e.g. B, and a 20% probability of being of the other. The 50/50 cue indicated that upcoming shapes had an equal probability of being of either category. The ideal observer would bias decisions in favor of the indicated alternative at 80/20 and show zero bias at 50/50. We found that subjects did bias their decisions in the predicted direction at 80/20 but did not show zero bias at 50/50. Instead, at 50/50 the subjects retained biases of the same sign as their 80/20 biases, though of diminished magnitude. The signature of a persistent though diminished bias at 50/50 was also evident in fMRI data from frontal and parietal regions previously implicated in decision-making. As a control, we acquired fMRI data from naïve subjects who experienced only the 50/50 stimulus distributions during both the prescan training and the fMRI experiment. The behavioral and fMRI data from the naïve subjects reflected decision biases closer to those of the ideal observer than those of the prior knowledge subjects at 50/50. The results indicate that practice making decisions in the context of non-equal prior probabilities biases decisions made later when prior probabilities are equal. This finding may be related to the “anchoring and adjustment” strategy described in the psychology, economics and marketing literatures, in which subjects adjust a first approximation response – the “anchor” – based on additional information, typically applying insufficient adjustment relative to the ideal

  17. A Bias in the Diagnosis of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reade, William Kent; Wertheimer, Michael

    1976-01-01

    Research shows a relationship between diagnoses of schizophrenia among twins. It was studied whether information that a twin was schizophrenic would bias diagnoses. Such information almost doubled the rater's estimates of probability of schizophrenia in a hypothetical case history. (NG)

  18. Gender bias in the force concept inventory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, R. D.; Pearson, R. H.; Semak, M. R.; Willis, C. W.

    2012-02-01

    Could the well-established fact that males tend to score higher than females on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) be due to gender bias in the questions? The eventual answer to the question hinges on the definition of bias. We assert that a question is biased only if a factor other than ability (in this case gender) affects the likelihood that a student will answer the question correctly. The statistical technique of differential item functioning allows us to control for ability in our analysis of student performance on each of the thirty FCI questions. This method uses the total score on the FCI as the measure of ability. We conclude that the evidence for gender bias in the FCI questions is marginal at best.

  19. Galaxy Bias and Primordial Non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Assassi, Valentin; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of galaxy biasing in the presence of primordial non-Gaussianity. For a large class of non-Gaussian initial conditions, we define a general bias expansion and prove that it is closed under renormalization, thereby showing that the basis of operators in the expansion is complete. We then study the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the statistics of galaxies. We show that the equivalence principle enforces a relation between the scale-dependent bias in the galaxy power spectrum and that in the dipolar part of the bispectrum. This provides a powerful consistency check to confirm the primordial origin of any observed scale-dependent bias. Finally, we also discuss the imprints of anisotropic non-Gaussianity as motivated by recent studies of higher-spin fields during inflation.

  20. Galaxy bias and primordial non-Gaussianity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    We present a systematic study of galaxy biasing in the presence of primordial non-Gaussianity. For a large class of non-Gaussian initial conditions, we define a general bias expansion and prove that it is closed under renormalization, thereby showing that the basis of operators in the expansion is complete. We then study the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the statistics of galaxies. We show that the equivalence principle enforces a relation between the scale-dependent bias in the galaxy power spectrum and that in the dipolar part of the bispectrum. This provides a powerful consistency check to confirm the primordial origin of any observed scale-dependent bias. Finally, we also discuss the imprints of anisotropic non-Gaussianity as motivated by recent studies of higher-spin fields during inflation.

  1. Statistical framework for estimating GNSS bias

    CERN Document Server

    Vierinen, Juha; Rideout, William C; Erickson, Philip J; Norberg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) non-ionospheric differential time delay bias. The biases are estimated by examining differences of measured line integrated electron densities (TEC) that are scaled to equivalent vertical integrated densities. The spatio-temporal variability, instrumentation dependent errors, and errors due to inaccurate ionospheric altitude profile assumptions are modeled as structure functions. These structure functions determine how the TEC differences are weighted in the linear least-squares minimization procedure, which is used to produce the bias estimates. A method for automatic detection and removal of outlier measurements that do not fit into a model of receiver bias is also described. The same statistical framework can be used for a single receiver station, but it also scales to a large global network of receivers. In addition to the Global Positioning System (GPS), the method is also applicable to other dual frequency GNSS s...

  2. Future research in weight bias: What next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberga, Angela S; Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; von Ranson, Kristin M; McLaren, Lindsay; Ramos Salas, Ximena; Sharma, Arya M

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 Canadian Weight Bias Summit disseminated the newest research advances and brought together 40 experts, stakeholders, and policy makers in various disciplines in health, education, and public policy to identify future research directions in weight bias. In this paper we aim to share the results of the Summit as well as encourage international and interdisciplinary research collaborations in weight bias reduction. Consensus emerged on six research areas that warrant further investigation in weight bias: costs, causes, measurement, qualitative research and lived experience, interventions, and learning from other models of discrimination. These discussions highlighted three key lessons that were informed by the Summit, namely: language matters, the voices of people living with obesity should be incorporated, and interdisciplinary stakeholders should be included. PMID:27129601

  3. Bootstrap bias-adjusted GMM estimators

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalho, Joaquim J.S.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of six alternative bootstrap methods to reduce the bias of GMM parameter estimates is examined in an instrumental variable framework using Monte Carlo analysis. Promising results were found for the two bootstrap estimators suggested in the paper.

  4. Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias Wh...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias When Using Medicare Prescription Drug Data Unobservable exposure time is common among Medicare Part D beneficiaries,...

  5. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  6. Arbitrary protein−protein docking targets biologically relevant interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Juliette

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein recognition is of fundamental importance in the vast majority of biological processes. However, it has already been demonstrated that it is very hard to distinguish true complexes from false complexes in so-called cross-docking experiments, where binary protein complexes are separated and the isolated proteins are all docked against each other and scored. Does this result, at least in part, reflect a physical reality? False complexes could reflect possible nonspecific or weak associations. Results In this paper, we investigate the twilight zone of protein-protein interactions, building on an interesting outcome of cross-docking experiments: false complexes seem to favor residues from the true interaction site, suggesting that randomly chosen partners dock in a non-random fashion on protein surfaces. Here, we carry out arbitrary docking of a non-redundant data set of 198 proteins, with more than 300 randomly chosen "probe" proteins. We investigate the tendency of arbitrary partners to aggregate at localized regions of the protein surfaces, the shape and compositional bias of the generated interfaces, and the potential of this property to predict biologically relevant binding sites. We show that the non-random localization of arbitrary partners after protein-protein docking is a generic feature of protein structures. The interfaces generated in this way are not systematically planar or curved, but tend to be closer than average to the center of the proteins. These results can be used to predict biological interfaces with an AUC value up to 0.69 alone, and 0.72 when used in combination with evolutionary information. An appropriate choice of random partners and number of docking models make this method computationally practical. It is also noted that nonspecific interfaces can point to alternate interaction sites in the case of proteins with multiple interfaces. We illustrate the usefulness of arbitrary docking

  7. Arbitrary protein−protein docking targets biologically relevant interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein-protein recognition is of fundamental importance in the vast majority of biological processes. However, it has already been demonstrated that it is very hard to distinguish true complexes from false complexes in so-called cross-docking experiments, where binary protein complexes are separated and the isolated proteins are all docked against each other and scored. Does this result, at least in part, reflect a physical reality? False complexes could reflect possible nonspecific or weak associations. In this paper, we investigate the twilight zone of protein-protein interactions, building on an interesting outcome of cross-docking experiments: false complexes seem to favor residues from the true interaction site, suggesting that randomly chosen partners dock in a non-random fashion on protein surfaces. Here, we carry out arbitrary docking of a non-redundant data set of 198 proteins, with more than 300 randomly chosen "probe" proteins. We investigate the tendency of arbitrary partners to aggregate at localized regions of the protein surfaces, the shape and compositional bias of the generated interfaces, and the potential of this property to predict biologically relevant binding sites. We show that the non-random localization of arbitrary partners after protein-protein docking is a generic feature of protein structures. The interfaces generated in this way are not systematically planar or curved, but tend to be closer than average to the center of the proteins. These results can be used to predict biological interfaces with an AUC value up to 0.69 alone, and 0.72 when used in combination with evolutionary information. An appropriate choice of random partners and number of docking models make this method computationally practical. It is also noted that nonspecific interfaces can point to alternate interaction sites in the case of proteins with multiple interfaces. We illustrate the usefulness of arbitrary docking using PEBP (Phosphatidylethanolamine binding

  8. Energy Biased Technical Change: A CGE Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Löschel, Andreas; Otto, Vincent M.; Rob B. Dellink

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies energy bias in technical change. For this purpose, we develop a computable general equilibrium model that builds on endogenous growth models. The model explicitly captures links between energy, the rate and direction of technical change, and the economy. We derive the equilibrium determinants of biased technical change and show the importance of feedback in technical change, substitution possibilities between final goods, and general-equilibrium effects for the equilibrium ...

  9. Constraints on Assembly Bias from Galaxy Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Zentner, Andrew R.; Hearin, Andrew; Bosch, Frank C. van den; Lange, Johannes U.; Villarreal, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the newly-introduced decorated Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model using SDSS DR7 measurements of projected galaxy clustering or r-band luminosity threshold samples. The decorated HOD is a model for the galaxy-halo connection that augments the HOD by allowing for the possibility of galaxy assembly bias: galaxy luminosity may be correlated with dark matter halo properties besides mass, Mvir. We demonstrate that it is not possible to rule out galaxy assembly bias using DR7 mea...

  10. Spending Biased Legislators - Discipline Through Disagreement

    OpenAIRE

    Facundo Piguillem; Alessandro Riboni

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies politicians who have a present-bias for spending; they want to increase current spending and procrastinate spending cuts. We argue that legislators' bias is more severe in economies with low institutional quality. We show that disagreement in legislatures leads to policy persistence and that this attenuates the temptation to overspend. Depending on the environment, legislators' decisions to be fiscally responsible may either complement or substitute other legislator's decis...

  11. Bias, Misinformation and the Paradox of Neutrality

    OpenAIRE

    Bednar, Peter; Welch, Christine

    2008-01-01

    What is normally described as bias? A possible definition comprises attempts to distort or mislead to achieve a certain perspective, i.e. subjective descriptions intended to mislead. If designers were able to exclude bias from informing systems, then this would maximize their effectiveness. This implicit conjecture appears to underpin much of the research in our field. However, in our efforts to support the evolution and design of informing systems, the way we think, communicate and conceptua...

  12. Clustering coefficient without degree correlations biases

    OpenAIRE

    Soffer, Sara Nadiv; Vazquez, Alexei

    2004-01-01

    The clustering coefficient quantifies how well connected are the neighbors of a vertex in a graph. In real networks it decreases with the vertex degree, which has been taken as a signature of the network hierarchical structure. Here we show that this signature of hierarchical structure is a consequence of degree correlation biases in the clustering coefficient definition. We introduce a new definition in which the degree correlation biases are filtered out, and provide evidence that in real n...

  13. The Local Bias of Individual Investors

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Zhu

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates individual investors' bias towards nearby companies. Using data from a large U.S. discount brokerage, we find that individual investors tend to invest in companies closer to them relative to the market portfolio. Unlike Coval and Moskowitz's (1999) findings on institutional investors, however, we find that advantageous information cannot explain individual investors' local bias. Accounting numbers and information asymmetry matter less to individual investors' local bia...

  14. Biased liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard;

    2008-01-01

    We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure.......We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure....

  15. Resolving Bias in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, James; Horstwood, Matthew; Gehrels, George

    2013-06-01

    Increasingly, scientific investigations requiring geochronology utilize laser ablation (LA)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), taking advantage of the efficiency and throughput possible for uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating. A number of biases exist when comparing data among laboratories and an ongoing community-based effort is working to resolve and eliminate these biases to improve the accuracy of scientific interpretation based on these data.

  16. Invited Commentary: Causal Diagrams and Measurement Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Hernán, Miguel A.; Cole, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Causal inferences about the effect of an exposure on an outcome may be biased by errors in the measurement of either the exposure or the outcome. Measurement errors of exposure and outcome can be classified into 4 types: independent nondifferential, dependent nondifferential, independent differential, and dependent differential. Here the authors describe how causal diagrams can be used to represent these 4 types of measurement bias and discuss some problems that arise when using measured expo...

  17. Local Bias and Stock Market Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Giannetti, Mariassunta; Laeven, Luc

    2012-01-01

    We show that the local bias in U.S. mutual fund portfolios varies significantly over time and is more pronounced at times of heightened market uncertainty, such as during financial crises. Similarly, the local bias is less pronounced in periods when market sentiment is strong. These results do not depend on past fund performance or fund inflows during good times. Additionally, we do not find that fund managers earn superior returns on local stocks during periods of heightened market uncertain...

  18. Time Series Properties of Expectation Biases

    OpenAIRE

    Kinari, Yusuke

    2011-01-01

    This study exammes time senes properties of expectation biases usmg a highfrequency survey on stock price forecasts, which required participants to forecast the Nikkei 225 over three forecasting horizons: one day, one week, and one month ahead. Constructing proxies for overconfidence and optimism as the expectation biases, this study shows that overconfidence is likely to remain stable over time while optimism is not. Moreover, a relationship exists between optimism and stock price movement, ...

  19. Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content

  20. La Cautela Socini como salvaguarda del patrimonio familiar en favor del cónyuge viudo.

    OpenAIRE

    García Palicio, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    El presente trabajo se encuentra dividido en cuatro bloques a través el lector podrá ver el funcionamiento de la Cautela Socini respecto al usufructo universal en favor del cónyuge viudo y los derechos de los herederos forzosos del causante. En un primer bloque, encontramos un estudio de los derechos legitimarios que le son reconocidos al cónyuge viudo en el Código Civil, continuando con un segundo bloque en el que se realiza un análisis de la figura del usufructo universal en favor del cónyu...

  1. Engineered Rhizosphere: the Trophic Bias Generated by Opine-Producing Plants Is Independent of the Opine Type, the Soil Origin, and the Plant Species

    OpenAIRE

    Mansouri, Hounayda; Petit, Annik; Oger, Phil; Dessaux, Yves

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that transgenic Lotus plants producing opines (which are small amino acid and sugar conjugates) specifically favor growth of opine-degrading rhizobacteria. The opine-induced bias was repeated and demonstrated with another soil type and another plant species (Solanum nigrum). This phenomenon is therefore independent of both soil type and plant species.

  2. Evolution of Protein Lipograms: A Bioinformatics Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B., III; Dhurjati, Prasad

    2006-01-01

    A protein lacking one of the 20 common amino acids is a protein lipogram. This open-ended problem-based learning assignment deals with the evolution of proteins with biased amino acid composition. It has students query protein and metabolic databases to test the hypothesis that natural selection has reduced the frequency of each amino acid…

  3. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Maria Felisberti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174. An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2. Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3. Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  4. Predicting Carriers of Ongoing Selective Sweeps without Knowledge of the Favored Allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakov, Shay; Rosenberg, Noah A.; Bafna, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Methods for detecting the genomic signatures of natural selection have been heavily studied, and they have been successful in identifying many selective sweeps. For most of these sweeps, the favored allele remains unknown, making it difficult to distinguish carriers of the sweep from non-carriers. In an ongoing selective sweep, carriers of the favored allele are likely to contain a future most recent common ancestor. Therefore, identifying them may prove useful in predicting the evolutionary trajectory—for example, in contexts involving drug-resistant pathogen strains or cancer subclones. The main contribution of this paper is the development and analysis of a new statistic, the Haplotype Allele Frequency (HAF) score. The HAF score, assigned to individual haplotypes in a sample, naturally captures many of the properties shared by haplotypes carrying a favored allele. We provide a theoretical framework for computing expected HAF scores under different evolutionary scenarios, and we validate the theoretical predictions with simulations. As an application of HAF score computations, we develop an algorithm (PreCIOSS: Predicting Carriers of Ongoing Selective Sweeps) to identify carriers of the favored allele in selective sweeps, and we demonstrate its power on simulations of both hard and soft sweeps, as well as on data from well-known sweeps in human populations. PMID:26402243

  5. The Changing Format of Reference Collections: Are Research Libraries Favoring Electronic Access over Print?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Sarah; McCain, Cheryl; Scrivener, Laurie

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the holdings of ARL libraries for core reference titles to see if there is a trend towards canceling the print in favor of electronic, and discusses the implications of duplication of titles in both formats. It also looks at the issue within the context of several areas of study including general reference, arts and humanities,…

  6. Uranium favorability of the San Rafael Swell area, east-central Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The San Rafael Swell project area in east-central Utah is approximately 3,000 sq mi and includes the San Rafael Swell anticline and the northern part of the Waterpocket Fold monocline at Capitol Reef. Rocks in the area are predominantly sedimentary rocks of Pennsylvanian through Cretaceous age. Important deposits of uranium in the project area are restricted to two formations, the Chinle (Triassic) and Morrison (Jurassic) Formations. A third formation, the White Rim Sandstone (Permian), was also studied because of reported exploration activity. The White Rim Sandstone is considered generally unfavorable on the basis of lithologic characteristics, distance from a possible source of uranium, lack of apparent mineralization, and the scarcity of anomalies on gamma-ray logs or in rock, water, and stream-sediment samples. The lower Chinle from the Moss Back Member down to the base of the formation is favorable because it is a known producer. New areas for exploration are all subsurface. Both Salt Wash and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation are favorable. The Salt Wash Member is favorable because it is a known producer. The Brushy Basin Member is favorable as a low-grade resource

  7. Biofilm Mode of Growth of Streptococcus intermedius Favored by a Competence-Stimulating Signaling Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Fernanda C; Pecharki, Daniele; Scheie, Anne A.

    2004-01-01

    Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate population behavior. In several streptococci, quorum sensing mediated by competence-stimulating peptides (CSP) is associated with development of competence for transformation. We show here that a synthetic CSP favored the biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius without affecting the rate of culture growth.

  8. Pathogen prevalence, group bias, and collectivism in the standard cross-cultural sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashdan, Elizabeth; Steele, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    It has been argued that people in areas with high pathogen loads will be more likely to avoid outsiders, to be biased in favor of in-groups, and to hold collectivist and conformist values. Cross-national studies have supported these predictions. In this paper we provide new pathogen codes for the 186 cultures of the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample and use them, together with existing pathogen and ethnographic data, to try to replicate these cross-national findings. In support of the theory, we found that cultures in high pathogen areas were more likely to socialize children toward collectivist values (obedience rather than self-reliance). There was some evidence that pathogens were associated with reduced adult dispersal. However, we found no evidence of an association between pathogens and our measures of group bias (in-group loyalty and xenophobia) or intergroup contact. PMID:23389437

  9. An Empirical Test of Rejection- and Anger-Related Interpretation Bias in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; McNally, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    The authors tested whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by interpretation bias for disambiguating stimuli in favor of threatening interpretations, especially concerning abuse, abandonment, rejection, and anger-core emotional triggers for BPD patients. A mixed sample of 106 patients with marked BPD traits and nonpatients were assessed with SCID I and II and were presented with vignettes depicting ambiguous social interactions. Interpretations of these vignettes were assessed both in a closed and an open answer format. Results showed that BPD traits were related to a rejection- (closed and open answer formats) and an anger-related interpretation bias (closed answer option only). Cluster C traits were associated with self-blame interpretations. Aside from further validating the cognitive model of BPD, these findings denote interpretation bias as a key feature in patients with BPD that might contribute to their emotional hyperreactivity and interpersonal problems. These findings also highlight the importance of therapeutically normalizing interpretative bias in BPD and cluster C patients. PMID:25893553

  10. The large-scale bias of the hard X-ray background

    OpenAIRE

    Boughn, S.; Crittenden, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Recent deep X-ray surveys combined with spectroscopic identification of the sources have allowed the determination of the rest-frame 2-8 keV luminosity as a function of redshift. In addition, an analysis of the HEAO1 A2 2-10 keV full-sky map of the X-ray background (XRB) reveals clustering on the scale of several degrees. Combining these two results in the context of the currently favored Lambda-CDM cosmological model implies an average X-ray bias factor, b_x, of b_x^2 = 1.12 +- 0.33, i.e., b...

  11. Debt Bias in Corporate Taxation and the Costs of Banking Crises in the EU

    OpenAIRE

    Langedijk, Sven; Nicodeme, Gaetan; Pagano, Andrea; Rossi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    During the period 2008-2012, EU governments incurred substantial costs bailing out banks. As corporate income taxation (CIT) in most countries still favors debt- over equity financing, reducing or eliminating this debt bias would complement regulatory reforms reducing costs of financial crises. To estimate this effect, we use a two-step approach. First, using panel regressions on a dataset of 32,833 bank-year observations we find sizable long-run effects of CIT on leverage in the EU. Secon...

  12. Biased diffusion in tubes of alternating diameter: Numerical study over a wide range of biasing force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A. [Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 29, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20819 (United States); Antipov, Anatoly E. [Faculty of Fundamental Physics and Chemical Engineering, Moscow State University, GSP-1, 1-51 Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Zitserman, Vladimir Yu. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bldg. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-07

    This paper is devoted to particle transport in a tube formed by alternating wide and narrow sections, in the presence of an external biasing force. The focus is on the effective transport coefficients—mobility and diffusivity, as functions of the biasing force and the geometric parameters of the tube. Dependences of the effective mobility and diffusivity on the tube geometric parameters are known in the limiting cases of no bias and strong bias. The approximations used to obtain these results are inapplicable at intermediate values of the biasing force. To bridge the two limits Brownian dynamics simulations were run to determine the transport coefficients at intermediate values of the force. The simulations were performed for a representative set of tube geometries over a wide range of the biasing force. They revealed that there is a range of the narrow section length, where the force dependence of the mobility has a maximum. In contrast, the diffusivity is a monotonically increasing function of the force. A simple formula is proposed, which reduces to the known dependences of the diffusivity on the tube geometric parameters in both limits of zero and strong bias. At intermediate values of the biasing force, the formula catches the diffusivity dependence on the narrow section length, if the radius of these sections is not too small.

  13. Thinking in Black and White: Conscious thought increases racially biased judgments through biased face memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strick, M.A.; Stoeckart, P.F.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    It is a common research finding that conscious thought helps people to avoid racial discrimination. These three experiments, however, illustrate that conscious thought may increase biased face memory, which leads to increased judgment bias (i.e., preferring White to Black individuals). In Experiment

  14. Placebo effect studies are susceptible to response bias and to other types of biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin G

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of placebo are often challenging to conduct and interpret. The history of placebo shows that assessment of its clinical significance has a real potential to be biased. We analyze and discuss typical types of bias in studies on placebo....

  15. Reciprocity-induced bias in digital reputation

    CERN Document Server

    Livan, Giacomo; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-01-01

    The peer-to-peer (P2P) economy relies on establishing trust in distributed networked systems, where the reliability of a user is assessed through digital peer-review processes that aggregate ratings into reputation scores. Here we present evidence of a network effect which biases the digital reputations of the users of P2P networks, showing that P2P networks display exceedingly high levels of reciprocity. In fact, these are so large that they are close to the highest levels structurally compatible with the networks' reputation landscape. This shows that the crowdsourcing process underpinning digital reputation is significantly distorted by the attempt of users to mutually boost reputation, or to retaliate, through the exchange of ratings. We show that the least active users are predominantly responsible for such reciprocity-induced bias, and that this fact can be exploited to suppress the bias itself.

  16. Motion, identity and the bias toward agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eFields

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented human bias toward agency as a cause and therefore an explanation of observed events is typically attributed to evolutionary selection for a social brain. Based on a review of developmental and adult behavioral and neurocognitive data, it is argued that the bias toward agency is a result of the default human solution, developed during infancy, to the computational requirements of object re-identification over gaps in observation of more than a few seconds. If this model is correct, overriding the bias toward agency to construct mechanistic explanations of observed events requires structure-mapping inferences, implemented by the pre-motor action planning system, that replace agents with mechanisms as causes of unobserved changes in contextual or featural properties of objects. Experiments that would test this model are discussed.

  17. Recognition bias and the physical attractiveness stereotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Jean-Christophe; Rasmussen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have found a recognition bias for information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype (PAS), in which participants believe that they remember that attractive individuals have positive qualities and that unattractive individuals have negative qualities, regardless of what information actually occurred. The purpose of this research was to examine whether recognition bias for PAS congruent information is replicable and invariant across a variety of conditions (i.e. generalizable). The effects of nine different moderator variables were examined in two experiments. With a few exceptions, the effect of PAS congruence on recognition bias was independent of the moderator variables. The results suggest that the tendency to believe that one remembers information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype is a robust phenomenon. PMID:22416805

  18. Systematic approach to establishing criticality biases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic approach has been developed to determine benchmark biases and apply those biases to code results to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24 regarding documenting criticality safety margins. Previously, validation of the code against experimental benchmarks to prove reasonable agreement was sufficient. However, DOE Order 5480.24 requires contractors to adhere to the requirements of ANSI/ANS-8.1 and establish subcritical margins. A method was developed to incorporate biases and uncertainties from benchmark calculations into a keff value with quantifiable uncertainty. The method produces a 95% confidence level in both the keff value of the scenario modeled and the distribution of the keffS calculated by the Monte Carlo code. Application of the method to a group of benchmarks modeled using the KENO-Va code and the SCALE 27 group cross sections is also presented

  19. Racial bias in perceptions of others' pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Trawalter

    Full Text Available The present work provides evidence that people assume a priori that Blacks feel less pain than do Whites. It also demonstrates that this bias is rooted in perceptions of status and the privilege (or hardship status confers, not race per se. Archival data from the National Football League injury reports reveal that, relative to injured White players, injured Black players are deemed more likely to play in a subsequent game, possibly because people assume they feel less pain. Experiments 1-4 show that White and Black Americans-including registered nurses and nursing students-assume that Black people feel less pain than do White people. Finally, Experiments 5 and 6 provide evidence that this bias is rooted in perceptions of status, not race per se. Taken together, these data have important implications for understanding race-related biases and healthcare disparities.

  20. Observational biases in flux magnification measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrandt, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Flux magnification is an interesting complement to shear-based lensing measurements, especially at high redshift where sources are harder to resolve. One measures either changes in the source density (magnification bias) or in the shape of the flux distribution (e.g. magnitude-shift). The interpretation of these measurements relies on theoretical estimates of how the observables change under magnification. Here we present simulations to create multi-band photometric mock catalogues of Lyman-break galaxies in a CFHTLenS-like survey that include several observational effects that can change these relations, making simple theoretical estimates unusable. In particular, we show how the magnification bias can be affected by photometric noise, colour selection, and dust extinction. We find that a simple measurement of the slope of the number-counts is not sufficient for the precise interpretation of virtually all observations of magnification bias. We also explore how sensitive the shift in the mean magnitude of a s...

  1. Linearity Limits of Biased 1337 Trap Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Balling, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The upper power limit of linear response of light trap detectors was recently measured [2,3]. We have completed this measurement with test of traps with bias voltage at several visible wavelengths using silicon photodiodes Hamamatsu S1337 1010 and made a brief test of S5227 1010. Bias extends the linearity limit by factor of more than 10 for very narrow beams and more than 30 for wide beams [5]. No irreversible changes were detected even for the highest irradiance of 33 W/cm2 at 406nm. Here we present measurement of minimal bias voltage necessary for 99%, 99.8% and 99.95% linearity for several beam sizes.

  2. Improved detection in CDMA for biased sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efraim, Hadar [Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Yacov, Nadav [Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Shental, Ori [Center for Magnetic Recording Research (CMRR), University of California, San Diego (UCSD), 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kanter, Ido [Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Saad, David [Neural Computing Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-17

    We consider the detection of biased information sources in the ubiquitous code-division multiple-access (CDMA) scheme. We propose a simple modification to both the popular single-user matched-filter detector and a recently introduced near-optimal message-passing-based multiuser detector. This modification allows for detecting modulated biased sources directly with no need for source coding. Analytical results and simulations with excellent agreement are provided, demonstrating substantial improvement in bit error rate in comparison with the unmodified detectors and the alternative of source compression. The robustness of error-performance improvement is shown under practical model settings, including bias estimation mismatch and finite-length spreading codes.

  3. Improved detection in CDMA for biased sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the detection of biased information sources in the ubiquitous code-division multiple-access (CDMA) scheme. We propose a simple modification to both the popular single-user matched-filter detector and a recently introduced near-optimal message-passing-based multiuser detector. This modification allows for detecting modulated biased sources directly with no need for source coding. Analytical results and simulations with excellent agreement are provided, demonstrating substantial improvement in bit error rate in comparison with the unmodified detectors and the alternative of source compression. The robustness of error-performance improvement is shown under practical model settings, including bias estimation mismatch and finite-length spreading codes

  4. Preferential uptake of ribose by primitive cells might explain why RNA was favored over its analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wei, Chenyu

    Permeation of molecules through membranes is a fundamental process in biological systems, which not only involves mass and signal transfers between the interior of a contemporary cell and its environment, but was also of crucial importance in the origin of life. In the absence of complex protein transporters, nutrients and building blocks of biopolymers must have been able to permeate membranes at sufficient rates to support primordial metabolism and cel-lular reproduction. From this perspective one class of solutes that is of special interest are monosaccharides, which serve not only as nutritional molecules but also as building blocks for information molecules. In particular, ribose is a part of the RNA backbone, but RNA analogs containing a number of other sugars have also been shown to form stable duplexes. Why, among these possibilities, ribose (and, subsequently, deoxyribose) was selected for the backbone of information polymers is still poorly understood. It was recently found that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose [1]. On this basis it was hypothesized that differences in membrane permeability to aldopentoses provide a mechanism for preferential delivery of ribose to primitive cells for subsequent, selective incorporation into nucleotides and their polymers. However, the origins of these unusually large differences had not been well understood. We addressed this issue in molecular dynamics simulations combined with free energy calculations. It was found that the free energy barrier for transferring ribose from water to the bilayer is lower by 1.5-2 kcal/mol than the barrier for transferring the other two aldopentoses. The calculated [2] and measured [1] permeability coefficients are in an excellent agreement. The sugar structures that permeate the membrane are -pyranoses, with a possible contribution of the -anomer for arabinose. The furanoid form of ribose is not substantially involved in

  5. Systematic review of the empirical evidence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Dwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased use of meta-analysis in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions has highlighted several types of bias that can arise during the completion of a randomised controlled trial. Study publication bias has been recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis and can make the readily available evidence unreliable for decision making. Until recently, outcome reporting bias has received less attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review and summarise the evidence from a series of cohort studies that have assessed study publication bias and outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials. Sixteen studies were eligible of which only two followed the cohort all the way through from protocol approval to information regarding publication of outcomes. Eleven of the studies investigated study publication bias and five investigated outcome reporting bias. Three studies have found that statistically significant outcomes had a higher odds of being fully reported compared to non-significant outcomes (range of odds ratios: 2.2 to 4.7. In comparing trial publications to protocols, we found that 40-62% of studies had at least one primary outcome that was changed, introduced, or omitted. We decided not to undertake meta-analysis due to the differences between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Recent work provides direct empirical evidence for the existence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias. There is strong evidence of an association between significant results and publication; studies that report positive or significant results are more likely to be published and outcomes that are statistically significant have higher odds of being fully reported. Publications have been found to be inconsistent with their protocols. Researchers need to be aware of the problems of both types of bias and efforts should be concentrated on improving the reporting of trials.

  6. Traders, Courts and the Home Bias Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Turrini, Alessandro; Van Ypersele, Tanguy

    2001-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the ‘home bias puzzle’ in international trade may be associated with the mere presence of national borders (McCallum (1995)). In this Paper we provide a theoretical framework to explain why borders may matter so much for trade. Our argument is that even between perfectly integrated and similar countries the legal system differs, so that legal costs are higher when business is done abroad. Using a matching model of trade, we show that the home bias is associated with...

  7. Motion, identity and the bias toward agency

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Fields

    2014-01-01

    The well-documented human bias toward agency as a cause and therefore an explanation of observed events is typically attributed to evolutionary selection for a “social brain.” Based on a review of developmental and adult behavioral and neurocognitive data, it is argued that the bias toward agency is a result of the default human solution, developed during infancy, to the computational requirements of object re-identification over gaps in observation of more than a few seconds. If this model...

  8. Motion, identity and the bias toward agency

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The well-documented human bias toward agency as a cause and therefore an explanation of observed events is typically attributed to evolutionary selection for a “social brain”. Based on a review of developmental and adult behavioral and neurocognitive data, it is argued that the bias toward agency is a result of the default human solution, developed during infancy, to the computational requirements of object re-identification over gaps in observation of more than a few seconds. If this model i...

  9. Recursive bias estimation and L2 boosting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA, FRANCE; Matzner - Lober, Eric [RENNE, FRANCE

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general iterative bias correction procedure for regression smoothers. This bias reduction schema is shown to correspond operationally to the L{sub 2} Boosting algorithm and provides a new statistical interpretation for L{sub 2} Boosting. We analyze the behavior of the Boosting algorithm applied to common smoothers S which we show depend on the spectrum of I - S. We present examples of common smoother for which Boosting generates a divergent sequence. The statistical interpretation suggest combining algorithm with an appropriate stopping rule for the iterative procedure. Finally we illustrate the practical finite sample performances of the iterative smoother via a simulation study.

  10. BIAS GENDER: MASALAH UTAMA DALAM INTERPRETASI ARKEOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Savitri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Gender bias is an important theme in Gender Archaeology. It is influenced by modern people thinking and it has influenced archaeological interpretation for a long time. As a result, archaeological interpretation of past society is not objective. This problem should be solved to reach an objective interpretation of people’s life in the past. The author argues that gender bias in archaeology can be solved by actively criticizing androcentrism and paying more attention to men and women’s relationship in the past.

  11. Optimal design of APD biasing circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chun-sheng; QIN Shi-qiao; WANG Xing-shu; ZHU Dong-hua

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method for avalanche photodiode (APD) reverse bias with temperature compensation and load resistance compensation. The influence of background light and load resistance on APD detection circuit is analyzed in detail. A theoretical model of temperature compensation and load resistance compensation is established, which is used for APD biasing circuit designing. It is predicted that this control method is especially suitable for LD laser range finder used on vehicles. Experimental results confirm thatthe design proposed in this paper can considerablely improve the performance of range finder.

  12. Biases of tree-independent-character-subsampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mark P; Gatesy, John

    2016-07-01

    Observed Variability (OV) and Tree Independent Generation of Evolutionary Rates (TIGER) are quick and easy-to-apply tree-independent methods that have been proposed to provide unbiased estimates of each character's rate of evolution and serve as the basis for excluding rapidly evolving characters. Both methods have been applied to multiple phylogenomic datasets, and in many cases the authors considered their trees inferred from the OV- and TIGER-delimited sub-matrices to be better estimates of the phylogeny than their trees based on all characters. In this study we use four sets of simulations and an empirical phylogenomic example to demonstrate that both methods share a systematic bias against characters with more symmetric distributions of character states, against characters with greater observed character-state space, and against large clades in the context of character conflict. As a result these methods can favor convergences and reversals over synapomorphy, exacerbate long-branch attraction, and produce mutually exclusive phylogenetic inferences that are dependent upon differential taxon sampling. We assert that neither OV nor TIGER should be relied upon to increase the ratio of phylogenetic to non-phylogenetic signal in a data matrix. We also assert that skepticism is warranted for empirical phylogenetic results that are based on OV- and/or TIGER-based character deletion wherein a small clade is supported after deletion of characters, yet is contradicted by a larger clade when the entire data matrix was analyzed. PMID:27103257

  13. Attention Bias Variability and Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Iacoviello, Brian M.; Wu, Gang; Abend, Rany; Murrough, James W.; Feder, Adriana; Fruchter, Eyal; Levinstein, Yoav; Wald, Ilan; Bailey, Christopher R.; Pine, Daniel S.; Neumeister, Alexander; Bar-Haim, Yair; Charney, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive theories implicate information-processing biases in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Results of attention-bias studies in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been inconsistent, suggesting biases towards and away from threat. Within-subject variability of attention biases in posttraumatic patients may be a useful marker for attentional control impairment and the development of posttrauma symptoms. This study reports 2 experiments investigating threat-related attention biases,...

  14. The influence of cognitive biases on psychophysiological vulnerability to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who disproportionately attend to negative aspects of a situation (attention bias), or who unduly interpret ambiguity in a negative manner (interpretive bias) report more psychological ill-effects of stress than those with balanced or positively-skewed inclinations. Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) techniques improve maladaptive biases through implicitly-based association learning, with induced positive biases buffering the future perception of stress. Six experimen...

  15. Information bias in health research: definition, pitfalls, and adjustment methods

    OpenAIRE

    Althubaiti, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    As with other fields, medical sciences are subject to different sources of bias. While understanding sources of bias is a key element for drawing valid conclusions, bias in health research continues to be a very sensitive issue that can affect the focus and outcome of investigations. Information bias, otherwise known as misclassification, is one of the most common sources of bias that affects the validity of health research. It originates from the approach that is utilized to obtain or confir...

  16. Role of Aspergillus fumigatus in Triggering Protease-Activated Receptor-2 in Airway Epithelial Cells and Skewing the Cells toward a T-helper 2 Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Bhushan, Bharat; Norton, James E; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Gupta, Dave S; Schleimer, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) infection and sensitization are common and promote Th2 disease in individuals with asthma. Innate immune responses of bronchial epithelial cells are now known to play a key role in determination of T cell responses upon encounter with inhaled pathogens. We have recently shown that extracts of AF suppress JAK-STAT signaling in epithelial cells and thus may promote Th2 bias. To elucidate the impact of AF on human bronchial epithelial cells, we tested the hypothesis that AF can modulate the response of airway epithelial cells to favor a Th2 response and explored the molecular mechanism of the effect. Primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were treated with AF extract or fractionated AF extract before stimulation with poly I:C or infection with human rhinovirus serotype 16 (HRV16). Expression of CXCL10 mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and protein (ELISA) were measured as markers of IFN-mediated epithelial Th1-biased responses. Western blot was performed to evaluate expression of IFN regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3), NF-κB, and tyrosine-protein phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11), which are other markers of Th1 skewing. Knockdown experiments for protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) and PTPN11 were performed to analyze the role of PAR-2 in the mechanism of suppression by AF. AF and a high-molecular-weight fraction of AF extract (HMW-AF; > 50 kD) profoundly suppressed poly I:C- and HRV16-induced expression of both CXCL10 mRNA and protein from NHBE cells via a mechanism that relied upon PAR-2 activation. Both AF extract and a specific PAR-2 activator (AC-55541) suppressed the poly I:C activation of phospho-IRF-3 without affecting activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, HMW-AF extract enhanced the expression of PTPN11, a phosphatase known to inhibit IFN signaling, and concurrently suppressed poly I:C-induced expression of both CXCL10 mRNA and protein from NHBE cells. These results show that exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to AF extract

  17. Influences of Mental Illness Stigma on Perceptions of and Responses to Requests for Favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Tatsuya; Dailey, René

    2016-07-01

    This article examines mental illness stigma effects on a request for a favor from a mentally ill individual. Four hundred and fourteen participants interacted with a hypothetical target on Facebook who was believed to have schizophrenia, depression, or a tooth cavity (i.e., the control group). Participants were asked to rate the favor request in terms of face threat, in addition to writing a response, which was then coded using message design logics. Results indicated that a request by a schizophrenic target threatened participants' positive face more significantly than that of a target with depression or without any mental illness. Participants' responses to the schizophrenic target were more likely to be conventional messages, whereas responses to the depressed target were more likely to be rhetorical messages. Theoretical and practical contributions are considered. PMID:26642875

  18. Perceived Distributive Fairness of EU Transfer Payments, Outcome Favorability, Identity, and EU-Tax Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartner, Martina; Rechberger, Silvia; Kirchler, Erich; Wenzel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In a representative UK study (N = 1000) the link between distributive fairness perceptions, outcome favorability, identity, and tax compliance was researched in the context of European transfer payments. Results showed that both forms of tax compliance (i.e., individual and collective EU-tax compliance) were influenced by perceived distributive fairness judgments of EU transfer payments. Fairness itself was related to perceived outcome favorability (i.e., whether their own nation benefits from the EU in financial as well as socio-political terms). Additionally, national identifiers (i.e., people identifying with their own nation, but not with Europe) perceived EU membership as unbeneficial in financial as well as in socio-political terms and thus considered the transfer payments as less fair. Dual identifiers (i.e., people identifying with their own nation and with Europe) perceived the socio-political outcomes from EU membership as more beneficial and thus evaluated the transfer payments as fairer. PMID:21412442

  19. Uranium favorability evaluation of the Mt. Withington cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mt. Withington cauldron is unfavorable for initial-magmatic pneumatogenic, hydroauthigenic, and hydroallogenic uranium deposits. Despite their favorable major-oxide chemistry, the rocks in the cauldron are relatively poor uranium source rocks; evidence for significant uranium mobilization and transport is lacking; the ash-flow tuffs and the domes and lava flows do not have porous structures adequate to accommodate uranium precipitated by pressure-temperature mechanisms in amounts large enough to constitute uranium deposits; and the lack of reductants signifies that uranium precipitation in adequate amounts by reduction is not probable. It is concluded that no further uranium favorability work in the Mt. Withington cauldron is warranted. 1 figure, 1 table

  20. Detecting Two-Spirit erotics: The fiction of Carole laFavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatonetti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the life and novels of Carole laFavor, arguing for her importance to and influence in Two-Spirit studies. Along with being a writer, laFavor was a powerful voice for social justice and Indigenous health sovereignty in Minnesota and the nation. Her two novels, Along the Journey River and Evil Dead Center, which both focus on Anishinaabe lesbian detective protagonist Renee LaRoche, are the first lesbian detective fiction published by a Native author. Renee's embrace of a specifically Two-Spirit erotics anchors her to family and brings her tribal community a powerful healing when she employs her skills to protect her people from instances of racism, abuse, and injustice. This article, then, reads these novels as the first of an emerging genre of texts that claim an overtly Two-Spirit erotic as well as vital precursors to the present embrace of sovereign erotics in Indigenous studies. PMID:27254762

  1. Favorable Long-term Prognosis of Cataract Surgery in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kulbhushan Prakash; Mahajan, Deepti; Panwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Scleritis is a rare presentation of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complicated most commonly by iridocyclitis and raised intraocular pressure. These complications can recur in subsequent years, therefore they should be managed well. Case Report: We describe a female patient who developed scleritis, complicated cataract and secondary glaucoma 2 years after being diagnosed by HZO. Secondary glaucoma was managed medically, and the patient underwent extracapsular cataract extraction for the complicated cataract. Final visual acuity was 6/6 and IOP was 22.4 mm Hg. This is a rare report describing favorable long-term (>20 years) prognosis for surgical management of cataract associated with HZO together with scleritis, secondary glaucoma and post-herpetic neuralgia. Conclusion: A favorable outcome may be attained with surgery for complicated cataract associated with HZO if the condition is managed optimally and intraocular inflammation is well controlled. PMID:27413505

  2. Rational selection of structurally diverse natural product scaffolds with favorable ADME properties for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiulla, D S; Vaidyanathan, V V; Arun, P C; Balan, G; Blaze, M; Bondre, S; Chandrasekhar, G; Gadakh, A; Kumar, R; Kharvi, G; Kim, H O; Kumar, S; Malikayil, J A; Moger, M; Mone, M K; Nagarjuna, P; Ogbu, C; Pendhalkar, D; Rao, A V S Raja; Rao, G Venkateshwar; Sarma, V K; Shaik, S; Sharma, G V R; Singh, S; Sreedhar, C; Sonawane, R; Timmanna, U; Hardy, L W

    2005-01-01

    Natural product analogs are significant sources for therapeutic agents. To capitalize efficiently on the effective features of naturally occurring substances, a natural product-based library production platform has been devised at Aurigene for drug lead discovery. This approach combines the attractive biological and physicochemical properties of natural product scaffolds, provided by eons of natural selection, with the chemical diversity available from parallel synthetic methods. Virtual property analysis, using computational methods described here, guides the selection of a set of natural product scaffolds that are both structurally diverse and likely to have favorable pharmacokinetic properties. The experimental characterization of several in vitro ADME properties of twenty of these scaffolds, and of a small set of designed congeners based upon one scaffold, is also described. These data confirm that most of the scaffolds and the designed library members have properties favorable to their utilization for creating libraries of lead-like molecules. PMID:15789560

  3. Biased signalling from the glucocorticoid receptor: Renewed opportunity for tailoring glucocorticoid activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Christine R; Lew, Michael J; Stewart, Alastair G

    2016-07-15

    Recent landmark studies applying analytical pharmacology approaches to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) have demonstrated that different ligands can cause differential activation of distinct GR-regulated genes. Drawing on concepts of signalling bias from the field of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology, we speculate that ligand-dependent differences in GR signalling can be considered analogous to GPCR biased signalling, and thus can be quantitatively analysed in a similar way. This type of approach opens up the possibility of using rational structure-based drug optimisation strategies to improve the therapeutic selectivity of glucocorticoid drugs to maximise their efficacy and minimise adverse effects. PMID:26898958

  4. The Importance of Education to Favor the Development of Students’ Creative Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela FLOARES (STOICA)

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the importance of education to favor the development of students' creative ability. The argument insists on the fact that human evolution is conditioned and stimulated by the creativity of individuals and the actual society requires a more rapid accommodation, continuous information conjugation with the inventive creative attitude. In the first part, creativity is the core of the future education in the light of the new curriculum, the relationship between education and cr...

  5. Climate engineering field research: The favorable setting of international environmental law

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, J L

    2014-01-01

    As forecasts for climate change and its impacts have become more dire, climate engineering proposals have come under increasing consideration and are presently moving toward field trials. This article examines the relevant international environmental law, distinguishing between climate engineering research and deployment. It also emphasizes the climate change context of these proposals and the enabling function of law. Extant international environmental law generally favors such field tests, ...

  6. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley. Overall, small

  7. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pfattheicher

    Full Text Available The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump. Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O

  8. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Pfattheicher; Simon Schindler

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR s...

  9. The tax credit in favor of the renewable energies and the energy savings bear fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents in the first part the positive economical results obtained by the implementing in January 2005, of a tax credit majored of 40% in favor of equipments using a renewable energy source. The second part is devoted to other financial incentives in the domain of energy saving and renewable energies uses. Specifications concerning the equipments and legal aspects are presented. (A.L.B.)

  10. Improved DNA Electrophoresis in Conditions Favoring Polyborates and Lewis Acid Complexation

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Hari; Ren, Yunzhao R.; Kern, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial compression among the longer DNA fragments occurs during DNA electrophoresis in agarose and non-agarose gels when using certain ions in the conductive buffer, impairing the range of fragment sizes resolved well in a single gel. Substitutions using various polyhydroxyl anions supported the underlying phenomenon as the complexation of Lewis acids to DNA. We saw significant improvements using conditions (lithium borate 10 mM cations, pH 6.5) favoring the formation of borate polyanions an...

  11. Verification of predictions from estimators of favorable alleles to improve yield of sweet corn hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Malvar Pintos, Rosa Ana; Revilla Temiño, Pedro; Ordás Pérez, Amando; Cartea González, María Elena; Soengas Fernández, María del Pilar

    2004-01-01

    Sweet corn (Zea mays L.) breeding has focused on quality, with yield and agronomic performance as secondary traits. Elite American and European field corn inbreds were selected to improve the agronomic value of sweet corn for European conditions. Our objective was to compare realized results and predictions of methods to identify potential donors for improving agronomic performance of sweet corn hybrids. Yield and three agronomic traits were recorded. Estimates of favorable dominant alleles p...

  12. Energetically favorable sites of iodine atoms in zirconium crystal: an ab-initio approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to the determination of the energetically favorable sites of iodine atoms in zirconium crystal within the density functional framework and using norm-conserving pseudopotentials. We show that the substitutional sites are preferentially occupied compared to the interstitial ones. Our conclusion is that the diffusion process of iodine in site zirconium is of substitutional type in perfect agreement with an experimental study. (authors)

  13. Favored subjects and psychosocial needs in music therapy in terminally ill cancer patients: a content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Preissler, Pia; Kordovan, Sarah; Ullrich, Anneke; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has shown positive effects of music therapy on the physical and mental well-being of terminally ill patients. This study aimed to identify favored subjects and psychosocial needs of terminally ill cancer patients during music therapy and associated factors. Methods Forty-one Patients receiving specialized inpatient palliative care prospectively performed a music therapy intervention consisting of at least two sessions (total number of sessions: 166; per patient average: 4,...

  14. Theory Construction in Second Language Acquisition In Favor of the Rationalism

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Shokouhi

    2012-01-01

    One of the most controversial issues in second language acquisition (SLA) seems to be the issue of theory construction. There are mainly two opposing views considering the SLA theory construction namely the Rationalist view and the Relativist view. The former tries to reasons that there should be a few theories of SLA at work while the latter favors as many theories as possible. However, the present paper tries to take a supportive stance with regard to the rationalism reasoning that the rati...

  15. Favorable and Unfavorable Characteristics of EFL Teachers Perceived by University Students of Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Teachers play pivotal roles in EFL classrooms. Characteristics of EFL teachers may affect students’ attitudes and motivations to language learning. The effective/good characteristics of the EFL teachers perceived by the students have been extensively investigated by the previous research works. However, the perceptions of the students from different backgrounds to EFL teachers may vary in different learning settings. In addition, the research works on both favorable and unfavorable characteri...

  16. Development of a new β Ti alloy with low modulus and favorable plasticity for implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, S X; Feng, X J; Yin, L X; Liu, X Y; Ma, M Z; Liu, R P

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important development directions of the Ti and its alloys is the applications in medical field. Development of new Ti alloys with low elastic modulus and/or favorable biocompatibility plays an important role for promoting its application in medical field. In this work, a new β Ti alloy (Ti-31Nb-6Zr-5Mo, wt.%) was designed for implant material using d-electron alloy design method. Microstructure and tensile properties of the designed alloy after hot rolling (HR) and solution followed by aging treatments (SA) were investigated. Results show that the designed alloy is composed of single β phase. However, microstructural analysis shows that the β phase in the designed alloy separates into Nb-rich and Nb-poor phase regions. The Nb-rich regions in HR specimen are typical elongated fiber texture, but are equiaxed particles with several micrometers in SA specimen. Tensile results show that the designed alloy has low Young's modulus of 44 GPa for HR specimen and 48 GPa for SA specimen which are very close to the extreme of Young's modulus of bulk titanium alloys. At the same time, the designed alloy has favorable plasticity in term of elongation of 26.7% for HR specimen and 20.6% for SA specimen, and appropriate tensile strength over 700 MPa. In short, the designed alloy has low elastic modulus close to that of bone and favorable plasticity and strength which can be a potential candidate for hard tissue replacements. PMID:26838858

  17. The Study of Relationship Between Work Teams and Favoring Knowledge Management (Case: Bank Keshavarzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamze Jamshidi Kohsari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is a process that has been recently generated as an activity which isvery important in the dynamic environment, and in the competitive scene. We believe that KM is aprocess which its organizational knowledge is created from the individual knowledge of themembers of the organization. The relevant studies have indicated that organizing based on workteams could be considered a way to create the appropriate context for KM. However, thisorganizing based on work teams is not enough; it only has the necessary characteristics of the workteams that favor KM. Moreover, based on studies done, we distinguish which characteristics ofwork teams favor the KM process in its different phases (i.e. creation, transfer and integration. Inthis study, we conducted multiple regression and analysis of variance.Complementary skills (H2 and a climate of trust (H3 in work teams were more importantfactors that favor the management of organizational knowledge.This research is based on the Zarraga and Perez studies in 2006.

  18. Cognitive bias measurement and social anxiety disorder: Correlating self-report data and attentional bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Miloff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social anxiety disorder (SAD and attentional bias are theoretically connected in cognitive behavioral therapeutic models. In fact, there is an emerging field focusing on modifying attentional bias as a stand-alone treatment. However, it is unclear to what degree these attentional biases are present before commencing treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure pre-treatment attentional bias in 153 participants diagnosed with SAD using a home-based Internet version of the dot-probe paradigm. Results showed no significant correlation for attentional bias (towards or away from negative words or faces and the self-rated version of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR. However, two positive correlations were found for the secondary measures Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9. These indicated that those with elevated levels of anxiety and depression had a higher bias towards negative faces in neutral–negative and positive–negative valence combinations, respectively. The unreliability of the dot-probe paradigm and home-based Internet delivery are discussed to explain the lack of correlations between LSAS-SR and attentional bias. Changes to the dot-probe task are suggested that could improve reliability.

  19. Creating Culturally Considerate Schools: Educating without Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kim L.; Davis, Bonnie M.

    2012-01-01

    This unique collaboration between a veteran educator and a psychotherapist shows that the educators who are most effective in teaching diverse student populations are the ones who can "see students clearly and respond to their needs without hesitation or bias." Framed around an original, eight-stage model of diversity development, this book…

  20. Avoiding bias in safety testing design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    All scientists are biased, no matter what their backgrounds or affiliations, so what is it about the scientific method that overcomes this and which makes science so successful? Key features are transparency and critical peer scrutiny. These general issues will be will be considered in terms...

  1. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, A. E., E-mail: aberk@ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, California 92093 (United States); Sinha, S. K. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Fullerton, E. E. [Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, California 92093 (United States); Smith, D. J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  2. A new polarization amplitude bias reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Matias; Leahy, J. P.; Dickinson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarization amplitude estimation is affected by a positive noise bias, particularly important in regions with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We present a new approach to correct for this bias in the case there is additional information about the polarization angle. We develop the `known-angle estimator' that works in the special case when there is an independent and high SNR (≳ 2σ) measurement of the polarization angle. It is derived for the general case where the uncertainties in the Q, U Stokes parameters are not symmetric. This estimator completely corrects for the polarization bias if the polarization angle is perfectly known. In the realistic case, where the angle template has uncertainties, a small residual bias remains, but that is shown to be much smaller that the one left by other classical estimators. We also test our method with more realistic data, using the noise properties of the three lower frequency maps of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. In this case, the known-angle estimator also produces better results than methods that do not include the angle information. This estimator is therefore useful in the case where the polarization angle is expected to be constant over different data sets with different SNR.

  3. Clustering and Bias Measurements of SDSS Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Clampitt, Joseph; Sánchez, Carles

    2015-01-01

    Using a void catalog from the SDSS survey, we present the first measurements of void clustering and the corresponding void bias. Over the range 30-200 Mpc/h the void auto-correlation is detected at 5-sigma significance for voids of radius 15-20 Mpc/h. We also measure the void-galaxy cross-correlation at higher signal-to-noise and compare the inferred void bias with the autocorrelation results. Void bias is constant with scale for voids of a given size, but its value falls from 5.6 +/- 1.0 to below zero as the void radius increases from 15 to 30 Mpc/h. The comparison of our measurements with carefully matched galaxy mock catalogs, with no free parameters related to the voids, shows that model predictions can be reliably made for void correlations. We study the dependence of void bias on tracer density and void size with a view to future applications. In combination with our previous lensing measurements of void mass profiles, these clustering measurements provide another step towards using voids as cosmologica...

  4. Uncovering Racial Bias in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The portrayal of African Americans in nursing fundamentals textbooks was analyzed, resulting in 11 themes in the areas of history, culture, and physical assessment. Few African American leaders were included, and racial bias and stereotyping were apparent. Differences were often discussed using Eurocentric norms, and language tended to minimize…

  5. Bounding the Bias of Contrastive Divergence Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Anja; Igel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    number of variables in the RBM, and the maximum change in energy that can be produced by changing a single variable. The last reflects the dependence on the absolute values of the RBM parameters. The magnitude of the bias is also affected by the distance in variation between the modeled distribution and...

  6. Examining Gender Bias in Studies of Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Crowden, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the presence of a gender bias in studies of innovation. Using the Innovation Systems Research Network (ISRN) and its interview guide as a case study, this research project examines how accurately and completely such innovation studies present gender differences in the innovation process.

  7. Zero bias transformation and asymptotic expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Let W be a sum of independent random variables. We apply the zero bias transformation to deduce recursive asymptotic expansions for $\\mathbb {E}[h(W)]$ in terms of normal expectations, or of Poisson expectations for integer-valued random variables. We also discuss the estimates of remaining errors.

  8. Sociocognitive Biases in the Evaluation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Causes of evaluator bias are: overemphasizing concrete, salient, and retrievable information; reporting only evidence which confirms hypothesis; focusing on stable personality factors, rather than on situation and environment; developing positive perceptions of a program as both an evaluator and a highly involved participant; statistical naivete;…

  9. Knowledge of Social Affiliations Biases Economic Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Joel E.; Mack, Michael L.; Gelman, Bernard D.; Preston, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    An individual’s reputation and group membership can produce automatic judgments and behaviors toward that individual. Whether an individual’s social reputation impacts interactions with affiliates has yet to be demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that during initial encounters with others, existing knowledge of their social network guides behavior toward them. Participants learned reputations (cooperate, defect, or equal mix) for virtual players through an iterated economic game (EG). Then, participants learned one novel friend for each player. The critical question was how participants treated the friends in a single-shot EG after the friend-learning phase. Participants tended to cooperate with friends of cooperators and defect on friends of defectors, indicative of a decision making bias based on memory for social affiliations. Interestingly, participants’ explicit predictions of the friends’ future behavior showed no such bias. Moreover, the bias to defect on friends of defectors was enhanced when affiliations were learned in a social context; participants who learned to associate novel faces with player faces during reinforcement learning did not show reputation-based bias for associates of defectors during single-shot EG. These data indicate that when faced with risky social decisions, memories of social connections influence behavior implicitly. PMID:27441563

  10. Assessing Projection Bias in Consumers' Food Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Magistris, Tiziana; Gracia, Azucena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether projection bias exists in consumers' purchasing decisions for food products. To achieve our aim, we used a non-hypothetical experiment (i.e., experimental auction), where hungry and non-hungry participants were incentivized to reveal their willingness to pay (WTP). The results confirm the existence of projection bias when consumers made their decisions on food products. In particular, projection bias existed because currently hungry participants were willing to pay a higher price premium for cheeses than satiated ones, both in hungry and satiated future states. Moreover, participants overvalued the food product more when they were delivered in the future hungry condition than in the satiated one. Our study provides clear, quantitative and meaningful evidence of projection bias because our findings are based on economic valuation of food preferences. Indeed, the strength of this study is that findings are expressed in terms of willingness to pay which is an interpretable amount of money. PMID:26828930

  11. Assessing Projection Bias in Consumers’ Food Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Magistris, Tiziana; Gracia, Azucena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether projection bias exists in consumers’ purchasing decisions for food products. To achieve our aim, we used a non-hypothetical experiment (i.e., experimental auction), where hungry and non-hungry participants were incentivized to reveal their willingness to pay (WTP). The results confirm the existence of projection bias when consumers made their decisions on food products. In particular, projection bias existed because currently hungry participants were willing to pay a higher price premium for cheeses than satiated ones, both in hungry and satiated future states. Moreover, participants overvalued the food product more when they were delivered in the future hungry condition than in the satiated one. Our study provides clear, quantitative and meaningful evidence of projection bias because our findings are based on economic valuation of food preferences. Indeed, the strength of this study is that findings are expressed in terms of willingness to pay which is an interpretable amount of money. PMID:26828930

  12. Exchange bias of conetic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Tatiana; Kirby, Hillary; Jayathilaka, Priyanga; Campbell, Scott; Miller, Casey

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we study the exchange bias and coercivity of Ni77Fe14Cu5Mo4 (Conetic, also known as mu-metal) exchange coupled with FeMn as functions of Conetic thickness and buffer layer material. The samples studied were BL(30nm)/Conetic(9nm-30nm)/FeMn(10nm)/Ta(5nm), where BL = Cu or Ta. All samples were grown by magnetron sputtering in a deposition field of ˜150 Oe during growth to set the exchange bias axis. Room temperature hysteresis loops were measured by a magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer as a function of applied-field angle. For each variety of sample, the exchange bias and coercivity were inversely proportional to Conetic thickness. With Cu buffer layers grown on Si, the Heb decreased from 300 Oe to 62 Oe, and Hc decreased from 99 Oe to 9 Oe. Similar results were found when the Cu buffer layer was grown on SiOx, though the maximum coercivity was only 67 Oe. For the samples grown on Si(001)/Ta(5nm), the exchange bias decreased from 80 Oe to 14 Oe, while the coercivity increases only slightly from 2 Oe to 10 Oe. These results indicate a trade-off between preserving the softness of the ferromagnet and having a large exchange, which may be useful for tuning the performance of low-field sensing materials

  13. A new method to measure galaxy bias

    CERN Document Server

    Pollack, Jennifer E; Porciani, Cristiano

    2013-01-01

    We present a new approach for modelling halo bias that utilizes the full non-linear information contained in the moments of the matter density field. The basis of our technique is to derive this information directly from a set of numerical simulations. Although our method is general, we perform a case study based on the local Eulerian bias scheme truncated to second-order. Using 200 N-body simulations that cover a total comoving volume of 675 (Gpc/h)^3, we measure several 2- and 3-point statistics of the halo distribution to unprecedented accuracy. We then use the bias model to fit the halo-halo power spectrum, the halo-matter cross spectrum and the corresponding three bispectra for wavenumbers in the range 0.04 < k < 0.12 h Mpc^-1. While all fits accurately describe the data, we find that the constraints on the bias parameters obtained using the full non-linear information differ significantly from those derived using leading-order standard perturbation theory. Hence, neglecting the full non-linear inf...

  14. Researching Sex Bias in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, Dan

    This paper outlines five methods of research on sex bias in the classroom: one-time survey, one class/one treatment, two class/two treatment, one class/random assignment to treatment, and analysis of differentiated effect. It shows how each method could be used in attempting to measure the effect of a unit on Norma Klein's "Mom, the Wolfman and…

  15. Linguistic Abstractness, Intergroup Bias and National Essentialism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouřilová, Sylvie; Geschke, D.; Finell, E.; Bilewicz, M.; Casini, A.

    2007, s. 25-25. [Transfer of Knowledge Conference. Brno (CZ), 05.09.2007-09.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/07/1561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : language abstraction * linguistic category model * intergroup bias, national essentialism Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  16. Bias sensitive multispectral structures for imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results on the optimization of an pinpii'n' type a-Si:H based three color detector with voltage controlled spectral sensitivity. The sensor element was fabricated on a glass covered with Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and consists of a p-i-n a-SiC:H multilayer structure which faces the incident illumination, followed by a-SiC:H(-p)/a-SiC:H(-i)/a-Si:H(-i')/a-SiC:H(-n')/ITO heterostructure, that allows the optically addressed readout. Results show that this approach leads to regionally different collection parameters resulting in multispectral photodiodes. In the polychromatic operation mode different sensitivity ranges are programmed by switching between different biases so that the basic colors can be resolved with a single device. Positive bias is needed under blue irradiation and moderated reverse bias under green. The threshold voltage between green and red sensitivity depends on the thickness of the bottom a-SiC:H (-i) layer, and corresponds to the complete confinement of the absorbed green photons across the pinpi sequence. As the thickness of the a-Si:H i'-layer increases, the self-reverse effect due to the front absorption will be balanced by the decrease of the self-forward effect due to the back absorption shifting the threshold voltage to lower reverse bias. The various design parameters are discussed and supported by a 2D numerical simulation

  17. Teaching EFL Students about Language Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Justus J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, I discuss a method for teaching EFL students about language bias. The method involves (A) introducing vocabulary, (B) activating knowledge, (C) giving instruction, (D) group and individual practice, and (E) reflection. I also summarize guidelines for teaching students about the use of gendered pronouns, gender-loaded nouns and…

  18. Very Massive Tracers and Higher Derivative Biases

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir; Angulo, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Most of the upcoming cosmological information will come from analyzing the clustering of the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe through LSS or CMB observations. It is therefore essential to be able to understand their behavior with exquisite precision. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a consistent framework to make predictions for LSS observables in the mildly non-linear regime. In this paper we focus on biased tracers. We argue that in calculations at a given order in the dark matter perturbations, highly biased tracers will underperform because of their larger higher derivative biases. A natural prediction of the EFTofLSS is therefore that by simply adding higher derivative biases, all tracers should perform comparably well. We implement this prediction for the halo-halo and the halo-matter power spectra at one loop, and the halo-halo-halo, halo-halo-matter, and halo-matter-matter bispectra at tree-level, and compare with simulations. We find good agreement ...

  19. Assessing Projection Bias in Consumers' Food Preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana de-Magistris

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test whether projection bias exists in consumers' purchasing decisions for food products. To achieve our aim, we used a non-hypothetical experiment (i.e., experimental auction, where hungry and non-hungry participants were incentivized to reveal their willingness to pay (WTP. The results confirm the existence of projection bias when consumers made their decisions on food products. In particular, projection bias existed because currently hungry participants were willing to pay a higher price premium for cheeses than satiated ones, both in hungry and satiated future states. Moreover, participants overvalued the food product more when they were delivered in the future hungry condition than in the satiated one. Our study provides clear, quantitative and meaningful evidence of projection bias because our findings are based on economic valuation of food preferences. Indeed, the strength of this study is that findings are expressed in terms of willingness to pay which is an interpretable amount of money.

  20. Bias and variance in continuous EDA

    OpenAIRE

    Teytaud, Fabien; Teytaud, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of Distribution Algorithms are based on statistical estimates. We show that when combining classical tools from statistics, namely bias/variance decomposition, reweighting and quasi-randomization, we can strongly improve the convergence rate. All modifications are easy, compliant with most algorithms, and experimentally very efficient in particular in the parallel case (large offsprings).

  1. Audibility and visual biasing in speech perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Bart Richard

    Although speech perception has been considered a predominantly auditory phenomenon, large benefits from vision in degraded acoustic conditions suggest integration of audition and vision. More direct evidence of this comes from studies of audiovisual disparity that demonstrate vision can bias and even dominate perception (McGurk & MacDonald, 1976). It has been observed that hearing-impaired listeners demonstrate more visual biasing than normally hearing listeners (Walden et al., 1990). It is argued here that stimulus audibility must be equated across groups before true differences can be established. In the present investigation, effects of visual biasing on perception were examined as audibility was degraded for 12 young normally hearing listeners. Biasing was determined by quantifying the degree to which listener identification functions for a single synthetic auditory /ba-da-ga/ continuum changed across two conditions: (1)an auditory-only listening condition; and (2)an auditory-visual condition in which every item of the continuum was synchronized with visual articulations of the consonant-vowel (CV) tokens /ba/ and /ga/, as spoken by each of two talkers. Audibility was altered by presenting the conditions in quiet and in noise at each of three signal-to- noise (S/N) ratios. For the visual-/ba/ context, large effects of audibility were found. As audibility decreased, visual biasing increased. A large talker effect also was found, with one talker eliciting more biasing than the other. An independent lipreading measure demonstrated that this talker was more visually intelligible than the other. For the visual-/ga/ context, audibility and talker effects were less robust, possibly obscured by strong listener effects, which were characterized by marked differences in perceptual processing patterns among participants. Some demonstrated substantial biasing whereas others demonstrated little, indicating a strong reliance on audition even in severely degraded acoustic

  2. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  3. Single-Receiver GPS Phase Bias Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertiger, William I.; Haines, Bruce J.; Weiss, Jan P.; Harvey, Nathaniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Existing software has been modified to yield the benefits of integer fixed double-differenced GPS-phased ambiguities when processing data from a single GPS receiver with no access to any other GPS receiver data. When the double-differenced combination of phase biases can be fixed reliably, a significant improvement in solution accuracy is obtained. This innovation uses a large global set of GPS receivers (40 to 80 receivers) to solve for the GPS satellite orbits and clocks (along with any other parameters). In this process, integer ambiguities are fixed and information on the ambiguity constraints is saved. For each GPS transmitter/receiver pair, the process saves the arc start and stop times, the wide-lane average value for the arc, the standard deviation of the wide lane, and the dual-frequency phase bias after bias fixing for the arc. The second step of the process uses the orbit and clock information, the bias information from the global solution, and only data from the single receiver to resolve double-differenced phase combinations. It is called "resolved" instead of "fixed" because constraints are introduced into the problem with a finite data weight to better account for possible errors. A receiver in orbit has much shorter continuous passes of data than a receiver fixed to the Earth. The method has parameters to account for this. In particular, differences in drifting wide-lane values must be handled differently. The first step of the process is automated, using two JPL software sets, Longarc and Gipsy-Oasis. The resulting orbit/clock and bias information files are posted on anonymous ftp for use by any licensed Gipsy-Oasis user. The second step is implemented in the Gipsy-Oasis executable, gd2p.pl, which automates the entire process, including fetching the information from anonymous ftp

  4. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding of...

  5. Collective properties of injection-induced earthquake sequences: 1. Model description and directivity bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, David; Suckale, Jenny

    2016-05-01

    Induced seismicity is of increasing concern for oil and gas, geothermal, and carbon sequestration operations, with several M > 5 events triggered in recent years. Modeling plays an important role in understanding the causes of this seismicity and in constraining seismic hazard. Here we study the collective properties of induced earthquake sequences and the physics underpinning them. In this first paper of a two-part series, we focus on the directivity ratio, which quantifies whether fault rupture is dominated by one (unilateral) or two (bilateral) propagating fronts. In a second paper, we focus on the spatiotemporal and magnitude-frequency distributions of induced seismicity. We develop a model that couples a fracture mechanics description of 1-D fault rupture with fractal stress heterogeneity and the evolving pore pressure distribution around an injection well that triggers earthquakes. The extent of fault rupture is calculated from the equations of motion for two tips of an expanding crack centered at the earthquake hypocenter. Under tectonic loading conditions, our model exhibits a preference for unilateral rupture and a normal distribution of hypocenter locations, two features that are consistent with seismological observations. On the other hand, catalogs of induced events when injection occurs directly onto a fault exhibit a bias toward ruptures that propagate toward the injection well. This bias is due to relatively favorable conditions for rupture that exist within the high-pressure plume. The strength of the directivity bias depends on a number of factors including the style of pressure buildup, the proximity of the fault to failure and event magnitude. For injection off a fault that triggers earthquakes, the modeled directivity bias is small and may be too weak for practical detection. For two hypothetical injection scenarios, we estimate the number of earthquake observations required to detect directivity bias.

  6. A face detection bias for horizontal orientations develops in middle childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Balas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Faces are complex stimuli that can be described via intuitive facial features like the eyes, nose, and mouth, configural features like the distances between facial landmarks, and features that correspond to computations performed in the early visual system (e.g. oriented edges. With regard to this latter category of descriptors, adult face recognition relies disproportionately on information in specific spatial frequency and orientation bands: Many recognition tasks are performed more accurately when adults have access to mid-range spatial frequencies (8-16 cycles/face and horizontal orientations (Dakin & Watt, 2009. In the current study, we examined how this information bias develops in middle childhood. We recruited children between the ages of 5-10 years old to participate in a simple categorization task that required them to label images according to whether they depicted a face or a house. Critically, children were presented with face and house images comprised either of primarily horizontal orientation energy, primarily vertical orientation energy, or both horizontal and vertical orientation energy. We predicted that any bias favoring horizontal information over vertical should be more evident in faces than in houses, and also that older children would be more likely to show such a bias than younger children. We designed our categorization task to be sufficiently easy that children would perform at near-ceiling accuracy levels, but with variation in response times that would reflect how they rely on different orientations as a function of age and object category. We found that horizontal bias for face detection (but not house detection correlated significantly with age, suggesting an emergent category-specific bias for horizontal orientation energy that develops during middle childhood. These results thus suggest that the tuning of high-level recognition to specific low-level visual features takes take place over several years of visual

  7. Assessment of exploration bias in data-driven predictive models and the estimation of undiscovered resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolbaugh, M.F.; Raines, G.L.; Zehner, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial distribution of discovered resources may not fully mimic the distribution of all such resources, discovered and undiscovered, because the process of discovery is biased by accessibility factors (e.g., outcrops, roads, and lakes) and by exploration criteria. In data-driven predictive models, the use of training sites (resource occurrences) biased by exploration criteria and accessibility does not necessarily translate to a biased predictive map. However, problems occur when evidence layers correlate with these same exploration factors. These biases then can produce a data-driven model that predicts known occurrences well, but poorly predicts undiscovered resources. Statistical assessment of correlation between evidence layers and map-based exploration factors is difficult because it is difficult to quantify the "degree of exploration." However, if such a degree-of-exploration map can be produced, the benefits can be enormous. Not only does it become possible to assess this correlation, but it becomes possible to predict undiscovered, instead of discovered, resources. Using geothermal systems in Nevada, USA, as an example, a degree-of-exploration model is created, which then is resolved into purely explored and unexplored equivalents, each occurring within coextensive study areas. A weights-of-evidence (WofE) model is built first without regard to the degree of exploration, and then a revised WofE model is calculated for the "explored fraction" only. Differences in the weights between the two models provide a correlation measure between the evidence and the degree of exploration. The data used to build the geothermal evidence layers are perceived to be independent of degree of exploration. Nevertheless, the evidence layers correlate with exploration because exploration has preferred the same favorable areas identified by the evidence patterns. In this circumstance, however, the weights for the "explored" WofE model minimize this bias. Using these revised

  8. Self-bias technique improves amplifier gain and noise figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fithian, Michael J.

    1988-05-01

    A nover self-bias technique, which provides optimum amplifier performance from low-noise GaAs FET amplifiers, is described. The self-bias scheme employs small thin-film substrates to mount packaged FETs to amplifier's main microstrip substrates. The substrates, which feature high dielectric constant, are placed under each FET source lead. The use of self-biased amplifiers results in several benefits. Thus, with a single bias supply, proper bias sequencing is not requried among amplifier stages; in a self-bias layout, the active devices are not damaged by a bias-supply failure; finally, proper self-biasing is not complex, requiring only two resistors per stage. The results of an experimental testing of the self-bias technique, evaluated for a 5.0 to 5.6 GHz low-noise amplifier with the aid of commercially available CAD software, are presented.

  9. Bias annealing: A method for obtaining transition paths de novo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Ma, Ao; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2006-09-01

    Computational studies of dynamics in complex systems require means for generating reactive trajectories with minimum knowledge about the processes of interest. Here, we introduce a method for generating transition paths when an existing one is not already available. Starting from biased paths obtained from steered molecular dynamics, we use a Monte Carlo procedure in the space of whole trajectories to shift gradually to sampling an ensemble of unbiased paths. Application to basin-to-basin hopping in a two-dimensional model system and nucleotide-flipping by a DNA repair protein demonstrates that the method can efficiently yield unbiased reactive trajectories even when the initial steered dynamics differ significantly. The relation of the method to others and the physical basis for its success are discussed.

  10. Decisional impairments in cocaine addiction, reward bias, and cortical oscillation "unbalance".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Finocchiaro, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    A vast amount of research has suggested that subjects with substance use disorder (SUD) might have difficulty making advantageous decisions that opt in favor of a longer-term, larger reward than an immediate, smaller reward. The current research explored the impact of reward bias and cortical frontal asymmetry (left lateralization effect) in SUD in response to a decisional task (Iowa Gambling Task). Fifty SUD participants and 40 controls (CG) were tested using the Iowa Gambling Task. Electrophysiology (electroencephalography) recording was performed during task execution. We measured left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex power activity. Behavioral responses (gain/loss options); frequency band modulation (asymmetry index) for delta, theta, alpha, and beta band; and cortical source localization (standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography) were considered. The SUD group opted in favor of the immediate reward option (loss) more frequently than the long-term option (gain) when compared to the CG. Secondly, SUD showed increased left-hemisphere activation in response to losing (with immediate reward) choices in comparison with the CG. The left hemispheric unbalance effect and the "reward bias" were adduced to explain the decisional impairment in SUD. PMID:25848274

  11. The "Biased Rhizosphere" Concept: Bacterial Competitiveness and Persistence in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Frans J.

    2013-04-01

    The association of plant surfaces with microorganisms has been the subject of intense investigations. Numerous processes have been shown to be important in plant-associative bacteria including attachment, motility, chemotaxis, nutrition, and production of signaling molecules and secondary metabolites. One strategy to favor the competitiveness and persistence of bacteria in the plant environment relies upon manipulation of nutritional compounds secreted into the phytosphere, which comprises the rhizosphere (root surface/zone influenced by secretions) and the phyllosphere (leaf surface/zone influenced by secretions). The pattern of plant host exudate can be bred or engineered to establish "biased phytospheres" with bacteria that can naturally, or by engineering, use metabolic resources produced by the host plant. Over the last two decades, natural biases, generated by opine-like molecules of Agrobacterium-plant interactions and by rhizopine-like molecules of the Rhizobium-legume interactions, have provided tactics based on unique metabolites produced by plants to favor the competitiveness and persistence of bacteria that can catabolize the host-produced novel nutrients. An overview of this field or research will be presented.

  12. Thinking in Black and White: Conscious thought increases racially biased judgments through biased face memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, Madelijn; Stoeckart, Peter F; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2015-11-01

    It is a common research finding that conscious thought helps people to avoid racial discrimination. These three experiments, however, illustrate that conscious thought may increase biased face memory, which leads to increased judgment bias (i.e., preferring White to Black individuals). In Experiments 1 and 2, university students formed impressions of Black and White housemate candidates. They judged the candidates either immediately (immediate decision condition), thought about their judgments for a few minutes (conscious thought condition), or performed an unrelated task for a few minutes (unconscious thought condition). Conscious thinkers and immediate decision-makers showed a stronger face memory bias than unconscious thinkers, and this mediated increased judgment bias, although not all results were significant. Experiment 3 used a new, different paradigm and showed that a Black male was remembered as darker after a period of conscious thought than after a period of unconscious thought. Implications for racial prejudice are discussed. PMID:26164254

  13. Effect of Reverse Bias Stress on Leakage Currents and Breakdown Voltages of Solid Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    the processes under reverse bias conditions. In practice, there were instances when, due to unforeseen events, the system operated at conditions when capacitors experience periodically a relatively small reverse bias for some time followed by normal, forward bias conditions. In such a case an assessment should be made on the degree to which these capacitors are degraded by application of low-voltage reverse bias, and whether this degradation can be reversed by normal operating conditions. In this study, reverse currents in different types of tantalum capacitors were monitored at different reverse voltages below 15%VR and temperatures in the range from room to 145 C for up to 150 hours to get better understanding of the degradation process and determine conditions favorable to the unstable mode of operation. The reversibility of RB degradation has been evaluated after operation of the capacitors at forward bias conditions. The effect of reverse bias stress (RBS) on reliability at normal operating conditions was evaluated using highly accelerated life testing at voltages of 1.5VR and 2 VR and by analysis of changes in distributions of breakdown voltages. Possible mechanisms of RB degradation are discussed.

  14. ICAM-2 expression mediates a membrane-actin link, confers a nonmetastatic phenotype and reflects favorable tumor stage or histology in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Jin Yoon

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton is a primary determinant of tumor cell motility and metastatic potential. Motility and metastasis are thought to be regulated, in large part, by the interaction of membrane proteins with cytoplasmic linker proteins and of these linker proteins, in turn, with actin. However, complete membrane-to-actin linkages have been difficult to identify. We used co-immunoprecipitation and competitive peptide assays to show that intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2/alpha-actinin/actin may comprise such a linkage in neuroblastoma cells. ICAM-2 expression limited the motility of these cells and redistributed actin fibers in vitro, and suppressed development of disseminated tumors in an in vivo model of metastatic neuroblastoma. Consistent with these observations, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated ICAM-2 expression in primary neuroblastoma tumors exhibiting features that are associated with limited metastatic disease and more favorable clinical outcome. In neuroblastoma cell lines, ICAM-2 expression did not affect AKT activation, tumorigenic potential or chemosensitivity, as has been reported for some types of transfected cells. The observed ICAM-2-mediated suppression of metastatic phenotype is a novel function for this protein, and the interaction of ICAM-2/alpha-actinin/actin represents the first complete membrane-linker protein-actin linkage to impact tumor cell motility in vitro and metastatic potential in an in vivo model. Current work focuses on identifying specific protein domains critical to the regulation of neuroblastoma cell motility and metastasis and on determining if these domains represent exploitable therapeutic targets.

  15. Selection and Biased Gene Conversion in a Multigene Family: Consequences of Interallelic Bias and Threshold Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, James Bruce

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper, I investigated the interactions in a gene family of additive selection and biased gene conversion in a finite population when conversion events are rare. Here I extend my "weak-conversion limit" model by allowing biased interallelic conversion (conversion between alleles at the same locus) of arbitrary frequency and various threshold selection schemes for rare interlocus conversion events. I suggest that it is not unreasonable for gene families to experience threshold fit...

  16. Where Has All the Bias Gone? Detecting Gender Bias in the Intrahousehold Allocation of Educational Expenditure

    OpenAIRE

    Kingdon, Geeta Gandhi

    2005-01-01

    The reliability of the household consumption-based (Engel curve) methodology in detecting gender bias has been called into question because it has generally failed to confirm bias even where it exists. This article seeks to find explanations for this failure by exploiting a data set that has educational expenditure information at the individual level and also, by aggregation, at the household level. I find that, in the basic education age groups, the discriminatory mechanism in education is v...

  17. Constructing a Bias-Free Trade Governance Indicator: Revealing the Biases of Existing Survey Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Hamanaka, Shintaro; Tafgar, Aiken; Ico, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Governance is one of the key factors that shape the economic performance of an economy in terms of economic and trade growth. However, accurately measuring the quality of governance is not an easy task. Research typically uses governance indicators from surveys, which may have biases and inherent errors. In this paper, we attempt to construct an alternative governance indicator, which is free from perception and subjective biases. Our exercise is based on the inference that economies with goo...

  18. JAK2 exon 12 mutant mice display isolated erythrocytosis and changes in iron metabolism favoring increased erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisouard, Jean; Li, Sai; Kubovcakova, Lucia; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Meyer, Sara C; Lundberg, Pontus; Hao-Shen, Hui; Romanet, Vincent; Murakami, Masato; Radimerski, Thomas; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Skoda, Radek C

    2016-08-11

    Mutations in JAK2 exon 12 are frequently found in patients with polycythemia vera (PV) that do not carry a JAK2-V617F mutation. The majority of these patients display isolated erythrocytosis. We generated a mouse model that expresses JAK2-N542-E543del, the most frequent JAK2 exon 12 mutation found in PV patients. Mice expressing the human JAK2-N542-E543del (Ex12) showed a strong increase in red blood cell parameters but normal neutrophil and platelet counts, and reduced overall survival. Erythropoiesis was increased in the bone marrow and spleen, with normal megakaryopoiesis and absence of myelofibrosis in histopathology. Erythroid progenitors and precursors were increased in hematopoietic tissues, but the numbers of megakaryocytic precursors were unchanged. Phosphorylation Stat3 and Erk1/2 proteins were increased, and a trend toward increased phospho-Stat5 and phospho-Stat1 was noted. However, Stat1 knock out in Ex12 mice induced no changes in platelet or red cell parameters, indicating that Stat1 does not play a central role in mediating the effects of Ex12 signaling on megakaryopoiesis or erythropoiesis. Ex12 mice showed decreased expression of hepcidin and increased expression of transferrin receptor-1 and erythroferrone, suggesting that the strong erythroid phenotype in Ex12 mutant mice is favored by changes in iron metabolism that optimize iron availability to allow maximal production of red cells. PMID:27288519

  19. High expression of BCL-2 predicts favorable outcome in non-small cell lung cancer patients with non squamous histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bcl-2 promotes cell survival by inhibiting adapters needed for the activation and cleavage of caspases thus blocking the proteolytic cascade that ultimately dismantles the cell. Bcl-2 has been investigated as a prognostic factor in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with conflicting results. Here, we quantitatively assessed Bcl-2 expression in two large and independent cohorts to investigate the impact of Bcl-2 on survival. AQUA®, a fluorescent-based method for analysis of in situ protein expression, was used to measure Bcl-2 protein levels and classify tumors by Bcl-2 expression in a cohort of 180 NSCLC patients. An independent cohort of 354 NSCLC patients was used to validate Bcl-2 classification and evaluate outcome. Fifty % and 52% of the cases were classified as high expressers in training and validation cohorts respectively. Squamous cell carcinomas were more likely to be high expressers compared to adenocarcinomas (63% vs. 45%, p = 0.002); Bcl-2 was not associated with other clinical or pathological characteristics. Survival analysis showed that patients with high BCL-2 expression had a longer median survival compared to low expressers (22 vs. 17.5 months, log rank p = 0.014) especially in the subset of non-squamous tumors (25 vs. 13.8 months, log rank p = 0.04). Multivariate analysis revealed an independent lower risk for all patients with Bcl-2 expressing tumors (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.75, p = 0.0003) and for patients with non-squamous tumors (HR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.31-0.81, p = 0.005). Bcl-2 expression defines a subgroup of patients with a favorable outcome and may be useful for prognostic stratification of NSCLC patients

  20. Loss of CRABP-II Characterizes Human Skin Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Favors DMBA/TPA-Induced Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Daniela; Doldo, Elena; Tarquini, Chiara; Costanza, Gaetana; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Agostinelli, Sara; Campione, Elena; Di Stefani, Alessandro; Giunta, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Retinol and its derivatives play an important role in epidermal growth and differentiation and represent chemopreventive agents in nonmelanoma skin cancer. Retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) is a cytoplasmic receptor that critically regulates all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) trafficking. We documented the marked reduced expression of CRABP-II and its promoter methylation in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas. To investigate the role of CRABP-II in skin carcinogenesis we used skin lesion induction by dimethylbenz[a]anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in CRABP-II-knockout C57BL/6 mice. We observed earlier and more diffuse epidermal dysplasia, greater incidence and severity of tumors, reduced expression of cytokeratin 1/cytokeratin 10 and involucrin, increased proliferation, and impaired ATRA inhibition of tumor promotion compared with wild-type animals. CRABP-II-transfected HaCaT, FaDu, and A431 cells showed expression of differentiation markers, retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling, ATRA sensitivity, and suppression of EGFR/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT) pathways in a fatty acid binding protein 5/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-δ-independent manner. The opposite was true in keratinocytes isolated from CRABP-II-knockout mice. Finally, CRABP-II accumulation induced ubiquitination-associated reduction of EGFR. Our results showed reduced CRABP-II expression in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, and its gene deletion favored experimental skin carcinogenesis and impaired ATRA antitumor efficacy, likely modulating EGFR/AKT pathways and retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling. Therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring CRABP-II-mediated signaling may amplify therapeutic retinoid efficacy in nonmelanoma skin cancer. PMID:26945879

  1. Addressing bias in the forensic assessment of sexual harassment claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, L H

    1998-01-01

    This article addresses unique biases that arise in the assessment of sexual harassment claims by forensic psychiatrists. These include gender biases, diagnostic biases, sociopolitical biases, and bias that arises from lack of knowledge regarding sexual harassment or lack of formal psychiatric training. Forensic psychiatrists are ethically obligated to strive for objectivity and honesty in their assessments. By becoming aware of these biases and attempting to minimize them, we can meet our ethical obligations as forensic psychiatrists. In addition, we can provide more credible and valuable assessments to the courts in this increasingly litigated and partisan issue. PMID:9894213

  2. When bias binds: Effect of implicit outgroup bias on ingroup affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby-Senghor, Drew S; Sinclair, Stacey; Smith, Colin Tucker

    2015-09-01

    We tested a novel process we term implicit homophily in which perceivers' implicit outgroup bias shapes their affiliative responses toward ingroup targets with outgroup friends as a function of perceived similarity. Across 4 studies, we tested implicit homophily in the context of racial groups. We found that White participants with higher implicit anti-Black bias reported less affiliative responses toward White targets with Black friends compared with White targets with White friends, and this effect persisted above and beyond the effects of implicit pro-White bias and explicit racial bias (Studies 1-3). We further found evidence that this relationship between implicit anti-Black bias and affiliation exists because participants infer how comfortable targets are around outgroup members (Preliminary Study) and use this information to infer similarity on this dimension (Studies 1-3). Our findings also suggested that stigma transference and expectancy violation were not viable alternative mediators (Preliminary Study and Study 1). Finally, women's implicit anti-Black bias predicted their likelihood of having Facebook friends with Black friends, providing ecological and behavioral evidence of implicit homophily (Study 4). Implications for research on stigma by association, extended contact, affiliation, and network formation are discussed. PMID:26280842

  3. The HII Galaxy Hubble Diagram Strongly Favors Rh = ct over ΛCDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Melia, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    We continue to build support for the proposal to use HII galaxies (HIIGx) and giant extragalactic HII regions (GEHR) as standard candles to construct the Hubble diagram at redshifts beyond the current reach of Type Ia supernovae. Using a sample of 25 high-redshift HIIGx, 107 local HIIGx, and 24 GEHR, we confirm that the correlation between the emission-line luminosity and ionized-gas velocity dispersion is a viable luminosity indicator, and use it to test and compare the standard model ΛCDM and the Rh = ct Universe by optimizing the parameters in each cosmology using a maximization of the likelihood function. For the flat ΛCDM model, the best fit is obtained with Ω _m= 0.40_{-0.09}^{+0.09}. However, statistical tools, such as the Akaike (AIC), Kullback (KIC) and Bayes (BIC) Information Criteria favor Rh = ct over the standard model with a likelihood of ≈94.8% - 98.8% versus only ≈1.2% - 5.2%. For wCDM (the version of ΛCDM with a dark-energy equation of state wde ≡ pde/ρde rather than wde = wΛ = -1), a statistically acceptable fit is realized with Ω _m=0.22_{-0.14}^{+0.16} and w_de= -0.51_{-0.25}^{+0.15} which, however, are not fully consistent with their concordance values. In this case, wCDM has two more free parameters than Rh = ct, and is penalized more heavily by these criteria. We find that Rh = ct is strongly favored over wCDM with a likelihood of ≈92.9% - 99.6% versus only 0.4% - 7.1%. The current HIIGx sample is already large enough for the BIC to rule out ΛCDM/wCDM in favor of Rh = ct at a confidence level approaching 3σ.

  4. Growth and Mycotoxin Production by Chaetomium globosum Is Favored in a Neutral pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Fogle

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chaetomium globosum is frequently isolated in water-damaged buildings and produces two mycotoxins called chaetoglobosins A and C when cultured on building material. In this study, the influence of ambient pH on the growth of C. globosum was examined on an artificial medium. This fungus was capable of growth on potato dextrose agar ranging in pH from 4.3 to 9.4 with optimal growth and chaetoglobosin C production occurring at a neutral pH. In addition, our results show that sporulation is favored in an acidic environment.

  5. Favorable outcome of patients affected by rhabdoid tumors due to rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome (RTPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordes, Uwe; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Modena, Piergiorgio; Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Reinhard, Harald; Hasselblatt, Martin; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome is usually associated with shorter survival in patients with malignant rhabdoid tumors regardless of anatomical origin. Here we present four children harboring truncating heterozygous SMARCB1/INI1 germline mutations with favorable outcome. All four patients received multi-modality treatment, three according to therapeutic recommendations by the EU-RHAB registry, two without radiotherapy, and mean event-free survival accounts for 7 years. In conclusion, intensive treatment with curative intent is justified for children with rhabdoid tumors even if an underlying rhabdoid predisposition syndrome is demonstrated. PMID:24123847

  6. Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, H.H.

    1981-03-01

    An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States.

  7. 2005 winter meeting - pleading in favor of a sensible energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year's Winter Meeting of Deutsches Atomforum, which was held under the general heading of 'Pleading in Favor of a Sensible Energy Mix', dealt with the large variety of aspects and perspectives of this important key topic, also with respect to the sustainability factors, environment, economy, and social aspects. Twelve contributions, or statements, by representatives from politics, industry, society, and research covered different aspects of a 'sensible energy mix'. A round of politicians debated the subject controversially. The meeting, which was attended by more than 250 participants, thus opened 2005 with an interesting presentation of present and future topics of the power supply debate. (orig.)

  8. 2005 DAtF winter meeting - pleading in favor of a sensible energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year's Winter Meeting of Deutsches Atomforum, which was held under the general heading of 'Pleading in Favor of a Sensible Energy Mix', dealt with the large variety of aspects and perspectives of this important key topic, also with respect to the sustainability factors, environment, economy, and social aspects. Twelve contributions, or statements, by representatives from politics, industry, society, and research covered different aspects of a 'sensible energy mix'. A round of politicians debated the subject controversially. The meeting, which was attended by more than 250 participants, thus opened 2005 with an interesting presentation of present and future topics of the power supply debate. (orig.)

  9. Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States

  10. Educar a favor d'una nova cultura ambiental de l'aigua

    OpenAIRE

    Castelltort Valls, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Aquesta tesi doctoral és un estudi de casos que té per objectiu identificar i analitzar les condicions i les activitats que contribueixen a la formació d'una nova cultura ambiental de l'aigua en l'alumnat de l'Educació Primària (EP) i en els estudiants del Grau d'Educació Primària (GEP). Entenent per nova cultura ambiental de l'aigua el conjunt de coneixements -tant conceptuals com actitudinals- que han d'afavorir una competència per actuar a favor de la conservació dels recursos hídrics. En ...

  11. IMPACT OF ISLAMIC RELIGIOUS SYMBOL IN PRODUCING FAVORABLE ATTITUDE TOWARD ADVERTISEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas NASERI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature on religion and advertisement led to the identification of three lines of studies examining the influence of religion on advertising. These three lines of studies focused on attitude toward advertising of controversial products, presence of religious values in advertisements executions, and the consumers’ reactions to advertisement containing religious cues or symbols. The latter line has been followed modestly in Christian context but not in Islamic context of advertising. Hijab as a significant religious cue might peripherally generates a favorable attitude toward advertisement among Muslims. It is suggested that information processing theories like Elaboration Likelihood Model provides a pertinent theoretical framework to examine this effect empirically.

  12. Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: The Contribution of Different Evolutionary Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Patthy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the accompanying papers we have shown that sequence errors of public databases and confusion of paralogs and epaktologs (proteins that are related only through the independent acquisition of the same domain types significantly distort the picture that emerges from comparison of the domain architecture (DA of multidomain Metazoan proteins since they introduce a strong bias in favor of terminal over internal DA change. The issue of whether terminal or internal DA changes occur with greater probability has very important implications for the DA evolution of multidomain proteins since gene fusion can add domains only at terminal positions, whereas domain-shuffling is capable of inserting domains both at internal and terminal positions. As a corollary, overestimation of terminal DA changes may be misinterpreted as evidence for a dominant role of gene fusion in DA evolution. In this manuscript we show that in several recent studies of DA evolution of Metazoa the authors used databases that are significantly contaminated with incomplete, abnormal and mispredicted sequences (e.g., UniProtKB/TrEMBL, EnsEMBL and/or the authors failed to separate paralogs and epaktologs, explaining why these studies concluded that the major mechanism for gains of new domains in metazoan proteins is gene fusion. In contrast with the latter conclusion, our studies on high quality orthologous and paralogous Swiss-Prot sequences confirm that shuffling of mobile domains had a major role in the evolution of multidomain proteins of Metazoa and especially those formed in early vertebrates.

  13. Quantitative Bias Analysis in Regulatory Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, Timothy L; Fox, Matthew P; Cooney, Darryl; Lu, Yun; Forshee, Richard A

    2016-07-01

    Nonrandomized studies are essential in the postmarket activities of the US Food and Drug Administration, which, however, must often act on the basis of imperfect data. Systematic errors can lead to inaccurate inferences, so it is critical to develop analytic methods that quantify uncertainty and bias and ensure that these methods are implemented when needed. "Quantitative bias analysis" is an overarching term for methods that estimate quantitatively the direction, magnitude, and uncertainty associated with systematic errors influencing measures of associations. The Food and Drug Administration sponsored a collaborative project to develop tools to better quantify the uncertainties associated with postmarket surveillance studies used in regulatory decision making. We have described the rationale, progress, and future directions of this project. PMID:27196652

  14. Bias and spread in EVT performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    Performance tests (error probability measurements) of communications systems characterized by low bit rates and high reliability requirements frequently utilize classical extreme value theory (EVT) to avoid the excessive test times encountered with bit error rate (BER) tests. If the underlying noise is Gaussian or perturbed Gaussian, the EVT error estimates have either excessive bias or excessive variance if an insufficient number of test samples is used. EVT is examined to explain the cause of this bias and spread. Experimental verification is made by testing a known Gaussian source, and procedures that minimize these effects are described. It seems apparent that even under the best of conditions the EVT test results are not particularly better than those of BER tests.

  15. Calibration biases in logical reasoning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Macbeth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution is to present an experimental study about calibration in deductive reasoning tasks. Calibration is defi ned as the empirical convergence or divergence between the objective and the subjective success. The underconfi dence bias is understood as the dominance of the former over the latter. The hypothesis of this study states that the form of the propositions presented in the experiment is critical for calibration phenomena. Affi rmative and negative propositions are distinguished in their cognitive processing. Results suggests that monotonous compound propositions are prone to underconfi dence. An heuristic approach to this phenomenon is proposed. The activation of a monotony heuristic would produce an illusion of simplicity that generates the calibration bias. These evidence is analysed in the context of the metacognitive modeling of calibration phenomena.

  16. Leveraging Pileup as a Zero Bias Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider, each event recorded by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations contains many nearly simultaneous pp collisions occurring at nearly the same time as the primary interaction of interest. These pileup collisions are usually a nuisance, degrading the energy resolution of jets and the missing transverse momentum, as well as affecting other reconstructed physics objects. However, interesting processes can also occur in the pileup interactions, and by construction they are recorded without selection bias since the triggering signal originates from the primary interaction in the event. These zero bias events have a large effective prescale, but can be useful for searches and measurements of processes that are difficult or not possible to record with an online trigger. As one example, we show a significant improvement in the sensitivity to low mass dijet resonances using pileup interactions.

  17. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meifeng Dai; Jie Liu; Feng Zhu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present trapping issues of weight-dependent walks on weighted hierarchical networks which are based on the classic scale-free hierarchical networks. Assuming that edge’s weight is used as local information by a random walker, we introduce a biased walk. The biased walk is that a walker, at each step, chooses one of its neighbours with a probability proportional to the weight of the edge. We focus on a particular case with the immobile trap positioned at the hub node which has the largest degree in the weighted hierarchical networks. Using a method based on generating functions, we determine explicitly the mean first-passage time (MFPT) for the trapping issue. Let parameter (0 < < 1) be the weight factor. We show that the efficiency of the trapping process depends on the parameter a; the smaller the value of a, the more efficient is the trapping process.

  18. Plutino Detection Biases, Including the Kozai Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, S M

    2013-01-01

    Because of their proximity within the transneptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modelling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion (omega) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of omega, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction (fkoz) has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true fkoz has been predicted to be between 10...

  19. Human language reveals a universal positivity bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Clark, Eric M; Desu, Suma; Frank, Morgan R; Reagan, Andrew J; Williams, Jake Ryland; Mitchell, Lewis; Harris, Kameron Decker; Kloumann, Isabel M; Bagrow, James P; Megerdoomian, Karine; McMahon, Matthew T; Tivnan, Brian F; Danforth, Christopher M

    2015-02-24

    Using human evaluation of 100,000 words spread across 24 corpora in 10 languages diverse in origin and culture, we present evidence of a deep imprint of human sociality in language, observing that (i) the words of natural human language possess a universal positivity bias, (ii) the estimated emotional content of words is consistent between languages under translation, and (iii) this positivity bias is strongly independent of frequency of word use. Alongside these general regularities, we describe interlanguage variations in the emotional spectrum of languages that allow us to rank corpora. We also show how our word evaluations can be used to construct physical-like instruments for both real-time and offline measurement of the emotional content of large-scale texts. PMID:25675475

  20. Components of visual bias: a multiplicative hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundesen, Claus; Vangkilde, Signe; Habekost, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Attentional selection can be viewed as having two aspects: selection with respect to particular objects and selection with respect to particular categories. Both aspects are mathematically modeled in the theory of visual attention (TVA). In this paper, we expand the rate equation of the TVA and propose that the visual bias toward seeing an object x as a member of category i is a product of three factors: the expectancy (prior probability) of being presented with members of category i, the subjective importance (utility) of seeing objects in category i as members of that category, and the general level of alertness. Together, the three factors also determine the level of arousal in the visual system. The hypothesized multiplicative interaction between the three components of visual bias seems consistent with the function of an ideal observer and also paves the way for a Bayesian interpretation of the TVA. PMID:25675882

  1. Biased liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Scolari, Lara;

    2009-01-01

    A simulation scheme for the transmission spectrum of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal and subject to an external bias is presented. The alignment of the biased liquid crystal is simulated using the finite element method to solve the relevant system of coupled...... partial differential equations. From the liquid crystal alignment the full tensorial dielectric permittivity in the capillaries is derived. The transmission spectrum for the photonic crystal fiber is obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue problem deriving from Maxwell’s equations using a vector...... element based finite element method. We demonstrate results for a splay aligned liquid crystal infiltrated into the capillaries of a four-ring photonic crystal fiber and compare them to corresponding experiments....

  2. Bias in emerging biomarkers for bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, A F; Köhler, C A; Fernandes, B S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date no comprehensive evaluation has appraised the likelihood of bias or the strength of the evidence of peripheral biomarkers for bipolar disorder (BD). Here we performed an umbrella review of meta-analyses of peripheral non-genetic biomarkers for BD. METHOD: The Pubmed/Medline, E......BACKGROUND: To date no comprehensive evaluation has appraised the likelihood of bias or the strength of the evidence of peripheral biomarkers for bipolar disorder (BD). Here we performed an umbrella review of meta-analyses of peripheral non-genetic biomarkers for BD. METHOD: The Pubmed......) was observed in 11 meta-analyses. Heterogeneity was high for (I 2 ⩾ 50%) 16 meta-analyses. Only two biomarkers met criteria for suggestive evidence namely the soluble IL-2 receptor and morning cortisol. The median power of included studies, using the effect size of the largest dataset as the plausible...

  3. Electrically Tunable Quenching of DNA Fluctuations in Biased Solid-State Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hu; Girdhar, Anuj; Schulten, Klaus; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-26

    Nanopores offer sensors for a broad range of nanoscale materials, in particular ones of biological origin such as single- and double-stranded DNA or DNA-protein complexes. In order to increase single-molecule sensitivity, it is desirable to control biomolecule motion inside nanopores. In the present study, we investigate how in the case of a double-stranded DNA the single-molecule sensitivity can be improved through bias voltages. For this purpose we carry out molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA inside nanopores in an electrically biased metallic membrane. Stabilization of DNA, namely, a reduction in thermal fluctuations, is observed under positive bias voltages, while negative voltages bring about only negligible stabilization. For positive biases the stabilization arises from electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged DNA backbone and the positively charged pore surface. Simulations on a teardrop-shaped pore show a transverse shift of DNA position toward the sharp end of the pore under positive bias voltages, suggesting the possibility to control DNA alignment inside nanopores through geometry shaping. The present findings open a feasible and efficient route to reduce thermal noise and, in turn, enhance the signal-to-noise ratio in single-molecule nanopore sensing. PMID:26998639

  4. Sex-Biased Networks and Nodes of Sexually Antagonistic Conflict in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. B. Hansen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual antagonism, or conflict, can occur when males and females harbor opposing reproductive strategies. The large fraction of sex-biased genes in genomes present considerable opportunities for conflict to occur, suggesting that sexual antagonism may potentially be a general phenomenon at the molecular level. Here, we employ a novel strategy to identify potential nodes of sexual conflict in Drosophila melanogaster by coupling male, female, and sex-unbiased networks derived from genome-wide expression data with available genetic and protein interaction data. We find that sex-biased networks comprise a large fraction (~1/3 of the total interaction network with the male network possessing nearly twice the number of nodes (genes relative to the female network. However, there are far less edges or interaction partners among male relative to female subnetworks as seen in their power law distributions. We further identified 598 sex-unbiased genes that can act as indirect nodes of interlocus sexual conflict as well as 271 direct nodal pairs of potential conflict between male- and female-biased genes. The pervasiveness of such potentially conflicting nodes may explain the rapid evolution of sex-biased as well as non-sex-biased genes via this molecular mechanism of sexual selection even among taxa such as Drosophila that are nominally sexually dimorphic.

  5. Characterization, Manipulation, and Prediction of Protein Aggregation in Model Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Galm, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Main influencing factors favoring protein aggregation are to be identified regarding solution conditions of the surrounding aqueous solution and regarding physicochemical properties of the model proteins themselves. Based on these experimental results, concepts are developed for manipulation of protein aggregation behavior. Finally, based on selected parameters that significantly impact protein aggregation behavior, approaches are developed to predict protein aggregation propensity.

  6. Limiter biasing experiments on the tokamak ISTTOK

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silva, C.; Nedzelskiy, I.; Figueiredo, H.; Cabral, J. A. C.; Varandas, C. A. F.; Stöckel, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2003), s. 937-944. ISSN 0011-4626. [Workshop "Electric Fields Structures and Relaxation in Edge Plasmas"/6th./. St. Petersburg, 13.06.2003-14.06.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : biasing, edge plasma, particle confinement Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  7. Edge biasing in the WEGA stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, Oliver

    2009-02-27

    The WEGA stellarator is used to confine low temperature, overdense (densities exceeding the cut-off density of the heating wave) plasmas by magnetic fields in the range of B=50-500 mT. Microwave heating systems are used to ignite gas discharges using hydrogen, helium, neon or argon as working gases. The produced plasmas have been analyzed using Langmuir and emissive probes, a single-channel interferometer and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy. For a typical argon discharge in the low field operation, B=56 mT, the maximum electron density is n{sub e}{proportional_to}10{sup 18} m{sup -3} with temperatures in the range of T=4-12 eV. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probes and are cross-checked with interferometry. It is demonstrated within this work that the joint use of emissive probes and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy allows a precise measurement of the radial electric field. The focus of this work is on demonstrating the ability to modify the existing radial electric field in a plasma by using the biasing probe. This work commences with a basic approach and first establishes the diagnostic tools in a well-known discharge. Then the perturbation caused by the biasing probe is assessed. Following the characterization of the unperturbed plasmas, plasma states altered by the operation of the energized biasing probe are characterized. During biasing the plasma two different stable plasma states have been found. The two observed plasma states differ in plasma parameter profiles, such as density, temperature, electric field and confined energy. (orig.)

  8. Calibration biases in logical reasoning tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Macbeth; Alfredo López Alonso; Eugenia Razumiejczyk; Rodrigo Sosa; Carolina Pereyra; Humberto Fernández

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to present an experimental study about calibration in deductive reasoning tasks. Calibration is defi ned as the empirical convergence or divergence between the objective and the subjective success. The underconfi dence bias is understood as the dominance of the former over the latter. The hypothesis of this study states that the form of the propositions presented in the experiment is critical for calibration phenomena. Affi rmative and negative propositions are...

  9. A Protectionist Bias in Majoritarian Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Gene; Helpman, Elhanan

    2005-01-01

    We develop a novel model of campaigns, elections, and policymaking in which the ex ante objectives of national party leaders differ from the ex post objectives of elected legislators. This generates a distinction between "policy rhetoric" and "policy reality" and introduces an important role for "party discipline" in the policymaking process. We identify a protectionist bias in majoritarian politics. When trade policy is chosen by the majority delegation and legislators in the minority have l...

  10. Bias During the Evaluation of Animal Studies?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Knight

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Animal experimentation evokes strong emotional responses in people on both sides of the debate surrounding its ethical status. However, the true level of its usefulness to society may only be discerned by careful examination of reliable scientific evidence. My recent book, The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments, reviewed more than 500 relevant scientific publications. Recently in this journal, however, a reviewer essentially accused me of bias. Yet the conclusions of my b...

  11. Substitution biases in price indices during transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Filer, Randall K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2004), s. 167-177. ISSN 0167-8000 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : price liberalization * substitution bias * transition economies Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=17109091&site=ehost-live

  12. Edge biasing in the WEGA stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WEGA stellarator is used to confine low temperature, overdense (densities exceeding the cut-off density of the heating wave) plasmas by magnetic fields in the range of B=50-500 mT. Microwave heating systems are used to ignite gas discharges using hydrogen, helium, neon or argon as working gases. The produced plasmas have been analyzed using Langmuir and emissive probes, a single-channel interferometer and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy. For a typical argon discharge in the low field operation, B=56 mT, the maximum electron density is ne∝1018 m-3 with temperatures in the range of T=4-12 eV. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probes and are cross-checked with interferometry. It is demonstrated within this work that the joint use of emissive probes and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy allows a precise measurement of the radial electric field. The focus of this work is on demonstrating the ability to modify the existing radial electric field in a plasma by using the biasing probe. This work commences with a basic approach and first establishes the diagnostic tools in a well-known discharge. Then the perturbation caused by the biasing probe is assessed. Following the characterization of the unperturbed plasmas, plasma states altered by the operation of the energized biasing probe are characterized. During biasing the plasma two different stable plasma states have been found. The two observed plasma states differ in plasma parameter profiles, such as density, temperature, electric field and confined energy. (orig.)

  13. Plutino Detection Biases, Including the Kozai Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their proximity within the transneptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modelling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, co...

  14. The Scarcity Bias: Some Theoretical Notes

    OpenAIRE

    Mittone, Luigi; Soraperra, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    The bias generated by the subjective perception of scarcity on the consumer’s choice is discussed from a theoretical perspective. The core idea here discussed is that scarcity is an Lancasterian attribute of the goods which is not endogenously built in the goods, like many physical attributes, color, weight, etc. but which is dependent from the context where the good is consumed. The exogenously nature of scarcity requires a specific theoretical treatment which is here attempted.

  15. Interpretive biases in socially anxious adults

    OpenAIRE

    Godfree, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Social phobia is a highly prevalent and debilitating anxiety disorder that can significantly impact quality of life and produce extreme distress in social situations. Cognitive models of social phobia suggest that information-processing biases are involved in the maintenance of social anxiety. Treatment typically involves a course of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Recent advancements in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying social anxiety have led to specific adjunctive treatme...

  16. Home Biases, 19th Century Style

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Flandreau

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the existence of 'home' biases in the 19th century global capital market, whereby colonies appear to have received a 'disproportionate' amount of capital from their metropolis. Starting from a discussion of the Bulow Rogoff (1989) problem, we argue that imperial links provided a natural institutional framework to make pre-commitment credible by ensuring an adequate degree of willingness to pay. This was not because imperial rule provided coercion or punishment, but rather...

  17. Frictions, behavioral biases and active portfolio management

    OpenAIRE

    Eisele, Alexander; Nowak, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The three chapters of this thesis contribute to the following research questions: (i) What is the role of agency frictions for the performance of mutual funds? (ii) What is the role of market frictions for the performance of hedge funds? (iii) Do hedge funds profit from the behavioral biases of other market participants? The first chapter of this thesis comprises the article "Are Star Funds really Shining? Cross-trading and Performance Shifting in Mutual Fund Families", which is joint wo...

  18. Reference bias in reports of drug trials.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickersin, K

    1987-01-01

    Articles published before 1985 describing double blind trials of two or more non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rheumatoid arthritis were examined to see whether there was any bias in the references they cited. Althogether 244 articles meeting the criteria were found through a Medline search and through examining the reference lists of the articles retrieved. The drugs compared in the studies were classified as new or as control drugs and the outcome of the trial as positive or not posi...

  19. Team formation and biased self-attribution

    OpenAIRE

    Corgnet, Brice

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the impact of individuals' self-attribution biases on the formation of teams in the workplace. We consider a two periods model in which workers jointly decide whether to form a team or work alone. We assume workers' abilities are unknown. Agents update their beliefs about abilities after receiving a signal at the end of the first period. We show that allowing workers to learn about their abilities undermines cooperation when a fixed allocation of the group outcome is assumed. Consi...

  20. Using biased discriminant analysis for email filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Juan Carlos; Moens, Marie-Francine

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on email filtering based on content features. We test the validity of a novel statistical feature extraction method, which relies on dimensionality reduction to retain the most informative and discriminative features from messages. The approach, named Biased Discriminant Analysis (BDA), aims at finding a feature space transformation that closely clusters positive examples while pushing away the negative ones. This method is an extension of Linear Discriminant Analysis (L...

  1. The bias in time series volatility forecasts

    OpenAIRE

    Ederington, Louis H; Wei Guan

    2010-01-01

    By Jensen's inequality, a model's forecasts of the variance and standard deviation of returns cannot both be unbiased. This study explores the bias in GARCH type model forecasts of the standard deviation of returns, which we argue is the more appropriate volatility measure for most financial applications. For a wide variety of markets, the GARCH, EGARCH, and GJR (or TGARCH) models tend to persistently over‐estimate the standard deviation of returns, whereas the ARLS model of L. Ederington and...

  2. The natalist bias of pollution control

    OpenAIRE

    De La Croix, David; GOSSERIES, Axel

    2011-01-01

    For a given technology, two ways are available to achieve low polluting emissions: reducing production per capita or reducing population size. This paper insists on the tension between the former and the latter. Controlling pollution either through Pigovian taxes or through tradable quotas schemes encourages agents to shift away from production to tax free activities such as procreation and leisure. This natalist bias will deteriorate the environment further, entailing the need to impose ever...

  3. Gender Roles:Biases or Differences?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏静

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to probe into the two distinct gender roles-males and females-in several ways, and further answers the question“what on earth cause the salient differentiation in gender roles, biases or differences? ”In conclusion, the author holds that it is the physiological and psychological differences in the two sexes that result in the differed distribution of such vari-ous duties which males and females are supposed to fulfill as the current society has expected.

  4. Bias Adaptation for Vocal Tract Length Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Saheer, Lakshmi; Yamagishi, Junichi; Garner, Philip N.; Dines, John

    2013-01-01

    Vocal tract length normalisation (VTLN) is a well known rapid adaptation technique. VTLN as a linear transformation in the cepstral domain results in the scaling and translation factors. The warping factor represents the spectral scaling parameter. While, the translation factor represented by bias term captures more speaker characteristics especially in a rapid adaptation framework without having the risk of over-fitting. This paper presents a complete and comprehensible derivation of the bia...

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Mirsafian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure.

  6. Biases in Cometary Catalogues and Planet X

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, J

    2002-01-01

    Two sets of investigators -- Murray (1999) and Matese, Whitman & Whitmire (1999) -- have recently claimed evidence for an undiscovered Solar System planet from possible great circle alignments in the aphelia directions of the long period comets. However, comet discoveries are bedevilled by selection effects. These include anomalies caused by the excess of observers in the northern as against the southern hemisphere, seasonal and diurnal biases, directional effects which make it harder to discover comets in certain regions of the sky, as well as sociological biases. The stream proposed by Murray is shown on an equal area Hammer-Aitoff projection. The addition of newer data weakens the case for the alignment. There is also evidence that the subsample in the stream is affected by seasonal and north-south biases. The stream proposed by Matese et al. is most obvious in the sample of dynamically new comets, and especially in those whose orbits are best known. The most recent data continues to maintain the overp...

  7. Primordial black holes as biased tracers

    CERN Document Server

    Tada, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are theoretical black holes which may be formed during the radiation dominant era and, basically, caused by the gravitational collapse of radiational overdensities. It has been well known that in the context of the structure formation in our Universe such collapsed objects, e.g., halos/galaxies, could be considered as bias tracers of underlying matter fluctuations and the halo/galaxy bias has been studied well. Employing a peak-background split picture which is known to be a useful tool to discuss the halo bias, we consider the large scale clustering behavior of the PBH and propose an almost mass-independent constraint to the scenario that dark matters (DMs) consist of PBHs. We consider the case where the statistics of the primordial curvature perturbations is almost Gaussian, but with small local-type non-Gaussianity. If PBHs account for the DM abundance, such a large scale clustering of PBHs behaves as nothing but the matter isocurvature perturbation and constrained strictly by...

  8. A Model of Inductive Bias Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, J

    2011-01-01

    A major problem in machine learning is that of inductive bias: how to choose a learner's hypothesis space so that it is large enough to contain a solution to the problem being learnt, yet small enough to ensure reliable generalization from reasonably-sized training sets. Typically such bias is supplied by hand through the skill and insights of experts. In this paper a model for automatically learning bias is investigated. The central assumption of the model is that the learner is embedded within an environment of related learning tasks. Within such an environment the learner can sample from multiple tasks, and hence it can search for a hypothesis space that contains good solutions to many of the problems in the environment. Under certain restrictions on the set of all hypothesis spaces available to the learner, we show that a hypothesis space that performs well on a sufficiently large number of training tasks will also perform well when learning novel tasks in the same environment. Explicit bounds are also de...

  9. Anandamide mediates cognitive judgement bias in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregiel, J; Malek, N; Popik, P; Starowicz, K; Rygula, R

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid (EC) system on the valence of cognitive judgement bias of rats in the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. To accomplish this goal, after initial behavioural training, different groups of rats received single, systemic injections of the irreversible anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis inhibitor URB597, the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251, the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) inverse agonist AM630, the combination of URB597 and AM251, and a combination of URB597 and AM630 and were subsequently tested with the ACI paradigm. We report that URB597 at a dose of 1 mg/kg significantly biased animals towards positive interpretation of the ambiguous cue and that this effect was abolished by pre-treatment with AM251 (1 mg/kg) or AM630 (1 mg/kg). The CB1 and CB2 inverse agonists administered alone (1 mg/kg) had no statistically significant effects on the interpretation of the ambiguous cue by rats. Our findings suggest involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the mediation of optimistic judgement bias. PMID:26363193

  10. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE, and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. METHODS: We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale, an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors, and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. RESULTS: MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant, facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions, and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant. In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  11. Bias temperature instability for devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to one of the more challenging reliability issues plaguing modern semiconductor technologies, negative bias temperature instability.  Readers will benefit from state-of-the art coverage of research in topics such as time dependent defect spectroscopy, anomalous defect behavior, stochastic modeling with additional metastable states, multiphonon theory, compact modeling with RC ladders and implications on device reliability and lifetime.  ·         Enables readers to understand and model negative bias temperature instability, with an emphasis on dynamics; ·         Includes coverage of DC vs. AC stress, duty factor dependence and bias dependence; ·         Explains time dependent defect spectroscopy, as a measurement method that operates on nanoscale MOSFETs; ·         Introduces new defect model for metastable defect states, nonradiative multiphonon theory and stochastic behavior.

  12. Effects of Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone precipitation bias on ENSO phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the effect of mean precipitation bias over the Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) on the El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) transition is examined using CMIP3 and CMIP5 archives. It is found that the climate models with excessive mean precipitation over the central/eastern Pacific ITCZ tend to simulate slower phase transition of the ENSO. This is because a wetter climatology provides a favorable condition for anomalously strong convective activity; the El Niño-related convection anomaly tends to be increased over the central/eastern Pacific ITCZ with a local wet bias. This induces additional low-level westerlies over the central/eastern equatorial Pacific. As a result, the ENSO-related zonal wind stress anomaly over the central Pacific, which is south of the equator without the wet ITCZ bias during boreal winter, is shifted to the east, and its meridional width is expanded northward. It is found that both the eastward shift and northward expansion of ENSO-related wind stress can lead to slower ENSO phase transition as it takes longer time for the reflected Rossby waves to suppress the ENSO growth. This implies that the off-equatorial mean precipitation plays an important role in ENSO phase transition

  13. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis which is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the NRC for evaluation of the integrity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. It is anticipated that there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code which is accepted by the NRC and utilities, as more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracture Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) PTS PFM code, which is intended to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as PFM global modeling methodology, the capability to approximate the effects of thermal streaming on circumferential flaws located inside a plume region created by fluid and thermal stratification, a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an adequate range of two and three dimensional inside surface flaws, the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports, and user friendliness

  14. Description of electromagnetic and favored $\\alpha$-transitions in heavy odd-mass nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrescu, A

    2016-01-01

    We describe electromagnetic and favored \\alpha-transitions to rotational bands in odd-mass nuclei built upon a single particle state with angular momentum projection $\\Omega=\\frac{1}{2}$ in the region $88 \\le Z \\le 98$. We use the particle coupled to an even-even core approach described by the Coherent State Model (CSM) and the coupled channels method to estimate partial $\\alpha$-decay widths. We reproduce the energy levels of the rotational band where favored $\\alpha$-transitions occur for 26 nuclei and predict B (E2) values for electromagnetic transitions to the bandhead using a deformation parameter and a Hamiltonian strength parameter for each nucleus, together with an effective collective charge depending linearly on the deformation parameter. Where experimental data is available, the contribution of the single particle effective charge to the total B (E2) value is calculated. The Hamiltonian describing the $\\alpha$- nucleus interaction contains two terms, a spherically symmetric potential given by the d...

  15. Bond population analysis on combination of favorable growth unit of Al(OH)3 crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The quantum chemical calculation on four representative combination modes of the favorable growth unit Al6(OH)18(H2O)6of Al(OH)3 crystals and the single unit were calculated. On the base of the prior investigation, and from the point of view of bond population and net atomic charge, the relationships between the combination mode of the favorable growth unit and the relative intensity of chemical bond of the systems were discussed. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed at RB3LYP/6-31G and RHF/6-31G levels by ab initio and DFT methods respectively. From the point of view of bond population, it can be preliminarily presumed that the interatomic bond force of the system with side-face-combination-B mode is weaker to a certain extent. From the point of view of the net charge, when the combination mode is obverse-face-combination-D, the interatomic bond force will be enhanced.

  16. Bound on the Slope of Steady Water Waves with Favorable Vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Walter A.; Wheeler, Miles H.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the angle {θ} of inclination (with respect to the horizontal) of the profile of a steady two dimensional inviscid symmetric periodic or solitary water wave subject to gravity. Although {θ} may surpass 30° for some irrotational waves close to the extreme wave, Amick (Arch Ration Mech Anal 99(2):91-114, 1987) proved that for any irrotational wave the angle must be less than 31.15°. Is the situation similar for periodic or solitary waves that are not irrotational? The extreme Gerstner wave has infinite depth, adverse vorticity and vertical cusps (θ = 90°). Moreover, numerical calculations show that even waves of finite depth can overturn if the vorticity is adverse. In this paper, on the other hand, we prove an upper bound of 45° on {θ} for a large class of waves with favorable vorticity and finite depth. In particular, the vorticity can be any constant with the favorable sign. We also prove a series of general inequalities on the pressure within the fluid, including the fact that any overturning wave must have a pressure sink.

  17. Highly Expressed and Slowly Evolving Proteins Share Compositional Properties with Thermophilic Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cherry, Joshua L.

    2009-01-01

    The sequences of proteins encoded by a genome evolve at different rates. A correlate of a protein's evolutionary rate is its expression level: highly expressed proteins tend to evolve slowly. Some explanations of rate variation and the correlation between rate and expression predict that more slowly evolving and more highly expressed proteins have more favorable equilibrium constants for folding. Proteins from thermophiles generally have more stable folds than proteins from mesophiles, and it...

  18. Impact of Continued Biased Disenrollment from the Medic...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Impact of Continued Biased Disenrollment from the Medicare Advantage Program to Fee-for-Service As reported in Impact of Continued Biased Disenrollment from the...

  19. Comparing measures of cognitive bias relating to eating behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Pothos, E. M.; Calitri, R.; Tapper, K.; Brunstrom, J M; Rogers, P J

    2009-01-01

    Consumption of and/or abstinence from substances with a high reward value (e.g., heroin, marijuana, alcohol, nicotine, certain foods) are associated with cognitive biases for information related to the substance. Such cognitive biases are important since they may contribute to difficulties in controlling intake of the substance. We examine cognitive biases for stimuli related to food. For the first time, we concurrently employ and compare five conceptually distinct measures of cognitive bias ...

  20. Application and investigation of a bound for outcome reporting bias

    OpenAIRE

    Gamble Carrol; Williamson Paula R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Direct empirical evidence for the existence of outcome reporting bias is accumulating and this source of bias is recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Methods A method for calculating the maximum bias in a meta-analysis due to publication bias is adapted for the setting where within-study selective non-reporting of outcomes is suspected, and compared to the alternative approach of missing data imputation. The prope...

  1. Biased quantitative measurement of interval ordered homothetic preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Le Menestrel, Marc; LEMAIRE, Bertrand

    2004-01-01

    We represent interval ordered homothetic preferences with a quantitative homothetic utility function and a multiplicative bias. When preferences are weakly ordered (i.e. when indifference is transitive), such a bias equals 1. When indifference is intransitive, the biasing factor is a positive function smaller than 1 and measures a threshold of indifference. We show that the bias is constant if and only if preferences are semiordered, and we identify conditions ensuring a linear utility functi...

  2. Simulation of HPIB propagation in biased charge collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.5D PIC simulation using KARAT code for inner charge propagation within biased charge collector for measuring HPIB is presented. The simulation results indicate that the charges were neutralized but the current non-neutralized in the biased charge collector. The influence of ions collected vs biased voltage of the collector was also simulated. -800 V biased voltage can meet the measurement of 500 keV HPIB, and this is consistent with the experimental results

  3. Multiple Adaptive Fading Schmidt-Kalman Filter for Unknown Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Tai-Shan Lou; Zhi-Hua Wang; Meng-Li Xiao; Hui-Min Fu

    2014-01-01

    Unknown biases in dynamic and measurement models of the dynamic systems can bring greatly negative effects to the state estimates when using a conventional Kalman filter algorithm. Schmidt introduces the “consider” analysis to account for errors in both the dynamic and measurement models due to the unknown biases. Although the Schmidt-Kalman filter “considers” the biases, the uncertain initial values and incorrect covariance matrices of the unknown biases still are not considered. To solve th...

  4. Information bias in health research: definition, pitfalls, and adjustment methods

    OpenAIRE

    Althubaiti A

    2016-01-01

    Alaa Althubaiti Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: As with other fields, medical sciences are subject to different sources of bias. While understanding sources of bias is a key element for drawing valid conclusions, bias in health research continues to be a very sensitive issue that can affect the focus and outcome of investigations. Information bias, otherwise known as misclassific...

  5. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth...

  6. Modifying Threat-Related Interpretive Bias in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemink, Elske; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2011-01-01

    Socially anxious feelings sharply increase during adolescence and such feelings have been associated with interpretive biases. Studies in adults have shown that interpretive biases can be modified using Cognitive Bias Modification procedures (CBM-I) and subsequent effects on anxiety have been observed. The current study was designed to examine…

  7. CEO emotional bias and dividend policy: Bayesian network method

    OpenAIRE

    Azouzi Mohamed Ali; Jarboui Anis

    2012-01-01

    This paper assumes that managers, investors, or both behave irrationally. In addition, even though scholars have investigated behavioral irrationality from three angles, investor sentiment, investor biases and managerial biases, we focus on the relationship between one of the managerial biases, overconfidence and dividend policy. Previous research investigating the relationship between overconfidence and financial decisions has studied investment, financing decisions and firm values. However,...

  8. Development of Heuristic Bias Detection in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neys, Wim; Feremans, Vicky

    2013-01-01

    Although human reasoning is often biased by intuitive heuristics, recent studies have shown that adults and adolescents detect the biased nature of their judgments. The present study focused on the development of this critical bias sensitivity by examining the detection skills of young children in elementary school. Third and 6th graders were…

  9. Cultural Bias in Children's Storybooks: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Joan S.

    This study addresses concern about bias in educational materials for elementary school pupils. Children's storybooks were examined for the appearance of biases across the cultural categories of race, ethnicity, gender, age, socioeconomic level, religion, and environmental background. These biases included stereotyping, invisibility (omission of…

  10. MMPI Profiles of Black Americans: Is There a Bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmer, Paul J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews literature on Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) racial bias since 1977. Research indicates cases in which racial bias is present and cases where it is not. Anticipates the onslaught of research on racial bias with the MMPI-2 and provides recommendations to researchers and mental-health counselors. (RJM)

  11. Questioning Children: Interactional Evidence of Implicit Bias in Medical Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Tanya; Majid, Asifa

    2007-01-01

    Social psychologists have shown experimentally that implicit race bias can influence an individual's behavior. Implicit bias has been suggested to be more subtle and less subject to cognitive control than more explicit forms of racial prejudice. Little is known about how implicit bias is manifest in naturally occurring social interaction. This…

  12. The effect of optimism bias on time preference

    OpenAIRE

    Tal Shavit

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of optimism bias on monetary time preference and risk tolerance. The results of a survey show that preference towards the present increases with optimism bias. I argue that the factor which affects time preference is the individual’s concern regarding future events, as measured by optimism bias.

  13. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Kazumi Nakano; Toshiki Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA a...

  14. Maturation experiments reveal bias in the fossil record of feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria; Field, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary history of birds and feathers is a major focus in palaeobiology and evolutionary biology. Diverse exceptionally preserved birds and feathered dinosaurs from Jurassic and Cretaceous biotas in China have provided pivotal evidence of early feathers and feather-like integumentary features, but the true nature of many of these fossil soft tissues is still debated. Interpretations of feathers at intermediate developmental stages (i.e. Stages II, III and IV) and of simple quill-like (Stage I) feathers are particularly controversial. This reflects key uncertainties relating to the preservation potential of feathers at different evolutionary-developmental stages, and to the relative preservation potential of diagnostic features of Stage I feathers and hair. To resolve these issues, we used high pressure-high temperature autoclave experiments to simulate the effects of burial on modern feathers from the Black Coucal (Centropus grilii) and Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), and on human hair. Our results reveal profound differences in the recalcitrance of feathers of different types during maturation: Stage I and Stage V feathers retain diagnostic morphological and ultrastructural details following maturation, whereas other feather types do not. Further, the morphology and arrangement of certain ultrastructural features diagnostic of Stages III and IV, e.g. barbules, are preferentially lost during maturation. These results indicate a pervasive bias in the fossil record of feathers, whereby preservation of feathers at Stages I and V is favored. Critical stages in the evolution of feathers, i.e. Stages II, III and IV, are less likely to be preserved and more likely to be misinterpreted as feathers at earlier developmental stages. Our discovery has major implications for our understanding of the fidelity of the fossil record of feathers and provides a framework for testing the significance of putative examples of fossil feathers at different developmental

  15. Perturbation theory for nonlinear halo power spectrum: the renormalized bias and halo bias

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi J; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    We revisit an analytical model to describe the halo-matter cross-power spectrum and the halo auto-power spectrum in the weakly nonlinear regime, by combining the perturbation theory (PT) for matter clustering, the local bias model, and the halo bias. Nonlinearities in the power spectra arise from the nonlinear clustering of matter as well as the nonlinear relation between the matter and halo density fields. By using the "renormalization" approach, we express the nonlinear power spectra by a sum of the two contributions: the nonlinear matter power spectrum with the effective linear bias parameter, and the higher-order PT spectra having the halo bias parameters as the coefficients. The halo auto-power spectrum includes the residual shot noise contamination that needs to be treated as additional free parameter. The term(s) of the higher-order PT spectra and the residual shot noise cause a scale-dependent bias function relative to the nonlinear matter power spectrum in the weakly nonlinear regime. We show that th...

  16. Some effects of favorable and adverse electric fields on pool boiling in dielectric fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the application of an electric field on pool boiling in dielectric fluids were studied in this work.Two different geometries were used: one which is favorable to the bubble detachment (favorable electric field) and other which attract the bubbles toward the heater (adverse electric field).In the favorable electric field experiments, the void fraction and impact rate were calculated from the measured indicator function.Those parameters were obtained varying the probe-heater distance and the power to the heater.The results show a reduction of the void fraction with increasing applied voltage, probably caused by the combination of the dielectrophoretic force and a smaller bubble size due to the electric field application. Also, the impact rate decreases when a voltage is applied and the heat fluxes are close to the critical heat flux (CHF).On the other hand, the impact rate increases with voltage for moderate heat fluxes.Another interesting result is the approximately exponential decay of the void fraction and impact rate with the distance to the heater. Both the void fraction and the impact rate grow with heat flux if the heat fluxes are moderate, with or without applied voltage.For highest heat fluxes the void fraction still grows with heat flux if there are no applied electric fields while decreases with heat flux when there is an applied voltage. Similar behavior is observed in the impact rate.The boiling regimes was measured with adverse electric fields using two techniques.The heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime was measured on an electrically powered heater.The results in these experiments show a reduction in the CHF of 10 % for saturation conditions and 10 kV of applied voltage, and a reduction of up to 40 % for 20 oC of liquid subcooling.The boiling curve corresponding to the transition and film boiling was performed with quenching experiments.An increase in the heat flux was achieved when an electric field was applied in spite of the

  17. Characteristics of whey proteinhydrolysates from cheese whey, favors onvarious food applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jeewanthi Chaturika Renda Kankanamge; Paik Hyun-Dong; Kim Myeong-Hee; Lee Na-Kyoung; Kim Soo-Yeon; Yoon Chang Yoh

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate theproduction of whey protein hydrolysates,examiningthe physiochemical properties withfive enzyme types named Alcalase, Protease S,Protease M, Trypsin, and Pepsin. Whey protein concentratewas adjusted by ultrafiltration,increasing the whey content to 135% that of initial levels. The hydrolysates have been shown to improve the characteristics of a number of food products, and the type of enzyme has a considerable influ...

  18. Agarose gel shift assay reveals that calreticulin favors substrates with a quaternary structure in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Sanne Grundvad; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present an agarose gel shift assay that, in contrast to other electrophoresis approaches, is loaded in the center of the gel. This allows proteins to migrate in either direction according to their isoelectric points. Therefore, the presented assay enables a direct visualization, separation......-sheets in their secondary structure. It is also demonstrated that the agarose gel shift assay is useful in the study of other protein interactions and can be used as an alternative method to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis....

  19. Cosmology Favoring Extra Radiation and Sub-eV Mass Sterile Neutrinos as an Option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precision cosmology and big-bang nucleosynthesis mildly favor extra radiation in the Universe beyond photons and ordinary neutrinos, lending support to the existence of low-mass sterile neutrinos. We use the WMAP 7-year data, small-scale cosmic microwave background observations from ACBAR, BICEP, and QuAD, the SDSS 7th data release, and measurement of the Hubble parameter from HST observations to derive credible regions for the assumed common mass scale ms and effective number Ns of thermally excited sterile neutrino states. Our results are compatible with the existence of one or perhaps two sterile neutrinos, as suggested by LSND and MiniBooNE, if ms is in the sub-eV range.

  20. How to Ask for a Favor: A Case Study on the Success of Altruistic Requests

    CERN Document Server

    Althoff, Tim; Jurafsky, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Requests are at the core of many social media systems such as question & answer sites and online philanthropy communities. While the success of such requests is critical to the success of the community, the factors that lead community members to satisfy a request are largely unknown. Success of a request depends on factors like who is asking, how they are asking, when are they asking, and most critically what is being requested, ranging from small favors to substantial monetary donations. We present a case study of altruistic requests in an online community where all requests ask for the very same contribution and do not offer anything tangible in return, allowing us to disentangle what is requested from textual and social factors. Drawing from social psychology literature, we extract high-level social features from text that operationalize social relations between recipient and donor and demonstrate that these extracted relations are predictive of success. More specifically, we find that clearly communic...

  1. Maternal Acceptance: Its Contribution to Children's Favorable Perceptions of Discipline and Moral Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Renee B; Gibbs, John C

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the contribution of maternal acceptance or warmth to children's and adolescents' perceptions of discipline and formation of moral identity. The sample consisted of 93 male and female students from Grades 5, 8, and 10 and their mothers. Students completed measures pertaining to perceived maternal discipline practices and acceptance-rejection, as well as moral identity. A subsample of mothers reported on their accepting or rejecting actions toward their children. Children were more likely to feel accepted, if their mothers used inductive discipline (vs. power assertion and love withdrawal). Perceived acceptance was also related to more favorable discipline evaluations in certain respects. Specifically, inductive discipline recipients who felt accepted also evaluated induction as appropriate and responded to it with positive and guilt-related emotions. Power assertion was evaluated as appropriate among those children who did feel accepted. Finally, among inductive discipline recipients, those who felt accepted also reported higher moral identity. PMID:27177121

  2. Intramolecular Crystal Nucleation Favored by Polymer Crystallization: Monte Carlo Simulation Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Zha, Liyun; Hu, Wenbing

    2016-07-14

    We performed dynamic Monte Carlo simulations of half-half binary blends of symmetric (double and mutual) crystallizable polymers. We separately enhanced the driving forces for polymer-uniform and polymer-staggered crystals. Under parallel enhancements, polymer-uniform crystals exhibit faster nucleation and growth, with more chain folding and less lamellar thickening, than those in polymer-staggered crystals. We attributed the results to intramolecular crystal nucleation, ruined by enhanced polymer-staggered crystallization. Our observations provide direct molecular-level evidence to support the fact that intramolecular crystal nucleation is favored by polymer crystallization in quiescent solutions and melt, which yields chain folding for the characteristic β-sheet or lamellar morphology of macromolecular crystals. PMID:27300471

  3. Balanced bilinguals favor lexical processing in their opaque language and conversion system in their shallow language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetler, Karin A; de León Rodríguez, Diego; Laganaro, Marina; Müri, René; Nyffeler, Thomas; Spierer, Lucas; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2015-11-01

    Referred to as orthographic depth, the degree of consistency of grapheme/phoneme correspondences varies across languages from high in shallow orthographies to low in deep orthographies. The present study investigates the impact of orthographic depth on reading route by analyzing evoked potentials to words in a deep (French) and shallow (German) language presented to highly proficient bilinguals. ERP analyses to German and French words revealed significant topographic modulations 240-280 ms post-stimulus onset, indicative of distinct brain networks engaged in reading over this time window. Source estimations revealed that these effects stemmed from modulations of left insular, inferior frontal and dorsolateral regions (German>French) previously associated to phonological processing. Our results show that reading in a shallow language was associated to a stronger engagement of phonological pathways than reading in a deep language. Thus, the lexical pathways favored in word reading are reinforced by phonological networks more strongly in the shallow than deep orthography. PMID:26545236

  4. Evaluating Environmental Favorability for Tropical Cyclone Development with the Method of Point-Downscaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Nolan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method is presented to determine the favorability for tropical cyclone development of an atmospheric environment, as represented by a mean sounding of temperature, humidity, and wind as a function of height. A mesoscale model with nested, moving grids is used to simulate the evolution of a weak, precursor vortex in a large domain with doubly periodic boundary conditions. The equations of motion are modified to maintain arbitrary profiles of both zonal and meridional wind as a function of height, without the necessary large-scale temperature gradients that cannot be consistent with doubly periodic boundary conditions. Comparisons between simulations using the point-downscaling method and simulations using wind shear balanced by temperature gradients illustrate both the advantages and the limitations of the technique. Further examples of what can be learned with this method are presented using both idealized and observed soundings and wind profiles.

  5. Biases in Visual, Auditory, and Audiovisual Perception of Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Odegaard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Localization of objects and events in the environment is critical for survival, as many perceptual and motor tasks rely on estimation of spatial location. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that spatial localizations should generally be accurate. Curiously, some previous studies have reported biases in visual and auditory localizations, but these studies have used small sample sizes and the results have been mixed. Therefore, it is not clear (1 if the reported biases in localization responses are real (or due to outliers, sampling bias, or other factors, and (2 whether these putative biases reflect a bias in sensory representations of space or a priori expectations (which may be due to the experimental setup, instructions, or distribution of stimuli. Here, to address these questions, a dataset of unprecedented size (obtained from 384 observers was analyzed to examine presence, direction, and magnitude of sensory biases, and quantitative computational modeling was used to probe the underlying mechanism(s driving these effects. Data revealed that, on average, observers were biased towards the center when localizing visual stimuli, and biased towards the periphery when localizing auditory stimuli. Moreover, quantitative analysis using a Bayesian Causal Inference framework suggests that while pre-existing spatial biases for central locations exert some influence, biases in the sensory representations of both visual and auditory space are necessary to fully explain the behavioral data. How are these opposing visual and auditory biases reconciled in conditions in which both auditory and visual stimuli are produced by a single event? Potentially, the bias in one modality could dominate, or the biases could interact/cancel out. The data revealed that when integration occurred in these conditions, the visual bias dominated, but the magnitude of this bias was reduced compared to unisensory conditions. Therefore, multisensory integration not only

  6. Genotype effect on regulation of behaviour by vitellogenin supports reproductive origin of honeybee foraging bias

    OpenAIRE

    Ihle, Kate E.; Page, Robert E.; Frederick, Katy; Fondrk, M. Kim; Amdam, Gro V.

    2010-01-01

    In honeybee colonies, food collection is performed by a group of mostly sterile females called workers. After an initial nest phase, workers begin foraging for nectar and pollen, but tend to bias their collection towards one or the other. The foraging choice of honeybees is influenced by vitellogenin (vg), an egg-yolk precursor protein that is expressed although workers typically do not lay eggs. The forager reproductive ground plan hypothesis (RGPH) proposes an evolutionary path in which the...

  7. Improved Normalization of Systematic Biases Affecting Ion Current Measurements in Label-free Proteomics Data*

    OpenAIRE

    Rudnick, Paul A.; WANG,Xia; Yan, Xinjian; Sedransk, Nell; Stein, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Normalization is an important step in the analysis of quantitative proteomics data. If this step is ignored, systematic biases can lead to incorrect assumptions about regulation. Most statistical procedures for normalizing proteomics data have been borrowed from genomics where their development has focused on the removal of so-called ‘batch effects.’ In general, a typical normalization step in proteomics works under the assumption that most peptides/proteins do not change; scaling is then use...

  8. Codon Deviation Coefficient: a novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Zhang; Li Jun; Cui Peng; Ding Feng; Li Ang; Townsend Jeffrey P; Yu Jun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB). Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not...

  9. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for evaluation of the integrity of pressurized water reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. OCA-P and VISA-II are PTS PFM computer codes that are currently referenced in Regulatory Guide 1.154 as acceptable codes for performing plant-specific analyses. These codes perform PFM analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability as the vessel accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. Experience with the application of these codes in the last few years has provided insights into areas where they could be improved. As more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses, there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code that is accepted by the NRC and utilities. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracture Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) code, which is expected to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as (1) a PFM global modeling methodology; (2) the calculation of the axial stress component associated with coolant streaming beneath an inlet nozzle; (3) a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an appropriate range of two and three dimensional inner-surface flaws; (4) the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports; and (5) enhanced user friendliness

  10. Does community-based conservation shape favorable attitudes among locals? an empirical study from nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, J N; Heinen, J T

    2001-08-01

    Like many developing countries, Nepal has adopted a community-based conservation (CBC) approach in recent years to manage its protected areas mainly in response to poor park-people relations. Among other things, under this approach the government has created new "people-oriented" conservation areas, formed and devolved legal authority to grassroots-level institutions to manage local resources, fostered infrastructure development, promoted tourism, and provided income-generating trainings to local people. Of interest to policy-makers and resource managers in Nepal and worldwide is whether this approach to conservation leads to improved attitudes on the part of local people. It is also important to know if personal costs and benefits associated with various intervention programs, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics influence these attitudes. We explore these questions by looking at the experiences in Annapurna and Makalu-Barun Conservation Areas, Nepal, which have largely adopted a CBC approach in policy formulation, planning, and management. The research was conducted during 1996 and 1997; the data collection methods included random household questionnaire surveys, informal interviews, and review of official records and published literature. The results indicated that the majority of local people held favorable attitudes toward these conservation areas. Logistic regression results revealed that participation in training, benefit from tourism, wildlife depredation issue, ethnicity, gender, and education level were the significant predictors of local attitudes in one or the other conservation area. We conclude that the CBC approach has potential to shape favorable local attitudes and that these attitudes will be mediated by some personal attributes. PMID:11443381

  11. High myeloperoxidase positive cell infiltration in colorectal cancer is an independent favorable prognostic factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul A Droeser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC infiltration by adaptive immune system cells correlates with favorable prognosis. The role of the innate immune system is still debated. Here we addressed the prognostic impact of CRC infiltration by neutrophil granulocytes (NG. METHODS: A TMA including healthy mucosa and clinically annotated CRC specimens (n = 1491 was stained with MPO and CD15 specific antibodies. MPO+ and CD15+ positive immune cells were counted by three independent observers. Phenotypic profiles of CRC infiltrating MPO+ and CD15+ cells were validated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions derived from enzymatically digested surgical specimens. Survival analysis was performed by splitting randomized data in training and validation subsets. RESULTS: MPO+ and CD15+ cell infiltration were significantly correlated (p<0.0001; r = 0.76. However, only high density of MPO+ cell infiltration was associated with significantly improved survival in training (P = 0.038 and validation (P = 0.002 sets. In multivariate analysis including T and N stage, vascular invasion, tumor border configuration and microsatellite instability status, MPO+ cell infiltration proved an independent prognostic marker overall (P = 0.004; HR = 0.65; CI:±0.15 and in both training (P = 0.048 and validation (P = 0.036 sets. Flow-cytometry analysis of CRC cell suspensions derived from clinical specimens showed that while MPO+ cells were largely CD15+/CD66b+, sizeable percentages of CD15+ and CD66b+ cells were MPO-. CONCLUSIONS: High density MPO+ cell infiltration is a novel independent favorable prognostic factor in CRC.

  12. Maintenance of motility bias during cyanobacterial phototaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Ursell, Tristan; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Bhaya, Devaki

    2015-04-01

    Signal transduction in bacteria is complex, ranging across scales from molecular signal detectors and effectors to cellular and community responses to stimuli. The unicellular, photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 transduces a light stimulus into directional movement known as phototaxis. This response occurs via a biased random walk toward or away from a directional light source, which is sensed by intracellular photoreceptors and mediated by Type IV pili. It is unknown how quickly cells can respond to changes in the presence or directionality of light, or how photoreceptors affect single-cell motility behavior. In this study, we use time-lapse microscopy coupled with quantitative single-cell tracking to investigate the timescale of the cellular response to various light conditions and to characterize the contribution of the photoreceptor TaxD1 (PixJ1) to phototaxis. We first demonstrate that a community of cells exhibits both spatial and population heterogeneity in its phototactic response. We then show that individual cells respond within minutes to changes in light conditions, and that movement directionality is conferred only by the current light directionality, rather than by a long-term memory of previous conditions. Our measurements indicate that motility bias likely results from the polarization of pilus activity, yielding variable levels of movement in different directions. Experiments with a photoreceptor (taxD1) mutant suggest a supplementary role of TaxD1 in enhancing movement directionality, in addition to its previously identified role in promoting positive phototaxis. Motivated by the behavior of the taxD1 mutant, we demonstrate using a reaction-diffusion model that diffusion anisotropy is sufficient to produce the observed changes in the pattern of collective motility. Taken together, our results establish that single-cell tracking can be used to determine the factors that affect motility bias, which can then be coupled with

  13. Approach bias modification in inpatient psychiatric smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machulska, Alla; Zlomuzica, Armin; Rinck, Mike; Assion, Hans-Jörg; Margraf, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Drug-related automatic approach tendencies contribute to the development and maintenance of addictive behavior. The present study investigated whether a nicotine-related approach bias can be modified in smokers undergoing inpatient psychiatric treatment by using a novel training variant of the nicotine Approach-Avoidance-Task (AAT). Additionally, we assessed whether the AAT-training would affect smoking behavior. Inpatient smokers were randomly assigned to either an AAT-training or a sham-training condition. In the AAT-training condition, smokers were indirectly instructed to make avoidance movements in response to nicotine-related pictures and to make approach movements in response to tooth-cleaning pictures. In the sham-training condition, no contingency between picture content und arm movements existed. Trainings were administered in four sessions, accompanied by a brief smoking-cessation intervention. Smoking-related self-report measures and automatic approach biases toward smoking cues were measured before and after training. Three months after training, daily nicotine consumption was obtained. A total of 205 participants were recruited, and data from 139 participants were considered in the final analysis. Prior to the trainings, smokers in both conditions exhibited a stronger approach bias for nicotine-related pictures than for tooth-cleaning pictures. After both trainings, this difference was no longer evident. Although reduced smoking behavior at posttest was observed after both trainings, only the AAT-training led to a larger reduction of nicotine consumption at a three-month follow-up. Our preliminary data partially support the conclusion that the AAT might be a feasible tool to reduce smoking in the long-term in psychiatric patients, albeit its effect on other smoking-related measures remains to be explored. PMID:26874269

  14. The Subtle Transmission of Race Bias via Televised Nonverbal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, Max; Pauker, Kristin; Ambady, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    As compared to more explicit racial slurs and sexist statements, biased facial expressions and body language may resist conscious identification and thus produce a hidden social influence. In four studies we show that race biases can be subtly transmitted via televised nonverbal behavior. Characters on 11 popular television shows exhibited more negative nonverbal behavior toward black than toward status-matched white characters. Critically, exposure to pro-white (vs. pro-black) nonverbal bias increased viewers’ bias even though patterns of nonverbal behavior could not be consciously reported. These findings suggest that hidden patterns of televised nonverbal behavior influence bias among viewers. PMID:20019288

  15. Residual bias in a multiphase flow model calibration and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeter, E.P.; Johnson, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    When calibrated models produce biased residuals, we assume it is due to an inaccurate conceptual model and revise the model, choosing the most representative model as the one with the best-fit and least biased residuals. However, if the calibration data are biased, we may fail to identify an acceptable model or choose an incorrect model. Conceptual model revision could not eliminate biased residuals during inversion of simulated DNAPL migration under controlled conditions at the Borden Site near Ontario Canada. This paper delineates hypotheses for the source of bias, and explains the evolution of the calibration and resulting model predictions.

  16. A Possible Bias Model for Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Li-Zhi; Jing, Y. P.

    1998-01-01

    We propose that the majority of quasars at redshift $z\\sim 1 - 5$ formed in the environment of new born collapsed halos with 1-D velocity dispersion $\\sigma_v^{1d} \\sim 400 \\kms$. The harboring coefficient $f$ of quasars per halo and the lifetime of quasars depend only on local process, not modulated by the density inhomogeneities on scales larger than the size of the halos. Thus, the bias of quasars on scale larger than the size of these halos is mainly determined by the parameter $\\sigma_v$...

  17. Biasing Factors of the Consumer Price Index

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Ilona

    2003-01-01

    Studies conducted in the United States came to the conclusion that the annual average inflationary rate of 3 percent measured during the interval beginning in the early 1990’s through the mid-1990’s overestimates by 1.1 percentage points the changes in the cost of living. As a result, throughout the world, not just in the United States, many countries are reconsidering the supposed bias of the Consumer Price Index, its consequences, and consequences related to economic decision making. The pu...

  18. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The role of education in the process of socioeconomic attainment is a topic of long standing interest to sociologists and economists. Recently there has been growing interest not only in estimating the average causal effect of education on outcomes such as earnings, but also in estimating how...... causal effects might vary over individuals or groups. In this paper we point out one of the under-appreciated hazards of seeking to estimate heterogeneous causal effects: conventional selection bias (that is, selection on baseline differences) can easily be mistaken for heterogeneity of causal effects...

  19. Hindsight Bias in Cause Analysis of Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsuo Murata; Yasunari Matsushita

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that hindsight becomes an obstacle to the objective investigation of an accident, and that the proper countermeasures for the prevention of such an accident is impossible if we view the accident with hindsight. Therefore, it is important for organizational managers to prevent hindsight from occurring so that hindsight does not hinder objective and proper measures to be taken and this does not lead to a serious accident. In this study, a basic phenomenon potentially related to accidents, that is, hindsight was taken up, and an attempt was made to explore the phenomenon in order to get basically insights into the prevention of accidents caused by such a cognitive bias.

  20. Gender Bias and Child Labor in LDCs

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Kumar; Emma Underhill

    2014-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that girls work more than boys as child labor. In this paper, we develop a model to analyze the causes and consequences of the gender differentials in child labor. In particular, we analyze the effects of gender bias on child labor. We find that when parents can give strictly positive bequests to both boys and girls, son preference on its own does not lead to gender differential in child labor. Only when parents cannot give bequests, girls work more than boys as ch...