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Sample records for bi-partite plant mitochondrial

  1. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.;

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  2. Virus spread in complete bi-partite graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omic, J.S.; Kooij, R.E.; Mieghem, P. van

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the spread of viruses on the complete bi-partite graph Km,n. Using mean field theory we first show that the epidemic threshold for this type of graph satifies Tc = 1/√MN, hence, confirming previous results from literature. Next, we find an expression for the average number of

  3. Distillation of bi-partite entanglement from W state with cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Li; Chen Ai-Xi; Chen De-Hai; Huang Ke-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Following the theoretical protocol described by Fortescue and Lo [Fortescue B and Lo H K 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 260501], we present a scheme in which one can distill maximally entangled bi-partite states from a tri-partite W state with cavity QED. Our scheme enables the concrete physical system to realize its protocol. In our scheme, the rate distillation also asymptotically approaches one. Based on the present cavity QED techniques, we discuss the experimental feasibility.

  4. Unique optimal solution instance and computational complexity of backbone in the graph bi-partitioning problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an important tool for heuristic design of NP-hard problems, backbone analysis has become a hot spot in theoretical computer science in recent years. Due to the difficulty in the research on computational complexity of the backbone, many researchers analyzed the backbone by statistic ways. Aiming to increase the backbone size which is usually very small by the existing methods, the unique optimal solution instance construction (UOSIC) is proposed for the graph bi-partitioning problem (GBP). Also, we prove by using the UOSIC that it is NP-hard to obtain the backbone, i.e. no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a GBP in polynomial time under the assumption that P ( NP. Our work expands the research area of computational complexity of the backbone. And the UOSIC provides a new way for heuristic design of NP-hard problems.

  5. Mitochondrial ferritin in animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatro, Andrea; Puntarulo, Susana

    2007-01-01

    Ferritins play a role in preventing Fe toxicity because of their ability to sequester several thousand Fe atoms in their central cavity in a soluble, non-toxic bioavailable form. The identification of ferritin in mitochondria, an organelle with a constant generation of O2(-) as a by-product of the electron transfer, and the presence of a mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase activity opened up brand new metabolic interactions to be analyzed. In spite of cytosolic ferritins in mammals being ubiquitous, mitochondrial ferritin (mtF) expression is restricted to the testis, neuronal cells, islets of Langerhans, and as recently described to mice normal retinas. None was detected in major storage organs such as liver and spleen. MtF has about 80% identity to cytosolic H-chain and 55% to L-chain in its coding region. There has been reported some differences in the Fe binding and oxidation properties between mtF and cytosolic H-ferritin suggesting that mtF functions differently as an Fe storage protein within the mitochondria and perhaps has other function(s) in Fe homeostasis as well. Recently it was also presented evidence for the presence of ferritins in plant mitochondria. The understanding of the role of mitochondrial ferritin in Fe oxidative metabolism may be useful in approaching clinical situations such as the treatment of Friedreich's ataxia, X-linked sideroblastic anemia, and in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17127361

  6. Mitochondrial Composition,Function and Stress Response in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard P.Jacoby; Lei Li; Shaobai Huang; Chun Pong Lee; A.Harvey Millar; Nicolas L.Taylor

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of mitochondria is respiration,where catabolism of substrates is coupled to ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation.In plants,mitochondrial composition is relatively complex and flexible and has specific pathways to support photosynthetic processes in illuminated leaves.This review begins with outlining current models of mitochondrial composition in plant cells,with an emphasis upon the assembly of the complexes of the classical electron transport chain (ETC).Next,we focus upon the comparative analysis of mitochondrial function from different tissue types.A prominent theme in the plant mitochondrial literature involves linking mitochondrial composition to environmental stress responses,and this review then gives a detailed outline of how oxidative stress impacts upon the plant mitochondrial proteome with particular attention to the role of transition metals.This is followed by an analysis of the signaling capacity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species,which studies the transcriptional changes of stress responsive genes as a framework to define specific signals emanating from the mitochondrion.Finally,specific mitochondrial roles during exposure to harsh environments are outlined,with attention paid to mitochondrial delivery of energy and intermediates,mitochondrial support for photosynthesis,and mitochondrial processes operating within root cells that mediate tolerance to anoxia and unfavorable soil chemistries.

  7. The Plant Mitochondrial Transportome: Balancing Metabolic Demands with Energetic Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Pong; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-08-01

    In plants, mitochondrial function is associated with hundreds of metabolic reactions. To facilitate these reactions, charged substrates and cofactors move across the charge-impermeable inner mitochondrial membrane via specialized transporters and must work cooperatively with the electrochemical gradient which is essential for mitochondrial function. The regulatory framework for mitochondrial metabolite transport is expected to be more complex in plants than in mammals owing to the close metabolic association between mitochondrial, plastids, and peroxisome metabolism, as well as to the major diurnal fluctuations in plant metabolic function. We propose here how recent advances can be integrated towards defining the mitochondrial transportome in plants. We also discuss what this reveals about sustaining cooperativity between bioenergetics, metabolism, and transport in typical and challenging environments. PMID:27162080

  8. Controlling transfer of quantum correlations among bi-partitions of a composite quantum system by combining different noisy environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiu-Xing; LiFu-Li

    2011-01-01

    The correlation dynamics are investigated for various bi-partitions of a composite quantum system consisting of two qubits and two independent and non-identical noisy environments.The two qubits have no direct interaction with each other and locally interact with their environments.Classical and quantum correlations including the entanglement are initially prepared only between the two qubits.We find that contrary to the identical noisy environment case,the quantum correlation transfer direction can be controlled by combining different noisy environments.The amplitudedamping environment determines whether there exists the entanglement transfer among bi-partitions of the system.When one qubit is coupled to an amplitude-damping environment and the other one to a bit-flip one,we find a very interesting result that all the quantum and the classical correlations,and even the entanglement,originally existing between the qubits,can be completely transferred without any loss to the qubit coupled to the bit-flit environment and the amplitude-damping environment.We also notice that it is possible to distinguish the quantum correlation from the classical correlation and the entanglement by combining different noisy environments.

  9. The plant mitochondrial carrier family: functional and evolutionary aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ilka eHaferkamp; Stephan eSchmitz-Esser

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in respiration and energy production and are involved in multiple eukaryotic but also in several plant specific metabolic pathways. Solute carriers in the inner mitochondrial membrane connect the internal metabolism with that of the surrounding cell. Because of their common basic structure, these transport proteins affiliate to the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF). Generally, MCF proteins consist of six membrane-spanning helices, exhibit typical conserved domain...

  10. Indications of a pan-hemispheric bi-partition of the Younger Dryas Stadial from Lake Suigetsu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlolaut, Gordon; Brauer, Achim; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Lamb, Henry; Marshall, Michael; Kato-Saito, Megumi; Staff, Richard; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Bryant, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas Stadial marks the final succession of climatic fluctuations of the last Glacial. Whilst well studied in records from Europe and Greenland, few high resolution records are available from East Asia. Here we present a high resolution, multi-proxy study of the Lake Suigetsu (Japan) sediments using the 'SG06' composite profile. Utilising microfacies, μXRF, pollen and diatom analysis we characterise changes occurring in the timeframe corresponding to the Younger Dryas Stadial. Firstly, our results show that the climatic equivalent of the Younger Dryas at Lake Suigetsu shows no major lead or lag in comparison to records from the North Atlantic region, which was postulated by an earlier project on the Suigetsu sediments ('SG93'). Reason for this disagreement between the SG06 and SG93 core is that the SG93 core/chronology was compromised by gaps between individual cores and varve count uncertainties. Furthermore, some of the analysed proxies from the SG06 core show a sub-division of the Younger Dryas Stadial. The timing of this sub-division is similar to the bi-partition of the Younger Dryas Stadial observed in a number of European records (e.g. Lane et al., 2013). This bi-partition was related to a northward shift of the westerly wind jet in the North Atlantic region. Our findings imply that the underlying climatic mechanism operated on a hemispheric rather than just on a regional scale. References: Lane et al. 2013, Volcanic ash reveals time-transgressive abrupt climate change during the Younger Dryas, Geology 41, 1251-1254

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gossypium hirsutum and evolutionary analysis of higher plant mitochondrial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozheng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria are the main manufacturers of cellular ATP in eukaryotes. The plant mitochondrial genome contains large number of foreign DNA and repeated sequences undergone frequently intramolecular recombination. Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. is one of the main natural fiber crops and also an important oil-producing plant in the world. Sequencing of the cotton mitochondrial (mt genome could be helpful for the evolution research of plant mt genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We utilized 454 technology for sequencing and combined with Fosmid library of the Gossypium hirsutum mt genome screening and positive clones sequencing and conducted a series of evolutionary analysis on Cycas taitungensis and 24 angiosperms mt genomes. After data assembling and contigs joining, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. hirsutum was obtained. The completed G.hirsutum mt genome is 621,884 bp in length, and contained 68 genes, including 35 protein genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. Five gene clusters are found conserved in all plant mt genomes; one and four clusters are specifically conserved in monocots and dicots, respectively. Homologous sequences are distributed along the plant mt genomes and species closely related share the most homologous sequences. For species that have both mt and chloroplast genome sequences available, we checked the location of cp-like migration and found several fragments closely linked with mitochondrial genes. CONCLUSION: The G. hirsutum mt genome possesses most of the common characters of higher plant mt genomes. The existence of syntenic gene clusters, as well as the conservation of some intergenic sequences and genic content among the plant mt genomes suggest that evolution of mt genomes is consistent with plant taxonomy but independent among different species.

  12. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    Due to the sessile nature of plants, it is crucial for their survival and growth that they can handle a constantly changing, and thus stressful, ambient environment by modifying their structure and metabolism. The central metabolism of plants is characterized by many alternative options for metab......Due to the sessile nature of plants, it is crucial for their survival and growth that they can handle a constantly changing, and thus stressful, ambient environment by modifying their structure and metabolism. The central metabolism of plants is characterized by many alternative options...

  13. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca2+ transients which are further transduced by Ca2+ sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca2+ signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca2+ across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca2+ signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca2+ signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca2+ concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca2+ across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  14. The roles of mitochondrial transcription termination factors (MTERFs) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Víctor

    2016-07-01

    Stress such as salinity, cold, heat or drought affect plant growth and development, and frequently result in diminished productivity. Unlike animals, plants are sedentary organisms that must withstand and cope with environmental stresses. During evolution, plants have developed strategies to successfully adapt to or tolerate such stresses, which might have led to the expansion and functional diversification of gene families. Some new genes may have acquired functions that could differ from those of their animal homologues, e.g. in response to abiotic stress. The mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF) family could be a good example of this. Originally identified and characterized in metazoans, MTERFs regulate transcription, translation and DNA replication in vertebrate mitochondria. Plant genomes harbor a considerably larger number of MTERFs than animals. Nonetheless, only eight plant MTERFs have been characterized, which encode chloroplast or mitochondrial proteins. Mutations in MTERFs alter the expression of organelle genes and impair chloroplast or mitochondria development. This information is transmitted to the nucleus, probably through retrograde signaling, because mterf plants often exhibit changes in nuclear gene expression. This study summarizes the recent findings, mainly from the analysis of mterf mutants, which support an emerging role for plant MTERFs in response to abiotic stress.

  15. The uniqueness of the plant mitochondrial potassium channel

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    Donato Pastore

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-inhibited Plant Mitochondrial K+ Channel (PmitoKATPwas discovered about fifteen years ago in Durum WheatMitochondria (DWM. PmitoKATP catalyses the electrophoreticK+ uniport through the inner mitochondrial membrane;moreover, the co-operation between PmitoKATP and K+/H+antiporter allows such a great operation of a K+ cycle tocollapse mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ and ΔpH, thusimpairing protonmotive force (Δp. A possible physiological roleof such ΔΨ control is the restriction of harmful reactive oxygenspecies (ROS production under environmental/oxidative stressconditions. Interestingly, DWM lacking Δp were found to benevertheless fully coupled and able to regularly accomplish ATPsynthesis; this unexpected behaviour makes necessary to recastin some way the classical chemiosmotic model. In the whole,PmitoKATP may oppose to large scale ROS production bylowering ΔΨ under environmental/oxidative stress, but, whenstress is moderate, this occurs without impairing ATP synthesisin a crucial moment for cell and mitochondrial bioenergetics.[BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 391-397

  16. Plant mitochondrial genome peculiarities evolving in the earliest vascular plant lineages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volker KNOOP

    2013-01-01

    In plants,the mitochondrial DNA has evolved in peculiar ways.Simple circular mitochondrial genomes found in most other eukaryotic lineages have expanded tremendously in size.Mitochondrial DNAs in some flowering plants may in fact be larger than genomes of free-living bacteria.Introns,retrotransposons,pseudogene fragments,and promiscuous DNA copied from the chloroplast or nuclear genome contribute to the size expansion but most intergenic DNA remains unaccounted for so far.Additionally,frequent recombination results in heterogeneous pools of coexisting,subgenomic mtDNA molecules in angiosperms.In contrast,the mitochondrial DNAs of bryophytes,the extant representatives of very early splits in plant phylogeny,are more conservative in structural evolution and seem to be devoid of active recombination.However,whereas mitochondrial introns are highly conserved among seed plants (spermatophytes),not a single one of more than 80 different introns in bryophyte mtDNAs is conserved among the three divisions,liverworts,mosses,and hornworts.Lycophytes are now unequivocally identified as living representatives of the earliest vascular plant branch in a crucial phylogenetic position between bryophytes and later diversifying tracheophytes including spermatophytes.Very recently,mtDNAs have become available for the three orders of extant lycophytes-Isoetales,Selaginellales,and Lycopodiales.As I will discuss here,the lycophyte mtDNAs not only show a surprising diversity of features but also previously unseen novelties of plant mitochondrial DNA evolution.The transition from a gametophyte-dominated bryophyte lifestyle to a sporophytedominated vascular plant lifestyle apparently gave rise to several peculiar independent changes in plant chondrome evolution.

  17. Regulation of Thermogenesis In Plants: The Interaction of Alternative Oxidase and Plant Uncoupling Mitochondrial Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhu; Jianfei Lu; Jing Wang; Fu Chen; Feifan Leng; Hongyu Li

    2011-01-01

    Thermogenesis is a process of heat production in living organisms.It is rare in plants,but it does occur in some species of angiosperm.The heat iS generated via plant mitochondrial respiration.As possible Involvement in thermogenesis of mitochondrial factors,alternative oxidases(AOXs)and plant uncoupling mitochondrial proteins(PUMPs)have been well studied.AOXs and PUMPs are ubiquitously present in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria.They serve as two major energy dissipation systems that balance mitochondrial respiration and uncoupled phosphorylation by dissipating the H+ redox energy and proton electrochemical gradient(△μH+)as heat,respectively.AOXs and PUMPs exert similar physiological functions during homeothermic heat production in thermogenic plants.AOXs have five isoforms,while PUMPs have six.Both AOXS and PUMPS are encoded by small nuclear multigene families.Multiple isoforms are expressed in different tissues or organs.Extensive studies have been done in the area of thermogenesis in higher plants.In this review,we focus on the involvement and regulation of AOXs and PUMPs in thermogenesis.

  18. Coordination of plant mitochondrial biogenesis: keeping pace with cellular requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina eWelchen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitochondria are complex organelles that carry out numerous metabolic processes related with the generation of energy for cellular functions and the synthesis and degradation of several compounds. Mitochondria are semiautonomous and dynamic organelles changing in shape, number and composition depending on tissue or developmental stage. The biogenesis of functional mitochondria requires the coordination of genes present both in the nucleus and the organelle. In addition, due to their central role, all processes held inside mitochondria must be finely coordinated with those in other organelles according to cellular demands. Coordination is achieved by transcriptional control of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by specific transcription factors that recognize conserved elements in their promoter regions. In turn, the expression of most of these transcription factors is linked to developmental and environmental cues, according to the availability of nutrients, light-dark cycles and warning signals generated in response to stress conditions. Among the signals impacting in the expression of nuclear genes, retrograde signals that originate inside mitochondria help to adjust mitochondrial biogenesis to organelle demands. Adding more complexity, several nuclear encoded proteins are dual localized to mitochondria and either chloroplasts or the nucleus. Dual targeting might establish a crosstalk between the nucleus and cell organelles to ensure a fine coordination of cellular activities. In this article, we discuss how the different levels of coordination of mitochondrial biogenesis interconnect to optimize the function of the organelle according to both internal and external demands.

  19. Plant mitochondrial Complex I composition and assembly: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanian, Nitya; Remacle, Claire; Hamel, Patrice Paul

    2016-07-01

    In the mitochondrial inner membrane, oxidative phosphorylation generates ATP via the operation of several multimeric enzymes. The proton-pumping Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first and most complicated enzyme required in this process. Complex I is an L-shaped enzyme consisting of more than 40 subunits, one FMN molecule and eight Fe-S clusters. In recent years, genetic and proteomic analyses of Complex I mutants in various model systems, including plants, have provided valuable insights into the assembly of this multimeric enzyme. Assisted by a number of key players, referred to as "assembly factors", the assembly of Complex I takes place in a sequential and modular manner. Although a number of factors have been identified, their precise function in mediating Complex I assembly still remains to be elucidated. This review summarizes our current knowledge of plant Complex I composition and assembly derived from studies in plant model systems such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Plant Complex I is highly conserved and comprises a significant number of subunits also present in mammalian and fungal Complexes I. Plant Complex I also contains additional subunits absent from the mammalian and fungal counterpart, whose function in enzyme activity and assembly is not clearly understood. While 14 assembly factors have been identified for human Complex I, only two proteins, namely GLDH and INDH, have been established as bona fide assembly factors for plant Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  20. Wheat Mitochondrial Proteomes Reveal Links between Mitochondrial Respiration, Antioxidant Defence and Plant Salinity Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard P.Jacoby; A.Harvey Millar; Nicolas L.Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration extracts chemical energy from carbon-containing molecules,and converts that energy into ATP,the cellular energy currency.The ATP produced by respiration fuels biochemical and physiological processes that enable the plant to survive and grow.Several studies have observed a negative correlation between respiration rate and growth rate,indicating that respiratory properties might influence biomass accumulation.Furthermore,there is evidence that salinity-sensitive wheat varieties display a higher respiration rate under salt treatment,while salt-tolerant varieties maintains similar a respiration rate under both control and salt treatments.However,the molecular basis of such results remains unexplored.Here we have investigated the mitochondrial proteome and differences associated with salt tolerance in two Australian commercial varieties of wheat.Using 2D-DIGE we have found quantitative differences in the shoot mitochondrial proteomes of Triticum aestivum v.Wyalkatchem and v.Janz,two commercially important wheat varieties that are known from a range of experiments to have differing salinity tolerance.These proteins included Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD),cysteine synthase,nucleotide diphosphate kinase and the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC).Antibodies to the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX),previously linked to reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation from the electron transport chain and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis,also showed a commensurate higher abundance in v.Wyakatchem in both control and salt-treated conditions.To further investigate this intial observation we screened 24 west australian wheat varieties for biomass retention when subjected to salt stress in a hydroponic system in a growth cabinet,with v.Krichauff and v.Westonia being the top performers.In addition we have investigated the the biomass and respiration rates in a subset of these varieties grown in a salt-affected field in the WA wheatbelt

  1. Multiple major increases and decreases in mitochondrial substitution rates in the plant family Geraniaceae

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    Shirk Andrew J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of synonymous nucleotide substitutions are, in general, exceptionally low in plant mitochondrial genomes, several times lower than in chloroplast genomes, 10–20 times lower than in plant nuclear genomes, and 50–100 times lower than in many animal mitochondrial genomes. Several cases of moderate variation in mitochondrial substitution rates have been reported in plants, but these mostly involve correlated changes in chloroplast and/or nuclear substitution rates and are therefore thought to reflect whole-organism forces rather than ones impinging directly on the mitochondrial mutation rate. Only a single case of extensive, mitochondrial-specific rate changes has been described, in the angiosperm genus Plantago. Results We explored a second potential case of highly accelerated mitochondrial sequence evolution in plants. This case was first suggested by relatively poor hybridization of mitochondrial gene probes to DNA of Pelargonium hortorum (the common geranium. We found that all eight mitochondrial genes sequenced from P. hortorum are exceptionally divergent, whereas chloroplast and nuclear divergence is unexceptional in P. hortorum. Two mitochondrial genes were sequenced from a broad range of taxa of variable relatedness to P. hortorum, and absolute rates of mitochondrial synonymous substitutions were calculated on each branch of a phylogenetic tree of these taxa. We infer one major, ~10-fold increase in the mitochondrial synonymous substitution rate at the base of the Pelargonium family Geraniaceae, and a subsequent ~10-fold rate increase early in the evolution of Pelargonium. We also infer several moderate to major rate decreases following these initial rate increases, such that the mitochondrial substitution rate has returned to normally low levels in many members of the Geraniaceae. Finally, we find unusually little RNA editing of Geraniaceae mitochondrial genes, suggesting high levels of retroprocessing in their

  2. Mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation capacities of organs from a non-oilseed plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, C.; Wood, C.

    2001-01-01

    Until recently, beta-oxidation was believed to be exclusively located in the peroxisomes of all higher plants. Whilst this is true for germinating oilseeds undergoing gluconeogenesis, evidence demonstrating mitochondrial beta-oxidation in other plant systems has refuted this central dogma of plant lipid metabolism. This report describes a comparative study of the dual mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation capacities of plant organs. Oxidation of [1-(14)C] palmitate was measured in the ...

  3. A complete mitochondrial genome of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai), and fast evolving mitochondrial genes in higher plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peng Cui; Huitao Liu; Qiang Lin; Feng Ding; Guoyin Zhuo; Songnian Hu; Dongcheng Liu; Wenlong Yang; Kehui Zhan; Aimin Zhang; Jun Yu

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy production, play an important role in the development and reproduction of the plant. They occupy a specific evolutionary pattern relative to their nuclear counterparts. Here, we determined the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai) mitochondrial genome in a length of 452 and 526 bp by shotgun sequencing its BAC library. It contains 202 genes, including 35 known protein-coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA genes, as well as 149 open reading frames (ORFs; greater than 300 bp in length). The sequence is almost identical to the previously reported sequence of the spring wheat (T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring); we only identified seven SNPs (three transitions and four transversions) and 10 indels (insertions and deletions) between the two independently acquired sequences, and all variations were found in non-coding regions. This result confirmed the accuracy of the previously reported mitochondrial sequence of the Chinese Spring wheat. The nucleotide frequency and codon usage of wheat are common among the lineage of higher plant with a high AT-content of 58%. Molecular evolutionary analysis demonstrated that plant mitochondrial genomes evolved at different rates, which may correlate with substantial variations in metabolic rate and generation time among plant lineages. In addition, through the estimation of the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates between orthologous mitochondrion-encoded genes of higher plants, we found an accelerated evolutionary rate that seems to be the result of relaxed selection.

  4. Plant mitochondrial Complex I composition and assembly: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanian, Nitya; Remacle, Claire; Hamel, Patrice Paul

    2016-07-01

    In the mitochondrial inner membrane, oxidative phosphorylation generates ATP via the operation of several multimeric enzymes. The proton-pumping Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first and most complicated enzyme required in this process. Complex I is an L-shaped enzyme consisting of more than 40 subunits, one FMN molecule and eight Fe-S clusters. In recent years, genetic and proteomic analyses of Complex I mutants in various model systems, including plants, have provided valuable insights into the assembly of this multimeric enzyme. Assisted by a number of key players, referred to as "assembly factors", the assembly of Complex I takes place in a sequential and modular manner. Although a number of factors have been identified, their precise function in mediating Complex I assembly still remains to be elucidated. This review summarizes our current knowledge of plant Complex I composition and assembly derived from studies in plant model systems such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Plant Complex I is highly conserved and comprises a significant number of subunits also present in mammalian and fungal Complexes I. Plant Complex I also contains additional subunits absent from the mammalian and fungal counterpart, whose function in enzyme activity and assembly is not clearly understood. While 14 assembly factors have been identified for human Complex I, only two proteins, namely GLDH and INDH, have been established as bona fide assembly factors for plant Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26801215

  5. Horizontal acquisition of multiple mitochondrial genes from a parasitic plant followed by gene conversion with host mitochondrial genes

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    Hao Weilong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is relatively common in plant mitochondrial genomes but the mechanisms, extent and consequences of transfer remain largely unknown. Previous results indicate that parasitic plants are often involved as either transfer donors or recipients, suggesting that direct contact between parasite and host facilitates genetic transfer among plants. Results In order to uncover the mechanistic details of plant-to-plant HGT, the extent and evolutionary fate of transfer was investigated between two groups: the parasitic genus Cuscuta and a small clade of Plantago species. A broad polymerase chain reaction (PCR survey of mitochondrial genes revealed that at least three genes (atp1, atp6 and matR were recently transferred from Cuscuta to Plantago. Quantitative PCR assays show that these three genes have a mitochondrial location in the one species line of Plantago examined. Patterns of sequence evolution suggest that these foreign genes degraded into pseudogenes shortly after transfer and reverse transcription (RT-PCR analyses demonstrate that none are detectably transcribed. Three cases of gene conversion were detected between native and foreign copies of the atp1 gene. The identical phylogenetic distribution of the three foreign genes within Plantago and the retention of cytidines at ancestral positions of RNA editing indicate that these genes were probably acquired via a single, DNA-mediated transfer event. However, samplings of multiple individuals from two of the three species in the recipient Plantago clade revealed complex and perplexing phylogenetic discrepancies and patterns of sequence divergence for all three of the foreign genes. Conclusions This study reports the best evidence to date that multiple mitochondrial genes can be transferred via a single HGT event and that transfer occurred via a strictly DNA-level intermediate. The discovery of gene conversion between co-resident foreign and native

  6. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Lycophyte Huperzia squarrosa: The Most Archaic Form in Vascular Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Bin Wang; Peng Cui; Libo Li; Jia-Yu Xue; Jun Yu; Yin-Long Qiu

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes have maintained some bacterial features despite their residence within eukaryotic cells for approximately two billion years. One of these features is the frequent presence of polycistronic operons. In land plants, however, it has been shown that all sequenced vascular plant chondromes lack large polycistronic operons while bryophyte chondromes have many of them. In this study, we provide the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome of a lycophyte, from Huperzia squarros...

  7. Mitochondrial pleomorphy in plant cells is driven by contiguous ER dynamics

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    Erica-Ashley eJaipargas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are pleomorphic, double membrane-bound organelles involved in cellular energetics in all eukaryotes. Mitochondria in animal and yeast cells are typically tubular-reticulate structures and several micro-meters long but in green plants they are predominantly observed as 0.2-1.5µm punctae. While fission and fusion, through the coordinated activity of several conserved proteins, shapes mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER has recently been identified as an additional player in this process in yeast and mammalian cells. The mitochondria-ER relationship in plant cells remains largely uncharacterized. Here, through live-imaging of the entire range of mitochondria pleomorphy we uncover the underlying basis for the predominantly punctate mitochondrial form in plants. We demonstrate that mitochondrial morphology changes in response to light and cytosolic sugar levels in an ER mediated manner. Whereas large ER polygons and low dynamics under dark conditions favor mitochondrial fusion and elongation, small ER polygons result in increased fission and predominantly small mitochondria. Hypoxia also reduces ER dynamics and increases mitochondrial fusion to produce giant mitochondria. By observing elongated mitochondria in normal plants and fission-impaired Arabidopsis nmt1-2 and drp3a mutants we also establish that thin extensions called matrixules and a beads-on-a-string mitochondrial phenotype are direct consequences of mitochondria-ER interactions.

  8. The mitochondrial genome of Malus domestica and the import-driven hypothesis of mitochondrial genome expansion in seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Lockhart, Peter J; Viola, Roberto; Velasco, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of spermatophytes are the largest of all organellar genomes. Their large size has been attributed to various factors; however, the relative contribution of these factors to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) expansion remains undetermined. We estimated their relative contribution in Malus domestica (apple). The mitochondrial genome of apple has a size of 396 947 bp and a one to nine ratio of coding to non-coding DNA, close to the corresponding average values for angiosperms. We determined that 71.5% of the apple mtDNA sequence was highly similar to sequences of its nuclear DNA. Using nuclear gene exons, nuclear transposable elements and chloroplast DNA as markers of promiscuous DNA content in mtDNA, we estimated that approximately 20% of the apple mtDNA consisted of DNA sequences imported from other cell compartments, mostly from the nucleus. Similar marker-based estimates of promiscuous DNA content in the mitochondrial genomes of other species ranged between 21.2 and 25.3% of the total mtDNA length for grape, between 23.1 and 38.6% for rice, and between 47.1 and 78.4% for maize. All these estimates are conservative, because they underestimate the import of non-functional DNA. We propose that the import of promiscuous DNA is a core mechanism for mtDNA size expansion in seed plants. In apple, maize and grape this mechanism contributed far more to genome expansion than did homologous recombination. In rice the estimated contribution of both mechanisms was found to be similar.

  9. Mitochondrial retrograde regulation tuning fork in nuclear genes expressions of higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghua Yang; Mingfang Zhang; Jingquan Yu

    2008-01-01

    In plant cells, there are three organelles: the nucleus, chloroplast, and mitochondria that store genetic information. The nucleus possesses the majority of genetic information and controls most aspects of organelles gene expression, growth, and development. In return,organdies also send signals back to regulate nuclear gene expression, a process defined as retrograde regulation. The best studies of organelles to nucleus retrograde regulation exist in plant chloroplast-to-nuclear regulation and yeast mitochondria-to-nuclear regulation. In this review, we summarize the recent understanding of mitochondrial retrograde regulation in higher plant, which involves multiple potential signaling pathway in relation to cytoplasmic male-sterility, biotic stress, and abiotie stress. With respect to mitochondrial retrograde regulation signal pathways involved in cytoplasmic male-sterility, we consider that nuclear transcriptional factor genes are the targeted genes regulated by mitoehondria to determine the abnormal reproductive development, and the MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in this regulation in Brassica juncea. When plants suffer biotic and abiotie stress, plant cells will initiate cell death or other events directed toward recovering from stress. During this process, we propose that mitochondria may determine how plant cell responds to a given stress through retrograde regulation. Meanwhile, several transducer molecules have also been discussed here. In particular, thePaepe research group reported that leaf mitochondrial modulated whole cell redox homeostasis, set antioxidant capacity, and determinedstress resistance through altered signaling and diurnal regulation, which is an indication of plant mitochondria with more active function than ever.

  10. The mitochondrial genome of the lycophyte Huperzia squarrosa: the most archaic form in vascular plants.

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    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial genomes have maintained some bacterial features despite their residence within eukaryotic cells for approximately two billion years. One of these features is the frequent presence of polycistronic operons. In land plants, however, it has been shown that all sequenced vascular plant chondromes lack large polycistronic operons while bryophyte chondromes have many of them. In this study, we provide the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome of a lycophyte, from Huperzia squarrosa, which is a member of the sister group to all other vascular plants. The genome, at a size of 413,530 base pairs, contains 66 genes and 32 group II introns. In addition, it has 69 pseudogene fragments for 24 of the 40 protein- and rRNA-coding genes. It represents the most archaic form of mitochondrial genomes of all vascular plants. In particular, it has one large conserved gene cluster containing up to 10 ribosomal protein genes, which likely represents a polycistronic operon but has been disrupted and greatly reduced in the chondromes of other vascular plants. It also has the least rearranged gene order in comparison to the chondromes of other vascular plants. The genome is ancestral in vascular plants in several other aspects: the gene content resembling those of charophytes and most bryophytes, all introns being cis-spliced, a low level of RNA editing, and lack of foreign DNA of chloroplast or nuclear origin.

  11. The Mitochondrial Genomes of the Early Land Plants Treubia lacunosa and Anomodon rugelii: Dynamic and Conservative Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Liu; Jia-Yu Xue; Bin Wang; Libo Li; Yin-Long Qiu

    2011-01-01

    Early land plant mitochondrial genomes captured important changes of mitochondrial genome evolution when plants colonized land. The chondromes of seed plants show several derived characteristics, e.g., large genome size variation, rapid intra-genomic rearrangement, abundant introns, and highly variable levels of RNA editing. On the other hand, the chondromes of charophytic algae are still largely ancestral in these aspects, resembling those of early eukaryotes. When the transition happened ha...

  12. Localized Retroprocessing as a Model of Intron Loss in the Plant Mitochondrial Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Argelia; Ross, T Gregory; Graham, Sean W; Barrett, Craig F; Davis, Jerrold I; Seberg, Ole; Petersen, Gitte

    2016-08-03

    Loss of introns in plant mitochondrial genes is commonly explained by retroprocessing. Under this model, an mRNA is reverse transcribed and integrated back into the genome, simultaneously affecting the contents of introns and edited sites. To evaluate the extent to which retroprocessing explains intron loss, we analyzed patterns of intron content and predicted RNA editing for whole mitochondrial genomes of 30 species in the monocot order Alismatales. In this group, we found an unusually high degree of variation in the intron content, even expanding the hitherto known variation among angiosperms. Some species have lost some two-third of the cis-spliced introns. We found a strong correlation between intron content and editing frequency, and detected 27 events in which intron loss is consistent with the presence of nucleotides in an edited state, supporting retroprocessing. However, we also detected seven cases of intron loss not readily being explained by retroprocession. Our analyses are also not consistent with the entire length of a fully processed cDNA copy being integrated into the genome, but instead indicate that retroprocessing usually occurs for only part of the gene. In some cases, several rounds of retroprocessing may explain intron loss in genes completely devoid of introns. A number of taxa retroprocessing seem to be very common and a possibly ongoing process. It affects the entire mitochondrial genome.

  13. A male sterility-associated mitochondrial protein in wild beets causes pollen disruption in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki P; Shinada, Hiroshi; Onodera, Yasuyuki; Komaki, Chihiro; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2008-06-01

    In higher plants, male reproductive (pollen) development is known to be disrupted in a class of mitochondrial mutants termed cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) mutants. Despite the increase in knowledge regarding CMS-encoding genes and their expression, definitive evidence that CMS-associated proteins actually cause pollen disruption is not yet available in most cases. Here we compare the translation products of mitochondria between the normal fertile cytoplasm and the male-sterile I-12CMS(3) cytoplasm derived from wild beets. The results show a unique 12 kDa polypeptide that is present in the I-12CMS(3) mitochondria but is not detectable among the translation products of normal mitochondria. We also found that a mitochondrial open reading frame (named orf129) was uniquely transcribed in I-12CMS(3) and is large enough to encode the novel 12 kDa polypeptide. Antibodies against a GST-ORF129 fusion protein were raised to establish that this 12 kDa polypeptide is the product of orf129. ORF129 was shown to accumulate in flower mitochondria as well as in root and leaf mitochondria. As for the CMS-associated protein (PCF protein) in petunia, ORF129 is primarily present in the matrix and is loosely associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. The orf129 sequence was fused to a mitochondrial targeting pre-sequence, placed under the control of the Arabidopsis apetala3 promoter, and introduced into the tobacco nuclear genome. Transgenic expression of ORF129 resulted in male sterility, which provides clear supporting evidence that ORF129 is responsible for the male-sterile phenotype in sugar beet with wild beet cytoplasm.

  14. A plant mitochondrial sequence transcribed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts is not edited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, C.A.; Hanson, M.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Zoubenko, O.V.; Maliga, P. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    RNA editing occurs in two higher-plant organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Because chloroplasts and mitochondria exhibit some similarity in editing site selection, we investigated whether mitochondrial RNA sequences could be edited in chloroplasts. We produced transgenic tobacco plants that contained chimeric genes in which the second exon of a Petunia hybrida mitochondrial coxII gene was under the control of chloroplast gene regulatory sequences. coxII transcripts accumulated to low or high levels in transgenic chloroplasts containing chimeric genes with the plastid ribosomal protein gene rps16 or the rRNA operon promoter, respectively. Exon 2 of coxII was chosen because it carries seven editing sites and is edited in petunia mitochondria even when located in an abnormal context in an aberrant recombined gene. When editing of the coxII transcripts in transgenic chloroplasts was examined, no RNA editing at any of the usual sites was detected, nor was there any novel editing at any other sites. These results indicate that the RNA editing mechanisms of chloroplasts and mitochondria are not identical but must have at least some organelle-specific components. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Ribosomal protein L10 is encoded in the mitochondrial genome of many land plants and green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Bonen Linda; Mower Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The mitochondrial genomes of plants generally encode 30-40 identified protein-coding genes and a large number of lineage-specific ORFs. The lack of wide conservation for most ORFs suggests they are unlikely to be functional. However, an ORF, termed orf-bryo1, was recently found to be conserved among bryophytes suggesting that it might indeed encode a functional mitochondrial protein. Results From a broad survey of land plants, we have found that the orf-bryo1 gene is also ...

  16. Synonymous codon usage bias in plant mitochondrial genes is associated with intron number and mirrors species evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Xu

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias (SCUB is a common event that a non-uniform usage of codons often occurs in nearly all organisms. We previously found that SCUB is correlated with both intron number and exon position in the plant nuclear genome but not in the plastid genome; SCUB in both nuclear and plastid genome can mirror the evolutionary specialization. However, how about the rules in the mitochondrial genome has not been addressed. Here, we present an analysis of SCUB in the mitochondrial genome, based on 24 plant species ranging from algae to land plants. The frequencies of NNA and NNT (A- and T-ending codons are higher than those of NNG and NNC, with the strongest preference in bryophytes and the weakest in land plants, suggesting an association between SCUB and plant evolution. The preference for NNA and NNT is more evident in genes harboring a greater number of introns in land plants, but the bias to NNA and NNT exhibits even among exons. The pattern of SCUB in the mitochondrial genome differs in some respects to that present in both the nuclear and plastid genomes.

  17. Family-specific vs. universal PCR primers for the study of mitochondrial DNA in plants

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    Aleksić Jelena M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs or mitogenomes of seed plants are characterized by a notoriously unstable organization on account of which available so-called universal or consensus primers may fail to fulfil their foreseen function - amplification of various mtDNA regions in a broad range of plant taxa. Thus, the primers developed for groups assumed to have similar organization of their mitogenomes, such as families, may facilitate a broader usage of more variable non-coding portions of these genomes in group members. Using in silico PCR method and six available complete mitogenomes of Fabaceae, it has been demonstrated that only three out of 36 published universal primer and three Medicago sativa-specific primer pairs that amplify various mtDNA regions are suitable for six representatives of the Fabaceae family upon minor modifications, and develop 21 Fabaceae-specific primer pairs for amplification of all 14 cis-splicing introns in genes of NADH subunits (nad genes which represent the most commonly used non-coding mtDNA regions in various studies in plants. Using the same method and six available complete mitogenomes of representatives of related families Cucurbitaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Rosaceae and a model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, it has further been demonstrated that applicability of newly developed primer pairs for amplification of nad introns in more or less related taxa was dependent not only on species evolutionary distances but also on their genome sizes. A reported set of 24 primer pairs is a valuable resource which may facilitate a broader usage of mtDNA variability in future studies at both intra- and inter-specific levels in Fabaceae, which is the third largest family of flowering plants rarely studied at the mtDNA level, and in other more or less related taxa. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173005

  18. Inhibition of flower formation by antisense repression of mitochondrial citrate synthase in transgenic potato plants leads to a specific disintegration of the ovary tissues of flowers.

    OpenAIRE

    Landschütze, V; Willmitzer, L.; Müller-Röber, B

    1995-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle constitutes a major component of the mitochondrial metabolism of eucaryotes, including higher plants. To analyze the importance of this pathway, we down-regulated mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS; EC 4.1.3.7), the first enzyme of the TCA cycle, in transgenic potato plants using an antisense RNA approach. Several transformants were identified with reduced citrate synthase activity (down to approximately 6% of wild-type activity). These plants were indistin...

  19. Mitochondrial genes reveal cryptic diversity in plant-breeding frogs from Madagascar (Anura, Mantellidae, Guibemantis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Richard M; Nussbaum, Ronald A; Richards, Christina M; Cannatella, David C; Vences, Miguel

    2007-09-01

    One group of mantellid frogs from Madagascar (subgenus Pandanusicola of Guibemantis) includes species that complete larval development in the water-filled leaf axils of rainforest plants. This group consists of six described species: G. albolineatus, G. bicalcaratus, G. flavobrunneus, G. liber, G. pulcher, and G. punctatus. We sequenced the 12S and 16S mitochondrial rRNA genes ( approximately 1.8 kb) from multiple specimens (35 total) of all six species to assess phylogenetic relationships within this group. All reconstructions strongly supported G. liber as part of the Pandanusicola clade, even though this species does not breed in plant leaf axils. This result confirms a striking reversal of reproductive specialization. However, all analyses also indicated that specimens assigned to G. liber include genetically distinct allopatric forms that do not form a monophyletic group. Most other taxa that were adequately sampled (G. bicalcaratus, G. flavobrunneus, and G. pulcher) likewise consist of several genetically distinct lineages that do not form monophyletic groups. These results suggest that many of the recognized species in this group are complexes of cryptic species.

  20. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolstenhome, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    We have completed sequencing segments of the maize mitochondrial (mt) DNA that contains all five of the exons (A-E) of the gene (nad1) for subunit I of the respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase. Analysis of these sequences indicates that exons B and C are joined by a continuous group II intron, but the remaining exons are associated with partial group II introns and are encoded at widely separated locations in the maize mtDNA molecule. We have shown that mature transcripts of the maize nad1 gene contain 23 edited nucleotides, and that transcripts of maize and soybean mat-r genes contain 15 and 14 edits, respectively. The majority of edits in nad1 transcripts result in amino acid replacements that increase similarity between the maize NAD1 protein and NAD1 proteins of other plant species and of animal species. We found that the intron between exons b and c is not edited. From data obtained using PCR and sequencing we have shown that transcripts containing all possible exon combinations exist in maize mitochondria.

  1. Mapping of wheat mitochondrial mRNA termini and comparison with breakpoints in DNA homology among plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Boyoung; Acero, Maria M; Bonen, Linda

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA rearrangements occur very frequently in flowering plants and when close to genes there must be concomitant acquisition of new regulatory cis-elements. To explore whether there might be limits to such DNA shuffling, we have mapped the termini of mitochondrial mRNAs in wheat, a monocot, and compared them to the known positions for counterpart genes in the eudicot Arabidopsis. Nine genes share homologous 3' UTRs over their full-length and for six of them, the termini map very close to the site of wheat/Arabidopsis DNA rearrangements. Only one such case was seen for comparisons of 5' UTRs, and the 5' ends of mRNAs are typically more heterogeneous than 3' termini. Approximately half of the thirty-one wheat mitochondrial transcriptional units are preceded by CRTA promoter-like motifs, and of the potential stem-loop or tRNA-like structures identified as candidate RNA processing/stability signals near the 5' or 3' ends, several are shared with Arabidopsis. Comparison of the mitochondrial gene flanking sequences from normal fertile wheat (Triticum aestivum) with those of Aegilops kotschyi which is the source of mitochondria present in K-type cytoplasmic male sterile wheat, revealed six cases where mRNAs are precluded from sharing full-length homologous UTRs because of genomic reorganization events, and the presence of short repeats located at the sites of discontinuity points to a reciprocal recombination-mediated mode of rearrangement.

  2. Is plant mitochondrial RNA editing a source of phylogenetic incongruence? An answer from in silico and in vivo data sets

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    Quagliariello Carla

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plant mitochondria, the post-transcriptional RNA editing process converts C to U at a number of specific sites of the mRNA sequence and usually restores phylogenetically conserved codons and the encoded amino acid residues. Sites undergoing RNA editing evolve at a higher rate than sites not modified by the process. As a result, editing sites strongly affect the evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes, representing an important source of sequence variability and potentially informative characters. To date no clear and convincing evidence has established whether or not editing sites really affect the topology of reconstructed phylogenetic trees. For this reason, we investigated here the effect of RNA editing on the tree building process of twenty different plant mitochondrial gene sequences and by means of computer simulations. Results Based on our simulation study we suggest that the editing ‘noise’ in tree topology inference is mainly manifested at the cDNA level. In particular, editing sites tend to confuse tree topologies when artificial genomic and cDNA sequences are generated shorter than 500 bp and with an editing percentage higher than 5.0%. Similar results have been also obtained with genuine plant mitochondrial genes. In this latter instance, indeed, the topology incongruence increases when the editing percentage goes up from about 3.0 to 14.0%. However, when the average gene length is higher than 1,000 bp (rps3, matR and atp1 no differences in the comparison between inferred genomic and cDNA topologies could be detected. Conclusions Our findings by the here reported in silico and in vivo computer simulation system seem to strongly suggest that editing sites contribute in the generation of misleading phylogenetic trees if the analyzed mitochondrial gene sequence is highly edited (higher than 3.0% and reduced in length (shorter than 500 bp. In the current lack of direct experimental evidence the results

  3. The Roles of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cellular Signaling and Stress Response in Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, A. Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria produce ATP via respiratory oxidation of organic acids and transfer of electrons to O2 via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This process produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) at various rates that can impact respiratory and cellular function, affecting a variety of signaling processes in the cell. Roles in redox signaling, retrograde signaling, plant hormone action, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens have been attributed to ROS generated in plant mitochondria (mtROS). The shortcomings of the black box-idea of mtROS are discussed in the context of mechanistic considerations and the measurement of mtROS. The overall aim of this update is to better define our current understanding of mtROS and appraise their potential influence on cellular function in plants. Furthermore, directions for future research are provided, along with suggestions to increase reliability of mtROS measurements. PMID:27021189

  4. EdiPy: a resource to simulate the evolution of plant mitochondrial genes under the RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Ernesto; Quagliariello, Carla

    2006-02-01

    EdiPy is an online resource appropriately designed to simulate the evolution of plant mitochondrial genes in a biologically realistic fashion. EdiPy takes into account the presence of sites subjected to RNA editing and provides multiple artificial alignments corresponding to both genomic and cDNA sequences. Each artificial data set can successively be submitted to main and widespread evolutionary and phylogenetic software packages such as PAUP, Phyml, PAML and Phylip. As an online bioinformatic resource, EdiPy is available at the following web page: http://biologia.unical.it/py_script/index.html.

  5. OrgConv: detection of gene conversion using consensus sequences and its application in plant mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Weilong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestry of mitochondria and chloroplasts traces back to separate endosymbioses of once free-living bacteria. The highly reduced genomes of these two organelles therefore contain very distant homologs that only recently have been shown to recombine inside the mitochondrial genome. Detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs was previously impossible due to the lack of suitable computer programs. Recently, I developed a novel method and have, for the first time, discovered recurrent gene conversion between chloroplast mitochondrial genes. The method will further our understanding of plant organellar genome evolution and help identify and remove gene regions with incongruent phylogenetic signals for several genes widely used in plant systematics. Here, I implement such a method that is available in a user friendly web interface. Results OrgConv (Organellar Conversion is a computer package developed for detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologous genes. OrgConv is available in two forms; source code can be installed and run on a Linux platform and a web interface is available on multiple operating systems. The input files of the feature program are two multiple sequence alignments from different organellar compartments in FASTA format. The program compares every examined sequence against the consensus sequence of each sequence alignment rather than exhaustively examining every possible combination. Making use of consensus sequences significantly reduces the number of comparisons and therefore reduces overall computational time, which allows for analysis of very large datasets. Most importantly, with the significantly reduced number of comparisons, the statistical power remains high in the face of correction for multiple tests. Conclusions Both the source code and the web interface of OrgConv are available for free from the OrgConv website http

  6. Screening SIRT1 Activators from Medicinal Plants as Bioactive Compounds against Oxidative Damage in Mitochondrial Function

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    Yi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1 belongs to the family of NAD+ dependent histone deacetylases and plays a critical role in cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs, as an important part of natural products, have been reported to exert protective effect against oxidative stress in mitochondria. In this study, we screened SIRT1 activators from TCMs and investigated their activities against mitochondrial damage. 19 activators were found in total by in vitro SIRT1 activity assay. Among those active compounds, four compounds, ginsenoside Rb2, ginsenoside F1, ginsenoside Rc, and schisandrin A, were further studied to validate the SIRT1-activation effects by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and confirm their activities against oxidative damage in H9c2 cardiomyocytes exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The results showed that those compounds enhanced the deacetylated activity of SIRT1, increased ATP content, and inhibited intracellular ROS formation as well as regulating the activity of Mn-SOD. These SIRT1 activators also showed moderate protective effects on mitochondrial function in t-BHP cells by recovering oxygen consumption and increasing mitochondrial DNA content. Our results suggested that those compounds from TCMs attenuated oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in cardiomyocytes through activation of SIRT1.

  7. Alternative Oxidase: A Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathway to Maintain Metabolic and Signaling Homeostasis during Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Plants

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    Greg C. Vanlerberghe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alternative oxidase (AOX is a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. While respiratory carbon oxidation pathways, electron transport, and ATP turnover are tightly coupled processes, AOX provides a means to relax this coupling, thus providing a degree of metabolic homeostasis to carbon and energy metabolism. Beside their role in primary metabolism, plant mitochondria also act as “signaling organelles”, able to influence processes such as nuclear gene expression. AOX activity can control the level of potential mitochondrial signaling molecules such as superoxide, nitric oxide and important redox couples. In this way, AOX also provides a degree of signaling homeostasis to the organelle. Evidence suggests that AOX function in metabolic and signaling homeostasis is particularly important during stress. These include abiotic stresses such as low temperature, drought, and nutrient deficiency, as well as biotic stresses such as bacterial infection. This review provides an introduction to the genetic and biochemical control of AOX respiration, as well as providing generalized examples of how AOX activity can provide metabolic and signaling homeostasis. This review also examines abiotic and biotic stresses in which AOX respiration has been critically evaluated, and considers the overall role of AOX in growth and stress tolerance.

  8. PHOSPHORYLATION/DEPHOSPHORYLATION OF MITOCHONDRIAL PROTEINS IN REDOX-SIGNALLING OF HIGHER PLANTS UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subota I.Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied an impact of the widely spread intra-cellular signals Ca2+ and сAMP on activity of the protein phosphorylation in maize mitochondria. The use of the isolated mitochondria is a convenient model system for investigation of the different physiological processes, for example for simulation of the different stress conditions. The treatment of maize mitochondria with high concentration of calcium ions which mimics the initial stage of apoptosis led to an increase of the phosphorylation level of some proteins and to an additional phosphorylation of the 59 and 66 kDa proteins. The treatment of the mitoplasts, i.e., the mitochondria devoid of the outer membrane with calcium ions insignificantly induced the activity of protein phosphorylation. It is assumed that the outer membrane is essential for Ca2+ signal transduction to plant mitochondria. We also identified a 94 kDa protein involved in phosphorylation of the mitochondrial proteins. This protein might be a single-subunit protein kinase or one of the subunits of the protein kinase complex. Antimycin A and KCN which are the inhibitors of mitochondria respiration increased the phosphorylation activity of the mitochondrial polypeptides. The effect of this inhibitors was similar both in in organello system and at the level of the whole plant. It should be noticed that at the level of the whole plant the effect of KCN on activity of the mitochondrial protein phosphorylation was more essential. Some considerable differences were found both at the level of protein phosphorylation and in electrophoresis patterns representing the intact mitochondria, the mitoplasts and the outer membrane fraction. The activity of protein phosphorylation in mitoplasts and the outer membrane fraction was extremely high compared to the phosphorylation activity of the mitochondrial proteins. This could be explained by the higher level of “substrate phosphoprotein phosphatase” in the outer membrane of mitochondria

  9. Mitochondria as pharmacological targets: the discovery of novel anti-obesity mitochondrial uncouplers from Africa's medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocloo, Augustine; Dongdem, Julius Tieroyaare

    2012-01-01

    Obesity results from prolonged positive imbalance between energy in take and expenditure. When food intake chronically exceeds the body's energy need, an efficient metabolism results in the storage of the excess energy as fat. Mitochondria are the main centre for energy production in eukaryotic cells. Mitochondrial proton cycling is responsible for a significant proportion of basal or standard metabolic rate, therefore, further uncoupling of mitochondria may be a good way to increase energy expenditure and hence represent a good pharmacological target for the treatment of obesity. This implies that, any chemical agent or photochemical compound that further uncouples the mitochondria in vivo without having any effect on mitochondria activity could be a potential target in finding treatment for obesity. In the past, uncoupling by 2, 4-dinitrophenol has been used this way with notable success. This paper discusses the mitochondria as targets in the discovery of potential plant natural anti-obesity products from Africa's rich rainforests. PMID:23983343

  10. An Arabidopsis mitochondrial uncoupling protein confers tolerance to drought and salt stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Begcy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants are challenged by a large number of environmental stresses that reduce productivity and even cause death. Both chloroplasts and mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species under normal conditions; however, stress causes an imbalance in these species that leads to deviations from normal cellular conditions and a variety of toxic effects. Mitochondria have uncoupling proteins (UCPs that uncouple electron transport from ATP synthesis. There is evidence that UCPs play a role in alleviating stress caused by reactive oxygen species overproduction. However, direct evidence that UCPs protect plants from abiotic stress is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tolerances to salt and water deficit were analyzed in transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress a UCP (AtUCP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Seeds of AtUCP1 transgenic lines germinated faster, and adult plants showed better responses to drought and salt stress than wild-type (WT plants. These phenotypes correlated with increased water retention and higher gas exchange parameters in transgenic plants that overexpress AtUCP1. WT plants exhibited increased respiration under stress, while transgenic plants were only slightly affected. Furthermore, the transgenic plants showed reduced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in stressed leaves compared with WT plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Higher levels of AtUCP1 improved tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, and this protection was correlated with lower oxidative stress. Our data support previous assumptions that UCPs reduce the imbalance of reactive oxygen species. Our data also suggest that UCPs may play a role in stomatal closure, which agrees with other evidence of a direct relationship between these proteins and photosynthesis. Manipulation of the UCP protein expression in mitochondria is a new avenue for crop improvement and may lead to crops with greater tolerance for challenging environmental conditions.

  11. Interspecific Comparison and annotation of two complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millenbaugh, Bonnie A; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Kema, Gert H.J.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2007-12-07

    The mitochondrial genomes of two isolates of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola were sequenced completely and compared to identify polymorphic regions. This organism is of interest because it is phylogenetically distant from other fungi with sequenced mitochondrial genomes and it has shown discordant patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial genome of M. graminicola is a circular molecule of approximately 43,960 bp containing the typical genes coding for 14 proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, one RNA polymerase, two rRNA genes and a set of 27 tRNAs. The mitochondrial DNA of M. graminicola lacks the gene encoding the putative ribosomal protein (rps5-like), commonly found in fungal mitochondrial genomes. Most of the tRNA genes were clustered with a gene order conserved with many other ascomycetes. A sample of thirty-five additional strains representing the known global mt diversity was partially sequenced to measure overall mitochondrial variability within the species. Little variation was found, confirming previous RFLP-based findings of low mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial sequence of M. graminicola is the first reported from the family Mycosphaerellaceae or the order Capnodiales. The sequence also provides a tool to better understand the development of fungicide resistance and the conflicting pattern of high nuclear and low mitochondrial diversity in global populations of this fungus.

  12. On the role of plant mitochondrial metabolism and its impact on photosynthesis in both optimal and sub-optimal growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Wagner L; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2014-02-01

    Given that the pathways of photosynthesis and respiration catalyze partially opposing processes, it follows that their relative activities must be carefully regulated within plant cells. Recent evidence has shown that the components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain are essential for the proper maintenance of intracellular redox gradients, to allow considerable rates of photorespiration and in turn efficient photosynthesis. Thus considerable advances have been made in understanding the interaction between respiration and photosynthesis during the last decades and the potential mechanisms linking mitochondrial function and photosynthetic efficiency will be reviewed. Despite the fact that manipulation of various steps of mitochondrial metabolism has been demonstrated to alter photosynthesis under optimal growth conditions, it is likely that these changes will, by and large, not be maintained under sub-optimal situations. Therefore producing plants to meet this aim remains a critical challenge. It is clear, however, that although there have been a range of studies analysing changes in respiratory and photosynthetic rates in response to light, temperature and CO2, our knowledge of the environmental impact on these processes and its linkage still remains fragmented. We will also discuss the metabolic changes associated to plant respiration and photosynthesis as important components of the survival strategy as they considerably extend the period that a plant can withstand to a stress situation.

  13. 植物线粒体遗传的研究进展%Research progress of mitochondrial inheritance in plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔彬彬; 朱维红; 张妍; 蓝岚

    2011-01-01

    对植物线粒体遗传方式、遗传机理的最新进展进行了综述。被子植物线粒体的遗传方式以单亲母系遗传占绝对的统治地位,在裸子植物中,不同的种差别较大,松科、红豆杉科线粒体多为母系遗传,而南洋杉科、杉科、柏科和三尖杉科的线粒体主要为父系遗传方式。绝大数植物线粒体遗传有其不同于质体遗传的特征,线粒体在雄性生殖细胞中持续存在,甚至参与受精进入合子,但又更多地表现为母系遗传。%Genetic pattern and genetic mechanisms of plant mitochondrias were summarized in the paper. Trie single maternal inheritance was the absolute dominance of the mitochondrial genetic manners of angiosperm. In gymnosperm, the different species vary greatly, the mitochondrias of most species of Knaceae.Taxaceae were maternal inheritance, and the mitochondrias of most species of Araucariaceae, Taxodiaceae, Cupressaceae and Cephalotaxaceae were paternal inheritance. The most plant mitochonrias had their different genetic characteristics of plasmid inheritance. Mitochondria in the male germ cells per-sistly existed and even participated in the fertilization process and entered into the zygote and showed maternal inheritace.

  14. Warming does not stimulate mitochondrial respiration and it responds to leaf carbohydrates availability in soybean plants grown under elevated CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Vera, U. M.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.; Ort, D. R.; Siebers, M.

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of understanding on the mechanism underlying the response of mitochondrial respiration (Rs) to the single and combined effects of increasing CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and warming. We investigated the response of Rs to the single and combined effects of elevated [CO2] and warming in soybean plants over a complete growing season using Temperature by Free Air CO2 enrichment technology under field conditions. The treatments were: control, elevated [CO2] (eC), high temperature (eT), and elevated [CO2]+high temperature (eT+eC). Given that photosynthetic rates in eT+eC grown plants were not higher than in plants grown under eC, we hypothesized that Rs would increase only slightly in plants grown under eT+eC compared to eC plants, due to the increase of temperature. Contrary to our prediction, our preliminary results showed that plants grown under the warming treatments had low Rs, thus eT+eC had lower Rs than eC. The response of Rs to these factors was consistent at two different plant high levels (canopy and five nodes down the canopy). Changes in Rs were explained by variations in the carbohydrate content. Our results indicate that the response of Rs to changes in [CO2] and temperature will depend on the carbohydrate availability of plant tissues and thus on how photosynthesis is affected by this environmental factors.

  15. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  16. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are ... cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria ...

  17. Effects of flooding stress in 'Micro-Tom' tomato plants transformed with different levels of mitochondrial sHSP23.6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüther, C M; Martinazzo, E G; Rombaldi, C V; Bacarin, M A

    2016-07-11

    Soil flooding is an environmental stressor for crops that can affect physiological performance and reduce crop yields. Abiotic stressors cause changes in protein synthesis, modifying the levels of a series of proteins, especially the heat shock proteins (HSP), and these proteins can help protect the plants against abiotic stress. The objective of this study was to verify if tomato plants cv. Micro-Tom from different genotypes with varying expression levels of MT-sHSP23.6 (mitochondrial small heat shock proteins) have different responses physiological to flooding. Plants from three genotypes (untransformed, MT-sHSP23.6 sense expression levels and MT-sHSP23.6 antisense expression levels) were cultivated under controlled conditions. After 50 days, the plants were flooded for 14 days. After this period half of the plants from each genotype were allowed to recover. Chlorophyll fluorescence, gas exchange, chlorophyll index, leaf area and dry matter were evaluated. Flood stress affected the photosynthetic electron transport chain, which is related to inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex, loss of connectivity among units in photosystem II, oxidation-reduction of the plastoquinone pool and activity of photosystem I. The genotype with MT-sHSP23.6 sense expression levels was less sensitive to stress from flooding. PMID:27409224

  18. Mitochondria as Pharmacological Targets: The Discovery of Novel Anti-Obesity Mitochondrial Uncouplers from Africa's Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ocloo, Augustine; Dongdem, Julius Tieroyaare

    2011-01-01

    Obesity results from prolonged positive imbalance between energy in take and expenditure. When food intake chronically exceeds the body's energy need, an efficient metabolism results in the storage of the excess energy as fat. Mitochondria are the main centre for energy production in eukaryotic cells. Mitochondrial proton cycling is responsible for a significant proportion of basal or standard metabolic rate, therefore, further uncoupling of mitochondria may be a good way to increase energy e...

  19. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper;

    We are testing the hypothesis that oxidized peptides are released from stressed mitochondria and contribute to retrograde signalling (Møller IM & Sweetlove LJ 2010 Trends Plant Sci 15, 370-374). However, there is a large gap between the number of experimentally verified mitochondrial proteins (~450......) and in silico-predicted mitochondrial proteins (2000-3000). Thus, before starting to look for oxidized peptides, we wanted to expand the current compendium of plant mitochondrial proteins while obtaining what could be termed the "baseline proteome" from our model organelle, the potato tuber mitochondrion. Its...

  20. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS supports research focused on effective treatments and cures for mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases. Scientists are investigating the possible benefits of exercise programs and nutritional supplements, primarily natural and synthetic versions of CoQ10. While CoQ10 has ...

  1. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  2. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-12-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. The intra-mitochondrial availability of molecular oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor drives the evolutionary fashioned chemiosmotic production of ATP as a high-efficiency biological process. The mechanistic bases of carcinogenesis have demonstrated profound alteration of normative mitochondrial function, notably dysregulated respiratory processes. Accordingly, the classic Warburg effect functionally links aerobic glycolysis, aberrant production and release of lactate, and metabolic down-regulation of mitochondrial oxidative processes with the carcinogenetic phenotype. We surmise, however, that aerobic fermentation by cancer cells may also represent a developmental re-emergence of an evolutionarily conserved early phenotype, which was "sidelined" with the emergence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary mechanism for ATP production in normal cells. Regardless of state-dependent physiological status in mixed populations of cancer cells, it has been established that mitochondria are functionally linked to the initiation of cancer and its progression. Biochemical, molecular, and physiological differences in cancer cell mitochondria, notably mtDNA heteroplasmy and allele-specific expression of selected nuclear genes, may represent major focal points for novel targeting and elimination of cancer cells in metastatic disease afflicting human populations. To date, and despite considerable research efforts, the practical realization of advanced mitochondrial

  3. Discord as a quantum resource for bi-partite communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Assad, Syed M.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University (Australia); Gu, Mile; Modi, Kavan; Vedral, Vlatko [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ralph, Timothy C. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Department of Physics, University of Queensland (Australia)

    2014-12-04

    Coherent interactions that generate negligible entanglement can still exhibit unique quantum behaviour. This observation has motivated a search beyond entanglement for a complete description of all quantum correlations. Quantum discord is a promising candidate. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that under certain measurement constraints, discord between bipartite systems can be consumed to encode information that can only be accessed by coherent quantum interactions. The inability to access this information by any other means allows us to use discord to directly quantify this ‘quantum advantage’.

  4. Heterogeneous protection in regular and complete bi-partite networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omić, J.; Kooij, R.E.; Mieghem, P. van

    2009-01-01

    We examine the influence of heterogeneous curing rates for a SIS model, used for malware spreading on the Internet, information dissemination in unreliable networks, and propagation of failures in networks. The topology structures considered are the regular graph which represents the homogenous netw

  5. Introduction into bi-partite networks in python

    OpenAIRE

    Kasberger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This essay and the related computation delivers a comprehensive introduction into the concept of bipartite networks, a class of networks whose nodes are divided into two sets and only the connection between two nodes in different sets is allowed (Easley and Kleinberg, 2010). The analysis and visualization is done in the programming language Python and offers easy to understand first steps in both fields, network analyses and python programming. As data a collaboration network of github users ...

  6. Quantitation of cyanide detoxification product ß-cyanoalanine by LC-MS/MS in plant tissue and mitochondrial preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianfeng; 吳劍鋒

    2014-01-01

    β-cyanoalanine is a metabolite in the detoxification of cyanide created as a co-product in ethylene biosynthesis pathway. This reaction is catalyzed by β-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) in the mitochondrion in the presence of cysteine as the other reactant. However, quantitative analysis of β-cyanoalanine by high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) has not yet been demonstrated in plant mitochondria and tissues. In this study, pear (Pyrus communis) mesocarp...

  7. Grapes, galls, and geography: the distribution of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation across host-plant species and regions in a specialist herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, D A; Fisher, J R; Granett, J

    2001-07-01

    Studies of patterns of molecular variation in natural populations can provide important insights into a number of evolutionary problems. Among these, the question of whether geographic factors are more important than ecological factors in promoting population differentiation and ultimately speciation has been an important and contentious area in evolutionary biology. Systems involving herbivorous insects have played a leading role in this discussion. This study examined the distribution of molecular variation in a highly specialized gall-forming insect, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch), that is found on both sympatric and allopatric host-plant species of the genus Vitis. In addition, the relationship of insects in the introduced range in the United States to ancestral populations in the native range was examined. Evidence for differentiation along host-plant lines from both nuclear (RAPD) and mitochondrial (COI) DNA was confounded with the effect of geography. Differentiation was found where hosts were allopatric or parapatric, but no evidence was found for such differentiation on two hosts, V. vulpina and V. aestivalis, that are broadly sympatric. The question of population differentiation onto these sympatric hosts can be considered to be resolved--it has not occurred in spite of a long history of association. Evidence was equivocal, but suggestive of a period of divergence in allopatry prior to reestablishment of contact, for insects associated with another host plant species, V. cinerea, found in both sympatric and parapatric populations. A low level of diversity and placement of samples collected from the grape species V. riparia at the tip of a phylogenetic tree supports the hypothesis that this host has been recently colonized from populations from the Mississippi Valley. A polyphyletic origin for biotype B grape phylloxera was supported: Although most samples collected from vineyards in the introduced range in California had similar

  8. Proteomic Dissection of the Mitochondrial DNA Metabolism Apparatus in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAlly A. Mackenzie

    2004-01-06

    This study involves the investigation of nuclear genetic components that regulate mitochondrial genome behavior in higher plants. The approach utilizes the advanced plant model system of Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and functionally characterize multiple components of the mitochondrial DNA replication, recombination and mismatch repair system and their interaction partners. The rationale for the research stems from the central importance of mitochondria to overall cellular metabolism and the essential nature of the mitochondrial genome to mitochondrial function. Relatively little is understood about mitochondrial DNA maintenance and transmission in higher eukaryotes, and the higher plant mitochondrial genome displays unique properties and behavior. This investigation has revealed at least three important properties of plant mitochondrial DNA metabolism components. (1) Many are dual targeted to mitochondrial and chloroplasts by novel mechanisms, suggesting that the mitochondria a nd chloroplast share their genome maintenance apparatus. (2)The MSH1 gene, originating as a component of mismatch repair, has evolved uniquely in plants to participate in differential replication of the mitochondrial genome. (3) This mitochondrial differential replication process, termed substoichiometric shifting and also involving a RecA-related gene, appears to represent an adaptive mechanism to expand plant reproductive capacity and is likely present throughout the plant kingdom.

  9. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  10. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  11. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  12. A recombination point is conserved in the mitochondrial genome of higher plant species and located downstream from the cox2 pseudogene in Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susely F.S. Tada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The potato (Solanum tuberosum L. mitochondrial cox3/sdh4/pseudo-cox2 gene cluster has previously been identified by heterologous hybridization using a Marchantia polymorpha sdh4 probe. In our present study we used Southern blotting using sdh4 and cox2 probes to show that the sdh4 and cox2 genes are clustered in the mitochondria of potato, soybean and pea. Northern blotting revealed cotranscription of sdh4 and cox2 in potato but not in cauliflower, indicating that these genes are not clustered in cauliflower. A putative recombination point was detected downstream of the cox2 pseudogene (pseudo-cox2 in potato mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. This sequence corresponds to a 32 bp sequence which appears to be well-conserved and is adjacent to the terminals of some mitochondrial genes in Citrullus lanatus, Beta vulgaris and Arabidopsis thaliana and is probably involved in the genic rearrangements. It is possible the potato mtDNA pseudo-cox2 gene was generated by recombination during evolution in the same way as that of several other mitochondrial genes and remains as an inactive partial copy of the functional cox2 which was also detected in potato mtDNA.

  13. The American cranberry mitochondrial genome reveals the presence of selenocysteine (tRNA-Sec and SECIS) insertion machinery in land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) mitochondrial genome was assembled and reconstructed from whole genome 454 Roche GS-FLX and Illumina shotgun sequences. Compared with other Asterids, the reconstruction of the genome revealed an average size mitochondrion (459,678 nt) with comparat...

  14. Transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes correlate with mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a natural population of Silene vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Matthew S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although rapid changes in copy number and gene order are common within plant mitochondrial genomes, associated patterns of gene transcription are underinvestigated. Previous studies have shown that the gynodioecious plant species Silene vulgaris exhibits high mitochondrial diversity and occasional paternal inheritance of mitochondrial markers. Here we address whether variation in DNA molecular markers is correlated with variation in transcription of mitochondrial genes in S. vulgaris collected from natural populations. Results We analyzed RFLP variation in two mitochondrial genes, cox1 and atp1, in offspring of ten plants from a natural population of S. vulgaris in Central Europe. We also investigated transcription profiles of the atp1 and cox1 genes. Most DNA haplotypes and transcription profiles were maternally inherited; for these, transcription profiles were associated with specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. One individual exhibited a pattern consistent with paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA; this individual exhibited a transcription profile suggestive of paternal but inconsistent with maternal inheritance. We found no associations between gender and transcript profiles. Conclusions Specific transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were associated with specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a natural population of a gynodioecious species S. vulgaris. Our findings suggest the potential for a causal association between rearrangements in the plant mt genome and transcription product variation.

  15. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  16. The agaricus bisporus cox1 gene: the longest mitochondrial gene and the largest reservoir of mitochondrial group I introns

    OpenAIRE

    Cyril Férandon; Serge Moukha; Philippe Callac; Jean-Pierre Benedetto; Michel Castroviejo; Gérard Barroso

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, introns are located in nuclear and organelle genes from several kingdoms. Large introns (up to 5 kbp) are frequent in mitochondrial genomes of plant and fungi but scarce in Metazoa, even if these organisms are grouped with fungi among the Opisthokonts. Mitochondrial introns are classified in two groups (I and II) according to their RNA secondary structure involved in the intron self-splicing mechanism. Most of these mitochondrial group I introns carry a “Homing Endonuclease Gen...

  17. Strokes in mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Pizova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that mitochondrial diseases might be identified in 22—33% of cryptogenic stroke cases in young subjects. The incidence of mitochondrial disorders in patients with stroke is unknown; it is 0.8 to 7.2% according to the data of some authors. The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of mitochondrial diseases, such as mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS and insulin-like episodes; myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF syndrome, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (sporadic multisystem mitochondrial pathology.

  18. Accelerated evolution of the mitochondrial genome in an alloplasmic line of durum wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat is not only an important crop but also an excellent plant species for nuclear mitochondrial interaction studies. To investigate the level of sequence changes introduced into the mitochondrial genome under the alloplasmic conditions, three mitochondrial genomes of Triticum-Aegilops species w...

  19. ZmPUMP encodes a fully functional monocot plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein whose affinity to fatty acid is increased with the introduction of a His pair at the second matrix loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are specialized mitochondrial transporter proteins that uncouple respiration from ATP synthesis. In this study, cDNA encoding maize uncoupling protein (ZmPUMP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant ZmPUMP reconstituted in liposomes. ZmPUMP activity was associated with a linoleic acid (LA)-mediated H+ efflux with K m of 56.36 ± 0.27 μM and V max of 66.9 μmol H+ min-1 (mg prot)-1. LA-mediated H+ fluxes were sensitive to ATP inhibition with K i of 2.61 ± 0.36 mM (at pH 7.2), a value similar to those for dicot UCPs. ZmPUMP was also used to investigate the importance of a histidine pair present in the second matrix loop of mammalian UCP1 and absent in plant UCPs. ZmPUMP with introduced His pair (Lys155His and Ala157His) displayed a 1.55-fold increase in LA-affinity while its activity remained unchanged. Our data indicate conserved properties of plant UCPs and suggest an enhancing but not essential role of the histidine pair in proton transport mechanism

  20. Scoliosis in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrial myopathies include a diverse group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of muscle mitochondria. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. This study presents a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of mitochondrial myopathies and explores the possible mechanisms between the 2 diseases. A previously unreported scoliosis in mitochondrial myopathies is described. The patient was a 16-year-old Chinese adolescent b...

  1. Phylogenetic relationships among domesticated and wild species of Cucurbita (Cucurbitaceae) inferred from a mitochondrial gene: Implications for crop plant evolution and areas of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjur, Oris I; Piperno, Dolores R; Andres, Thomas C; Wessel-Beaver, Linda

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the phylogenetic relationships among six wild and six domesticated taxa of Cucurbita using as a marker an intron region from the mitochondrial nad1 gene. Our study represents one of the first successful uses of a mtDNA gene in resolving inter- and intraspecific taxonomic relationships in Angiosperms and yields several important insights into the origins of domesticated Cucurbita. First, our data suggest at least six independent domestication events from distinct wild ancestors. Second, Cucurbita argyrosperma likely was domesticated from a wild Mexican gourd, Cucurbita sororia, probably in the same region of southwest Mexico that gave rise to maize. Third, the wild ancestor of Cucurbita moschata is still unknown, but mtDNA data combined with other sources of information suggest that it will probably be found in lowland northern South America. Fourth, Cucurbita andreana is supported as the wild progenitor of Cucurbita maxima, but humid lowland regions of Bolivia in addition to warmer temperate zones in South America from where C. andreana was originally described should possibly be considered as an area of origin for C. maxima. Fifth, our data support other molecular results that indicate two separate domestications in the Cucurbita pepo complex. The potential zone of domestication for one of the domesticated subspecies, C. pepo subsp. ovifera, includes eastern North America and should be extended to northeastern Mexico. The wild ancestor of the other domesticated subspecies, C. pepo subsp. pepo, is undiscovered but is closely related to C. pepo subsp. fraterna and possibly will be found in southern Mexico.

  2. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  3. Identification of mitochondrial coenzyme a transporters from maize and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallot, Rémi; Agrimi, Gennaro; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Teresinski, Howard J; Frelin, Océane; Ellens, Kenneth W; Castegna, Alessandra; Russo, Annamaria; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Mullen, Robert T; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Hanson, Andrew D

    2013-06-01

    Plants make coenzyme A (CoA) in the cytoplasm but use it for reactions in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes, implying that these organelles have CoA transporters. A plant peroxisomal CoA transporter is already known, but plant mitochondrial or chloroplastic CoA transporters are not. Mitochondrial CoA transporters belonging to the mitochondrial carrier family, however, have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Leu-5p) and mammals (SLC25A42). Comparative genomic analysis indicated that angiosperms have two distinct homologs of these mitochondrial CoA transporters, whereas nonflowering plants have only one. The homologs from maize (Zea mays; GRMZM2G161299 and GRMZM2G420119) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; At1g14560 and At4g26180) all complemented the growth defect of the yeast leu5Δ mitochondrial CoA carrier mutant and substantially restored its mitochondrial CoA level, confirming that these proteins have CoA transport activity. Dual-import assays with purified pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondria and chloroplasts, and subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein fusions in transiently transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells, showed that the maize and Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to mitochondria. Consistent with the ubiquitous importance of CoA, the maize and Arabidopsis mitochondrial CoA transporter genes are expressed at similar levels throughout the plant. These data show that representatives of both monocotyledons and eudicotyledons have twin, mitochondrially located mitochondrial carrier family carriers for CoA. The highly conserved nature of these carriers makes possible their reliable annotation in other angiosperm genomes. PMID:23590975

  4. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Yisang; Galloway, Chad A.; Jhun, Bong Sook; Yu, Tianzheng

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are at the center of cellular energy metabolism and regulate cell life and death. The cell biological aspect of mitochondria, especially mitochondrial dynamics, has drawn much attention through implications in human pathology, including neurological disorders and metabolic diseases. Mitochondrial fission and fusion are the main processes governing the morphological plasticity and are controlled by multiple factors, including mechanochemical enzymes and accessory proteins. Emergin...

  5. Sclareol, a plant diterpene, exhibits potent antiproliferative effects via the induction of apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss in osteosarcoma cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; He, Hong-Sheng; Yu, Hua-Long; Zeng, Yun; Han, Heng; He, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Shou-Jia; Xiong, Min

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of sclareol against MG63 osteosarcoma cells. A 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the cell viability of cells following treatment with sclareol. The extent of cell death induced by sclareol was evaluated using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The effect of sclareol on cell cycle progression and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) was evaluated with flow cytometry using the DNA‑binding fluorescent dyes propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes in the MG63 osteosarcoma cancer cells and the appearance of apoptotic bodies following sclareol treatment. The results revealed that sclareol induced dose‑ and time‑dependent growth inhibition of MG63 cancer cells with an IC50 value of 65.2 µM following a 12‑h incubation. Furthermore, sclareol induced a significant increase in the release of LDH from MG63 cell cultures, which was much more pronounced at higher doses. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sclareol induced characteristic morphological features of apoptosis and the appearance of apoptotic bodies. Flow cytometry revealed that sclareol induced G1‑phase cell cycle arrest, which showed significant dose‑dependence. Additionally, sclareol induced a progressive and dose‑dependent reduction in the ΛΨm. In summary, sclareol inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma cancer cells via the induction of apoptosis, which is accompanied by G1‑phase cell cycle arrest and loss of ΛΨm.

  6. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  7. Subamolide B Isolated from Medicinal Plant Cinnamomum subavenium Induces Cytotoxicity in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through Mitochondrial and CHOP-Dependent Cell Death Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Shu-Yi Yang; Hui-Min Wang; Tai-Wen Wu; Yi-Ju Chen; Jeng-Jer Shieh; Ju-Hwa Lin; Tsing-Fen Ho; Ren-Jie Luo; Chung-Yi Chen; Chia-Che Chang

    2013-01-01

    Subamolide B is a butanolide isolated from Cinnamomum subavenium, a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat various ailments including carcinomatous swelling. We herein reported for the first time that subamolide B potently induced cytotoxicity against diverse human skin cancer cell lines while sparing nonmalignant cells. Mechanistic studies on human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line SCC12 highlighted the involvement of apoptosis in subamolide B-induced cytotoxicity, as ev...

  8. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  9. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Mitochondrial Disease FAQ's MitoFirst Handbook More Information Mito 101 Symposium Archives Get Connected Find an Event Adult Advisory Council Team Ask The Mito Doc Grand Rounds Kids & Teens Medical Child Abuse ...

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny M.A. Kianian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution of this organelle into daughter cells. The genes that underlie these changes are beginning to be identified in model plants such as Arabidopsis. In animals disruption of the drp1 gene, a homolog to the plant drp3A and drp3B, delays mitochondrial division. This mutation results in increased aneuploidy due to chromosome mis-segregation. It remains to be discovered if a similar outcome is observed in plants. Alloplasmic lines provide an opportunity to understand the communication between the cytoplasmic organelles and the nucleus. Examples of studies in these lines, especially from the extensive collection in wheat, point to the role of mitochondria in chromosome movement, pollen fertility and other aspects of development. Genes involved in NM interaction also are believed to play a critical role in evolution of species and interspecific cross incompatibilities.

  11. Mitochondrial metabolism and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Ki‐Up; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The oversupply of calories and sedentary lifestyle has resulted in a rapid increase of diabetes prevalence worldwide. During the past two decades, lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Mitochondria are vital to most of the eukaryotic cells as they provide energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate by oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose‐stimulated insulin...

  12. Mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Der-Fen; Norris, Kristi L.; Youle, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In healthy cells, mitochondria continually divide and fuse to form a dynamic interconnecting network. The molecular machinery that mediates this organelle fission and fusion is necessary to maintain mitochondrial integrity, perhaps by facilitating DNA or protein quality control. This network disintegrates during apoptosis at the time of cytochrome c release and prior to caspase activation, yielding more numerous and smaller mitochondria. Recent work shows that proteins involved in mitochondri...

  13. Dysfunction of Rice Mitochondrial Membrane Induced by Yb3+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia-Ling; Wu, Man; Liu, Wen; Feng, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Ytterbium (Yb), a widely used rare earth element, is treated as highly toxic to human being and adverseness to plant. Mitochondria play a significant role in plant growth and development, and are proposed as a potential target for ytterbium toxicity. In this paper, the biological effect of Yb(3+) on isolated rice mitochondria was investigated. We found that Yb(3+) with high concentrations (200 ~ 600 μM) not only induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (mtMPT), but also disturbed the mitochondrial ultrastructure. Moreover, Yb(3+) caused the respiratory chain damage, ROS formation, membrane potential decrease, and mitochondrial complex II activity reverse. The results above suggested that Yb(3+) with high concentrations could induce mitochondrial membrane dysfunction. These findings will support some valuable information to the safe application of Yb-based agents. PMID:26305923

  14. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassa, Christopher J; Ebert, Daniel P; Kane, Nolan C; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-01-01

    This is the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for sunflower and the first complete mitochondrial genome for any member of Asteraceae, the largest plant family, which includes over 23,000 named species. The master circle is 300,945-bp long and includes 27 protein-coding sequences, 18 tRNAs, and the 26S, 5S, and 18S rRNAs. PMID:27635002

  15. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Daniel P.; Kane, Nolan C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for sunflower and the first complete mitochondrial genome for any member of Asteraceae, the largest plant family, which includes over 23,000 named species. The master circle is 300,945-bp long and includes 27 protein-coding sequences, 18 tRNAs, and the 26S, 5S, and 18S rRNAs. PMID:27635002

  16. Yeast PPR proteins, watchdogs of mitochondrial gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Christopher J.; Golik, Pawel; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins are a family of ubiquitous RNA-binding factors, found in all the Eukaryotic lineages, and are particularly numerous in higher plants. According to recent bioinformatic analyses, yeast genomes encode from 10 (in S. pombe) to 15 (in S. cerevisiae) PPR proteins. All of these proteins are mitochondrial and very often interact with the mitochondrial membrane. Apart from the general factors, RNA polymerase and RNase P, most yeast PPR proteins are involved in the stability and/or transl...

  17. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  18. Neurological mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytopathies are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by structural and functional abnormalities in mitochondria. To the best of our knowledge, there are very few studies published from India till date. Selected and confirmed fourteen cases of neurological mitochondrial cytopathies with different clinical syndromes admitted between 1997 and 2000 are being reported. There were 8 male and 6 female patients. The mean age was 24.42+/-11.18 years (range 4-40 years. Twelve patients could be categorized into well-defined syndromes, while two belonged to undefined group. In the defined syndrome categories, three patients had MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes, three had MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibre myopathy, three cases had KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and three were diagnosed to be suffering from mitochondrial myopathy. In the uncategorized group, one case presented with paroxysmal kinesogenic dystonia and the other manifested with generalized chorea alone. Serum lactic acid level was significantly increased in all the patients (fasting 28.96+/-4.59 mg%, post exercise 41.02+/-4.93 mg%. Muscle biopsy was done in all cases. Succinic dehydrogenase staining of muscle tissue showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in 12 cases. Mitochondrial DNA study could be performed in one case only and it did not reveal any mutation at nucleotides 3243 and 8344. MRI brain showed multiple infarcts in MELAS, hyperintensities in putaminal areas in chorea and bilateral cerebellar atrophy in MERRF.

  19. The Potato Tuber Mitochondrial Proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper F; Chen, Mingjie;

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are called the powerhouses of the cell. To better understand the role of mitochondria in maintaining and regulating metabolism in storage tissues, highly purified mitochondria were isolated from dormant potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum ‘Folva’) and their proteome investigated. Proteins....../transporters, a number of new proteins involved in coenzyme biosynthesis and iron metabolism, the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and a type 2C protein phosphatase that may catalyze the dephosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Systematic analysis of prominent posttranslational modifications revealed...... that more than 50% of the identified proteins harbor at least one modification. The most prominently observed class of posttranslational modifications was oxidative modifications. This study reveals approximately 500 new or previously unconfirmed plant mitochondrial proteins and outlines a facile strategy...

  20. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion. PMID:20196232

  1. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  2. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Psychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw-Hwa Jou; Nan-Yin Chiu; Chin-San Liu

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles crucial in the production of cellular energy.Mitochondrial diseases may result from malfunctions in this biochemical cascade. Severalinvestigators have proposed that mitochondrial dysfunction is related to the pathophysiologyof bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Theauthors reviewed recent study findings and tried to delineate the current understanding of thecorrelation between mitochondrial dysfunction and p...

  4. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Boland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability and other more conventional aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the sigificance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis and spatial dynamics and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knockon effects for cell proliferation and growth. Scientifically, there is also scope for defining what mitochondria dysfunction is and here we address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  7. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Yamamoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders.

  8. Monitoring wheat mitochondrial compositional and respiratory changes using Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy in response to agrochemical treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungicides and plant growth regulators can impact plant growth outside of their effects on fungal pathogens. Although many of these chemicals are inhibitors of mitochondrial oxygen uptake, information remains limited as to whether they are able tomodify other mitochondrial constituents. Fourier tran...

  9. The mitochondrial complexome of Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Muriithi Kiirika

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Legumes (Fabaceae, Leguminosae are unique in their ability to carry out an elaborate endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation process with rhizobia proteobacteria. The symbiotic nitrogen fixation enables the host plants to grow almost independently of any other nitrogen source. Establishment of symbiosis requires adaptations of the host cellular metabolism, here foremost of the energy metabolism mainly taking place in mitochondria. Since the early 1990s, the galegoid legume Medicago truncatula Gaertn. is a well-established model for studying legume biology, but little is known about the protein complement of mitochondria from this species. An initial characterization of the mitochondrial proteome of M. truncatula (Jemalong A17 was published recently. In the frame of this study, mitochondrial protein complexes were characterized using 2D BN / SDS PAGE. From 139 detected spots, the "first hit" (= most abundant proteins of 59 spots were identified by mass spectrometry. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the mitochondrial complexome (the protein complex proteome of M. truncatula via 2D BN / SDS PAGE in combination with high sensitive MS protein identification. In total, 1,485 proteins were identified within 158 gel spots, representing 467 unique proteins. Data evaluation by the novel GelMap annotation tool allowed recognition of protein complexes of low abundance. Overall, at least 36 mitochondrial protein complexes were found. To our knowledge several of these complexes were described for the first time in Medicago. The data set is accessible under http://www.gelmap.de/medicago/. The mitochondrial protein complex proteomes of Arabidopsis (available at http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis/ and Medicago are compared.

  10. Preventing mitochondrial fission impairs mitochondrial function and leads to loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Parone

    Full Text Available Mitochondria form a highly dynamic tubular network, the morphology of which is regulated by frequent fission and fusion events. However, the role of mitochondrial fission in homeostasis of the organelle is still unknown. Here we report that preventing mitochondrial fission, by down-regulating expression of Drp1 in mammalian cells leads to a loss of mitochondrial DNA and a decrease of mitochondrial respiration coupled to an increase in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. At the cellular level, mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the lack of fission leads to a drop in the levels of cellular ATP, an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in autophagy. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondrial fission is required for preservation of mitochondrial function and thereby for maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  11. Sealing the Mitochondrial Respirasome

    OpenAIRE

    Winge, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is organized within an array of supercomplexes that function to minimize the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during electron transfer reactions. Structural models of supercomplexes are now known. Another recent advance is the discovery of non-OXPHOS complex proteins that appear to adhere to and seal the individual respiratory complexes to form stable assemblages that prevent electron leakage. This review highlights recent advances in our underst...

  12. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  13. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  14. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  15. The mitochondrial plasmid of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum bypasses uniparental inheritance by promoting mitochondrial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Rakusa; Nomura, Hideo; Moriyam, Yohsuke; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2004-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited maternally in most eukaryotes. Linear mitochondrial plasmids in higher plants and fungi are also transmitted from the maternal parent to the progeny. However, mF, which is a mitochondrial linear plasmid of Physarum polycephalum, evades uniparental mitochondrial inheritance. We examined 36 myxamoebal strains of Physarum and isolated three novel mF+ strains (JE8, TU111, NG111) that harbored free mF plasmids. These strains were mated with the mF- strain KM88. Of the three mF- x mF+ crosses, only KM88 x JE8 displayed complete uniparental inheritance. However, in KM88 x TU111 and KM88 x NG111, the mtDNA of KM88 and mF of TU111 and NG111 were inherited by the plasmodia and showed recombination. For example, although the mtDNA of TU111 was eliminated, the mF of TU111 persisted and became inserted into the mtDNA of KM88, such that recombinant mtDNA represented 80% of the total mtDNA. The parental mitochondria fused to yield giant mitochondria with two or more mitochondrial nucleoids. The mF appears to exchange mitochondria from the recipient (paternal) to the donor (maternal) by promoting mitochondrial fusion. PMID:15179521

  16. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  17. Sealing the mitochondrial respirasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winge, Dennis R

    2012-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is organized within an array of supercomplexes that function to minimize the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during electron transfer reactions. Structural models of supercomplexes are now known. Another recent advance is the discovery of non-OXPHOS complex proteins that appear to adhere to and seal the individual respiratory complexes to form stable assemblages that prevent electron leakage. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the structures of supercomplexes and the factors that mediate their stability.

  18. Biochemical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients with a suspected mitochondrial disorder is often a challenge. Both knowledge of the clinical spectrum of mitochondrial disorders and the number of identified disease-causing molecular genetic defects are continuously expanding. The diagnostic examination of patie

  19. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D;

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...

  20. Heat stress enhances the accumulation of polyadenylated mitochondrial transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Adamo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyadenylation of RNA has a decisive influence on RNA stability. Depending on the organisms or subcellular compartment, it either enhances transcript stability or targets RNAs for degradation. In plant mitochondria, polyadenylation promotes RNA degradation, and polyadenylated mitochondrial transcripts are therefore widely considered to be rare and unstable. We followed up a surprising observation that a large number of mitochondrial transcripts are detectable in microarray experiments that used poly(A-specific RNA probes, and that these transcript levels are significantly enhanced after heat treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As the Columbia genome contains a complete set of mitochondrial genes, we had to identify polymorphisms to differentiate between nuclear and mitochondrial copies of a mitochondrial transcript. We found that the affected transcripts were uncapped transcripts of mitochondrial origin, which were polyadenylated at multiple sites within their 3'region. Heat-induced enhancement of these transcripts was quickly restored during a short recovery period. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that polyadenylated transcripts of mitochondrial origin are more stable than previously suggested, and that their steady-state levels can even be significantly enhanced under certain conditions. As many microarrays contain mitochondrial probes, due to the frequent transfer of mitochondrial genes into the genome, these effects need to be considered when interpreting microarray data.

  1. Mitochondrial Flash: Integrative Reactive Oxygen Species and pH Signals in Cell and Organelle Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guohua; Wang, Xianhua; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Cheng, Heping; Dirksen, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Recent breakthroughs in mitochondrial research have advanced, reshaped, and revolutionized our view of the role of mitochondria in health and disease. These discoveries include the development of novel tools to probe mitochondrial biology, the molecular identification of mitochondrial functional proteins, and the emergence of new concepts and mechanisms in mitochondrial function regulation. The discovery of “mitochondrial flash” activity has provided unique insights not only into real-time visualization of individual mitochondrial redox and pH dynamics in live cells but has also advanced understanding of the excitability, autonomy, and integration of mitochondrial function in vivo. Recent Advances: The mitochondrial flash is a transient and stochastic event confined within an individual mitochondrion and is observed in a wide range of organisms from plants to Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. As flash events involve multiple transient concurrent changes within the mitochondrion (e.g., superoxide, pH, and membrane potential), a number of different mitochondrial targeted fluorescent indicators can detect flash activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that flash events reflect integrated snapshots of an intermittent mitochondrial process arising from mitochondrial respiration chain activity associated with the transient opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Critical Issues: We review the history of flash discovery, summarize current understanding of flash biology, highlight controversies regarding the relative roles of superoxide and pH signals during a flash event, and bring forth the integration of both signals in flash genesis. Future Directions: Investigations using flash as a biomarker and establishing its role in cell signaling pathway will move the field forward. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 534–549. PMID:27245241

  2. Frequent fusion and fission of plant mitochondria with unequal nucleoid distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Arimura, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Junko; Aida, Gen Paul; Nakazono, Mikio; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission influences the reticular shape of mitochondria in yeasts. Little is known about whether mitochondria fusion occurs in plants. Plant mitochondria are usually more numerous and more grain-shaped than animal mitochondria. blast searches of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of Arabidopsis thaliana did not find any obvious homologue of mitochondrial fusion genes found in animals and yeasts. To determine whether mitochondrial fusion ...

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  5. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  6. Mitochondrial Stress: A Bridge between Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions such as obesity, excessive oxidation of nutrients may induce mitochondrial stress, leading to mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and initiation of a retrograde stress signaling pathway. Defects in the UPRmt and the retrograde signaling pathways may disrupt the integrity and homeostasis of the mitochondria, resulting endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance. Improving the capacity of mitochondria to reduce stress may be an effective a...

  7. Double-strand break repair processes drive evolution of the mitochondrial genome in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedge Vikas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of higher plants is unusually dynamic, with recombination and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ activities producing variability in size and organization. Plant mitochondrial DNA also generally displays much lower nucleotide substitution rates than mammalian or yeast systems. Arabidopsis displays these features and expedites characterization of the mitochondrial recombination surveillance gene MSH1 (MutS 1 homolog, lending itself to detailed study of de novo mitochondrial genome activity. In the present study, we investigated the underlying basis for unusual plant features as they contribute to rapid mitochondrial genome evolution. Results We obtained evidence of double-strand break (DSB repair, including NHEJ, sequence deletions and mitochondrial asymmetric recombination activity in Arabidopsis wild-type and msh1 mutants on the basis of data generated by Illumina deep sequencing and confirmed by DNA gel blot analysis. On a larger scale, with mitochondrial comparisons across 72 Arabidopsis ecotypes, similar evidence of DSB repair activity differentiated ecotypes. Forty-seven repeat pairs were active in DNA exchange in the msh1 mutant. Recombination sites showed asymmetrical DNA exchange within lengths of 50- to 556-bp sharing sequence identity as low as 85%. De novo asymmetrical recombination involved heteroduplex formation, gene conversion and mismatch repair activities. Substoichiometric shifting by asymmetrical exchange created the appearance of rapid sequence gain and loss in association with particular repeat classes. Conclusions Extensive mitochondrial genomic variation within a single plant species derives largely from DSB activity and its repair. Observed gene conversion and mismatch repair activity contribute to the low nucleotide substitution rates seen in these genomes. On a phenotypic level, these patterns of rearrangement likely contribute to the reproductive versatility of higher plants.

  8. Tracing evolutionary and developmental implications of mitochondrial stoichiometric shifting in the common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Montiel, M; Lyznik, A; Woloszynska, M; Janska, H; Tohme, J; Mackenzie, S

    2001-01-01

    The recombination and copy number shifting activities of the plant mitochondrial genome are widely documented across plant genera, but these genome processes have not been as well examined with regard to their roles in plant evolution. Because of the extensive plant collections of Phaseolus spp and the degree to which cytoplasmic male sterility (cms) has been characterized in the common bean, this system would be valuable for investigating mitochondrial genome dynamics in natural populations. We have used the cms-associated sequence pvs-orf239 as a mitochondrial genetic marker for these studies and have demonstrated its universal presence throughout a diversity of undomesticated Phaseolus lines. Within these populations, the pvs-orf239 sequence is present in high copy number in approximately 10% of the lines, but substoichiometric in all others. This mitochondrial sequence, derived apparently by at least two recombination events, is well conserved with two point mutations identified that are both apparently silent with regard to the sterility phenotype. A putative progenitor sequence was identified in Phaseolus glabelus in substoichiometric levels, suggesting that the present-day pvs-orf239 sequence was likely introduced substoichiometrically. Copy number shifting within the mitochondrial genome results in a 1000- to 2000-fold change, so that substoichiometric forms are estimated at less than one copy per every 100 cells. On the basis of PCR analysis of root tips, we postulate that a mitochondrial "transmitted form" resides within the meristem to assure transmission of a complete genetic complement to progeny. PMID:11404346

  9. Genetic counseling in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento, Jodie M; Pappa, Belen

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by alterations in nuclear DNA and/or mitochondrial DNA. Although some mitochondrial syndromes have been described clearly in the literature many others present as challenging clinical cases with multisystemic involvement at variable ages of onset. Given the clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of these conditions, patients and their families often experience a lengthy and complicated diagnostic process. The diagnostic journey may be characterized by heightened levels of uncertainty due to the delayed diagnosis and the absence of a clear prognosis, among other factors. Uncertainty surrounding issues of family planning and genetic testing may also affect the patient. The role of the genetic counselor is particularly important to help explain these complexities and support the patient and family's ability to achieve effective coping strategies in dealing with increased levels of uncertainty.

  10. Bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Mourier, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic hotspots, producing the bulk of ATP by the oxidative phosphorylation process. Mitochondria are also structurally dynamic and undergo coordinated fusion and fission to maintain their function. Recent studies of the mitochondrial fusion machinery have provided new evidence in detailing their role in mitochondrial metabolism. Remarkably, mitofusin 2, in addition to its role in fusion, is important for maintaining coenzyme Q levels and may be an integral player in the mevalonate synthesis pathway. Here, we review the bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial dynamics and emphasize the importance of the in vitro growth conditions when evaluating mitochondrial respiration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060252

  11. The assembly of mitochondrial complex I : a product of nuclear-mitochondrial synergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Rutger Oscar

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to cellular energy production. Embedded in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the engine of the mitochondrial powerhouse is formed by the five enzymatic complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Dysfunction of this system results in mitochondrial disease,

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  13. Mitochondrial transplantation for therapeutic use

    OpenAIRE

    McCully, James Donald; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas Burr

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in the homeostasis of the vast majority of the body’s cells. In the myocardium where mitochondria constitute 30 % of the total myocardial cell volume, temporary attenuation or obstruction of blood flow and as a result oxygen delivery to myocardial cells (ischemia) severely alters mitochondrial structure and function. These alterations in mitochondrial structure and function occur during ischemia and continue after blood flow and oxygen delivery to the myocardium i...

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Johri, Ashu; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a large group of disabling disorders of the nervous system, characterized by the relative selective death of neuronal subtypes. In most cases, there is overwhelming evidence of impaired mitochondrial function as a causative factor in these diseases. More recently, evidence has emerged for impaired mitochondrial dynamics (shape, size, fission-fusion, distribution, movement etc.) in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyo...

  16. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  17. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  18. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  19. Mitochondrial Epigenetics and Environmental Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Luca; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2016-09-01

    The rising toll of chronic and debilitating diseases brought about by the exposure to an ever expanding number of environmental pollutants and socio-economic factors is calling for action. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the effects of environmental exposures can lead to the development of biomarkers that can support the public health fields of both early diagnosis and intervention to limit the burden of environmental diseases. The study of mitochondrial epigenetics carries high hopes to provide important biomarkers of exposure and disease. Mitochondria are in fact on the frontline of the cellular response to the environment. Modifications of the epigenetic factors regulating the mitochondrial activity are emerging as informative tools that can effectively report on the effects of the environment on the phenotype. Here, we will discuss the emerging field of mitochondrial epigenetics. This review describes the main epigenetic phenomena that modify the activity of the mitochondrial DNA including DNA methylation, long and short non-coding RNAs. We will discuss the unique pattern of mitochondrial DNA methylation, describe the challenges of correctly measuring it, and report on the existing studies that have analysed the correlation between environmental exposures and mitochondrial DNA methylation. Finally, we provide a brief account of the therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondria currently under consideration. PMID:27344144

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qingsong; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in surviving DA neurons in most cases. Although the cause of PD is still unclear, the remarkable advances have been made in understanding the possible causative mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Numerous studies showed that dysfunction of mitochondria may play key roles in DA neuronal loss. Both genetic and environmental factors that are associated with PD contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and PD pathogenesis. The induction of PD by neurotoxins that inhibit mitochondrial complex I provides direct evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction to PD. Decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity is present in PD brain and in neurotoxin- or genetic factor-induced PD cellular and animal models. Moreover, PINK1 and parkin, two autosomal recessive PD gene products, have important roles in mitophagy, a cellular process to clear damaged mitochondria. PINK1 activates parkin to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins to induce a selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by autophagy. In this review, we summarize the factors associated with PD and recent advances in understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. PMID:27453777

  1. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  2. MOLECULAR NEUROGENETICS OF MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES

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    E. Cardaioli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial diseases are an expanding group of clinically heterogeneous disorders associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations or nuclear gene defects. Whatever the mechanism, the final common step in mitochondrial disorders is a defect of energy production resulting from respiratory chain impairment. The complexity of the biochemical and genetic features of the respiratory chain accounts for the extraordinarily wide range of clinical presentations of mitochondrial disorders. In general, organs with high aerobic demand, such as skeletal muscle, brain and heart, are the most affected. However, virtually any organ or tissue in the body may be affected and the disorders can be multisystemic (mitochondrial encephalomyopathiesor confined to a single tissue. Moreover, mitochondrial diseases can be sporadic or transmitted by mendelian (nuclear genes or maternal inheritance (mutations in mtDNA. Precise diagnosis is often a challenge; we go through the traditional steps of the diagnostic process, starting with study of inheritance in the family, clinical manifestations in the individual,electrophysiology and imaging techniques at organ level, down to biochemistry, pathology and molecular genetics at tissue, cell and DNA level, respectively. In fact the ultimate goal is to reach, whenever possible, a definitive molecular diagnosis, which can permit rational therapeutic approach and a genetic counseling.

  3. The evolutionary history of mitochondrial porins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausner Georg

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial porins, or voltage-dependent anion-selective channels (VDAC allow the passage of small molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and are involved in complex interactions regulating organellar and cellular metabolism. Numerous organisms possess multiple porin isoforms, and initial studies indicated an intriguing evolutionary history for these proteins and the genes that encode them. Results In this work, the wealth of recent sequence information was used to perform a comprehensive analysis of the evolutionary history of mitochondrial porins. Fungal porin sequences were well represented, and newly-released sequences from stramenopiles, alveolates, and seed and flowering plants were analyzed. A combination of Neighbour-Joining and Bayesian methods was used to determine phylogenetic relationships among the proteins. The aligned sequences were also used to reassess the validity of previously described eukaryotic porin motifs and to search for signature sequences characteristic of VDACs from plants, animals and fungi. Secondary structure predictions were performed on the aligned VDAC primary sequences and were used to evaluate the sites of intron insertion in a representative set of the corresponding VDAC genes. Conclusion Our phylogenetic analysis clearly shows that paralogs have appeared several times during the evolution of VDACs from the plants, metazoans, and even the fungi, suggesting that there are no "ancient" paralogs within the gene family. Sequence motifs characteristic of the members of the crown groups of organisms were identified. Secondary structure predictions suggest a common 16 β-strand framework for the transmembrane arrangement of all porin isoforms. The GLK (and homologous or analogous motifs and the eukaryotic porin motifs in the four representative Chordates tend to be in exons that appear to have changed little during the evolution of these metazoans. In fact there is phase

  4. Mitochondrial drug targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in neurodegenerative diseases. Given the fact that mitochondria participate in diverse cellular processes, including energetics, metabolism, and death, the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuronal cells are inevitable. In fact, new strategies targeting mitochondrial dysfunction are emerging as potential alternatives to current treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on mitochondrial proteins that are directly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We also examine recently identified small molecule modulators of these mitochondrial targets and assess their potential in research and therapeutic applications.

  5. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  6. Overview of mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Vitor M C

    2012-01-01

    Bioenergetic Science started in seventh century with the pioneer works by Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier on photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. New developments were implemented by Pasteur in 1860s with the description of fermentations associated to microorganisms, further documented by Buchner brothers who discovered that fermentations also occurred in cell extracts in the absence of living cells. In the beginning of twentieth century, Harden and Young demonstrated that orthophosphate and other heat-resistant compounds (cozymase), later identified as NAD, ADP, and metal ions, were mandatory in the fermentation of glucose. The full glycolysis pathway has been detailed in 1940s with the contributions of Embden, Meyeroff, Parnas, Warburg, among others. Studies on the citric acid cycle started in 1910 (Thunberg) and were elucidated by Krebs et al. in the 1940s. Mitochondrial bioenergetics gained emphasis in the late 1940s and 1950s with the works of Lenhinger, Racker, Chance, Boyer, Ernster, and Slater, among others. The prevalent "chemical coupling hypothesis" of energy conservation in oxidative phosphorylation was challenged and replaced by the "chemiosmotic hypothesis" originally formulated in 1960s by Mitchell and later substantiated and extended to energy conservation in bacteria and chloroplasts, besides mitochondria, with clear-cut identification of molecular proton pumps. After identification of most reactive mechanisms, emphasis has been directed to structure resolution of molecular complex clusters, e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, complex III, complex II, ATP synthase, photosystem I, photosynthetic water splitting center, and energy collecting antennæ of several photosynthetic systems. Modern trends concern to the reactivity of radical and other active species in association with bioenergetic activities. A promising trend concentrates on the cell redox status quantified in terms of redox potentials. In spite of significant development and

  7. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

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    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  8. RECG maintains plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing extensive recombination between short dispersed repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Odahara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8-79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12-63 bp in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions.

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzhong Wei; R Scott Rector; John P Thyfault; Jamal A Ibdah

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis,and cirrhosis. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in the United States and worldwide. Due to the rapid rise of the metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of NAFLD has recently dramatically increased and will continue to increase. NAFLD has also the potential to progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver failure. NAFLD is strongly linked to caloric overconsumption, physical inactivity, insulin resistance and genetic factors. Although significant progress in understanding the pathogenesis of NAFLD has been achieved in years, the primary metabolic abnormalities leading to lipid accumulation within hepatocytes has remained poorly understood.Mitochondria are critical metabolic organelles serving as "cellular power plants". Accumulating evidence indicate that hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. This review is focused on the significant role of mitochondria in the development of NAFLD.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  11. Nanodelivery System for Mitochondrial Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in cellular functions such as energy production and death execution. They are emerging as intriguing therapeutic target as their dysregulation was found to be monumental in diseases such as neurodegenerative disease, obesity, and cancer etc. Despite tremendous interest being focused on therapeutically intervening mitochondrial function, few mito-active drugs were successfully developed, particularly due to challenges in delivering active compound to this organelle. In this review, effort in utilizing nanotechnology for targeted mitochondrial delivery of compound is expounded based on the nature of the nanomaterial used. The advantage and potential offered are discussed alongside the limitation. Finally the review is concluded with perspectives of the application of nanocarrier in mitochondrial medicine, given the unresolved concern on potential complications.

  12. Recent Advances in the Composition and Heterogeneity of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Pong eLee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are important organelles for providing the ATP and carbon skeletons required to sustain cell growth. While these organelles also participate in other key metabolic functions across species, they have a specialized role in plants of optimizing photosynthesis through participating in photorespiration. It is therefore critical to map the protein composition of mitochondria in plants to gain a better understanding of their regulation and define the uniqueness of their metabolic networks. To date, less than 30% of the predicted number of mitochondrial proteins has been verified experimentally by proteomics and/or GFP localization studies. In this mini-review, we will provide an overview of the advances in mitochondrial proteomics in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana over the past five years. The ultimate goal of mapping the mitochondrial proteome in Arabidopsis is to discover novel mitochondrial components that are critical during development in plants as well as genes involved in developmental abnormalities, such as those implicated in mitochondrial-linked cytoplasmic male sterility.

  13. Unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms: Think mitochondrial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, TP; Hadley, G.; Fratter, C; Cullen, SN; Bax, BE; Bain, MD; Sapsford, RA; Poulton, J; Travis, SP

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial function are increasingly recognised as central to the pathogenesis of many diseases, both inherited and acquired. Many of these mitochondrial defects arise from abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA and can result in multisystem disease, with gastrointestinal involvement common. Moreover, mitochondrial disease may present with a range of non-specific symptoms, and thus can be easily misdiagnosed, or even considered to be non-organic.We describe the clinical, histopathol...

  14. Unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms: think mitochondrial disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, TP; Hadley, G.; Fratter, C; Cullen, SN; Bax, BE; Bain, MD; Sapsford, RA; Poulton, J; Travis, SP

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial function are increasingly recognised as central to the pathogenesis of many diseases, both inherited and acquired. Many of these mitochondrial defects arise from abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA and can result in multisystem disease, with gastrointestinal involvement common. Moreover, mitochondrial disease may present with a range of non-specific symptoms, and thus can be easily misdiagnosed, or even considered to be non-organic. We describe the clinical, histopatho...

  15. Platelet mitochondrial membrane potential in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Antony, P.M.; Boyd, O.; Trefois, C.; Ammerlaan, W; Ostaszewski, M.; Baumuratov, A.S.; Longhino, L.; Antunes, L; Koopman, W.J.H.; Balling, R; Diederich, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), which has been reported not to be restricted to striatal neurons. However, studies that analyzed mitochondrial function at the level of selected enzymatic activities in peripheral tissues have produced conflicting data. We considered the electron transport chain as a complex system with mitochondrial membrane potential as an integrative indicator for mitochondrial fitness. METHODS: Twenty-five IPD pati...

  16. Unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms: think mitochondrial disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, TP; Hadley, G.; Fratter, C; Cullen, SN; Bax, BE; Bain, MD; Sapsford, RA; Poulton, J; Travis, SP

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial function are increasingly recognised as central to the pathogenesis of many diseases, both inherited and acquired. Many of these mitochondrial defects arise from abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA and can result in multisystem disease, with gastrointestinal involvement common. Moreover, mitochondrial disease may present with a range of non-specific symptoms, and thus can be easily misdiagnosed, or even considered to be non-organic.We describe the clinical, histopathol...

  17. Ethics of mitochondrial therapy for deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Michael; Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2014-11-07

    Mitochondrial therapy may provide the relief to many families with inherited mitochondrial diseases. However, it also has the potential for use in non-fatal disorders such as inherited mitochondrial deafness, providing an option for correction of the deafness using assisted reproductive technology. In this paper we discuss the potential for use in correcting mitochondrial deafness and consider some of the issues for the deaf community.

  18. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers, Deborah E.; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease is a heterogeneous group of multisystemic diseases that develop consequent to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. The prevalence of inherited mitochondrial disease has been estimated to be greater than 1 in 5,000 births; however, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease are not taught in most adult-cardiology curricula. Because mitochondrial diseases often occur as a syndrome with resultant multiorgan dysfunction, they might not immediately appear to be specifi...

  19. Mitochondrial myopathy and myoclonic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a family (mother, son and two daughters with mitochondrial myopathy. The mother was asymptomatic. Two daughters had lactic acidosis and myoclonic epilepsy, mild dementia, ataxia, weakness and sensory neuropathy. The son suffered one acute hemiplegic episode due to an ischemic infarct in the right temporal region. All the patients studied had hypertension. EEG disclosed photomyoclonic response in the proband patient. Muscle biopsy disclosed ragged-red fibers and abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed a defect of cytochrome C oxidase in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle. Several clinical and genetic aspects of the mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are discussed.

  20. The mitochondrial genome map of Nelumbo nucifera reveals ancient evolutionary features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Songtao; Wu, Zhihua; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yinzhen; Zhu, Zhixuan; Liang, Dequan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera is an evolutionary relic from the Late Cretaceous period. Sequencing the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome is important for elucidating the evolutionary characteristics of basal eudicots. Here, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome was sequenced using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT), and the mitochondrial genome map was constructed after de novo assembly and annotation. The results showed that the 524,797-bp N. nucifera mitochondrial genome has a total of 63 genes, including 40 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 20 tRNA genes. Fifteen collinear gene clusters were conserved across different plant species. Approximately 700 RNA editing sites in the protein-coding genes were identified. Positively selected genes were identified with selection pressure analysis. Nineteen chloroplast-derived fragments were identified, and seven tRNAs were derived from the chloroplast. These results suggest that the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome retains evolutionarily conserved characteristics, including ancient gene content and gene clusters, high levels of RNA editing, and low levels of chloroplast-derived fragment insertions. As the first publicly available basal eudicot mitochondrial genome, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome facilitates further analysis of the characteristics of basal eudicots and provides clues of the evolutionary trajectory from basal angiosperms to advanced eudicots. PMID:27444405

  1. Comparative mitochondrial genome analysis reveals the evolutionary rearrangement mechanism in Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Liu, G; Zhao, N; Chen, S; Liu, D; Ma, W; Hu, Z; Zhang, M

    2016-05-01

    The genus Brassica has many species that are important for oil, vegetable and other food products. Three mitochondrial genome types (mitotype) originated from its common ancestor. In this paper, a B. nigra mitochondrial main circle genome with 232,407 bp was generated through de novo assembly. Synteny analysis showed that the mitochondrial genomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea had a better syntenic relationship than B. nigra. Principal components analysis and development of a phylogenetic tree indicated maternal ancestors of three allotetraploid species in Us triangle of Brassica. Diversified mitotypes were found in allotetraploid B. napus, in which napus-type B. napus was derived from B. oleracea, while polima-type B. napus was inherited from B. rapa. In addition, the mitochondrial genome of napus-type B. napus was closer to botrytis-type than capitata-type B. oleracea. The sub-stoichiometric shifting of several mitochondrial genes suggested that mitochondrial genome rearrangement underwent evolutionary selection during domestication and/or plant breeding. Our findings clarify the role of diploid species in the maternal origin of allotetraploid species in Brassica and suggest the possibility of breeding selection of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:27079962

  2. Natural Compounds Modulating Mitochondrial Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Gibellini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles responsible for several crucial cell functions, including respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of apoptosis; they are also the main intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In the last years, a particular interest has been devoted to studying the effects on mitochondria of natural compounds of vegetal origin, quercetin (Qu, resveratrol (RSV, and curcumin (Cur being the most studied molecules. All these natural compounds modulate mitochondrial functions by inhibiting organelle enzymes or metabolic pathways (such as oxidative phosphorylation, by altering the production of mitochondrial ROS and by modulating the activity of transcription factors which regulate the expression of mitochondrial proteins. While Qu displays both pro- and antioxidant activities, RSV and Cur are strong antioxidant, as they efficiently scavenge mitochondrial ROS and upregulate antioxidant transcriptional programmes in cells. All the three compounds display a proapoptotic activity, mediated by the capability to directly cause the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or indirectly by upregulating the expression of proapoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 family and downregulating antiapoptotic proteins. Interestingly, these effects are particularly evident on proliferating cancer cells and can have important therapeutic implications.

  3. Historical Perspective on Mitochondrial Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Garone, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we trace the origins and follow the development of mitochondrial medicine from the premolecular era (1962-1988) based on clinical clues, muscle morphology, and biochemistry into the molecular era that started in 1988 and is still advancing at a brisk pace. We have tried to stress conceptual advances, such as endosymbiosis,…

  4. Coenzyme Q and Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and an important antioxidant. Deficiency of CoQ[subscript 10] is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous syndrome, which, to date, has been found to be autosomal recessive in inheritance and generally responsive to CoQ[subscript…

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction and Huntington disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a chronic autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disease. The gene coding Huntingtin has been identified, but the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still not fully understood. This paper reviews the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of HD.

  6. Mitochondrial rejuvenation after induced pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Suhr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As stem cells of the early embryo mature and differentiate into all tissues, the mitochondrial complement undergoes dramatic functional improvement. Mitochondrial activity is low to minimize generation of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species during pre-implantation development and increases following implantation and differentiation to meet higher metabolic demands. It has recently been reported that when the stem cell type known as induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs are re-differentiated for several weeks in vitro, the mitochondrial complement progressively re-acquires properties approximating input fibroblasts, suggesting that despite the observation that IPSC conversion "resets" some parameters of cellular aging such as telomere length, it may have little impact on other age-affected cellular systems such as mitochondria in IPSC-derived cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have examined the properties of mitochondria in two fibroblast lines, corresponding IPSCs, and fibroblasts re-derived from IPSCs using biochemical methods and electron microscopy, and found a dramatic improvement in the quality and function of the mitochondrial complement of the re-derived fibroblasts compared to input fibroblasts. This observation likely stems from two aspects of our experimental design: 1 that the input cell lines used were of advanced cellular age and contained an inefficient mitochondrial complement, and 2 the re-derived fibroblasts were produced using an extensive differentiation regimen that may more closely mimic the degree of growth and maturation found in a developing mammal. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results - coupled with earlier data from our laboratory - suggest that IPSC conversion not only resets the "biological clock", but can also rejuvenate the energetic capacity of derived cells.

  7. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function.

  8. The Agaricus bisporus cox1 gene: the longest mitochondrial gene and the largest reservoir of mitochondrial group i introns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Férandon

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, introns are located in nuclear and organelle genes from several kingdoms. Large introns (up to 5 kbp are frequent in mitochondrial genomes of plant and fungi but scarce in Metazoa, even if these organisms are grouped with fungi among the Opisthokonts. Mitochondrial introns are classified in two groups (I and II according to their RNA secondary structure involved in the intron self-splicing mechanism. Most of these mitochondrial group I introns carry a "Homing Endonuclease Gene" (heg encoding a DNA endonuclease acting in transfer and site-specific integration ("homing" and allowing intron spreading and gain after lateral transfer even between species from different kingdoms. Opposed to this gain mechanism, is another which implies that introns, which would have been abundant in the ancestral genes, would mainly evolve by loss. The importance of both mechanisms (loss and gain is matter of debate. Here we report the sequence of the cox1 gene of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus, the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world. This gene is both the longest mitochondrial gene (29,902 nt and the largest group I intron reservoir reported to date with 18 group I and 1 group II. An exhaustive analysis of the group I introns available in cox1 genes shows that they are mobile genetic elements whose numerous events of loss and gain by lateral transfer combine to explain their wide and patchy distribution extending over several kingdoms. An overview of intron distribution, together with the high frequency of eroded heg, suggests that they are evolving towards loss. In this landscape of eroded and lost intron sequences, the A. bisporus cox1 gene exhibits a peculiar dynamics of intron keeping and catching, leading to the largest collection of mitochondrial group I introns reported to date in a Eukaryote.

  9. Mitochondrial plasticity in pathophysiological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Padrão, Ana Isabel Martins Novais

    2013-01-01

    Both skeletal and cardiac muscles daily burn tremendous amounts of ATP to meet the energy requirements for contraction. So, it is not surprising that the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology, number, distribution and functionality in striated muscle are important for muscle homeostasis. In these tissues mitochondria present the added dimension of two populations, the intermyofibrillar (IMF) and the subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria, being IMF the most abundant one. In the present thesis, th...

  10. Uncoupling Mitochondrial Respiration for Diabesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W; Larrick, Jasmine W; Mendelsohn, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, the mechanism of adaptive thermogenesis was ascribed to the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown and beige adipocytes. UCP1 is known to catalyze a proton leak of the inner mitochondrial membrane, resulting in uncoupled oxidative metabolism with no production of adenosine triphosphate and increased energy expenditure. Thus increasing brown and beige adipose tissue with augmented UCP1 expression is a viable target for obesity-related disorders. Recent work demonstrates an UCP1-independent pathway to uncouple mitochondrial respiration. A secreted enzyme, PM20D1, enriched in UCP1+ adipocytes, exhibits catalytic and hydrolytic activity to reversibly form N-acyl amino acids. N-acyl amino acids act as endogenous uncouplers of mitochondrial respiration at physiological concentrations. Administration of PM20D1 or its products, N-acyl amino acids, to diet-induced obese mice improves glucose tolerance by increasing energy expenditure. In short-term studies, treated animals exhibit no toxicity while experiencing 10% weight loss primarily of adipose tissue. Further study of this metabolic pathway may identify novel therapies for diabesity, the disease state associated with diabetes and obesity. PMID:27378359

  11. Effect of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Carbon Metabolism and Gene Expression in Flower Tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria V.Busi; Maria E.Gomez-Lobato; Sebastian P.Rius; Valeria R.Turowski; Paula Casati; Eduardo J.Zabaleta; Diego F.Gomez-Casati; Alejandro Araya

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the transcriptomic response of transgenic plants carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the expression of the unedited form of the ATP synthase subunit 9.The u-ATP9 transgene driven by A9 and APETALA3 promoters induce mitochondrial dysfunction revealed by a decrease jn both oxygen uptake and adenine nucleotides(ATP,ADP)levels without changes in the ATP/ADP ratio.Furthermore,we measured an increase in ROS accumulation and a decrease in glutathione and ascorbate levels with a concomitant oxidative stress response.The transcriptome analysis of young Arabidopsis flowers,validated by Qrt-PCR and enzymatic or functional tests,showed dramatic changes in u-ATP9 plants.Both lines display a modification in the expression of various genes involved in carbon,lipid,and cell wall metabolism,suggesting that an important metabolic readjustment occurs in plants with a mitochondrial dysfunction.Interestingly,transcript levels involved in mitochondrial respiration,protein synthesis,and degradation are affected.Moreover,the Ievels of several mRNAs encoding for transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also changed.Some of them are involved in stress and hormone responses,suggesting that several signaling pathways overlap.Indeed,the transcriptome data revealed that the mitochondrial dysfunction dramatically alters the expression of genes involved in signaling pathways,including those related to ethylene,absicic acid,and auxin signal transduction.Our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction model used in this report may be usefuI to uncover the retrograde signaling mechanism between the nucleus and mitochondria in plant cells.

  12. Mechanisms of Berberine (Natural Yellow 18)–Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Interaction with the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Cláudia V.; Machado, Nuno G; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2008-01-01

    Berberine [Natural Yellow 18, 5,6-dihydro-9,10-dimethoxybenzo(g)-1,3-benzodioxolo (5,6-a) quinolizinium] is an alkaloid present in plants of the Berberidaceae family and used in traditional Chinese and North American medicine. We have previously demonstrated that berberine causes mitochondrial depolarization and fragmentation, with simultaneous increase in oxidative stress. We also demonstrated that berberine causes an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and a decrease on calcium loading ...

  13. Mitochondrial disease heterogeneity: a prognostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggio, Maurizio; Colombo, Irene; Peverelli, Lorenzo; Villa, Luisa; Xhani, Rubjona; Testolin, Silvia; Di Mauro, Salvatore; Sciacco, Monica

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of progressive, genetically transmitted, multisystem disorders caused by impaired mitochondrial function. The disease course for individuals with mitochondrial myopathies varies greatly from patient to patient because disease progression largely depends on the type of disease and on the degree of involvement of various organs which makes the prognosis unpredictable both within the same family and among families with the same mutation. This is particularly, but not exclusively, true for mitochondrial disorders caused by mtDNA point mutations, which are maternally inherited and subject to the randomness of the heteroplasmy. For this reason, the prognosis cannot be given by single mitochondrial disease, but should be formulated by any single mitochondrial disease-related event or complication keeping in mind that early recognition and treatment of symptoms are crucial for the prognosis. The following approach can help prevent severe organ dysfunctions or at least allow early diagnosis and treatment of disease-related complications. PMID:25709378

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Melbye, M; Diaz, L J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial mutations are commonly reported in tumours, but it is unclear whether impaired mitochondrial function per se is a cause or consequence of cancer. To elucidate this, we examined the risk of cancer in a nationwide cohort of patients with mitochondrial dysfunction. METHODS......: We used nationwide results on genetic testing for mitochondrial disease and the Danish Civil Registration System, to construct a cohort of 311 patients with mitochondrial dysfunction. A total of 177 cohort members were identified from genetic testing and 134 genetically untested cohort members were...... mDNA mutation, cases=13. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mitochondrial dysfunction do not appear to be at increased risk of cancer compared with the general population....

  15. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Keshan disease and mitochondrial cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Fuyu

    2006-01-01

    Keshan disease (KD) is a potentially fatal form of cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle) endemic in certain areas of China. From 1984 to 1986, a national comprehensive scientific investigation on KD in Chuxiong region of Yunnan Province in the southwest China was conducted. The investigation team was composed of epidemiologists, clinic doctors, pathologists, biochemists, biophysicists and specialists in ecological environment. Results of pathological, biochemical and biophysical as well as clinical studies showed: an obvious increase of enlarged and swollen mitochondria with distended crista membranes in myocardium from patients with KD; significant reductions in the activity of oxidative phosphorylation (succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase, succinate oxidase, H+-ATPase) of affected mitochondria; decrease in CoQ, cardiolipin, Se and GSHPx activity, while obvious increase in the Ca2+ content. So, it was suggested that mitochondria are the predominant target of the pathogenic factors of KD. Before Chuxiong KD survey only a few cases of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy were studied. During the multidisciplinary scientific investigation on KD in Chuxiong a large amount of samples from KD cases and the positive controls were examined. On the basis of the results obtained it was suggested that KD might be classified as a "Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy" endemic in China. This is one of the achievements in the three years' survey in Chuxiong and is valuable not only to the deeper understanding of pathogenic mechanism of KD but also to the study of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in general.Keshan disease is not a genetic disease, but is closely related to the malnutrition (especially microelement Se deficiency). KD occurs along a low Se belt, and Se supplementation has been effective in prevention of such disease. The incidence of KD has sharply decreased along with the steady raise of living standard and realization of preventive measures. At present, patients of

  17. Effect of mitochondrial ascorbic acid synthesis on photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, M E; Gergoff Grozeff, G E; Alegre, M L; Barrile, F; De Tullio, M C; Bartoli, C G

    2016-07-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is synthesized in plant mitochondria through the oxidation of l-galactono-1,4-lactone (l-GalL) and then distributed to different cell compartments. AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants (vtc2) and exogenous applications of l-GalL were used to generate plants with different AA content in their leaves. This experimental approach allows determining specific AA-dependent effects on carbon metabolism. No differences in O2 uptake, malic and citric acid and NADH content suggest that AA synthesis or accumulation did not affect mitochondrial activity; however, l-GalL treatment increased CO2 assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport rate in vtc2 (but not wt) leaves demonstrating a stimulation of photosynthesis after l-GalL treatment. Increased CO2 assimilation correlated with increased leaf stomatal conductance observed in l-GalL-treated vtc2 plants. PMID:27010742

  18. Renal manifestations of genetic mitochondrial disease

    OpenAIRE

    O’Toole JF

    2014-01-01

    John F O'Toole Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, MetroHealth Medical System, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Mitochondrial diseases can be related to mutations in either the nuclear or mitochondrial genome. Childhood presentations are commonly associated with renal tubular dysfunction, but renal involvement is less commonly reported outside of this age-group. Mitochondrial diseases are notable for the significant...

  19. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Andrew R. Hall; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of changing their shape and distribution by undergoing either fission or fusion. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, which is under the control of specific mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, have been implicated in cell division, embryonic development, apoptosis, autophagy, and metabolism. Although the machinery for modulating mitochondrial dynamics is present in the cardiovascular system, its function there has only recently be...

  20. Mitochondrial Diseases: Clinical Features- Management of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Koc

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are unique organells which their own DNA in cells. Human mitochondrial DNA is circular, double-stranded molecule and small. Because all mitochondria are contributed by the ovum during the formation of the zygote, the mitochondrial genom is transmitted by maternal inheritance. Multisystem disorders such as deafness, cardiomyopathy, miyopathy can be seen in mitochondrial diseases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(0.100: 14-31

  1. Bezafibrate improves mitochondrial function in the CNS of a mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Noe, Natalie; Dillon, Lloye; Lellek, Veronika; Diaz, Francisca; Hida, Aline; Carlos T. Moraes; Wenz, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction frequently affects the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the effect of bezafibrate treatment on neuronal mitochondrial function and its impact on the progression of a mitochondrial encephalopathy. We used a murine model with a forebrain-specific cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by conditional deletion of the COX10 gene. In this mouse model, bezafibrate-administration improved the phenotype of the mice associated with an increase in mitochondrial pro...

  2. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  3. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  4. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism.

  5. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26857402

  6. Drosophila Porin/VDAC affects mitochondrial morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehye Park

    Full Text Available Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC has been suggested to be a mediator of mitochondrial-dependent cell death induced by Ca(2+ overload, oxidative stress and Bax-Bid activation. To confirm this hypothesis in vivo, we generated and characterized Drosophila VDAC (porin mutants and found that Porin is not required for mitochondrial apoptosis, which is consistent with the previous mouse studies. We also reported a novel physiological role of Porin. Loss of porin resulted in locomotive defects and male sterility. Intriguingly, porin mutants exhibited elongated mitochondria in indirect flight muscle, whereas Porin overexpression produced fragmented mitochondria. Through genetic analysis with the components of mitochondrial fission and fusion, we found that the elongated mitochondria phenotype in porin mutants were suppressed by increased mitochondrial fission, but enhanced by increased mitochondrial fusion. Furthermore, increased mitochondrial fission by Drp1 expression suppressed the flight defects in the porin mutants. Collectively, our study showed that loss of Drosophila Porin results in mitochondrial morphological defects and suggested that the defective mitochondrial function by Porin deficiency affects the mitochondrial remodeling process.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiongbin; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Junqing; Bi, Guiqi

    2016-09-01

    Drosophila albomicans has been widely used as an important animal model for chromosome evolution. In this study, the mitochondrial genome sequence of this species is determined and described for the first time. The mitochondrial genome (15 849 bp) encompasses two rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 13 protein-coding genes. Genome content and structure are similar to those reported from other Drosophila mitochondrial genomes. Phylogeny analysis indicates that D. albomicans have a closer genetic relationship with Drosophil aincompta and Drosophil alittoralis. This mitochondrial genome is potentially important for studying molecular evolution and conservation genetics in Drosophila genus. PMID:26358579

  8. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; De Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Sillje, Herman H W

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a genetic variant in the mitochondrial exo/endo nuclease EXOG, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrop

  9. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V;

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  10. Restoration of normal embryogenesis by mitochondrial supplementation in pig oocytes exhibiting mitochondrial DNA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnone, Gael L M; Tsai, Te-Sha; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Matthews, Pamela; Gould, Jodee; Bonkowski, Michael S; Elgass, Kirstin D; Wong, Ashley S A; Wu, Lindsay E; McKenzie, Matthew; Sinclair, David A; St John, Justin C

    2016-03-18

    An increasing number of women fail to achieve pregnancy due to either failed fertilization or embryo arrest during preimplantation development. This often results from decreased oocyte quality. Indeed, reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number (mitochondrial DNA deficiency) may disrupt oocyte quality in some women. To overcome mitochondrial DNA deficiency, whilst maintaining genetic identity, we supplemented pig oocytes selected for mitochondrial DNA deficiency, reduced cytoplasmic maturation and lower developmental competence, with autologous populations of mitochondrial isolate at fertilization. Supplementation increased development to blastocyst, the final stage of preimplantation development, and promoted mitochondrial DNA replication prior to embryonic genome activation in mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes but not in oocytes with normal levels of mitochondrial DNA. Blastocysts exhibited transcriptome profiles more closely resembling those of blastocysts from developmentally competent oocytes. Furthermore, mitochondrial supplementation reduced gene expression patterns associated with metabolic disorders that were identified in blastocysts from mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes. These results demonstrate the importance of the oocyte's mitochondrial DNA investment in fertilization outcome and subsequent embryo development to mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes.

  11. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei, E-mail: wshlei@aliyun.com; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-05

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. - Highlights: • We study MCU with primary neuron culture. • MCU induces mitochondrial fission. • MCU reverses MIEF1 effect.

  12. Mitochondrial myopathy in Senna occidentalis-seed-fed chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, M J; Calore, E E; Haraguchi, M; Górniak, S L; Dagli, M L; Raspantini, P C; Calore, N M; Weg, R

    1997-07-01

    Plants of the genus Senna (formerly Cassia) have been recognized as the cause of a natural and experimental syndrome of muscle degeneration frequently leading to death in animals. Histologically, it demonstrated skeletal and cardiac muscle necrosis, with floccular degeneration and proliferation of sarcolemmal nuclei. Recently, it was described as an experimental model of mitochondrial myopathy in hens chronically treated with Senna occidentalis. Currently, skeletal muscles of chicks intoxicated with seeds of the poisonous plant S. occidentalis were studied by histochemistry and electron microscopy. Since birth, the birds were fed ground dried seeds of this plant with a regular chicken ration at a dose of 4% for 11 days. Microscopic examination revealed, besides muscle-fiber atrophy, lipid storage in most fibers and a moderate amount of cytochrome oxidase-negative fibers. By electron microscopy, enlarged mitochondria with disrupted or excessively branched cristae were seen. This picture was characteristic of mitochondrial myopathy. These findings have hitherto remained unnoticed in skeletal muscle of young birds treated with S. occidentalis.

  13. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements in glomus species triggered by homologous recombination between distinct mtDNA haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms.AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence,were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigated podiversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity.We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants.

  14. Complex Mutation and Weak Selection together Determined the Codon Usage Bias in Bryophyte Mitochondrial Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Jing Liu; Liang Jin; Xue-Ying Feng; Jian-Qun Chen

    2010-01-01

    Mutation and selection are two major forces causing codon usage biases. How these two forces influence the codon usages in green plant mitochondrial genomes has not been well investigated. In the present study, we surveyed five bryophyte mitochondrial genomes to reveal their codon usagepatterns as well as the determining forces. Three interesting findings were made. First, comparing to Chara vulgaris, an algal species sister to all extant land plants, bryophytes have more G, C-ending codon usages in their mitochondrial genes. This is consistent with the generally higher genomic GC content in bryophyte mitochondria, suggesting an increased mutational pressure toward GC. Second, as indicated by Wright's Nc-GC3s plot, mutation, not selection, is the major force affecting codon usages of bryophyte mitochondrial genes. However, the real mutational dynamics seem very complex. Context-dependent analysis indicated that nucleotide at the 2nd codon position would slightly affect synonymous codon choices. Finally, in bryophyte mitochondria, tRNA genes would apply a weak selection force to finetune the synonymous codon frequencies, as revealed by data of Ser4-Pro-Thr-Val families. In summary,complex mutation and weak selection together determined the codon usages in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

  15. Apricot melanoidins prevent oxidative endothelial cell death by counteracting mitochondrial oxidation and membrane depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Cossu

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD, therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress.

  16. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  17. Defects in Mitochondrial and Peroxisomal β-Oxidation Influence Virulence in the Maize Pathogen Ustilago maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Kretschmer, Matthias; Klose, Jana; Kronstad, James W.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of metabolic adaptation during the colonization of plants by phytopathogenic fungi is critical for developing strategies to protect crops. Lipids are abundant in plant tissues, and fungal phytopathogens in the phylum basidiomycota possess both peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways to utilize this potential carbon source. Previously, we demonstrated a role for the peroxisomal β-oxidation enzyme Mfe2 in the filamentous growth, virulence, and sporulation of the maiz...

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  19. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ0 cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed

  20. Angiosperm phylogeny inferred from sequences of four mitochondrial genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Long QIU; Zhi-Duan CHEN; Libo LI; Bin WANG; Jia-Yu XUE; Tory A. HENDRY; Rui-Qi LI; Joseph W. BROWN; Yang LIU; Geordan T. HUDSON

    2010-01-01

    An angiosperm phylogeny was reconstructed in a maximum likelihood analysis of sequences of four mitochondrial genes, atpl, matR, had5, and rps3, from 380 species that represent 376 genera and 296 families of seed plants. It is largely congruent with the phylogeny of angiosperms reconstructed from chloroplast genes atpB, matK, and rbcL, and nuclear 18S rDNA. The basalmost lineage consists of Amborella and Nymphaeales (including Hydatellaceae). Austrobaileyales follow this clade and are sister to the mesangiosperms, which include Chloranthaceae, Ceratophyllum, magnoliids, monocots, and eudicots. With the exception of Chloranthaceae being sister to Ceratophyllum, relationships among these five lineages are not well supported. In eudicots, Ranunculales, Sabiales, Proteales, Trochodendrales, Buxales, Gunnerales, Saxifragales, Vitales, Berberidopsidales, and Dilleniales form a basal grade of lines that diverged before the diversification of rosids and asterids. Within rosids, the COM (Celastrales-Oxalidales-Malpighiales) clade is sister to malvids (or rosid Ⅱ), instead of to the nitrogen-fixing clade as found in all previous large-scale molecular analyses of angiosperms. Santalales and Caryophyllales are members of an expanded asterid clade. This study shows that the mitochondrial genes are informative markers for resolving relationships among genera, families, or higher rank taxa across angiosperms. The low substitution rates and low homoplasy levels of the mitochondrial genes relative to the chloroplast genes, as found in this study, make them particularly useful for reconstructing ancient phylogenetic relationships. A mitochondrial gene-based angiosperm phylogeny provides an independent and essential reference for comparison with hypotheses of angiosperm phylogeny based on chloroplast genes, nuclear genes, and non-molecular data to reconstruct the underlying organismal phylogeny.

  1. Transcription-independent role for human mitochondrial RNA polymerase in mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Surovtseva, Yulia V; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT, is required for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and forms initiation complexes with human mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (h-mtTFB2). However, POLRMT also interacts with the paralogue of h-mtTFB2, h-mtTFB1, which is a 12S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase required for small (28S) mitochondrial ribosome subunit assembly. Herein, we show that POLRMT associates with h-mtTFB1 in 28S mitochondrial ribosome complexes that are stable in the abs...

  2. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barbi de Moura

    Full Text Available SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  3. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca(2+) homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca(2+) transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  4. Role of mitochondrial calcium uniporter in regulating mitochondrial fission in the cerebral cortexes of living rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Shilei; Li, Shuhong; Li, Yu; Wang, Jinying; Wang, Min

    2014-06-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports Ca2+ from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix and thus maintains Ca2+ homeostasis. Previous studies have reported that inhibition of MCU by ruthenium red (RR) protects the brain from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and that mitochondrial fission plays an important role in I/R injury. However, it is still not known whether MCU affects mitochondrial fission. In the present study, treatment with RR was found to decrease the concentration of free calcium in the mitochondria, calcineurin enzyme activity and dynamin-related protein 1 expression, and treatment with spermine was found to have the opposite effect in organisms subjected to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery lasting 2 h followed by 24 h reperfusion. These results indicate that MCU may be related to mitochondrial fission via modulating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and this relationship between MCU and mitochondrial fission may protect the brain from I/R injury.

  5. A molecular link between mitochondrial preprotein transporters and respiratory chain complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Murcha, Monika W.; Wang, Yan; Whelan, James

    2012-01-01

    The TIM17:23 complex on the mitochondrial inner membrane is responsible for import of the majority of mitochondrial proteins in plants. In Arabidopsis, Tim17 and Tim23 belong to a large gene family consisting of 16 members termed the Preprotein and Amino acid transporters (PRAT). Recently, two members of this protein family, Tim23-2 and the Complex I subunit B14.7, have been shown to assemble into both Complex I of the respiratory chain and the TIM17:23 complex (Wang et al., 2012), adding to ...

  6. From Proteomics to Structural Studies of Cytosolic/Mitochondrial-Type Thioredoxin Systems in Barley Seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahpiri, Azar; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    for Trx, indicating that Trx plays a key role in several aspects of cell metabolism. In contrast to other organisms, plants contain multiple forms of Trx that are classified based on their primary structures and sub-cellular localization. The reduction of cytosolic and mitochondrial types of Trx is...... dependent on NADPH and catalyzed by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR). In barley, two isoforms each of Trx and NTR have been identified and investigated using proteomics, gene expression, and structural studies. This review outlines the diverse roles suggested for cytosolic/mitochondrial-type Trx...

  7. Platelet mitochondrial membrane potential in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antony, P.M.; Boyd, O.; Trefois, C.; Ammerlaan, W.; Ostaszewski, M.; Baumuratov, A.S.; Longhino, L.; Antunes, L.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Balling, R.; Diederich, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), which has been reported not to be restricted to striatal neurons. However, studies that analyzed mitochondrial function at the level of selected enzymatic activities in peripheral tissues have produced confli

  8. Mitochondrial transcription: How does it end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Byrnes; M Garcia-Diaz

    2011-12-31

    The structure of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF1) provides novel insight into the mechanism of binding, recognition of the termination sequence and the conformational changes involved in mediating termination. Besides its functional implications, this structure provides a framework to understand the consequences of numerous diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesa, Marc; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    The meaning of the word mitochondrion (from the Greek mitos, meaning thread, and chondros, grain) illustrates that the heterogeneity of mitochondrial morphology has been known since the first descriptions of this organelle. Such a heterogeneous morphology is explained by the dynamic nature of mitochondria. Mitochondrial dynamics is a concept that includes the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, the regulation of mitochondrial architecture (morphology and distribution), and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission events. The relevance of these events in mitochondrial and cell physiology has been partially unraveled after the identification of the genes responsible for mitochondrial fusion and fission. Furthermore, during the last decade, it has been identified that mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause prevalent neurodegenerative diseases (Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and Kjer disease/autosomal dominant optic atrophy). In addition, other diseases such as type 2 diabetes or vascular proliferative disorders show impaired MFN2 expression. Altogether, these findings have established mitochondrial dynamics as a consolidated area in cellular physiology. Here we review the most significant findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian cells and their implication in human pathologies.

  10. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  11. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels ofperoxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1αand the downstream targetscytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, andIdh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (allPrespiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  12. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division.

  13. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that the cells need to work. In mitochondrial diseases, the mitochondria cannot efficiently turn sugar and oxygen into energy, so the cells do not work correctly. There are many types of mitochondrial disease, and they can affect different parts of the ...

  14. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  15. Mitochondrial accumulation of APP and Abeta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Pavel F; Petersen, Anna Camilla Hansson; Glaser, Elzbieta;

    2009-01-01

    mitochondrial function of neurons within specific brain regions. This is accompanied by an elevated production of reactive oxygen species contributing to increased rates of neuronal loss in the AD-affected brain regions. In this review, we will discuss the role of mitochondrial function and dysfunction in AD...

  16. [Mitochondrial diseases; thinking beyond organ specialism necessary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are caused by a defect in intracellular energy production. In general, these are multi-system disorders, predominantly affecting organs with high energy requirements. Due to the fact that mitochondrial disorders are not as rare as is generally assumed, and due to the diversit

  17. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  18. Mitochondrial mutations and polymorphisms in psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sequeira (Vasco); M.V. Martin (Maureen); S.M. Rollins; E.A. Moon (Emily); W.E. Bunney (William E); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); S. Lupoli (Sara); G.D. Smith; J. Kelsoe (John); C.N. Magnan (Christophe); M. van Oven (Mannis); P. Baldi (Pierre); D.C. Wallace; M.P. Vawter (Marquis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMitochondrial deficiencies with unknown causes have been observed in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) in imaging and postmortem studies. Polymorphisms and somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were investigated as potential causes with next generation sequencing of m

  19. Mitochondrial transcription: how does it end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, James; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF1) provides novel insight into the mechanism of binding, recognition of the termination sequence and the conformational changes involved in mediating termination. Besides its functional implications, this structure provides a framework to understand the consequences of numerous diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  20. Rice Mitochondrial Genes Are Transcribed by Multiple Promoters That Are Highly Diverged

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-Yu Zhang; Yao-Guang Liu

    2006-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial genes are often transcribed into complex sets of mRNA. To characterize the transcription initiation and promoter structure, the transcript termini of four mitochondrial genes, atp1, atp6, cob,rps7, in rice (Oryza sativa L.), were determined by using a modified circularized RNA reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction method. The results revealed that three genes (atp1, atp6, rps7) were transcribed from multiple initiation sites, indicating the presence of multiple promoters. Two transcription termination sites were detected in three genes (atp6, cob, rps7), respectively. Analysis on the promoter architecture showed that the YRTA (Y=T or C, R=A or G) motifs that are widely present in the mitochondrial promoters of other monocot and dicot plant species were detected only in two of the 12 analyzed promoters.Our data suggest that the promoter sequences in the rice mitochondrial genome are highly diverged in comparison to those in other plants, and the YRTA motif is not an essential element for the promoter activity.

  1. Pervasive Mitochondrial Sequence Heteroplasmy in Natural Populations of Wild Carrot, Daucus carota spp. carota L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Mandel

    Full Text Available Exceptions to the generally accepted rules that plant mitochondrial genomes are strictly maternally inherited and that within-individual sequence diversity in those genomes, i.e., heteroplasmy, should be minimal are becoming increasingly apparent especially with regard to sequence-level heteroplasmy. These findings raise questions about the potential significance of such heteroplasmy for plant mitochondrial genome evolution. Still studies quantifying the amount and consequences of sequence heteroplasmy in natural populations are rare. In this study, we report pervasive sequence heteroplasmy in natural populations of wild carrot, a close relative of the cultivated crop. In order to assay directly for this heteroplasmy, we implemented a quantitative PCR assay that can detect and quantify intra-individual SNP variation in two mitochondrial genes (Cox1 and Atp9. We found heteroplasmy in > 60% of all wild carrot populations surveyed and in > 30% of the 140 component individuals that were genotyped. Heteroplasmy ranged from a very small proportion of the total genotype (e.g., 0.995:0.005 to near even mixtures (e.g., 0.590:0.410 in some individuals. These results have important implications for the role of intra-genomic recombination in the generation of plant mitochondrial genome genotypic novelty. The consequences of such recombination are evident in the results of this study through analysis of the degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD between the SNP sites at the two genes studied.

  2. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  3. Rice-Specific Mitochondrial Iron-Regulated Gene (MIR) Plays an Important Role in Iron Homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuhiro Ishimaru; Khurram Bashir; Masaru Fujimoto; Gynheung An; Reiko Nakanishi Itai; Nobuhiro Tsutsumi; Hiromi Nakanishi; Naoko K Nishizawa

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria utilize iron (Fe), but the proteins involved in mitochondrial Fe regulation are not characterized in plants. We cloned and characterized a mitochondrial iron-regulated (MIR) gene in rice involved in Fe homeostasis. MIP. when expressed in tobacco BY-2 cells, was localized to the mitochondria. MIR transcripts were greatly increased in re-sponse to Fe deficiency in roots and shoot tissue. MIR is not homologous to any known protein, as homologs were not found in the rice or Arabidopsis genome databases, or in the EST database for other organisms. Growth in the MIR T-DNA knockout rice mutant (mir) was significantly impaired compared to wild-type (WT) plants when grown under Fe-deficient or-sufficient conditions. Furthermore, mir plants accumulated more than twice the amount of Fe in shoot and root tissue compared to WT plants when grown under either Fe-sufficient or-deficient conditions. Despite the high accumulation of Fe in roots and shoots, mir plants triggered the expression of Fe-deficiency-inducible genes, indicating that mir may not be able to utilize Fe for physiological functions. These results clearly suggest that MIR is a rice-specific mitochondrial protein, recently evolved, and plays a significant role in Fe homeostasis.

  4. Identification of a mammalian mitochondrial homolog of ribosomal protein S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavdar Koc, E; Blackburn, K; Burkhart, W; Spremulli, L L

    1999-12-01

    Bovine mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The region containing the most basic protein(s) was excised and the protein(s) present subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin. Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry was used to provide sequence information on some of the peptide products. Searches of the human EST database using the sequence of the longest peptide analyzed indicated that this peptide was from the mammalian mitochondrial homolog of prokaryotic ribosomal protein S7 (MRP S7(human)). MRP S7(human) is a 28-kDa protein with a pI of 10. Significant homology to bacterial S7 is observed especially in the C-terminal half of the protein. Surprisingly, MRP S7(human) shows less homology to the corresponding mitochondrial proteins from plants and fungi than to bacterial S7.

  5. Tetracyclines Disturb Mitochondrial Function across Eukaryotic Models: A Call for Caution in Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Moullan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tetracyclines, such as doxycycline, have become broadly used to control gene expression by virtue of the Tet-on/Tet-off systems. However, the wide range of direct effects of tetracycline use has not been fully appreciated. We show here that these antibiotics induce a mitonuclear protein imbalance through their effects on mitochondrial translation, an effect that likely reflects the evolutionary relationship between mitochondria and proteobacteria. Even at low concentrations, tetracyclines induce mitochondrial proteotoxic stress, leading to changes in nuclear gene expression and altered mitochondrial dynamics and function in commonly used cell types, as well as worms, flies, mice, and plants. Given that tetracyclines are so widely applied in research, scientists should be aware of their potentially confounding effects on experimental results. Furthermore, these results caution against extensive use of tetracyclines in livestock due to potential downstream impacts on the environment and human health.

  6. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R

    2016-05-01

    Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  7. Unravelling the mechanisms regulating muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, David A; Tryon, Liam D; Carter, Heather N; Kim, Yuho; Chen, Chris C W

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is a tissue with a low mitochondrial content under basal conditions, but it is responsive to acute increases in contractile activity patterns (i.e. exercise) which initiate the signalling of a compensatory response, leading to the biogenesis of mitochondria and improved organelle function. Exercise also promotes the degradation of poorly functioning mitochondria (i.e. mitophagy), thereby accelerating mitochondrial turnover, and preserving a pool of healthy organelles. In contrast, muscle disuse, as well as the aging process, are associated with reduced mitochondrial quality and quantity in muscle. This has strong negative implications for whole-body metabolic health and the preservation of muscle mass. A number of traditional, as well as novel regulatory pathways exist in muscle that control both biogenesis and mitophagy. Interestingly, although the ablation of single regulatory transcription factors within these pathways often leads to a reduction in the basal mitochondrial content of muscle, this can invariably be overcome with exercise, signifying that exercise activates a multitude of pathways which can respond to restore mitochondrial health. This knowledge, along with growing realization that pharmacological agents can also promote mitochondrial health independently of exercise, leads to an optimistic outlook in which the maintenance of mitochondrial and whole-body metabolic health can be achieved by taking advantage of the broad benefits of exercise, along with the potential specificity of drug action. PMID:27470593

  8. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and Huntington's disease (HD. Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R.

  9. Legionella pneumophila Secretes a Mitochondrial Carrier Protein during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Dolezal; Margareta Aili; Janette Tong; Jhih-Hang Jiang; Marobbio, Carlo M.T.; Sau Fung Lee; Ralf Schuelein; Simon Belluzzo; Eva Binova; Aurelie Mousnier; Gad Frankel; Giulia Giannuzzi; Ferdinando Palmieri; Kipros Gabriel; Thomas Naderer

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Mitochondrial carrier proteins evolved during endosymbiosis to transport substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. As such the proteins are associated exclusively with eukaryotic organisms. Despite this, we identified putative mitochondrial carrier proteins in the genomes of different intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. We named the mitochondrial carrier protein from L. pneumophila LncP and...

  10. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  11. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  12. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    glycosylases, AP endonuclease, DNA polymerase (POLgamma in mitochondria) and DNA ligase. This article outlines procedures for measuring oxidative damage formation and BER in mitochondria, including isolation of mitochondria from tissues and cells, protocols for measuring BER enzyme activities, gene......The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...

  13. Study on the Mitochondrial Genome of Sea Island Cotton (Gossypium barbadense) by BAC Library Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Ai-guo; LI Shuang-shuang; LIU Guo-zheng; LEI Bin-bin; KANG Ding-ming; LI Zhao-hu; MA Zhi-ying; HUA Jin-ping

    2014-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial genome displays complex features, particularly in terms of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). Therefore, research on the cotton mitochondrial genome may provide important information for analyzing genome evolution and exploring the molecular mechanism of CMS. In this paper, we present a preliminary study on the mitochondrial genome of sea island cotton (Gossypium barbadense) based on positive clones from the bacterial artiifcial chromosome (BAC) library. Thirty-ifve primers designed with the conserved sequences of functional genes and exons of mitochondria were used to screen positive clones in the genome library of the sea island cotton variety called Pima 90-53. Ten BAC clones were obtained and veriifed for further study. A contig was obtained based on six overlapping clones and subsequently laid out primarily on the mitochondrial genome. One BAC clone, clone 6 harbored with the inserter of approximate 115 kb mtDNA sequence, in which more than 10 primers fragments could be ampliifed, was sequenced and assembled using the Solexa strategy. Fifteen mitochondrial functional genes were revealed in clone 6 by gene annotation. The characteristics of the syntenic gene/exon of the sequences and RNA editing were preliminarily predicted.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA plasticity is an essential inducer of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W T Y; Cain, J E; Cuddihy, A; Johnson, J; Dickinson, A; Yeung, K-Y; Kumar, B; Johns, T G; Watkins, D N; Spencer, A; St John, J C

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA has been implicated in diseases such as cancer, its role remains to be defined. Using three models of tumorigenesis, namely glioblastoma multiforme, multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma, we show that mitochondrial DNA plays defining roles at early and late tumour progression. Specifically, tumour cells partially or completely depleted of mitochondrial DNA either restored their mitochondrial DNA content or actively recruited mitochondrial DNA, which affected the rate of tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, non-depleted tumour cells modulated mitochondrial DNA copy number at early and late progression in a mitochondrial DNA genotype-specific manner. In glioblastoma multiforme and osteosarcoma, this was coupled with loss and gain of mitochondrial DNA variants. Changes in mitochondrial DNA genotype affected tumour morphology and gene expression patterns at early and late progression. Importantly, this identified a subset of genes that are essential to early progression. Consequently, mitochondrial DNA and commonly expressed early tumour-specific genes provide novel targets against tumorigenesis.

  15. Exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis - with special reference to mitochondrial transcription factors and lipin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman Appel, Susanna E

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is one prominent adaptation to endurance training in skeletal muscle tissue. An increased mitochondrial density of the muscle fibres contributes to an enhanced aerobic capacity and thereby to improved fatigueresistance. Multiple signalling pathways and transcriptional networks are involved in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. The transcriptional co-regulator lipin-1 is one factor proposed to contribute, based on its ability to interact with PGC-1α a...

  16. Impaired Mitochondrial Function and Insulin Resistance of Skeletal Muscle in Mitochondrial Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Szendroedi, Julia; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Meyerspeer, Martin; Cervin, Camilla; Kacerovsky, Michaela; Smekal, Gerhard; Gräser-Lang, Sabine; Groop, Leif; Roden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired muscular mitochondrial function is related to common insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Mitochondrial diseases frequently lead to diabetes, which is mostly attributed to defective β-cell mitochondria and secretion. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed muscular mitochondrial function and lipid deposition in liver (hepatocellular lipids [HCLs]) and muscle (intramyocellular lipids [IMCLs]) using 31P/1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and insulin sensitivity and endogeno...

  17. Mitochondrial Dysregulation in the Pathogenesis of Diabetes: Potential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis-Mediated Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Anna-Maria Joseph; Joanisse, Denis R.; Baillot, Richard G.; Hood, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle mitochondrial metabolism is a tightly controlled process that involves the coordination of signaling pathways and factors from both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Perhaps the most important pathway regulating metabolism in muscle is mitochondrial biogenesis. In response to physiological stimuli such as exercise, retrograde signaling pathways are activated that allow crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria, upregulating hundreds of genes and leading to higher mitochondria...

  18. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in Hashimoto's hypothyroid myopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Siciliano, Gabriele; Monzani, Fabio; Manca, Maria Laura; Tessa, Alessandra; Caraccio, Nadia; Tozzi, Giulia; Piemonte, Fiorella; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Ferrannini, Eleuterio; Murri, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial changes have been described in muscle tissue in acquired hypothyroidism. Among the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones regulate expression of nuclear genes encoding for regulatory proteins of mitochondrial respiratory function, the mitochondrial transcription factor A (h-mtTFA) has been proposed to be a target of thyroid hormone action. The aim of this study has been to relate h-mtTFA levels in the skeletal muscle of patients affected by Hashimoto's hypoth...

  19. Correlation between mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-yu; DING Jian-qing

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. A growing number of studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Therefore, this review will mainly discuss the research progress on the correlation between PD and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial autophapy as well as mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial complex Ⅰ inhibition.doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.012

  20. MTERF3 Regulates Mitochondrial Ribosome Biogenesis in Invertebrates and Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Wredenberg, Anna; Lagouge, Marie; Bratic, Ana; Metodiev, Metodi D; Spåhr, Henrik; Mourier, Arnaud; Freyer, Christoph; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Tain, Luke; Grönke, Sebastian; Baggio, Francesca; Kukat, Christian; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Wibom, Rolf; Polosa, Paola Loguercio

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary One of the main functions of the mitochondrial network is to provide the energy currency ATP to drive a large array of cellular metabolic processes. The formation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which allows this energy supply, is under the control of two separate genetic systems, the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes, whose expressions have to be tightly coordinated to ensure efficient mitochondrial function. The regulation of mitochondrial genome expression is sti...

  1. Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism and Implications for Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rossignol, Daniel A.; J. J. Bradstreet

    2008-01-01

    Classical mitochondrial diseases occur in a subset of individuals with autism and are usually caused by genetic anomalies or mitochondrial respiratory pathway deficits. However, in many cases of autism, there is evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) without the classic features associated with mitochondrial disease. MtD appears to be more common in autism and presents with less severe signs and symptoms. It is not associated with discernable mitochondrial pathology in muscle biopsy spec...

  2. Pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Zhu; Xuerui Peng; Min-Xin Guan; Qingfeng Yan

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinical phenotypes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, which can be caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear genes. In this review, we summarized the pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders. These nuclear genes encode, components of mitochondrial translational machinery and structural subunits and assembly factors of the oxidative phosphorylation, that complex. The molecular mechanisms, that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic expression of mtDNA mutations, are discussed in detail.

  3. Correlation between mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu LIU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. A growing number of studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Therefore, this review will mainly discuss the research progress on the correlation between PD and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial autophapy as well as mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial complex Ⅰ inhibition.doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.012

  4. Disruption of mitochondrial DNA replication in Drosophila increases mitochondrial fast axonal transport in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan M Baqri

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol gamma cause several progressive human diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alper's syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. At the cellular level, disruption of pol gamma leads to depletion of mtDNA, disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and increases susceptibility to oxidative stress. Although recent studies have intensified focus on the role of mtDNA in neuronal diseases, the changes that take place in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial axonal transport when mtDNA replication is disrupted are unknown. Using high-speed confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical approaches, we report that mutations in pol gamma deplete mtDNA levels and lead to an increase in mitochondrial density in Drosophila proximal nerves and muscles, without a noticeable increase in mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, there is a rise in flux of bidirectional mitochondrial axonal transport, albeit with slower kinesin-based anterograde transport. In contrast, flux of synaptic vesicle precursors was modestly decreased in pol gamma-alpha mutants. Our data indicate that disruption of mtDNA replication does not hinder mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial axonal transport, and raises the question of whether high levels of circulating mtDNA-deficient mitochondria are beneficial or deleterious in mtDNA diseases.

  5. Mitochondrial Fragmentation Due to Inhibition of Fusion Increases Cyclin B through Mitochondrial Superoxide Radicals.

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    Tejas M Gupte

    Full Text Available During the cell cycle, mitochondria undergo regulated changes in morphology. Two particularly interesting events are first, mitochondrial hyperfusion during the G(1-S transition and second, fragmentation during entry into mitosis. The mitochondria remain fragmented between late G(2- and mitotic exit. This mitotic mitochondrial fragmentation constitutes a checkpoint in some cell types, of which little is known. We bypass the 'mitotic mitochondrial fragmentation' checkpoint by inducing fragmented mitochondrial morphology and then measure the effect on cell cycle progression. Using Drosophila larval hemocytes, Drosophila S2R(+ cell and cells in the pouch region of wing imaginal disc of Drosophila larvae we show that inhibiting mitochondrial fusion, thereby increasing fragmentation, causes cellular hyperproliferation and an increase in mitotic index. However, mitochondrial fragmentation due to over-expression of the mitochondrial fission machinery does not cause these changes. Our experiments suggest that the inhibition of mitochondrial fusion increases superoxide radical content and leads to the upregulation of cyclin B that culminates in the observed changes in the cell cycle. We provide evidence for the importance of mitochondrial superoxide in this process. Our results provide an insight into the need for mitofusin-degradation during mitosis and also help in understanding the mechanism by which mitofusins may function as tumor suppressors.

  6. Mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone induces mitochondrial dysfunction and catastrophic vacuolization in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Lim, Chaemin; Sacher, Joshua R; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei; Wipf, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in tumor cell physiology and survival by providing energy and metabolites for proliferation and metastasis. As part of their oncogenic status, cancer cells frequently produce increased levels of mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, extensive stimulation of ROS generation in mitochondria has been shown to be able to induce cancer cell death, and is one of the major mechanisms of action of many anticancer agents. We hypothesized that enhancing mitochondrial ROS generation through direct targeting of a ROS generator into mitochondria will exhibit tumor cell selectivity, as well as high efficacy in inducing cancer cell death. We thus synthesized a mitochondrial targeted version of β-lapachone (XJB-Lapachone) based on our XJB mitochondrial targeting platform. We found that the mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone is more efficient in inducing apoptosis compared to unconjugated β-lapachone, and the tumor cell selectivity is maintained. XJB-Lapachone also induced extensive cellular vacuolization and autophagy at a concentration not observed with unconjugated β-lapachone. Through characterization of mitochondrial function we revealed that XJB-Lapachone is indeed more capable of stimulating ROS generation in mitochondria, which led to a dramatic mitochondrial uncoupling and autophagic degradation of mitochondria. Taken together, we have demonstrated that targeting β-lapachone accomplishes higher efficacy through inducing ROS generation directly in mitochondria, resulting in extensive mitochondrial and cellular damage. XJB-Lapachone will thus help to establish a novel platform for the design of next generation mitochondrial targeted ROS generators for cancer therapy.

  7. Mitochondrial Quality Control: Decommissioning Power Plants in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukmini Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell has an intricate quality control system to protect its mitochondria from oxidative stress. This surveillance system is multi-tiered and comprises molecules that are present inside the mitochondria, in the cytosol, and in other organelles like the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. These molecules cross talk with each other and protect the mitochondria from oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a fundamental part of early disease pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These disorders also damage the cellular quality control machinery that protects the cell against oxidative stress. This exacerbates the oxidative damage and causes extensive neuronal cell death that is characteristic of neurodegeneration.

  8. Mitochondrial APE1/Ref-1 suppressed protein kinase C-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Park, Kyoungsook; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2014-07-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) induces mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an important pathological factor in cardiovascular diseases. The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) on PKC-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has not been variously investigated. In this study, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization and reactive oxygen species generation and also increased mitochondrial translocation of APE1/Ref-1. APE1/Ref-1 overexpression suppressed PMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, gene silencing of APE1/Ref-1 increased the sensitivity of mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS)-fused APE1/Ref-1 more effectively suppressed PMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions. These results suggest that mitochondrial APE1/Ref-1 is contributed to the protective role to protein kinase C-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  9. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Akihiro Yamashita

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs, while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles. Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN. The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  10. Mosaic origins of a complex chimeric mitochondrial gene in Silene vulgaris.

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    Helena Storchova

    Full Text Available Chimeric genes are significant sources of evolutionary innovation that are normally created when portions of two or more protein coding regions fuse to form a new open reading frame. In plant mitochondria astonishingly high numbers of different novel chimeric genes have been reported, where they are generated through processes of rearrangement and recombination. Nonetheless, because most studies do not find or report nucleotide variation within the same chimeric gene, evolution after the origination of these chimeric genes remains unstudied. Here we identify two alleles of a complex chimera in Silene vulgaris that are divergent in nucleotide sequence, genomic position relative to other mitochondrial genes, and expression patterns. Structural patterns suggest a history partially influenced by gene conversion between the chimeric gene and functional copies of subunit 1 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase gene (atp1. We identified small repeat structures within the chimeras that are likely recombination sites allowing generation of the chimera. These results establish the potential for chimeric gene divergence in different plant mitochondrial lineages within the same species. This result contrasts with the absence of diversity within mitochondrial chimeras found in crop species.

  11. cAMP signalling meets mitochondrial compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles comprising at least three distinct areas, the OMM (outer mitochondrial membrane), the IMS (intermembrane space) and the mitochondrial matrix. Physical compartmentalization allows these organelles to host different functional domains and therefore participate in a variety of important cellular actions such as ATP synthesis and programmed cell death. In a surprising homology, it is now widely accepted that the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP uses the same stratagem, compartmentalization, in order to achieve the characteristic functional pleiotropy of its pathway. Accumulating evidence suggests that all the main mitochondrial compartments contain segregated cAMP cascades; however, the regulatory properties and functional significance of such domains are not fully understood and often remain controversial issues. The present mini-review discusses our current knowledge of how the marriage between mitochondrial and cAMP compartmentalization is achieved and its effects on the biology of the cell. PMID:24646228

  12. Evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in obese adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, L; Larsen, J; Pedersen, P L;

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Although obesity and weight gain generally are anticipated to be caused by an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, the significance of thyroid hormones (TH) remains unclear. Examination of mitochondrial function may reflect intracellular thyroid hormone effect...... and mitochondrial function in peripheral blood monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Significant increase in TSH (3.06 +/- 1.56 mU/L vs. 2.33 +/- 0.91 mU/L, p ... compared with lean adolescents. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a lower mitochondrial mass (6385 +/- 1962 a.u. vs. 7608 +/- 2328 a.u., p mitochondrial membrane potential (11426 +/- 3861 a.u. vs. 14017 +/- 5536 a.u., p

  13. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

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    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  14. Rosiglitazone induces mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strum, Jay C; Shehee, Ron; Virley, David; Richardson, Jill; Mattie, Michael; Selley, Paula; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nock, Christina; Saunders, Ann; Roses, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Rosiglitazone was found to simulate mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse brain in an apolipoprotein (Apo) E isozyme-independent manner. Rosiglitazone induced both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and estrogen-stimulated related receptor alpha (ESRRA) mRNA, a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Transcriptomics and proteomics analysis suggested the mitochondria produced in the presence of human ApoE3 and E4 were not as metabolically efficient as those in the wild type or ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we propose that PPARgamma agonism induces neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis and improves glucose utilization leading to improved cellular function and provides mechanistic support for the improvement in cognition observed in treatment of Alzheimer's patients with rosiglitazone.

  15. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niescier, Robert F; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  16. Overexpression of mtDNA-associated AtWhy2 compromises mitochondrial function

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    Abou-Rached Charbel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background StWhy1, a member of the plant-specific Whirly single-stranded DNA-binding protein family, was first characterized as a transcription factor involved in the activation of the nuclear PR-10a gene following defense-related stress in potato. In Arabidopsis thaliana, Whirlies have recently been shown to be primarily localized in organelles. Two representatives of the family, AtWhy1 and AtWhy3 are imported into plastids while AtWhy2 localizes to mitochondria. Their function in organelles is currently unknown. Results To understand the role of mitochondrial Whirlies in higher plants, we produced A. thaliana lines with altered expression of the atwhy2 gene. Organellar DNA immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AtWhy2 binds to mitochondrial DNA. Overexpression of atwhy2 in plants perturbs mitochondrial function by causing a diminution in transcript levels and mtDNA content which translates into a low activity level of respiratory chain complexes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits. This lowered activity of mitochondria yielded plants that were reduced in size and had distorted leaves that exhibited accelerated senescence. Overexpression of atwhy2 also led to early accumulation of senescence marker transcripts in mature leaves. Inactivation of the atwhy2 gene did not affect plant development and had no detectable effect on mitochondrial morphology, activity of respiratory chain complexes, transcription or the amount of mtDNA present. This lack of phenotype upon abrogation of atwhy2 expression suggests the presence of functional homologues of the Whirlies or the activation of compensating mechanisms in mitochondria. Conclusion AtWhy2 is associated with mtDNA and its overexpression results in the production of dysfunctional mitochondria. This report constitutes the first evidence of a function for the Whirlies in organelles. We propose that they could play a role in the regulation of the gene expression machinery of organelles.

  17. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M;

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  18. Mitochondrial Protein Dynamics in Cardiac Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac mitochondrial proteome contains ~1,500 distinct proteins that carry out necessary metabolic and energetic processes in the heart. To sustain cardiac function, the mitochondrial proteome must be maintained in constant renewal, or turnover, especially under stress conditions. Disruptions of protein turnover can lead to protein damage and proteotoxicity, a hallmark of many heart disease etiologies. Current quantitative proteomics experiments largely focus on the measurement of the st...

  19. Mitochondrial Deficiency Is Associated With Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2013-01-01

    The specific cellular underpinnings or mechanisms of insulin resistance (IR) are not clear. Here I present evidence to support a causal association between mitochondrial energetics and IR. A large body of literature indicates that mitochondrial capacity for oxidative metabolism is lower in human obesity and type 2 diabetes. Whether or not mitochondria play a causal role in IR is hotly debated. First, IR can be caused by many factors, many of which may or may not involve mitochondria. These in...

  20. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

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    Tara Diane Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 hours post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 hours. Post-TBI administration of Mdivi-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the hippocampus and improved

  1. Endocrine disorders in mitochondrial disease ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Andrew M; Walker, Mark; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine dysfunction in mitochondrial disease is commonplace, but predominantly restricted to disease of the endocrine pancreas resulting in diabetes mellitus. Other endocrine manifestations occur, but are relatively rare by comparison. In mitochondrial disease, neuromuscular symptoms often dominate the clinical phenotype, but it is of paramount importance to appreciate the multi-system nature of the disease, of which endocrine dysfunction may be a part. The numerous phenotypes attributable ...

  2. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

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    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  3. Extraocular mitochondrial myopathies and their differential diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoser, Benedikt G H; Pongratz, Dieter

    2006-06-01

    The diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy depends upon a constellation of findings, family history, type of muscle involvement, specific laboratory abnormalities, and the results of histological, pathobiochemical and genetic analysis. In the present paper, the authors describe the diagnostic approach to mitochondrial myopathies manifesting as extraocular muscle disease. The most common ocular manifestation of mitochondrial myopathy is progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). To exclude myasthenia gravis, ocular myositis, thyroid associated orbitopathy, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles in patients with an early onset or long-lasting very slowly progressive ptosis and external ophthalmoplegia, almost without any diplopia, and normal to mildly elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and MRI of the orbits should be performed. A PEO phenotype forces one to look comprehensively for other multisystemic mitochondrial features (e.g., exercise induced weakness, encephalopathy, polyneuropathy, diabetes, heart disease). Thereafter, and presently even in familiar PEO, a diagnostic muscle biopsy should be taken. Histological and ultrastructural hallmarks are mitochondrial proliferations and structural abnormalities, lipid storage, ragged-red fibers, or cytochrome-C negative myofibers. In addition, Southern blotting may reveal the common deletion, or molecular analysis may verify specific mutations of distinct mitochondrial or nuclear genes. PMID:16760117

  4. Unsolved issues related to human mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombès, Anne; Auré, Karine; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Gilleron, Mylène; Jardel, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Human mitochondrial diseases, defined as the diseases due to a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defect, represent a large group of very diverse diseases with respect to phenotype and genetic causes. They present with many unsolved issues, the comprehensive analysis of which is beyond the scope of this review. We here essentially focus on the mechanisms underlying the diversity of targeted tissues, which is an important component of the large panel of these diseases phenotypic expression. The reproducibility of genotype/phenotype expression, the presence of modifying factors, and the potential causes for the restricted pattern of tissular expression are reviewed. Special emphasis is made on heteroplasmy, a specific feature of mitochondrial diseases, defined as the coexistence within the cell of mutant and wild type mitochondrial DNA molecules. Its existence permits unequal segregation during mitoses of the mitochondrial DNA populations and consequently heterogeneous tissue distribution of the mutation load. The observed tissue distributions of recurrent human mitochondrial DNA deleterious mutations are diverse but reproducible for a given mutation demonstrating that the segregation is not a random process. Its extent and mechanisms remain essentially unknown despite recent advances obtained in animal models.

  5. Mitochondrial preconditioning: a potential neuroprotective strategy

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    Sónia C Correia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria have long been known as the powerhouse of the cell. However, these organelles are also pivotal players in neuronal cell death. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of chronic brain disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and cerebral ischemic stroke. Data derived from morphologic, biochemical and molecular genetic studies indicate that mitochondria constitute a convergence point for neurodegeneration. Conversely, mitochondria have also been implicated in the neuroprotective signaling processes of preconditioning. Despite the precise molecular mechanisms underlying preconditioning-induced brain tolerance are still unclear, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels activation have been shown to be involved in the preconditioning phenomenon. This review intends to discuss how mitochondrial malfunction contributes to the onset and progression of cerebral ischemic stroke and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, two major neurodegenerative disorders. The role of mitochondrial mechanisms involved in the preconditioning-mediated neuroprotective events will be also discussed. Mitochondrial targeted preconditioning may represent a promising therapeutic weapon to fight neurodegeneration.

  6. Mitochondrial oxidative stress causes hyperphosphorylation of tau.

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    Simon Melov

    Full Text Available Age-related neurodegenerative disease has been mechanistically linked with mitochondrial dysfunction via damage from reactive oxygen species produced within the cell. We determined whether increased mitochondrial oxidative stress could modulate or regulate two of the key neurochemical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD: tau phosphorylation, and beta-amyloid deposition. Mice lacking superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 die within the first week of life, and develop a complex heterogeneous phenotype arising from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Treatment of these mice with catalytic antioxidants increases their lifespan and rescues the peripheral phenotypes, while uncovering central nervous system pathology. We examined sod2 null mice differentially treated with high and low doses of a catalytic antioxidant and observed striking elevations in the levels of tau phosphorylation (at Ser-396 and other phospho-epitopes of tau in the low-dose antioxidant treated mice at AD-associated residues. This hyperphosphorylation of tau was prevented with an increased dose of the antioxidant, previously reported to be sufficient to prevent neuropathology. We then genetically combined a well-characterized mouse model of AD (Tg2576 with heterozygous sod2 knockout mice to study the interactions between mitochondrial oxidative stress and cerebral Ass load. We found that mitochondrial SOD2 deficiency exacerbates amyloid burden and significantly reduces metal levels in the brain, while increasing levels of Ser-396 phosphorylated tau. These findings mechanistically link mitochondrial oxidative stress with the pathological features of AD.

  7. The linkage disequilibrium between chloroplast DNA and mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima (L.): the usefulness of both genomes for population genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplanque, B; Viard, F; Bernard, J; Forcioli, D; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Cuguen, J; Van Dijk, H

    2000-02-01

    The structure and evolution of the plant mitochondrial genome may allow recurrent appearance of the same mitochondrial variants in different populations. Whether the same mitochondrial variant is distributed by migration or appears recurrently by mutation (creating homoplasy) in different populations is an important question with regard to the use of these markers for population genetic analyses. The genetic association observed between chloroplasts and mitochondria (i.e. two maternally inherited cytoplasmic genomes) may indicate whether or not homoplasy occurs in the mitochondrial genome. Four-hundred and fourteen individuals sampled in wild populations of beets from France and Spain were screened for their mitochondrial and chloroplast polymorphisms. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism was investigated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) polymorphism was investigated with polymerase chain reaction PCR-RFLP, using universal primers for the amplification. Twenty and 13 variants for mtDNA and cpDNA were observed, respectively. Most exhibited a widespread geographical distribution. As a very strong linkage disequilibrium was estimated between mtDNA and cpDNA haplotypes, a high rate of recurrent mutation was excluded for the mitochondrial genome of beets. Identical mitochondrial variants found in populations of different regions probably occurred as a result of migration. We concluded from this study that mtDNA is a tool as valuable as cpDNA when a maternal marker is needed for population genetics analyses in beet on a large regional scale.

  8. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  9. The Mitochondrial Genome of Raphanus sativus and Gene Evolution of Cruciferous Mitochondrial Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengxin Chang; Jianmei Chen; Yankun Wang; Bingchao Gu; Jianbo He; Pu Chu; Rongzhan Guan

    2013-01-01

    To explore the mitochondrial genes of the Cruciferae family,the mitochondrial genome of Raphanus sativus (sat) was sequenced and annotated.The circular mitochondrial genome of sat is 239,723 bp and includes 33 protein-coding genes,three rRNA genes and 17 tRNA genes.The mitochondrial genome also contains a pair of large repeat sequences 5.9 kb in length,which may mediate genome reorganization into two sub-genomic circles,with predicted sizes of 124.8 kb and 115.0 kb,respectively.Furthermore,gene evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Cruciferae family was analyzed using sat mitochondrial type (mitotype),together with six other reported mitotypes.The cruciferous mitochondrial genomes have maintained almost the same set of functional genes.Compared with Cycas taitungensis (a representative gymnosperm),the mitochondrial genomes of the Cruciferae have lost nine protein-coding genes and seven mitochondrial-like tRNA genes,but acquired six chloroplast-like tRNAs.Among the Cruciferae,to maintain the same set of genes that are necessary for mitochondrial function,the exons of the genes have changed at the lowest rates,as indicated by the numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms.The open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function in the cruciferous genomes are not conserved.Evolutionary events,such as mutations,genome reorganizations and sequence insertions or deletions (indels),have resulted in the nonconserved ORFs in the cruciferous mitochondrial genomes,which is becoming significantly different among mitotypes.This work represents the first phylogenic explanation of the evolution of genes of known function in the Cruciferae family.It revealed significant variation in ORFs and the causes of such variation.

  10. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

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    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  11. Evolution of gastropod mitochondrial genome arrangements

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    Zardoya Rafael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastropod mitochondrial genomes exhibit an unusually great variety of gene orders compared to other metazoan mitochondrial genome such as e.g those of vertebrates. Hence, gastropod mitochondrial genomes constitute a good model system to study patterns, rates, and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangement. However, this kind of evolutionary comparative analysis requires a robust phylogenetic framework of the group under study, which has been elusive so far for gastropods in spite of the efforts carried out during the last two decades. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of five mitochondrial genomes of gastropods (Pyramidella dolabrata, Ascobulla fragilis, Siphonaria pectinata, Onchidella celtica, and Myosotella myosotis, and we analyze them together with another ten complete mitochondrial genomes of gastropods currently available in molecular databases in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among the main lineages of gastropods. Results Comparative analyses with other mollusk mitochondrial genomes allowed us to describe molecular features and general trends in the evolution of mitochondrial genome organization in gastropods. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (ME, MP, ML, BI arrived at a single topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in the group. Conclusion Four main lineages were identified within gastropods: Caenogastropoda, Vetigastropoda, Patellogastropoda, and Heterobranchia. Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda are sister taxa, as well as, Patellogastropoda and Heterobranchia. This result rejects the validity of the derived clade Apogastropoda (Caenogastropoda + Heterobranchia. The position of Patellogastropoda remains unclear likely due to long-branch attraction biases. Within Heterobranchia, the most heterogeneous group of gastropods, neither Euthyneura (because of the inclusion of P

  12. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  14. DECREASED SYNTHESIS AND INEFFICIENT MITOCHONDRIAL IMPORT OF HSP60 IN A PATIENT WITH A MITOCHONDRIAL ENCEPHALOMYOPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUCKRIEDE, A; AGSTERIBBE, E

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper (Agsteribbe et al. (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 193, 146-154) we suggested deficiency of heat shock protein 60 (hsp60) as the possible cause of a systemic mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with multiple deficiency of mitochondrial enzymes. In this paper we present new data w

  15. Persistence and protection of mitochondrial DNA in the generative cell of cucumber is consistent with its paternal transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucumber, unlike most plants, shows paternal inheritance of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); however, the mechanisms regulating this unique transmission mode are unclear. Here we monitored the amounts of mtDNA through the development of cucumber microspores to pollen and observed that mtDNA decreases ...

  16. The mitochondrial genome, a growing interest inside an organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Crimi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marco Crimi1, Roberta Rigolio21National Institute of Molecular Genetics (INGM, Functional Genomics Unit, Milan, Italy; 2Department of Neurosciences and Biomedical Technologies, University of Milan Bicocca, Monza, ItalyAbstract: Mitochondria are semi-autonomously reproductive organelles within eukaryotic cells carrying their own genetic material, called the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA. Until some years ago, mtDNA had primarily been used as a tool in population genetics. As scientists began associating mtDNA mutations with dozens of mysterious disorders, as well as the aging process and a variety of chronic degenerative diseases, it became increasingly evident that the information contained in this genome had substantial potential applications to improve human health. Today, mitochondria research covers a wide range of disciplines, including clinical medicine, biochemistry, genetics, molecular cell biology, bioinformatics, plant sciences and physiology. The present review intends to present a summary of the most exiting fields of the mitochondrial research bringing together several contributes in terms of original prospective and future applications.Keywords: mtDNA, heteroplasmy, molecular diagnostics, mitochondriopathies, nanogenomics

  17. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  18. Current perspectives on mitochondrial inheritance in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jianping Xu,1,2 He Li2 1Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; 2The Key Laboratory for Non-Wood Forest Cultivation and Conservation of the Federal Ministry of Education, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The mitochondrion is an essential organelle of eukaryotes, generating the universal energy currency, adenosine triphosphate, through oxidative phosphorylation. However, aside from generation of adenosine triphosphate, mitochondria have also been found to impact a diversity of cellular functions and organ system health in humans and other eukaryotes. Thus, inheriting and maintaining functional mitochondria are essential for cell health. Due to the relative ease of conducting genetic and molecular biological experiments using fungi, they (especially the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used as model organisms for investigating the patterns of inheritance and intracellular dynamics of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA. Indeed, the diversity of mitochondrial inheritance patterns in fungi has contributed to our broad understanding of the genetic, cellular, and molecular controls of mitochondrial inheritance and their evolutionary implications. In this review, we briefly summarize the patterns of mitochondrial inheritance in fungi, describe the genes and processes involved in controlling uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance in sexual crosses in basidiomycete yeasts, and provide an overview of the molecular and cellular processes governing mitochondrial inheritance during asexual budding in S. cerevisiae. Together, these studies reveal that complex regulatory networks and molecular processes are involved in ensuring the transmission of healthy mitochondria to the progeny. Keywords: uniparental inheritance, biparental inheritance, mating type, actin cable, mitochore, mitochondrial partition 

  19. Sensitivity to Alternaria alternata toxin in citrus because of altered mitochondrial RNA processing

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtani, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    Specificity in the interaction between rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) and the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata rough lemon pathotype is determined by a host-selective toxin, ACR-toxin. Mitochondria from rough lemon are sensitive to ACR-toxin whereas mitochondria from resistant plants, including other citrus species, are resistant. We have identified a C. jambhiri mitochondrial DNA sequence, designated ACRS (ACR-toxin sensitivity gene), that confers toxin sensitivity to Escherichia co...

  20. A genome wide study in fission yeast reveals nine PPR proteins that regulate mitochondrial gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kühl, Inge; Dujeancourt, Laurent; Gaisne, Mauricette; Herbert, Christopher J.; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are particularly numerous in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they are involved in different steps of RNA metabolism, probably due to the repeated 35 amino acid PPR motifs that are thought to mediate interactions with RNA. In non-photosynthetic eukaryotes only a handful of PPR proteins exist, for example the human LRPPRC, which is involved in a mitochondrial disease. We have conducted a systematic study of the PPR proteins in the fission yeast...

  1. RECQL4 localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial DNA integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; Rossi, Marie L; Canugovi, Chandrika;

    2012-01-01

    in mitochondria. Q-PCR amplification of mitochondrial DNA demonstrated that mtDNA damage accumulated in RECQL4-deficient cells. Microarray analysis suggested that mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways might be affected in RTS. Measurements of mitochondrial bioenergetics showed a reduction in the mitochondrial...... reserve capacity after lentiviral knockdown of RECQL4 in two different primary cell lines. Additionally, biochemical assays with RECQL4, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA polymerase ¿ showed that the polymerase inhibited RECQL4's helicase activity. RECQL4 is the first 3'-5' Rec...

  2. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Sauvanet

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from

  3. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems - at least partially - in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. PMID:27157140

  4. MAVS maintains mitochondrial homeostasis via autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Sun, Liwei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a critical adaptor protein to transduce antiviral signalling by physically interacting with activated RIG-I and MDA5 receptors. MAVS executes its functions at the outer membrane of mitochondria to regulate downstream antiviral signalling, indicating that the mitochondria provides a functional platform for innate antiviral signalling transduction. However, little is known about whether and how MAVS-mediated antiviral signalling contributes to mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we show that the activation of MAVS is sufficient to induce autophagic signalling, which may mediate the turnover of the damaged mitochondria. Importantly, we find MAVS directly interacts with LC3 through its LC3-binding motif ‘YxxI’, suggesting that MAVS might act as an autophagy receptor to mediate mitochondrial turnover upon excessive activation of RLR signalling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that both MAVS self-aggregation and its interaction with TRAF2/6 proteins are important for MAVS-mediated mitochondrial turnover. Collectively, our findings suggest that MAVS acts as a potential receptor for mitochondria-associated autophagic signalling to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:27551434

  5. Characteristics of Mitochondrial Transformation into Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, E. E.; Saada-Reich, A.; Lorberboum-Galski, H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria can be incorporated into mammalian cells by simple co-incubation of isolated mitochondria with cells, without the need of transfection reagents or any other type of intervention. This phenomenon was termed mitochondrial transformation, and although it was discovered in 1982, currently little is known regarding its mechanism(s). Here we demonstrate that mitochondria can be transformed into recipient cells very quickly, and co-localize with endogenous mitochondria. The isolated mitochondria interact directly with cells, which engulf the mitochondria with cellular extensions in a way, which may suggest the involvement of macropinocytosis or macropinocytosis-like mechanisms in mitochondrial transformation. Indeed, macropinocytosis inhibitors but not clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibition-treatments, blocks mitochondria transformation. The integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane and its proteins is essential for the transformation of the mitochondria into cells; cells can distinguish mitochondria from similar particles and transform only intact mitochondria. Mitochondrial transformation is blocked in the presence of the heparan sulfate molecules pentosan polysulfate and heparin, which indicate crucial involvement of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the mitochondrial transformation process. PMID:27184109

  6. Mitochondrial Proteases as Emerging Pharmacological Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of mitochondrial function and integrity is critical for cell viability. Under stress conditions, unfolded, misfolded or damaged proteins accumulate in a certain compartment of the organelle, interfering with oxidative phosphorylation and normal mitochondrial functions. In stress conditions, several mechanisms, including mitochondrial unfolded protease response (UPRmt), fusion and fission, and mitophagy are engaged to restore normal proteostasis of the organelle. Mitochondrial proteases are a family of more than 20 enzymes that not only are involved in the UPRmt, but actively participate at multiple levels in the stress-response system. Alterations in their expression levels, or mutations that determine loss or gain of function of these proteases deeply impair mitochondrial functionality and can be associated with the onset of inherited diseases, with the development of neurodegenerative disorders and with the process of carcinogenesis. In this review, we focus our attention on six of them, namely CLPP, HTRA2 and LONP1, by analysing the current knowledge about their functions, their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases, and the compounds currently available for inhibiting their functions. PMID:26831646

  7. Mitochondrial functions on oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ya WANG; Da-hui WANG; Xiang-yang ZOU; Chen-ming XU

    2009-01-01

    Oocyte quality has long been considered as a main limiting factor for in vitro fertilization (IVF). In the past decade,extensive observations demonstrated that the mitochondrion plays a vital role in the oocyte cytoplasm, for it can provide adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for fertilization and preimplantation embryo development and also act as stores of intracellular calcium and proapoptotic factors. During the oocyte maturation, mitochondria are characterized by distinct changes of their distribution pattern from being homogeneous to heterogeneous, which is correlated with the cumulus apoptosis. Oocyte quality decreases with the increasing maternal age. Recent studies have shown that low quality oocytes have some age-related dysfunctions, which include the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damages, chromosomal aneuploidies,the incidence of apoptosis, and changes in mitochondrial gene expression. All these dysfunctions may cause a high level of developmental retardation and arrest of preimplantation embryos. It has been suggested that these mitochondrial changes may arise from excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is closely associated with the oxidative energy production or calcium overload,which may trigger permeability transition pore opening and subsequent apoptosis. Therefore, mitochondria can be seen as signs for oocyte quality evaluation, and it is possible that the oocyte quality can be improved by enhancing the physical function of mitochondria. Here we reviewed recent advances in mitochondrial functions on oocytes.

  8. Control mechanisms in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jana Hroudová; Zdeněk Fi(s)ar

    2013-01-01

    Distribution and activity of mitochondria are key factors in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and axogenesis. The majority of energy sources, necessary for cellular functions, originate from oxidative phosphorylation located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The adenosine-5'- triphosphate production is regulated by many control mechanism–firstly by oxygen, substrate level, adenosine-5'-diphosphate level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and rate of coupling and proton leak. Recently, these mechanisms have been implemented by "second control mechanisms," such as reversible phosphorylation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and electron transport chain complexes, allosteric inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, thyroid hormones, effects of fatty acids and uncoupling proteins. Impaired function of mitochondria is implicated in many diseases ranging from mitochondrial myopathies to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are usually related to the ability of mitochondria to generate adenosine-5'-triphosphate in response to energy demands. Large amounts of reactive oxygen species are released by defective mitochondria, similarly, decline of antioxidative enzyme activities (e.g. in the elderly) enhances reactive oxygen species production. We reviewed data concerning neuroplasticity, physiology, and control of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production.

  9. Characteristics of Mitochondrial Transformation into Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, E E; Saada-Reich, A; Lorberboum-Galski, H

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria can be incorporated into mammalian cells by simple co-incubation of isolated mitochondria with cells, without the need of transfection reagents or any other type of intervention. This phenomenon was termed mitochondrial transformation, and although it was discovered in 1982, currently little is known regarding its mechanism(s). Here we demonstrate that mitochondria can be transformed into recipient cells very quickly, and co-localize with endogenous mitochondria. The isolated mitochondria interact directly with cells, which engulf the mitochondria with cellular extensions in a way, which may suggest the involvement of macropinocytosis or macropinocytosis-like mechanisms in mitochondrial transformation. Indeed, macropinocytosis inhibitors but not clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibition-treatments, blocks mitochondria transformation. The integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane and its proteins is essential for the transformation of the mitochondria into cells; cells can distinguish mitochondria from similar particles and transform only intact mitochondria. Mitochondrial transformation is blocked in the presence of the heparan sulfate molecules pentosan polysulfate and heparin, which indicate crucial involvement of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the mitochondrial transformation process.

  10. MAVS maintains mitochondrial homeostasis via autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Sun, Liwei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a critical adaptor protein to transduce antiviral signalling by physically interacting with activated RIG-I and MDA5 receptors. MAVS executes its functions at the outer membrane of mitochondria to regulate downstream antiviral signalling, indicating that the mitochondria provides a functional platform for innate antiviral signalling transduction. However, little is known about whether and how MAVS-mediated antiviral signalling contributes to mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we show that the activation of MAVS is sufficient to induce autophagic signalling, which may mediate the turnover of the damaged mitochondria. Importantly, we find MAVS directly interacts with LC3 through its LC3-binding motif 'YxxI', suggesting that MAVS might act as an autophagy receptor to mediate mitochondrial turnover upon excessive activation of RLR signalling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that both MAVS self-aggregation and its interaction with TRAF2/6 proteins are important for MAVS-mediated mitochondrial turnover. Collectively, our findings suggest that MAVS acts as a potential receptor for mitochondria-associated autophagic signalling to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:27551434

  11. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems - at least partially - in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins.

  12. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  13. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Luz

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1-, fusion (fzo-1-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  14. Human Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein MRPL12 Interacts Directly with Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase to Modulate Mitochondrial Gene Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhibo; Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2007-01-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription machinery comprises a single subunit bacteriophage-related RNA polymerase, POLRMT, the high mobility group box DNA-binding protein h-mtTFA/TFAM, and two transcriptional co-activator proteins, h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 that also have rRNA methyltransferase activity. Recapitulation of specific initiation of transcription in vitro can be achieved by a complex of POLRMT, h-mtTFA, and either h-mtTFB1 or h-mtTFB2. However, the nature of mitochondrial transcrip...

  15. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26930489

  16. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2 and 4 (PDK4. In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  17. Mitochondrial oxidative function and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Boushel, Robert; Dela, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    biochemical measurements of oxidative enzyme and electron transport activity, isolation of mitochondria for measurements of respiration, and ATP production and indirect measurements of ATP production using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - spectroscopy. Biochemical markers of mitochondrial content are also...... discussed. Several studies show reduced activity of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetics. The reductions are independent of muscle fiber type, and are accompanied by visual evidence of damaged mitochondria. In most studies, the reduced oxidative enzyme activity is explained by decreases...... in mitochondrial content; thus, evidence of a functional impairment in mitochondria in type 2 diabetes is not convincing. These impairments in oxidative function and mitochondrial morphology could reflect the sedentary lifestyle of the diabetic subjects, and the influence of physical activity on oxidative activity...

  18. Dinoflagellates: a mitochondrial genome all at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Edmund A; Nisbet, R Ellen R; Barbrook, Adrian C; Howe, Christopher J

    2008-07-01

    Dinoflagellate algae are notorious for their highly unusual organization of nuclear and chloroplast genomes. Early studies on the dinoflagellate mitochondrial genome indicated that it encodes the same three protein-coding genes found in Plasmodium spp., but with a complex organization and transcript editing. Recent work has extended this view, showing that the dinoflagellate mitochondrial genome contains a wide array of gene fragments and genes interspersed with noncoding inverted repeats. The genome seems to require noncanonical start and stop codons, as well as high levels of editing, trans-splicing and the addition of oligonucleotide caps at the 5' and 3' ends of transcripts. Despite its small coding content, the dinoflagellate mitochondrial genome is one of the most complex known.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA mutation in essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqi Liu; Shiwen Wang

    2008-01-01

    Essential hypertension (EH) is an escalating problem for developed and developing countries.It is currently seen as a 'complex' genetic trait caused by multiple susceptibility genes which are modulated by gene-environment and gene-gene interactions.Over the past 10 years,mitochondrial defects have been implicated in a wide variety of degenerative diseases,aging,and cancer.Recently several studies showed that human essential hypertension has excess maternal transmission which suggests a possible mitochondrial involvement.However,the exact pathophysiology of mitochondrial DNA mutation (mtDNA) in essential hypertension still remains perplexing.With the application of a variety of imaging approaches and successive mouse model of mitochonddal diseases we convince that these problems will be resolved in the near future.(J Geriatr Cardiol 2008;5(1):60-64)

  20. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I;

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial function. Therefore, this study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in the smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cardiac......, skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), pmitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (222±13; 115±2; 48±2 umol•g(-1)•min(-1), p

  1. A role of taurine in mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Svend Høime; Andersen, Mogens Larsen; Cornett, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial pH gradient across the inner-membrane is stabilised by buffering of the matrix. A low-molecular mass buffer compound has to be localised in the matrix to maintain its alkaline pH value. Taurine is found ubiquitously in animal cells with concentrations in the millimolar range...... and its pKa value is determined to 9.0 (25 degrees C) and 8.6 (37 degrees C), respectively. Localisation of such a low-molecular buffer in the mitochondrial matrix, transforms the matrix into a biochemical reaction chamber for the important matrix-localised enzyme systems. Three acyl-CoA dehydrogenase...... enzymes, which are pivotal for beta-oxidation of fatty acids, are demonstrated to have optimal activity in a taurine buffer. By application of the model presented, taurine depletion caused by hyperglycemia could provide a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and diabetes....

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and resuscitation in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, Albert J; Levy, Richard J; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2010-07-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in patients in intensive care units in North America and Europe. In the United States, it accounts for upwards of 250,000 deaths each year. Investigations into the pathobiology of sepsis have most recently focused on common cellular and subcellular processes. One possibility would be a defect in the production of energy, which translates to an abnormality in the production of adenosine triphosphate and therefore in the function of mitochondria. This article presents a clear role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sepsis. What is less clear is the teleology underlying this response. Prolonged mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis clearly are detrimental. However, early inhibition of mitochondrial function may be adaptive. PMID:20643307

  3. Primary Mitochondrial Disease and Secondary Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Importance of Distinction for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazov, Dmitriy M; Kahler, Stephan G; Frye, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to abnormal oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos). Primary mitochondrial disease (PMD) is diagnosed clinically and ideally, but not always, confirmed by a known or indisputably pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutation. The PMD genes either encode oxphos proteins directly or they affect oxphos function by impacting production of the complex machinery needed to run the oxphos process. However, many disorders have the 'mitochondrial' phenotype without an identifiable mtDNA or nDNA mutation or they have a variant of unknown clinical significance. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction (SMD) can be caused by genes encoding neither function nor production of the oxphos proteins and accompanies many hereditary non-mitochondrial diseases. SMD may also be due to nongenetic causes such as environmental factors. In our practice, we see many patients with clinical signs of mitochondrial dysfunction based on phenotype, biomarkers, imaging, muscle biopsy, or negative/equivocal mtDNA or nDNA test results. In these cases, it is often tempting to assign a patient's phenotype to 'mitochondrial disease', but SMD is often challenging to distinguish from PMD. Fortunately, rapid advances in molecular testing, made possible by next generation sequencing, have been effective at least in some cases in establishing accurate diagnoses to distinguish between PMD and SMD. This is important, since their treatments and prognoses can be quite different. However, even in the absence of the ability to distinguish between PMD and SMD, treating SMD with standard treatments for PMD can be effective. We review the latest findings regarding mitochondrial disease/dysfunction and give representative examples in which differentiation between PMD and SMD has been crucial for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27587988

  4. Tissue-specific modulation of mitochondrial DNA segregation by a defect in mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Riikka; Marttinen, Paula; Stewart, James B; Neil Dear, T; Battersby, Brendan J

    2016-02-15

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that divide and fuse by remodeling an outer and inner membrane in response to developmental, physiological and stress stimuli. These events are coordinated by conserved dynamin-related GTPases. The dynamics of mitochondrial morphology require coordination with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to ensure faithful genome transmission, however, this process remains poorly understood. Mitochondrial division is linked to the segregation of mtDNA but how it affects cases of mtDNA heteroplasmy, where two or more mtDNA variants/mutations co-exist in a cell, is unknown. Segregation of heteroplasmic human pathogenic mtDNA mutations is a critical factor in the onset and severity of human mitochondrial diseases. Here, we investigated the coupling of mitochondrial morphology to the transmission and segregation of mtDNA in mammals by taking advantage of two genetically modified mouse models: one with a dominant-negative mutation in the dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 or Dnm1l) that impairs mitochondrial fission and the other, heteroplasmic mice segregating two neutral mtDNA haplotypes (BALB and NZB). We show a tissue-specific response to mtDNA segregation from a defect in mitochondrial fission. Only mtDNA segregation in the hematopoietic compartment is modulated from impaired Dnm1l function. In contrast, no effect was observed in other tissues arising from the three germ layers during development and in mtDNA transmission through the female germline. Our data suggest a robust organization of a heteroplasmic mtDNA segregating unit across mammalian cell types that can overcome impaired mitochondrial division to ensure faithful transmission of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:26681804

  5. Choosing and Using a Plant DNA Barcode

    OpenAIRE

    Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Graham, Sean W.; Little, Damon P.

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of DNA barcoding is to establish a shared community resource of DNA sequences that can be used for organismal identification and taxonomic clarification. This approach was successfully pioneered in animals using a portion of the cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) mitochondrial gene. In plants, establishing a standardized DNA barcoding system has been more challenging. In this paper, we review the process of selecting and refining a plant barcode; evaluate the factors which influence the ...

  6. Evidence for several cysteine transport mechanisms in the mitochondrial membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Pong; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is essential for many mitochondrial processes in plants, including translation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and cyanide detoxification. Its biosynthesis is carried out by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL) which can be found in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria. Mutants lacking one compartment-specific OAS-TL isoform show viable phenotypes, leading to the hypothesis that the organellar membranes are permeable to substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. In this report, we show that exogenouslly supplied [(35)S]cysteine accumulates in the mitochondrial fraction and is taken up into isolated mitochondria for in organello protein synthesis. Analysis of cysteine uptake by isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts indicates that cysteine is transported by multiple facilitated mechanisms that operate in a concentration gradient-dependent manner. In addition, cysteine uptake is dependent mainly on the ΔpH across the inner membrane. The rates of mitochondrial cysteine transport can be mildly altered by specific metabolites in the cyanide detoxification-linked sulfide oxidation, but not by most substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the transport of cysteine plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular cysteine biosynthesis as well as modulating the availability of sulfur for mitochondrial metabolism.

  7. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D’Elia, D.; Montalvo, A. de; Pinto, B. de; De Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H. V.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MitBASE reports all available information from different organisms and from intraspecies variants and mutants. Data have been drawn from the primary databases and from the literature; value adding information has been structured, e.g., editing information on protist mtDNA genomes, pathological information for human mtDNA variants, etc. The different databases, some of which are structured using commercial packages (Microsoft Access, File Maker Pro) while others use a flat-file format, have been integrated under ORACLE. Ad hoc retrieval systems have been devised for some of the above listed databases keeping into account their peculiarities. The database is resident at the EBI and is available at the following site: http://www3.ebi.ac.uk/Research/Mitbase/mitbase.pl . The impact of this project is intended for both basic and applied research. The study of mitochondrial genetic diseases and mitochondrial DNA intraspecies diversity are key topics in several biotechnological fields. The database has been funded within the EU Biotechnology programme. PMID:10592207

  8. Mitochondrial DNA under siege in avian phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Robert M; Barrowclough, George F

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been the workhorse of research in phylogeography for almost two decades. However, concerns with basing evolutionary interpretations on mtDNA results alone have been voiced since the inception of such studies. Recently, some authors have suggested that the potential problems with mtDNA are so great that inferences about population structure and species limits are unwarranted unless corroborated by other evidence, usually in the form of nuclear gene data. Here we review the relative merits of mitochondrial and nuclear phylogeographical studies, using birds as an exemplar class of organisms. A review of population demographic and genetic theory indicates that mitochondrial and nuclear phylogeographical results ought to concur for both geographically unstructured populations and for populations that have long histories of isolation. However, a relatively common occurrence will be shallow, but geographically structured mtDNA trees--without nuclear gene corroboration--for populations with relatively shorter periods of isolation. This is expected because of the longer coalescence times of nuclear genes (approximately four times that of mtDNA); such cases do not contradict the mtDNA inference of recent isolation and evolutionary divergence. Rather, the nuclear markers are more lagging indicators of changes in population structure. A review of the recent literature on birds reveals the existence of relatively few cases in which nuclear markers contradict mitochondrial markers in a fashion not consistent with coalescent theory. Preliminary information from nuclear genes suggests that mtDNA patterns will prove to be robust indicators of patterns of population history and species limits. At equilibrium, mitochondrial loci are generally a more sensitive indicator of population structure than are nuclear loci, and mitochondrial estimates of F(ST)-like statistics are generally expected to exceed nuclear ones. Hence, invoking behavioural or ecological

  9. Effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on the immunological properties of microglia

    OpenAIRE

    Ferger Annette I; Campanelli Loretta; Reimer Valentina; Muth Katharina N; Merdian Irma; Ludolph Albert C; Witting Anke

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by both mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of microglia, the macrophages of the brain. Here, we investigate the effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on the activation profile of microglial cells. Methods We incubated primary mouse microglia with the mitochondrial toxins 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) or rotenone. These mitochondrial toxins are known to induce neurodegeneration in humans and in experimental animals. We charac...

  10. Mitochondrial DNA determines androgen dependence in prostate cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Higuchi, M; Kudo, T; Suzuki, S.; Evans, TT; Sasaki, R.; Wada, Y; Shirakawa, T.; Sawyer, JR; Gotoh, A

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer progresses from an androgen-dependent to androgen-independent stage after androgen ablation therapy. Mitochondrial DNA plays a role in cell death and metastatic competence. Further, heteroplasmic large-deletion mitochondrial DNA is verycommon in prostate cancer. To investigate the role of mitochondrial DNA in androgen dependence of prostate cancers, we tested the changes of normal and deleted mitochondrial DNA in accordance with the progression of prostate cancer. We demonstra...

  11. Titration of mitochondrial fusion rescues Mff-deficient cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hsiuchen; Ren, Shuxun; Clish, Clary; Jain, Mohit; Mootha, Vamsi; McCaffery, J. Michael; Chan, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial fusion or fission are associated with many pathologies, raising the hope that pharmacological manipulation of mitochondrial dynamics may have therapeutic benefit. This approach assumes that organ physiology can be restored by rebalancing mitochondrial dynamics, but this concept remains to be validated. We addressed this issue by analyzing mice deficient in Mff, a protein important for mitochondrial fission. Mff mutant mice die at 13 wk as a result of severe dilated ca...

  12. The Elusive Magic Pill: Finding Effective Therapies for Mitochondrial Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Amy; Wolfe, Lynne A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mitochondrial diseases has been estimated at 11.5/100,000 (1:8500) worldwide. In the USA up to 4000 newborns annually are expected to develop a mitochondrial disease. More than 50 million adults in the USA also suffer from diseases in which primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction is involved. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been identified in cancer, infertility, diabetes, heart diseases, blindness, deafness, kidney disease, liver disease, stroke, migraine, dwarfism, and...

  13. May “Mitochondrial Eve” and Mitochondrial Haplogroups Play a Role in Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Caldarazzo Ienco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, play a critical role in several metabolic processes and apoptotic pathways. Multiple evidences suggest that mitochondria may be crucial in ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, mitochondrial haplogroups have been linked to multiple area of medicine, from normal ageing to diseases, including neurodegeneration. Polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome might lead to impaired energy generation and to increased amount of reactive oxygen species, having either susceptibility or protective role in several diseases. Here, we highlight the role of the mitochondrial haplogroups in the pathogenetic cascade leading to diseases, with special attention to Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as difficulty in conceiving a child after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility can arise either because of the male factor or female factor or both. According to the current estimates, 15% of couples attempting their first pregnancy could not succeed. Infertility is either primary or secondary. Mitochondria have profound effect on all biochemical pathways, including the one that drivessperm motility. Sperm motility is heavily dependent on the ATP generated by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial sheath. In this review, the very positive role of mitochondrial genome′s association with infertility is discussed

  15. SNP-finding in pig mitochondrial ESTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Gilchrist, M.J.;

    2008-01-01

    The Sino-Danish pig genome project produced 685 851 ESTs (Gorodkin et al. 2007), of which 41 499 originated from the mitochondrial genome. In this study, the mitochondrial ESTs were assembled, and 374 putative SNPs were found. Chromatograms for the ESTs containing SNPs were manually inspected, an......, and 112 total (52 non-synonymous) SNPs were found to be of high confidence (five of them are close to disease-causing SNPs in humans). Nine of the high-confidence SNPs were tested experimentally, and eight were confirmed. The SNPs can be accessed online at http://pigest.ku.dk/more.mito...

  16. Mitochondrial DNA variants in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Knoll

    Full Text Available Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0. For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2. SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002 located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039. These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048. Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between mothers and

  17. Bias and conflict in phylogenetic inference of myco-heterotrophic plants: a case study in Thismiaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckx, V.; Bakker, F.T.; Huysmans, K.; Smets, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    Due to morphological reduction and absence of amplifiable plastid genes, the identification of photosynthetic relatives of heterotrophic plants is problematic. Although nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences may offer a welcome alternative source of phylogenetic markers, the presence of rate heter

  18. Genes and processed paralogs co-exist in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Argelia; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Jahren, Anne Hoppe

    2012-04-01

    RNA-mediated gene duplication has been proposed to create processed paralogs in the plant mitochondrial genome. A processed paralog may retain signatures left by the maturation process of its RNA precursor, such as intron removal and no need of RNA editing. Whereas it is well documented that an RNA intermediary is involved in the transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, no direct evidence exists for insertion of processed paralogs in the mitochondria (i.e., processed and un-processed genes have never been found simultaneously in the mitochondrial genome). In this study, we sequenced a region of the mitochondrial gene nad1, and identified a number of taxa were two different copies of the region co-occur in the mitochondria. The two nad1 paralogs differed in their (a) presence or absence of a group II intron, and (b) number of edited sites. Thus, this work provides the first evidence of co-existence of processed paralogs and their precursors within the plant mitochondrial genome. In addition, mapping the presence/absence of the paralogs provides indirect evidence of RNA-mediated gene duplication as an essential process shaping the mitochondrial genome in plants.

  19. Novel super-resolution capable mitochondrial probe, MitoRed AIE, enables assessment of real-time molecular mitochondrial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Camden Yeung-Wah; Chen, Sijie; Creed, Sarah Jayne; Kang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Na; Tang, Ben Zhong; Elgass, Kirstin Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial dynamics play vital roles in health and disease. With the intricate nanometer-scale structure and rapid dynamics of mitochondria, super-resolution microscopy techniques possess great un-tapped potential to significantly contribute to understanding mitochondrial biology and kinetics. Here we present a novel mitochondrial probe (MitoRed AIE) suitable for live mitochondrial dynamics imaging and single particle tracking (SPT), together with a multi-dimensional data analysis approach to assess local mitochondrial (membrane) fluidity. The MitoRed AIE probe localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes, with 95 ms fluorophore on-time delivering 106 photons/ms, characteristics which we exploit to demonstrate live cell 100 fps 3D time-lapse tracking of mitochondria. Combining our experimental and analytical approaches, we uncover mitochondrial dynamics at unprecedented time scales. This approach opens up a new regime into high spatio-temporal resolution dynamics in many areas of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27492961

  20. The Use of Neuroimaging in the Diagnosis of Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Seth D.; Shaw, Dennis W. W.; Ishak, Gisele; Gropman, Andrea L.; Saneto, Russell P.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA impacting mitochondrial function result in disease manifestations ranging from early death to abnormalities in all major organ systems and to symptoms that can be largely confined to muscle fatigue. The definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder can be difficult to establish. When the constellation…

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of Ark shell Scapharca subcrenata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya; Wu, Biao; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Yang, Ai-Guo; Ren, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Li-Qing; Dong, Chun-Guang; Tian, Ji-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial genome of Scapharca subcrenata was determined in this report. It is 48,161 bp in length, being the largest mitochondrial genome among reported shellfish at present. The entire mitochondrial genome consists of 57 genes including 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 41 transfer RNAs.

  2. The Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorders caused by the biochemical complexity of mitochondrial respiration and the fact that two genomes, one mitochondrial and one nuclear, encode the components of the respiratory chain. These disorders can manifest at birth or present later in…

  3. Involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in the segregation of mitochondrial matrix proteins during stationary phase mitophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeliovich, Hagai; Zarei, Mostafa; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T. G.; Youle, Richard J.; Dengjel, Joern

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy, the autophagic degradation of mitochondria, is an important housekeeping function in eukaryotic cells, and defects in mitophagy correlate with ageing phenomena and with several neurodegenerative disorders. A central mechanistic question regarding mitophagy is whether mitochondria are consumed en masse, or whether an active process segregates defective molecules from functional ones within the mitochondrial network, thus allowing a more efficient culling mechanism. Here we combine a proteomic study with a molecular genetics and cell biology approach to determine whether such a segregation process occurs in yeast mitochondria. We find that different mitochondrial matrix proteins undergo mitophagic degradation at distinctly different rates, supporting the active segregation hypothesis. These differential degradation rates depend on mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting a mechanism coupling weak physical segregation with mitochondrial dynamics to achieve a distillation-like effect. In agreement, the rates of mitophagic degradation strongly correlate with the degree of physical segregation of specific matrix proteins.

  4. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore opening and mitochondrial energetic status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄行许; 翟大勇; 黄有国; 杨福愉

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore (PTP) opening as well as the effects of mitochondrial energetic status on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening were studied. The results showed that the calcium-induced calcium release from mitochondria (mClCR) induced PTP opening. Inhibitors for electron transport of respiratory chain inhibited mClCR and PTP opening. Partial recovery of electron transport in respiratory chain resulted in partial recovery of mClCR and PTP opening. mClCR and PTP opening were also inhibited by CCCP which eliminated transmembrane proton gradient. The results indicated that mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening are largely dependent on electron transport and energy coupling.

  5. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore opening and mitochondrial energetic status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore (PTP) opening as well as the effects of mitochondrial energetic status on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening were studied. The results showed that the calcium-induced calcium release from mitochondria (mCICR) induced PTP opening. Inhibitors for electron transport of respiratory chain inhibited mCICR and PTP opening. Partial recovery of electron transport in respiratory chain resulted in partial recovery of mCICR and PTP opening. mCICR and PTP opening were also inhibited by CCCP which eliminated transmembrane proton gradient. The results indicated that mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening are largely dependent on electron transport and energy coupling.

  6. Convergent mechanisms for dysregulation of mitochondrial quality control in metabolic disease: implications for mitochondrial therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Tanecia; Chacko, Balu; Ballinger, Scott; Bailey, Shannon; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a broad range of pathologies including diabetes, ethanol toxicity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiac failure. It is now becoming clear that maintaining mitochondrial quality through a balance between biogenesis, reserve capacity, and mitophagy is critical in determining the response to metabolic or xenobiotic stress. In diseases associated with metabolic stress, such as type II diabetes, non-alcoholic and alcoholic steatosis, the mitochondria are sub...

  7. Mitochondrial Gene Therapy Augments Mitochondrial Physiology in a Parkinson's Disease Cell Model

    OpenAIRE

    Keeney, Paula M; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Papageorge, Christina M.; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Schwarz, Kathleen M.; Trimmer, Patricia A; Khan, Shaharyar M.; Portell, Francisco R.; Bergquist, Kristen E.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology (“ProtoFection”) that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-ter...

  8. Neurodegenerative and Fatiguing Illnesses, Infections and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Use of Natural Supplements to Improve Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth L. Nicolson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many chronic diseases and illnesses are associated with one or more chronic infections, dysfunction of mitochondria and reduced production of ATP. This results in fatigue and other symptoms that occur in most if not all chronic conditions and diseases. Methods: This is a review of the published literature on chronic infections in neurodegenerative diseases and fatiguing illnesses that are also typified by mitochondrial dysfunction. This contribution also reviews the use of natural supplements to enhance mitochondrial function and reduce the effects of chronic infections to improve overall function in various chronic illnesses. Results: Mitochondrial function can be enhanced by the use of various natural supplements, notably Lipid Replacement Therapy (LRT using glyerolphospholipids and other mitochondrial supplements. In various chronic illnesses that are characterized by the presence of chronic infections, such as intracellular bacteria (Mycoplasma, Borrelia, Chlamydia and other infections and viruses, LRT has proven useful in multiple clinical trials. For example, in clinical studies on chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia syndrome and other chronic fatiguing illnesses where a large majority of patients have chronic infections, LRT significantly reduced fatigue by 35-43% in different clinical trials and increased mitochondrial function. In clinical trials on patients with multiple intracellular bacterial infections and intractable fatigue LRT plus other mitochondrial supplements significantly decreased fatigue and improved mood and cognition. Conclusions: LRT formulations designed to improve mitochondrial function appear to be useful as non-toxic dietary supplements for reducing fatigue and restoring mitochondrial and other cellular membrane functions in patients with chronic illnesses and multiple chronic infections.

  9. Mitochondrial proteome evolution and genetic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynen, M.A.; Hollander, M. de; Szklarczyk, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential organelle, not only to the human cell, but to all eukaryotic life. This essentiality is reflected in the large number of mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins that lead to disease. Aside from their relevance to disease, mitochondria are, given their endosym

  10. Social and ethical issues in mitochondrial donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction or background The UK is at the forefront of mitochondrial science and is currently the only country in the world to legalize germ-line technologies involving mitochondrial donation. However, concerns have been raised about genetic modification and the ‘slippery slope’ to designer babies. Sources of data This review uses academic articles, newspaper reports and public documents. Areas of agreement Mitochondrial donation offers women with mitochondrial disease an opportunity to have healthy, genetically related children. Areas of controversy Key areas of disagreement include safety, the creation of three-parent babies, impact on identity, implications for society, definitions of genetic modification and reproductive choice. Growing points The UK government legalized the techniques in March 2015. Scientific and medical communities across the world followed the developments with interest. Areas timely for developing research It is expected that the first cohort of ‘three parent’ babies will be born in the UK in 2016. Their health and progress will be closely monitored. PMID:26351372

  11. Parkinson's disease and mitochondrial gene variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andalib, Sasan; Vafaee, Manouchehr Seyedi; Gjedde, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common disorder of the central nervous system in the elderly. The pathogenesis of PD is a complex process, with genetics as an important contributing factor. This factor may stem from mitochondrial gene variations and mutations as well as from nuclear gene variations...

  12. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birke Bartosch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is characterized by metabolic disorders and a microenvironment in the liver dominated by oxidative stress, inflammation and regeneration processes that lead in the long term to hepatocellular carcinoma. Many lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunctions, including modification of metabolic fluxes, generation and elimination of oxidative stress, Ca2+ signaling and apoptosis, play a central role in these processes. However, how these dysfunctions are induced by the virus and whether they play a role in disease progression and neoplastic transformation remains to be determined. Most in vitro studies performed so far have shown that several of the hepatitis C virus (HCV proteins localize to mitochondria, but the consequences of these interactions on mitochondrial functions remain contradictory, probably due to the use of artificial expression and replication systems. In vivo studies are hampered by the fact that innate and adaptive immune responses will overlay mitochondrial dysfunctions induced directly in the hepatocyte by HCV. Thus, the molecular aspects underlying HCV-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions and their roles in viral replication and the associated pathology need yet to be confirmed in the context of productively replicating virus and physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems.

  13. Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA Database

    OpenAIRE

    Anandakumar, Shanmugam; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; Arumugam, Nagarajan; Gromiha, M. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA is a web-based database, which provides specific information on non-coding RNA in mammals. This database includes easy searching, comparing with BLAST and retrieving information on predicted structure and its function about mammalian ncRNAs. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/mmndb/

  14. [Mitochondrial DNA diversity in Kazym Khanty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, O Iu; Khaiat, S Sh; Rychkov, S Iu

    2009-06-01

    New data on mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in the representatives of Kazym territorial group of Northern Khanty are presented. MtDNA diversity observed in Kazym Khanty was compared with that in Khanty from Shuryshkarskii raion of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug.

  15. Liver transplantation in mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokal, EM; Sokol, R; Cormier, [No Value; Lacaille, F; McKiernan, P; Van Spronsen, FJ; Bernard, O; Saudubray, JM

    1999-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disease may lead to neonatal or late onset liver failure, requiring liver transplantation. In rare cases, the disease is restricted to the liver and the patient is cured after surgery. More frequently, other organs are simultaneously involved and neuromuscular or othe

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons why mtDNA is the molecule of

  17. Mitochondrial phylogenomics of modern and ancient equids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup, Julia T; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Stiller, Mathias;

    2013-01-01

    to calibrate reliable molecular clocks. Additional mitochondrial genome sequence data, including radiocarbon dated ancient equids, will be required before revisiting the exact timing of the lineage radiation leading up to modern equids, which for now were found to have possibly shared a common ancestor as far...

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Control of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar D. Yoboue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process. It necessitates the contribution of both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes and therefore crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria. It is now well established that cellular mitochondrial content can vary according to a number of stimuli and physiological states in eukaryotes. The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance. The cellular redox state has been considered for a long time as a key element in the regulation of various processes. In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  19. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Mitochondrial Respiration in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Højberg, Patricia M V; Almdal, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content is reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Whether hyperglycemia inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis and/or function is unknown. This study examined the effect of different levels of glycemia on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in patients with T2...... to mitochondrial content did not differ between control subjects and patients with T2DM. DISCUSSION: Mitochondrial respiration and content was not improved after significant improvements in glycemic control. However, severe hyperglycemia inhibited respiration reversibly, but moderate hyperglycemia...

  20. ERp57 modulates mitochondrial calcium uptake through the MCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingquan; Shi, Weikang; Guo, Yu; Chai, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    ERp57 participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis. Although ERp57 modulates calcium flux across the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, its functions on mitochondria are largely unknown. Here, we found that ERp57 can regulate the expression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and modulate mitochondrial calcium uptake. In ERp57-silenced HeLa cells, MCU was downregulated, and the mitochondrial calcium uptake was inhibited, consistent with the effect of MCU knockdown. When MCU was re-expressed in the ERp57 knockdown cells, mitochondrial calcium uptake was restored. Thus, ERp57 is a potent regulator of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

  1. Targeting mitochondrial metal dyshomeostasis for the treatment of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Jeffrey R

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial impairment and metal dyshomeostasis are suggested to be associated with many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Friedreich's ataxia. Treatments aimed at restoring metal homeostasis are highly effective in models of these diseases, and clinical trials hold promise. However, in general, the effect of these treatments on mitochondrial metal homeostasis is unclear, and the contribution of mitochondrial metal dyshomeostasis to disease pathogenesis requires further investigation. This review describes the role of metals in mitochondria in health, how mitochondrial metals are disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases, and potential therapeutics aimed at restoring mitochondrial metal homeostasis and function.

  2. Neuroradiologic findings in children with mitochondrial disorder: correlation with mitochondrial respiratory chain defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Eung Yeop [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Young-Mock; Lee, Joon Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Epilepsy Clinics, Severance Children' s Hospital, Brain Research Institute, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Heung Dong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Epilepsy Clinics, Severance Children' s Hospital, Brain Research Institute, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-08-15

    Mitochondrial disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting energy metabolism that can present at any age with a wide variety of clinical symptoms. We investigated brain magnetic resonance (MR) findings in 40 children with defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex and correlated them with the type of MRC defects. Enrolled were 40 children with MRC defects in biochemical enzyme assay of the muscle specimen. Twenty-one children were found to have classical syndromes of mitochondrial disorders and 19 children presented nonspecific mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Their brain MR imaging findings were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with the biochemical defect in the MRC complex. Children with MRC defects showed various neuroradiologic features on brain MR imaging that resulted from a complex genetic background and a heterogeneous phenotype. Rapid progression of atrophy involving all structures of the brain with variable involvement of deep gray and white matter are the most frequent MR findings in children with MRC defects in both classical syndromes of mitochondrial disorder and nonspecific mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. The type of biochemical defect in the MRC complex enzyme did not correlate with brain MR findings in child patients. (orig.)

  3. Neuroradiologic findings in children with mitochondrial disorder: correlation with mitochondrial respiratory chain defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting energy metabolism that can present at any age with a wide variety of clinical symptoms. We investigated brain magnetic resonance (MR) findings in 40 children with defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex and correlated them with the type of MRC defects. Enrolled were 40 children with MRC defects in biochemical enzyme assay of the muscle specimen. Twenty-one children were found to have classical syndromes of mitochondrial disorders and 19 children presented nonspecific mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Their brain MR imaging findings were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with the biochemical defect in the MRC complex. Children with MRC defects showed various neuroradiologic features on brain MR imaging that resulted from a complex genetic background and a heterogeneous phenotype. Rapid progression of atrophy involving all structures of the brain with variable involvement of deep gray and white matter are the most frequent MR findings in children with MRC defects in both classical syndromes of mitochondrial disorder and nonspecific mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. The type of biochemical defect in the MRC complex enzyme did not correlate with brain MR findings in child patients. (orig.)

  4. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNAVal mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. → Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. → We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNAVal gene which was absent in 150 controls. → Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. → The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNAVal. This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  5. The evolution of land plants: a perspective from horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Qia Wang; Hang Sun; Jinling Huang

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) played a significant role in the evolution of eukaryotic lineages. We here review the mechanisms of HGT in plants and the importance of HGT in land plant evolution. In particular, we discuss the role of HGT in plant colonization of land, phototropic response, C4 photosynthesis, and mitochondrial genome evolution.

  6. Connexin 43 impacts on mitochondrial potassium uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin eBoengler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In cardiomyocytes, connexin 43 (Cx43 forms gap junctions and unopposed hemichannels at the plasma membrane, but the protein is also present at the inner membrane of subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Both inhibition and genetic ablation of Cx43 reduce ADP-stimulated complex 1 respiration. Since mitochondrial potassium influx impacts on oxygen consumption, we investigated whether or not inhibition or ablation of mitochondrial Cx43 alters mitochondrial potassium uptake.Subsarcolemmal mitochondria were isolated from rat left ventricular (LV myocardium and loaded with the potassium-sensitive dye PBFI. Intramitochondrial potassium was replaced by TEA (tetraethylammonium. Mitochondria were incubated under control conditions or treated with 250 µM Gap19, a peptide that specifically inhibits Cx43-dependent hemichannels at plasma membranes. Subsequently, 140 mM KCl was added and the slope of the increase in PBFI fluorescence over time was calculated. The slope of the PBFI fluorescence of the control mitochondria was set to 100%. In the presence of Gap19, the mitochondrial potassium influx was reduced from 100±11.6 % in control mitochondria to 65.5±10.7 % (n=6, p<0.05. In addition to the pharmacological inhibition of Cx43, potassium influx was studied in mitochondria isolated from conditional Cx43 knockout mice. Here, the ablation of Cx43 was achieved by the injection of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (Cx43Cre-ER(T/fl + 4-OHT. The mitochondria of the Cx43Cre-ER(T/fl + 4-OHT mice contained 3±1% Cx43 (n=6 of that in control mitochondria (100±11%, n=8, p<0.05. The ablation of Cx43 (n=5 reduced the velocity of the potassium influx from 100±11.2 % in control mitochondria (n=9 to 66.6±5.5 % (p<0.05.Taken together, our data indicate that both pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation of Cx43 reduce mitochondrial potassium influx.

  7. Mitochondrial Energy-Deficient Endophenotype in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Gargus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available While evidence points to a multigenic etiology of most autism, the pathophysiology of the disorder has yet to be defined and the underlying genes and biochemical pathways they subserve remain unknown. Autism is considered to be influenced by a combination of various genetic, environmental and immunological factors; more recently, evidence has suggested that increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may be involved in the etiology of this multifactorial disorder. Furthermore, recent studies have pointed to a subset of autism associated with the biochemical endophenotype of mitochondrial energy deficiency, identified as a subtle impairment in fat and carbohydrate oxidation. This phenotype is similar, but more subtle than those seen in classic mitochondrial defects. In some cases the beginnings of the genetic underpinnings of these mitochondrial defects are emerging, such as mild mitochondrial dysfunction and secondary carnitine deficiency observed in the subset of autistic patients with an inverted duplication of chromosome 15q11-q13. In addition, rare cases of familial autism associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS or associated with abnormalities in cellular calcium homeostasis, such as malignant hyperthermia or cardiac arrhythmia, are beginning to emerge. Such special cases suggest that the pathophysiology of autism may comprise pathways that are directly or indirectly involved in mitochondrial energy production and to further probe this connection three new avenues seem worthy of exploration: 1 metabolomic clinical studies provoking controlled aerobic exercise stress to expand the biochemical phenotype, 2 high-throughput expression arrays to directly survey activity of the genes underlying these biochemical pathways and 3 model systems, either based upon neuronal stem cells or model genetic organisms, to discover novel genetic and environmental inputs into these pathways.

  8. The pseudo-mitochondrial genome influences mistakes in heteroplasmy interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittock Roy

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts are a potential source of contamination during mitochondrial DNA PCR amplification. This possibility warrants careful experimental design and cautious interpretation of heteroplasmic results. Results Here we report the cloning and sequencing of numts loci, amplified from human tissue and rho-zero (ρ0 cells (control with primers known to amplify the mitochondrial genome. This paper is the first to fully sequence 46 paralogous nuclear DNA fragments that represent the entire mitochondrial genome. This is a surprisingly small number due primarily to the primer sets used in this study, because prior to this, BLAST searches have suggested that nuclear DNA harbors between 400 to 1,500 paralogous mitochondrial DNA fragments. Our results indicate that multiple numts were amplified simultaneously with the mitochondrial genome and increased the load of pseudogene signal in PCR reactions. Further, the entire mitochondrial genome was represented by multiple copies of paralogous nuclear sequences. Conclusion These findings suggest that mitochondrial genome disease-associated biomarkers must be rigorously authenticated to preclude any affiliation with paralogous nuclear pseudogenes. Importantly, the common perception that mitochondrial template "swamps" numts loci precluding detectable amplification, depends on the region of the mitochondrial genome targeted by the PCR reaction and the number of pseudogene loci that may co-amplify. Cloning and relevant sequencing data will facilitate the correct interpretation. This is the first complete, wet-lab characterization of numts that represent the entire mitochondrial genome.

  9. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  10. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Demine

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction(s (MDs can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic.

  11. [Exercise and aging: regulation of mitochondrial function and redox system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian-Kang

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that aging is closely related to mitochondrial decay and redox imbalance. With aging, both mitochondrial content and protein synthesis declined and free radicals, the by-products of mitochondrial metabolism and their oxidation to lipids, proteins and nuclear acids increased. The age-related declines in mitochondrial function and redox imbalance affect physical function, induce insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, thus, play a major role in regulation of life span. Therefore, mitochondrion may be the most important determinant of life span. Increasing evidence demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise could prevent age-related diseases and improve life quality of aged people. Exercise may possibly stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II antioxidant defense system to regulate mitochondrial function and balance of redox system. Therefore, regular aerobic exercise may prevent age-related diseases, increase life quality and prolong life span through regulation of mitochondrial function and redox balance. PMID:25764789

  12. Mitochondrial DNA: Radically free of free-radical driven mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Johanna H K; Stewart, James B

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA has long been posited as a likely target of oxidative damage induced mutation during the ageing process. Research over the past decades has uncovered the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in association with a mosaic pattern of cells displaying mitochondrial dysfunction in ageing individuals. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms are far less straightforward than originally anticipated. Recent research on mitochondria reveals that these genomes are far less helpless than originally envisioned. Additionally, new technologies have allowed us to analyze the mutational signatures of many more somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations, revealing surprising patterns that are inconsistent with a DNA-oxidative damage based hypothesis. In this review, we will discuss these recent observations and new insights into the eccentricities of mitochondrial genetics, and their impact on our understanding of mitochondrial mutations and their role in the ageing process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging.

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Different Routes to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Picone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic ATP-generating organelle which contribute to many cellular functions including bioenergetics processes, intracellular calcium regulation, alteration of reduction-oxidation potential of cells, free radical scavenging, and activation of caspase mediated cell death. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by amyloid β peptide (Aβ, an important component in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis, and Aβ can interact with mitochondria and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. One of the most accepted hypotheses for AD onset implicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are one of the primary events in the insurgence of the pathology. Here, we examine structural and functional mitochondrial changes in presence of Aβ. In particular we review data concerning Aβ import into mitochondrion and its involvement in mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetics, biogenesis, trafficking, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP formation, and mitochondrial protein interaction. Moreover, the development of AD therapy targeting mitochondria is also discussed.

  14. The mitochondrial genome encodes abundant small noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seungil Ro; Hsiu-Yen Ma; Chanjae Park; Nicole Ortogero; Rui Song; Grant W Hennig; Huili Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs identified thus far are all encoded by the nuclear genome.Here,we report that the murine and human mitochondriai genomes encode thousands of small noncoding RNAs,which are predominantly derived from the sense transcripts of the mitochondrial genes (host genes),and we termed these small RNAs mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNAs (mitosRNAs).DICER inactivation affected,but did not completely abolish mitosRNA production.MitosRNAs appear to be products of currently unidentified mitochondrial ribonucleases.Overexpression of mitosRNAs enhanced expression levels of their host genes in vitro,and dysregulated mitosRNA expression was generally associated with aberrant mitochondrial gene expression in vivo.Our data demonstrate that in addition to 37 known mitochondrial genes,the mammalian mitochondrial genome also encodes abundant mitosRNAs,which may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial gene expression in the cell.

  15. Towards a functional definition of the mitochondrial human proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Fasano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial human proteome project (mt-HPP was initiated by the Italian HPP group as a part of both the chromosome-centric initiative (C-HPP and the “biology and disease driven” initiative (B/D-HPP. In recent years several reports highlighted how mitochondrial biology and disease are regulated by specific interactions with non-mitochondrial proteins. Thus, it is of great relevance to extend our present view of the mitochondrial proteome not only to those proteins that are encoded by or transported to mitochondria, but also to their interactors that take part in mitochondria functionality. Here, we propose a graphical representation of the functional mitochondrial proteome by retrieving mitochondrial proteins from the NeXtProt database and adding to the network their interactors as annotated in the IntAct database. Notably, the network may represent a reference to map all the proteins that are currently being identified in mitochondrial proteomics studies.

  16. Protection from Palmitate-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Damage Prevents from Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Apoptosis, and Impaired Insulin Signaling in Rat L6 Skeletal Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V.; Solodushko, Viktoriya A.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Rachek, Lyudmila I.

    2011-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme ...

  17. An unexpectedly large and loosely packed mitochondrial genome in the charophycean green alga Chlorokybus atmophyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six groups of charophycean green algae. The scaly biflagellate Mesostigma viride (Mesostigmatales and the sarcinoid Chlorokybus atmophyticus (Chlorokybales represent the earliest diverging lineages of this phylum. In trees based on chloroplast genome data, these two charophycean green algae are nested in the same clade. To validate this relationship and gain insight into the ancestral state of the mitochondrial genome in the Charophyceae, we sequenced the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA of Chlorokybus and compared this genome sequence with those of three other charophycean green algae and the bryophytes Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens. Results The Chlorokybus genome differs radically from its 42,424-bp Mesostigma counterpart in size, gene order, intron content and density of repeated elements. At 201,763-bp, it is the largest mtDNA yet reported for a green alga. The 70 conserved genes represent 41.4% of the genome sequence and include nad10 and trnL(gag, two genes reported for the first time in a streptophyte mtDNA. At the gene order level, the Chlorokybus genome shares with its Chara, Chaetosphaeridium and bryophyte homologues eight to ten gene clusters including about 20 genes. Notably, some of these clusters exhibit gene linkages not previously found outside the Streptophyta, suggesting that they originated early during streptophyte evolution. In addition to six group I and 14 group II introns, short repeated sequences accounting for 7.5% of the genome were identified. Mitochondrial trees were unable to resolve the correct position of Mesostigma, due to analytical problems arising from accelerated sequence evolution in this lineage. Conclusion The Chlorokybus and Mesostigma mtDNAs exemplify the marked fluidity of the mitochondrial genome in charophycean green algae. The notion that the mitochondrial genome was constrained to remain compact during charophycean

  18. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  19. Cytoplasmic male sterility-associated chimeric open reading frames identified by mitochondrial genome sequencing of four Cajanus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Reetu; Saxena, Rachit K; Davila, Jaime; Shah, Trushar; Chen, Wenbin; Xiao, Yong-Li; Fan, Guangyi; Saxena, K B; Alverson, Andrew J; Spillane, Charles; Town, Christopher; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2013-10-01

    The hybrid pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) breeding technology based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is currently unique among legumes and displays major potential for yield increase. CMS is defined as a condition in which a plant is unable to produce functional pollen grains. The novel chimeric open reading frames (ORFs) produced as a results of mitochondrial genome rearrangements are considered to be the main cause of CMS. To identify these CMS-related ORFs in pigeonpea, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of three C. cajan lines (the male-sterile line ICPA 2039, the maintainer line ICPB 2039, and the hybrid line ICPH 2433) and of the wild relative (Cajanus cajanifolius ICPW 29). A single, circular-mapping molecule of length 545.7 kb was assembled and annotated for the ICPA 2039 line. Sequence annotation predicted 51 genes, including 34 protein-coding and 17 RNA genes. Comparison of the mitochondrial genomes from different Cajanus genotypes identified 31 ORFs, which differ between lines within which CMS is present or absent. Among these chimeric ORFs, 13 were identified by comparison of the related male-sterile and maintainer lines. These ORFs display features that are known to trigger CMS in other plant species and to represent the most promising candidates for CMS-related mitochondrial rearrangements in pigeonpea. PMID:23792890

  20. Cytoplasmic male sterility-associated chimeric open reading frames identified by mitochondrial genome sequencing of four Cajanus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Reetu; Saxena, Rachit K; Davila, Jaime; Shah, Trushar; Chen, Wenbin; Xiao, Yong-Li; Fan, Guangyi; Saxena, K B; Alverson, Andrew J; Spillane, Charles; Town, Christopher; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2013-10-01

    The hybrid pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) breeding technology based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is currently unique among legumes and displays major potential for yield increase. CMS is defined as a condition in which a plant is unable to produce functional pollen grains. The novel chimeric open reading frames (ORFs) produced as a results of mitochondrial genome rearrangements are considered to be the main cause of CMS. To identify these CMS-related ORFs in pigeonpea, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of three C. cajan lines (the male-sterile line ICPA 2039, the maintainer line ICPB 2039, and the hybrid line ICPH 2433) and of the wild relative (Cajanus cajanifolius ICPW 29). A single, circular-mapping molecule of length 545.7 kb was assembled and annotated for the ICPA 2039 line. Sequence annotation predicted 51 genes, including 34 protein-coding and 17 RNA genes. Comparison of the mitochondrial genomes from different Cajanus genotypes identified 31 ORFs, which differ between lines within which CMS is present or absent. Among these chimeric ORFs, 13 were identified by comparison of the related male-sterile and maintainer lines. These ORFs display features that are known to trigger CMS in other plant species and to represent the most promising candidates for CMS-related mitochondrial rearrangements in pigeonpea.

  1. Neutral invertase, hexokinase and mitochondrial ROS homeostasis: emerging links between sugar metabolism, sugar signaling and ascorbate synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Li, Yi; Rolland, Filip; Van den Ende, Wim

    2011-10-01

    Alkaline/neutral invertases (A/N-Invs) are unique to plants and photosynthetic bacteria. Although considerable advances have been made in our understanding of sucrose metabolic enzymes in plants, the function of A/N-Invs remained puzzling. In a recent study, we have analyzed the subcellullar localization of a cytosolic (At-A/N-InvG, At1g35580) and a mitochondrial (At-A/N-InvA, At1g56560) Arabidopsis A/N-Inv. Unexpectedly, At-A/N-InvA knockout plants showed a more severe growth defect than At-A/N-InvG knockout plants and a link between the two A/N-Invs and oxidative stress defence was found. Overexpression of At-A/N-InvA and At-A/N-InvG in leaf mesophyll protoplasts reduced the activity of the ascorbate peroxidase 2 (APX2) promoter, that was stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and abscisic acid. It is discussed here how sugars and ascorbate might contribute to mitochondrial reactive oxygen species homeostasis. We hypothesize that both mitochondrial and cytosolic A/N-Invs and mitochondria-associated hexokinases are key mediators, integrating metabolic and sugar signalling processes. 

  2. Mitochondrial involvement in drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah; Berson, Alain; Fromenty, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major mechanism of liver injury. A parent drug or its reactive metabolite can trigger outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or rupture due to mitochondrial permeability transition. The latter can severely deplete ATP and cause liver cell necrosis, or it can instead lead to apoptosis by releasing cytochrome c, which activates caspases in the cytosol. Necrosis and apoptosis can trigger cytolytic hepatitis resulting in lethal fulminant hepatitis in some patients. Other drugs severely inhibit mitochondrial function and trigger extensive microvesicular steatosis, hypoglycaemia, coma, and death. Milder and more prolonged forms of drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can also cause macrovacuolar steatosis. Although this is a benign liver lesion in the short-term, it can progress to steatohepatitis and then to cirrhosis. Patient susceptibility to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and liver injury can sometimes be explained by genetic or acquired variations in drug metabolism and/or elimination that increase the concentration of the toxic species (parent drug or metabolite). Susceptibility may also be increased by the presence of another condition, which also impairs mitochondrial function, such as an inborn mitochondrial cytopathy, beta-oxidation defect, certain viral infections, pregnancy, or the obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Liver injury due to mitochondrial dysfunction can have important consequences for pharmaceutical companies. It has led to the interruption of clinical trials, the recall of several drugs after marketing, or the introduction of severe black box warnings by drug agencies. Pharmaceutical companies should systematically investigate mitochondrial effects during lead selection or preclinical safety studies. PMID:20020267

  3. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime; Santo-Domingo; Andreas; Wiederkehr; Umberto; De; Marchi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria sense,shape and integrate signals,and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca2+ waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance,the molecular nature of the proteins involvedin mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca2+ promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and downstream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio,but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species(ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state,which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redoxsensitive sensors,real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca2+ combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca2+ and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review,we describe mitochondrial Ca2+ handling,focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings,revealing how mitochondrial Ca2+ influences the matrix redox state. As a result,mitochondrial Ca2+ is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  4. Mitochondrial divergence between slow- and fast-aging garter snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial function has long been hypothesized to be intimately involved in aging processes--either directly through declining efficiency of mitochondrial respiration and ATP production with advancing age, or indirectly, e.g., through increased mitochondrial production of damaging free radicals with age. Yet we lack a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genotypes and phenotypes across diverse animal models, particularly in species that have extremely labile physiology. Here, we measure mitochondrial genome-types and transcription in ecotypes of garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) that are adapted to disparate habitats and have diverged in aging rates and lifespans despite residing in close proximity. Using two RNA-seq datasets, we (1) reconstruct the garter snake mitochondrial genome sequence and bioinformatically identify regulatory elements, (2) test for divergence of mitochondrial gene expression between the ecotypes and in response to heat stress, and (3) test for sequence divergence in mitochondrial protein-coding regions in these slow-aging (SA) and fast-aging (FA) naturally occurring ecotypes. At the nucleotide sequence level, we confirmed two (duplicated) mitochondrial control regions one of which contains a glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gene expression of protein-coding genes was higher in FA snakes relative to SA snakes for most genes, but was neither affected by heat stress nor an interaction between heat stress and ecotype. SA and FA ecotypes had unique mitochondrial haplotypes with amino acid substitutions in both CYTB and ND5. The CYTB amino acid change (Isoleucine → Threonine) was highly segregated between ecotypes. This divergence of mitochondrial haplotypes between SA and FA snakes contrasts with nuclear gene-flow estimates, but correlates with previously reported divergence in mitochondrial function (mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP production, and reactive oxygen species consequences).

  5. Mitochondrial genome organization and vertebrate phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Sérgio Luiz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of DNA sequencing techniques the organization of the vertebrate mitochondrial genome shows variation between higher taxonomic levels. The most conserved gene order is found in placental mammals, turtles, fishes, some lizards and Xenopus. Birds, other species of lizards, crocodilians, marsupial mammals, snakes, tuatara, lamprey, and some other amphibians and one species of fish have gene orders that are less conserved. The most probable mechanism for new gene rearrangements seems to be tandem duplication and multiple deletion events, always associated with tRNA sequences. Some new rearrangements seem to be typical of monophyletic groups and the use of data from these groups may be useful for answering phylogenetic questions involving vertebrate higher taxonomic levels. Other features such as the secondary structure of tRNA, and the start and stop codons of protein-coding genes may also be useful in comparisons of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  6. Newcomers in the process of mitochondrial permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucken-Ardjomande, Safa; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2005-02-01

    Under stress conditions, apoptogenic factors normally sequestered in the mitochondrial intermembrane space are released into the cytosol, caspases are activated and cells die by apoptosis. Although the precise mechanism that leads to the permeabilization of mitochondria is still unclear, the activation of multidomain pro-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bax and Bak, is evidently crucial. Regulation of Bax and Bak by other members of the family has been known for a long time, but recent evidence suggests that additional unrelated proteins participate in the process, both as inhibitors and activators. The important rearrangements mitochondrial lipids undergo during apoptosis play a role in the permeabilization process and this role is probably more central than first envisioned.

  7. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Negrette-Guzmán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that curcumin (CUR, a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM- induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2.

  8. Mitochondrial transcription factor A regulates mitochondrial transcription initiation, DNA packaging, and genome copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christopher T; Kolesar, Jill E; Kaufman, Brett A

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA, mtTF1, TFAM) is an essential protein that binds mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with and without sequence specificity to regulate both mitochondrial transcription initiation and mtDNA copy number. The abundance of mtDNA generally reflects TFAM protein levels; however, the precise mechanism(s) by which this occurs remains a matter of debate. Data suggest that the usage of mitochondrial promoters is regulated by TFAM dosage, allowing TFAM to affect both gene expression and RNA priming for first strand mtDNA replication. Additionally, TFAM has a non-specific DNA binding activity that is both cooperative and high affinity. TFAM can compact plasmid DNA in vitro, suggesting a structural role for the non-specific DNA binding activity in genome packaging. This review summarizes TFAM-mtDNA interactions and describes an emerging view of TFAM as a multipurpose coordinator of mtDNA transactions, with direct consequences for the maintenance of gene expression and genome copy number. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression. PMID:22465614

  9. The mitochondrial genome in embryo technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiendleder, S; Wolf, E

    2003-08-01

    The mammalian mitochondrial genome encodes for 37 genes which are involved in a broad range of cellular functions. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule is commonly assumed to be inherited through oocyte cytoplasm in a clonal manner, and apparently species-specific mechanisms have evolved to eliminate the contribution of sperm mitochondria after natural fertilization. However, recent evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance in embryos and offspring questions the general validity of this model, particularly in the context of assisted reproduction and embryo biotechnology. In addition to normal mt DNA haplotype variation, oocytes and spermatozoa show remarkable differences in mtDNA content and may be affected by inherited or acquired mtDNA aberrations. All these parameters have been correlated with gamete quality and reproductive success rates. Nuclear transfer (NT) technology provides experimental models for studying interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Recent studies demonstrated (i) a significant effect of mtDNA haplotype or other maternal cytoplasmic factors on the efficiency of NT; (ii) phenotypic differences between transmitochondrial clones pointing to functionally relevant nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions; and (iii) neutral or non-neutral selection of mtDNA haplotypes in heteroplasmic conditions. Mitochondria form a dynamic reticulum, enabling complementation of mitochondrial components and possibly mixing of different mtDNA populations in heteroplasmic individuals. Future directions of research on mtDNA in the context of reproductive biotechnology range from the elimination of adverse effects of artificial heteroplasmy, e.g. created by ooplasm transfer, to engineering of optimized constellations of nuclear and cytoplasmic genes for the production of superior livestock. PMID:12887568

  10. Mitochondrial DNA in Sensitive Forensic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martina

    2007-01-01

    Genetic profiling is commonly performed on the autosomes using multiple DNA markers. Although routine forensic DNA analysis is robust and based on reliable technologies, samples with degraded or limited amounts of DNA often fail. In these cases, the analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be very valuable due to the high copy number per cell. This thesis describes evaluation and modifications of existing technologies that are useful in forensic DNA typing, mainly focusing on mtDNA. DNA quan...

  11. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Wenink, P W

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons why mtDNA is the molecule of choice to probe the recent evolutionary history of a species. Most importantly, mtDNA accumulates substitutions at a high average rate that permits the tracing of genealogies within the time frame ...

  12. Mitochondrial Adenine Nucleotide Transport and Cardioprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Samarjit; Steenbergen, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly metabolically active cell organelles that not only act as the powerhouse of the cell by supplying energy through ATP production, but also play a destructive role by initiating cell death pathways. Growing evidence recognizes that mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the major causes of cardiovascular disease. Under de-energized conditions, slowing of adenine nucleotide transport in and out of the mitochondria significantly attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion inju...

  13. Diabetes and mitochondrial bioenergetics: Alterations with age

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Fernanda M.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; Seiça, Raquel; Moreno, António J.; Santos, Maria S.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have been carried out to evaluate the alterations in mitochondrial functions of diabetic rats. However, some of the results reported are controversial, since experimental conditions, such as aging, and/or strain of animals used were different. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metabolic changes in liver mitochondria, both in the presence of severe hyperglycaemia (STZ-treated rats) and mild hyperglycaemia (Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats). Moreover, metabolic alterations we...

  14. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain dr...

  15. Inferring ethnicity from mitochondrial DNA sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Măndoiu, Ion I; Nelson, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The assignment of DNA samples to coarse population groups can be a useful but difficult task. One such example is the inference of coarse ethnic groupings for forensic applications. Ethnicity plays an important role in forensic investigation and can be inferred with the help of genetic markers. Being maternally inherited, of high copy number, and robust persistence in degraded samples, mitochondrial DNA may be useful for inferring coarse ethnicity. In this study, we compare the per...

  16. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    van der Bliek, Alexander M.; Shen, Qinfang; Kawajiri, Sumihiro

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria continually change shape through the combined actions of fission, fusion, and movement along cytoskeletal tracks. The lengths of mitochondria and the degree to which they form closed networks are determined by the balance between fission and fusion rates. These rates are influenced by metabolic and pathogenic conditions inside mitochondria and by their cellular environment. Fission and fusion are important for growth, for mitochondrial redistribution, and for maintenance of a hea...

  17. Review: Mitochondrial Defects in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, J.; Honorato, B. (Beatriz); Garcia-Foncillas, J

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe ...

  18. Metabolic Determinants of Mitochondrial Function in Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Emily A; Moley, Kelle H

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial production of cellular energy is essential to oocyte function, zygote development and successful continuation of pregnancy. This review focuses on several key functions of healthy oocyte mitochondria and the effect of pathologic states such as aging, oxidative stress and apoptosis on these functions. The effect of these abnormal conditions is presented in terms of clinical presentations, specifically maternal obesity, diminished ovarian reserve and assisted reproductive technologies.

  19. MitoTimer probe reveals the impact of autophagy, fusion, and motility on subcellular distribution of young and old mitochondrial protein and on relative mitochondrial protein age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferree, Andrew W; Trudeau, Kyle; Zik, Eden; Benador, Ilan Y; Twig, Gilad; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Shirihai, Orian S

    2013-11-01

    To study mitochondrial protein age dynamics, we targeted a time-sensitive fluorescent protein, MitoTimer, to the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial age was revealed by the integrated portions of young (green) and old (red) MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial protein age was dependent on turnover rates as pulsed synthesis, decreased import, or autophagic inhibition all increased the proportion of aged MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial fusion promotes the distribution of young mitochondrial protein across the mitochondrial network as cells lacking essential fusion genes Mfn1 and Mfn2 displayed increased heterogeneity in mitochondrial protein age. Experiments in hippocampal neurons illustrate that the distribution of older and younger mitochondrial protein within the cell is determined by subcellular spatial organization and compartmentalization of mitochondria into neurites and soma. This effect was altered by overexpression of mitochondrial transport protein, RHOT1/MIRO1. Collectively our data show that distribution of young and old protein in the mitochondrial network is dependent on turnover, fusion, and transport.

  20. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna Busiello

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the metabolic factors that contribute to energy metabolism (EM is critical for the development of new treatments for obesity and related diseases. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is not perfectly coupled to ATP synthesis, and the process of proton-leak plays a crucial role. Proton-leak accounts for a significant part of the resting metabolic rate and therefore enhancement of this process represents a potential target for obesity treatment. Since their discovery, uncoupling proteins have stimulated great interest due to their involvement in mitochondrial-inducible proton-leak. Despite the widely accepted uncoupling/thermogenic effect of uncoupling protein one (UCP1, which was the first in this family to be discovered, the reactions catalyzed by its homologue UCP3 and the physiological role remain under debate.This review provides an overview of the role played by UCP1 and UCP3 in mitochondrial uncoupling/functionality as well as EM and suggests that they are a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and its related diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus.

  1. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, A.G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Costa, E.; Krueger, K.E. (Georgetown Univ. School of Medicine, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4{prime}-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit {sup 3}H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations.

  2. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4'-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit 3H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaganathan Mabalirajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma.

  5. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  6. Mitochondrial calcium uptake capacity modulates neocortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S

    2013-07-01

    Local calcium (Ca(2+)) changes regulate central nervous system metabolism and communication integrated by subcellular processes including mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Mitochondria take up Ca(2+) through the calcium uniporter (mCU) aided by cytoplasmic microdomains of high Ca(2+). Known only in vitro, the in vivo impact of mCU activity may reveal Ca(2+)-mediated roles of mitochondria in brain signaling and metabolism. From in vitro studies of mitochondrial Ca(2+) sequestration and cycling in various cell types of the central nervous system, we evaluated ranges of spontaneous and activity-induced Ca(2+) distributions in multiple subcellular compartments in vivo. We hypothesized that inhibiting (or enhancing) mCU activity would attenuate (or augment) cortical neuronal activity as well as activity-induced hemodynamic responses in an overall cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Spontaneous and sensory-evoked cortical activities were measured by extracellular electrophysiology complemented with dynamic mapping of blood oxygen level dependence and cerebral blood flow. Calcium uniporter activity was inhibited and enhanced pharmacologically, and its impact on the multimodal measures were analyzed in an integrated manner. Ru360, an mCU inhibitor, reduced all stimulus-evoked responses, whereas Kaempferol, an mCU enhancer, augmented all evoked responses. Collectively, the results confirm aforementioned hypotheses and support the Ca(2+) uptake-mediated integrative role of in vivo mitochondria on neocortical activity.

  7. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Haylett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093, while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p=0.0304. Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p=0.0001. These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation.

  8. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylett, William; Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  9. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  10. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylett, William; Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation.

  11. What is hot in plant mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Ian Max

    2016-07-01

    In this overview of recent trends in plant mitochondrial research, four questions are considered: (1) How large is the mitochondrial proteome? It appears to be in excess of 1500 proteins in a tissue at any given time. It is proposed that the fusion-fission frequently observed for plant mitochondria provides a vital mixing function ensuring that all low-abundance proteins are present in each mitochondrion at least some of the time. (2) What is the significance of posttranslational modifications (PTM) of proteins? As a result of PTM, many proteins are present in a very large number of slightly different forms. The most well-studied PTMs, such as protein phosphorylation, acetylation and reversible cysteine oxidation, are known to regulate mitochondrial function. Recent studies have provided examples of the importance of this regulation, but it remains a research area with a massive growth potential. (3) What is the role(s) of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins in plant mitochondria? There is general agreement that PPR proteins are involved in RNA metabolism such as RNA editing. Recent comprehensive proteomic studies raise the question of how many of the potential 250-300 mitochondrial PPR proteins encoded in the nuclear DNA are required to be present for a mitochondrion to be able to grow and divide. (4) What is the mechanism(s) of retrograde signal transduction from the mitochondria to the nucleus? The nature of the signal transduction molecule is still unknown, but calcium ions, hydrogen peroxide and/or oxidized peptides are potential candidates. Recent results place a receptor for the activation of a group of nuclear genes on the endoplasmic reticulum, possibly close to ER-mitochondrial contact points. PMID:27094909

  12. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  13. Human 2'-phosphodiesterase localizes to the mitochondrial matrix with a putative function in mitochondrial RNA turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Kjær, Karina Hansen;

    2011-01-01

    . Interestingly, 2′-PDE shares both functionally and structurally characteristics with the CCR4-type exonuclease–endonuclease–phosphatase family of deadenylases. Here we show that 2′-PDE locates to the mitochondrial matrix of human cells, and comprise an active 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exhibiting a preference...... for oligo-adenosine RNA like canonical cytoplasmic deadenylases. Furthermore, we document a marked negative association between 2′-PDE and mitochondrial mRNA levels following siRNA-directed knockdown and plasmid-mediated overexpression, respectively. The results indicate that 2′-PDE, apart from playing...... a role in the cellular immune system, may also function in mitochondrial RNA turnover....

  14. The physiological role of mitochondrial calcium revealed by mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany; Liu, Chengyu; Sun, Junhui; Teng, Yanjie; Fergusson, Maria M; Rovira, Ilsa I; Allen, Michele; Springer, Danielle A; Aponte, Angel M; Gucek, Marjan; Balaban, Robert S; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial calcium has been postulated to regulate a wide range of processes from bioenergetics to cell death. Here, we characterize a mouse model that lacks expression of the recently discovered mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have no apparent capacity to rapidly uptake calcium. Whereas basal metabolism seems unaffected, the skeletal muscle of MCU(-/-) mice exhibited alterations in the phosphorylation and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, MCU(-/-) mice exhibited marked impairment in their ability to perform strenuous work. We further show that mitochondria from MCU(-/-) mice lacked evidence for calcium-induced permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The lack of PTP opening does not seem to protect MCU(-/-) cells and tissues from cell death, although MCU(-/-) hearts fail to respond to the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A. Taken together, these results clarify how acute alterations in mitochondrial matrix calcium can regulate mammalian physiology.

  15. Pivotal role of AKAP121 in mitochondrial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czachor, Alexander; Failla, Athena; Lockey, Richard; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2016-04-15

    In this Perspective, we discuss some recent developments in the study of the mitochondrial scaffolding protein AKAP121 (also known as AKAP1, or AKAP149 as the human homolog), with an emphasis on its role in mitochondrial physiology. AKAP121 has been identified to function as a key regulatory molecule in several mitochondrial events including oxidative phosphorylation, the control of membrane potential, fission-induced apoptosis, maintenance of mitochondrial Ca(2+)homeostasis, and the phosphorylation of various mitochondrial respiratory chain substrate molecules. Furthermore, we discuss the role of hypoxia in prompting cellular stress and damage, which has been demonstrated to mediate the proteosomal degradation of AKAP121, leading to an increase in reactive oxgyen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ultimately cell death. PMID:26825124

  16. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  17. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. ► Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in Δyfh1 cells. ► Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. ► Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in Δyfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron–sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin (Δyfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in Δyfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  18. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development.

  19. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  20. Multiple origins of cultivated radishes as evidenced by a comparison of the structural variations in mitochondrial DNA of Raphanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Terachi, Toru

    2003-02-01

    Configurations of mitochondrial coxI and orfB gene regions were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in three wild and one cultivated species of Raphanus. A total of 207 individual plants from 60 accessions were used. PCR with five combinations of primers identified five different amplification patterns both in wild and cultivated radishes. While the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) type of Ogura male-sterile cytoplasm was distinguishable from the normal type, the mtDNAs of normal radishes were further classified into four types. The variations were common to wild and cultivated radishes, although contrasting features were found depending on the region of cultivation. These results provide evidence that cultivated radishes have multiple origins from various wild plants of Raphanus.

  1. Mitochondrial Plasticity With Exercise Training and Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity and biochemical coupling efficiency may be differentially regulated...... with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial up-regulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level. SUMMARY: Muscle mitochondrial are responsive to training and environment, yet thresholds for volume vs. regulatory changes and their physiological...

  2. MitoVariome: a variome database of human mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Woo-Yeon; Ji, Mihyun; Kim, Ji Han; Bhak, Jong

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial sequence variation provides critical information for studying human evolution and variation. Mitochondrial DNA provides information on the origin of humans, and plays a substantial role in forensics, degenerative diseases, cancers, and aging process. Typically, human mitochondrial DNA has various features such as HVSI, HVSII, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), restriction enzyme sites, and short tandem repeat (STR). Results We present a variome database (MitoVariom...

  3. Mitochondrial Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Protection by Beta-Glucan

    OpenAIRE

    Shaki, Fatemeh; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the toxicity of uranyl acetate (UA), a soluble salt of depleted uranium (DU). We examined the ability of the two antioxidants, beta-glucan and butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT), to prevent UA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction using rat-isolated kidney mitochondria. Beta-glucan (150 nM) and BHT (20 nM) attenuated UA-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation and glutathione oxidat...

  4. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate Mosquito Susceptibility to Plasmodium Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Renata L. S.; Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Andersen, John F.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Pedro L Oliveira; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology, acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways and as an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulate redox metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that a novel member of the mitochondrial transporter protein family, Anopheles gambiae mitochondrial carrier 1 (AgMC1), is required to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential in mosquito midgut cells and modulates epithelial responses ...

  5. Mitochondrial-targeted fluorescent probes for reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Bryan C; Srikun, Duangkhae; Chang, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    As the primary consumers of oxygen within all aerobic organisms, mitochondria are a major source of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from the in vivo chemistry of oxygen metabolism. Mitochondrial ROS have been traditionally implicated in aging and in a variety of pathologies, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and diabetes, but recent studies also link controlled mitochondrial ROS fluxes to cell regulation and signaling events. Progress in the development of mitochondrial-targ...

  6. Impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    expression analysis and proteomics have pointed to abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cellular stress in muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects, and recent work suggests that impaired mitochondrial activity is another early defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This review...... will discuss the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes with focus on possible links between impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  7. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    , and finally to assess myocardial antioxidant levels. Mitochondrial respiration in biopsies from ischemic and nonischemic regions from the left ventricle of the same heart was compared in nine human subjects. Maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity in fresh muscle fibers was lower in ischemic compared.......05), and the levels of antioxidant protein expression was lower. Diminished mitochondrial respiration capacity and excessive ROS production demonstrate an impaired mitochondrial function in ischemic human heart muscle. No chronic ischemic preconditioning effect was found....

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Regulate Metastasis of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotake Imanishi; Keisuke Hattori; Reiko Wada; Kaori Ishikawa; Sayaka Fukuda; Keizo Takenaga; Kazuto Nakada; Jun-ichi Hayashi

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might contribute to expression of the tumor phenotypes, such as metastatic potential, as well as to aging phenotypes and to clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial diseases by induction of mitochondrial respiration defects and the resultant overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To test whether mtDNA mutations mediate metastatic pathways in highly metastatic human tumor cells, we used human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, which simultaneously e...

  9. A mitochondrial import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Söllner, Thomas; Griffiths, Gareth; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a mitochondrial outer membrane protein of 72 kd (MOM72) that exhibits the properties of an import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC), the most abundant mitochondrial protein. Monospecific antibodies and Fab fragments against MOM72 selectively inhibit import of AAC at the level of specific binding to the mitochondria. AAC bound to the mitochondrial surface is coprecipitated with antibodies against MOM72 after lysis of mitochondria with detergent. MOM72 thus has a complem...

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Emperor Penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiwu; Xia, Yan; Dang, Xiao; Chen, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    The emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the largest living species of penguin. Herein, we first reported the complete mitochondrial genome of emperor penguin. The mitochondrial genome is a circular molecule of 17 301 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA, and one control region. To verify the accuracy and the utility of new determined mitogenome sequences, we constructed the species phylogenetic tree of emperor penguin together with 10 other closely species. This is the second complete mitochondrial genome of penguin, and this is going to be an important data to study mitochondrial evolution of birds. PMID:26403091

  11. Involvement of the mitochondrial compartment in human NCL fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzini, Francesco; Gismondi, Floriana [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Tessa, Alessandra [IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris-Molecular Medicine Unit, Pisa (Italy); Tonin, Paola [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Carrozzo, Rosalba [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Hospital-Molecular Medicine Unit, Roma (Italy); Mole, Sara E. [MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, Molecular Medicines Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London (United Kingdom); Santorelli, Filippo M. [IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris-Molecular Medicine Unit, Pisa (Italy); Simonati, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.simonati@univr.it [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial reticulum fragmentation occurs in human CLN1 and CLN6 fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Likewise mitochondrial shift-to periphery and decreased mitochondrial density are seen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced caspase-mediated apoptosis occurs following STS treatment in CLN1 fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders of childhood, characterized by the endo-lysosomal storage of autofluorescent material. Impaired mitochondrial function is often associated with neurodegeneration, possibly related to the apoptotic cascade. In this study we investigated the possible effects of lysosomal accumulation on the mitochondrial compartment in the fibroblasts of two NCL forms, CLN1 and CLN6. Fragmented mitochondrial reticulum was observed in all cells by using the intravital fluorescent marker Mitotracker, mainly in the perinuclear region. This was also associated with intense signal from the lysosomal markers Lysotracker and LAMP2. Likewise, mitochondria appeared to be reduced in number and shifted to the cell periphery by electron microscopy; moreover the mitochondrial markers VDCA and COX IV were reduced following quantitative Western blot analysis. Whilst there was no evidence of increased cell death under basal condition, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic nuclei following Staurosporine treatment in CLN1 cells only. In conclusion, the mitochondrial compartment is affected in NCL fibroblasts invitro, and CLN1 cells seem to be more vulnerable to the negative effects of stressed mitochondrial membrane than CLN6 cells.

  12. Life without mitochondrial DNA : studies of transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianming

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a closed circular DNA genome that resides in the mitochondrial network. Mutations of mtDNA cause spontaneous and hereditary disorders known as mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) is a key factor for transcription of mtDNA in vitro. We disrupted the mouse Tfam gene by using the cre-loxP recombination system to study the in vivo roles of Tfam. This thesis focuses on the analyses of germline knockout mice and the c...

  13. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iorizzo Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution.

  14. The chloroplast trnP-trnW-petG gene cluster in the mitochondrial genomes of Beta vulgaris, B. trigyna and B. webbiana: evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, T; Yanai, Y; Kinoshita, T; Mikami, T

    1995-02-01

    The chloroplast trnP-trnW-petG gene cluster has been identified in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). The chloroplast-derived trnW gene is transcribed in the mitochondria; the other two genes, however, do not seem to be transcribed. This gene cluster is also present in the mitochondrial genomes of two wild Beta species, B. trigyna and B. webbiana. Sugar beet and the two wild relatives share 100% sequence identity in the coding regions of both the mitochondrial trnP and trnW genes. On the other hand, the petG genes from the wild Beta mtDNAs were found to be disrupted either by a 5-bp duplication (B. trigyna) or by a deletion of the 5' region (B. webbiana). A data-base search revealed that a conserved sequence of 60 bp is present in the trnP-trnW intergenic region of the mitochondrial genomes of the three Beta species as well as in other higher plants, including wheat and maize, and that the conserved sequence is absent from the chloroplast counterpart. Our results thus favour the hypothesis of a monophyletic origin of the trnP-trnW-petG cluster found in the plant mitochondrial genomes examined.

  15. A detrimental mitochondrial-nuclear interaction causes cytoplasmic male sterility in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dangping; Xu, Hong; Liu, Zhenlan; Guo, Jingxin; Li, Heying; Chen, Letian; Fang, Ce; Zhang, Qunyu; Bai, Mei; Yao, Nan; Wu, Hong; Wu, Hao; Ji, Chonghui; Zheng, Huiqi; Chen, Yuanling; Ye, Shan; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiucai; Li, Riqing; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2013-05-01

    Plant cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) results from incompatibilities between the organellar and nuclear genomes and prevents self pollination, enabling hybrid crop breeding to increase yields. The Wild Abortive CMS (CMS-WA) has been exploited in the majority of 'three-line' hybrid rice production since the 1970s, but the molecular basis of this trait remains unknown. Here we report that a new mitochondrial gene, WA352, which originated recently in wild rice, confers CMS-WA because the protein it encodes interacts with the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein COX11. In CMS-WA lines, WA352 accumulates preferentially in the anther tapetum, thereby inhibiting COX11 function in peroxide metabolism and triggering premature tapetal programmed cell death and consequent pollen abortion. WA352-induced sterility can be suppressed by two restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, suggesting the existence of different mechanisms to counteract deleterious cytoplasmic factors. Thus, CMS-related cytoplasmic-nuclear incompatibility is driven by a detrimental interaction between a newly evolved mitochondrial gene and a conserved, essential nuclear gene.

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: A Basic Mechanism in Inflammation-Related Non-Communicable Diseases and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hernández-Aguilera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not necessarily a predisposing factor for disease. It is the handling of fat and/or excessive energy intake that encompasses the linkage of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism to the deleterious effects associated with the continuous excess of food ingestion. The roles of cytokines and insulin resistance in excessive energy intake have been studied extensively. Tobacco use and obesity accompanied by an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity are the main factors that underlie noncommunicable diseases. The implication is that the management of energy or food intake, which is the main role of mitochondria, is involved in the most common diseases. In this study, we highlight the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the mutual relationships between causative conditions. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that fuse and divide in response to environmental stimuli, developmental status, and energy requirements. These organelles act to supply the cell with ATP and to synthesise key molecules in the processes of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism. Therefore, energy sensors and management effectors are determinants in the course and development of diseases. Regulating mitochondrial function may require a multifaceted approach that includes drugs and plant-derived phenolic compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that improve mitochondrial biogenesis and act to modulate the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  17. Increased mitochondrial substrate sensitivity in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S; Stride, N; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2011-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Mitochondrial respiration has been linked to insulin resistance. We studied mitochondrial respiratory capacity and substrate sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (patients), and obese and lean control participants. METHODS: Mitochondrial respiration was measured...

  18. EFFECT OF PERILLA FRUTESCENS EXTRACTS AND ROSMARINIC ACID ON RAT HEART MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudone, Lina; Burdulis, Deividas; Raudonis, Raimondas; Janulis, Valdimaras; Jankauskiene, Laima; Viskelis, Pranas; Trumbeckaite, Sonata

    2016-01-01

    Perilla frutescens L. due to its aromatic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant traits has been traditionally used as medicinal plant in Eastern Asia. Alterations of mitochondria are interconnected with many chronic diseases. Bioactives of herbal extracts can modulate mitochondrial effects and be beneficial in prevention of mitochondrial related chronic diseases. Direct effects of the red-leaf form P. frutescens extract (PFE) and the green-leaf form P. frutescens var. crispa f. viridis extract (PCE) were evaluated investigating activities on the oxidative phosphorylation and antioxidant activity in the rat heart mitochondria in vitro. HPLC-MS analysis was applied for the identification of phenolic compounds. Cell with a Clark-type oxygen electrode was used for mitochondrial respiration measurement. The generation of reactive oxygen species was estimated in isolated rat heart mitochondria and determined fluorimetrically. State 3 respiration rate was not affected by lower concentrations, however, it was inhibited at higher concentrations by 22-70% for PFE and by 45-55% for PCE. PFE containing anthocyanins induced the concentration-dependent stimulation (by 23-76%) of the State 4 respiration rate after addition of cytochrome c due to reducing properties. Significant reduction of H₂O₂ pro- duction was observed with investigated concentrations of rosmarinic acid and both perilla extracts. Our results demonstrate that the effect of PFE and PCE extracts on rat heart mitochondria depend on the qualitative characteristics of complex of biologically active compounds. Selective effects on mitochondrial function could enable the regulation of apoptosis or another mechanisms occurring in cells. PMID:27008808

  19. Mitochondrial pathway mediates the antileukemic effects of Hemidesmus indicus, a promising botanical drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Fimognari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cancers are characterized by the deregulation of multiple signalling pathways, most current anticancer therapies involve the modulation of a single target. Because of the enormous biological diversity of cancer, strategic combination of agents targeted against the most critical of those alterations is needed. Due to their complex nature, plant products interact with numerous targets and influence several biochemical and molecular cascades. The interest in further development of botanical drugs has been increasing steadily and the FDA recently approved the first new botanical prescription drug. The present study is designed to explore the potential antileukemic properties of Hemidesmus indicus with a view to contributing to further development of botanical drugs. Hemidesmus was submitted to an extensive in vitro preclinical evaluation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A variety of cellular assays and flow cytometry, as well as a phytochemical screening, were performed on different leukemic cell lines. We have demonstrated that Hemidesmus modulated many components of intracellular signaling pathways involved in cell viability and proliferation and altered the protein expression, eventually leading to tumor cell death, mediated by a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. ADP, adenine nucleotide translocator and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors did not reverse Hemidesmus-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Hemidesmus induced a significant [Ca(2+](i raise through the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+ stores. Moreover, Hemidesmus significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of three commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs (methotrexate, 6-thioguanine, cytarabine. A clinically relevant observation is that its cytotoxic activity was also recorded in primary cells from acute myeloid leukemic patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate the molecular basis of

  20. Vimar Is a Novel Regulator of Mitochondrial Fission through Miro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lianggong; Han, Yanping; Li, Yuhong; Ji, Xunming; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    As fundamental processes in mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fusion, fission and transport are regulated by several core components, including Miro. As an atypical Rho-like small GTPase with high molecular mass, the exchange of GDP/GTP in Miro may require assistance from a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). However, the GEF for Miro has not been identified. While studying mitochondrial morphology in Drosophila, we incidentally observed that the loss of vimar, a gene encoding an atypical GEF, enhanced mitochondrial fission under normal physiological conditions. Because Vimar could co-immunoprecipitate with Miro in vitro, we speculated that Vimar might be the GEF of Miro. In support of this hypothesis, a loss-of-function (LOF) vimar mutant rescued mitochondrial enlargement induced by a gain-of-function (GOF) Miro transgene; whereas a GOF vimar transgene enhanced Miro function. In addition, vimar lost its effect under the expression of a constitutively GTP-bound or GDP-bound Miro mutant background. These results indicate a genetic dependence of vimar on Miro. Moreover, we found that mitochondrial fission played a functional role in high-calcium induced necrosis, and a LOF vimar mutant rescued the mitochondrial fission defect and cell death. This result can also be explained by vimar's function through Miro, because Miro’s effect on mitochondrial morphology is altered upon binding with calcium. In addition, a PINK1 mutant, which induced mitochondrial enlargement and had been considered as a Drosophila model of Parkinson’s disease (PD), caused fly muscle defects, and the loss of vimar could rescue these defects. Furthermore, we found that the mammalian homolog of Vimar, RAP1GDS1, played a similar role in regulating mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a functional conservation of this GEF member. The Miro/Vimar complex may be a promising drug target for diseases in which mitochondrial fission and fusion are dysfunctional. PMID:27716788

  1. The Unique Mitochondrial Genetics of Cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cells typically contain two organelles, plastids and mitochondria. For the vast majority of plants, both of these organelles are maternally transmitted. Cucumber and melon are exceptions to this rule because the mitochondria are paternally transmitted. These two plants also possess mitochon...

  2. Mitochondrial genome sequencing helps show the evolutionary mechanism of mitochondrial genome formation in Brassica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiyong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes are more complex than those of other organisms. Analyses of the mitochondrial genome sequences of at least 11 angiosperm species have showed several common properties; these cannot easily explain, however, how the diverse mitotypes evolved within each genus or species. We analyzed the evolutionary relationships of Brassica mitotypes by sequencing. Results We sequenced the mitotypes of cam (Brassica rapa, ole (B. oleracea, jun (B. juncea, and car (B. carinata and analyzed them together with two previously sequenced mitotypes of B. napus (pol and nap. The sizes of whole single circular genomes of cam, jun, ole, and car are 219,747 bp, 219,766 bp, 360,271 bp, and 232,241 bp, respectively. The mitochondrial genome of ole is largest as a resulting of the duplication of a 141.8 kb segment. The jun mitotype is the result of an inherited cam mitotype, and pol is also derived from the cam mitotype with evolutionary modifications. Genes with known functions are conserved in all mitotypes, but clear variation in open reading frames (ORFs with unknown functions among the six mitotypes was observed. Sequence relationship analysis showed that there has been genome compaction and inheritance in the course of Brassica mitotype evolution. Conclusions We have sequenced four Brassica mitotypes, compared six Brassica mitotypes and suggested a mechanism for mitochondrial genome formation in Brassica, including evolutionary events such as inheritance, duplication, rearrangement, genome compaction, and mutation.

  3. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity involves mitochondrial injury with impaired tubular mitochondrial enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Ellezian, Lena; Brown, Dan; Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Parikh, Samir M; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Stillman, Isaac E; Pacher, Pál

    2012-07-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic agent. However, its major limitation is dose-dependent nephrotoxicity whose precise mechanism is poorly understood. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular epithelium contributes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Here the authors extend those findings by describing the role of an important electron transport chain enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Immunohistochemistry for COX 1 protein demonstrated that, in response to cisplatin, expression was mostly maintained in focally damaged tubular epithelium. In contrast, COX enzyme activity in proximal tubules (by light microscopy) was decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla showed decreased mitochondrial mass, disruption of cristae, and extensive mitochondrial swelling in proximal tubular epithelium. Functional electron microscopy showed that COX enzyme activity was decreased in the remaining mitochondria in the proximal tubules but maintained in distal tubules. In summary, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with structural and functional damage to the mitochondria. More broadly, using functional electron microscopy to measure mitochondrial enzyme activity may generate mechanistic insights across a spectrum of renal disorders. PMID:22511597

  4. Low number of mitochondrial pseudogenes in the chicken (Gallus gallus nuclear genome: implications for molecular inference of population history and phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Allan J

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA has been detected in the nuclear genome of eukaryotes as pseudogenes, or Numts. Human and plant genomes harbor a large number of Numts, some of which have high similarity to mitochondrial fragments and thus may have been inadvertently included in population genetic and phylogenetic studies using mitochondrial DNA. Birds have smaller genomes relative to mammals, and the genome-wide frequency and distribution of Numts is still unknown. The release of a preliminary version of the chicken (Gallus gallus genome by the Genome Sequencing Center at Washington University, St. Louis provided an opportunity to search this first avian genome for the frequency and characteristics of Numts relative to those in human and plants. Results We detected at least 13 Numts in the chicken nuclear genome. Identities between Numts and mitochondrial sequences varied from 58.6 to 88.8%. Fragments ranged from 131 to 1,733 nucleotides, collectively representing only 0.00078% of the nuclear genome. Because fewer Numts were detected in the chicken nuclear genome, they do not represent all regions of the mitochondrial genome and are not widespread in all chromosomes. Nuclear integrations in chicken seem to occur by a DNA intermediate and in regions of low gene density, especially in macrochromosomes. Conclusion The number of Numts in chicken is low compared to those in human and plant genomes, and is within the range found for most sequenced eukaryotic genomes. For chicken, PCR amplifications of fragments of about 1.5 kilobases are highly likely to represent true mitochondrial amplification. Sequencing of these fragments should expose the presence of unusual features typical of pseudogenes, unless the nuclear integration is very recent and has not yet been mutated. Metabolic selection for compact genomes with reduced repetitive DNA and gene-poor regions where Numts occur may explain their low incidence in birds.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Min-Xin

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial 12S rRNA has been shown to be the hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss. Of all the mutations, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region in the 12S rRNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. The A1555G or C1494T mutation is expected to form novel 1494C-G1555 or 1494U-A1555 base-pair at the highly conserved A-site of 12S rRNA. These transitions make the secondary structure of this RNA more closely resemble the corresponding region of bacterial 16S rRNA. Thus, the new U - A or G-C pair in 12S rRNA created by the C1494T or A1555G transition facilitates the binding of aminoglycosides, thereby accounting for the fact that the exposure to aminoglycosides can induce or worsen hearing loss in individuals carrying these mutations. Furthermore, the growth defect and impairment of mitochondrial translation were observed in cell lines carrying the A1555G or C1494T mutation in the presence of high concentration of aminoglycosides. In addition, nuclear modifier genes and mitochondrial haplotypes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the A1555G and C1494T mutations. These observations provide the direct genetic and biochemical evidences that the A1555G or C1494T mutation is a pathogenic mtDNA mutation associated with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Therefore, these data have been providing valuable information and technology to predict which individuals are at risk for ototoxicity, to improve the safety of aminoglycoside antibiotic therapy, and eventually to decrease the incidence of deafness.

  6. Mitochondrial complex I-linked disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most frequently encountered single mitochondrial single enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial disorder. Although specific genotype-phenotype correlations are very difficult to identify, the majority of patients present with symptoms caused by leukodystrophy. The poor genotype-phenotype correlations can make establishing a diagnosis a challenge. The classical way to establish a complex I deficiency in patients is by performing spectrophotometric measurements of the enzyme in a muscle biopsy or other patient-derived material (liver or heart biopsy, cultured skin fibroblasts). Complex I is encoded by both the mtDNA and nuclear DNA and pathogenic mutations have been identified in the majority of the 44 genes encoding the structural subunits of complex I. In recent years, the increasing possibilities for diagnostic molecular genetic tests of large gene panels, exomes, and even entire genomes has led to the identification of many novel genetic defects causing complex I deficiency. Complex I mutations not only result in a reduced enzyme activity but also induce secondary effects at the cellular level, such as elevated reactive oxygen species production, altered membrane potential and mitochondrial morphology. At this moment there is no cure for complex I deficiency and the treatment options for complex I patients are restricted to symptomatic treatment. Recent developments, amongst others based on the treatment of the secondary effects of complex I deficiency, have shown to be promising as new therapeutic strategies in vitro and have entered clinical trials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  7. Decidual cell polyploidization necessitates mitochondrial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Ma

    Full Text Available Cellular polyploidy has been widely reported in nature, yet its developmental mechanism and function remain poorly understood. In the present study, to better define the aspects of decidual cell polyploidy, we isolated pure polyploid and non-polyploid decidual cell populations from the in vivo decidual bed. Three independent RNA pools prepared for each population were then subjected to the Affymetrix gene chip analysis for the whole mouse genome transcripts. Our data revealed up-regulation of 1015 genes and down-regulation of 1207 genes in the polyploid populations, as compared to the non-polyploid group. Comparative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results indeed confirmed differential expressional regulation of several genes between the two populations. Based on functional enrichment analyses, up-regulated polyploidy genes appeared to implicate several functions, which primarily include cell/nuclear division, ATP binding, metabolic process, and mitochondrial activity, whereas that of down-regulated genes primarily included apoptosis and immune processes. Further analyses of genes that are related to mitochondria and bi-nucleation showed differential and regional expression within the decidual bed, consistent with the pattern of polyploidy. Consistently, studies revealed a marked induction of mitochondrial mass and ATP production in polyploid cells. The inhibition of mitochondrial activity by various pharmacological inhibitors, as well as by gene-specific targeting using siRNA-mediated technology showed a dramatic attenuation of polyploidy and bi-nucleation development during in vitro stromal cell decidualization, suggesting mitochondria play a major role in positive regulation of decidual cell polyploidization. Collectively, analyses of unique polyploidy markers and molecular signaling networks may be useful to further characterize functional aspects of decidual cell polyploidy at the site of implantation.

  8. Mitochondrial Akt Regulation of Hypoxic Tumor Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Young Chan; Vaira, Valentina; Caino, M Cecilia; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Seo, Jae Ho; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Lucignani, Giovanni; Bertolini, Irene; Locatelli, Marco; Bryant, Kelly G; Ghosh, Jagadish C; Lisanti, Sofia; Ku, Bonsu; Bosari, Silvano; Languino, Lucia R; Speicher, David W; Altieri, Dario C

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia is a universal driver of aggressive tumor behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Using a phosphoproteomics screen, we now show that active Akt accumulates in the mitochondria during hypoxia and phosphorylates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) on Thr346 to inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In turn, this pathway switches tumor metabolism toward glycolysis, antagonizes apoptosis and autophagy, dampens oxidative stress, and maintains tumor cell proliferation in the face of severe hypoxia. Mitochondrial Akt-PDK1 signaling correlates with unfavorable prognostic markers and shorter survival in glioma patients and may provide an "actionable" therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27505672

  9. Mitochondrial DNA sequence of Onychostoma rara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chun-Fang; Li, Xiao-Ling; Li, Chuan-Wu; Huang, Xiang-Rong; Wan, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Onychostoma rara was determined to be 16,590 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, large (rrnL) and small (rrnS) rRNA and the non-coding control region. Its total A + T content is 55.65%. We also analyzed the structure of control region, 6 CSBs (CSB-1, CSB-2, CSB-3, CSB-D, CSB-E and CSB-F) and 2 bp tandem repeat were detected.

  10. Structure of human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Ringel, Rieke; Sologub, Marina; Morozov, Yaroslav I.; Litonin, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of the mitochondrial genome is performed by a single-subunit RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) that is distantly related to the RNAP of bacteriophage T7, the pol I family of DNA polymerases, and single-subunit RNAPs from chloroplasts1, 2, 3, 4. Whereas T7 RNAP can initiate transcription by itself, mtRNAP requires the factors TFAM and TFB2M for binding and melting promoter DNA5, 6, 7. TFAM is an abundant protein that binds and bends promoter DNA 15–40 base pairs upstream of the transcripti...

  11. Structural Studies of the Yeast Mitochondrial Degradosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    and nuclear exosome complexes, which consist of 10-12 different nuclease subunits, the mitochondrial degradosome is composed of only two large subunits - an RNase (Dss1p) and a helicase (Suv3p), belonging the Ski2 class of DExH box RNA helicases. Both subunits are encoded on the yeast nuclear genome...... and and Suv3p from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, have been cloned for heterologous expression in E. coli. Of the two, we have succeeded in purifying the 73kDa Suv3p by Ni2+-affinity chromatography followed by cleavage of the N-terminal His-tag, cation exchange, and gel filtration. Crystals...

  12. Mitochondrial Genomes of Domestic Animals Need Scrutiny

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Ni-Ni; Fan, Long; Yao, Yong-Gang; Peng, Min-Sheng; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    More than 1000 complete or near-complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences have been deposited in GenBank for eight common domestic animals (i.e. cattle, dog, goat, horse, pig, sheep, yak and chicken) and their close wild ancestors or relatives. Nevertheless, few efforts have been performed to evaluate the sequence data quality, which heavily impact the original conclusion. Herein, we conducted a phylogenetic survey of these complete or near-complete mtDNA sequences based on mtDNA haplogrou...

  13. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two ornamental fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Likun; Zhang, Songhao; Chen, Baohua; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Feng, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of two ornamental fishes, black molly (Poecilia sphenops) and blue gourami (Trichogaster trichopterus), were obtained by the traditional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based sequencing approach. The mitogenomes of P. sphenops and T. trichopterus are determined as 16,533 bp and 16,456 bp in length, respectively. Both the genomes include 22 transfer RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the complete mitogenomes of these two species and closely related 20 teleost species to assess their phylogenic relationship and evolution. PMID:26061340

  14. Altered Mitochondrial Function, Mitochondrial DNA and Reduced Metabolic Flexibility in Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Czajka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in diabetic nephropathy (DN, a kidney disease which affects >100 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of renal failure despite therapy. A cross-sectional study comparing DN with diabetes patients without kidney disease (DC and healthy controls (HCs; and renal mesangial cells (HMCs grown in normal and high glucose, was carried out. Patients with diabetes (DC had increased circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA, and HMCs increased their MtDNA within 24 h of hyperglycaemia. The increased MtDNA content in DCs and HMCs was not functional as transcription was unaltered/down-regulated, and MtDNA damage was present. MtDNA was increased in DC compared to HC, conversely, patients with DN had lower MtDNA than DC. Hyperglycaemic HMCs had fragmented mitochondria and TLR9 pathway activation, and in diabetic patients, mitophagy was reduced. Despite MtDNA content and integrity changing within 4 days, hyperglycaemic HMCs had a normal bio-energetic profile until 8 days, after which mitochondrial metabolism was progressively impaired. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from DN patients had reduced reserve capacity and maximal respiration, loss of metabolic flexibility and reduced Bioenergetic Health Index (BHI compared to DC. Our data show that MtDNA changes precede bioenergetic dysfunction and that patients with DN have impaired mitochondrial metabolism compared to DC, leading us to propose that systemic mitochondrial dysfunction initiated by glucose induced MtDNA damage may be involved in the development of DN. Longitudinal studies are needed to define a potential cause–effect relationship between changes in MtDNA and bioenergetics in DN.

  15. Impaired coronary metabolic dilation in the metabolic syndrome is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Giacinta; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Pung, Yuh Fen; Marzilli, Mario; Chen, Yeong Renn; Chen, Chwen Lih; Kang, Patrick T; Hardwick, James P; Kolz, Christopher L; Yin, Liya; Wilson, Glenn L; Shokolenko, Inna; Dobson, James G; Fenton, Richard; Chilian, William M

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes can be caused by excessive production of free radicals, which can damage mitochondrial DNA. Because mitochondrial DNA plays a key role in the production of ATP necessary for cardiac work, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, induced by mitochondrial DNA damage, uncouples coronary blood flow from cardiac work. Myocardial blood flow (contrast echocardiography) was measured in Zucker lean (ZLN) and obese fatty (ZOF) rats during increased cardiac metabolism (product of heart rate and arterial pressure, i.v. norepinephrine). In ZLN increased metabolism augmented coronary blood flow, but in ZOF metabolic hyperemia was attenuated. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired and ROS production was greater in ZOF than ZLN. These were associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ZOF. To determine if coronary metabolic dilation, the hyperemic response induced by heightened cardiac metabolism, is linked to mitochondrial function we introduced recombinant proteins (intravenously or intraperitoneally) in ZLN and ZOF to fragment or repair mtDNA, respectively. Repair of mtDNA damage restored mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation, and reduced ROS production in ZOF; whereas induction of mtDNA damage in ZLN reduced mitochondrial function, increased ROS production, and attenuated metabolic dilation. Adequate metabolic dilation was also associated with the extracellular release of ADP, ATP, and H2O2 by cardiac myocytes; whereas myocytes from rats with impaired dilation released only H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial function plays a seminal role in connecting myocardial blood flow to metabolism, and integrity of mtDNA is central to this process. PMID:27040114

  16. Mentha piperita essential oil induces apoptosis in yeast associated with both cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS-mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Patrícia; Cardoso, Teresa; Ferreira, Filipa; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Piper, Peter; Sousa, Maria João

    2014-11-01

    Mentha piperita (MP), also known as peppermint, is an aromatic and medicinal plant widely used in the food industry, perfumery and cosmetic, pharmacy and traditional medicine. Its essential oil (EO) displays antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria and fungi. In this study, we found that MP EO lethal cytotoxicity is associated with increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial fragmentation and chromatin condensation, without loss of the plasma membrane integrity, indicative of an apoptotic process. Overexpression of cytosolic catalase and superoxide dismutases reverted the lethal effects of the EO and of its major component menthol. Conversely, deficiency in Sod1p (cytosolic copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase) greatly increased sensitivity to both agents, but deficiency in Sod2p (mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase) only induced sensitivity under respiratory growth conditions. Mentha piperita EO increased the frequency of respiratory deficient mutants indicative of damage to the mitochondrial genome, although increase in mitochondrial thiol oxidation does not seem to be involved in the EO toxicity. PMID:25065265

  17. Mentha piperita essential oil induces apoptosis in yeast associated with both cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS-mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Patrícia; Cardoso, Teresa; Ferreira, Filipa; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Piper, Peter; Sousa, Maria João

    2014-11-01

    Mentha piperita (MP), also known as peppermint, is an aromatic and medicinal plant widely used in the food industry, perfumery and cosmetic, pharmacy and traditional medicine. Its essential oil (EO) displays antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria and fungi. In this study, we found that MP EO lethal cytotoxicity is associated with increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial fragmentation and chromatin condensation, without loss of the plasma membrane integrity, indicative of an apoptotic process. Overexpression of cytosolic catalase and superoxide dismutases reverted the lethal effects of the EO and of its major component menthol. Conversely, deficiency in Sod1p (cytosolic copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase) greatly increased sensitivity to both agents, but deficiency in Sod2p (mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase) only induced sensitivity under respiratory growth conditions. Mentha piperita EO increased the frequency of respiratory deficient mutants indicative of damage to the mitochondrial genome, although increase in mitochondrial thiol oxidation does not seem to be involved in the EO toxicity.

  18. Regulation and quantification of cellular mitochondrial morphology and content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tronstad, K.J.; Nooteboom, M.; Nilsson, L.I.; Nikolaisen, J.; Sokolewicz, M.; Grefte, S.; Pettersen, I.K.; Dyrstad, S.; Hoel, F.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in signal transduction, redox homeostasis and cell survival, which extends far beyond their classical functioning in ATP production and energy metabolism. In living cells, mitochondrial content ("mitochondrial mass") depends on the cell-controlled balance between mitocho

  19. Effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on the immunological properties of microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferger Annette I

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by both mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of microglia, the macrophages of the brain. Here, we investigate the effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on the activation profile of microglial cells. Methods We incubated primary mouse microglia with the mitochondrial toxins 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP or rotenone. These mitochondrial toxins are known to induce neurodegeneration in humans and in experimental animals. We characterized lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced microglial activation and the alternative, interleukin-4- (IL-4- induced microglial activation in these mitochondrial toxin-treated microglial cells. Results We found that, while mitochondrial toxins did not affect LPS-induced activation, as measured by release of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β, they did inhibit part of the IL-4-induced alternative activation, as measured by arginase activity and expression, induction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and the counteraction of the LPS induced cytokine release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in microglial cells inhibits part of the IL-4-induced alternative response. Because this alternative activation is considered to be associated with wound healing and an attenuation of inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction in microglial cells might contribute to the detrimental effects of neuroinflammation seen in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent;

    2008-01-01

    for mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic and prediabetic subjects, primarily due to a lower content of mitochondria (mitochondrial biogenesis) and possibly to a reduced functional capacity per mitochondrion. This article discusses the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular...

  1. Interactions between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cellular glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg-Apers, D.C.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Grefte, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and detoxification are tightly balanced. Shifting this balance enables ROS to activate intracellular signaling and/or induce cellular damage and cell death. Increased mitochondrial ROS production is observed in a number of pathological condit

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrede, Joanna E; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra;

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins...

  3. The importance of mitochondrial DNA in aging and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Singh, Keshav K;

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in premature aging, age-related diseases, and tumor initiation and progression. Alterations of the mitochondrial genome accumulate both in aging tissue and tumors. This paper describes our contemporary view of mechanisms by which alterations of the mi...

  4. Mitochondrial approaches to protect against cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadou K.S. Camara

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion is a vital component in cellular energy metabolism and intracellular signaling processes. Mitochondria are involved in a myriad of complex signaling cascades regulating cell death vs. survival. Importantly, mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting oxidative and nitrosative stress are central in the pathogenesis of numerous human maladies including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and retinal diseases, many of which are related. This review will examine the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular diseases and will explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the organelle in attenuating the disease process. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate or manipulate mitochondrial function, to the use of light therapy directed to the mitochondrial function, and to modification of the mitochondrial genome for potential therapeutic benefit. The approach to rationally treat mitochondrial dysfunction could lead to more effective interventions in cardiovascular diseases that to date have remained elusive. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the etiology of cardiovascular diseases (e.g. ischemic heart disease, alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction will contribute to mitigating the severity or progression of the disease. To this end, this review will provide an overview of our current understanding of mitochondria function in cardiovascular diseases as well as the potential role for targeting mitochondria with potential drugs or other interventions that lead to protection against cell injury.

  5. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  6. Muscle mitochondrial capacity exceeds maximal oxygen delivery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Gnaiger, Erich; Calbet, Jose A L;

    2011-01-01

    Across a wide range of species and body mass a close matching exists between maximal conductive oxygen delivery and mitochondrial respiratory rate. In this study we investigated in humans how closely in-vivo maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2) max) is matched to state 3 muscle mitochondrial respira...

  7. A mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shu Qing; Yang, Ying Zhong; Zhou, Jun;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate genetic mechanisms of high altitude adaptations of native mammals on the Tibetan Plateau, we compared mitochondrial sequences of the endangered Pantholops hodgsonii with its lowland distant relatives Ovis aries and Capra hircus, as well as other mammals. The complete mitochondrial...

  8. [Understanding mitochondrial genome fragmentation in parasitic lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen-Ge; Guo, Xian-Guo; Jin, Dao-Chao; Xue, Shi-Peng; Qin, Feng; Simon, Song; Stephen, C Barker; Renfu, Shao

    2013-07-01

    Lice are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Extensive fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes has been found in some louse species in the families Pediculidae, Pthiridae, Philopteridae and Trichodectidae. For example, the mt genomes of human body louse (Pediculus humanus), head louse (Pediculus capitis), and public louse (Pthirus pubis) have 20, 20 and 14 mini-chromosomes, respectively. These mini-chromosomes might be the results of deletion and recombination of mt genes. The factors and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome fragmentation are currently unknown. The fragmentation might be the results of evolutionary selection or random genetic drift or it is probably related to the lack of mtSSB (mitochondrial single-strand DNA binding protein). Understanding the fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes is of significance for understanding the origin and evolution of mitochondria. This paper reviews the recent advances in the studies of mito-chondrial genome fragmentation in lice, including the phenomena of mitochondrial genome fragmentation, characteristics of fragmented mitochondrial genomes, and some factors and mechanisms possibly leading to the mitochondrial genome fragmentation of lice. Perspectives for future studies on fragmented mt genomes are also discussed. PMID:23853355

  9. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  10. MICU1 motifs define mitochondrial calcium uniporter binding and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nicholas E; Chandramoorthy, Harish C; Shamugapriya, Santhanam; Zhang, Xueqian; Rajan, Sudarsan; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Gandhirajan, Rajesh Kumar; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Ferrer, Lucas M; Sreekrishnanilayam, Krishnalatha; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy; Vallem, Sandhya; Force, Thomas; Choi, Eric T; Cheung, Joseph Y; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2013-12-26

    Resting mitochondrial matrix Ca(2+) is maintained through a mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1)-established threshold inhibition of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) activity. It is not known how MICU1 interacts with MCU to establish this Ca(2+) threshold for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and MCU activity. Here, we show that MICU1 localizes to the mitochondrial matrix side of the inner mitochondrial membrane and MICU1/MCU binding is determined by a MICU1 N-terminal polybasic domain and two interacting coiled-coil domains of MCU. Further investigation reveals that MICU1 forms homo-oligomers, and this oligomerization is independent of the polybasic region. However, the polybasic region confers MICU1 oligomeric binding to MCU and controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) current (IMCU). Moreover, MICU1 EF hands regulate MCU channel activity, but do not determine MCU binding. Loss of MICU1 promotes MCU activation leading to oxidative burden and a halt to cell migration. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for MICU1 control of MCU-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation, and dysregulation of this mechanism probably enhances vascular dysfunction.

  11. Teaching the Role of Mitochondrial Transport in Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarella, Salvatore; Atlante, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Studies from our laboratories over recent years have uncovered the existence, and established the properties of a variety of mitochondrial transporters. The properties of these transporters throw light on a variety of biochemical phenomena that were previously poorly understood. In particular the role of mitochondrial transport in energy…

  12. Differences in catalytic properties between cerebral cytoplasmic and mitochondrial hexokinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M F; Bachelard, H S

    1977-03-01

    1. Clear kinetic differences between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of type-I cerebral hexokinase were demonstrated from experiments performed under identical conditions on three (cytoplasmic, bound mitochondrial and solubilized mitochondrial) preparations of the enzyme. 2. Whereas the Michaelis constant for glucose (KmGlc) was consistent, that for MgATP2- (KmATP) was lower in the cytoplasmic than in the two mitochondrial preparations. The substrate dissociation constants (KsGlc and KsATP) were both higher in the cytoplasmic than in the mitochondrial preparations. A further difference in the substrate kinetic patterns was that KmATP=KmATP for the cytoplasmic enzyme, in contrast with the mitochondrial enzyme, where KmATP was clearly not equal to KsATP [Bachelard et al. (1971) Biochem. J. 123, 707-715]. 3. Dead-end inhibition produced by N-acetyl-glucosamine and by AMP also exhibited different quantitative kinetic patterns for the two enzyme sources. Both inhibitions gave Ki values similar or equal to those of Ki' for the cytoplasmic activity, whereas Ki was clearly not equal to Ki' for the mitochondrial activity. 4. All of these studies demonstrated the similarity of the two mitochondrial activities (particulate and solubilized), which were both clearly different from the cytoplasmic activity. 5. The analysis gives a practical example of our previous theoretical treatment on the derivation of true inhibition constants. 6. The results are discussed in terms of the function of cerebral hexokinases.

  13. PLMItRNA, a database for mitochondrial tRNA genes and tRNAs in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Fabrizio; Gallerani, Raffaele; Liuni, Sabino; Licciulli, Flavio; Ceci, Luigi R.

    2001-01-01

    The PLMItRNA database for mitochondrial tRNA molecules and genes in Viridiplantae (green plants) [Volpetti,V., Gallerani,R., DeBenedetto,C., Liuni,S., Licciulli,F. and Ceci,L.R. (2000) Nucleic Acids Res., 28, 159–162] has been enlarged to include algae. The database now contains 436 genes and 16 tRNA entries relative to 25 higher plants, eight green algae, four red algae (Rhodophytae) and two Stramenopiles. The PLMItRNA database is accessible via the WWW at http://bio-www.ba.cnr.it:8000/PLMItRNA. PMID:11125079

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of the nematophagous fungus Acremonium implicatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yurong; Lin, Runmao; Tian, Xueliang; Shen, Baoming; Mao, Zhenchuan; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the nematophagous fungus Acremonium implicatum is reported for the first time. The genome is concatenated with 22,367 bp in length, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and a set of 17 transfer RNA genes. The synteny analysis reveals that 50.35% of A. implicatum mitochondrial sequences matched to 48.21% of Acremonium chrysogenum mitochondrial sequences with 85.68% identity. Two proteins of cox3 and nad6, as well as seven tRNAs are lost in A. implicatum mitogenome compared to A. chrysogenum mitogenome. The gene orders in A. implicatum and A. chrysogenum mitogenome is different, which is mainly due to the location of nad4 and cox2. In addition, one transposition event related to tRNAs is identified in these two mitogenomes. This study may provide valuable mitochondrial information for research on A. implicatum and facilitate the study of mitochondrial evolution. PMID:25630733

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of the scleractinian coral Porites rus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Juan Sebastián; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Wilke, Thomas; Kalinowski, Joern

    2016-09-01

    Scleractinian corals of the genus Porites are found across a wide geographical range along the tropical seas. Some species of the genus such as Porites rus are important reef builders in coral reef ecosystems and display a remarkable stress tolerance. Despite their physiological particularities and ecological importance, there is a scarcity of molecular data for members of this genus. Here, we report the first complete mitochondrial genome of Porites rus (Genbank accession number LN864762) which is 18 647 bp in size. It has the typical coral mitochondrial gene arrangement, consisting of 14 protein-coding genes, with a GC content of 36.2%, 12 tRNAs and two rRNAs. The P. rus mitochondrial genome displays two groups: 1 intron in cox1 and nad5 genes. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the genus Porites. The complete mitochondrial genome will be helpful for addressing questions regarding mitochondrial gene evolution. PMID:27158873

  16. Mitophagy plays a central role in mitochondrial ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, Alan; Morten, Karl; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying ageing have been discussed for decades, and advances in molecular and cell biology of the last three decades have accelerated research in this area. Over this period, it has become clear that mitochondrial function, which plays a major role in many cellular pathways from ATP production to nuclear gene expression and epigenetics alterations, declines with age. The emerging concepts suggest novel mechanisms, involving mtDNA quality, mitochondrial dynamics or mitochondrial quality control. In this review, we discuss the impact of mitochondria in the ageing process, the role of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production, in nuclear gene expression, the accumulation of mtDNA damage and the importance of mitochondrial dynamics and recycling. Declining mitophagy (mitochondrial quality control) may be an important component of human ageing. PMID:27352213

  17. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME. PMID:27581092

  18. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-09-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME.

  19. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME. PMID:27581092

  20. Inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis by oxazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, E E; Ferguson, M; Bentley, A T; Marks, T A

    2006-06-01

    The effects of a variety of oxazolidinones, with different antibacterial potencies, including linezolid, on mitochondrial protein synthesis were determined in intact mitochondria isolated from rat heart and liver and rabbit heart and bone marrow. The results demonstrate that a general feature of the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics is the inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis. Inhibition was similar in mitochondria from all tissues studied. Further, oxazolidinones that were very potent as antibiotics were uniformly potent in inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis. These results were compared to the inhibitory profiles of other antibiotics that function by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. Of these, chloramphenicol and tetracycline were significant inhibitors of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis while the macrolides, lincosamides, and aminoglycosides were not. Development of future antibiotics from the oxazolidinone class will have to evaluate potential mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:16723564

  1. Erythropoietin treatment enhances muscle mitochondrial capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia;

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity...... in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over 8 weeks with oral iron (100 mg) supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis...... before and after rhEpo treatment. OXPHOS was determined with the mitochondrial complex I substrates malate, glutamate, pyruvate, and complex II substrate succinate in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations, while maximal electron transport capacity (ETS) was assessed by addition of an uncoupler...

  2. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Svendsen, Pernille Maj; Skovbro, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    Objective Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, which has been linked to decreased mitochondrial function. We measured mitochondrial respiration in lean and obese women with and without PCOS using high-resolution respirometry. Methods...... Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps (40 mU/min/m2) and muscle biopsies were performed on 23 women with PCOS (9 lean (body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m2)) and 17 age- and weight-matched controls (6 lean and 11 obese). Western blotting and high-resolution respirometry was used to determine mitochondrial function. Results...... Insulin sensitivity decreased with PCOS and increasing body weight. Mitochondrial respiration with substrates for complex I and complex I+II were similar in all groups, and PCOS was not associated with a decrease in mitochondrial content as measured by mtDNA/genomicDNA. We found no correlation between...

  3. LHON and other optic nerve atrophies: the mitochondrial connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) are reviewed. The etiology of LHON is complex, but the primary risk factor is a mutation in one of the seven mitochondrial genes that encode subunits of respiratory chain complex I. The pathogenesis of LHON is not yet understood, but one plausible model is that increased or altered mitochondrial ROS production renders the retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to apoptotic cell death. In addition to LHON, there are a large number of other optic nerve degenerative disorders including autosomal dominant optic atrophy, the toxic/nutritional optic neuropathies and glaucoma. A review of the recent scientific literature suggests that these disorders also involve mitochondrial dysfunction or altered mitochondrial signaling pathways in their pathogenesis. This mitochondrial link provides new avenues of experimental investigation to these major causes of loss of vision.

  4. Exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction: a myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2016-08-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity on mitochondrial health are well substantiated in the scientific literature, with regular exercise improving mitochondrial quality and quantity in normal healthy population, and in cardiometabolic and neurodegenerative disorders and aging. However, several recent studies questioned this paradigm, suggesting that extremely heavy or exhaustive exercise fosters mitochondrial disturbances that could permanently damage its function in health and disease. Exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction (EIMD) might be a key proxy for negative outcomes of exhaustive exercise, being a pathophysiological substrate of heart abnormalities, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or muscle degeneration. Here, we overview possible factors that mediate negative effects of exhaustive exercise on mitochondrial function and structure, and put forward alternative solutions for the management of EIMD. PMID:27389587

  5. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of Paramisgurnus dabryanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Luyi; Guo, Baoying; Chu, Zhangjie; Wang, Yong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Paramisgurnus dabryanus was obtained by PCR base on 18 pairs of primers. Among the 18 primers, the 14 primers were from the previously published universal primers for Cyprinus carpio L. mitogenome amplification. The remaining 4 primers were designed on the basis of related species mtDNA sequences. The genome is 16,570 bp in length, including 2 ribosomal RNA genes. 13 proteins-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a non-coding control region, the gene composition and order of which was similar to most reported from other vertebrates. Sequence analysis showed that the overall base composition of Paramisgurnus dabryanus is T 27.3%, C 26.9%, A 28.5%, and G 17.4%. The sequence is a slight A + T bias of 55.8%, which is similar to other fishes. Mitochondrial genome is widely used in phylogenetic analysis, evolutionary genomics, species identification and related research of fish.

  7. Mitochondrial health, the epigenome and healthspan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aon, Miguel A; Cortassa, Sonia; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Food nutrients and metabolic supply-demand dynamics constitute environmental factors that interact with our genome influencing health and disease states. These gene-environment interactions converge at the metabolic-epigenome-genome axis to regulate gene expression and phenotypic outcomes. Mounting evidence indicates that nutrients and lifestyle strongly influence genome-metabolic functional interactions determining disease via altered epigenetic regulation. The mitochondrial network is a central player of the metabolic-epigenome-genome axis, regulating the level of key metabolites [NAD(+), AcCoA (acetyl CoA), ATP] acting as substrates/cofactors for acetyl transferases, kinases (e.g. protein kinase A) and deacetylases (e.g. sirtuins, SIRTs). The chromatin, an assembly of DNA and nucleoproteins, regulates the transcriptional process, acting at the epigenomic interface between metabolism and the genome. Within this framework, we review existing evidence showing that preservation of mitochondrial network function is directly involved in decreasing the rate of damage accumulation thus slowing aging and improving healthspan. PMID:27358026

  8. Structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Maria Luisa; Bianchi, Cristina; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Two models exist of the mitochondrial respiratory chain: the model of a random organization of the individual respiratory enzyme complexes and that of a super-complex assembly formed by stable association between the individual complexes. Recently Schägger, using digitonin solubilization and Blue Native PAGE produced new evidence of preferential associations, in particular a Complex I monomer with a Complex III dimer, and suggested a model of the respiratory chain (the respirasome) based on direct electron channelling between complexes. Discrimination between the two models is amenable to kinetic testing using flux control analysis. Experimental evidence obtained in beef heart SMP, according to the extension of the Metabolic Control Theory for pathways with metabolic channelling, showed that enzyme associations involving Complex I and Complex III take place in the respiratory chain while Complex IV seems to be randomly distributed, with cytochrome c behaving as a mobile component. Flux control analysis at anyone of the respiratory complexes involved in aerobic succinate oxidation indicated that Complex II and III are not functionally associated in a stable supercomplex. A critical appraisal of the solid-state model of the mitochondrial respiratory chain requires its reconciliation with previous biophysical and kinetic evidence that CoQ behaves as a homogeneous diffusible pool between all reducing enzyme and all oxidizing enzymes: the hypothesis can be advanced that both models (CoQ pool and supercomplexes) are true, by postulating that supercomplexes physiologically exist in equilibrium with isolated complexes depending on metabolic conditions of the cell.

  9. A mitochondrial stratigraphy for island southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Catherine; Soares, Pedro; Mormina, Maru; Macaulay, Vincent; Clarke, Dougie; Blumbach, Petya B; Vizuete-Forster, Matthieu; Forster, Peter; Bulbeck, David; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Richards, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) was first colonized by modern humans at least 45,000 years ago, but the extent to which the modern inhabitants trace their ancestry to the first settlers is a matter of debate. It is widely held, in both archaeology and linguistics, that they are largely descended from a second wave of dispersal, proto-Austronesian-speaking agriculturalists who originated in China and spread to Taiwan approximately 5,500 years ago. From there, they are thought to have dispersed into ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago, assimilating the indigenous populations. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial DNA diversity in the region is extremely high and includes a large number of indigenous clades. Only a fraction of these date back to the time of first settlement, and the majority appear to mark dispersals in the late-Pleistocene or early-Holocene epoch most likely triggered by postglacial flooding. There are much closer genetic links to Taiwan than to the mainland, but most of these probably predated the mid-Holocene "Out of Taiwan" event as traditionally envisioned. Only approximately 20% at most of modern mitochondrial DNAs in ISEA could be linked to such an event, suggesting that, if an agriculturalist migration did take place, it was demographically minor, at least with regard to the involvement of women. PMID:17160892

  10. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  11. Transient expression of a mitochondrial precursor protein - A new approach to study mitochondrial protein import in cells of higher eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huckriede, A; Heikema, A; Wilschut, J; Agsteribbe, E

    1996-01-01

    In order to study mitochondrial protein import in the context of whole cell metabolism, we have used the transfection technique based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV) to express a mitochondrial precursor protein within BHK21 cells and human fibroblasts. Recombinant SFV particles mediate a highly effici

  12. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harasima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  13. Three dimensional reconstruction of the human skeletal muscle mitochondrial network as a tool to assess mitochondrial content and structural organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Rannvá; Larsen, Steen; Dohlmann, Tine L;

    2015-01-01

    with 3D reconstruction was used as a tool to analyze mitochondrial morphology and measure mitochondrial fractional volume. Results: Most type I and type II muscle fibers have tubular highly interconnected profusion mitochondria, which are thicker and more structured in type I muscle fibers (Figure 1...

  14. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore contributes to the neuroprotection induced by activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-pingWU; FangSHEN; QiangXIA

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the neuroprotection via activating mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKTP) is mediated by the inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawleyrats were undergoing 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion(MCAO) by introducing a nylon monofilament through the external

  15. Clonal expansion of early to mid-life mitochondrial DNA point mutations drives mitochondrial dysfunction during human ageing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaves, L.C.; Nooteboom, M.; Elson, J.L.; Tuppen, H.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Commane, D.M.; Arasaradnam, R.P.; Khrapko, K.; Taylor, R.W.; Kirkwood, T.B.; Mathers, J.C.; Turnbull, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related decline in the integrity of mitochondria is an important contributor to the human ageing process. In a number of ageing stem cell populations, this decline in mitochondrial function is due to clonal expansion of individual mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations within single cells. Ho

  16. Mitochondrial DNA background modulates the assembly kinetics of OXPHOS complexes in a cellular model of mitochondrial disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pello, R.; Martin, M.A.; Carelli, V.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Achilli, A.; Pala, M.; Torroni, A.; Gomez-Duran, A.; Ruiz-Pesini, E.; Martinuzzi, A.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Arenas, J.; Ugalde, C.

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disorder, is mostly due to three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in respiratory chain complex I subunit genes: 3460/ND1, 11778/ND4 and 14484/ND6. Despite considerable clinical evidences, a genetic modifying role of the m

  17. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene MCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E; Hines, Kevin J; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett A; Cheung, Joseph Y; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2015-03-03

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function, and when cytosolic Ca2+ concentration becomes too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+ -permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+ -regulated transcription factor CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein) directly bound the MCU promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulates mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+ -dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+ uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA copy number - but not a mitochondrial tandem CC to TT transition - is increased in sun-exposed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Daniel; Mahler, Bettina; Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Bergemann, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are causatively associated with photo-ageing and are used as biomarkers of UV exposure. The most prominent mitochondrial mutation is the common deletion (CD), which is induced in many tissues by oxidative stress. More photo-specific mutations might be CC to TT tandem transitions which arise from UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. As nucleotide excision repair is absent in mitochondria, this DNA damage can presumably not be repaired resulting in high mitochondrial mutation levels. Here, we analysed levels of the CD, a mitochondrial and a chromosomal tandem transition in epidermis and dermis from exposed and less UV-exposed skin. We also analysed mtDNA copy number, for which changes as a result of oxidative stress have been described in different experimental settings. Whereas mitochondrial tandem transition levels were surprisingly low with no discernible correlation with UV exposure, mtDNA copy number and CD were significantly increased in UV-exposed samples.

  19. The MTL1 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for Both Translation and Splicing of the Mitochondrial NADH DEHYDROGENASE SUBUNIT7 mRNA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïli, Nawel; Planchard, Noelya; Arnal, Nadège; Quadrado, Martine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Dahan, Jennifer; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Mireau, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial translation involves a complex interplay of ancient bacteria-like features and host-derived functionalities. Although the basic components of the mitochondrial translation apparatus have been recognized, very few protein factors aiding in recruiting ribosomes on mitochondria-encoded messenger RNA (mRNAs) have been identified in higher plants. In this study, we describe the identification of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MITOCHONDRIAL TRANSLATION FACTOR1 (MTL1) protein, a new member of the Pentatricopeptide Repeat family, and show that it is essential for the translation of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) mRNA. We demonstrate that mtl1 mutant plants fail to accumulate the Nad7 protein, even though the nad7 mature mRNA is produced and bears the same 5' and 3' extremities as in wild-type plants. We next observed that polysome association of nad7 mature mRNA is specifically disrupted in mtl1 mutants, indicating that the absence of Nad7 results from a lack of translation of nad7 mRNA. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial translation requires the intervention of gene-specific nucleus-encoded PPR trans-factors and that their action does not necessarily involve the 5' processing of their target mRNA, as observed previously. Interestingly, a partial decrease in nad7 intron 2 splicing was also detected in mtl1 mutants, suggesting that MTL1 is also involved in group II intron splicing. However, this second function appears to be less essential for nad7 expression than its role in translation. MTL1 will be instrumental to understand the multifunctionality of PPR proteins and the mechanisms governing mRNA translation and intron splicing in plant mitochondria. PMID:26537562

  20. Frequent, geographically structured heteroplasmy in the mitochondria of a flowering plant, ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levsen, N; Bergero, R; Charlesworth, D; Wolff, K

    2016-07-01

    Recent research has convincingly documented cases of mitochondrial heteroplasmy in a small set of wild and cultivated plant species. Heteroplasmy is suspected to be common in flowering plants and investigations of additional taxa may help understand the mechanisms generating heteroplasmy as well as its effects on plant phenotypes. The role of mitochondrial heteroplasmy is of particular interest in plants as cytoplasmic male sterility is controlled by mitochondrial genotypes, sometimes leading to co-occurring female and hermaphroditic individuals (gynodioecy). Paternal leakage may be important in the evolution of mating systems in such populations. We conducted a genetic survey of the gynodioecious plant Plantago lanceolata, in which heteroplasmy has not previously been reported, and estimated the frequencies of mitochondrial genotypes and heteroplasmy. Sanger sequence genotyping of 179 individuals from 15 European populations for two polymorphic mitochondrial loci, atp6 and rps12, identified 15 heteroplasmic individuals. These were distributed among 6 of the 10 populations that had polymorphisms in the target loci and represented 8% of all sampled individuals and 15% of the individuals in those 6 populations. The incidence was highest in Northern England and Scotland. Our results are consistent with geographic differences in the incidence of paternal leakage and/or the rates of nuclear restoration of male fertility. PMID:26956565

  1. Defects in mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation influence virulence in the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Matthias; Klose, Jana; Kronstad, James W

    2012-08-01

    An understanding of metabolic adaptation during the colonization of plants by phytopathogenic fungi is critical for developing strategies to protect crops. Lipids are abundant in plant tissues, and fungal phytopathogens in the phylum basidiomycota possess both peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways to utilize this potential carbon source. Previously, we demonstrated a role for the peroxisomal β-oxidation enzyme Mfe2 in the filamentous growth, virulence, and sporulation of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. However, mfe2 mutants still caused disease symptoms, thus prompting a more detailed investigation of β-oxidation. We now demonstrate that a defect in the had1 gene encoding hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase for mitochondrial β-oxidation also influences virulence, although its paralog, had2, makes only a minor contribution. Additionally, we identified a gene encoding a polypeptide with similarity to the C terminus of Mfe2 and designated it Mfe2b; this gene makes a contribution to virulence only in the background of an mfe2Δ mutant. We also show that short-chain fatty acids induce cell death in U. maydis and that a block in β-oxidation leads to toxicity, likely because of the accumulation of toxic intermediates. Overall, this study reveals that β-oxidation has a complex influence on the formation of disease symptoms by U. maydis that includes potential metabolic contributions to proliferation in planta and an effect on virulence-related morphogenesis.

  2. Tissue mitochondrial DNA changes. A stochastic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsidas, G; Kovalenko, S A; Heffernan, D R; Yarovaya, N; Kramarova, L; Stojanovski, D; Borg, J; Islam, M M; Caragounis, A; Linnane, A W

    2000-06-01

    Several lines of evidence support the view that the bioenergetic function of the mitochondria in postmitotic tissue deteriorates during normal aging. Skeletal muscle is one such tissue that undergoes age-related fiber loss and atrophy and an age-associated rise in the number of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient fibers. With such metabolic pressure placed on skeletal muscle it would be an obvious advantage to supplement the cellular requirement for energy by up-regulating glycolysis, and alternative pathway for energy synthesis. Analysis of rat skeletal muscle utilizing antibodies directed against key enzymes involved in glycolysis has provided evidence of an age-associated increase in the enzymes involved in glycolysis. Fructose-6-phosphate kinase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase protein levels appeared to increase in the soleus, gracilis, and quadriceps muscle from aged rats. The increase in the level of these proteins appeared to correlate to a corresponding decrease in the amount of cytochrome c oxidase protein measured in the same tissue. Together these results are interpreted to represent a general upregulation of glycolysis that occurs in response to the age-associated decrease in mitochondrial energy capacity. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mutations may accumulate with advancing age until they reach a threshold level were they impinge on the bioenergy capacity of the cell or tissue. Evidence indicates that mtDNA from the skeletal muscle of both aged rats and humans not only undergoes changes at the nucleotide sequence level (mutations and DNA damage), but also undergoes modifications at the tertiary level to generate unique age-related conformational mtDNA species. One particular age-related conformational form was only detected in aged rat tissues with high demands on respiration, specifically in heart, kidney, soleus muscle, and, to a lesser extent, the quadriceps muscle. The age-related form was not

  3. Tissue mitochondrial DNA changes. A stochastic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsidas, G; Kovalenko, S A; Heffernan, D R; Yarovaya, N; Kramarova, L; Stojanovski, D; Borg, J; Islam, M M; Caragounis, A; Linnane, A W

    2000-06-01

    Several lines of evidence support the view that the bioenergetic function of the mitochondria in postmitotic tissue deteriorates during normal aging. Skeletal muscle is one such tissue that undergoes age-related fiber loss and atrophy and an age-associated rise in the number of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient fibers. With such metabolic pressure placed on skeletal muscle it would be an obvious advantage to supplement the cellular requirement for energy by up-regulating glycolysis, and alternative pathway for energy synthesis. Analysis of rat skeletal muscle utilizing antibodies directed against key enzymes involved in glycolysis has provided evidence of an age-associated increase in the enzymes involved in glycolysis. Fructose-6-phosphate kinase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase protein levels appeared to increase in the soleus, gracilis, and quadriceps muscle from aged rats. The increase in the level of these proteins appeared to correlate to a corresponding decrease in the amount of cytochrome c oxidase protein measured in the same tissue. Together these results are interpreted to represent a general upregulation of glycolysis that occurs in response to the age-associated decrease in mitochondrial energy capacity. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mutations may accumulate with advancing age until they reach a threshold level were they impinge on the bioenergy capacity of the cell or tissue. Evidence indicates that mtDNA from the skeletal muscle of both aged rats and humans not only undergoes changes at the nucleotide sequence level (mutations and DNA damage), but also undergoes modifications at the tertiary level to generate unique age-related conformational mtDNA species. One particular age-related conformational form was only detected in aged rat tissues with high demands on respiration, specifically in heart, kidney, soleus muscle, and, to a lesser extent, the quadriceps muscle. The age-related form was not

  4. Mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species play a vital role in the salicylic acid signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjun Nie

    Full Text Available Plant mitochondria constitute a major source of ROS and are proposed to act as signaling organelles in the orchestration of defense response. At present, the signals generated and then integrated by mitochondria are still limited. Here, fluorescence techniques were used to monitor the events of mitochondria in vivo, as well as the induction of mitochondrial signaling by a natural defensive signal chemical salicylic acid (SA. An inhibition of respiration was observed in isolated mitochondria subjected to SA. The cytochrome reductase activity analysis in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that SA might act directly on the complex III in the respiration chain by inhibiting the activity. With this alteration, a quick burst of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS was stimulated. SA-induced mtROS caused mitochondrial morphology transition in leaf tissue or protoplasts expressing mitochondria-GFP (43C5 and depolarization of membrane potential. However, the application of AsA, an H2O2 scavenger, significantly prevented both events, indicating that both of them are attributable to ROS accumulation. In parallel, SA-induced mtROS up-regulated AOX1a transcript abundance and this induction was correlated with the disease resistance, whereas AsA-pretreatment interdicted this effect. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of SA-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the SA-mediated biological processes, including plant defense response.

  5. Drosophila clueless is highly expressed in larval neuroblasts, affects mitochondrial localization and suppresses mitochondrial oxidative damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sen

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critical for neuronal function due to the high demand of ATP in these cell types. During Drosophila development, neuroblasts in the larval brain divide asymmetrically to populate the adult central nervous system. While many of the proteins responsible for maintaining neuroblast cell fate and asymmetric cell divisions are known, little is know about the role of metabolism and mitochondria in neuroblast division and maintenance. The gene clueless (clu has been previously shown to be important for mitochondrial function. clu mutant adults have severely shortened lifespans and are highly uncoordinated. Part of their lack of coordination is due to defects in muscle, however, in this study we have identified high levels of Clu expression in larval neuroblasts and other regions of the dividing larval brain. We show while mitochondria in clu mutant neuroblasts are mislocalized during the cell cycle, surprisingly, overall brain morphology appears to be normal. This is explained by our observation that clu mutant larvae have normal levels of ATP and do not suffer oxidative damage, in sharp contrast to clu mutant adults. Mutations in two other genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, technical knockout and stress sensitive B, do not cause neuroblast mitochondrial mislocalization, even though technical knockout mutant larvae suffer oxidative damage. These results suggest Clu functions upstream of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, has a role in suppressing oxidative damage in the cell, and that lack of Clu's specific function causes mitochondria to mislocalize. These results also support the previous observation that larval development relies on aerobic glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation. Thus Clu's role in mitochondrial function is not critical during larval development, but is important for pupae and adults.

  6. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures.

  7. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures. PMID:27566481

  8. SCID mice containing muscle with human mitochondrial DNA mutations. An animal model for mitochondrial DNA defects.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, K M; Watt, D J; Lightowlers, R N; Johnson, M A; Relvas, J B; Taanman, J.W.; Turnbull, D M

    1998-01-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial genome are important causes of disease. Despite major advances in our investigation of patients, there is no effective therapy. Progress in this area is limited by the absence of any animal models in which we can evaluate treatment. To develop such a model we have injected human myoblasts into the tibialis anterior of SCID mice after inducing necrosis. After injection of normal human myoblasts, regenerating fibers expressed human beta-spectrin, confirming they wer...

  9. Multiple Targets for Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is rapidly gaining the interest of researchers and practitioners as a prominent liability in drug discovery and development, accounting for a growing proportion of preclinical drug attrition and post-market withdrawals or black box warnings by the U.S. FDA. To date, the focus of registries of drugs that elicit mitochondrial toxicity has been largely restricted to those that either inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) or uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less appreciated are the toxicities that are secondary to the drug affecting either the molecular regulation, assembly or incorporation of the ETC into the inner mitochondrial membrane or those that limit substrate availability. The current article describes the complexities of molecular events and biochemical pathways required to sustain mitochondrial fidelity and substrate homeostasis with examples of drugs that interfere which the various pathways. The principal objective of this review is to shed light on the broader scope of drug-induced mitochondrial toxicities and how these secondary targets may account for a large portion of drug failures. PMID:25973981

  10. HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL tRNA MUTATIONS IN MATERNALLY INHERITED DEAFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; GONG Sha-sha; TANG Xiao-wen; ZHU Yi; GUAN Min-xin

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes have been shown to be associated with maternally inherited syn-dromic and non-syndromic deafness. Among those, mutations such as tRNALeu(UUR) 3243A>G associated with syndromic deafness are often present in heteroplasmy, and the non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mu-tations including tRNASer(UCN) 7445A>G are often in homoplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary factors underlying the development of hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNAThr 15927G>A and tRNASer(UCN) 7444G>A are insufficient to produce a deafness phe-notype, but always act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, and can modulate their phenotypic manifestation. These tRNA mutations may alter the structure and function of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs and cause failures in tRNAs metabolism. Thereby, the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and subsequent defects in respiration caused by these tRNA mutations, results in mitochon-drial dysfunctions and eventually leads to the development of hearing loss. Here, we summarized the deaf-ness-associated mitochondrial tRNA mutations and discussed the pathophysiology of these mitochondrial tRNA mutations, and we hope these data will provide a foundation for the early diagnosis, management, and treatment of maternally inherited deafness.

  11. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  12. Analysis of Mitochondrial haemoglobin in Parkinson's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Freya; Greville-Heygate, Oliver; Liddell, Susan; Emes, Richard; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an early feature of neurodegeneration. We have shown there are mitochondrial haemoglobin changes with age and neurodegeneration. We hypothesised that altered physiological processes are associated with recruitment and localisation of haemoglobin to these organelles. To confirm a dynamic localisation of haemoglobin we exposed Drosophila melanogaster to cyclical hypoxia with recovery. With a single cycle of hypoxia and recovery we found a relative accumulation of haemoglobin in the mitochondria compared with the cytosol. An additional cycle of hypoxia and recovery led to a significant increase of mitochondrial haemoglobin (pbrains. Relative mitochondrial/cytosolic quantities of haemoglobin were obtained for the cortical region, substantia nigra and cerebellum. In age matched post-mortem brain mitochondrial haemoglobin ratios change, decreasing with disease duration in female cerebellum samples (n=7). The change is less discernible in male cerebellum (n=18). In cerebellar mitochondria, haemoglobin localisation in males with long disease duration shifts from the intermembrane space to the outer membrane of the organelle. These new data illustrate dynamic localisation of mitochondrial haemoglobin within the cell. Mitochondrial haemoglobin should be considered in the context of gender differences characterised in Parkinson's disease. It has been postulated that cerebellar circuitry may be activated to play a protective role in individuals with Parkinson's. The changing localisation of intracellular haemoglobin in response to hypoxia presents a novel pathway to delineate the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's disease. PMID:27181046

  13. Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism and Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Rossignol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical mitochondrial diseases occur in a subset of individuals with autism and are usually caused by genetic anomalies or mitochondrial respiratory pathway deficits. However, in many cases of autism, there is evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD without the classic features associated with mitochondrial disease. MtD appears to be more common in autism and presents with less severe signs and symptoms. It is not associated with discernable mitochondrial pathology in muscle biopsy specimens despite objective evidence of lowered mitochondrial functioning. Exposure to environ-mental toxins is the likely etiology for MtD in autism. This dysfunction then contributes to a number of diagnostic symptoms and comorbidities observed in autism including: cognitive impairment, language deficits, abnormal energy metabolism, chronic gastrointestinal problems, abnormalities in fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxidative stress. MtD and oxidative stress may also explain the high male to female ratio found in autism due to increased male vulnerability to these dysfunctions. Biomarkers for mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified, but seem widely under-utilized despite available therapeutic interventions. Nutritional supplementation to decrease oxidative stress along with factors to improve reduced glutathione, as well as hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT represent supported and rationale approaches. The underlying pathophysiology and autistic symptoms of affected individuals would be expected to either improve or cease worsening once effective treatment for MtD is implemented.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  15. Audiological evaluation in Chinese patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yuhe; Xue Junfang; Zhao Danhua; Chen Li; Yuan Yun; Wang Zhaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Background Hearing impairment has been reported to be common in patients with mitochondrial disorders,a group of diseases characterized by pleiomorphic clinical manifestations due to defects in oxidative phosphorylation of mitochondria.This study aimed to investigate the audiological characteristics in a large cohort of patients with mitochondrial disease.Methods Comprehensive audiological evaluations,including pure tone audiometry,tympanometry,speech audiometry,otoacoustic emissions,electrocochleography and auditory brainstem evoked potentials,were performed in 73 Chinese patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and with confirmed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects.Results Among the patients,71% had hearing impairment.However,the incidence rate and severity of hearing impairment were much less in the chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) subtype than in the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy,lactic acidosis,and stroke-like episodes (MELAS),myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF) and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) subtypes.While most of our patients had a predominantly cochlea origin for the hearing deficit,five patients had an auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and three patients had impairment of both cochlea and auditory codex.Conclusions Various portions of the auditory system could be involved in patients with mitochondrial diseases,including cochlea,auditory nerve,auditory pathway and cortex.Hearing loss was more associated with multisystem involvement.Genotype,mutant load of mtDNA and other unknown factors could contribute to heterogeneity of hearing impairment in mitochondrial disease.

  16. Measurement of mitochondrial NADH and FAD autofluorescence in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, Fernando; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2015-01-01

    In the process of energy production, mitochondrial networks are key elements to allow metabolism of substrates into ATP. Many pathological conditions have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction as mitochondria are associated with a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, any disruption in the energy production induces devastating effects that can ultimately lead to cell death due to chemical ischemia. To address the mitochondrial health and function, there are several bioenergetic parameters reflecting either whole mitochondrial functionality or individual mitochondrial complexes. Particularly, metabolism of nutrients in the tricarboxylic acid cycle provides substrates used to generate electron carriers (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NADH] and flavin adenine dinucleotide [FADH2]) which ultimately donate electrons to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The levels of NADH and FADH2 can be estimated through imaging of NADH/NAD(P)H or FAD autofluorescence. This report demonstrates how to perform and analyze NADH/NAD(P)H and FAD autofluorescence in a time-course-dependent manner and provides information about NADH and FAD redox indexes both reflecting the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). Furthermore, total pools of NADH and FAD can be estimated providing information about the rate of substrate supply into the ETC. Finally, the analysis of NADH autofluorescence after induction of maximal respiration can offer information about the pentose phosphate pathway activity where glucose can be alternatively oxidized instead of pyruvate. PMID:25631020

  17. Mechanisms of ER Stress-Mediated Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    During apoptosis, the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) represents a point-of-no-return as it commits the cell to death. Here we have assessed the role of caspases, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore on ER stress-induced MOMP and subsequent cell death. Induction of ER stress leads to upregulation of several genes such as Grp78, Edem1, Erp72, Atf4, Wars, Herp, p58ipk, and ERdj4 and leads to caspase activation, release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins and dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from caspase-9, -2 and, -3 knock-out mice were resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis which correlated with decreased processing of pro-caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with caspase inhibitors (Boc-D.fmk and DEVD.fmk) attenuated ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. However, only deficiency of caspase-9 and -2 could prevent ER stress-mediated loss of DeltaPsim. Bcl-2 overexpression or pretreatment of cells with the cell permeable BH4 domain (BH4-Tat) or the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors, bongkrekic acid or cyclosporine A, attenuated the ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. These data suggest a role for caspase-9 and -2, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during ER stress-induced apoptosis.

  18. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Edith E., E-mail: ed.mueller@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Mayr, Johannes A., E-mail: h.mayr@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Zimmermann, Franz A., E-mail: f.zimmermann@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Feichtinger, Rene G., E-mail: r.feichtinger@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Stanger, Olaf, E-mail: o.stanger@rbht.nhs.uk [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Sperl, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.sperl@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Kofler, Barbara, E-mail: b.kofler@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined OXPHOS and citrate synthase enzyme activities in HEK293 cells devoid of mtDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes partially encoded by mtDNA show reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also the entirely nuclear encoded complex II and citrate synthase exhibit reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of mtDNA induces a feedback mechanism that downregulates complex II and citrate synthase. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 {rho}{sup 0} cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in {rho}{sup 0} cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  19. Prevalence of migraine in persons with the 3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, S.; Esserlind, A-L; Andersson, Z;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Over the last three decades mitochondrial dysfunction has been postulated to be a potential mechanism in migraine pathogenesis. The lifetime prevalence of migraine in persons carrying the 3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA was investigated. METHODS: In this cross...... of mitochondrial dysfunction and susceptibility to migraine. Mitochondrial DNA aberrations may contribute to the pathogenesis of migraine....

  20. Unraveling the complexities of SIRT1-mediated mitochondrial regulation in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Philp, Andrew; Schenk, Simon

    2013-01-01

    SIRT1 is a purported central regulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. Herein we discuss our recent work utilizing conditional mouse models, which highlight the complexities of SIRT1 biology in vivo, and question its role in regulating mitochondrial function and mitochondrial adaptions to endurance exercise. Further, we discuss the possible contribution of proposed SIRT1 substrates to muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.