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Sample records for bhutan

  1. Bhutan at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On Tuesday 12 March, CERN received an extraordinary visitor, a very great representative of a very tiny country. His Royal Highness, Dasho Jigme Khesar Namgyal Wangchuk, Crown Prince of Bhutan, visited the assembly site of CMS. For those whose geographical knowledge is weak, Bhutan is a tiny bhuddist kingdom, nestled in the Himalayas and surrounded by two giants, India and China.

  2. Chikungunya fever outbreak, Bhutan, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, Sonam; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Dorji, Tshering; Tobgay, Tashi; Dorji, Tandin; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    In 2012, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was reported for the first time in Bhutan. IgM ELISA results were positive for 36/210 patient samples; PCR was positive for 32/81. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that Bhutan CHIKV belongs to the East/Central/South African genotype. Appropriate responses to future outbreaks require a system of surveillance and improved laboratory capacity.

  3. Free Education in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yezer, Yezer; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    ’. It focuses on the interplay of education expenditures and international development assistance in the light of macro-economic performance. Expenditures for the growing outlay of social services are impinging on the government budget and the future sustainability of ‘free education’ in Bhutan is questionable......Paper for the International Workshop “Development Challenges in Bhutan”, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, 29-30 May, 2013. Abstract This paper attempts to give insight into the dilemma faced by the government in terms of rising costs and growing demand for social services especially ‘free education...

  4. Moist temperate forest butterflies of western Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun P. Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Random surveys were carried out in moist temperate forests (1,860–3,116 m around Bunakha Village and Dochula Pass, near Thimphu in western Bhutan, recording 65 species of butterflies.  Of these, 11 species, viz., Straightwing Blue Orthomiella pontis pontis Elwes, Slate Royal Maneca bhotea bhotea Moore, Dull Green Hairstreak Esakiozephyrus icana Moore, Yellow Woodbrown Lethe nicetas Hewitson, Small Silverfork Zophoessa jalaurida elwesi Moore, Scarce Labyrinth, Neope pulahina (Evans, Chumbi Wall Chonala masoni Elwes, Pale Hockeystick Sailer Neptis manasa manasa Moore and White Commodore Parasarpa dudu dudu Westwood, are restricted to the eastern Himalaya, northeastern India and Myanmar.  Two other species, Tawny Mime Chiasa agestor agestor (Gray and Himalayan Spotted Flat Celaenorrhinus munda Moore have been only rarely recorded from Bhutan and a few individuals of the rare Bhutan Glory Bhutanitis lidderdalei Atkinson were also recorded near Bunakha.  

  5. Assessment of solar energy programmes in Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthan, B.; Monga, P. [UNIDO, Vienna (Austria); Giri, S. [UNDP, United Nation Building, Thimphu (Bhutan); Adhikari, R.N. [Norlha Associates, Thimphu (Bhutan)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reports on the renewable energy and solar electrification programmes in Bhutan. Findings from a field survey of PV systems have been presented and lessons identified. A discussion of the key results from the assessments are also presented and conclusions drawn. The paper provides direct feedback on the performance of PV systems in difficult geographical conditions such as those prevailing in Bhutan. The results and findings of this paper are relevant to PV industry targeting rural electrification markets and policy makers and aid-planners involved in PV rural electrification initiatives. (authors)

  6. Market Performance of Potato Auctions in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilburg, van A.; Kuiper, W.E.; Swinkels, R.

    2008-01-01

    Market performance with respect to a main horticultural export commodity in Bhutan is the subject of this paper. Imperfections in (market) infrastructure and market structure and conduct may prevent an optimal price for farmers. Market performance is assessed by testing the law of one price for this

  7. Cordyceps collected from Bhutan, an appropriate alternative of Cordyceps sinensis

    OpenAIRE

    Ding-Tao Wu; Guang-Ping Lv; Jian Zheng; Qian Li; Shuang-Cheng Ma; Shao-Ping Li; Jing Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Natural Cordyceps collected in Bhutan has been widely used as natural Cordyceps sinensis, an official species of Cordyceps used as Chinese medicines, around the world in recent years. However, whether Cordyceps from Bhutan could be really used as natural C. sinensis remains unknown. Therefore, DNA sequence, bioactive components including nucleosides and polysaccharides in twelve batches of Cordyceps from Bhutan were firstly investigated, and compared with natural C. sinensis. Results showed t...

  8. Bhutan: Educational Challenges in the Land of the Thunder Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, June A.

    2013-01-01

    The Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan, where images of magical splendor obscure its challenges, provides a viewpoint from which to understand the contradictions that emerging economies face as they move towards mass education. Isolated from the outside world in every sense except for the mythologies that surround it, Bhutan is attempting to move from a…

  9. Bibliography and checklist of the dragonflies and damselflies of Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gyeltshen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of literature containing distribution records of dragonflies and damselflies in Bhutan.  Based on this an annotated checklist is presented which contains 92 species.  Camacinia gigantea (Brauer, 1867 and Libellago lineata (Burmeister, 1839 are listed as new to Bhutan

  10. The GANSSER seismological network in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, G.

    2013-12-01

    Our project investigates the Geodynamics ANd Seismic Structure of the Eastern-Himalaya Region (GANSSER). It aims to reveal the first seismological images beneath Bhutan and as such is a tribute to the late Augusto Gansser, geological discoverer of Bhutan [1]. Project GANSSER builds on the deployment of a temporary broadband seismometer network. This consists of 38 stations deployed across the Kingdom of Bhutan. Two south-north segments in the western and eastern part of the country constitute densely spaced lines of ca. 7 km inter-station distance with respectively 16 and 14 stations. The main technique to apply is receiver functions in order to image the Moho as it deepens from India to Tibet, thus revealing how the crust thickens in the Eastern Himalayas. Further 8 stations are located in-between these lines, in the central part of the country. The main purpose here is to characterize the seismicity of the country in a homogeneous manner. Altogether, the station network will allow the application of different classical seismological techniques, such as teleseismic, local earthquake, ambient noise and attenuation tomography. The dataset will also be exploited to try to locate landslides that cause a significant hazard, especially in and after the summer monsoon season. The station network described above has been deployed in January 2013 and is planned to operate until spring 2014. A first visit to the stations in April 2013 found operational conditions better than the average for temporary seismological networks. Data recovery in this time period exceeded 90%. Power spectral density diagrams indicate that the noise levels at our station sites are within the bounds of the Peterson Noise Model bounds [2] and in some cases are significantly less than the high-noise model. Starting April 2013 remote communications pathways with one third of the stations are tested. The scientific goals of Project GANSSER include: the determination of the structure and physical

  11. Science Education in Bhutan: Issues and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann; Tenzin, Wangpo; Johnson, David; Ramachandran, Kiran

    2012-02-01

    Science education in a developing country is pivotal in the developmental process. Bhutan, like other developing countries, places great importance in institutionalising a relevant and challenging science curriculum for all of its school-aged children. A number of factors have made the review of the science curriculum in Bhutan a priority including international debates about scientific literacy and the changing time and needs of Bhutanese society and its students. This article reports on the findings of a study to investigate the present status and challenges of the current science curriculum from interviews with teachers, students, and other key stakeholders such as higher education lecturers and employers. The study also draws on observations of science classes and key curriculum documents. This study was conducted as a prelude to the major science curriculum reform prioritised in the government's 10th Five Year Plan (2008-2012) in order to provide a research informed perspective for science curriculum development. The findings from the research are reported here and show a number of positive issues in science education including good student motivation in lower classes. Challenges are identified including issues of teacher development, resourcing, and fragmentation and discontinuity in the current curriculum. These issues and challenges are discussed in the light of literature on science education in developing countries.

  12. Opening doors to knowledge in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    School girls, teachers, and health school students were surveyed, using 3 different questionnaires, in January 1993. Catherine Payne, former research associate of the Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania, visited Bhutan from August 18 through September 4, 1993, to assist with the interpretation of results and to interview teachers in schools where the new curriculum would be introduced and officials who were writing it. Results were released in October 1993. 160 young women (10-20 years of age) from 5 schools were surveyed and another 60 were interviewed by Payne. 25% of the surveyed girls understood the connection between menstruation and reproduction. Of those who had heard of menstruation, 60% had heard about it from their friends; 30%, from siblings; 27%, from mothers; and 10%, from schools. Teachers in the survey were supportive of the study and recognized the importance of reproductive health education. Also, officials of the education and health ministries, epidemiologists, experts in information, education, and communication (IEC), and district health officers attended a 2-day workshop directed at local data collection and analysis of this type. Although teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are increasing in Bhutan, family planning services are not reaching youth, particularly those who do not attend school or do not have children. Hospitals provide contraceptives mainly to those over 21, and outreach clinics are not catering to the family planning needs of minors. One of the recommendations of this survey/workshop was to provide correct information on reproductive health to youth.

  13. Happy Environments: Bhutan, Interdependence and the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Schroeder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing trend to understand economic and environmental policies in terms of multiple dimensions and “interdependence.” Bhutan is increasingly seen as an operational model with its Gross National Happiness (GNH strategy. GNH, which is rooted in Mahayana Buddhism, is a framework and set of policy tools that conceptualizes sustainability as interdependent ecological, economic, social, cultural and good governance concerns. Bhutan’s practical GNH experience illustrates a significant ability to positively couple economic growth with a healthy environment. Can the “West”—with its legacy of either/or economics—learn anything from Bhutan’s multidimensional policy experiment? At first, it would seem not. It is questionable whether the West can replicate Bhutan’s unorthodox policy tools as we do not have a balancing set of Buddhist values rooted in mainstream culture. We are not equipped to respond to the many unintended consequences of interdependent policy because we do not yet understand what “interdependence” actually entails. There is hope, but much of it exists in the grey literature of ecological economics. This literature is in urgent need of greater exposure if we are to imagine and enact sustainability policy tools that are truly sensitive to interdependence, and thus follow Bhutan on its perilous but necessary journey.

  14. CERN visit of His Excellency Mr.Kinga Singye / Bhutan

    CERN Document Server

    Hoch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    CERN visit of His Excellency Mr Kinga Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  15. Taxonomic review of the superfamily Pyraloidea in Bhutan (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatishwor Singh Irungbam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The result of an investigation of the lepidopteran fauna of Central and Southern Bhutan (Bumthang, Dagana, Trongsa, Tsirang, and Sarpang districts is presented in this study. The investigation was the part of the Invertebrate Documentation Project of Bhutan initiated by the National Biodiversity Center, Thimphu, funded by the Bhutan Trust Fund for Environmental Conservation, Thimphu. The checklist was based on the systematic collections by light trapping at nine locations and the occasional collections from native forest and gardens within the five districts of Central and Southern Bhutan. The specimens were photographed and collected as specimens for future identification and reference. A list of 182 species belonging to families Crambidae and Pyralidae is presented, including 92 species as new records for the country. All the studied specimens are deposited at “Invertebrate Referral Collection Center” at the National Biodiversity Center, Thimphu.

  16. Malaria prevention and control in Bhutan: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobgay, Tashi; Torres, Cristina E; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2011-03-01

    This paper highlights on the current malaria situations in Bhutan and its challenges for future prevention and control strategies. In Bhutan, malaria affects more than half of the entire population, mostly residing in the southern districts bordering with Indian states of Assam and West Bengal. Over the past ten years, due to concerted efforts, the morbidity and mortality due to malaria has significantly declined. These preventive and control measures focused on the mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal treated nets, focal indoor residual spray and use of artemisinin-based combination therapies. However, considerable challenge lies ahead and research is needed to generate local evidence for sustainable elimination of malaria from Bhutan. The article should be of value and interest to planners, malaria programs and for future researchers on malaria in Bhutan.

  17. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  18. Bhutan tõrjus India oma asjade ajamiselt / Allan Espenberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Espenberg, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Bhutani kuningas Jigme Khesar Namgyal Wangchuk ja India president Abdul Kalam allkirjastasid lepingu, mille kohaselt saab Bhutan endale suuremad õigused ja vabadused iseseisvamalt välis- ja kaitsepoliitikat ajada

  19. Cordyceps collected from Bhutan, an appropriate alternative of Cordyceps sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ding-Tao; Lv, Guang-Ping; Zheng, Jian; Li, Qian; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Li, Shao-Ping; Zhao, Jing

    2016-11-22

    Natural Cordyceps collected in Bhutan has been widely used as natural Cordyceps sinensis, an official species of Cordyceps used as Chinese medicines, around the world in recent years. However, whether Cordyceps from Bhutan could be really used as natural C. sinensis remains unknown. Therefore, DNA sequence, bioactive components including nucleosides and polysaccharides in twelve batches of Cordyceps from Bhutan were firstly investigated, and compared with natural C. sinensis. Results showed that the fungus of Cordyceps from Bhutan was C. sinensis and the host insect belonged to Hepialidae sp. In addition, nucleosides and their bases such as guanine, guanosine, hypoxanthine, uridine, inosine, thymidine, adenine, and adenosine, as well as compositional monosaccharides, partial acid or enzymatic hydrolysates, molecular weights and contents of polysaccharides in Cordyceps from Bhutan were all similar to those of natural C. sinensis. All data suggest that Cordyceps from Bhutan is a rational alternative of natural C. sinensis, which is beneficial for the improvement of their performance in health and medicinal food areas.

  20. Kingdom of Bhutan VIP visit at CERN / CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Yeshey Zimba Member of Parliament and His Excellency Daw Penjo Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan visiting at CERN the LHC tunnel and the CMS experiment. Further guests were : Mrs Daw Zam, Mrs Thuji Zangmo, Mr. Rinchen Dorji, Mrs Dechen Wangmo, Ms Choni Ome Guided by R. Voss, Michael Hoch, Tiziano Camporesi

  1. Lessons from Bhutan: Embrace Cultural Differences to Effect Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Laurie; Telsey, Alison; McCormack, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Nestled in the Himalayan Mountains, Bhutan, a Buddhist country, is one of the most isolated nations in the world. After spending a month there, the authors all agreed it deserved its title of "The Last Shangri-La." Their team of professional development specialists spent the summer of 2010 providing professional development in the basic…

  2. World Culture and ICT use – a Study from Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Pär-Ola Mikael; Choeda, Choeda; Dukpa, Dorji

    2015-01-01

    understanding in international projects and global appropriation of technology may be larger than the current theorizing implies. In this paper we investigate the ICT use, with emphasis on World Culture, within Higher Education in Bhutan. We find a remarkably strong presence of World Culture among faculty...

  3. Investigation and control of anthrax outbreak at the human-animal interface, Bhutan, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Nirmal K; Tenzin; Wangdi, Karma; Dorji, Tshering; Migma; Dorjee, Jambay; Marston, Chung K; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-09-01

    In 2010, we investigated anthrax outbreak in Bhutan. A total of 43 domestic animals died, and cutaneous anthrax developed in 9 persons, and 1 died. All affected persons had contact with the carcasses of infected animals. Comprehensive preparedness and response guidelines are needed to increase public awareness of anthrax in Bhutan.

  4. An assessment of fiscal space for health in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jayendra

    2016-07-01

    Several factors are expected to put a strain on health financing in Bhutan. In a predominantly public-financed healthcare, ensuring that the health system gains sufficient fiscal space to ensure the sustainability of its financing is a critical policy concern. This fiscal space assessment bases its analysis on national surveys and statistics, international databases and review of official documents and reports. Assuming that the government health spending will continue to respond in the same way to growth as in the period 2002-2012, Bhutan can expect to see a robust increase in government investments in health. If elasticity of health expenditure with respect to GDP does not change significantly, projections indicate that per-capita government spending for health could more than double in the period 2012 to 2019. This increase from Ngultrum 2632 in 2012 to Ngultrum 6724 in 2019 could correspond to government health spending from 2.65% of GDP to 3.98% of GDP in the respective years. The country, however, needs to closely monitor and ensure that government investment in healthcare keeps pace with the growth of the national economy. Along with this, supplementary resources for healthcare could be explored through earmarked taxes and by generating efficiency gains. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Development of Distributed Learning Techniques in Bhutan and Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Rennie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses research and development work currently being conducted with universities in Bhutan and Nepal to design appropriate systems for distance and distributed learning courses among a network of campus sites. Although working from a high level of awareness of pedagogic skills, staff in the region face two significant impediments in the adoption of a more open culture of learning. Firstly, Internet access is improving rapidly, but is still generally too weak and inconsistent to allow any reliance on net-based learning solutions. Secondly, the academic culture is resistant to the recognition of the value of open-learning degrees, with subsequent difficulties in re-designing course materials for a more educationally flexible, student-centred learning environment. Some current pilot initiatives in distributed learning are described. Methods for addressing these two impediments are discussed.

  6. Municipal Solid Waste Management in Phuntsholing City, Bhutan

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    Norbu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal solid waste problem is a major concern in major cities in Bhutan. Despite the lack of reliable data on both waste composition and quantity, no studies have been conducted to identify problems and alternatives to improve the current system. The study objectives are: 1 to determine solid waste composition and generation rate; and 2 to investigate current solid waste management system. Six waste samples were selected in Phuntsholing city from three designated collection spots and from three collection vehicles and analyzed for their composition. Waste generation rate was computed from waste collected by collection vehicles. The investigation was carried out through interviews with municipal authorities, existing document reviews, and field observations. The organic fraction of solid waste composition comprised about 71 percent. The waste generation rate was estimated to 0.40 kg/capita.day. The current management system is inefficient, and recommendations are given to improve the current situation.

  7. A participatory framework to identify Gross National Happiness Issues for the development of smallholder mixed farming systems in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samdup, T.; Udo, H.M.J.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a participatory methodological framework to identify Gross National Happiness (GNH) issues at the smallholder level in Bhutan. GNH is a development paradigm of Bhutan that has increasingly drawn international attention. Its four pillars are sustainable and equitable socioeconomic

  8. Lowland forest butterflies of the Sankosh River catchment, Bhutan

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    A.P. Singh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides information on butterflies of the lowland forests of Bhutan for the first time. As a part of the biodiversity impact assessment for the proposed Sankosh hydroelectric power project, a survey was carried out along the Sankosh River catchment to study the butterfly diversity. The aim of the study was to identify species of conservation priority, their seasonality and to know the butterfly diversity potential of the area. Surveys were carried out during five different seasons (winter, spring, pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon lasting 18 days from January 2009 to March 2010. Pollard walk method was used to assess the diversity on four-line transects within 10-12 km radius of the proposed dam site. Two hundred and thirteen species, including 22 papilionids, were thus sampled. Eleven species amongst these are listed in Schedules I and II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection Act, 1972, of which 10 taxa (Pareronia avatar avatar, Nacaduba pactolus continentalis, Porostas aluta coelestis, Elymnias vasudeva vasudeva, Mycalesis mestra retus, Melanitis zitenius zitenius, Charaxes marmax, Athyma ranga ranga, Neptis manasa manasa and Neptis soma soma are of conservation priority as they are ‘rare’ in occurrence across their distribution range in the region. The maximum number of species (128 were recorded during the spring season (March and lowest (66 during July (monsoon. The seasonal pattern of variation in diversity was very typical of the pattern found in other areas of the lower foothills and adjoining plains of the Himalaya. Relative abundances of butterflies during spring varied significantly (p<0.05 as compared to winter, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. However, species composition changed with every season as Sorensen’s similarity index varied between 0.3076 to 0.5656. All these findings suggest that the lowland forests of Bhutan hold a rich and unique diversity of butterflies during every season of the year thus having

  9. Prospects of Organic Farming in Bhutan: A SWOT Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Tashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the prospects of organic agriculture (OA in Bhutan from the experts’ perspective, particularly the SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat aspect. Thirty-five Bhutanese experts were interviewed. The strengths of OA were (i good alignment of the principles of OA with Bhutan’s development philosophy, (ii strong policy and political support, (iii pristine environment, (iv OA practices similar to traditional farming, and (v compatibility of OA with the local farming knowledge. The major weaknesses were (i a lack of awareness of the benefits of OA, (ii lack of incentives, (iii shortage of farm labor, (iv small and irregular supply of organic product, (v lack of clarity in policy, (vi limited plant protection materials, and (vii a lack of coordination between agencies. Opportunities were (i a huge regional and global organic market, (ii promoting healthy lifestyle, (iii sustainable use of resources, (iv lowering dependence on food and input imports, (v development of local organic manure suppliers, (vi creating seed sovereignty, (vii conserving local crops, (viii building soil fertility, (ix introducing premium price for organic products, and (x addressing unemployment. Threats included (i increasing incidences of pests and diseases, (ii decline in sources of organic manure, and (iii limited sources of organic manures and fertilizers.

  10. The ICT-Integrated Pedagogy in the Colleges of Royal University of Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choeda, Par-Ola Zander; Penjor, Tandin; Dukpa, Dorji

    2014-01-01

    lecturers who actually attained training. The status of ICT integrated pedagogy in higher education in Bhutan is at an early stage being affected by low speed internet connectivity and lack of adequate resource as well as training in ICT integrated pedagogy. However, lecturers are highly motivated......This paper reports a research study on the integration of ICT and pedagogy in the colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan. It investigates whether ICT is integrated into the pedagogy, and if so, in what way. The samples (Faculty members) of the study were picked up randomly from ten colleges...... under Royal University of Bhutan. The study identifies the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLE), used as part of ICT-integrated pedagogy. However, the use of VLE has been found to be confined to be a platform where activities such as work plan, module descriptors, uploading assignments have been...

  11. Introduction and establishment of fluoroquinolone-resistant Shigella sonnei into Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung The, Hao; Rabaa, Maia A.; Thanh, Duy Pham; Ruekit, Sirigade; Wangchuk, Sonam; Dorji, Tshering; Tshering, Kinzang Pem; Nguyen, To Nguyen Thi; Vinh, Phat Voong; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; Minh, Chau Nguyen Ngoc; Turner, Paul; Sar, Poda; Thwaites, Guy; Holt, Kathryn E.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Jeffries Mason, Carl; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Shigella sonnei is a major contributor to the global burden of diarrhoeal disease, generally associated with dysenteric diarrhoea in developed countries but also emerging in developing countries. The reason for the recent success of S. sonnei is unknown, but is likely catalysed by its ability to acquire resistance against multiple antimicrobials. Between 2011 and 2013, S. sonnei exhibiting resistance to fluoroquinolones, the first-line treatment recommended for shigellosis, emerged in Bhutan. Aiming to reconstruct the introduction and establishment of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. sonnei populations in Bhutan, we performed whole-genome sequencing on 71 S. sonnei samples isolated in Bhutan between 2011 and 2013.We found that these strains represented an expansion of a clade within the previously described lineage III, found specifically in Central Asia. Temporal phylogenetic reconstruction demonstrated that all of the sequenced Bhutanese S. sonnei diverged from a single ancestor that was introduced into Bhutan around 2006. Our data additionally predicted that fluoroquinolone resistance, conferred by mutations in gyrA and parC, arose prior to the introduction of the founder strain into Bhutan. Once established in Bhutan, these S. sonnei had access to a broad gene pool, as indicated by the acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding plasmids and genes encoding type IV pili. The data presented here outline a model for the introduction and maintenance of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. sonnei in a new setting. Given the current circulation of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. sonnei in Asia, we speculate that this pattern of introduction is being recapitulated across the region and beyond.

  12. Habitat correlates of the red panda in the temperate forests of Bhutan.

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    Sangay Dorji

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities and associated global climate change are threatening the biodiversity in the Himalayas against a backdrop of poor knowledge of the region's threatened species. The red panda (Ailurus fulgens is a threatened mammal confined to the eastern Himalayas, and because of Bhutan's central location in the distributional range of red pandas, its forests are integral to the long-term viability of wild populations. Detailed habitat requirements of the red panda are largely speculative, and there is virtually no ecological information available on this species in Bhutan. Between 2007 and 2009, we established 615 presence/absence plots in a systematic sampling of resident habitat types within Jigme Dorji and Thrumshingla National Parks, Bhutan, to investigate broad and fine-scale red panda habitat associations. Additional locality records of red pandas were obtained from interviewing 664 park residents. Red pandas were generally confined to cool broadleaf and conifer forests from 2,110-4,389 m above sea level (asl, with the majority of records between 2,400-3,700 m asl on south and east-facing slopes. At a finer scale, multivariate analysis revealed that red pandas were strongly associated with old growth Bhutan Fir (Abies densa forest dominated by a dense cover of Yushania and Arundanaria bamboo with a high density of fallen logs and tree stumps at ground level; a high density of trees, dead snags, and rhododendron shrubs in the mid-storey; and locations that were close to water. Because Bhutan's temperate forests that encompass prime red panda habitat are also integral to human subsistence and socio-economic development, there exists an inadvertent conflict between the needs of people and red pandas. As such, careful sustainable management of Bhutan's temperate forests is necessary if a balance is to be met between the socioeconomic needs of people and the conservation goals for red pandas.

  13. Dog bites in humans and estimating human rabies mortality in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenzin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dog bites in humans are a public health problem worldwide. The issues of increasing stray dog populations, rabies outbreaks, and the risk of dogs biting humans have been frequently reported by the media in Bhutan. This study aimed to estimate the bite incidence and identify the risk factors for dog bites in humans, and to estimate human deaths from rabies in rabies endemic south Bhutan. METHODS: A hospital-based questionnaire survey was conducted during 2009-2010 among dog bites victims who visited three hospitals in Bhutan for anti-rabies vaccine injection. Decision tree modeling was used to estimate human deaths from rabies following dog bite injuries in two rabies endemic areas of south Bhutan. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty four dog bite victims were interviewed. The annual incidence of dog bites differed between the hospital catchment areas: 869.8 (95% CI: 722.8-1022.5, 293.8 (240-358.2 and 284.8 (251.2-323 per 100,000 people in Gelephu, Phuentsholing and Thimphu, respectively. Males (62% were more at risk than females (P<0.001. Children aged 5-9 years were bitten more than other age groups. The majority of victims (71% were bitten by stray dogs. No direct fatal injury was reported. In two hospital areas (Gelephu and Phuentsholing in south Bhutan the annual incidence of death from rabies was 3.14 (95% CI: 1.57-6.29 per 100,000 population. The decision tree model predicted an equivalent annual incidence of 4.67 (95% CI: 2.53-7.53 deaths/100,000 population at risk. In the absence of post exposure prophylaxis, the model predicted 19.24 (95% CI: 13.69-25.14 deaths/year in these two areas. CONCLUSIONS: Increased educational awareness of people about the risk of dog bites and rabies is necessary, particularly for children in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan.

  14. Status of Asiatic Golden Cat Catopuma temminckii Vigors & Horsfield, 1827 (Carnivora: Felidae in Bhutan

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    Tashi Dhendup

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Asiatic Golden Cat is a Near Threatened wild cat species as listed by the IUCN. Being a lesser studied species, there is a general paucity of data and hence, global assessment of its true status has been very difficult. In Bhutan, available information on this species is mainly from biodiversity surveys on big mammals such as Tiger and Snow Leopard. A modest attempt has been made to review all available literature on Asiatic Golden Cat in Bhutan and abroad to describe the current status of the species in the country and the need for further studies. 

  15. Road Expansion and Its Influence on Trail Sustainability in Bhutan

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    Taiichi Ito

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bhutan was an inhabited wilderness until 1961, when road construction started after the closure of the Tibetan border. Since then, the road network has expanded from the Indian boarder, often tracing traditional trails. This has accelerated commerce as well as movement of people from India, benefitting both the Bhutanese and foreign tourists. At the same time, dependence on imported automobiles and fossil fuel has risen, and roadless areas have begun to shrink. This brought an inevitable loss of traditional environmental knowledge, such as the care of mules for packing, and reduction in physical and mental health among the Bhutanese. People who lost jobs as horsemen moved into towns to find jobs. Road extension is also a double-edged sword for visitors. It has resulted in shrinking trekking areas and loss of traditional culture, both of which have been sacrificed for easy access. Protected areas often function as fortifications against mechanical civilization. However, protected-area status or its zoning does not guarantee that an area will remain roadless where there is considerable resident population. An analysis in Jigme Dorji National Park showed the gradual retreat of trailheads and increasing dependence on automobiles among residents and trekkers. B. MacKaye, a regional planner in the Eastern United States, proposed using trails as a tool to control such mechanical civilization. His philosophy of regional planning suggests two measures; one is consolidated trailheads as dams, and the other is confinement of roads by levees, consisting of new trails and wilderness belts. According to case studies, the author proposed six options for coexistence of trails with roads.

  16. Tracking Poverty Reduction in Bhutan: Income Deprivation Alongside Deprivation in Other Sources of Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Emma

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses poverty reduction in Bhutan between two points in time--2003 and 2007--from a multidimensional perspective. The measures estimated include consumption expenditure as well as other indicators which are directly (when possible) or indirectly associated to valuable functionings, namely, health, education, access to electricity,…

  17. Water balance in the complex mountainous terrain of Bhutan and linkages to land use

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    Ugyen Dorji

    2016-09-01

    Study Focus: Located in the Himalayas with elevation ranging 100–7550 m and with an area equivalent to Switzerland, Bhutan has great biodiversity despite its small area. A monsoon-dominated climate causes generally wet summer and dry winter. Bhutan is highly dependent of climatic conditions for its developmental activities. Using multiple regression analysis we have established models to predict the evapotranspiration (ETo and water balance and test the linkage to vegetation and land cover using meteorological data from 70 weather stations across Bhutan. Temperature-based ETo equations were evaluated in reference to the Penman-Monteith (PM method and a calibrated Hargreaves (H equation was used for computing the ETo. New Hydrological Insights for the Region. The calibrated Hargreaves equation gave good estimates of average daily ETo comparable to the PM ETo. The spatial variation in PM ETo is linked to variation in sunshine hours in summer and temperature in other seasons. Seasonal and annual ETo was mainly affected by elevation and latitude, which is linked to temperature and sunshine duration. Precipitation and water balance correlated positively with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI while ETo correlated negatively. Our models for predicting ETo and water balances performed clearly better than the global CRU gridded data for Bhutan. A positive water balance is found in broadleaf forest areas and small or negative water balance for coniferous forests.

  18. Crossbreeding and intensification of smallholder crop-cattle farming systems in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samdup, T.; Udo, H.M.J.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Ibrahim, M.N.M.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of livestock intensification through crossbreeding for dairying in Bhutan, where crossbreeding policies aim to improve smallholder livelihoods. It is also expected that crossbreeding will reduce dairy imports, and will reduce the environmental impact on forests and ot

  19. A new range record of Comostola hauensteini Smetacek, 2004 (Lepidoptera: Geometridae: Geometrinae from Bhutan

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    Irungbam Jatishwor Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Comostola hauensteini was described by Smetacek in 2004 on the basis of a holotype and paratype from Bhimtal, Uttarakhand (the western Himalaya. There seems to be no further record and description of this species. The present record extends the known distribution of C. hauensteini to Tsirang District of Bhutan (the eastern Himalaya. 

  20. The Paradox of Happiness: Health and Human Rights in the Kingdom of Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason Meier, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Averi

    2016-06-01

    The Kingdom of Bhutan is seeking to progressively realize the human right to health without addressing the cross-cutting human rights principles essential to a rights-based approach to health. Through a landscape analysis of the Bhutanese health system, documentary review of Bhutanese reporting to the United Nations human rights system, and semi-structured interviews with health policymakers in Bhutan, this study examines the normative foundations of Bhutan's focus on "a more meaningful purpose for development than just mere material satisfaction." Under this development paradigm of Gross National Happiness, the Bhutanese health system meets select normative foundations of the right to health, seeking to guarantee the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of health care and underlying determinants of health. However, where Bhutan continues to restrict the rights of minority populations-failing to address the ways in which human rights are indivisible, interdependent, and interrelated-additional reforms will be necessary to realize the right to health. Given the continuing prevalence of minority rights violations in the region, this study raises research questions for comparative studies in other rights-denying national contexts and advocacy approaches to advance principles of non-discrimination, participation, and accountability through health policy.

  1. Soil development on Late Quaternary river terraces in a high montane valley in Bhutan, Eastern Himalayas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tshering Dorji,; Caspari, T.; Bäumler, R.; Veldkamp, A.; Jongmans, A.G.; Kado Tshering,; Tsheten Dorji,; Baillie, I.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the geochemistry and micromorphology of the soils on a suite of morphologically well-defined and visually distinct fluvial terraces, up to 40 m elevation above the current riverbed, at Thangbi in the upper Bumthang Valley, Bhutan. The alluvia forming each of the terraces are lithological

  2. Malaria control in Bhutan: case study of a country embarking on elimination

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    Yangzom Thinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bhutan has achieved a major reduction in malaria incidence amid multiple challenges. This case study seeks to characterize the Bhutan malaria control programme over the last 10 years. Methods A review of the malaria epidemiology, control strategies, and elimination strategies employed in Bhutan was carried out through a literature review of peer-reviewed and grey national and international literature with the addition of reviewing the surveillance and vector control records of the Bhutan Vector-Borne Disease Control Programme (VDCP. Data triangulation was used to identify trends in epidemiology and key strategies and interventions through analysis of the VDCP surveillance and programme records and the literature review. Enabling and challenging factors were identified through analysis of socio-economic and health indicators, corroborated through a review of national and international reports and peer-review articles. Findings Confirmed malaria cases in Bhutan declined by 98.7% from 1994 to 2010. The majority of indigenous cases were due to Plasmodium vivax (59.9% and adult males are most at-risk of malaria. Imported cases, or those in foreign nationals, varied over the years, reaching 21.8% of all confirmed cases in 2006. Strategies implemented by the VDCP are likely to be related to the decline in cases over the last 10 years. Access to malaria diagnosis in treatment was expanded throughout the country and evidence-based case management, including the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for P. falciparum, increasing coverage of high risk areas with Indoor Residual Spraying, insecticide-treated bed nets, and long-lasting insecticidal nets are likely to have contributed to the decline alongside enabling factors such as economic development and increasing access to health services. Conclusion Bhutan has made significant strides towards elimination and has adopted a goal of national elimination. A major

  3. URBAN GROWTH AND WATER QUALITY IN THIMPHU, BHUTAN

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    Nandu Giri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Detailed study was undertaken in 2008 and 2009 on assessment of water quality of River Wang Chhu which flows through Thimphu urban area, the capital city of Bhutan. The water samples were examined at upstream of urban area, within the urban area and its downstream. The water samples were analyzed by studying the physico-chemical, biological and benthic macro-invertebrates. The water quality data obtained during present study are discussed in relation to land use/land cover changes(LULC and various ongoing human activities at upstream, within the each activity areas and it’s downstream. Analyses of satellite imagery of 1990 and 2008 using GIS revealed that over a period of eighteen years the forest, scrub and agricultural areas have decreased whereas urban area and road network have increased considerably. The forest cover, agriculture area and scrub decreased from 43.3% to 42.57%, 6.88% to 5.33% and 42.55% to 29.42%, respectively. The LULC changes effect water quality in many ways. The water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, turbidity, nitrate, phosphate, chloride, total coliform, and biological oxygen demand were lower at upstream and higher in urban area. On the other hand dissolved oxygen was found higher at upstream and lower in urban area. The pollution sensitive benthic macro-invertebrates population were dominant at upstream sampling sites whereas pollution tolerant benthic macro-invertebrates were found abundant in urban area and its immediate downstream. The rapid development of urban infrastructure in Thimphu city may be posing serious threats to water regime in terms of its quality. Though the deterioration of water quality is restricted to a few localized areas, the trend is serious and needs proper attention of policy planners and decision makers. Proper treatment of effluents from urban areas is urgently needed to reduce water pollution in such affected areas to check further deterioration of water quality

  4. URBAN GROWTH AND WATER QUALITY IN THIMPHU, BHUTAN

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    Nandu Giri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed study was undertaken in 2008 and 2009 on assessment of water quality of River Wang Chhu which flows through Thimphu urban area, the capital city of Bhutan. The water samples were examined at upstream of urban area, within the urban area and its downstream. The water quality was analyzed by studying the physico-chemical, biological and benthic macro-invertebrates. The water quality data obtained during present study are discussed in relation to land use/land cover changes (LULC and various ongoing human activities at upstream, within the each activity areas and it’s downstream. Analyses of satellite imagery of 1990 and 2008 using GIS revealed that over a period of eighteen years the forest, scrub and agricultural areas have decreased whereas urban area and road network have increased considerably. The forest cover, agriculture area and scrub decreased from 43.3% to 42.57%, 6.88% to 5.33% and 42.55% to 29.42%, respectively. The LULC changes effect water quality in many ways. The water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, turbidity, nitrate, phosphate, chloride, total coliform, and biological oxygen demand were lower at upstream and higher in urban area. On the other hand dissolved oxygen was found higher at upstream and lower in urban area. The pollution sensitive benthic macro- invertebrates population were dominant at upstream sampling sites whereas pollution tolerant benthic macro-invertebrates were found abundant in urban area and its immediate downstream. The rapid development of urban infrastructure in Thimphu city may be posing serious threats to water regime in terms of its quality. Though the deterioration of water quality is restricted to a few localized areas, the trend is serious and needs proper attention of policy planners and decision makers. Proper treatment of effluents from urban areas is urgently needed to reduce water pollution in such affected areas to check further deterioration of water quality

  5. Progress and delivery of health care in Bhutan, the Land of the Thunder Dragon and Gross National Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobgay, Tashi; Dorji, Tandin; Pelzom, Dorji; Gibbons, Robert V

    2011-06-01

    The Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan is rapidly changing, but it remains relatively isolated, and it tenaciously embraces its rich cultural heritage. Despite very limited resources, Bhutan is making a concerted effort to update its health care and deliver it to all of its citizens. Healthcare services are delivered through 31 hospitals, 178 basic health unit clinics and 654 outreach clinics that provide maternal and child health services in remote communities in the mountains. Physical access to primary health care is now well sustained for more than 90% of the population. Bhutan has made progress in key health indicators. In the past 50 years, life expectancy increased by 18 years and infant mortality dropped from 102.8 to 49.3 per 1000 live births between 1984 and 2008. Bhutan has a rich medical history. One of the ancient names for Bhutan was 'Land of Medicinal Herbs' because of the diverse medicinal plants it exported to neighbouring countries. In 1967, traditional medicine was included in the National Health System, and in 1971, formal training for Drungtshos (traditional doctors) and sMenpas (traditional compounders) began. In 1982, Bhutan established the Pharmaceutical and Research Unit, which manufactures, develops and researches traditional herbal medicines. Despite commendable achievements, considerable challenges lie ahead, but the advances of the past few decades bode well for the future.

  6. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of Dengue Virus Circulating in Bhutan, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangmo, Sangay; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Tantimavanich, Srisurang; Kosoltanapiwat, Nathamon; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Phuntsho, Kelzang; Wangchuk, Sonam; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most significant public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries, and is increasingly being detected in traditionally non-endemic areas. In Bhutan, dengue virus (DENV) has only recently been detected and limited information is available. In this study, we analyzed the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of DENV in two southern districts in Bhutan from 2013-2014. During this period, 379 patients were clinically diagnosed with suspected dengue, of whom 119 (31.4%) were positive for DENV infection by NS1 ELISA and/or nested RT-PCR. DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected with DENV-1 being predominant. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 using envelope gene demonstrated genotype V, closely related to strains from northern India.

  7. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of Dengue Virus Circulating in Bhutan, 2013-2014.

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    Sangay Zangmo

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the most significant public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries, and is increasingly being detected in traditionally non-endemic areas. In Bhutan, dengue virus (DENV has only recently been detected and limited information is available. In this study, we analyzed the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of DENV in two southern districts in Bhutan from 2013-2014. During this period, 379 patients were clinically diagnosed with suspected dengue, of whom 119 (31.4% were positive for DENV infection by NS1 ELISA and/or nested RT-PCR. DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected with DENV-1 being predominant. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 using envelope gene demonstrated genotype V, closely related to strains from northern India.

  8. The voice conveys emotion in ten globalized cultures and one remote village in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, Daniel T; Keltner, Dacher; Tshering, Sumjay; Wangchuk, Dorji; Flynn, Lisa M

    2016-02-01

    With data from 10 different globalized cultures and 1 remote, isolated village in Bhutan, we examined universals and cultural variations in the recognition of 16 nonverbal emotional vocalizations. College students in 10 nations (Study 1) and villagers in remote Bhutan (Study 2) were asked to match emotional vocalizations to 1-sentence stories of the same valence. Guided by previous conceptualizations of recognition accuracy, across both studies, 7 of the 16 vocal burst stimuli were found to have strong or very strong recognition in all 11 cultures, 6 vocal bursts were found to have moderate recognition, and 4 were not universally recognized. All vocal burst stimuli varied significantly in terms of the degree to which they were recognized across the 11 cultures. Our discussion focuses on the implications of these results for current debates concerning the emotion conveyed in the voice.

  9. A preliminary checklist of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Rhophalocera) of Mendrelgang, Tsirang District, Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    I. J. Singh; M. Chib

    2014-01-01

    The survey was conducted to prepare a preliminary checklist of butterflies of Mendrelgang, Bhutan. Butterflies were sampled from February 2012 to February 2013 to assess the species richness in a degraded forest patch of a sub-tropical broadleaf forest. This short-term study recorded 125 species of butterflies in 78 genera from five families. Of these, Sordid Emperor Apatura sordida Moore, Black-veined Sergeant Athyma ranga ranga Moore, Sullied Sailor Neptis soma soma Linnaeus, Blue Duke Euth...

  10. First paleoseismic evidence for great surface-rupturing earthquakes in the Bhutan Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux-Mallouf, Romain; Ferry, Matthieu; Ritz, Jean-François; Berthet, Théo.; Cattin, Rodolphe; Drukpa, Dowchu

    2016-10-01

    The seismic behavior of the Himalayan arc between central Nepal and Arunachal Pradesh remains poorly understood due to the lack of observations concerning the timing and size of past major and great earthquakes in Bhutan. We present here the first paleoseismic study along the Himalayan topographic front conducted at two sites in southern central Bhutan. Paleoseismological excavations and related OxCal modeling reveal that Bhutan experienced at least two great earthquakes in the last millennium: one between the seventeenth and eighteenth century and one during medieval times, producing a total cumulative vertical offset greater than 10 m. Along with previous studies that reported similar medieval events in Central Nepal, Sikkim, and Assam, our investigations support the occurrence of either (i) a series of great earthquakes between A.D. 1025 and A.D. 1520 or (ii) a single giant earthquake between A.D. 1090 and A.D. 1145. In the latter case, the surface rupture may have reached a total length of 800 km and could be associated with an earthquake of magnitude Mw = 8.7-9.1.

  11. Emergency satellite observation and assessment of a glacier lake outburst flood in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroto; Tadono, Takeo; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    Following a glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) on Jun. 28, 2015, in western Bhutan, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency performed an emergency observation on Jul. 2, 2015 using the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2"). Based on a dataset generated from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) imagery, "The Glacial Lake Inventory of Bhutan using ALOS Data", the glacier lake that potentially contributed to this GLOF were identified at 28°4'7.7"N, 89°34'50.0"E, in a headwater of the Mo Chu river basin, western Bhutan. A post-event lake outline was delineated manually using the acquired PALSAR-2 image. Pre-event outlines were delineated from previously acquired PALSAR-2 images (Apr. 23, 2015), Landsat 8 (Mar. 8, 2015), and ALOS (Dec. 22, 2010). The differences between these outlines reveal a remarkable expansion (+48.0%) from Mar. 8 to Apr. 23, 2015, followed by a remarkable shrinkage (-52.9%) from Apr. 23 to Jul. 2, 2015. This result indicates the lake to be a highly likely source of the flood. Topographically, it is located at a glacier terminus, surrounded by a moraine. Differing backscatter patterns between successive PALSAR-2 images in a certain part of the moraine suggest that it underwent some collapse, possibly as a result of the GLOF. More detailed investigations, including field surveys, are necessary to fully reveal and understand this event.

  12. Leptographium bhutanense sp. nov., associated with the root collar weevil Hylobitelus chenkupdorjii on Pinus wallichiana in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X D; Jacobs, K; Kirisits, T; Chhetri, D B; Wingfield, M J

    2008-12-01

    Leptographium spp. are commonly associated with bark beetles and weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and some are important tree pathogens. In a recent survey of diseases and insect pests of conifer trees in Bhutan, the root collar weevil, Hylobitelus chenkupdorjii was found girdling young Himalayan blue pine (Pinus wallichiana) trees in Central Bhutan. Intensive wood staining and a Leptographium sp. were associated with damage by this insect. The fungus was also isolated from individuals of H. chenkupdorjii. It was tentatively identified based on morphology and then compared with other Leptographium spp. using DNA sequences for three gene regions. Morphological characteristics showed that the Leptographium sp. from H. chenkupdorjii is similar to, but distinct from L. procerum and L. profanum. DNA sequence comparisons revealed that the isolates from Bhutan resided in a distinct well-supported clade and confirmed that they represent an undescribed taxon for which the name Leptographium bhutanense sp. nov. is provided.

  13. Preliminary assessment of active rock slope instabilities in the high Himalaya of Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Benedetta; Manconi, Andrea; Leith, Kerry; Loew, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The small kingdom of Bhutan, nested between India and Tibet (between 88° and 92° east and 26° and 28° north), is characterised by markedly different landscapes and climatic zones. V-shaped, forest-covered valleys in the south, affected by the monsoonal rains, give gradually way to steep, barren slopes of U-shaped valleys in the drier north, host of the highest peaks, a large number of glaciers and glacial lakes. A transition zone of vegetated, elevated plateaus collects the towns in which most of the population lives. Landslides in the high Himalaya of Bhutan have not been extensively studied despite the primary and secondary hazards related to them. The regulations and restrictions to travel to and within Bhutan imposed by the government, as well as the extremely rugged terrain hinder the accessibility to remote slopes and valleys, both of which have resulted in lack of data and investigations. In this work, we aim at producing an inventory of large rock slope instabilities (> 1 million m3) across the high Himalaya of Bhutan, identifying types of failure, assessing the activity and analysing the distribution of landslides in combination with predisposing and preparatory factors, such as lithology, tectonic structures, hypsometry, deglaciation, fluvial erosive power and climate. At this stage, we rely on the information retrieved through satellite remote sensing data, i.e. medium and high resolution DEMs, optical images and space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. An initial inventory was compiled based on the identification of geomorphological features associated with slope instabilities using the available Google Earth images. Moreover, we assessed the SAR data coverage and the expected geometrical distortions by assuming different sensors (ERS, Envisat, and ALOS Palsar-1). As we are mainly interested in detecting the surface deformation related to large unstable slopes by applying Differential SAR, we also computed the percentage of potentially

  14. Water balance in the complex mountainous terrain of Bhutan and linkages to land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorji, Ugyen; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig

    2016-01-01

    and sunshine duration. Comparison with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) provided a positive correlation of both precipitation and water balance to SOI, while there was a negative correlation between ETo and SOI. When testing our models for predicting ETo and water balances versus the global CRU gridded...... precipitation and evapotranspiration. We used data from 71 meteorological stations across Bhutan, each encompassing data series ranging from a few years till two decades. The temperature-based Hargreaves (H) equation for reference evapotranspiration (ETo) calculation was calibrated in reference to the FAO...

  15. New records of petiolate potter wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae from Bhutan

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    Tshering Nidup

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of seven species from five genera, Delta de Saussure, 1855, Eumenes Latreille, 1802, Pareumenes (de Saussure, 1855, Labus de Saussure, 1867, and Zethus Fabricius, 1804, belonging to the subfamily Eumeninae of the family Vespidae are documented. Pareumenes quadrispinosus acutus Liu, 1941, Delta esuriens (Fabricius, 1787, D. conoideum (Gmelin, 1790, E. gibbosus Nguyen, 2015, Labus pusillus van der Vecht, 1963 and Zethus dolosus Bingham, 1897, including the subspecies P. q. acutus Liu, 1941, are new records for Bhutan

  16. Donor-assisted Ethno-Nationalism and Health Education Policy in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    and objectives. This will be exemplified with reference to an analysis of two key policies education and health which should be understood in their own right as state-sanctioned but donor financed policies inserted into the context with elite and government promotion of Gross National Happiness (GNH......), Bhutanization, decentralization and guided democracy, The paper is divided into four sections. The first section gives an overview of what can be defined as ‘dependency through self-reliance and selection’. The government and developmentalist elite and bureaucracy seems to be able to choose consciously who...

  17. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence

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    Tran Thi Huyen Trang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3galT(jhp0563 was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  18. Leptographium bhutanense sp. nov., associated with the root collar weevil Hylobitelus chenkupdorjii on Pinus wallichiana in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.D.; Jacobs, K.; Kirisits, T.; Chhetri, D.B.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leptographium spp. are commonly associated with bark beetles and weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and some are important tree pathogens. In a recent survey of diseases and insect pests of conifer trees in Bhutan, the root collar weevil, Hylobitelus chenkupdorjii was found girdling young Himalaya

  19. Implementation of External Quality Assessment Scheme in Clinical Chemistry for District Laboratories in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtsho, Rixin; Nuchpramool, Wilairat

    2012-07-01

    External Quality Assessment Scheme (EQAS) involves evaluation of a number of laboratories by an outside agency on the performance of a number of laboratories based on their analytical performance of tests on samples supplied by the external agency. In developing countries, establishment of national EQAS by preparing homemade quality control material is a useful scheme in terms of resources and time to monitor the laboratory performance. The objective of this study is to implement an EQAS to monitor the analytical performance of the district laboratories in Bhutan. Baseline information was collected through questionnaires. Lyophilized human serum including normal and abnormal levels were prepared and distributed to 19 participating laboratories. Nine routine analytes were included for the study. Their results were evaluated using Variance index scores (VIS) and Coefficient of variations (CV) was compared with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) Proficiency Testing Criteria (PT) for each analyte. There was significant decrease in CV at the end of the study. The percentages of results in acceptable VIS as 'A' were 63, 60, 66, 69, 73 and 74, 75, 76 and 79 % in November 2009-July 2010 respectively. From our results, we concluded that, establishment of EQAS through distribution of home-made quality control material could be the useful scheme to monitor the laboratory performance in clinical chemistry in Bhutan.

  20. Spatial Variation of Temperature and Precipitation in Bhutan and Links to Vegetation and Land Cover

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    Ugyen Dorji

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bhutan, located in the Himalayas in the South Asian monsoon region, has extremely high variation in elevation, climatic conditions, and land cover despite its small geographical area, as well as great biodiversity. This paper provides the first comprehensive description of climatic conditions in Bhutan. It assesses the spatial variation of temperature and precipitation across the country and evaluates the causes for this variation based on daily data from 70 meteorological stations that have been recording data for time spans ranging from 3 to 21 years. Temperature and precipitation show contrasting spatial variation, with temperature primarily affected by elevation and precipitation by latitude. Models were developed using mixed linear regression models to predict seasonal and annual mean temperature and precipitation based on geographical location. Using linear regression we found that temperatures changed by about 0.5°C for every 100 m of change in elevation, with lapse rates being highest in February, March, and November and lowest from June to August. The lapse rate was highest for minimum temperatures and lowest for maximum temperatures, with the greatest difference during winter. The spatial distribution of precipitation was mainly controlled by latitude, having a quadratic relationship, with the highest rates in the southern foothills of the Himalayan range and the lowest at midlatitudes. The land cover is affected by topography and local climate, with variations in temperature being a main deciding factor for vegetation types; most human settlements and associated land uses are concentrated at lower elevations.

  1. Seismic Vulnerability and Mitigation on Non-Engineered Traditional Buildings of Bhutan

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    Chimi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake is one of the most deadly phenomena which disturb the harmonious living among human beings and claimed large number of lives without any notice and warning. However one should always be ready to learn, how to live with seismic hazard and minimize its adverse effect on built environment, as its happening can’t be prevented. The 6.1magnitute Earthquake of 21st September, 2009 caused huge damage in the eastern part of Bhutan and adjoining areas like Indian states and Bangladesh. This incident has now exposed to the seismic vulnerability and raised concerns over the safety of the built environment in Bhutan – particularly, the traditional stone and timber houses, some of which were badly affected during the earthquake. This paper presents an overview of damages observed in the region and its causes and performances of building during earthquake. It also describes, the seismic performance of those structures can be improved from life safety point of view, by adopting simple low-cost modifications to the existing construction practices and material selection with alternative solutions to make building earthquake resistant

  2. Evidence for Along-Strike Variations in the Crustal Deformation beneath the Bhutan Himalaya from Receiver Function Imaging and Seismicity

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    Singer, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Diehl, T.; Hetényi, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Bhutan Himalaya seismicity and geologic surface features like the Kuru Chu Spur (an embayment of the Main Central Thrust) or the Paro window indicate along-strike variations in the collisional structure. The deeper structure of the orogenic wedge and associated deformation processes, however, are poorly understood partly due to the lack of seismic images of the crust. To better understand these differences in structure and deformation, we use data of a temporary seismic broadband network in Bhutan to image the crustal structure with receiver functions (RF). We apply an iterative 3D wave-based migration scheme including a high-frequency ray approximation, which satisfies Snell's law for dipping interfaces. With this approach we image variably dipping intra-crustal interfaces and the Moho topography across the Bhutan Himalaya, and identify lateral variations in the orogenic structure, which we interpret jointly with a new local earthquake catalog. In West Bhutan, RF imaging depicts a northward dipping Moho at ~50 km depth. The low-angle dip steepens north of ~27.6°N which matches well observations by wide-angle seismics in South Tibet and the hypocenter of a deep crustal earthquake recorded by our network. We also identify the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) at ~14 km depth in West Bhutan with a ramp-like structure north of ~27.6°N. The ramp is characterized by a negative impedance contrast in the RF signals and coincides with a concentration of seismicity. In the East, the Moho appears to be almost flat at a depth of ~50 km without clear indications of steepening towards north. Beneath the Kuru Chu Spur in East Bhutan, we observe listric-shaped structures reaching from the upper crust beneath the Lesser Himalaya down to the Moho beneath the Greater Himalaya, which we interpret as a stack of crustal material typical for an accretionary wedge. While these structures appear aseismic, a horizontal alignment of seismicity at ~12 km depth suggests an active MHT in

  3. Companion Modeling, Conflict Resolution, and Institution Building: Sharing Irrigation Water in the Lingmuteychu Watershed, Bhutan

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    Tayan Raj. Gurung

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We used multi-agent systems (MAS, following the companion modeling method, to facilitate water management negotiations in Bhutan. We show how this methodology helped resolve a conflict over the sharing of water resources by establishing a concrete agreement and creating an institution for collective watershed management. The conceptual model begins with a role-playing game (RPG. The stakeholders play the game, thus validating the proposed environment, the behavioral rules, and the emergent properties of the game. It is then relatively easy to translate the RPG into computerized MAS that allow different scenarios to be explored. After this first step in the MAS model, stakeholders then create an institution. A second model is developed to facilitate this process. We conclude by discussing the relationship between the models and reality, as well as the use of MAS as a mediation tool and the social process.

  4. Recovery of nitrogen fertilizer by traditional and improved rice cultivars in the Bhutan Highlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaley, Bhim Bahadur; Høgh-Jensen, Henning; Christiansen, Jørgen Lindskrog

    2010-01-01

    The recovery of soil derived nitrogen (NDFS) and fertilizer N (NDFF) was investigated in highland rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields in Bhutan, characterized by high inputs of farmyard manure (FYM). The effect of 60 kg N ha-1 (60 N) applied in two splits to a traditional and an improved cultivar...... greater harvest index (HI). The mean percentage recovery of fertilizer N (REN) applied at 45 days after transplanting (DAT) was 34% compared to 22% at 7 DAT, resulting in 56% greater uptake of NDFF at 45 DAT. The overall REN for both the improved and the traditional cultivars were 25.7% and 30......% respectively, with no difference between cultivars, but REN decreased with increasing FYM inputs. Fertilizer N recommendations that allow for previous FYM inputs combined with applications timed to coincide with maximum crop demand (45 DAT), and the use of improved cultivars, could enhance N fertilizer...

  5. A preliminary checklist of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Rhophalocera of Mendrelgang, Tsirang District, Bhutan

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    I.J. Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The survey was conducted to prepare a preliminary checklist of butterflies of Mendrelgang, Bhutan. Butterflies were sampled from February 2012 to February 2013 to assess the species richness in a degraded forest patch of a sub-tropical broadleaf forest. This short-term study recorded 125 species of butterflies in 78 genera from five families. Of these, Sordid Emperor Apatura sordida Moore, Black-veined Sergeant Athyma ranga ranga Moore, Sullied Sailor Neptis soma soma Linnaeus, Blue Duke Euthalia durga durga Moore, Pea Blue Lampides boeticus Linnaeus and Chocolate Albatross Appias lyncida Cramer are listed in Schedule II of the Indian Wildlife (Protection Act (IWPA 1972. This study provides the baseline data of butterfly species richness of Mendrelgang.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from India, Pakistan and Bhutan in 2007–2011

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    Sethi Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge on antimicrobial drug resistance and genetic characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates circulating in India, Pakistan, and Bhutan is sorely lacking. In this paper, we describe the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of N. gonorrhoeae isolates from India, Pakistan, and Bhutan in 2007–2011. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility and β-lactamase production were tested for 65 N. gonorrhoeae isolates from India (n=40, Pakistan (n=18 and Bhutan (n=7 using Etest methodology (eight antimicrobials and nitrocefin solution, respectively. Resistance determinants, i.e. penA, mtrR, porB1b, gyrA, and parC, were sequenced. N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST was performed for molecular epidemiology. Results The highest resistance level was observed for ciprofloxacin (94%, followed by penicillin G (68%, erythromycin (62%, tetracycline (55%, and azithromycin (7.7%. All the isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and spectinomycin. Thirty-four (52% of the isolates were producing β-lactamase. No penA mosaic alleles or A501-altered alleles of penicillin-binding protein 2 were identified. Forty-nine NG-MAST STs were identified, of which 42 STs have not been previously described worldwide. Conclusions Based on this study, ceftriaxone, cefixime, and spectinomycin can be used as an empirical first-line therapy for gonorrhoea in India, Pakistan, and Bhutan, whereas ciprofloxacin, penicillin G, tetracycline, erythromycin, and azithromycin should not be. It is imperative to strengthen the laboratory infrastructure in this region, as well as to expand the phenotypic and genetic surveillance of antimicrobial resistance, emergence of new resistance, particularly, to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and molecular epidemiology.

  7. It’s a Dog’s Life: International Tourists’ Perceptions of the Stray Dog Population of Bhutan.

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    Paul C Strickland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the international tourists’ perception of the stray dog population of Bhutan as little or no mention of the increasing stray dog population and their impact on tourism has been documented. After personally visiting the Kingdom on many occasions, it is evident that the stray dog population is increasing in dog numbers in major cities. The problems arising are negative comments by tourists relating to the stray dog population that are starting to appear in social media that may impact the visitor experience and the perception of Bhutan’s tourism industry. Veterinary science is aware of both increasing dog populations and the control of diseases such as Rabies however the author can find no evidence regarding challenges for the tourism industry. The problem is aided by no local veterinary clinics, no laws regarding dog governance, little funding for sterilization programs and being predominately a Buddhist country that cannot ‘cull’ animals. Using qualitative analysis from international tourist focus groups who were visiting Bhutan, this study highlights the perceptions of tourists regarding the stray dog population and how it may impact on visitor expectations. The paper suggests options that local government, Bhutanese nationals and visitors can do to assist the issue based on visitor feedback. Future research may include comparisons with other cities or countries to examine if it is a global issue or unique to Bhutan.

  8. Differences in interleukin 8 expression in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa tissues from patients in Bhutan and the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Iwatani, Shun; Cruz, Modesto; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Disla, Mildre; Terao, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Tshering, Lotay; Mitsui, Takahiro; Shiota, Seiji; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection vary geographically. H pylori strains, disease presentation, and environments differ markedly in Bhutan and Dominican Republic. The aims were to compare the strains, histology, and expression of interleukin (IL) 8 and IL-10 from gastric mucosa from the 2 countries. H pylori status was assessed by the combination of rapid urease test, culture, and histology. Histology was evaluated using the updated Sydney System, and cytokines in gastric biopsies were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were 138 subjects from Bhutan and 155 from Dominican Republic. The prevalence of H pylori infection was 65% and 59%, respectively. The genotype of cagA was predominantly East Asian type in Bhutan versus Western type in Dominican Republic. Gastritis severity was significantly higher in H pylori-infected subjects from Bhutan than those from Dominican Republic. IL-8 expression by H pylori infection was 5.5-fold increased in Bhutan versus 3-fold in Dominican Republic (P < .001); IL-10 expression was similar. IL-8 expression levels among H pylori-infected cases tended to be positively correlated with polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration scores in both countries. IL-8 expression among those with grade 2 and 3 polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte infiltration was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Dominican Republic. The difference in IL-8 expression in the 2 countries is reflected in the different disease pattern between them. Whether the dominant factor is differences in H pylori virulence, in host-H pylori-environmental interactions, genetic factors or all remains unclear. However, severity of inflammation appears to be a critical factor in disease pathogenesis. We compared IL-8 messenger RNA levels between the high gastric cancer risk country, Bhutan (mainly East Asian-type H pylori), and the lower gastric cancer risk country, Dominican Republic (mainly Western-type H pylori).

  9. A NOVEL STRAIN OF SHIGELLA SPECIES OUTBREAK IN A RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL IN PEMAGATSHEL, BHUTAN, 2012

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    Tsheten

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A cluster of suspected shigellosis was reported from health center in Pemagatshel district to Royal Center for Disease Control on 14th May 2012. The investigation was done to determine the cause and risk factor for the outbreak so that appropriate control and prevention measures can be implemented. Methods: A descriptive study was used for the outbreak investigation. The food items and drinks served to boarding students were collected from the mess in-charge in order to assess their risk for the outbreak. The kitchen and its premises were inspected to study the likely contamination by rodents and other animals. The water and stool specimens were tested in the laboratory to identify all possible enteric pathogens. Results: 82 boarding students were affected with an overall attack rate of 28% (82/294. Diarrhea was the predominant symptom followed by abdominal pain and headache. The onset date of the cases varied between 11th and 18th May, 2012. Shigella species was isolated from stool specimens that showed resistant to amoxicillin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol and sulfamethoxazole. Water specimen collected from source, distribution reservoir and tap water at school were found grossly contaminated. Conclusion: The outbreak was caused by novel strain of Shigella species which was not detected earlier in Bhutan. The promotion and provision of boiled water will greatly reduce the incidence of shigellosis especially in boarding facility.

  10. Construction Claim Types and Causes for a Large-Scale Hydropower Project in Bhutan

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    Bonaventura H.W. Hadikusumo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydropower construction projects are complex and uncertain, have long gestational periods and involve several parties. Furthermore, they require the integration of different components (Civil, Mechanical and Electrical to work together as a single unit. These projects require highly specialised designs, detailed plans and specifications, high-risk construction methods, effective management, skilful supervision and close coordination. Thus, claims are common in such projects. These claims are undesirable because they require significant time and resources to resolve and cause adversarial relationships among the parties involved. Therefore, it is in the common interest of all involved parties to prevent, minimise, or resolve claims as amicably as possible. Identifying common claim types and their causes is essential in devising techniques to minimise and avoid them in future projects. This report details a case study performed on a large-scale hydropower project in Bhutan. The findings of this case study indicate that differing site conditions are the major contributor of impact and change claims and 95% of total claims can be settled by negotiation, whereas 5% of claims can be settled by arbitration.

  11. Joint approach combining damage and paleoseismology observations constrains the 1714 A.D. Bhutan earthquake at magnitude 8 ± 0.5

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    Hetényi, György; Le Roux-Mallouf, Romain; Berthet, Théo.; Cattin, Rodolphe; Cauzzi, Carlo; Phuntsho, Karma; Grolimund, Remo

    2016-10-01

    The region of Bhutan is thought to be the only segment of the Himalayas not having experienced a major earthquake over the past half millennium. A proposed explanation for this apparent seismic gap is partial accommodation of the India-Asia convergence further south across the Shillong Plateau, yet the seismic behavior of the Himalayan megathrust in Bhutan is unknown. Here we present historical documents from the region reporting on an earthquake in 1714 A.D. and geological evidence of surface rupture to constrain the latest large event in this area. We compute various earthquake scenarios using empirical scaling relationships relating magnitude with intensity, source location and rupture geometry. Our results constrain the 1714 A.D. earthquake to have ruptured the megathrust in Bhutan, most likely during a M7.5-8.5 event. This finding reclassifies the apparent seismic gap to a former information gap and implies that the entire Himalayan arc has a high level of earthquake potential.

  12. Study on Achievements and Problems of Bhutan Tourism Industry%试析不丹旅游产业的成就与问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁

    2014-01-01

    Bhutan tourism is an important part of tourism in the world. As our territory bordering Bhutan is tourist destination for Chinese tourists. In recent years, relationship of China and Bhutan, including economic relations and political relations, constantly im-proves. Because of special resources and development of high-end tourism products, Bhutan tourism is growing. It has become an impor-tant research content for experts and scholars. Bhutan ’s tourism industry also faces many development issues, part of the problem is de-termined by Bhutan tourism characteristics resources, and another part of the problem is made in its tourism product development pro-cess due to policy issues, financial problems caused by man-made problems. To solve their travel part of the problem in the industry, the Government of Bhutan and the business work together to promote the sustainable development of tourism in Bhutan.%不丹与我国领土接壤,是中国旅客旅游目的地国之一。近年来,中不关系包括经济关系与政治关系不断增进,尤其是旅游业因特色旅游资源和高端旅游产品快速发展,成为我国专家学者关注的重要研究内容。但不丹旅游业也面临诸多发展问题,这是由其旅游资源本身特点,旅游产品发展过程中因政策问题、资金问题造成的人为困难等决定的。为解决本国旅游业发展中的问题,不丹政府应与企业界通力合作,推动不丹旅游业的可持续发展。

  13. Size and demography pattern of the domestic dog population in Bhutan: Implications for dog population management and disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinzin, Karma; Tenzin, Tenzin; Robertson, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the demography of domestic dogs is essential to plan the dog population management and rabies control program. In this study, we estimated the owned and stray dog population and the proportion of owned dogs that are free-roaming in Bhutan. For this, a cross-sectional household surveys were conducted in six districts (both urban and rural areas) and two border towns in southern Bhutan. The population estimation was done by extrapolation of the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person, whilst mark-resight survey was conducted to estimate the proportion of owned dogs that were free-roaming. A total of 1,301 (rural:585; urban:716) respondents (one per household) were interviewed of which 173 households (24.4%) in urban areas owned 237 dogs whilst 238 households (40.8%) in rural areas owned 353 dogs. The mean number of dogs per dog owning household was estimated to be 1.44 (urban:1.37 dogs; rural:1.48 dogs) and dogs per household was estimated to be 0.45 (urban:0.33; rural:0.60). The dog: human ratio was 1:16.30 (0.06 dogs per person) in urban areas and 1:8.43 (0.12 dogs per person) in rural areas. The total owned dog population based on the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person were estimated to be 65,312 and 71,245 in the country, respectively. The male: female ratio of the owned dog was 1.31:1 in urban areas and 2.05:1 in rural areas. Majority of the dogs were local non-descript breeds in both urban (60.8%) and rural (78%) areas, and the most common source was acquisition from friends or family (44.7%). The stray dog population in Bhutan was estimated to be 48,379 (urban:22,772; rural:25,607). Of the total estimated owned dog population in the two border towns, the proportion that were found free-roaming was estimated to be 31%. The different dog population estimation methods were compared and discussed in this paper. This study generated baseline data on the demographic patterns of the owned and stray dogs in Bhutan which

  14. The State of Integration of the Virtual Learning Environment and ICT into the Pedagogy of the Royal University of Bhutan: A Descriptive Study

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    Choeda; Penjor, Tandin; Dupka, Dorji; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a descriptive research study on the integration of ICT and pedagogy in the colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan. It investigates whether ICT is integrated into the pedagogy and, if so, in what way. The study identifies the use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as the key technology, which is used as part of…

  15. Digital Storytelling in Bhutan: A Qualitative Examination of New Media Tools Used to Bridge the Digital Divide in a Rural Community School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyabak, Khendum; Godina, Heriberto

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the use of digital storytelling as an instructional intervention for bridging the digital divide among public school students in rural Bhutan. Primary participants for the study included elementary school children who had never been previously exposed to computer technology and were recipients of a donated classroom…

  16. Some Technological Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Dahi and Datshi, Naturally Fermented Milk Products of Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangpliang, H. N. J.; Sharma, Sharmila; Rai, Ranjita; Tamang, Jyoti P.

    2017-01-01

    Dahi and datshi are common naturally fermented milk (NFM) products of Bhutan. Population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in dahi (pH 3.7) and datshi (pH 5.2) was 1.4 × 107 and 3.9 × 108 cfu/ml, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing isolates of LAB from dahi and datshi were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. LAB strains were tested for some technological properties. All LAB strains except E. faecalis CH2:17 caused coagulation of milk at both 30°C for 48 h. Only E. faecium DH4:05 strain was resistant to pH 3. No significant difference (P > 0.05) of viable counts was observed in MRS broth with and without lysozyme. All LAB strains grew well in 0.3% bile showing their ability to tolerate bile salt. None of the LAB strains showed >70% hydrophobicity. This study, being the first of its microbiological analysis of the NFM of Bhutan, has opened up to an extent of research work that gives a new insight to the products. PMID:28203227

  17. 26 August 2016 - K. Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the CERN Guest book with Adviser P. Fassnacht

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    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Kinga Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva Friday 26 August 2016

  18. Snow/ice melt precipitation runoff modelling of glaciers in the Bhutan himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, T.; Leber, D.; Haeusler, H.; Brauner, M.; Wangda, D.

    2003-04-01

    After the 1994 outburst of the Luggye glacier lake in Northern Bhutan, the Royal Bhutanese Government initiated a project on GLOF risk reduction and mitigation measures in the Pho River headwaters. The approach to model snow/ice melt and precipitation of this high mountain system with few measured data only was a request of this integrated geoscientific project. The size of the test area for runoff modelling is about 50 km2 and comprises an interlinked glacier system of 3 glaciers and moraine dammed glacier lakes. The model proposed for the Luggye catchment area is based on records from a nearby weather station at Thanza (4150 m altitude) available for the years 2000-2001, a high resolution digital elevation model and the total surface discharge of the Luggye test area, calculated from the Luggye outlet hydrograph. Using the digital elevation model, the catchment area and the surface of the glaciers, up to 7000 m altitude, was divided into 100-meter elevation layers. Precipitation and mean air temperature from Thanza were extrapolated according to the best fitting results. Prominent single temperature and precipitation “events” recorded at Thanza can be related to discharge “events” in the Luggye hydrograph and allow for calculation of time lag and lapse rates. The modelled discharge is calculated as the total of the three simulated components, namely base flow, melt water from snow and ice, and precipitation. The model proposed can be interactively evaluated by best fitting of the model hydrograph to the measured hydrograph. This simulation was achieved using temperature lapse rates of -0.4 to -0.45 °C/100 m during the summer monsoon period, a degree/day factor of 6 to 8 l/(m2*day*°C), and the decrease of precipitation with approximately 7% per 100-meter altitude. Although many assumptions have to be taken for non-extreme weather conditions, the very good correlation of 0.97 between runoff modelling and the real discharge hydrograph highlights the

  19. Late Miocene-Pleistocene evolution of India-Eurasia convergence partitioning between the Bhutan Himalaya and the Shillong Plateau: New evidences from foreland basin deposits along the Dungsam Chu section, eastern Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutand, Isabelle; Barrier, Laurie; Govin, Gwladys; Grujic, Djordje; Hoorn, Carina; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Najman, Yani

    2016-12-01

    The Shillong Plateau is a unique basement-cored uplift in the foreland of the eastern Himalaya that accommodates part of the India-Eurasia convergence since the late Miocene. It was uplifted in the late Pliocene to 1600 m, potentially inducing regional climatic perturbations by orographically condensing part of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) precipitations along its southern flank. As such, the eastern Himalaya-Shillong Plateau-ISM is suited to investigate effects of tectonics, climate, and erosion in a mountain range-broken foreland system. This study focuses on a 2200 m thick sedimentary section of the Siwalik Group strategically located in the lee of the Shillong Plateau along the Dungsam Chu at the front of the eastern Bhutan Himalaya. We have performed magnetostratigraphy constrained by vitrinite reflectance and detrital apatite fission track dating, combined with sedimentological and palynological analyses. We show that (1) the section was deposited between 7 and 1 Ma in a marginal marine deltaic transitioning into continental environment after 5 Ma, (2) depositional environments and paleoclimate were humid with no major change during the depositional period indicating that the orographic effect of the Shillong Plateau had an unexpected limited impact on the paleoclimate of the Bhutanese foothills, and (3) the diminution of the flexural subsidence in the basin and/or of the detrital input from the range is attributable to a slowdown of the displacement rates along the Main Boundary Thrust in eastern Bhutan during the latest Miocene-Pleistocene, in response to increasing partitioning of the India-Eurasia convergence into the active faults bounding the Shillong Plateau.

  20. Along-Strike Variations in the Timing of Melt Crystallization and Metamorphism Across Central and Eastern Bhutan: New Insights from LASS Monazite Geochronology and Trace-Element Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. M.; Kauffman, R.; Gonzales-Clayton, B.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.; Agustsson, K. S.; Long, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Continent-continent collisional systems represent the largest orogens on Earth and provide locations to study processes that drive the transition from contraction and crustal thickening to extension and collapse. The Greater Himalayan Zone (GHZ) exposed along strike of the Himalayan orogen contains exhumed mid-crustal metasedimentary rocks. To better understand the history of burial, crustal flow, and partial melting during the early stages of Himalayan tectonics in the Eocene to ~40 Myr into its orogenic evolution, monazite was analyzed from five migmatitic gneisses and five host gneisses exposed across two transects within central and eastern Bhutan. Monazite was analyzed in situ by the split-stream laser-ablation (LASS) ICPMS technique, which allows simultaneous collection of U-Th-Pb isotopes and trace-element abundances. The migmatites from the eastern Bhutan transect yield monazite dates that record melt crystallization as young as ca. 15-13 Ma. The host gneisses yield similar to younger (down to ca. 11 Ma) dates, documenting coeval to continued metamorphism of the GHZ. In comparison, melt crystallization in the central Bhutan rocks ended by ca. 18 Ma, and metamorphic monazite from a metapelite record metamorphism until ca. 14 Ma. In the migmatite and host-rock samples from both transects, the trace-element data show an inverse correlation between date and the HREE concentration. This trend likely documents the breakdown of garnet, which probably coincides with the first stages of GHZ exhumation. Thus, the LASS data showed that garnet breakdown and GHZ exhumation occurred from ca. 18 to 14 Ma in eastern Bhutan and ca. 20 to 17 Ma in central Bhutan. The new monazite data suggest different histories for the melt crystallization, metamorphism, and exhumation of the GHZ rocks between central and eastern Bhutan, even though the present day rocks from the two transects are only exposed ~60 km apart. Moreover, in comparison to other parts of the eastern Himalaya, the

  1. The seroprevalence of foot-and-mouth disease in the sedentary livestock herds in four districts of Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukpa, Kinzang; Robertson, Ian D; Ellis, Trevor M

    2011-07-01

    Cross sectional serological surveys were conducted between March and December 2009 to determine the distribution of foot-and-mouth disease and also to validate the current passive surveillance system in Bhutan. A total of 1909 sera collected from cattle, goats, sheep, and pigs, from 485 herds in 106 villages, were tested using a foot-and-mouth disease non-structural protein 3ABC ELISA. The true prevalence at the animal-level for all species was 15% (95% CI: 13.5, 16.7) using the sensitivity (97.2%) and specificity (99.5%) for cattle. The true prevalence for cattle, goats, sheep and pigs were 17.6 (95% CI: 15.6, 19.5), 11.9% (95% CI: 5.6, 18.3), 11.9% (95% CI: 1.3, 25.1), and 1.9% (95% CI: 0.0, 3.8), respectively. The sub-districts that shared border with India had significantly (p=0.03) higher seroprevalence than the interior sub-districts. Villages located in the sub-tropical zone had significantly (p<0.0001) higher seroprevalence than those located at high altitude zones. Herds with known outbreaks of FMD were 3.6 times more likely (p<0.001) to be seropositive than those with no history of outbreaks of FMD. The study showed the usefulness of population-based serological surveys in detecting circulation of active infection in populations which were, until now, considered to be free of disease based on a passive surveillance system. The study also highlighted the benefits of conducting serological and questionnaire surveys, simultaneously, to ascertain the infection status of herds and animals. Some of the findings from this study could be considered for strengthening of the current FMD control program in Bhutan.

  2. Highly Pathogenic Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Clade 2.3.2.1a in Poultry, Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Franks, John; Tenzin, Sangay; Dahal, Narapati; Dukpa, Kinzang; Dorjee, Jambay; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Barman, Subrata; Krauss, Scott; McKenzie, Pamela; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1), clade 2.3.2.1a, with an H9-like polymerase basic protein 1 gene, isolated in Bhutan in 2012, replicated faster in vitro than its H5N1 parental genotype and was transmitted more efficiently in a chicken model. These properties likely help limit/eradicate outbreaks, combined with strict control measures. PMID:27584733

  3. Using a Policy of ‘Gross National Happiness’ to Guide the Development of Sustainable Early Learning Programs in the Kingdom of Bhutan: Aspirations and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ball

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A national study on demand for early childhood care and development programs in Bhutan found strong support for development of a new early childhood care and development (ECCD sector. A wide range of stakeholders participating in the study, including ministries of education and health, post-secondary institutions, private preschool providers, community management committees, parents and children, emphasized the goal of preschool to promote success in English-medium formal education. Promoting cultural traditions was also a priority, while developing children’s proficiency in home languages was hardly mentioned. The study highlighted the changing needs of Bhutanese families in the current context of increasing urbanization, dual career parents, and a shift from extended to nuclear family homes. Recommendations derived from the study encouraged a made in Bhutan approach to ECCD policy, programs, and professional education. Subsequent to the study, the national education policy included plans for implementation of ECCD covering children from birth to 8 years old. To ensure the sustainability and cultural congruence of new programs and investments with the Kingdom’s Gross National Happiness Policy, a Gross National Happiness Commission screened and approved the new National Education Policy, which the Ministry of Education is charged with implementing. The emergence of an ECCD sector in Bhutan points to the role that national aspirations and value-driven policies and review processes could play in maintaining language diversity and transmitting culturally based knowledge.

  4. The cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) of India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka: an annotated provisional catalogue, regional checklist and bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Elizabeth Louise; Marathe, Kiran; Sarkar, Vivek; Simon, Chris; Kunte, Krushnamegh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The cicadas of the Indian subcontinent, like many other insects in the region, have remained understudied since the early part of the 20th Century, and await modern taxonomic, systematic and phylogenetic treatment. This paper presents an updated systematic catalogue of cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka, the first in over a century. New information This paper treats 281 species, including: India and Bangladesh (189 species), Bhutan (19 species), Myanmar (81 species), Nepal (46 species) and Sri Lanka (22 species). For each species all recognized junior synonyms are included with information on the type material and additional specimens where relevant. The global distributional range and notes on the taxonomy of each species are included where appropriate. Two lists are provided: (1) species known to occur in India and Bangladesh (treated as a geographic unit), Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka; and (2) species previously listed from these countries in error. A bibliography of species descriptions is provided, with the papers containing the original descriptions provided where copyright allows. PMID:27660527

  5. Mobile assessment of on-road air pollution and its sources along the East-West Highway in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, Tenzin; Knibbs, Luke D.; He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-10-01

    Human exposures in transportation microenvironments are poorly represented by ambient stationary monitoring. A number of on-road studies using vehicle-based mobile monitoring have been conducted to address this. Most previous studies were conducted on urban roads in developed countries where the primary emission source was vehicles. Few studies have examined on-road pollution in developing countries in urban settings. Currently, no study has been conducted for roadways in rural environments where a substantial proportion of the population live. This study aimed to characterize on-road air quality on the East-West Highway (EWH) in Bhutan and identify its principal sources. We conducted six mobile measurements of PM10, particle number (PN) count and CO along the entire 570 km length of the EWH. We divided the EWH into five segments, R1-R5, taking the road length between two district towns as a single road segment. The pollutant concentrations varied widely along the different road segments, with the highest concentrations for R5 compared with other road segments (PM10 = 149 μg/m3, PN = 5.74 × 104 particles/cm-3, CO = 0.19 ppm), which is the final segment of the road to the capital. Apart from vehicle emissions, the dominant sources were road works, unpaved roads and roadside combustion activities. Overall, the highest contributions above the background levels were made by unpaved roads for PM10 (6 times background), and vehicle emissions for PN and CO (5 and 15 times background, respectively). Notwithstanding the differences in instrumentation used and particle size range measured, the current study showed lower PN concentrations compared with similar on-road studies. However, concentrations were still high enough that commuters, road maintenance workers and residents living along the EWH, were potentially exposed to elevated pollutant concentrations from combustion and non-combustion sources. Future studies should focus on assessing the dispersion patterns of

  6. Traditional Knowledge in the Time of Neo-Liberalism: Access and Benefit-Sharing Regimes in India and Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Barpujari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In a neoliberal world, traditional knowledge (TK of biodiversity possessed by Indigenous and Local Communities (ILCs in the global South has become a valuable "commodity" or "bio-resource," necessitating the setting up of harmonized ground rules (international and national in the form of an access and benefitsharing regime to facilitate its exchange in the world market. Despite criticisms that a regime with a neo-liberal orientation is antithetical to the normative ethos of ILCs, it could also offer a chance for developing countries and ILCs to generate revenue for socioeconomic development—to which they are gradually becoming open, but only under fair and equitable terms. Based on this context, this article proposes to look into the legal and policy frameworks and institutional regimes governing access and benefit sharing of TK associated with biological resources in two countries of South Asia: India and Bhutan. The article seeks to examine how such regimes are reconciling the imperatives of a neo-liberal economy with providing a just and equitable framework for ILCs and TK holders, which is truly participatory and not top-down.

  7. La mise à jour du traité de 1949 entre l’Inde et le Bhutan : l’amorce d’une nouvelle politique indienne de voisinage ? The Revision of the Indo-Bhutan Friendship Treaty, 1949: a new Diplomacy towards India's Neighbours ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Sermet

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Le traité de voisinage, de 1949, entre l'Inde et le Bhutan a été réécrit et corrigé dans ses aspects les plus discutables. Ce renouvellement intervient alors que le Bhutan connaît des réformes politiques visant à introduire des éléments de parlementarisme constitutionnel au sein de son régime monarchique. Du côté indien, faut-il considérer que cette initiative diplomatique pourrait retentir sur le traité indo-népalais de 1950, et surtout sur les relations difficiles entretenues avec la Chine et le Pakistan ?

  8. Livelihood asset maps: a multidimensional approach to measuring risk-management capacity and adaptation policy targeting—a case study in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Thor

    2013-01-01

    to the fact that some areas facing increased level of climate-related risks lack access to productive and human capital, while other areas facing a similar situation have relatively insufficient access to financial assets. This again shows that any non-targeted policy aiming at improving households’ risk......-makers with a tool to quickly identify areas with limited access to certain types of assets, making the latter less able to react to a changing level of climaterelated risks. In the case of Bhutan, distinct spatial patterns of asset endowments is identified using five different asset indicators drawing attention...

  9. Timing and conditions of metamorphism and melt crystallization in Greater Himalayan rocks, eastern and central Bhutan: insight from U-Pb zircon and monazite geochronology and trace-element analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, K.; Gordon, S. M.; Long, S. P.; Kylander-Clark, A. R. C.; Agustsson, K.; Penfold, M.

    2015-05-01

    Within the eastern Himalaya in central and eastern Bhutan, Greater Himalayan (GH) rocks are interpreted to have been thickened by the Kakhtang thrust (KT). In order to understand the metamorphic and exhumation history of the GH and to evaluate the structural significance of the KT, zircon and monazite from twenty samples were analyzed by laser-ablation split-stream ICPMS. In eastern Bhutan, zircon and monazite from samples collected in the KT hanging wall revealed ca. 36-28 Ma metamorphism. Subsequently, the initiation of melt crystallization shows a trend with structural distance above the KT, with early melt crystallization (ca. 27 Ma) in the structurally highest samples and younger melt crystallization (ca. 16 Ma) for leucosomes within the KT zone. Melt crystallization was protracted and continued until ca. 14-13 Ma in both the KT hanging wall and the footwall. In comparison, in central Bhutan, two leucosomes revealed extended melt crystallization from ca. 31 to 19 Ma. The youngest zircon dates from samples exposed structurally above and below the KT are similar, indicating that the KT was not as significant of a structure as other fault systems to which it has been correlated. However, the younging trend in the initiation of melt crystallization with decreasing structural distance above the KT argues that progressive underplating of ductile material assisted in the initial emplacement of the GH unit in central and eastern Bhutan. The KT likely represents a minor shear zone that aided in this underplating process.

  10. School-based assessments in high-stakes examinations in Bhutan: a question of trust? Exploring inconsistencies between external exam scores, school-based assessments, detailed teacher ratings, and student self-ratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyten, Hans; Dolkar, Dechen

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the validity of school-based assessments when they serve to supplement scores on central tests in high-stakes examinations. The school-based continuous assessment (CA) marks are compared to the marks scored on the central written Bhutan Certificate of Secondary Education (BCSE) e

  11. Project on Training of Non-Formal Education Personnel: National Workshops in Bhutan, Nepal, and India cum Study Visits Undertaken by Teams of China, Lao PDR and Viet Nam (June 17-July 5, 1998) (APPEAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This report is a summary of study visits plus workshops that took place in Bhutan, Nepal, and India in 1998 within the framework of UNESCO's Asia-Pacific Programme of Education for All (APPEAL). Three educators each from China, Lao PDR, and Vietnam and educators from the host countries participated. The project aimed to promote literacy and…

  12. Development Challenges in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    2016-01-01

    of problems and potential contradictions. The objective is to give an overall critical insight into issues related to nation-building, GNH and inequality understood not only as a material or socio-economic term relating to income, assets, land, resources, health and gender but also as a political cultural...

  13. Development Challenges in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    2016-01-01

    of problems and potential contradictions. The objective is to give an overall critical insight into issues related to nation-building, GNH and inequality understood not only as a material or socio-economic term relating to income, assets, land, resources, health and gender but also as a political cultural...... construct relating to ethnicity, religion, participation, influence and collective and individual rights. The chapter introduces the issues covered by the contributions to the book and briefly describes the aims of each chapter....

  14. RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism and their potential role in gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, T T H; Nagashima, H; Uchida, T; Mahachai, V; Vilaichone, R-K; Tshering, L; Binh, T T; Yamaoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism on the risk of gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection, we determined allele frequency and genotype distribution of this polymorphism in Bhutan--a population documented with high prevalence of gastric cancer and extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. The status of RAD51 G135C was examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR amplified fragments and sequencing. Histological scores were evaluated according to the updated Sydney system. G135C carriers showed significantly higher scores for intestinal metaplasia in the antrum than G135G carriers [mean (median) 0·33 (0) vs. 0·08 (0), P = 0·008]. Higher scores for intestinal metaplasia of G135C carriers compared to those of G135G carriers were also observed in H. pylori-positive patients [0·3 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] and H. pylori-positive patients with gastritis [0·4 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] but were not found in H. pylori-negative patients. Our findings revealed that a combination of H. pylori infection and RAD51 G135C genotype of the host showed an increasing score for intestinal metaplasia. Therefore, RAD51 G135C might be the important predictor for gastric cancer of H. pylori-infected patients.

  15. Is diabetes and hypertension screening worthwhile in resource-limited settings? An economic evaluation based on a pilot of a Package of Essential Non-communicable disease interventions in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukpa, Wangchuk; Teerawattananon, Yot; Rattanavipapong, Waranya; Srinonprasert, Varalak; Tongsri, Watsamon; Kingkaew, Pritaporn; Yothasamut, Jomkwan; Wangchuk, Dorji; Dorji, Tandin; Wangmo, Kinzang

    2015-10-01

    In response to a lack of cost-effective data on screening and early treatment of diabetes and hypertension in resource-limited settings, a model-based economic evaluation was performed on the World Health Organization (WHO)'s Package of Essential Non-communicable (PEN) disease interventions for primary health care in Bhutan. Both local and international data were applied in the model in order to derive lifetime costs and outcomes resulting from the early treatment of diabetes and hypertension. The results indicate that the current screening option (where people who are overweight, obese or aged 40 years or older who visit primary care facilities are screened for diabetes and hypertension) represents good value for money compared to 'no screening'. The study findings also indicate that expanding opportunistic screening (70% coverage of the target population) to universal screening (where 100% of the target population are screened), is likely to be even more cost-effective. From the sensitivity analysis, the value of the screening options remains the same when disease prevalence varies. Therefore, applying this model to other healthcare settings is warranted, since disease prevalence is one of the major factors in affecting the cost-effectiveness results of screening programs.

  16. Statistical and Hydrological Evaluation of TRMM-Based Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis over the Wangchu Basin of Bhutan: Are the Latest Satellite Precipitation Products 3B42V7 Ready for Use in Ungauged Basins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xianwu; Hong, Yang; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Gourley, Jonathan; Huffman, George J.; Khan, Sadiq Ibrahim; Dorji, Chhimi; Chen, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the successive Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products and further to explore the improvements and error propagation of the latest 3B42V7 algorithm relative to its predecessor 3B42V6 using the Coupled Routing and Excess Storage (CREST) hydrologic model in the mountainous Wangchu Basin of Bhutan. First, the comparison to a decade-long (2001-2010) daily rain gauge dataset reveals that: 1) 3B42V7 generally improves upon 3B42V6s underestimation both for the whole basin (bias from -41.15 to -8.38) and for a 0.250.25 grid cell with high-density gauges (bias from -40.25 to 0.04), though with modest enhancement of correlation coefficients (CC) (from 0.36 to 0.40 for basin-wide and from 0.37 to 0.41 for grid); and 2) 3B42V7 also improves its occurrence frequency across the rain intensity spectrum. Using the CREST model that has been calibrated with rain gauge inputs, the 3B42V6-based simulation shows limited hydrologic prediction NSCE skill (0.23 in daily scale and 0.25 in monthly scale) while 3B42V7 performs fairly well (0.66 in daily scale and 0.77 in monthly scale), a comparable skill score with the gauge rainfall simulations. After recalibrating the model with the respective TMPA data, significant improvements are observed for 3B42V6 across all categories, but not as much enhancement for the already well-performing 3B42V7 except for a reduction in bias (from -26.98 to -4.81). In summary, the latest 3B42V7 algorithm reveals a significant upgrade from 3B42V6 both in precipitation accuracy (i.e., correcting the underestimation) thus improving its potential hydrological utility. Forcing the model with 3B42V7 rainfall yields comparable skill scores with in-situ gauges even without recalibration of the hydrological model by the satellite precipitation, a compensating approach often used but not favored by the hydrology community, particularly in ungauged basins.

  17. Quality of School Education in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utha, Karma; Giri, Krishna; Gurung, Bhupen

    This book is a product of a collaborative Bhutanese-Danish research project concerning the quality of school education in Bhutanese secondary schools. The empirical investigations that were at the center of the project took part in 2012-2014 and consisted in case study of seven selected schools...

  18. Educators and Education at a Crossroad in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yezer, Yezer; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    to the population. In theory it would enhance equity in the country but the factual evidence shows exactly the opposite that inequality and uneven development is increasing. If this trend continues it may undermine the goals and objectives of GNH and indeed threaten the future stability in the country....

  19. Worlds of Knowledge in Central Bhutan: Documentation of 'Olekha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    A re-emergence in language documentation has brought with it a recent recognition of the potential contributions which collaboration with other disciplines has to offer linguistics. For example, ten chapters of the recently published Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Fieldwork (Thieberger 2012) were explicitly devoted to cross-discipline…

  20. Learning to fight a fly : developing citrus IPM in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoubroeck, van H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The chinese citrus fly is one of the key pests in Bhutanese mandarin orchards that lays eggs in developing fruit that cause pre-mature fruit drop. In this study it is used as a "model subject" to explore the integration of technical, social and administrative domains of knowledge. The confinement of

  1. Emotional climate of a pre-service science teacher education class in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchen, Sonam; Ritchie, Stephen M.; Bellocchi, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    This study explored pre-service secondary science teachers' perceptions of classroom emotional climate in the context of the Bhutanese macro-social policy of Gross National Happiness. Drawing upon sociological perspectives of human emotions and using Interaction Ritual Theory this study investigated how pre-service science teachers may be supported in their professional development. It was a multi-method study involving video and audio recordings of teaching episodes supported by interviews and the researcher's diary. Students also registered their perceptions of the emotional climate of their classroom at 3-minute intervals using audience response technology. In this way, emotional events were identified for video analysis. The findings of this study highlighted that the activities pre-service teachers engaged in matter to them. Positive emotional climate was identified in activities involving students' presentations using video clips and models, coteaching, and interactive whole class discussions. Decreases in emotional climate were identified during formal lectures and when unprepared presenters led presentations. Emotions such as frustration and disappointment characterized classes with negative emotional climate. The enabling conditions to sustain a positive emotional climate are identified. Implications for sustaining macro-social policy about Gross National Happiness are considered in light of the climate that develops in science teacher education classes.

  2. Exploring Health-Promotion and Policy Synergies in Education in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yezer, Yezer; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk; Christensen, Line Kikkenborg

    Paper for the International Workshop “Development Challenges in Bhutan”, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, 29-30 May, 2013 Abstract This contribution focuses on how the existing resources and policy objectives for social development activities within the area of health promotion through education...... and synergies between health and education are given in the next part; Then third section is an attempt to conceptualize Bhutan’s goals in formulating and planning of policy-making within health through learning; A comprehensive analysis deals with the implementation and promotion of health policies...

  3. Emotional Climate of a Pre-Service Science Teacher Education Class in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchen, Sonam; Ritchie, Stephen M.; Bellocchi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This study explored pre-service secondary science teachers' perceptions of classroom emotional climate in the context of the Bhutanese macro-social policy of Gross National Happiness. Drawing upon sociological perspectives of human emotions and using Interaction Ritual Theory this study investigated how pre-service science teachers may be…

  4. Donor-assisted Ethno-Nationalism and Education Policy in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to give an elaborate understanding of the raison d’être of the vertical and horizontal links between the overall planning and policy-making ideology and objectives. This is exemplified with reference to an analysis of education policies and government promotion of GNH, Bhutaniza......This chapter aims to give an elaborate understanding of the raison d’être of the vertical and horizontal links between the overall planning and policy-making ideology and objectives. This is exemplified with reference to an analysis of education policies and government promotion of GNH...... for modernization and progress. This section also looks at the ideology of Bhutanisation and how it is linked with GNH, decentralization and the introduction of democracy and good governance. The third focuses on the function of education policies and analyzes links and synergies at the level of discursive input...

  5. Community Perspectives on the On-Farm Diversity of Six Major Cereals and Climate Change in Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirtha Bdr. Katwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsistence Bhutanese farmers spread across different agro-ecological zones maintain large species and varietal diversity of different crops in their farm. However, no studies have been undertaken yet to assess why farmers conserve and maintain large agro-biodiversity, the extent of agro-ecological richness, species richness, estimated loss of traditional varieties and threats to the loss of on-farm agro-biodiversity. Information on the number of varieties cultivated by the farmers for six important staple crops were collected from nine districts and twenty sub-districts spread across six different agro-ecological zones of the country to understand farmers reasons for maintaining on-farm crop diversity, estimate agro-ecological richness, species richness and the overall loss of traditional varieties, to know the famers’ level of awareness on climate change and the different threats to crop diversity. The results from this study indicated that an overwhelming 93% of the respondents manage and use agro-biodiversity for household food security and livelihood. The average agro-ecological richness ranged from 1.17 to 2.26 while the average species richness ranged from 0.50 to 2.66. The average agro-ecological richness indicates a large agro-ecological heterogeneity in terms of the different species of staple crops cultivated. The average species richness on the other hand shows that agro-ecological heterogeneity determines the type and extent of the cultivation of the six different staple cereals under consideration. The overall loss of traditional varieties in a time period of 20 years stands at 28.57%. On climate change, 94% of the farmers recognize that local climate is changing while 86% responded that they are aware of the potential impacts of climate change on their livelihoods. Climate change and associated factors was considered the most imminent threat to the management and loss of on-farm agro-biodiversity. The results from this study indicate that on-farm agro-biodiversity conservation, development and utilization programs have to be more specific to the different agro-ecological zones considering the agro-ecological heterogeneity. Attention has to be given to individual crops that have low average species richness and high percentage of loss of traditional varieties. The impact of climate change could offset the traditional seed system which primarily supports the persistence of on-farm agro-biodiversity in several ways.

  6. Evolution of tourism approaches for poverty reduction impact in SNV Asia: Cases from Lao PDR, Bhutan and Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, J.A.; Gujadhur, T.; Ritsma, N.

    2013-01-01

    Development agencies are facing a growing demand to demonstrate larger impacts on poverty, which has resulted in a questioning of tourism as an effective intervention strategy. Tourism has been employed as an agent of economic development, job creation, and environmental and cultural conservation. H

  7. Evaluation of Oral Bait Vaccine Efficacy Against Classical Swine Fever in Village Backyard Pig Farms in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, V R; Stegeman, J A; Dukpa, K; Gurung, R B; Loeffen, W L A

    2016-12-01

    Control and eradication of classical swine fever (CSF) in countries with a high proportion of backyard holdings is a challenge. Conventional attenuated Chinese C-strain vaccines, though safe and effective, are difficult to use in backyard farms due to various practical reasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the CSF oral bait vaccine in village backyard pig farms and to assess the farmers' knowledge on CSF and motivation on using oral vaccines. The pigs were fed the bait by the farmers themselves; one bait was given on day 0, followed by second bait on the next day. Seventy-three per cent (140 of 193 pigs) of vaccinated pigs had either a slight (2-fold-3-fold; 60 pigs) or significant (at least 4-fold; 80 pigs) increase of the antibody titre against CSFV. A significant increase of the antibody titres was mainly observed in pigs with no pre-vaccination titre (OR = 12, 95% CI = 4-40). The number of pigs with protective antibody titres (≥40) rose from 47 (24%) to 115 (60%) following vaccination. Only 30% of the farmers claimed to be familiar with CSF, although clinical signs they mentioned were rather unspecific and could relate to many other pig diseases. Most of the farmers claimed to be motivated to use oral vaccines if made available. The oral vaccine could be a substitute for the conventional attenuated CSF vaccines in areas where it is logistically difficult for veterinarians to visit. It may therefore be a useful tool to combat endemic CSF disease in regions where the disease continues to have a serious impact on the backyard farmers who depend on pig farming for their sustenance and livelihoods.

  8. Providing a gateway to prevention and care for the most at-risk populations in Bhutan: is this being achieved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandu, L; Zachariah, R; Van den Bergh, R; Wangchuk, D; Tshering, N; Wangmo, D; Ananthakrishnan, R; Dorji, T; Satyanarayana, S

    2014-03-21

    Contexte : Deux centres indépendants de dépistage et conseil pour le VIH (HCT) au Bhoutan proposant leurs services à la population générale et ciblent les plus à risque (MARP).Objectifs : Evaluer la tendance des tests VIH, hépatite et syphilis dans la population générale et chez les MARP et déterminer si les caractéristiques sociodémographiques et les conduites à risque sont associées à la séropositivité pour le VIH, l'hépatite et la syphilis.Schéma : Etude transversale sur les dossiers des clients, de 2009 à 2012.Résultats :Sur 7894 clients, 3009 (38%) appartenaient à la population générale et 4885 (62%) aux MARP. Au cours des 4 années, les examens ont diminué pour la population générale tandis qu'ils augmentaient ou restaient stables pour les MARP. Sur 4885 MARP, la séropositivité était de 0,7% pour le VIH, 1,3% pour l'hépatite B et 1,2% pour la syphilis. Les professionnelles du sexe (risque relatif [RR] 4,4 ; P = 0,03) et les partenaires de personnes vivant avec le VIH (RR 25,9 ; P VIH positif. Les professionnelles du sexe aveint également un risque plus élevé d'être positives pour la syphilis (RR 9,1 ; P < 0,001).Conclusion : L'augmentation de l'utilisation des services de HCT par les MARP est un résultat bienvenu, mais la tendance relativement stationnaire demande l'introduction d'approches de stratégie avancées dans les communautés. La porte d'entrée critique offerte aux MARP est une « opportunité » d'accroitre le paquet de services actuels.

  9. The nutritional status of children in Bhutan: results from the 2008 National nutrition survey and trends over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangmo Ugyen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports on the nutritional status of Bhutanese children. The objective of this paper is to summarize results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and to describe progress achieved during the last two decades. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2376 children aged 6 to 59 months was conducted during November-December 2008 to provide national and regional estimates. A multi-stage cluster sampling method was applied and 40 gewogs/thromdes were selected from each region (Western, Central, Eastern. Guidelines on how to measure length/height and weight followed WHO standardized procedures. Data were analysed for consistency and validation using the software WHO Anthro and the WHO SPSS macro. Underweight, stunting, overweight, wasting and thinness were defined based on the WHO Child Growth Standards. Data from 1986-88 and 1999 national surveys were reanalysed using the WHO standards to describe trends in nutritional status. Results Nationally, 34.9% Bhutanese preschool children are stunted and 10.4% are underweight. Wasting is 4.7%, with severe wasting close to 2% in rural areas, while overweight affects 4.4% of preschool children. While underweight rates are similar across regions, wasting is substantially more prevalent in the Western region and stunting in the Eastern region. Stunting shows a steep rise during the first two years of life, as high as 40%, and levels off thereafter, while wasting is greatest among children aged 6-24 months and subsequently decreases. The prevalence of stunting fell from 60.9% in 1986-88 to 34.9% in 2008, and underweight declined from 34.0% to 10.4% during same period. The percentage of wasted children dropped from 5.2% in 1986-88 to 2.5% in 1999 but then increased to 4.7% in 2008. Conclusions There have been major improvements in the nutritional status of Bhutanese children over the past two decades, however, linear growth retardation remains a significant concern. Early identification of growth faltering is essential for improving the effectiveness of public health programs to prevent stunting. Similarly, wasting rates indicate the need for a system to identify children with severe malnutrition in the isolated communities so that they can receive appropriate care.

  10. 不丹在第二次英国侵藏战争中的角色探析%On the Role of Bhutan during British Indian Government' Second Invasive War against Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    扎洛

    2009-01-01

    1903年底英印政府为了克服翻越喜马拉雅山给军需补给带来的巨大困难,急需修筑一条经过不丹领土直接进入西藏亚东的道路.而不丹作为清朝的藩属和中国西藏的传统盟友有可能在战争中支持西藏,从而对英军右翼构成威胁.为了解决上述问题,英印政府通过威胁停止支付不丹年度津贴等手段,对不丹进行了一系列威逼利诱,最终迫使不丹屈服.不丹政治领袖乌金旺秋等虽以调停之名随英军前往拉萨,但实际上沦为侵略者的帮凶.不丹的这种角色变化反映了藏、英双方在综合实力以及在喜马拉雅山地区影响力方面的差异,也反映了十三世达赖喇嘛等西藏上层既缺乏明确的作战思路,又缺乏创造有利的战争环境的手段.

  11. Medical Library Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Speed Ahead and Other News Librarians without Borders® HINARI and Internet Resources Workshop Report Bhutan: September 5- ... 2016 September 5-6 and 7-8, 2016 HINARI and Internet Resources Workshop conducted at Keysar Gyalpo ...

  12. 聆听西藏(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    在童话里漫步

    2002-01-01

    Tibet has long been knownas the Roof of the World.It is in the southwesternpart of China bordering India,Bhutan, and Nepal. The region isfull of spectacular skylines ofmajestic mountain peaks, breath-

  13. Notes on the Eastern Comma Polygonia c-album agnicula Moore, 1872 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae from Tawang District, Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monsoon Jyoti Gogoi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Comma, Polygonia c-album ranges across W.Himalaya up to Sikkim-Bhutan but not reported from North East India. Altogether, three subspecies occur within Indian region.This sighting is not surprising as Tawang dist. shares boundary with Bhutan. This sighting shows that more survey is needed in W. Himalaya to know the butterfly fauna of the region.

  14. Current Status and Future Possibilities of Higher Education in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka%南亚区域合作联盟各成员国高等教育发展历程的简要回顾与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. P. S. 乔汉; 刘伟

    2014-01-01

    本文从高等教育结构、高等学校入学资格、高等教育质量、高等教育资金、民营企业办学等概述南亚区域合作联盟(South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation)各成员国高等教育发展状况。

  15. Levels and trends of smokeless tobacco use among youth in countries of the World Health Organization South-East Asia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At least two rounds of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS have been completed in most of the countries in the World Health Organization South-East Asia region. Comparing findings from these two rounds provides trend data on smokeless tobacco (SLT use for the first time. Methods: This study uses GYTS data from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Timor-Leste during 2006-2013. GYTS is a nationally representative survey of 13-15-year-old students using a consistent and standard protocol. Current SLT use is defined as using any kind of SLT products, such as chewing betel quid or nonbetel quid or snuffing any other products orally or through the nasal route, during the 30 days preceding the survey. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were computed using SAS/SUDAAN software. Results: According to most recent GYTS data available in each country, the prevalence of current use of SLT among youth varied from 5.7% in Thailand to 23.2% in Bhutan; among boys, from 7.1% in Bangladesh to 27.2% in Bhutan; and among girls, from 3.7% in Bangladesh to 19.8% in Bhutan. Prevalence of SLT was reported significantly higher among boys than girls in Bhutan (boys 27.2%; girls 19.8%, India (boys 11.1%; girls 6.0%, Maldives (boys 9.2%; girls 2.9%, Myanmar (boys 15.2%; girls 4.0%, and Sri Lanka (boys 13.0%; girls 4.1%. Prevalence of current SLT use increased in Bhutan from 9.4% in 2009 to 23.2% in 2013, and in Nepal from 6.1% in 2007 to 16.2% in 2011. Conclusion: The findings call for countries to implement corrective measures through strengthened policy and enforcement.

  16. A Quantitative Analysis of Distributed Leadership in Practice: Teachers' Perception of Their Engagement in Four Dimensions of Distributed Leadership in Bhutanese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashi, Kelzang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the teacher engagement in distributed leadership practices within the four dimensions of the distributed leadership in Bhutan. It seeks to investigate the differences in teachers' perception of distributed leadership based on teacher and school background including gender, experience and qualification,…

  17. Teacher Education in Northeast India--Status, Weaknesses and Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Northeast India comprises of a cluster of eight states--Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura. The region is usually stereotyped as underdeveloped. Geographically, the region is surrounded by international border with part of Nepal, Bhutan, China, Myanmar and Bangladesh. Prevalence of insurgency and…

  18. 48 CFR 1852.213-70 - Offeror Representations and Certifications-Other Than Commercial Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, the Maldives Islands, or Nepal). _ Individual/concern, other than one of the... black college or university” means an institution determined by the Secretary of Education to meet the... institution of higher education meeting the requirements of Section 1046(3) of the Higher Education Act...

  19. Safety Management Practices in the Bhutanese Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Dorji

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is considered as one of the most hazardous industrial sectors wherein the construction workers are more prone to accidents. In developed countries such as United Kingdom and United States of America, there is strict legal enforcement of safety in the construction industry and also in the implementation of safety management systems which are designed to minimize or eliminate accidents at work places. However, occupational safety in construction industry is very poor in developing countries such as Bhutan. This study investigates the prevalent safety management practices and perceptions in the construction industry in Bhutan. The study was conducted among 40 construction contractors and 14 government officials through method of questionnaire survey, interview and discussion. The result of the study revealed that there are many occupational safety problems in the construction industry in Bhutan, problems such as lack of safety regulations and standards, low priority of safety, lack of data on safety at construction sites, lack of competent manpower, lack of safety training, lack of safety promotion and lack of documented and organized safety management systems. Furthermore, the study also proposes some recommendations for safe construction in Bhutan.

  20. Participatory Publics - Examples from Higher Education in Fragile Democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Pär-Ola

    This paper presents two cases of local communities, defined by being constituted by students in higher education in polities that have a relatively short tradition of democracy. The first case is a college in Bhutan. The second example is a Madrasa in Bangladesh, a privately run institution...

  1. Predicting Virtual Learning Environment Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penjor, Sonam; Zander, Pär-Ola Mikael

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the significance of Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory with regard to the use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB). The focus is on different adoption types and characteristics of users. Rogers’ DOI theory is applied...

  2. Communications Channels in the Sahel Using Mauritania, Mali, Niger, and Chad as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Page 60 of 107 Appendix B - Phone Card Distribution Chain Phone Card Provider Internet Cafes ...92 Malaysia 22,25 93 Comoros 22,50 - Zambia 22,50 95 Niger 24,50 - Seychelles 24,50 97 Morocco 24,83 98 Bhutan 25,00 - Côte d’Ivoire 25,00

  3. Monazite Growth from the Eocene to the Miocene: New Interpretations of the Metamorphic History of Greater Himalayan Rocks in the Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. M.; Kauffman, R.; Gonzales-Clayton, B.; Long, S. P.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Across the Himalaya, mid- to lower-crustal Greater-Himalayan (GH) rocks have been exhumed during active continent-continent collision. In the eastern Himalaya within Bhutan, GH rocks are divided into an upper and lower level by an intra-GH shear zone, the Kakthang thrust (KT). To decipher the metamorphic, melt-crystallization and exhumation history of the GH rocks exposed above and below the KT, monazite from metapelites and migmatites was dated and trace elements were analyzed by laser-ablation, split-stream ICPMS. The trace elements from the monazite were used to track when the rocks were at near-peak conditions (based on the depletion of HREE and the likely presence of garnet during monazite growth) versus likely undergoing initial exhumation and garnet breakdown (based on an increase in HREE). Samples were collected from two N-S transects that cross the KT in central and eastern Bhutan. The eastern transect reveals a progressive younging of near-peak metamorphism within the GH, with dates of ca. 23-20 Ma for the structurally-highest sample versus ca. 18-16 Ma in the structurally-lowest sample. The youngest dates from all structural levels of the eastern Bhutan metapelites are 13-15 Ma; the same analyses yield higher HREE abundances, suggesting garnet breakdown during their (re)crystallization. The migmatites yield ca. 14-16 Ma melt-crystallization ages, consistent with the GH having undergone cooling and initial exhumation to cause garnet breakdown by ca. 15 Ma. In comparison, the central Bhutan transect reveals older near-peak metamorphic ages, with garnet-stable monazite populations at ca. 48­-46 Ma within the KT zone, ca. 38-30 Ma for rocks in the middle of the upper-GH, and ca. 25-22 Ma for the structurally-highest sample. Youngest monazites from the central Bhutan transect that yield growth or recrystallization at garnet-unstable conditions range from ca. 17-26 Ma. These results suggest earlier metamorphism and exhumation of GH rocks in central Bhutan

  4. Global surface temperature signals in pine ring-width chronologies from southern monsoon Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, B. M.; Cook, B. I.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Dukpa, D.; Chaudhary, V.

    2005-10-01

    We analyze Pinus ring width chronologies from three locations across monsoon Asia (Bhutan, India, and Thailand) where climate is dominated by the southwest monsoon in the boreal summer. We compare these records to global surface temperatures for the past 150 years, shifting the correlations through three seasonal averages: two seasons preceding the monsoon (Dec-Feb and Mar-May), and the monsoon season itself (Jun-Sep). Clear patterns emerge for each of the chronologies that highlight links to areas of known influence on the Asian monsoon: the Indian Ocean, the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, and the high-latitude Asian landmass. The Thai and Indian chronologies are from the same species (P. merkusii), and show a strong correlation with tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean bands. The Bhutan chronology (P. Wallichiana) is most strongly linked to climate over the north Pacific and Asian landmass. All of these correlations are strongest in seasons preceding the summer monsoon.

  5. Sichuan to Seek More Reciprocal Development with South Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ On January 27 and January 28,South Asia-Sichuan Business Promotion Seminar sponsored by CCPIT Sichuan Council was held in Chengdu, Sichuang.Present at the Seminar were Liu Qibao, Governor of Sichuan Province, Mr. Hook, President of South Asian Federal Association of Industry and Commerce, Mr. Yuping,Vice President of CCPIT as well as head of chamber of commerce of Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Bhutan.

  6. Defense Trade Data: Sources and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    detailed trade information on such products may be difficult. Recent U.S. concerns have ranged from dependency on rare earths and first level products...BHUTAN BR INDIAN OCEAN TERR EGYPT INDIA IRAN IRAQ ISRAEL JORDAN KOWAIT LEBANON LIBYA MALDIVES MOROCCO NEPAL OMAN PAKISTAN QATAR SAODI...specifically designed or developed for military application and any computer specifically modified for use with any defense article in any category of

  7. Nuclear Escalation Ladders in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Ibid., pp. 211-212. 23 Fig. 3. Indian Escalation Ladder - Facing China in the Himalayas Response or Initiative Rung Order Thresholds and Rungs Peace...potential land-warfare ladders in the Himalayas . A. Territorial Boundaries India and Pakistan face each other across a common international... Himalayas from Ladakh in Kashmir south and east for 2,100 miles, interrupted by Nepal and Bhutan, which have their own northern borders with China of 768 and

  8. Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades

    OpenAIRE

    Taleo George; Mendis Kamini; Kusriastuti Rita; Hsiang Michelle S; Qi Gao; Galappaththy Gawrie; Bustos Dorina; Douglas Nick M; Andersen Finn; Whittaker Maxine; Price Ric N; von Seidlein Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Quantitative data are lacking on published malaria research. The purpose of the study is to characterize trends in malaria-related literature from 1990 to 2009 in 11 Asian-Pacific countries that are committed to malaria elimination as a national goal. Methods A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 1990 to December 2009 in PubMed/MEDLINE using terms for malaria and 11 target countries (Bhutan, China, North Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippin...

  9. Udviklingsparadigmer i et partnerskab

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Liv Malene

    2015-01-01

    Throughout this master thesis I have examined the following problem definition: Which development paradigms shape the partnership between the Danish Scout and Guide Association (DDS) and The Bhutan Scouts Association (BSA)? Several development paradigms have been used as theory. Each of these development paradigms has their own buzzwords attached, and this is why I use buzzwords. I use sub-questions to be able to answer the problem definition. I apply selected theoretical concepts by Laclau a...

  10. Indian-U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-03

    and the United National Liberation Front (seeking an independent Manipur ) are among the groups at war with the central government. In April 2005, the...who had re-established their bases in Bhutan. Major Indian army operations in late 2004 may have overrun Manipur separatist bases near the Burmese...states in the country’s south (Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, and Maharashtra) and two in the northeast ( Manipur and Nagaland). According to

  11. The Paradox of Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Averi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Kingdom of Bhutan is seeking to progressively realize the human right to health without addressing the cross-cutting human rights principles essential to a rights-based approach to health. Through a landscape analysis of the Bhutanese health system, documentary review of Bhutanese reporting to the United Nations human rights system, and semi-structured interviews with health policymakers in Bhutan, this study examines the normative foundations of Bhutan’s focus on “a more meaningful purpose for development than just mere material satisfaction.” Under this development paradigm of Gross National Happiness, the Bhutanese health system meets select normative foundations of the right to health, seeking to guarantee the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of health care and underlying determinants of health. However, where Bhutan continues to restrict the rights of minority populations—failing to address the ways in which human rights are indivisible, interdependent, and interrelated—additional reforms will be necessary to realize the right to health. Given the continuing prevalence of minority rights violations in the region, this study raises research questions for comparative studies in other rights-denying national contexts and advocacy approaches to advance principles of non-discrimination, participation, and accountability through health policy.

  12. Landslide susceptibility mapping for rural development: Case studies and research findings from the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, J.; Petley, D. N.

    2003-04-01

    In 2002 landslides caused a reported 346 human fatalities in the Himalayan Kingdom of Nepal. Over the last decade the total reported deaths due to landslides has exceeded 900. During the past 2-3 years in neighbouring Bhutan landslides have caused extensive damage to roads and other infrastructure, also leading to significant loss of life. Landslides, therefore, are major considerations in the siting of new infrastructure, the maintenance of existing facilities and the protection of rural communities and road users in the Himalayan region. Despite this, there is extremely limited information available on landslide hazards in the region, and the situation is a particular concern in Nepal and Bhutan. The Landslide Risk Assessment Project was established in 2000 to investigate cause-effect relationships in landslide occurrence and to develop simple techniques of landslide susceptibility mapping. A total of over 1300 landslides have been mapped from remote sensing and field surveys in six study areas in Nepal and Bhutan. GIS has been used to compare the spatial distribution of these landslides with a range of geological, terrain and land use factors. The research has shown that consistent relationships can be found between the location of landslides and rock type, geological structure, slope steepness and terrain classification. The results have positive implications for the assessment of landslide susceptibility for rural development planning in areas where limited data already exist.

  13. Sensitivity and Response of Bhutanese Glaciers to Atmospheric Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Summer; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Burgener, Landon K.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tsering, Karma; Cook, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Glacierized change in the Himalayas affects river-discharge, hydro-energy and agricultural production, and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood potential, but its quantification and extent of impacts remains highly uncertain. Here we present conservative, comprehensive and quantitative predictions for glacier area and meltwater flux changes in Bhutan, monsoonal Himalayas. In particular, we quantify the uncertainties associated with the glacier area and meltwater flux changes due to uncertainty in climate data, a critical problem for much of High Asia. Based on a suite of gridded climate data and a robust glacier melt model, our results show that glacier area and meltwater change projections can vary by an order of magnitude for different climate datasets. However, the most conservative results indicate that, even if climate were to remain at the present-day mean values, almost 10% of Bhutan s glacierized area would vanish and the meltwater flux would drop by as much as 30%. Under the conservative scenario of an additional 1 C regional warming, glacier retreat is going to continue until about 25% of Bhutan s glacierized area will have disappeared and the annual meltwater flux, after an initial spike, would drop by as much as 65%. Citation

  14. Glacier Changes in the Bhutanese Himalaya - Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Burgener, L. K.; Maurer, J.; Smith, R.; Cook, E.; Putnam, A. E.; Krusic, P.; Tsering, K.; Koenig, L.

    2012-12-01

    Glacierized change in the Himalayas affects river-discharge, hydro-energy and agricultural production, and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood potential, but its quantification and extent of impacts remains highly uncertain. Here we present conservative, comprehensive and quantitative predictions for glacier area and meltwater flux changes in Bhutan, monsoonal Himalayas. In particular, we quantify the uncertainties associated with the glacier area and meltwater flux changes due to uncertainty in climate data, a critical problem for much of High Asia. Based on a suite of gridded climate data and a robust glacier melt model, our results show that glacier area and meltwater change projections can vary by an order of magnitude for different climate datasets. The most conservative results indicate that, even if climate were to remain at the present-day mean values (1980-2000), almost 10% of Bhutan's glacierized area would vanish and the meltwater flux would drop by as much as 30%. New mapping of glacierized area from 2000-2010 shows a significant change in glacierized area of 4-6%. Thus the conservative steady-state area changes predicted by the model are already being realized. Under the conservative scenario of an additional 1°C regional warming, glacier retreat is predicted to continue until about 25% of Bhutan's glacierized area will have disappeared and the annual meltwater flux, after an initial spike, would drop by as much as 65%.

  15. Sensitivity and response of Bhutanese glaciers to atmospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Summer; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Burgener, Landon K.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tsering, Karma; Cook, Edward R.

    2012-10-01

    Glacierized change in the Himalayas affects river-discharge, hydro-energy and agricultural production, and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood potential, but its quantification and extent of impacts remains highly uncertain. Here we present conservative, comprehensive and quantitative predictions for glacier area and meltwater flux changes in Bhutan, monsoonal Himalayas. In particular, we quantify the uncertainties associated with the glacier area and meltwater flux changes due to uncertainty in climate data, a critical problem for much of High Asia. Based on a suite of gridded climate data and a robust glacier melt model, our results show that glacier area and meltwater change projections can vary by an order of magnitude for different climate datasets. However, the most conservative results indicate that, even if climate were to remain at the present-day mean values, almost 10% of Bhutan's glacierized area would vanish and the meltwater flux would drop by as much as 30%. Under the conservative scenario of an additional 1°C regional warming, glacier retreat is going to continue until about 25% of Bhutan's glacierized area will have disappeared and the annual meltwater flux, after an initial spike, would drop by as much as 65%.

  16. Prevalence of smokeless tobacco use among adults in WHO South-East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Smokeless tobacco (SLT use is an understudied problem in South-East Asia. Information on SLT use among the adult population was collected from various available sources. SLT use prevalence varies among countries in the region. The prevalence of SLT use is known for all countries at national level in the region with the exception of Bhutan and DPR Korea. For Bhutan, data pertains to Thimphu only. There is no available data on SLT use for DPR Korea. Using all available data from Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, SLT use was found to be higher among males as compared to females; however, in Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Thailand, SLT use was higher among females as compared to males. Among males, prevalence of SLT use varied from 51.4% in Myanmar to 1.1% in Thailand. Among females, the prevalence of SLT use varied from 27.9% in Bangladesh to 1.9% in Timor-Leste. The prevalence also varies in different parts of countries. For instance, the prevalence of current use of SLT in India ranges from 48.7% in Bihar to 4.5% in Himachal Pradesh. In Thailand, prevalence of current use of tobacco use varies from 0.8% in Bangkok to over 4% in the northern (4.1% and northeastern (4.7% region. Among all SLT products, betel quid was the most commonly used product in most countries including Bangladesh (24.3% and Thailand (1.8%. However, Khaini (11.6% chewing was practiced most commonly in India. Nearly 5% of the adult population used tobacco as dentifrice in Bangladesh and India. SLT is more commonly used in rural areas and among disadvantaged groups. Questions from standard "Tobacco Questions for Surveys (TQS" need to be integrated in routine health system surveys in respective countries to obtain standardized tobacco use data at regular intervals that will help in providing trends of SLT use in countries.

  17. Implementation of Teaching Skills and Strategies in the Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choeda, Choeda; Kinley, Kinley

    2013-01-01

    ‘Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ are two core (professional) modules offered at the two colleges of education in Bhutan to develop pedagogical knowledge and skills of student teachers. However, a tracer study (in press) done by Samtse College of Education [SCE] revealed teacher graduates...... of teaching skills and strategies in the schools. Teacher graduates, both male and female having working experience of three years and above, teaching in Middle Secondary and Higher Secondary Schools, were selected as the participants in the study. Samples were drawn from the different parts of the country...

  18. 玉龙尾凤蝶的生物学特性初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易传辉; 和福仙; 和秋菊; 王琳

    2011-01-01

    玉龙尾凤蝶Bhutanitis yulongensis Chou是我国珍稀濒危物种。详细描述了该虫各虫态形态特征、生活史和习性。在云南丽江玉龙雪山,该蝶1年1代,以蛹滞育越冬,人工饲养成虫4月中旬开始出现,野外5月初开始出现,幼虫5龄,以马兜铃科Aristolochia ceae的宝兴马兜铃(Aristolochia moupinensis Franch)为食。

  19. Forage growth, yield and quality responses of Napier hybrid grass cultivars to three cutting intervals in the Himalayan foothills

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A 3 x 3 factorial study was conducted in the southern foothills of Bhutan to compare 3 cultivars of Napier hybrid grass (Pennisetum purpureum x P. glaucum: Pakchong-1, CO-3 and Giant Napier), at 3 cutting intervals (40, 60 and 80 days), in terms of forage growth, dry matter (DM) yield and crude protein (CP) concentration. The effects of cultivar x cutting interval were significant only on tiller number per plant and leaf:stem ratio (LSR). CO-3 consistently produced the highest tiller number p...

  20. Pathologists overseas: coordinating volunteer pathology services for 19 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenecke, Heinz; Lee, Victor; Roy, Indrojit

    2011-02-01

    Pathologists Overseas is a nonprofit organization that has been coordinating the efforts of volunteer pathologists and technologists for 19 years to improve and provide affordable pathology services to underserved patients worldwide. This is accomplished by aiding and establishing pathology laboratories, providing diagnostic pathology services, and training local physicians as pathologists. Projects have been completed or are currently active in Kenya, Eritrea, Madagascar, Ghana, Nepal, Bhutan, Peru, El Salvador, and St Lucia. The main challenge is finding enough volunteers to provide uninterrupted service to maintain a project. Our goal is to build on these experiences and continue to both support existing and establish more pathology laboratories worldwide.

  1. Flora of the Pan-Himalayas: General guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Editorial Committee,Flora of the Pan-Himalayas [May 2011]1.The Pan-Himalayas (the Himalayas and adjacent regions) forms a natural geographic unit,from the Wakhan Corridor and northeastern Hindu Kush eastwards to the Hengduan Mountains by way of Karakorum and the Himalayas.This region covers the northeastern corner of Afghanistan,northern Pakistan,northern India,Nepal,Bhutan,northern Myanmar,and southwest China (S Tibet,SE Qinghai,SE Gansu,W Sichuan,and NW Yunnan).

  2. Tibetans' Fight Against British Invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Late in the 19th century, the Qing Central Governmentwas in a state of permanent decline, and its control oversome southwestern and northwestern areas suffered accordingly,making possible British and Russian incursions. In order to expand its sphereof influence and occupy all of Tibet,Britain clandestinely sent nominal preachers, tourists and explorers to explore for minerals in Tibet. Later,they managed to encroach on some of the adjacent countries of Tibet including Nepal, Sikkim and Bhutan, paving the way for invading Tibet.

  3. Tibetanisering : religiøs og etnisk utdanning av tibetanske flyktningbarn i Nord-India

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Trude

    2007-01-01

    Religiøs sosialisering og nasjonal identitet blant tibetanske flyktningbarn i Nord-India er tema for denne oppgaven. Mye av materialet bygger på feltarbeidet jeg utførte ved Tibetan Children’s Village (TCV) Dharamsala høsten 2003. TCV regnes som en av de viktigste sekulære utdanningsinstitusjonene for tibetanerne i eksil. Siden den kinesiske invasjonen av Tibet i 1950 har mer en 100 000 tibetanere flyktet over fjellene i Himalaya til India, Nepal og Bhutan. Et av Dalai Lamas og eksilregje...

  4. Plateau 'pop-up' in the great 1897 Assam earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, R; England, P

    2001-04-12

    The great Assam earthquake of 12 June 1897 reduced to rubble all masonry buildings within a region of northeastern India roughly the size of England, and was felt over an area exceeding that of the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake. Hitherto it was believed that rupture occurred on a north-dipping Himalayan thrust fault propagating south of Bhutan. But here we show that the northern edge of the Shillong plateau rose violently by at least 11 m during the Assam earthquake, and that this was due to the rupture of a buried reverse fault approximately 110 km in length and dipping steeply away from the Himalaya. The stress drop implied by the rupture geometry and the prodigious fault slip of 18 +/- 7 m explains epicentral accelerations observed to exceed 1g vertically and surface velocities exceeding 3 m s-1 (ref. 1). This quantitative observation of active deformation of a 'pop-up' structure confirms that faults bounding such structures can penetrate the whole crust. Plateau uplift in the past 2-5 million years has caused the Indian plate to contract locally by 4 +/- 2 mm yr-1, reducing seismic risk in Bhutan but increasing the risk in northern Bangladesh.

  5. Forage growth, yield and quality responses of Napier hybrid grass cultivars to three cutting intervals in the Himalayan foothills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesang Wangchuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3 x 3 factorial study was conducted in the southern foothills of Bhutan to compare 3 cultivars of Napier hybrid grass (Pennisetum purpureum x P. glaucum: Pakchong-1, CO-3 and Giant Napier, at 3 cutting intervals (40, 60 and 80 days, in terms of forage growth, dry matter (DM yield and crude protein (CP concentration. The effects of cultivar x cutting interval were significant only on tiller number per plant and leaf:stem ratio (LSR. CO-3 consistently produced the highest tiller number per plant, leaves per plant and LSR, while Pakchong-1 produced the lowest. Pakchong-1 plants were taller, had bigger tillers and basal circumference and higher stem DM production than CO-3 and Giant. Leaf CP for all cultivars was about 17%, while stem CP concentration was lower for Pakchong-1 than for the other cultivars (3.6 vs. 5.3%, P<0.05. While 40-day cutting intervals produced high quality forage, yields suffered marked-ly and the best compromise between yield and quality of forage seemed to occur with 60-day cutting intervals. Pakchong-1 seems to have no marked advantages over CO-3 and Giant for livestock feed, and feeding studies would verify this. Its higher stem DM yields may be advantageous for biogas production and this aspect should be investigated.Keywords: Bhutan, CO-3, crude protein , dry matter, Giant Napier, Pakchong-1.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(3142-150

  6. Mithun : The pride animal of north-eastern hilly region of India

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    M. G. Shisode

    Full Text Available Mithun, the pride animal called as ‘Cattle of Hilly Region’ of north-eastern hilly region of India and tropical rain forest of China. The animal plays an important role in the day to day socio-economic life of the local tribal population. Mithun (Bos frontalis is a rear species of livestock and is found in the north-eastern region of our country like Arunachal Pradesh (75 per cent of the total population, Nagaland (60 per cent, Manipur (0.8 per cent andMizoram (0.1 per cent having total population 0.25 million according to census 2003 and also very meager in Myanmar, Bhutan, and Bangladesh. The animal has got good potential for production of quality meat, milk and leather. Mithun is the ‘Cattle of Hilly Region’ and is one of the domesticated animals from the North-eastern hilly region and mainly found in tropical rain forest of North-eastern hilly region. Very meager population is found inMyanmar, Bhutan and China. There are four defined mithun strains depending up on the geographical areas namely Arunachal, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram strains, respectively. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 480-481

  7. Siliguri: A Geopolitical Manoeuvre Corridor in the Eastern Himalayan Region for China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Yaser Malik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Siliguri Corridor being part of Indian West Bengal is a diplomatic manoeuvre place located between Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, India’s Seven Sister States and Chumbi Hills in the Eastern Himalayan Region. Being located at the crossroads and centrally situated between all the neighbouring countries the landlocked Siliguri has an especially economic and political value for the regional countries. The corridor being in close proximity to China and India’s Seven Sister States has added to the diplomatic mosaic of the Eastern Himalayan Region. The region consists of beautiful landscape, mountains and rivers which not only add to topographical diversity but also demographic mixture. Despite its geopolitical significance the area could not advance for not only being a northeastern border region but also for being a gateway to the Seven Sister States. Peripheral development of Siliguri Corridor is one of the reasons for illegal practices like smuggling and terrorism. In year 2002 Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh discussed a proposal to form a free trade corridor to simplify the goods transportation through Siliguri Corridor but no such pact could be concluded that would have avoided the activities like smuggling and terrorism mainly through economic and diplomatic ventures.

  8. The Sequence Variations of Intron-3 of the α-Amylase Gene in Adzuki Bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Wen-lin; Yamaguchi Hirofumi; Isigami Matiko; Yasuda Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    This study describes variation of intron-3 of a-amylase gene from 156 breeds of adzuki beansusing SSCP(single-strand conformation polymorphism)analysis. Based on a-amylase gene structure and se-quence, A pair of PCR primers, F (CCTACATTCTAACACACCCT) and R (GCATATTGTGCCAGTACAAT)were designed to amplify intron-3 fragments of a-amylase gene. 14 variant types were detected, including 13,9, 10, 4 variant types in the wild, weed, locally cultivated and modern brought-up adzuki beans respectively,9, 8, 7 variant types of the wild adzuki beans from Japan, China and Korea respectively, and some other va-riant types in the local adzuki beans from China and Bhutan. 60 % of subjects of cultivated races were found tobe EE type in the experiment. In addition, sequence analysis of intron-3 of α-amylase gene from 8 varianttypes reveals the evolution process of various variant types in adzuki beans.

  9. The usage of ICT for teaching at a Bhutanese college

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinley, Kinley; Zander, Pär-Ola; Georgsen, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Students today are connected through computers, instant messaging, intranet, internet, and cell phones. In order to cater to the students' experience with technology, corresponding changes in pedagogy and curriculum should happen. Students in Bhutan are also exposed to technologies like any other...... on the use of ICT as an enabling factor for effective delivery of lessons. However, the motivation level among faculty is found to be low, which was related to resource constraints, lack of IT support, and poor and unstable internet connection. There are also variations amongst the lecturers in terms...... of competences, professional training, skill level and in their individual use of ICT for teaching. We conclude by discussing the general relevance of these findings, as well as outlining future research....

  10. Gross National Happiness: Ideology versus practices in Bhutanese Seconday Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Rasmussen, Lone Krogh; Giri, Krishna Prasad

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates practices related to the ideology of infusing Gross National Happiness (GNH) into school curriculum, the effectiveness of the meditation and mind training and the implication of GNH for school environment. It also explores how GNH ambience has been managed and practiced......, the influence of the concept of GNH in school life generally and specifically and the effects on teachers and students of mindfull training in the class, how does it work? The investigation is based on empirical data from eight selected secondary schools spread all over Bhutan. Principals, teachers, students...... and parents were interviewed in 2012/2013 individually and in groups. Further more classroom observations took place. Finally the investigation is based on literature review and readings of documents, which describe and analyse policies, principles, strategies and philosophies related to the implementation...

  11. Butterflies (Lepidoptera of the Kameng Protected Area Complex, western Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sondhi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies of the Kameng Protected Area Complex in western Arunachal Pradesh, India, covering the protected areas of Eaglenest Wildlife Sanctuary, Pakke Tiger Reserve and Sessa Orchid Wildlife Sanctuary were surveyed over a 5-year period (2009–2014.  A total of 421 butterfly species were recorded during the survey, including two species new to India (Gonepteryx amintha thibetana and Bhutanitis ludlowi and several species rediscoveries and range extensions in the Eastern Himalaya, most notably Arhopala belphoebe, Sovia separata magna, Aulocera saraswati vishnu, Calinaga aborica, Callerebia annada annada, and Callerebria scanda opima.  Here we provide an annotated checklist of butterflies of the Kameng Protected Area Complex, including historical records, distributions, abundance, habitats and other notes on these 421 species. An additional 42 species recorded in older literature or by other authors in recent times are also listed, taking the total number of species recorded in the landscape to 463.  

  12. The Chronological History and Taxonomic Variation of the Genus Cupressus(Cupressaceae) in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Silba

    2006-01-01

    Recent embryological evidence of studies of seedlings of Cupressus L. Along with chemotaxonomic studies of heart wood components has demonstrated that Cupressus lusitanica Mill. Did indeed originate from the country of India. In the midsixteenth century, Portuguese merchants established early trade routes between India and Portugal. The trade developed from the spice industry confirms Miller's (1768) original description that Cupressus lusitanica did indeed originate from India.Later authors suggested that Cupressus lusitanica cultivated in Portugal was introduced from wild populations of Cupressus in Mexico. However, this latter theory was never accepted by native botanist in the country of Mexico, including noted botanist M. Martinez (1948). In fact, all Cupressus species in India seem to have a different embryology than that of all Cupressus species in Nepal, Bhutan, China and Vietnam (Silba, 1994).

  13. Traditional medicine: a rare cause of lead poisoning in Western countries [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2c6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halima Muller

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man from Bhutan was admitted to the emergency department with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Enhanced abdominal CT scan was found negative, however laboratory tests showed hemolytic anemia and basophilic stippling which are often seen in lead and heavy metal poisoning. Additional tests revealed a high level of lead in blood and urine. The patient was administered a chelator treatment with rapid improvement of the symptoms. A detailed interview revealed that the patient had been taking daily Bhutanese traditional medicines to treat a Bell’s palsy from which he had been suffering for a few months. The analysis of these medicines confirmed the presence of a high level of lead.

  14. 20 years of cleft lip and palate missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, J Thomas; Kreusch, Thomas; Marsh, Jeff L; Schopper, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Volunteer missions for cleft lip and palate (CLP) care in Indonesia (1991-1992), India (1994-2003), Bhutan (2005-2010), and Kenya (2011), took place always at the same Hospital in each country. Altogether over a thousand patients were operated using a conservative protocol: Safety first - no experiments. Five months and 5 kg were the basic rules. For the native doctors, training help for self-help was priority. In the announcements, patients with CLP were primarily addressed. Burns, contractions, tumors, and trauma-cases were the second priority. Fresh trauma was done in night shifts with the local surgeons in order not to interfere. Besides facial esthetics speech was the number one issue, following priorities fell into place. Cultural aspects played a certain role in the different countries and continents.

  15. Exploring the mental health effects of political trauma with newly arrived refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patricia J; Wieling, Elizabeth; McCleary, Jennifer Simmelink; Becher, Emily

    2015-04-01

    We explored the mental health effects of war trauma and torture as described by 111 refugees newly arrived in the United States. We used ethnocultural methodologies to inform 13 culture-specific focus groups with refugees from Bhutan (34), Burma (23), Ethiopia (27), and Somalia (27). Contrary to the belief that stigma prevents refugees from discussing mental health distress, participants readily described complex conceptualizations of degrees of mental health distress informed by political context, observation of symptoms, cultural idioms, and functional impairment. Recommendations for health care providers include assessment processes that inquire about symptoms in their political context, the degree of distress as it is culturally conceptualized, and its effect on functioning. Findings confirm the cross-cultural recognition of symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder; however, refugees described significant cultural variation in expressions of distress, indicating the need for more research on culture-bound disorders and idioms of distress.

  16. Chronic peritoneal dialysis in South Asia - challenges and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Georgi; Pratap, Balaji; Sankarasubbaiyan, Suresh; Govindan, Priyanka; Nayak, K Shivanand; Sheriff, Rezvi; Naqvi, S A Jaffar

    2008-01-01

    Chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD), especially continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD), is being increasingly utilized in South Asian countries (population of 1.4 billion). There are divergent geopolitical and socioeconomic factors that influence the growth and expansion of CAPD in this region. The majority of the countries in South Asia are lacking in government healthcare system for reimbursing renal replacement therapy. The largest utilization of chronic PD is in India, with nearly 6500 patients on this treatment by the end of 2006. A large majority of patients are doing 2 L exchanges 3 times per day, using glucose-based dialysis solution manufactured in India. Chronic PD is not being utilized in Myanmar, Bhutan, or Seychelles. Affirmative action by the manufacturing industry, medical professionals, government policy makers, and nongovernmental organizations for reducing the cost of chronic PD will enable the growth and utilization of this life-saving therapy.

  17. Study of drying characteristics of large-cardamom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, V.G.; Mande, S.; Kishore, V.V.N. [Tata Energy Research Inst., New Delhi (India)

    2001-07-01

    India is the largest producer of large-cardamom in the world with a 54% share in world production followed by Nepal (33%) and Bhutan (13%). For long-duration storage of cardamom and in order to bring out its aroma, the fresh cardamom capsules (with 80-85% moisture) has to be dried immediately after harvesting to bring down its moisture content to less than 10% (w.b.) through a curing(drying) process. Still a primitive and inefficient (operating efficiency level of about 5-15%) smoking method (using traditional bhatti) is being used for drying of large- cardamom resulting in huge (estimated 20,000 MT/yr) wastage of fuel wood and poor (charred and blackened ) quality product. This paper gives a brief description of efforts made to obtain basic drying parameters of large- cardamom (which is a pre-requisite for dryer design) under different operating conditions. (Author)

  18. Molecular epidemiology of influenza A (H5N1) viruses, Bangladesh, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Md Ahasanul; Tun, Hein Min; Hassan, Mohammad Mahmudul; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Islam, Skm Azizul; Islam, Md Nurul; Giasuddin, Md; Osmani, Tabm Muzaffar Goni; Islam, Ariful; Thornton, Ronald Norman; Burgess, Graham William; Skerratt, Lee Francis; Selleck, Paul; Brun, Edgar; Debnath, Nitish Chandra; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the origins, evolution and patterns of spread of HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in Bangladesh, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction analysis using Bayesian methods. The analysis was conducted using 81 hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences from the H5N1 viruses isolated in Bangladesh from 2007 to 2011, together with 264 publicly available HA sequences of clade 2.2, 2.3.2 and 2.3.4 retrieved from GenBank. Our study provides evidence that clade 2.2.2 viruses that caused outbreaks in Bangladesh were lineages independent from the viruses introduced earlier into India. Furthermore, the Bangladesh clade 2.2.2 descendents subsequently spread to India and Bhutan. This has implications for avian influenza control in southern Asia suggesting multiple routes of entry of the virus including one pathway that spread to neighboring countries via Bangladesh.

  19. Biogeography of the ‘water flea’ Daphnia O. F. Müller (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Anomopoda on the Indian subcontinent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer M. Padhye

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Daphnia distribution in Indian subcontinent have been few and regionally restricted despite Daphnia being by far the most studied cladoceran. We here present a first biogeographical assessment of the genus on the Indian subcontinent (Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We collected all pertinent literature and considered nineteen bioclimatic variables along with latitude, longitude, and altitude for statistical analysis of factors governing distribution in space. Significant variables (determined by Kruskal Wallis test were tested by nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA to clarify whether Daphnia species had specific environmental requirements. Canonical correspondence analysis was used to understand how environmental variables affected distribution.  Eight Daphnia (Ctenodaphnia and 4 Daphnia s.str. occurred at 100 different localities. The variables temperature, altitude and latitude differed among species and so did their bio-climatic requirements. Daphnia distribution responded positively to altitude and negatively to a decrease in latitude and temperature.

  20. ICT-based Distance Education in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally D. Berman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This report provides an update about innovative uses of information and communication technology (ICT for distance education and training in South Asia. Particular focus is given to ICT initiatives in India, Sri Lanka, and Bhutan, at university level, and in non-formal interventions. Lessons learned from these countries are of value to any developing nation that wishes to address the improvement of educational and living standards of its people. The report stresses current uses of ICT serving the distance education needs of rural populations, and concludes that in all three countries the traditional media, including radio and TV, must play an important continuing role to ensure that education is accessible to the widest possible range of students.

  1. The prospects and requirements for increasing private sector investments in the mineral sector of the countries of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handelsman, S.D. [Ridgewood Partners Ltd., New York, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) was established at the Dhaka summit, Dec 1985, to foster better understanding and economic development through mutual cooperation. The economies of the SAARC countries (India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives) are at different stages of liberalization and economic reforms with the objective to increase economic development in these countries. To mobilize the financing and transfer of the technology and know-how required for such increased economic development, more emphasis is being given to the role and contribution of the private sector. A summary is presented of a study commissioned by the Asian Development Bank: to review the present status of the mineral sector in the SAARC countries; to identify its potential for further development; and the steps that need to be taken by the governments to promote such development. 171 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Education in conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, I

    1999-11-01

    The provision of education is affected in many different ways by political and civil unrest and armed conflict. During armed conflict, the lack of adequate financial support for the maintenance of school buildings, supplies and teacher's salaries becomes particularly acute. Other factors include the destruction of school buildings and other infrastructures in time of war, and the targeting of teachers by acts of violence. This paper explores the impact of conflict on the educational opportunities of men and women. Interventions to address the educational needs of children are also discussed. Among these programs are the Oxfam programs in Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua, Bosnia, and Eritrea which have provided psychosocial support and human rights education to refugee and displaced women and children through the provision of educational material and by training teachers.

  3. Mapping the vulnerability hotspots over Hindu-Kush Himalaya region to flooding disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shada Elalem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A disproportionate share of the global economic and human losses caused by environmental shocks is borne by people in the developing nations. The mountain region of Hindu-Kush Himalaya (HKH in South Asia is threatened by numerous flooding events annually. An efficient disaster risk reduction often needs to rest upon location-based synoptic view of vulnerability. Resolving this deficit improves the ability to take risk reduction measures in a cost-effective way, and in doing so, strengthens the resilience of societies to flooding disasters. The central aim of this research is to identify the vulnerable locations across HKH boundary from the perspective of reported history of economic and human impacts due to occurrence of flooding disasters. A detailed analysis indicates a very high spatial heterogeneity in flooding disaster occurrence in the past 6 decades. The most recent decade reported highest number of disasters and greater spatial coverage as compared to the earlier decades. The data indicates that, in general, economic impacts of flooding disasters were notably higher in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nepal. On the other hand, vulnerability scenarios with respect to human impacts were diverse for different countries. In terms of morbidity and mortality, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Bhutan and India were detected to be most susceptible to human impacts. Although Bhutan had seen lesser number of flooding disasters, higher population living within disaster prone region make them vulnerable. In summary, complex interactions between natural and socio-economic conditions play a dominant role to define and characterize the type and magnitude of vulnerability of HKH countries to disaster occurrence and their economic and human impacts.

  4. Atmospheric Science Without Borders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Arnico; Praveen, Ps; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Bhave, Prakash; Surapipith, Vanisa; Pradhan, Bidya; Karki, Anita; Ghimire, Shreta; Thapa, Alpha; Shrestha, Sujan

    2016-04-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in northern South Asia are among the most polluted and most densely populated places in the world, and they are upwind of vulnerable ecosystems in the Himalaya mountains. They are also fragmented across 5 countries between which movement of people, data, instruments and scientific understanding have been very limited. ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative has for the past three years been working on filling data gaps in the region, while facilitating collaborations across borders. It has established several atmospheric observatories at low and mid elevations in Bhutan and Nepal that provide new data on the inflow of pollutants from the IGP towards the mountains, as well as quantify the effects of local emissions on air quality in mountain cities. EGU will be the first international conference where these data will be presented. ICIMOD is in the process of setting up data servers through which data from the region will be shared with scientists and the general public across borders. Meanwhile, to promote cross-border collaboration among scientists in the region, while addressing an atmospheric phenomenon that affects the lives of the several hundred million people, ICIMOD' Atmosphere Initiative has been coordinating an interdisciplinary multi-year study of persistent winter fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains, with participation by researchers from Pakistan, India, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. Using a combination of in-situ measurements and sample collection, remote sensing, modeling and community based research, the researchers are studying how changing moisture availability and air pollution have led to increases in fog frequency and duration, as well as the fog's impacts on local communities and energy demand that may affect air pollution emissions. Preliminary results of the Winter 2015-2016 field campaign will be shown.

  5. Tobacco use: A major risk factor for non communicable diseases in South-East Asia region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is a serious public health problem in the South East Asia Region where use of both smoking and smokeless form of tobacco is widely prevalent. The region has almost one quarter of the global population and about one quarter of all smokers in the world. Smoking among men is high in the Region and women usually take to chewing tobacco. The prevalence across countries varies significantly with smoking among adult men ranges from 24.3% (India to 63.1% (Indonesia and among adult women from 0.4% (Sri Lanka to 15% (Myanmar and Nepal. The prevalence of smokeless tobacco use among men varies from 1.3% (Thailand to 31.8% (Myanmar, while for women it is from 4.6% (Nepal to 27.9% (Bangladesh. About 55% of total deaths are due to Non communicable diseases (NCDs with 53.4% among females with highest in Maldives (79.4% and low in Timor-Leste (34.4%. Premature mortality due to NCDs in young age is high in the region with 60.7% deaths in Timor Leste and 60.6% deaths in Bangladesh occurring below the age of 70 years. Age standardized death rate per 100,000 populations due to NCDs ranges from 793 (Bhutan and 612 (Maldives among males and 654 (Bhutan and 461 (Sri Lanka among females respectively. Out of 5.1 millions tobacco attributable deaths in the world, more than 1 million are in South East Asia Region (SEAR countries. Reducing tobacco use is one of the best buys along with harmful use of alcohol, salt reduction and promotion of physical activity for preventing NCDs. Integrating tobacco control with broader population services in the health system framework is crucial to achieve control of NCDs and sustain development in SEAR countries.

  6. Clockwise rotation of the Brahmaputra Valley relative to India: Tectonic convergence in the eastern Himalaya, Naga Hills, and Shillong Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernant, P.; Bilham, R.; Szeliga, W.; Drupka, D.; Kalita, S.; Bhattacharyya, A. K.; Gaur, V. K.; Pelgay, P.; Cattin, R.; Berthet, T.

    2014-08-01

    GPS data reveal that the Brahmaputra Valley has broken from the Indian Plate and rotates clockwise relative to India about a point a few hundred kilometers west of the Shillong Plateau. The GPS velocity vectors define two distinct blocks separated by the Kopili fault upon which 2-3 mm/yr of dextral slip is observed: the Shillong block between longitudes 89 and 93°E rotating clockwise at 1.15°/Myr and the Assam block from 93.5°E to 97°E rotating at ≈1.13°/Myr. These two blocks are more than 120 km wide in a north-south sense, but they extend locally a similar distance beneath the Himalaya and Tibet. A result of these rotations is that convergence across the Himalaya east of Sikkim decreases in velocity eastward from 18 to ≈12 mm/yr and convergence between the Shillong Plateau and Bangladesh across the Dauki fault increases from 3 mm/yr in the west to >8 mm/yr in the east. This fast convergence rate is inconsistent with inferred geological uplift rates on the plateau (if a 45°N dip is assumed for the Dauki fault) unless clockwise rotation of the Shillong block has increased substantially in the past 4-8 Myr. Such acceleration is consistent with the reported recent slowing in the convergence rate across the Bhutan Himalaya. The current slip potential near Bhutan, based on present-day convergence rates and assuming no great earthquake since 1713 A.D., is now ~5.4 m, similar to the slip reported from alluvial terraces that offsets across the Main Himalayan Thrust and sufficient to sustain a Mw ≥ 8.0 earthquake in this area.

  7. Out-of-Sequence Thrust in the Higher Himalaya- a Review & Possible Genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.; Koyi, H. A.; Talbot, C. J.

    2009-04-01

    An out-of-sequence thrust (OOST) has been established inside the Higher Himalaya by previous workers more frequently from Nepal- and Bhutan Himalaya. The OOST lies between the South Tibetan Detachment System-Upper (STDSU) and the South Tibetan Detachment System-Lower (STDSL). The thrust has been recognized as the Kakhtang Thrust in Bhutan (Grujic et al., 2002 and references therein); Khumbu Thrust (Searle, 1999), Modi Khola Shear Zone (Hodges et al., 1996), Kalopani Shear Zone (Vannay and Hodges, 1999), Toijem Shear Zone in Nepal (Carosi et al., 2007), Chaura Thrust (Jain et al., 2000)- also designated as the Sarahan Thrust (Chambers et al., 2008) in the western Indian Himalaya in Sutlej section, Zimithang Thrust in the eastern Indian Himalaya (Yin et al., 2006), as ‘physiographic transition' in Marsyandi valley, Nepal (Burbank et al., 2003). We note that considering the upper strand of the Main Central Thrust (the MCTU) as the lower boundary of the Higher Himalaya, the physiographic transition has also been referred to lie in the Lesser Himalaya.The period of activity of the OOST was 22.5-18.5 Ma (Hodges et al., 1996), 14-10 Ma (Grujic et al., 2002), 4.9-1.5 Ma (Jain et al., 2000), and from Late Pliocene to even Holocene Period (Burbank, 2005). The out-of-sequence thrusting was followed after the initiation of channel flow at ~ 15 Ma in the Higher Himalaya with a maximum delay of ~ 13 Ma. However, in the Bhutan Himalaya, the thrusting continued along with the extensional ductile shearing in the STDSU at 11-10 Ma (Hollister and Grujic, 2006). The OOST in the Higher Himalaya lies inside the zone of the top-to-SW sense of ductile shearing. The OOST, at Kakhtang, Toijem, and Chaura are ductile shear zones with a top-to-SW sense of shearing. The OOST merges with the MCT and the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) at a depth of 30 km or more and either runs 200-300 km beneath the Tibetan plateau (Grujic et al., 2002; Hollister and Grujic, 2006). The hanging wall side of the

  8. Improving SLCF Science in the Himalayan Region: ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, A. K.; Pradhan, B. B.; Surapipith, V.

    2013-12-01

    What fraction of the black carbon arriving on Yala Glacier in Langtang, Nepal, is from cooking fires in the houses in the valley below? What fraction is from elsewhere in rural Nepal? What fraction is from industrial and transport sources in Kathmandu? What fraction is from northern India and beyond? What fraction is from the high altitude forest fires that take place during March or April? Effectively mitigating the impacts of black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers requires detailed understanding not just of emissions and impacts, but also of the atmospheric transport pathways that connect the two. In mountainous areas of the Hindu-Kush Himalaya detailed quantitative knowledge about emissions, atmospheric processes, and impacts is still largely missing. The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) is an intergovernmental organization covering Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, China, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. ICIMOD's recently established Atmosphere Initiative not only assesses mitigation options and contributes to policy and capacity building in the region, but also works actively to promote collaboration among researchers in the region, while building up an in-house team whose research will address key questions about SLCF. In Spring 2013 ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative, in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, carried out the largest field campaign to date in Nepal, hosting instruments belonging to dozens of institutions around the world, at nine field site within and upwind of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The dataset that has been collected gives unprecedented insights into the emissions and atmospheric processes taking place downwind of and within the largest urban agglomeration in the Himalaya region. Meanwhile, in collaboration with national partner institutions, ICIMOD is in the process of setting up one atmospheric observatory each in Bhutan and in

  9. Nd isotopic compositions of the Tethyan Himalayan Sequence in southeastern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Himalayan orogen consists of three major lithologic units that are separated by two major north-dipping faults: the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) below the Main Central Thrust (MCT), the Greater Himalayan Crystalline Complex (GHC) above the MCT, and the Tethyan Himalayan Sequence (THS) juxtaposed by the South Tibet Detachment fault (STD) over the GHC. Due to widespread meta-morphism and intense deformation, differentiating the above three lithologic units is often difficult. This problem has been overcome by the use of Sm-Nd isotopic analysis. The previous studies suggested that the LHS can be clearly distinguished from the GHC and THS by their Nd isotope compositions. However, the lack of detailed and systematic Sm-Nd isotopic studies of the THS across the Himalaya in general has made differentiation of this unit from the nearby GHC impossible, as the two appear to share overlapping Nd compositions and model ages. To address this problem, we systematically sam-pled and analyzed Nd isotopes of the THS in southeastern Tibet directly north of Bhutan. Our study identifies two distinctive fields in a εNd -TDM plot. The first is defined by the εNd(210 Ma) values of -3.45 to -7.34 and TDM values of 1.15 to 1.29 Ga from a Late Triassic turbidite sequence, which are broadly similar to those obtained from the Lhasa block. The second field is derived from the Early Cretaceous meta-sedimentary rocks with εNd(130 Ma) values from -15.24 to -16.61 and TDM values from 1.63 to 2.00 Ga; these values are similar to those obtained from the Greater Himalayan Crystalline Complex in Bhutan directly south of our sampling traverse, which has εNd(130 Ma) values of -10.89 to -16.32 and Nd model ages (TDM) of 1.73 to 2.20 Ga. From the above observations, we suggest that the Late Triassic strata of the southeast Tibetan THS were derived from the Lhasa block in the north, while the Early Cretaceous strata of the THS were derived from a source similar to the High Himalayan Crystalline

  10. Projections of Rainfall and Temperature from CMIP5 Models over BIMSTEC Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnayak, K. C.; Kar, S. C.; Ragi, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall and surface temperature are the most important climatic variables in the context of climate change. Thus, these variables simulated from fifth phase of the Climate Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) models have been compared against Climatic Research Unit (CRU) observed data and projected for the twenty first century under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 emission scenarios. Results for the seven countries under Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) such as Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand have been examined. Six CMIP5 models namely GFDL-CM3, GFDL-ESM2M, GFDL-ESM2G, HadGEM2-AO, HadGEM2-CC and HadGEM2-ES have been chosen for this study. The study period has been considered is from 1861 to 2100. From this period, initial 145 years i.e. 1861 to 2005 is reference or historical period and the later 95 years i.e. 2005 to 2100 is projected period. The climate change in the projected period has been examined with respect to the reference period. In order to validate the models, the mean annual rainfall and temperature has been compared with CRU over the reference period 1901 to 2005. Comparison reveals that most of the models are able to capture the spatial distribution of rainfall and temperature over most of the regions of BIMSTEC countries. Therefore these model data can be used to study the future changes in the 21st Century. Four out six models shows that the rainfall over Central and North India, Thailand and eastern part of Myanmar shows decreasing trend and Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal and Sri Lanka shows an increasing trend in both RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. In case of temperature, all of the models show an increasing trend over all the BIMSTEC countries in both scenarios, however, the rate of increase is relatively less over Sri Lanka than the other countries. Annual cycles of rainfall and temperature over Bangladesh, Myanmar and Thailand

  11. Projections of Rainfall and Surface Temperature from CMIP5 Models under RCP4.5 and 8.5 over BIMSTEC Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan Pattnayak, Kanhu; Kar, Sarat Chandra; Kumari Pattnayak, Rashmita

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall and surface temperature are the most important climatic variables in the context of climate change. Thus, these variables simulated from fifth phase of the Climate Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) models have been compared against Climatic Research Unit (CRU) observed data and projected for the twenty first century under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 emission scenarios. Results for the seven countries under Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) such as Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand have been examined. Six CMIP5 models namely GFDL-CM3, GFDL-ESM2M, GFDL-ESM2G, HadGEM2-AO, HadGEM2-CC and HadGEM2-ES have been chosen for this study. The study period has been considered is from 1861 to 2100. From this period, initial 145 years i.e. 1861 to 2005 is reference or historical period and the later 95 years i.e. 2005 to 2100 is projected period. The climate change in the projected period has been examined with respect to the reference period. In order to validate the models, the mean annual rainfall and temperature has been compared with CRU over the reference period 1901 to 2005. Comparison reveals that most of the models are able to capture the spatial distribution of rainfall and temperature over most of the regions of BIMSTEC countries. Therefore these model data can be used to study the future changes in the 21st Century. Four out six models shows that the rainfall over Central and North India, Thailand and eastern part of Myanmar shows decreasing trend and Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal and Sri Lanka shows an increasing trend in both RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. In case of temperature, all of the models show an increasing trend over all the BIMSTEC countries in both scenarios, however, the rate of increase is relatively less over Sri Lanka than the other countries. Annual cycles of rainfall and temperature over Bangladesh, Myanmar and Thailand

  12. Genetic characterization of Bhutanese native chickens based on an analysis of Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus gallus and Gallus gallus spadecieus), domestic Southeast Asian and commercial chicken lines (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorji, Nedup; Duangjinda, Monchai; Phasuk, Yupin

    2012-07-01

    The genetic diversity of Bhutanese chickens needs to be understood in order to develop a suitable conservation strategy for these birds in Bhutan. In this, work, we used microsatellite markers to examine the genetic diversity of Bhutanese chickens. Four Bhutanese chicken varieties (Black plumage, Frizzle, Naked neck and Red Junglefowl-like, corresponding to Yuebjha Narp, Phulom, Khuilay and Seim, respectively), two subspecies of Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus gallus and Gallus gallus spadecieus), two varieties of Thai native chickens (Pradhu Hang Dam and Chee; Gallus gallus domesticus) representing the Southeast Asian domestic chicken, and two commercial lines (Broiler and Single Comb White Leghorn) were genotyped with 18 microsatellites that included 16 loci recommended by the FAO/ISAG for investigations of genetic variability in chickens. All loci were polymorphic, with the number of alleles ranging from six (MCW0111) to 23 (MCW0183). Substantial genetic variation was observed in all populations, with the Bhutanese native chicken Yuebjha Narp (Black plumage chicken) showing the lowest genetic variability. Despite extensive intrapopulation variation, the genetic differentiation among 10 populations was moderate. A neighbor-joining tree revealed the genetic relationships involved while principal component analysis showed that Bhutanese native chickens should be given priority in conservation efforts because of their genetic distinctiveness. Chee chickens are especially valuable as a reservoir of predomestic diversity, as indicated by their greater genetic variation and their position in the phylogenetic tree.

  13. Evaluation of spatial accessibility to primary healthcare using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtsho, S.; Corner, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    Primary health care is considered to be one of the most important aspects of the health care system in any country, which directly helps in improving the health of the population. Potential spatial accessibility is a very important component of the primary health care system. One technique for studying spatial accessibility is by computing a gravity-based measure within a geographic information system (GIS) framework. In this study, straight-line distances between the associated population clusters and the health facilities and the provider-to-population ratio were used to compute the spatial accessibility of the population clusters for the whole country. Bhutan has been chosen as the case study area because it is quite easy to acquire and process data for the whole country due to its small size and population. The spatial accessibility measure of the 203 sub-districts shows noticeable disparities in health care accessibility in this country with about only 19 sub-districts achieving good health accessibility ranking. This study also examines a number of different health accessibility policy scenarios which can assist in identifying the most effective health policy from amongst many probable planning scenarios. Such a health accessibility measuring system can be incorporated into an existing spatial health system in developing countries to facilitate the proper planning and equitable distribution of health resources.

  14. Status of Bay of Bengal: An Ecological Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai IK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The marine resources are a major source of food, a reservoir of minerals, major suppliers of oxygen, regulator of climate. It is also an ultimate dumping ground for the mounting burden of human waste material. Due to unchecked anthropogenic activity in recent years, the physico-chemical and biological status of the marine environments have changed significantly. This has resulted in the changing environmental scenario of the world. The Bay of Bengal, is one of the largest Bay in the world known to receive large flow of sediments from several rivers and other water bodies from India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Indonesia etc., Many of these rivers bring along with them, a large quantity of effluents from cities / towns located on either side of these rivers, thus making the Bay nutrient rich. This Bay also plays a major role in determining the climatic conditions of India and other South East Asian countries. Thus its ecology is of paramount interest. Further, the Bay is also known for its oligotrophic nature as well low productivity, thus resulting in high diversity of flora and fauna. The ecological status of the Bay has a direct bearing on the lifescape of the Bay, and therefore, a study was undertaken to understand abiotic and biotic factors with special reference to zooplankton. Based on the observations, the study recommends certain appropriate measures to be taken to conserve the ecology of one of the largest Bay in the world.

  15. Biodiversity research trends and gap analysis from a transboundary landscape, Eastern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratikshya Kandel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Kangchenjunga landscape, a transboundary complex shared by Bhutan, India, and Nepal, is one of the biologically richest regions in the Eastern Himalayas. Owing to the remarkable biodiversity, the three countries came together to enhance regional cooperation in conservation and development in 2012. To start a strategic conservation intervention, the status of our knowledge base on biodiversity of the landscape is the most important stepping stone. In this paper, we traced the history of biodiversity research in the Kangchenjunga landscape, and present the research trends over time and subject interests. Meanwhile, we also identified key research and knowledge gaps and future priorities. For this, we analyzed 500 peer-reviewed journal articles (until 2014 relating to biodiversity, which were retrieved from the web platform ‘Google Scholar’ and other peer-reviewed journals. The review showed that the landscape received attention from the scientific community as early as the 1840s, and grew progressively after the 1980s. Research on fauna (especially mammals and flora (especially angiosperms is most notable, but with major gaps in systematic research of their ecology, whereas invertebrates other than butterflies appear to be neglected. There is a need for systematic research with long-term monitoring that would allow us to understand changes occurring within the landscape.

  16. Use of GPM Data Products in SERVIR Hydrological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, A. S.; Mithieu, F.; Gurung, D. R.; Blankenship, C. B.; Crosson, W. L.; Anderson, E. R.; Flores, A.; Delgado, F.; Stanton, K.; Irwin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Availability of reliable precipitation data is a major challenge for SERVIR, a joint USAID-NASA project aimed at improving the environmental decision-making capacity of developing countries. GPM data products are fulfilling that challenge through frequent, high spatial resolution precipitation products over regional scales. SERVIR is using the products in different ways. First, SERVIR is using those in hydrologic modeling over Eastern Africa and in Hindu Kush Himalaya. SERVIR's distributed hydrologic modeling capability is helping the hydrological and meteorological departments in SERVIR regions, or Hubs, identify local watershed deserving immediate attention - such as recurring floods. Additionally, SERVIR technical implementers in the Hubs are building capacities of the departments and ministries in their member countries to effectively use the GPM products. SERVIR also provides an easy access for efficient integration of GPM products in web map services. This presentation will highlight ongoing collaborations and results generated through collaborative partnership among the water resources and hydrometeorology departments in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Namibia, and Bhutan, SERVIR Hubs, and SERVIR Applied Sciences Team projects

  17. Future Visions of the Brahmaputra - Establishing Hydrologic Baseline and Water Resources Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. A.; Yang, Y. E.; Wi, S.; Brown, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Brahmaputra River Basin (China-India-Bhutan-Bangladesh) is on the verge of a transition from a largely free flowing and highly variable river to a basin of rapid investment and infrastructure development. This work demonstrates a knowledge platform for the basin that compiles available data, and develops hydrologic and water resources system models of the basin. A Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model of the Brahmaputra basin supplies hydrologic information of major tributaries to a water resources system model, which routes runoff generated via the VIC model through water infrastructure, and accounts for water withdrawals for agriculture, hydropower generation, municipal demand, return flows and others human activities. The system model also simulates agricultural production and the economic value of water in its various uses, including municipal, agricultural, and hydropower. Furthermore, the modeling framework incorporates plausible climate change scenarios based on the latest projections of changes to contributing glaciers (upstream), as well as changes to monsoon behavior (downstream). Water resources projects proposed in the Brahmaputra basin are evaluated based on their distribution of benefits and costs in the absence of well-defined water entitlements, and relative to a complex regional water-energy-food nexus. Results of this project will provide a basis for water sharing negotiation among the four countries and inform trans-national water-energy policy making.

  18. Global situation of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)--a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesy, A

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the actual world FMD situation. In 2000, fifty nine countries officially reported outbreaks of FMD. The disease occurred in Europe (Greece), Asia (Russia, Mongolia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Japan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, in Caucasian region--Georgia, Azerbaijan and Armenia as well as in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan), Africa (Egypt, Kenya, Mauritania, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe) and in South America (Brazil, Colombia, Uruguay, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela). In 2001, FMD was still spreading throughout the endemic regions and appeared in some of the west European countries--Great Britain, The Netherlands, France and Ireland. In South America, FMD occurred in Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and Colombia. In Asia the FMD spread in Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Mongolia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Yemen, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Iran, Bhutan, Nepal, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan. The FMD situation in Africa was unclear, but probably most countries in West, East and South Africa were affected. The most recent data of the OIE from May 2002 confirmed FMD outbreaks in population of pigs in Republic of Korea.

  19. Preliminary Study on Geographical Distribution and Evolutionary Relationships Between Cultivated and Wild Adzuki Bean (Vigna angularis var. angularis and var. nipponensis) by AFLP Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Xu-xiao; Duncan Vaughan; Norihiko Tomooka; Akito Kaga; WANG Xin-wang; GUAN Jian-ping; WANG Shu-min

    2003-01-01

    A set of representative 146 adzuki (Vigna angularis var. angularis, and var. nipponensis)germplasm from 6 Asian countries traditionally for adzuki bean production, together with an out group stand-ard rice bean (Vigna umbellata), were analyzed by AFLP methodology using 12 informative primer pairs.313 unambiguous polymorphic bands were created. According to the dendrogram by cluster analysis based onAFLP banding, 143 of the accessions were distinct and revealed enough genetic diversity for identification andclassification of accessions within Vigna angularis. A neighbor joining tree was generated using newly devel-oped Innan's nucleotide diversity estimate from the AFLP data. From analysis, 7 distinct evolutionary groups,named as "Chinese cultivated", "Japanese cultivated", "Japanese complex-Korean cultivated", "Chinesewild", "China Taiwan wild", "Nepal-Bhutan cultivated" and "Hymalayan wild", were detected. Nucleotidediversity with geographical distribution of each group is discussed, regarding the evolutionary relationships be-tween wild and cultivated adzuki beans. The preliminary results indicated that cultivated adzuki bean should bedomesticated from at least 4 progenitors in at least 3 geographical origins.

  20. To Modernize,Not Westernize:Developing Bhutanese,and Buddhist, Children's Literature on a Globally Western Market%现代化而不是西化:在全球性西方市场发展佛教儿童文学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾碧·文陀拉[美; 李伟(译); 李萌羽(校)

    2015-01-01

    探讨佛教思想和不丹国民幸福理念为国际儿童文学提供一个新的种类的可能性。一种独特的不丹儿童文学可以促进国民幸福总值的增长和文化价值观的传播,但不丹(和任何发展中国家)要使自己的文学在国际市场获得一席之地,需要做出一定妥协。%I believe children's literature is greatly important to make and educate future citizens ,and i‐deological frameworks a Buddhist and Gross National Happiness philosophy can offer the international genre .A uniquely Bhutanese children's genre can help foster GN H and the transmission of cultural values ;however ,the data that follows outlines the difficulties in doing so ,and what compromises Bhutan (and any developing nation ) must make in order to have a literary presence on the international market .

  1. Large and great earthquakes in the Shillong plateau-Assam valley area of Northeast India Region: Pop-up and transverse tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, J. R.; Arefiev, S. S.; Baruah, Saurabh; Hazarika, D.; Gogoi, N.; Gautam, J. L.; Baruah, Santanu; Dorbath, C.; Tatevossian, R.

    2012-04-01

    The tectonic model of the Shillong plateau and Assam valley in the northeast India region, the source area for the 1897 great earthquake (Ms ~ 8.7) and for the four (1869, 1923, 1930 and 1943) large earthquakes (M. ≥ 7.0), is examined using the high precision data of a 20-station broadband seismic network. About 300 selected earthquakes M ≥ 3.0 recorded during 2001-2009 are analysed to study the seismicity and fault plane solutions. The dominating thrust/reverse faulting earthquakes in the western plateau may be explained by the proposed pop-up tectonics between two active boundary faults, the Oldham-Brahmaputra fault to the north and the Dapsi-Dauki thrust to the south, though the northern boundary fault is debated. The more intense normal and strike-slip faulting earthquakes in the eastern plateau (Mikir massif) and in the Assam valley, on the other hand, are well explained by transverse tectonics at the long and deep rooted Kopili fault that cuts across the Himalaya and caused the 2009 Bhutan earthquake (Mw 6.3). It is conjectured that the complex tectonics of the Shillong plateau and transverse tectonics at the Kopili fault make the region vulnerable for impending large earthquake(s).

  2. Experience of pico/micro hydro based power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, S.S. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Although India has approximately 150,000 megawatts of hydro potential, only a small portion is tapped. There is also significant untapped hydro potential in many developing countries such as Nepal, Bhutan, Vietnam, Indonesia and regions in South America and Africa. Small-scale hydroelectric power systems with capacities of up to a few megawatts are eco-friendly and sustainable. They can be classified based on unit sizes as pico (u pto 10 kilowatts), micro (10-100 kilowatts) and mini (100 kilowatts to a few megawatts) hydro systems. Mini hydro systems are always grid connected while micro can be either grid connected or off grid. Pico is always off grid. In India, there are thousands of favorable sites in this range that should be tapped for distributed power generation to electrify local communities. This need is reflected by the global emphasis on distributed power generation as well as the Government of India's policy to promote this type of power generation. A working stand alone pico-hydro power generating system has been successfully installed in 5 sites in Karnataka. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the technical, managerial and economic feasibility of setting up small hydro projects in remote hilly areas of Karnataka, India and its positive environmental impact. The presentation discussed the site selection criteria; installed sites of pico hydro; system description; parts of the system; the electric load controller; types of electronic load controllers; and a description of the unit and control scheme. tabs., figs.

  3. Technical Evaluation Report 60: The World-Wide Inaccessible Web, Part 1: Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batchuluun Batpurev

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Two studies are reported, comparing the browser loading times of webpages created using common Web development techniques. The loading speeds were estimated in 12 Asian countries by members of the PANdora network, funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC to conduct collaborative research in the development of effective distance education (DE practices. An online survey tool with stopwatch-type counter was used. Responses were obtained from Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Mongolia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. In most of the survey conditions, browser loading times were noted up to four times slower than commonly prescribed as acceptable. Failure of pages to load at all was frequent. The speediest loading times were observed when the online material was hosted locally, and was created either in the Docebo learning management system (LMS, or in the HTML option provided by the Moodle LMS. It is recommended that formative evaluation of this type should become standard practice in the selection and use of online programming techniques, in order to preserve the accessibility of the World-Wide-Web across large geographical distances, as for DE in the developing world.

  4. Predicted Attenuation Relation and Observed Ground Motion of Gorkha Nepal Earthquake of 25 April 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. P.; Ahmad, R.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of recent observed ground motion parameters of recent Gorkha Nepal earthquake of 25 April 2015 (Mw 7.8) with the predicted ground motion parameters using exitsing attenuation relation of the Himalayan region will be presented. The recent earthquake took about 8000 lives and destroyed thousands of poor quality of buildings and the earthquake was felt by millions of people living in Nepal, China, India, Bangladesh, and Bhutan. The knowledge of ground parameters are very important in developing seismic code of seismic prone regions like Himalaya for better design of buildings. The ground parameters recorded in recent earthquake event and aftershocks are compared with attenuation relations for the Himalayan region, the predicted ground motion parameters show good correlation with the observed ground parameters. The results will be of great use to Civil engineers in updating existing building codes in the Himlayan and surrounding regions and also for the evaluation of seismic hazards. The results clearly show that the attenuation relation developed for the Himalayan region should be only used, other attenuation relations based on other regions fail to provide good estimate of observed ground motion parameters.

  5. Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taleo George

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative data are lacking on published malaria research. The purpose of the study is to characterize trends in malaria-related literature from 1990 to 2009 in 11 Asian-Pacific countries that are committed to malaria elimination as a national goal. Methods A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 1990 to December 2009 in PubMed/MEDLINE using terms for malaria and 11 target countries (Bhutan, China, North Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vanuatu. The references were collated and categorized according to subject, Plasmodium species, and whether they contained original or derivative data. Results 2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2009 related to malaria in the target countries. The annual output of malaria-related papers increased linearly whereas the overall biomedical output from these countries grew exponentially. The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741 of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p Conclusions The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing. The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount. In addition the elimination of malaria will require operational research to implement and scale up interventions.

  6. Call to Conserve the Wild Water Buffalo (Bubalus Arnee in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achyut ARYAL

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild water buffaloes (Bubalus arnee are categorized as endangered on the IUCN Red List. With a global population of less than 4,000, the species has a very limited distribution spanning over less than 20,000 km2 in Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand and Bhutan. In Nepal, Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve was designated for wild Asian buffalo; this reserve contains approximately 219 individuals, although there is no precise information on the number of pure-bred wild buffalo. The conservation of wild buffalo is of global concern; there are numerous threats due to habitat fragmentation, as well as competition, hybridization, habitat overlap, disease and parasites transmitted by domestic livestock. The reserve provides an area of only 0.80 km2 per buffalo, which is insufficient maintaining a viable population of wild buffalo. It is therefore important to identify further potential habitat and to begin translocation of some of the individuals. A Wild Buffalo Conservation Alliance can play a key role in influencing conservation strategies by conducting detailed research including feasibility studies on translocation, developing awareness, holding workshops and preparing a conservation action plan. In this way the alliance can help to increase the number of wild buffaloes and to maintain a viable population of the species.

  7. HIMALA: Climate Impacts on Glaciers, Snow, and Hydrology in the Himalayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Ouyang, Hua; Habib, Shahid; Shrestha, Basanta; Shrestha, Mandira; Panday, Prajjwal; Tzortziou, Maria; Policelli, Frederick; Artan, Guleid; Giriraj, Amarnath; Bajracharya, Sagar R.; Racoviteanu, Adina

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers are the largest reservoir of freshwater on Earth, supporting one third of the world s population. The Himalaya possess one of the largest resources of snow and ice, which act as a freshwater reservoir for more than 1.3 billion people. This article describes a new project called HIMALA, which focuses on utilizing satellite-based products for better understanding of hydrological processes of the river basins of the region. With support from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), together with its partners and member countries, has been working on the application of satellite-based rainfall estimates for flood prediction. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partners are working with ICIMOD to incorporate snowmelt and glacier melt into a widely used hydrological model. Thus, through improved modeling of the contribution of snow and ice meltwater to river flow in the region, the HIMALA project will improve the ability of ICIMOD and its partners to understand the impact of weather and climate on floods, droughts, and other water- and climate-induced natural hazards in the Himalayan region in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

  8. Approach to Mountain Hazards in Tibet,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Dongtao; TU Jianjun; CUI Peng; LU Ruren

    2004-01-01

    Tibet is located at the southwest boundary of China. It is the main body of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, the highest and the youngest plateau in the world. Owing to complicated geology, Nco-tectonic movements, geomorphology, climate and plateau environment, various mountain hazards, such as debris flow, flash flood, landslide, collapse, snow avalanche and snow drifts, are widely distributed along the Jinsha River (the upper reaches of the Yangtze River), the Nu River and the Lancang River in the east, and the Yarlungzangbo River, the Pumqu River and the Poiqu River in the south and southeast of Tibet. The distribution area of mountain hazards in Tibet is about 589,000 km2, 49.3% of its total territory. In comparison to other mountain regions in China, mountain hazards in Tibet break out unexpectedly with tremendously large scale and endanger the traffic lines, cities and towns, farmland,grassland, mountain environment, and make more dangers to the neighboring countries, such as Nepal,India, Myanmar and Bhutan. To mitigate mountain hazards, some suggestions are proposed in this paper,such as strengthening scientific research, enhancing joint studies, hazards mitigation planning, hazards warning and forecasting, controlling the most disastrous hazards and forbidding unreasonable human exploring activities in mountain areas.

  9. 'Excuse me, do any of you ladies speak English?' Perspectives of refugee women living in South Australia: barriers to accessing primary health care and achieving the Quality Use of Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alice; Gilbert, Andrew; Rao, Deepa; Kerr, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Reforms to the Australian health system aim to ensure that services are accessible, clinically and culturally appropriate, timely and affordable. During the reform consultation process there were urgent calls from stakeholders to specifically consider the health needs of the thousands of refugees who settle here each year, but little is known about what is needed from the refugee perspective. Access to health services is a basic requirement of achieving the quality use of medicines, as outlined in Australia's National Medicines Policy. This study aimed to identify the barriers to accessing primary health care services and explore medicine-related issues as experienced by refugee women in South Australia. Thirty-six women participated in focus groups with accredited and community interpreters and participants were from Sudan, Burundi, Congo, Burma, Afghanistan and Bhutan who spoke English (as a second language), Chin, Matu, Dari and Nepali. The main barrier to accessing primary health care and understanding GPs and pharmacists was not being able to speak or comprehend English. Interpreter services were used inconsistently or not at all. To implement the health reforms and achieve the quality use of medicines, refugees, support organisations, GPs, pharmacists and their staff require education, training and support.

  10. Connecting science, policy, and implementation for landscape-scale habitat connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Jedediah F; Paxton, Midori; Nagulendran, Kangayatkarasu; Balamurugan, G; Clements, Gopalasamy Reuben; Reynolds, Glen; Jain, Anuj; Hon, Jason

    2016-10-01

    We examined the links between the science and policy of habitat corridors to better understand how corridors can be implemented effectively. As a case study, we focused on a suite of landscape-scale connectivity plans in tropical and subtropical Asia (Malaysia, Singapore, and Bhutan). The process of corridor designation may be more efficient if the scientific determination of optimal corridor locations and arrangement is synchronized in time with political buy-in and establishment of policies to create corridors. Land tenure and the intactness of existing habitat in the region are also important to consider because optimal connectivity strategies may be very different if there are few, versus many, political jurisdictions (including commercial and traditional land tenures) and intact versus degraded habitat between patches. Novel financing mechanisms for corridors include bed taxes, payments for ecosystem services, and strategic forest certifications. Gaps in knowledge of effective corridor design include an understanding of how corridors, particularly those managed by local communities, can be protected from degradation and unsustainable hunting. There is a critical need for quantitative, data-driven models that can be used to prioritize potential corridors or multicorridor networks based on their relative contributions to long-term metacommunity persistence.

  11. Mountain Commons: Changing Space and Status at Community Levels in the Himalayas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narpat S. JODHA

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the imperatives of nature-society interaction in the Himalayas as seen through CPR (Common Property Resources). It specifically looks at the process and factors that characterize the dynamics of the above interactions,with particular reference to the changing status and governance of CPRs at community levels. The paper puts together the synthesis of observations and inferences of different studies by ICIMOD and others in mountain regions, particularly in different parts of Nepal, India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, China and Pakistan. Rural CPRs (providing sustenance supplies and services)as an important component of a community's natural resource base, manifest the institutional arrangements evolved by the communities to facilitate their adaptations to nature.The above process can be more clearly illustrated with reference to specific characteristics of mountain areas,called mountain specificities.However, over time, the situation of CPRs in terms of their extent and status, governance and management as well as contributions to community sustenance, has changed. The paper attempts to indicate potential lead lines for searching options for rehabilitation of CPRs, based on a closer understanding of the factors contributing to their decline.

  12. China's Engagement with SAARC:Priorities & Possibilities%中国与南盟对话:重点与可能性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尼哈尔·洛德里戈

    2011-01-01

    Role of China and other Observers With growing pragmatic regional confidence and more interest in drawing on beneficial external linkages,the requests of outside states and organizations,for observer status in SAARC have been sensibly managed.The Declaration adopted at the 15th SAARC Summit held in Colombo (August 2008 )welcomed as Observers,Australia,China,Iran,Japan,the Republic of Korea,Mauritius,Myanmar,the United States of America as well as the European Union.The Summit also approved,in principle,Guidelines for Cooperation with the Observers and looked forward to working with them in the common pursuit of “a Partnership of Growth of the People of South Asia”,the theme of the Colombo Summit.Revised guidelines for cooperation with observers,were subsequently approved.They indicated the criteria for the participation of Observers as well as “modalities” for consideration of projects and their implementation.Financial contributions to the SAARC Development Fund (headquarters for which have now been set up in Bhutan) have also been approved and are being received.There is,already from China,an initial grant of $ 300000 to the Fund.

  13. Current status of HIV/AIDS in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaturaka Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the United Nations Joint Program on HIV/AIDS, 33.2 million adults and children are living with the infection worldwide. Of these, two to three million are estimated to be in South Asia. All countries of the region have a low prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. However, it is important to review the current epidemiological data to identify the trends of infection as it would have implications on prevention. Materials and Methods: We performed a MEDLINE search using phrases ′South Asia′ plus ′HIV′ , ′AIDS′, and names of individual countries in South Asia (limits: articles published in last 10 years, in English language. Clinical trials, reviews, meta-analyses, letters, editorials, and practice guidelines were all considered. The following countries were included as belonging to South Asia; Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Recent estimates and data on country status, and details of national control programs were obtained from websites of international agencies such as the World Bank and United Nations Joint Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS. Results and Discussion: This review looks into many aspects of HIV infection in South Asia including country profiles with regard to infection, economic and psychological burden of illness and treatment issues in the South Asian context.

  14. Identification of yeast strains isolated from marcha in Sikkim, a microbial starter for amylolytic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyoshi, Naoko; Fudou, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Shigeru; Kozaki, Michio; Tamang, Namrata; Thapa, Saroj; Tamang, Jyoti P

    2005-03-15

    Marcha or murcha is a traditional amylolytic starter used to produce sweet-sour alcoholic drinks, commonly called jaanr in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet (China). The aim of this study was to examine the microflora of marcha collected from Sikkim in India, focusing on yeast flora and their roles. Twenty yeast strains were isolated from six samples of marcha and identified by genetic and phenotypic methods. They were first classified into four groups (Group I, II, III, and IV) based on physiological features using an API test. Phylogenetic, morphological, and physiological characterization identified the isolates as Saccharomyces bayanus (Group I); Candida glabrata (Group II); Pichia anomala (Group III); and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, Saccharomycopsis capsularis, and Pichia burtonii (Group IV). Among them, the Group I, II, and III strains produced ethanol. The isolates of Group IV had high amylolytic activity. Because all marcha samples tested contained both starch degraders and ethanol producers, it was hypothesized that all four groups of yeast (Group I, II, III, and IV) contribute to starch-based alcohol fermentation.

  15. HIMALA: climate impacts on glaciers, snow, and hydrology in the Himalayan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Ouyang, Hua; Habib, Shahid; Shrestha, Basanta; Shrestha, Mandira; Panday, Prajjwal; Tzortziou, Maria; Policelli, Frederick; Artan, Guleid; Giriraj, Amarnath; Bajracharya, Sagar R.; Racoviteanu, Adina

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers are the largest reservoir of freshwater on Earth, supporting one third of the world's population. The Himalaya possess one of the largest resources of snow and ice, which act as a freshwater reservoir for more than 1.3 billion people. This article describes a new project called HIMALA, which focuses on utilizing satellite-based products for better understanding of hydrological processes of the river basins of the region. With support from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), together with its partners and member countries, has been working on the application of satellite-based rainfall estimates for flood prediction. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partners are working with ICIMOD to incorporate snowmelt and glacier melt into a widely used hydrological model. Thus, through improved modeling of the contribution of snow and ice meltwater to river flow in the region, the HIMALA project will improve the ability of ICIMOD and its partners to understand the impact of weather and climate on floods, droughts, and other water- and climate-induced natural hazards in the Himalayan region in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

  16. Technical Evaluation Report 61: The World-Wide Inaccessible Web, Part 2: Internet routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Klaas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the previous report in this series, Web browser loading times were measured in 12 Asian countries, and were found to be up to four times slower than commonly prescribed as acceptable. Failure of webpages to load at all was frequent. The current follow-up study compares these loading times with the complexity of the Internet routes linking the Web users and the Web servers hosting them. The study was conducted in the same 12 Asian countries, with the assistance of members of the International Development Research Centre’s PANdora distance education research network. The data were generated by network members in Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Mongolia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Additional data for the follow-up study were collected in China. Using a ‘traceroute’ routine, the study indicates that webpage loading time is linked to the complexity of the Internet routes between Web users and the host server. It is indicated that distance educators can apply such information in the design of improved online delivery and mirror sites, notably in areas of the developing world which currently lack an effective infrastructure for online education.

  17. South Asian Medicinal Compounds as Modulators of Resistance to Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rajendra Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that involves transformation, dysregulation of apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. During the last 30 years, extensive research has revealed much about the biology of cancer. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the mainstays of cancer treatment, particularly for patients who do not respond to surgical resection. However, cancer treatment with drugs or radiation is seriously limited by chemoresistance and radioresistance. Various approaches and strategies are employed to overcome resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Many plant-derived phytochemicals have been investigated for their chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties. The peoples of South Asian countries such as India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan have a large number of medicinal plants from which they produce various pharmacologically potent secondary metabolites. The medicinal properties of these compounds have been extensively investigated and many of them have been found to sensitize cancer cells to chemo- and radio-therapy. This review focuses on the role of South Asian medicinal compounds in chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties in drug- and radio-resistant cancer cells. Also discussed is the role of South Asian medicinal plants in protecting normal cells from radiation, which may be useful during radiotherapy of tumors to spare surrounding normal cells.

  18. Metagenomics Study of Viral Pathogens in Undiagnosed Respiratory Specimens and Identification of Human Enteroviruses at a Thailand Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfei; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Simasathien, Sriluck; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Yang, Yu; Marte-Salcedo, Omely A.; Shuck-Lee, Deidra J.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Hang, Jun; Jarman, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous pathogens cause respiratory infections with similar symptoms. Routine diagnostics detect only a limited number of pathogens, leaving a gap in respiratory illness etiology surveillance. This study evaluated next-generation sequencing for unbiased pathogen identification. Respiratory samples collected in Thailand, Philippines, Bhutan, and Nepal, that were negative by several molecular and immunofluorescence assays, underwent viral cultivation. Samples which demonstrated cytopathic effect in culture (N = 121) were extracted and tested by Luminex xTAG respiratory viral panel (RVP) assay and deep sequencing by Roche 454 FLX Titanium system. Using RVP assay, 52 (43%) samples were positive for enterovirus or rhinovirus and another three were positive for respiratory syncytial virus B, parainfluenza 4, and adenovirus. Deep sequencing confirmed the Luminex assay results and identified additional viral pathogens. Human enteroviruses, including Enterovirus A type 71 and 12 types of Enterovirus B (EV-B) were identified from a hospital in Bangkok. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis showed high correlation of VP1 gene-based phylogeny with genome-wide phylogeny and the frequent genetic exchange among EV-B viruses. The high number and diversity of enteroviruses in the hospital in Bangkok suggests prevalent existence. The metagenomic approach used in our study enabled comprehensive diagnoses of respiratory viruses. PMID:27352877

  19. Metagenomics Study of Viral Pathogens in Undiagnosed Respiratory Specimens and Identification of Human Enteroviruses at a Thailand Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfei; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Simasathien, Sriluck; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Yang, Yu; Marte-Salcedo, Omely A; Shuck-Lee, Deidra J; Thomas, Stephen J; Hang, Jun; Jarman, Richard G

    2016-09-01

    Numerous pathogens cause respiratory infections with similar symptoms. Routine diagnostics detect only a limited number of pathogens, leaving a gap in respiratory illness etiology surveillance. This study evaluated next-generation sequencing for unbiased pathogen identification. Respiratory samples collected in Thailand, Philippines, Bhutan, and Nepal, that were negative by several molecular and immunofluorescence assays, underwent viral cultivation. Samples which demonstrated cytopathic effect in culture (N = 121) were extracted and tested by Luminex xTAG respiratory viral panel (RVP) assay and deep sequencing by Roche 454 FLX Titanium system. Using RVP assay, 52 (43%) samples were positive for enterovirus or rhinovirus and another three were positive for respiratory syncytial virus B, parainfluenza 4, and adenovirus. Deep sequencing confirmed the Luminex assay results and identified additional viral pathogens. Human enteroviruses, including Enterovirus A type 71 and 12 types of Enterovirus B (EV-B) were identified from a hospital in Bangkok. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis showed high correlation of VP1 gene-based phylogeny with genome-wide phylogeny and the frequent genetic exchange among EV-B viruses. The high number and diversity of enteroviruses in the hospital in Bangkok suggests prevalent existence. The metagenomic approach used in our study enabled comprehensive diagnoses of respiratory viruses.

  20. Asians seek end to girls' trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Each year, approximately 1 million Asian children under 18 years old, many of them female, become prostitutes. With regard to this problem, the Summit Foundation, the United Nations Population Fund, UNICEF, and the Centre for Development and Population Activities are sponsoring a conference entitled "Girls' Rights, Society's Responsibility: Taking Action Against Child Sexual Exploitation," on December 8-10, 1997, at the Nehru Centre, Worli, Bombay. Policy makers from government, the legal and police professions, corporations, the tourism industry, and grassroots organizations will attend. Representatives from Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand will develop coordinated strategies to end the abuse. The experiences of community-based nongovernmental organizations will be used to develop approaches to prevent exploitation, provide surveillance, and rehabilitate girls who have been exploited. The Nehru Centre, Jet Airways, and the President Hotel of Bombay will provide support. Participants are to include the Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, UNIFEM, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development (USAID), Oxfam, CIDA, SIDA, NORAD, and many corporations (Bata, Apeejay, Pepsi, Tata, Godrej, Mahindra and Mahindra, and hotel and tourist businesses).

  1. Three-dimensional geometry of thrust surfaces and the origin of sinuous thrust traces in orogenic belts: Insights from scaled sandbox experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Jain, M.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sinuous traces of emerging thrust tips, comprising multiple salients and recesses, are commonly observed in orogenic belts (e.g. Lesser Himalayas of India, Nepal and Bhutan) and in accretionary prisms (e.g. Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan). Lateral (along the strike of the deformation zone) variation in the depths of foreland basins (i.e. variable sediment thickness) or in the strength of the basal detachment, or presence of a curved indenter has been traditionally cited to explain the formation of salients in fold-and-thrust belts, although they are not applicable in all cases. In the present work, we have carried out four series of scaled analog model experiments using dry quartz sand, changing the dip of the basal decollément (β = 0° or 5°) and the basal friction (μb = 0.5 or 0.3) to investigate the 3D shape of thrust surfaces under varying overall boundary conditions, but without any lateral variation of these parameters, within the models. The experimental results show that under all boundary conditions, thrust surfaces are curved both in their dip and strike directions (i.e. spoon-shaped in 3D). Multiple concave-upward and convex-upward segments constitute a thrust surface, which produces a sinuous trace when the tip line intersects the Earth's surface. It is also shown that thrust surface curvatures occur at different scales, and the overall thrust surface roughness (corrugations) has a self-affine fractal geometry.

  2. Human Rabies in the WHO Southeast Asia Region: Forward Steps for Elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra Gongal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are eleven Member States in the WHO southeast Asia region (Bangladesh, Bhutan, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste of which eight are endemic for rabies. More than 1.4 billion people in the Region are at risk of rabies infection, and approximately 45% of worldwide rabies deaths occur in Asia. Dog bites account for 96% of human rabies cases. Progress in preventing human rabies through control of the disease in dogs has been slow due to various factors. Innovative control tools and techniques have been developed and standardized in recent years. The introduction of cost-effective intradermal rabies vaccination regimens in Asian countries has increased the availability and affordability of postexposure prophylaxis. Elimination of rabies is not possible without regional and intersectoral cooperation. Considering the importance of consolidating achievements in rabies control in Member countries, the WHO Regional Office for southeast Asia has developed a regional strategy for elimination of human rabies transmitted by dogs in the Region. They have committed to provide technical leadership, to advocate national health authorities to develop major stakeholder consensus for a comprehensive rabies elimination programme, and to implement national strategies for elimination of human rabies.

  3. Nd isotopic compositions of the Tethyan Himalayan Sequence in southeastern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI JinGen; YIN An; LIU WenCan; WANG ChengShan

    2008-01-01

    The Himalayan orogen consists of three major lithologic units that are separated by two major north-dipping faults: the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) below the Main Central Thrust (MCT), the Greater Himalayan Crystalline Complex (GHC) above the MCT, and the Tethyan Himalayan Sequence (THS) juxtaposed by the South Tibet Detachment fault (STD) over the GHC.Due to widespread meta-morphism and intense deformation, differentiating the above three lithologic units is often difficult.This problem has been overcome by the use of Sm-Nd isotopic analysis.The previous studies suggested that the LHS can be clearly distinguished from the GHC and THS by their Nd isotope compositions.However, the lack of detailed and systematic Sm-Nd isotopic studies of the THS across the Himalaya in general has made differentiation of this unit from the nearby GHC impossible, as the two appear to share overlapping Nd compositions and model ages.To address this problem, we systematically sampled and analyzed Nd isotopes of the THS in southeastern Tibet directly north of Bhutan.Our study identifies two distinctive fields in a εNd-TDM plot.The first is defined by the εNd(210 Ma) values of -3.45 to -7.34 and TDM values of 1.15 to 1.29 Ga from a Late Triassic turbidite sequence, which are broadly similar to those obtained from the Lhasa block.The second field is derived from the Early Cretaceous meta-sedimentary rocks with εNd(130 Ma) values from -15.24 to -16.61 and TDM values from 1.63 to 2.00 Ga; these values are similar to those obtained from the Greater Himalayan Crystalline Complex in Bhutan directly south of our sampling traverse, which has εNd(130 Ma) values of -10.89 to -16.32 and Nd model ages (TDM) of 1.73 to 2.20 Ga.From the above observations, we suggest that the Late Triassic strata of the southeast Tibetan THS were derived from the Lhasa block in the north, while the Early Cretaceous strata of the THS were derived from a source similar to the High Himalayan Crystalline Complex or

  4. Multi-Decadal Comparison between Clean-Ice and Debris-Covered Glaciers in the Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, J. M.; Rupper, S.

    2014-12-01

    Himalayan glaciers are important natural resources and climatic indicators. Many of these glaciers have debris-covered ablation zones, while others are mostly clean ice. Regarding glacier dynamics, it is expected that debris-covered glaciers will respond differently to atmospheric warming compared to clean ice glaciers. In the Bhutanese Himalaya, there are (1) north flowing clean-ice glaciers with high velocities, likely with large amounts of basal sliding, and (2) south flowing debris-covered glaciers with slow velocities, thermokarst features, and influenced more by the Indian Summer Monsoon. This region, therefore, is ideal for comparing the dynamical response of clean-ice versus debris-covered glaciers to climatic change. In particular, previous studies have suggested the north flowing glaciers are likely adjusting more dynamically (i.e. retreating) in response to climate variations, while the south flowing glaciers are likely experiencing downwasting, with stagnant termini locations. We test this hypothesis by assessing glacier changes over three decades in the Bhutan region using a newly-developed workflow to extract DEMs and orthorectified imagery from both 1976 historical spy satellite images and 2006 ASTER images. DEM differencing for both debris-covered and clean glaciers allows for quantification of glacier surface elevation changes, while orthorectified imagery allows for measuring changes in glacier termini. The same stereo-matching, denoising, and georeferencing methodology is used on both datasets to ensure consistency, while the three decade timespan allows for a better signal to noise ratio compared to studies performed on shorter timescales. The results of these analyses highlight the similarities and differences in the decadal response of clean-ice and debris-covered glaciers to climatic change, and provide insights into the complex dynamics of debris-covered glaciers in the monsoonal Himalayas.

  5. Examining Temporal Sample Scale and Model Choice with Spatial Capture-Recapture Models in the Common Leopard Panthera pardus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joshua F; Tempa, Tshering; Norbu, Nawang; Hebblewhite, Mark; Mills, L Scott; Wangchuk, Tshewang R; Lukacs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Many large carnivores occupy a wide geographic distribution, and face threats from habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching, prey depletion, and human wildlife-conflicts. Conservation requires robust techniques for estimating population densities and trends, but the elusive nature and low densities of many large carnivores make them difficult to detect. Spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models provide a means for handling imperfect detectability, while linking population estimates to individual movement patterns to provide more accurate estimates than standard approaches. Within this framework, we investigate the effect of different sample interval lengths on density estimates, using simulations and a common leopard (Panthera pardus) model system. We apply Bayesian SCR methods to 89 simulated datasets and camera-trapping data from 22 leopards captured 82 times during winter 2010-2011 in Royal Manas National Park, Bhutan. We show that sample interval length from daily, weekly, monthly or quarterly periods did not appreciably affect median abundance or density, but did influence precision. We observed the largest gains in precision when moving from quarterly to shorter intervals. We therefore recommend daily sampling intervals for monitoring rare or elusive species where practicable, but note that monthly or quarterly sample periods can have similar informative value. We further develop a novel application of Bayes factors to select models where multiple ecological factors are integrated into density estimation. Our simulations demonstrate that these methods can help identify the "true" explanatory mechanisms underlying the data. Using this method, we found strong evidence for sex-specific movement distributions in leopards, suggesting that sexual patterns of space-use influence density. This model estimated a density of 10.0 leopards/100 km2 (95% credibility interval: 6.25-15.93), comparable to contemporary estimates in Asia. These SCR methods provide a guide to

  6. Droughts in Asian Least Developed Countries: Vulnerability and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimullah Miyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Droughts occur both in developed and developing countries with significant impacts and are exacerbating in frequency, severity and duration. Over exploitation of water resources, weather variability and climate change are mostly responsible for such exacerbation. The impacts of droughts encompass the global ecosystem as a whole but vary from region to region. Least developed countries (LDCs are becoming the worst sufferer of the impacts due to physical, social and economic as well as knowledge and skills differences. The increasing biophysical vulnerability contexts and intensity in the Asian LDCs causing adverse effects on food security, human health, biodiversity, water resources, hydroelectric power generation, streams, perennial springs, and livelihood. Drought is also responsible for increasing pollution, pests and diseases and forced migration and famine. Information indicates monsoon has become erratic contributing to up-scaling of droughts. South and Southeast Asian LDCs like Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Cambodia and Lao PDR under the monsoon climatic zone have also been suffering from increasing droughts arising out of delayed and changing distribution patterns of precipitation. Prolong dry spells increase the frequencies of wildfire in grasslands, forests, and range-lands. The rain-fed crops of the plains are facing challenges from soil-moisture stress with projected droughts. Droughts causing migration of fishes, and marine anadromus species are having adverse impacts on spawning habitats. Reduction in annual surface runoff is decreasing the ground and surface water with negative effect on agriculture and water supply for industrial and domestic sectors. As droughts are exacerbating the consequences are accelerating. However, traditionally people are adapting with the changing situations applying indigenous knowledge and practices for sustainable living. This paper reflects on prevalence and impacts of droughts, existing coping

  7. Impacts of the Indian Rivers Inter-link Project on Sediment Transport to River Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Indian Rivers Inter-link project is a proposal by the Indian government to link several of India's major rivers via a network of reservoirs and canals. Variations of the IRI have been discussed since 1980, but the current plan has recently received increased support from the Indian government. Construction on three canals has controversially begun. If the Inter-link project moves forward, fourteen canals will divert water from tributaries of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers to areas in the west, where fresh water is needed for irrigation. Additional canals would transport Himalayan sediments 500 km south to the Mahanadi delta and more than 1000 km south to the Godavari and Krishna deltas. We investigate the impacts of the proposed diversions on sediment transport to the Mahanadi/Brahmani, Godavari, and Krishna deltas in India and the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta in Bangladesh. We map the entire river network and the proposed new nodes and connections. Changing watersheds are delineated using the Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Models (TauDEM) Suite. Climate data comes from interpolation between observed precipitation stations located in China, Nepal, India, Bhutan and Bangladesh. Changes in water discharge due to the proposed canals are simulated using HydroTrend, a climate-driven hydrological water balance and transport model that incorporates drainage area, discharge, relief, temperature, basin-average lithology, and anthropogenic influences. Simulated river discharge is validated against observations from gauging stations archived by the Global Runoff Data Center (GRDC). HydroTrend is then used to investigate sediment transport changes that may result from the proposed canals. We also quantify changes in contributing areas for the outlets of nine major Indian rivers, showing that more than 50% of the land in India will contribute a portion of its runoff to a new outlet should the entire canal system be constructed.

  8. Inverted temperature sequences: role of deformation partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujic, D.; Ashley, K. T.; Coble, M. A.; Coutand, I.; Kellett, D.; Whynot, N.

    2015-12-01

    The inverted metamorphism associated with the Main Central thrust zone in the Himalaya has been historically attributed to a number of tectonic processes. Here we show that there is actually a composite peak and deformation temperature sequence that formed in succession via different tectonic processes. The deformation partitioning seems to the have played a key role, and the magnitude of each process has varied along strike of the orogen. To explain the formation of the inverted metamorphic sequence across the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) in eastern Bhutan, we used Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material (RSCM) to determine the peak metamorphic temperatures and Ti-in-quartz thermobarometry to determine the deformation temperatures combined with thermochronology including published apatite and zircon U-Th/He and fission-track data and new 40Ar/39Ar dating of muscovite. The dataset was inverted using 3D-thermal-kinematic modeling to constrain the ranges of geological parameters such as fault geometry and slip rates, location and rates of localized basal accretion, and thermal properties of the crust. RSCM results indicate that there are two peak temperature sequences separated by a major thrust within the LHS. The internal temperature sequence shows an inverted peak temperature gradient of 12 °C/km; in the external (southern) sequence, the peak temperatures are constant across the structural sequence. Thermo-kinematic modeling suggest that the thermochronologic and thermobarometric data are compatible with a two-stage scenario: an Early-Middle Miocene phase of fast overthrusting of a hot hanging wall over a downgoing footwall and inversion of the synkinematic isotherms, followed by the formation of the external duplex developed by dominant underthrusting and basal accretion. To reconcile our observations with the experimental data, we suggest that pervasive ductile deformation within the upper LHS and along the Main Central thrust zone at its top stopped at

  9. Toward best practices for developing regional connectivity maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Paul; Spencer, Wayne; Baldwin, Robert F; McRae, Brad H

    2011-10-01

    To conserve ecological connectivity (the ability to support animal movement, gene flow, range shifts, and other ecological and evolutionary processes that require large areas), conservation professionals need coarse-grained maps to serve as decision-support tools or vision statements and fine-grained maps to prescribe site-specific interventions. To date, research has focused primarily on fine-grained maps (linkage designs) covering small areas. In contrast, we devised 7 steps to coarsely map dozens to hundreds of linkages over a large area, such as a nation, province, or ecoregion. We provide recommendations on how to perform each step on the basis of our experiences with 6 projects: California Missing Linkages (2001), Arizona Wildlife Linkage Assessment (2006), California Essential Habitat Connectivity (2010), Two Countries, One Forest (northeastern United States and southeastern Canada) (2010), Washington State Connected Landscapes (2010), and the Bhutan Biological Corridor Complex (2010). The 2 most difficult steps are mapping natural landscape blocks (areas whose conservation value derives from the species and ecological processes within them) and determining which pairs of blocks can feasibly be connected in a way that promotes conservation. Decision rules for mapping natural landscape blocks and determining which pairs of blocks to connect must reflect not only technical criteria, but also the values and priorities of stakeholders. We recommend blocks be mapped on the basis of a combination of naturalness, protection status, linear barriers, and habitat quality for selected species. We describe manual and automated procedures to identify currently functioning or restorable linkages. Once pairs of blocks have been identified, linkage polygons can be mapped by least-cost modeling, other approaches from graph theory, or individual-based movement models. The approaches we outline make assumptions explicit, have outputs that can be improved as underlying data are

  10. Sensitivity of Different Satellites Gridded data over Brahmaputra Basin by using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Islam, A. S.; Hasan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    More than half a billion people of India, China, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan are directly or indirectly dependent on the water resources of the Brahmaputrariver. With climatic and anthropogenic change of this basin region is becoming a cause of concern for future water management and sharing with transboundary riparian nations. To address such issues, robust watershed runoff modeling of the basin is essential. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a widely used semi-distributed watershed model that is capable of analyzing surface runoff, stream flow, water yield,sediment and nutrienttransport in a large river basin such as Brahmaputra, but the performance of runoff the model depends on the accuracy of input precipitation datasets. But for a transboundary basin like Brahmaputra, precipitation gauge data from upstream areas is either not available or not accessible to the scientific communities.Satellite rainfall products are very effective where radar datasets are absent and conventional rain gauges are sparse. However, the sensitivity of the SWAT model to different satellite data products as well as hydrologic parameters for the Brahmaputra Basin are largely unknown. Thus in this study, a comparative analysis with different satellite data product has been made to assess the runoff using SWAT model. Here, data from three sources: TRMM, APHRDOTIE and GPCP were used as input precipitation satellite data set and ERA-Interim was used as input temperature dataset from 1998 to 2009. The main methods used in modeling the hydrologic processes in SWAT were curve number method for runoff estimating, Penman-Monteith method for PET and Muskingum method for channel routing. Our preliminary results have revealed thatthe TRMM data product is more accurate than APHRODITE and GPCP for runoff analysis. The coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies for both calibration and validation period from TRMM data are 0.83 and 0.72, respectively.

  11. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses circulating in Bangladesh from 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S P; Balasuriya, U B R; Yamage, M

    2013-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been endemic in Bangladesh since its first isolation in February 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene of HPAI H5N1 viruses demonstrated that 25 Bangladeshi isolates including two human isolates from 2007-2011 along with some isolates from neighbouring Asian countries (India, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal, China and Vietnam) segregate into two distinct clades (2.2 and 2.3). There was clear evidence of introduction of clade 2.3.2 and 2.3.4 viruses in 2011 in addition to clade 2.2 viruses that had been in circulation in Bangladesh since 2007. The data clearly demonstrated the movement of H5N1 strains between Asian countries included in this study due to migration of wild birds and/or illegal movement of poultry across borders. Interestingly, the two human isolates were closely related to the clade 2.2 Bangladeshi chicken isolates indicating that they have originated from chickens. Furthermore, comparative amino acid sequence analysis revealed several substitutions (including 189R>K and 282I>V) in HA protein of some clade 2.2 Bangladeshi viruses including the human isolates, suggesting there was antigenic drift in clade 2.2.3 viruses that were circulating between 2008 and 2011. Overall, the data imply genetic diversity among circulating viruses and multiple introductions of H5N1 viruses with an increased risk of human infections in Bangladesh, and establishment of H5N1 virus in wild and domestic bird populations, which demands active surveillance.

  12. Operationalizing land cover/land use data products to support decision making in the forestry sector of Hindu Kush Himalaya region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamer, F. M.; Gilani, H.; Uddin, K.; Pradhan, S.; Murthy, M.; Bajracharya, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Himalayan mountain ecosystem is under severe stress due to population pressure and overexploitation, which is now being further compounded by climate change. Particularly the Himalayan mountain forests has been degrading since the 1850s, in the early years of British administration. Consistent country-wide and local level data are needed to show the patterns and processes of degradation as a basis for developing management strategies to halt degradation and ensure long-term sustainability. Realizing the need for developing consistent national and regional databases in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region, with adequate spatial and temporal resolutions to be used by resource managers for informed decision making, time series land cover maps were developed for 1990, 2000, and 2010 based on the Landsat images. Considering forest sector as a primary user, a special attention was given to forest cover interpretation and relevant professional from national forestry institutions of Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan were closely engaged in developing standardized data products. With the use of consistent datasets and interpretation methods, this study provides first systematic assessment on forest cover distribution and change patterns during last two decades in these countries. At the same time, the results compiled at sub-district administrative unit, may facilitate institutions in developing appropriate forest conservation strategies, ecosystem vulnerability assessment and ecosystem services valuation at local level. To promote such usages, national forestry institutions are being closely engaged in a number of capacity building activities at national and regional level. In context of Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) initiatives, these datasets are also being evaluated to be considered as baseline for deforestation and degradation rates in the respective countries. To promote easy and open access, a web system was

  13. State of neonatal health care in eight countries of the SAARC region, South Asia: how can we make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jai K; Rizvi, Arjumand; Bhatti, Zaid; Paul, Vinod; Bahl, Rajiv; Shahidullah, Mohammod; Manandhar, Dharma; Stanekzai, Hedayatullah; Amarasena, Sujeewa; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-08-01

    The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) is an organization of eight countries--Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. The major objectives of this review are to examine trends and progress in newborn and neonatal health care in the region. A landscape analysis of the current state of neonatal mortality, stillbirths and trends over the years for each country and the effective interventions to reduce neonatal mortality and stillbirths was undertaken. A modelling exercise using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) was also undertaken to determine the impact of scaling up a set of essential interventions on neonatal mortality and stillbirths. The findings demonstrate that there is an unacceptably high and uneven burden of neonatal mortality and stillbirths in the region which together account for 39% of global neonatal deaths and 41% of global stillbirths. Progress is uneven across countries in the region, with five of the eight SAARC countries having reduced their neonatal mortality rate by more than 50% since 1990, while India (43%), Afghanistan (29%) and Pakistan (25%) have made slower progress and will not reach their MDG4 targets. The major causes of neonatal mortality are intrapartum-related deaths, preterm birth complications and sepsis which account for nearly 80% of all deaths. The LiST analysis shows that a gradual increase in coverage of proven available interventions until 2020 followed by a uniform scale-up to 90% of all interventions until 2030 could avert 52% of neonatal deaths (0.71 million), 29% of stillbirths (0.31 million) and achieve a 31% reduction in maternal deaths (0.25 million). The analysis demonstrates that the Maldives and Sri Lanka have done remarkably well while other countries need greater attention and specific focus on strategies to improve neonatal health.

  14. FORMAL TRADE BETWEEN INDIA AND BANGLADESH: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS

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    S. K.S. YADAV

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of improving trade flows between India and Bangladesh is not only beneficial to them, but for the whole SAARC region, given that Bhutan and Nepal utilise Bangladesh ports as gateways to trade outside the region. Bangladesh’s overall exports are dominated by labour-intensive manufacturing and its imports to India by primary commodities. The shares of manufactured goods in country’s overall export were about 92 and 91 percent in 2001 and 2011 respectively. However, the composition of bilateral trade between these two countries has been changing over time. Addition and removal in the list of products of trade basket is a usual process. Consistent products in the trade basket of Bangladesh are ready made garments and sea food, whereas those of India are raw cotton, cereals and products and machinery of iron and steel. Expansion of trade of these countries with outside world, but not with each other confirms the prevalence of certain barriers, physical or non-physical in nature, rendering many potential products remain untraded. India and Bangladesh being geographically proximate to each other possess huge scope to trade. Specifically as both the countries are rich in natural resources and are competent in the production of small-scale manufacturing and agrarian supplies, mostly from the eastern parts of India and Bangladesh, both possess huge potential for bilateral trade. Many items having high trade potential are still not able to get market exposure in the neighbouring country because of various non-tariff barriers prevailing in current trade scenario, which have hiked up the cost of doing business to unacceptable proportions and as most of the highly tradable products are still kept under the sensitive lists of Bangladesh. There are numerous bottlenecks in the current trade infrastructure which turns out to be physical barrier to trade. The present paper highlights the import export and Exchange Rate change and prospects of

  15. Lesser Himalayan sequences in Eastern Himalaya and their deformation: Implications for Paleoproterozoic tectonic activity along the northern margin of India

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    Dilip Saha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantial part of the northern margin of Indian plate is subducted beneath the Eurasian plate during the Caenozoic Himalayan orogeny, obscuring older tectonic events in the Lesser Himalaya known to host Proterozoic sedimentary successions and granitic bodies. Tectonostratigraphic units of the Proterozoic Lesser Himalayan sequence (LHS of Eastern Himalaya, namely the Daling Group in Sikkim and the Bomdila Group in Arunachal Pradesh, provide clues to the nature and extent of Proterozoic passive margin sedimentation, their involvement in pre-Himalayan orogeny and implications for supercontinent reconstruction. The Daling Group, consisting of flaggy quartzite, meta-greywacke and metapelite with minor mafic dyke and sill, and the overlying Buxa Formation with stromatolitic carbonate-quartzite-slate, represent shallow marine, passive margin platformal association. Similar lithostratigraphy and broad depositional framework, and available geochronological data from intrusive granites in Eastern Himalaya indicate strikewise continuity of a shallow marine Paleoproterozoic platformal sequence up to Arunachal Pradesh through Bhutan. Multiple fold sets and tectonic foliations in LHS formed during partial or complete closure of the sea/ocean along the northern margin of Paleoproterozoic India. Such deformation fabrics are absent in the upper Palaeozoic–Mesozoic Gondwana formations in the Lesser Himalaya of Darjeeling-Sikkim indicating influence of older orogeny. Kinematic analysis based on microstructure, and garnet composition suggest Paleoproterozoic deformation and metamorphism of LHS to be distinct from those associated with the foreland propagating thrust systems of the Caenozoic Himalayan collisional belt. Two possibilities are argued here: (1 the low greenschist facies domain in the LHS enveloped the amphibolite to granulite facies domains, which were later tectonically severed; (2 the older deformation and metamorphism relate to a Pacific type

  16. Economic and disease burden of dengue in Southeast Asia.

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    Donald S Shepard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue poses a substantial economic and disease burden in Southeast Asia (SEA. Quantifying this burden is critical to set policy priorities and disease-control strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We estimated the economic and disease burden of dengue in 12 countries in SEA: Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, East-Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam. We obtained reported cases from multiple sources--surveillance data, World Health Organization (WHO, and published studies--and adjusted for underreporting using expansion factors from previous literature. We obtained unit costs per episode through a systematic literature review, and completed missing data using linear regressions. We excluded costs such as prevention and vector control, and long-term sequelae of dengue. Over the decade of 2001-2010, we obtained an annual average of 2.9 million (m dengue episodes and 5,906 deaths. The annual economic burden (with 95% certainty levels was US$950m (US$610m-US$1,384m or about US$1.65 (US$1.06-US$2.41 per capita. The annual number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, based on the original 1994 definition, was 214,000 (120,000-299,000, which is equivalent to 372 (210-520 DALYs per million inhabitants. CONCLUSION: Dengue poses a substantial economic and disease burden in SEA with a DALY burden per million inhabitants in the region. This burden is higher than that of 17 other conditions, including Japanese encephalitis, upper respiratory infections, and hepatitis B.

  17. Quantifying ice loss in the eastern Himalayas since 1974 using declassified spy satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Joshua M.; Rupper, Summer B.; Schaefer, Joerg M.

    2016-09-01

    Himalayan glaciers are important natural resources and climate indicators for densely populated regions in Asia. Remote sensing methods are vital for evaluating glacier response to changing climate over the vast and rugged Himalayan region, yet many platforms capable of glacier mass balance quantification are somewhat temporally limited due to typical glacier response times. We here rely on declassified spy satellite imagery and ASTER data to quantify surface lowering, ice volume change, and geodetic mass balance during 1974-2006 for glaciers in the eastern Himalayas, centered on the Bhutan-China border. The wide range of glacier types allows for the first mass balance comparison between clean, debris, and lake-terminating (calving) glaciers in the region. Measured glaciers show significant ice loss, with an estimated mean annual geodetic mass balance of -0.13 ± 0.06 m w.e. yr-1 (meters of water equivalent per year) for 10 clean-ice glaciers, -0.19 ± 0.11 m w.e. yr-1 for 5 debris-covered glaciers, -0.28 ± 0.10 m w.e. yr-1 for 6 calving glaciers, and -0.17 ± 0.05 m w.e. yr-1 for all glaciers combined. Contrasting hypsometries along with melt pond, ice cliff, and englacial conduit mechanisms result in statistically similar mass balance values for both clean-ice and debris-covered glacier groups. Calving glaciers comprise 18 % (66 km2) of the glacierized area yet have contributed 30 % (-0.7 km3) to the total ice volume loss, highlighting the growing relevance of proglacial lake formation and associated calving for the future ice mass budget of the Himalayas as the number and size of glacial lakes increase.

  18. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

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    K. Fujita

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs, and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the outburst probability, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs. We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes experienced an outburst flood. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA, on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV; i.e., the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability to assess the possibility of GLOF hazards because it requires no particular expertise to carry out, though the PFV does not quantify the GLOF risk. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using visible band images and DEMs of ASTER data. The PFV distribution follows a power-law function. We found that 794 lakes did not have an SLA, and consequently had a PFV of zero, while we also identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3, which is a comparable volume to that of recorded major GLOFs. This PFV approach allows us to preliminarily identify and prioritize those Himalayan glacial lakes that require further detailed investigation on GLOF hazards and risk.

  19. Impact of land use change on the land atmosphere carbon flux of South and South East Asia: A Synthesis of Dynamic Vegetation Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervarich, M.; Shu, S.; Jain, A. K.; Poulter, B.; Stocker, B.; Arneth, A.; Viovy, N.; Kato, E.; Wiltshire, A.; Koven, C.; Sitch, S.; Zeng, N.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding our present day carbon cycle and possible solutions to recent increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide is dependent upon quantifying the terrestrial carbon budget. Currently, global land cover and land use change is estimated to emit 0.9 PgC yr-1 compared to emissions due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production of 8.4 PgC yr-1. South and Southeast Asia (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Singapore) is a region of rapid land cover and land use change due to the continuous development of agriculture, deforestation, reforestation, afforestation, and the increased demand of land for people to live. In this study, we synthesize outputs of nine models participated in Global Carbon Budget Project to identify the carbon budget of South and southeast Asia, diagnose the contribution of land cover and land use change to carbon emissions and assess areas of uncertainty in the suite of models. Uncertainty is determined using the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of net ecosystem exchange and its component parts. Results show the region's terrestrial biosphere was a source of carbon emissions from the 1980 to the early 1990s. During the same time period, land cover and land use change increasingly contributed to carbon emission. In the most recent two decades, the region became a carbon sink since emission due to land cover land use changes. Spatially, the greatest total emissions occurred in the tropical forest of Southeast Asia. Additionally, this is the subregion with the greatest uncertainty and greatest biomass. Model uncertainty is shown to be proportional to total biomass. The atmospheric impacts of ENSO are shown to suppress the net biosphere productivity in South and Southeast Asia leading to years of increased carbon emissions.

  20. One Health research and training and government support for One Health in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Joanna S.; Dahal, Rojan; Kakkar, Manish; Debnath, Nitish; Rahman, Mahmudur; Dorjee, Sithar; Naeem, Khalid; Wijayathilaka, Tikiri; Sharma, Barun Kumar; Maidanwal, Nasir; Halimi, Asmatullah; Kim, Eunmi; Chatterjee, Pranab; Devleesschauwer, Brecht

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Considerable advocacy, funding, training, and technical support have been provided to South Asian countries to strengthen One Health (OH) collaborative approaches for controlling diseases with global human pandemic potential since the early 2000s. It is essential that the OH approach continues to be strengthened given South Asia is a hot spot for emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases. The objectives of this article are to describe OH research and training and capacity building activities and the important developments in government support for OH in these countries to identify current achievements and gaps. Materials and methods A landscape analysis of OH research, training, and government support in South Asia was generated by searching peer-reviewed and grey literature for OH research publications and reports, a questionnaire survey of people potentially engaged in OH research in South Asia and the authors’ professional networks. Results Only a small proportion of zoonotic disease research conducted in South Asia can be described as truly OH, with a significant lack of OH policy-relevant research. A small number of multisectoral OH research and OH capacity building programmes were conducted in the region. The governments of Bangladesh and Bhutan have established operational OH strategies, with variable progress institutionalising OH in other countries. Identified gaps were a lack of useful scientific information and of a collaborative culture for formulating and implementing integrated zoonotic disease control policies and the need for ongoing support for transdisciplinary OH research and policy-relevant capacity building programmes. Discussion Overall we found a very small number of truly OH research and capacity building programmes in South Asia. Even though significant progress has been made in institutionalising OH in some South Asian countries, further behavioural, attitudinal, and institutional changes are required to strengthen OH research

  1. The in-comprehensive test ban

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. [Disarmament Intelligence Review, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    The author examines why the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban (CTB) treaty might not make it through the political minefields. Negotiators at the 60-nation U.N. The conference on Disarmament in Geneva reached an impasse, prompted by India`s assertions that the treaty was an inadequate document that perpetuated {open_quotes}nuclear apartheid{close_quotes} while violating India`s sovereignty. Because the Conference on Disarmament-often called the {open_quotes}Geneva Conference{close_quotes} or the {open_quotes}CD{close_quotes}-operates by consensus, India was able to veto the adoption of the treaty, which the conference had planned to transmit to the United Nations in early September. Australia saved the treaty with a last minute decision to bypass the Geneva Conference and take the CTB directly to the General Assembly in the form of a resolution. Some 127 nations co-sponsored Australia`s resolution, to which the treaty draft was attached. The General Assembly endorsed the treaty by a vote of 158 to three. India, Bhutan, and Libya voted against it. Despite the overwhelming vote, the treaty`s long-range outlook is uncertain. On the day of the vote, India`s chief test-ban negotiator, declared that India would {open_quotes}never sign this unequal treaty because Article XIV of the treaty, which requires that all 44 nuclear-capable nations who also belong to the Conference on Disarmament must sign and ratify the treaty. That requirement was viewed as contrary to international law because it denied India`s right of voluntary consent to an international treaty, thus violating India`s sovereignty.

  2. Partial altitudinal migration of a Himalayan Forest pheasant.

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    Nawang Norbu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altitudinal migration systems are poorly understood. Recent advances in animal telemetry which enables tracking of migrants across their annual cycles will help illustrate unknown migration patterns and test existing hypotheses. Using telemetry, we show the existence of a complex partial altitudinal migration system in the Himalayas and discuss our findings to help better understand partial and altitudinal migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used GPS/accelerometer tags to monitor the migration of Satyr tragopan (Tragopan satyra in the Bhutan Himalayas. We tagged 38 birds from 2009 - 2011 and found that tragopans are partially migratory. Fall migration lasted from the 3(rd week of September till the 3(rd week of November with migrants traveling distances ranging from 1.25 km to 13.5 km over 1 to 32 days. Snowfall did not influence the onset of migration. Return migration started by the 1(st week of March and lasted until the 1(st week of April. Individuals returned within 4 to 10 days and displayed site fidelity. One bird switched from being a migrant to a non-migrant. Tragopans displayed three main migration patterns: 1 crossing multiple mountains; 2 descending/ascending longitudinally; 3 moving higher up in winter and lower down in summer. More females migrated than males; but, within males, body size was not a factor for predicting migrants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations of migrants traversing over multiple mountain ridges and even of others climbing to higher elevations is novel. We support the need for existing hypotheses to consider how best to explain inter- as well as intra-sexual differences. Most importantly, having shown that the patterns of an altitudinal migration system are complex and not a simple up and down slope movement, we hope our findings will influence the way altitudinal migrations are perceived and thereby contribute to a better understanding of how species may respond to climate change.

  3. Identifying and Evaluating Possible Trigger Mechanisms for Glacial Lake Outburst Floods in the Hindu Kush Himalayas Using Remote Sensing Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, T. G.; Haritashya, U. K.

    2014-12-01

    Glacierized basins in high-altitude and mountainous areas, such as the Himalayas, have seen an increase in the number of glacial lakes over the years as a result of a changing climate. As the meltwater becomes more prevalent, the runoff can accumulate in a depression left behind by the receding glacier and can be bound by the walls of frontal and lateral moraines. These moraines, however, often are comprised of loose, unconsolidated sediment and can prove to be unstable dam structures for proglacial lakes. The factor of instability associated with the moraines poses a serious threat for failure and severe flooding. If the moraines were to be breached by the lake water, a phenomenon known as a glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) can occur, potentially putting lives and infrastructure in harm's way. Consequently, this study examines the likelihood of a GLOF occurrence by analyzing potential trigger mechanisms associated with three proglacial lakes in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region. Using ASTER satellite imagery, one lake from Nepal, India, and Bhutan have each been assessed for possible trigger mechanisms. Our results suggest that steep-sided moraines, rugged topography, unstable masses on the upper reaches of steep slopes, and smaller lakes perched high above can all be classified as possible trigger mechanisms for the areas of study. It is imperative to be able to successfully identify potential trigger mechanisms using satellite data so that further ground observations can be made and mitigation efforts can be incorporated where needed. As lakes continue to grow, so does the cause for concern for possible GLOFs. Glacial lake outburst floods are being studied more extensively now due to the greater number of glacial lakes in high-mountainous areas. It is vitally important to understand the dynamics of a GLOF, especially the potential trigger mechanisms associated with it.

  4. Transcriptome characterization analysis of Bactrocera minax and new insights into its pupal diapause development with gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongcheng; Desneux, Nicolas; Lei, Chaoliang; Niu, Changying

    2014-01-01

    Bactrocera minax is a major citrus pest distributed in China, Bhutan and India. The long pupal diapause duration of this fly is a major bottleneck for artificial rearing and underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Genetic information on B. minax transcriptome and gene expression profiles are needed to understand its pupal diapause. High-throughput RNA-seq technology was used to characterize the B. minax transcriptome and to identify differentially expressed genes during pupal diapause development. A total number of 52,519,948 reads were generated and assembled into 47,217 unigenes. 26,843 unigenes matched to proteins in the NCBI database using the BLAST search. Four digital gene expression (DGE) libraries were constructed for pupae at early diapause, late diapause, post-diapause and diapause terminated developmental status. 4,355 unigenes showing the differences expressed across four libraries revealed major shifts in cellular functions of cell proliferation, protein processing and export, metabolism and stress response in pupal diapause. When diapause was terminated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), many genes involved in ribosome and metabolism were differentially expressed which may mediate diapause transition. The gene sets involved in protein and energy metabolisms varied throughout early-, late- and post-diapause. A total of 15 genes were selected to verify the DGE results through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR); qRT-PCR expression levels strongly correlated with the DGE data. The results provided the extensive sequence resources available for B. minax and increased our knowledge on its pupal diapause development and they shed new light on the possible mechanisms involved in pupal diapause in this species.

  5. Traditional use and management of NTFPs in Kangchenjunga Landscape: implications for conservation and livelihoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Yadav; Poudel, Ram C; Gurung, Janita; Chettri, Nakul; Chaudhary, Ram P

    2016-05-03

    Non-timber Forest Products (NTFPs), an important provisioning ecosystem services, are recognized for their contribution in rural livelihoods and forest conservation. Effective management through sustainable harvesting and market driven commercialization are two contrasting aspects that are bringing challenges in development of NTFPs sector. Identifying potential species having market value, conducting value chain analyses, and sustainable management of NTFPs need analysis of their use patterns by communities and trends at a regional scale. We analyzed use patterns, trends, and challenges in traditional use and management of NTFPs in the southern slope of Kangchenjunga Landscape, Eastern Himalaya and discussed potential implications for conservation and livelihoods. A total of 739 species of NTFPs used by the local people of Kangchenjunga Landscape were reported in the reviewed literature. Of these, the highest number of NTFPs was documented from India (377 species), followed by Nepal (363) and Bhutan (245). Though the reported species were used for 24 different purposes, medicinal and edible plants were the most frequently used NTFP categories in the landscape. Medicinal plants were used in 27 major ailment categories, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal disorders. Though the Kangchenjunga Landscape harbors many potential NTFPs, trade of NTFPs was found to be nominal indicating lack of commercialization due to limited market information. We found that the unsustainable harvesting and lack of marketing were the major constraints for sustainable management of NTFPs sector in the landscape despite of promising policy provisions. We suggest sustainable harvesting practices, value addition at local level, and marketing for promotion of NTFPs in the Kangchenjunga Landscape for income generation and livelihood improvement that subsequently contributes to conservation.

  6. Performance of Electricity Generation from Bryophyllum Leaf for Practical Utilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md. Kamrul Alam

    2017-01-01

    Constructing an affordable cost, environment friendly simplified electrical energy source with Pathor Kuchi Leaf (PKL) for power electrifications which will significantly upgrade the life style of 1.6 billion people especially, who live in rural areas of Bangladesh. However, one fifth of the world's population still lack access to electricity-well, mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan). This innovative technology will meet essential requirements as lighting, telecommunication as well as information access. Electrodes are put into the Bryophyllum Pinnatum Leaf (BPL) or Pathor Kuchi Leaf (PKL) sap and they produce substantially sufficient amount of electricity to power energy consumed electronics and electrical appliances. CuSO4.5H2O solution is used as a secondary salt. The role of CuSO4.5H2O solution has been studied. The electrical and chemical properties, a very important factor for PKL electricity generation device have been studied in this research work. The electrical properties are: internal resistance, voltage regulation, energy efficiency, pulse performance, self discharge characteristics, discharge characteristics with load, capacity of the PKL cell, temperature characteristics and life cycle of the PKL cell. The chemical properties are: variation of voltage, current with the variation of [Zn2+], [Cu2+] and time. The performance of the production of the two bi-products (fertilizer and hydrogen gas production) has been studied. Variation of concentration of Zn2+ and Cu2+ with the variation of percentage of the I am grateful to the authority of the Science and technology ministry,Bangladesh for financial support during the research work.

  7. The anticancer potential of flavonoids isolated from the stem bark of Erythrina suberosa through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of STAT signaling pathway in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Pathania, Anup Singh; Saxena, A K; Vishwakarma, R A; Ali, Asif; Bhushan, Shashi

    2013-09-25

    Erythrina suberosa is an ornamental tall tree found in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Burma, Thailand and Vietnam. We have isolated four known distinct metabolites designated as α-Hydroxyerysotrine, 4'-Methoxy licoflavanone (MLF), Alpinumisoflavone (AIF) and Wighteone. Among the four isolated metabolites the two flavonoids, MLF and AIF were found to be the most potent cytotoxic agent with IC50 of ∼20μM in human leukemia HL-60 cells. We are reporting first time the anticancer and apoptotic potential of MLF and AIF in HL-60 cells. Both MLF and AIF inhibited HL-60 cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as measured by several biological endpoints. MLF and AIF induce apoptosis bodies formation, enhanced annexinV-FITC binding of the cells, increased sub-G0 cell fraction, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), release of cytochrome c, Bax, activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP (poly ADP Ribose polymers) cleavage in HL-60 cells. MLF and AIF also increase the expression of apical death receptor, Fas, with inhibition of anti-apoptotic protein Bid. All the above parameters revealed that these two flavonoids induce apoptosis through both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in HL-60 cells. In spite of apoptosis, these two flavonoids significantly inhibit nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway, which are highly expressed in leukemia. The present study provide an insight of molecular mechanism of cell death induced by MLF and AIF in HL-60 cells which may be useful in managing and treating leukemia.

  8. Source process of the Sikkim earthquake 18th September, 2011, inferred from teleseismic body-wave inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, A.; Sunil, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The recent earthquake of Mw 6.9 occurred on September 18, 2011 in Sikkim-Nepal border region. The hypocenter parameters determined by the Indian Meteorological Department shows that the epicentre is at 27.7°N, 88.2°E and focal depth of 58Km, located closed to the north-western terminus of Tista lineament. The reported aftershocks are linearly distributed in between Tista and Golapara lineament. The microscopic and geomorphologic studies infer a dextral strike-slip faulting, possibly along a NW-SE oriented fault. Landslides caused by this earthquake are distributed along Tista lineament . On the basis of the aftershock distribution, Kumar et al. (2012), have suggested possible NW orientation of the causative fault plane. The epicentral region of Sikkim bordered by Nepal, Bhutan and Tibet, comprises a segment of relatively lower level seismicity in the 2500km stretch of the active Himalayan Belt. The north Sikkim earthquake was felt in most parts of Sikkim and eastern Nepal; it killed more than 100 people and caused damage to buildings, roads and communication infrastructure. Through this study we focus on the earthquake source parameters and the kinematic rupture process of this particular event. We used tele-seismic body waveformsto determine the rupture pattern of earthquake. The seismic-rupture pattern are generally complex, and the result could be interpreted in terms of a distribution of asperities and barriers on the particular fault plane (Kikuchi and Kanamori, 1991).The methodology we adopted is based on the teleseismic body wave inversion methodology by Kikuchi and Kanamori (1982, 1986 and 1991). We used tele-seismic P-wave records observed at teleseismic distances between 50° and 90° with a good signal to noise ratio. Teleseismic distances in the range between 50° and 90° were used, in order to avoid upper mantle and core triplications and to limit the path length within the crust. Synthetic waveforms were generated gives a better fit with triangular

  9. The terrestrial carbon budget of South and Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervarich, Matthew; Shu, Shijie; Jain, Atul K.; Arneth, Almut; Canadell, Josep; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Houghton, Richard A.; Kato, Etsushi; Koven, Charles; Patra, Prabir; Poulter, Ben; Sitch, Stephen; Stocker, Beni; Viovy, Nicolas; Wiltshire, Andy; Zeng, Ning

    2016-10-01

    Accomplishing the objective of the current climate policies will require establishing carbon budget and flux estimates in each region and county of the globe by comparing and reconciling multiple estimates including the observations and the results of top-down atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) inversions and bottom-up dynamic global vegetation models. With this in view, this study synthesizes the carbon source/sink due to net ecosystem productivity (NEP), land cover land use change (E LUC), fires and fossil burning (E FIRE) for the South Asia (SA), Southeast Asia (SEA) and South and Southeast Asia (SSEA = SA + SEA) and each country in these regions using the multiple top-down and bottom-up modeling results. The terrestrial net biome productivity (NBP = NEP - E LUC - E FIRE) calculated based on bottom-up models in combination with E FIRE based on GFED4s data show net carbon sinks of 217 ± 147, 10 ± 55, and 227 ± 279 TgC yr-1 for SA, SEA, and SSEA. The top-down models estimated NBP net carbon sinks were 20 ± 170, 4 ± 90 and 24 ± 180 TgC yr-1. In comparison, regional emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels were 495, 275, and 770 TgC yr-1, which are many times higher than the NBP sink estimates, suggesting that the contribution of the fossil fuel emissions to the carbon budget of SSEA results in a significant net carbon source during the 2000s. When considering both NBP and fossil fuel emissions for the individual countries within the regions, Bhutan and Laos were net carbon sinks and rest of the countries were net carbon source during the 2000s. The relative contributions of each of the fluxes (NBP, NEP, E LUC, and E FIRE, fossil fuel emissions) to a nation’s net carbon flux varied greatly from country to country, suggesting a heterogeneous dominant carbon fluxes on the country-level throughout SSEA.

  10. CHARIS - The Contribution to High Asian Runoff from Ice and Snow, Preliminary results from the Upper Indus Basin, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. L.; Barrett, A. P.; Brodzik, M.; Fetterer, F. M.; Hashmey, D.; Horodyskyj, U. N.; Khalsa, S.; Racoviteanu, A.; Raup, B. H.; Williams, M. W.; Wilson, A.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the CHARIS project is to improve the understanding of the regional water resources of High Asia. In order to achieve this goal CHARIS is a cross-boundary exercise with University of Colorado scientists working directly with researchers at institutions in nine different nations where these ice and snow resources are located (Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan). These countries contain the headwaters of the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. This collaboration includes both joint research and capacity building that includes augmented field programs and technical training. While it is generally accepted that a significant component of these water resources results from the melting of glacier ice and seasonal snow, the actual water volume available from these two individual sources remains uncertain. The amount, timing, and spatial patterns of snow and ice melt play key roles in providing water for downstream irrigation, hydropower generation, and general consumption. The fundamental objective of this collaborative study is to develop a thorough and systematic assessment of the separate contributions from seasonal snow melt and from glacier ice melt to the water resources originating across the region. To accomplish project objectives, a suite of satellite remote sensing, reanalysis and ground based data are applied as input to specific snow and ice melt models. Gridded maps of snow and glacier area/elevation are used as input to temperature-index melt models to estimate runoff from snow covered grid cells, based on cell area and melt depth. Glacier melt is estimated in the same way, once seasonal snow has disappeared from glacierized grid cells. The melt models are driven by daily mean temperature from reanalysis data. We are comparing the melt volume time series generated from temperature-index models with measured river discharge volumes and comparing the regional scale

  11. Establishing a Collaborative Effort to Assess The Contribution to High Asian Runoff from Ice and Snow (CHARIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard; Barrett, Andrew; Brodzik, Mary Jo; Fetterer, Florence; Horodyskyj, Ulyana; Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Racoviteanu, Adina; Rasmussen, Al; Raup, Bruce; Williams, Mark; Wilson, Alana

    2013-04-01

    The improved understanding of the regional water resources of High Asia is a cross-boundary exercise and in order to achieve this goal, University of Colorado scientists are working directly with researchers at institutions in nine different nations where these ice and snow resources are located across High Asia (Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan). These countries contain the headwaters of the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. This collaboration includes both joint research and capacity building that will enhance the scientific understanding of the regional hydrology through augmented field programs and technical training. The fundamental objective of this collaborative study is to develop a thorough and systematic assessment of the separate contributions from seasonal snow melt and from glacier ice melt to the water resources originating across the Himalaya, Karakoram, Hindu Kush, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges. While it is generally accepted that the melt from glacier ice and seasonal snow is a significant component of High Asian water resources, the actual water volume available from these two individual sources remains uncertain. To accomplish project objectives, a suite of satellite remote sensing, reanalysis and ground based data are applied as input to specific snow and ice melt models. Gridded maps of snow and glacier area/elevation are used as input to temperature-index melt models to estimate runoff from snow covered grid cells, based on cell area and melt depth. Glacier melt is estimated in the same way, once snow has disappeared from glacierized grid cells. The melt models are driven by daily mean temperature from reanalysis data. We are comparing the melt volume time series generated from temperature-index models with measured river discharge volumes and comparing the regional scale results with local sub-basin studies based on energy balance modeling approaches

  12. Establishing a collaborative effort to assess the role of glaciers and seasonal snow cover in the hydrology of the mountains of High Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. L.; Barrett, A. P.; Brodzik, M.; Khalsa, S.; Racoviteanu, A.; Raup, B. H.; Williams, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental objective of this collaborative study is to develop a thorough and systematic assessment of the individual contributions from seasonal snow and from glacier ice melt to the water resources originating across the Himalaya, Karakoram, Hindu Kush, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges, referred to here as High Asia. While it is generally accepted that the melt from glacier ice and seasonal snow is a significant component of High Asian water resources, the actual water volume available from these two individual sources remains generally unknown. To improve our understanding of the High Asia regional water resources, a cross-boundary effort is required. In order to achieve this goal, University of Colorado scientists are working directly with researchers at institutions in nine different nations where these ice and snow resources are located across High Asia (Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan). These countries contain the headwaters of the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. This collaboration includes joint research activities, including cooperative field research, as well as capacity building (technical training, graduate student support) that will enhance the scientific understanding of the regional hydrology among our Asian partners. To accomplish basic project objectives, a suite of satellite remote sensing, reanalysis and ground based data are applied as input to specific snow and ice melt models. Gridded maps of snow and glacier area/elevation are used as input to a temperature-index melt model. The melt model estimates runoff from snow covered grid cells, based on cell area and melt depth. Glacier melt is estimated in the same way, once snow has disappeared from glacierized grid cells. The melt model is driven by daily mean temperature from reanalysis data. Validation efforts for the regional scale results will involve comparison with measured discharge data as well

  13. Tri-stereo Pleiades images-derived digital surface models for tectonic geomorphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Le Roux-Mallouf, Romain; Ritz, Jean-François; Berthet, Théo; Peyret, Michel; Vernant, Philippe; Maréchal, Anaïs; Cattin, Rodolphe; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Poujol, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    Very high resolution digital elevation models are a key component of modern quantitative geomorphology. In parallel to high-precision but time-consuming kinematic GPS and/or total station surveys and dense coverage but expensive LiDAR campaigns, we explore the usability of affordable, flexible, wide coverage digital surface models (DSMs) derived from Pleiades tri-stereo optical images. We present two different approaches to extract DSM from a triplet of images. The first relies on the photogrammetric extraction of 3 DSMs from the 3 possible stereo couples and subsequent merge based on the best correlation score. The second takes advantage of simultaneous correlation over the 3 images to derive a point cloud. We further extract DSM from panchromatic 0.5 m resolution images and multispectral 2 m resolution images to test for correlation and noise and determine optimal correlation window size and achievable resolution. Georeferencing is also assessed by comparing raw coordinates derived from Pleiades Rational Polynomial Coefficients to ground control points. Primary images appear to be referenced within ~15 m over flat areas where parallax is minimal while derived DSMs and associated orthorectified images show a much improved referencing within ~5 m of GCPs. In order to assess the adequacy of Pleiades DSMs for tectonic geomorphology, we present examples from case studies along the Trougout normal fault (Morocco), the Hovd strike-slip fault (Mongolia), the Denali strike-slip fault (USA and Canada) and the Main Frontal Thrust (Bhutan). In addition to proposing a variety of tectonic contexts, these examples cover a wide range of climatic conditions (semi-arid, arctic and tropical), vegetation covers (bare earth, sparse Mediterranean, homogeneous arctic pine, varied tropical forest), lithological natures and related erosion rates. The capacity of derived DSMs is demonstrated to characterize geomorphic markers of active deformation such as marine and alluvial terraces

  14. South Asia as a Reservoir for the Global Spread of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Shigella sonnei: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Thanh, Duy; De Lappe, Niall; Cormican, Martin; Howden, Benjamin P.; Wangchuk, Sonam; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Nguyen Thi Nguyen, To; Thompson, Corinne N.; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Voong Vinh, Phat; Ha Thanh, Tuyen; Turner, Paul; Sar, Poda; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Baker, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance is a major issue in the Shigellae, particularly as a specific multidrug-resistant (MDR) lineage of Shigella sonnei (lineage III) is becoming globally dominant. Ciprofloxacin is a recommended treatment for Shigella infections. However, ciprofloxacin-resistant S. sonnei are being increasingly isolated in Asia and sporadically reported on other continents. We hypothesized that Asia is a primary hub for the recent international spread of ciprofloxacin-resistant S. sonnei. Methods and Findings We performed whole-genome sequencing on a collection of 60 contemporaneous ciprofloxacin-resistant S. sonnei isolated in four countries within Asia (Vietnam, n = 11; Bhutan, n = 12; Thailand, n = 1; Cambodia, n = 1) and two outside of Asia (Australia, n = 19; Ireland, n = 16). We reconstructed the recent evolutionary history of these organisms and combined these data with their geographical location of isolation. Placing these sequences into a global phylogeny, we found that all ciprofloxacin-resistant S. sonnei formed a single clade within a Central Asian expansion of lineage III. Furthermore, our data show that resistance to ciprofloxacin within S. sonnei may be globally attributed to a single clonal emergence event, encompassing sequential gyrA-S83L, parC-S80I, and gyrA-D87G mutations. Geographical data predict that South Asia is the likely primary source of these organisms, which are being regularly exported across Asia and intercontinentally into Australia, the United States and Europe. Our analysis was limited by the number of S. sonnei sequences available from diverse geographical areas and time periods, and we cannot discount the potential existence of other unsampled reservoir populations of antimicrobial-resistant S. sonnei. Conclusions This study suggests that a single clone, which is widespread in South Asia, is likely driving the current intercontinental surge of ciprofloxacin-resistant S. sonnei and is capable of establishing

  15. GENDER PREFERENCES FOR ALTERNATIVE ENERGY TRANSPORT WITH FOCUS ON ELECTRIC VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation has become an important part of our day to day life. Due to changing lifestyle, frequent travels whether related to work or leisure has become a common phenomenon. Such lifestyle also demands comfortable transport medium and reasonable availability of fuels. As need of vehicle for transportation is rising, it has put pressure of fuel supply, fuel prices and environment as well. The rising prices of fuel, increasing pressure on resources and threatening environment pollution is driving the need for alternative and clean sources of energy. Increasing competition among nations to own the resources is becoming a serious threat for many developing countries. This paper empirically examines the gender preference for alternative energy sources and related technologies for vehicles. In total, 1168 questionnaires were received from respondents (male-711, female-442, not disclosed-15 from eleven cities in India viz. Bengaluru, Chennai, Cochin, Coimbatore, Hyderabad, Pune, Imphal, Rohtak, Sagar and Tiruvanathpuram in India and one city from Bhutan-Thimpu. Respondents who did not disclose their gender were excluded from the study. The study was conducted from October 2013 to June 2014. The objective of the study was to understand the social dimensions and gender preferences of the respondents regarding their preference for electric vehicle as an alternative energy transport for personal and public use. The primary data was collected through a structured questionnaire. The data was analyzed through the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS®. Findings indicate that in general fueled vehicles are still preferred over electric vehicles. However there is a strong interest in electric vehicles. It was observed that more than 66% of the respondents in the age group of 18-30 can become prospective customers in the near future, if the electric vehicles meet their expectations. In this age group, 59% of the respondents were male

  16. A systematic review of air pollution as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in South Asia: limited evidence from India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S S; Phalkey, R; Malik, A A

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are major contributors to mortality and morbidity in South Asia. Chronic exposure to air pollution is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although the majority of studies to date have been conducted in developed countries. Both indoor and outdoor air pollution are growing problems in developing countries in South Asia yet the impact on rising rates of CVD in these regions has largely been ignored. We aimed to assess the evidence available regarding air pollution effects on CVD and CVD risk factors in lower income countries in South Asia. A literature search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science. Our inclusion criteria included peer-reviewed, original, empirical articles published in English between the years 1990 and 2012, conducted in the World Bank South Asia region (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka). This resulted in 30 articles. Nine articles met our inclusion criteria and were assessed for this systematic review. Most of the studies were cross-sectional and examined measured particulate matter effects on CVD outcomes and indicators. We observed a bias as nearly all of the studies were from India. Hypertension and CVD deaths were positively associated with higher particulate matter levels. Biomarkers of oxidative stress such as increased levels of P-selection expressing platelets, depleted superoxide dismutase and reactive oxygen species generation as well as elevated levels of inflammatory-related C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 were also positively associated with biomass use or elevated particulate matter levels. An important outcome of this investigation was the evidence suggesting important air pollution effects regarding CVD risk in South Asia. However, too few studies have been conducted. There is as an urgent need for longer term investigations using robust measures of air pollution with different population groups that include a wider

  17. A global assessment of the societal impacts of glacier outburst floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Tweed, Fiona S.

    2016-09-01

    Glacier outburst floods are sudden releases of large amounts of water from a glacier. They are a pervasive natural hazard worldwide. They have an association with climate primarily via glacier mass balance and their impacts on society partly depend on population pressure and land use. Given the ongoing changes in climate and land use and population distributions there is therefore an urgent need to discriminate the spatio-temporal patterning of glacier outburst floods and their impacts. This study presents data compiled from 20 countries and comprising 1348 glacier floods spanning 10 centuries. Societal impacts were assessed using a relative damage index based on recorded deaths, evacuations, and property and infrastructure destruction and disruption. These floods originated from 332 sites; 70% were from ice-dammed lakes and 36% had recorded societal impact. The number of floods recorded has apparently reduced since the mid-1990s in all major world regions. Two thirds of sites that have produced > 5 floods (n = 32) have floods occurring progressively earlier in the year. Glacier floods have directly caused at least: 7 deaths in Iceland, 393 deaths in the European Alps, 5745 deaths in South America and 6300 deaths in central Asia. Peru, Nepal and India have experienced fewer floods yet higher levels of damage. One in five sites in the European Alps has produced floods that have damaged farmland, destroyed homes and damaged bridges; 10% of sites in South America have produced glacier floods that have killed people and damaged infrastructure; 15% of sites in central Asia have produced floods that have inundated farmland, destroyed homes, damaged roads and damaged infrastructure. Overall, Bhutan and Nepal have the greatest national-level economic consequences of glacier flood impacts. We recommend that accurate, full and standardised monitoring, recording and reporting of glacier floods is essential if spatio-temporal patterns in glacier flood occurrence, magnitude and

  18. Population change and some aspects of socio-economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Some of the major dimensions of the interrelationship of population dynamics and socioeconomic development are examined in the context of Asia and the Pacific. Most of the countries in the region are developing, and population growth is viewed more as an obstacle to development rather than as a stimulant to economic progress. There are at least 10 countries in the region whose per capita income is less than US$300, namely: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma, China, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In 1979 these countries had an estimated combined population of 1,867,103,000 or about 77% of the population of the region. Per capita gross national product (GNP) masks the real economic condition of the people as it fails to show the actual distribution of income and wealth. In most nonsocialist countries there is maldistribution of income and wealth. The International Labor Organization (ILO) report points out that during 1963-73 in Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, the richest 20% of households receive about half the income. In contrast, the poorest 40% receive between 12-18% of total income. In short, there could be economic development but not social development, such as equitable distribution of wealth and income. Studies have shown that equitable income distribution exerts a far greater influence on fertility than the GNP. In many countries of the region poverty is reality. The World Bank estimates that half of the people in absolute poverty live in South Asia, mainly India and Bangladesh. It is most unfortunate that among the very poor, poverty is frequently regarded as the cause rather than the effect of high fertility. Among the very poor, mortality, particularly infant mortality, tends to be high. China is among the countries which have recognized that rapid population growth is not beneficial to the accelerated speed of capital accumulation. It has been observed that in most countries as the GNP per

  19. Chemical evolution of Himalayan leucogranites based on an O, U-Pb and Hf study of zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Thomas N.; Warren, Clare J.; Harris, Nigel B. W.; Hammond, Samantha J.; Parrish, Randall R.

    2015-04-01

    Crustal melting is a characteristic process at convergent plate margins, where crustal rocks are heated and deformed. Miocene leucogranite sheets and plutons are found intruded into the high-grade metasedimentary core (the Greater Himalayan Sequence, GHS) across the Himalayan orogen. Previously-published Himalayan whole-rock data suggest that these leucogranites formed from a purely meta-sedimentary source, isotopically similar to those into which they now intrude. Bulk rock analyses carry inherent uncertainties, however: they may hide contributions from different contributing sources, and post-crystallization processes such as fluid interaction may significantly alter the original chemistry. In contrast, zircon is more able to retain precise information of the contributing sources of the melt from which it crystallises whilst its resistant nature is impervious to post-magmatic processes. This multi-isotope study of Oligocene-Miocene leucogranite zircons from the Bhutan Himalaya, seeks to differentiate between various geochemical processes that contribute to granite formation. Hf and O isotopes are used to detect discrete changes in melt source while U-Pb isotopes provide the timing of zircon crystallisation. Our data show that zircon rims of Himalayan age yield Hf-O signatures that lie within the previously reported whole-rock GHS field, confirming the absence of a discernible mantle contribution to the leucogranite source. Importantly, we document a decrease in the minimum ɛHf values during Himalayan orogenesis through time, correlating to a change in Hf model age from 1.4 Ga to 2.4 Ga. Nd model ages for the older Lesser Himalayan metasediments (LHS) that underthrust the GHS are significantly older than those for the GHS (2.4-2.9 Ga compared with 1.4-2.2 Ga), and as such even minor contributions of LHS material incorporated into a melt would significantly increase the resulting Hf model age. Hence our leucogranite data suggest either a change of source within

  20. Research progress of Radix Indigofera%苗药雪人参的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小果; 张汝国

    2015-01-01

    以国内外相关文献为基础,对苗药雪人参植物资源的分布及近年来的植物化学成分和药理活性研究概况进行综述,以期为进行雪人参药理活性及质量标准控制等研究提供参考。雪人参主要分布在贵州、云南、广西、湖北等地,泰国、缅甸、尼泊尔、印度及不丹也有分布。雪人参植物中含有挥发油、黄烷醇、甾醇体类化学成分,具有抗氧化、降血糖、降血脂、保肝、抗癌、抑菌、抗病毒等作用。今后应加强雪人参野生变家种的研究,建立雪人参栽培基地;对雪人参进行系统的化学成分、药理活性及质量标准控制等多方面的研究。%In the basis of relevant literature at home and abroad,research progress of Radix Indigofera were reviewed in the pa-per,including the plant resources,chemical constituents,and pharmacological actions in the past years.We want to provide reference for pharmacological action and quality control standards of Radix Indigofera.Radix Indigofera distributed mainly in the province of Guizhou,Yunnan,Guangxi,Hubei and other places,Thailand,Myanmar,Nepal,India and Bhutan have distributed too.Radix In-digofera contains volatile oils,flavanols and sterols,etc,possess lots of activies,such as antioxidation,lowering blood sugar and lipid, protecting liver,etc.Research on artificical planting,cultivation base,systemic chemical constituents,pharmacological actions and quality standard control systern.

  1. FOREST ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS ASSESSMENT AND PREDICTIVE MODELLING IN EASTERN HIMALAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. S. Kushwaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the forest ecosystem dynamics assessment and predictive modelling deforestation and forest cover prediction in a part of north-eastern India i.e. forest areas along West Bengal, Bhutan, Arunachal Pradesh and Assam border in Eastern Himalaya using temporal satellite imagery of 1975, 1990 and 2009 and predicted forest cover for the period 2028 using Cellular Automata Markov Modedel (CAMM. The exercise highlighted large-scale deforestation in the study area during 1975–1990 as well as 1990–2009 forest cover vectors. A net loss of 2,334.28 km2 forest cover was noticed between 1975 and 2009, and with current rate of deforestation, a forest area of 4,563.34 km2 will be lost by 2028. The annual rate of deforestation worked out to be 0.35 and 0.78% during 1975–1990 and 1990–2009 respectively. Bamboo forest increased by 24.98% between 1975 and 2009 due to opening up of the forests. Forests in Kokrajhar, Barpeta, Darrang, Sonitpur, and Dhemaji districts in Assam were noticed to be worst-affected while Lower Subansiri, West and East Siang, Dibang Valley, Lohit and Changlang in Arunachal Pradesh were severely affected. Among different forest types, the maximum loss was seen in case of sal forest (37.97% between 1975 and 2009 and is expected to deplete further to 60.39% by 2028. The tropical moist deciduous forest was the next category, which decreased from 5,208.11 km2 to 3,447.28 (33.81% during same period with further chances of depletion to 2,288.81 km2 (56.05% by 2028. It noted progressive loss of forests in the study area between 1975 and 2009 through 1990 and predicted that, unless checked, the area is in for further depletion of the invaluable climax forests in the region, especially sal and moist deciduous forests. The exercise demonstrated high potential of remote sensing and geographic information system for forest ecosystem dynamics assessment and the efficacy of CAMM to predict the forest cover change.

  2. Asian Traditional Dance Preservation and Dance Museum ——interview on Joseph Housea%亚洲传统舞蹈保护与舞蹈博物馆——约瑟夫·侯希尔访谈纪实

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮岷

    2011-01-01

    约瑟夫·侯希尔先生是美国传统舞蹈文化保护中心的执行总监和艺术总监。该中心总部位于美国芝加哥,是一个非盈利性的民间组织。这个组织成立于1999年,在过去的十余年里,主要在喜马拉雅地区与当地的古代舞蹈以及濒临绝迹的舞蹈形式的从业者一起合作,工作对象是亚洲的古代舞蹈和一些相对而言较小的舞蹈文化体系,在拉达克①、巴基斯坦、尼泊尔、不丹、日本和斯里兰卡等地开展保护性工作。该中心与博物馆有着密切的合作,推出了一系列高水平的亚洲艺术展览。本文根据其在北京舞蹈学院所进行的演讲与专访整理而成,从亚洲传统舞蹈保护及舞蹈与博物馆结合等方面,为大家提供新的视角。%Joseph Housea is the exclusive and artistic director of Core of Culture Dance Preservation in USA. Founded in 1999, and based in Chicago, USA, the Core is a non-profit and non-governmental organization. In the last ten years, the Core mainly made cooperation with the local ancient dances and some endangered dances practitioners in Himalaya, with the target on Asian ancient dances and some relatively minor dance cultural systems.The Core is making preservation in Ladakh, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Japan and Sri Lanka with close cooperation with the museums, holding a series of Asian artistic exhibitions of high level. The article, on the basis of his speech in Beijing Dance Academy and the interview, shall provide the brand new angle on the Asian traditional dance preservation and the integration between the dance and the museum.

  3. A Dynamic Information Framework: A Multi-Sector, Geospatial Gateway for Environmental Conservation and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, E. C.; Norbu, C.; Juizo, D.; Wangdi, T.; Richey, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Zambezi valley of Mozambique. The DrukDIF for Bhutan is moving from a test-of-concept to an operational phase, with uses from extending local biodiversity to computing how much energy can be sold tomorrow, based on waterflows today. AralDIF is being developed to serve as a neutral and transparent platform, as a catalyst for open and transparent discussion on water and energy linkages, for central Asia. ImisoziDIF is now being ramped up in Rwanda, to help guide scaling up of agricultural practices and biodiversity from sites to the country. The Virtual Mekong Basin, "tells the story" of the multiple issues facing the Mekong Basin.

  4. 用MaxEnt模拟湖北海棠(Malus hupehensis)地理分布%Modelling geographic distribution of Malus hupehensis with MaxEnt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雷宏; 杨俊仙; 黄成林

    2013-01-01

    采用湖北海棠551个分布数据以及当前生物气候数据,用MaxEnt软件模拟了它的地理分布.结果显示:①潜在分布地区有巴基斯坦北部、印度北部、尼泊尔、不丹、缅甸东北部、越南西北部、广西北部、西藏南部及东南部、日本岛东南侧、朝鲜半岛中南部及沿海地区;河北东北部、山东半岛北部和辽宁南部,其中分布值在0.6~1的地区有不丹、韩国济州岛及附近岛屿和日本及附近岛屿.②分布记录非常少,但分布值已达0.6~1的地区有山西东南部、江苏省南通、四川雅安市汉源和山东崂山.③以分布值在0.6~1的地区来表示现实地理分布格局,自西东向分布为喜马拉雅南部,东南部=横断山=秦岭=巫山=长江中下游山地=武夷山=朝鲜半岛=日本岛.自北向南,北界在太行山南部,南界武夷山西南部.④Jackknife test检测表明干旱季节的平均温度对湖北海棠的分布增益贡献最大,本种自然分布于干旱季节平均气温在-10℃~15℃的地区.%Geographic distribution of Malus hupehensis was modelled with MaxEnt by 551 presence recorded data and current bioclimatic data.The results showed that:①Malus hupehensis would be more likely to occur in those areas (potential distribution),such as northern Pakistan,northern India,Nepal,Bhutan,northeast Myanmar,northwest of Vietnam,northern of Guangxi,the southern and southeastern of Xizang,southeast of Japan,south,center and coast of Korea,northeast of Hebei,north of Shandong,southern of Liaoning.Of which,the areas with 0.6-1 distribution value (logistic) are Bhutan,Cheju Island and coastal islands of Korea,Japan islands and the its nearby islands.② The areas with distribution values 0.6-1 were in the southeast of Shanxi,Nantong of Jiangsu,Hanyuan of Sichuan,and Laoshan of Shandong,although,there were a few present records in those areas.③ Geographical distribution patterns of M.hupehensis could be expressed using those

  5. Glaciers of Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is the ninth to be released in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1386, Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World, a series of 11 chapters. In each of the geographic area chapters, remotely sensed images, primarily from the Landsat 1, 2, and 3 series of spacecraft, are used to analyze the specific glacierized region of our planet under consideration and to monitor glacier changes. Landsat images, acquired primarily during the middle to late 1970s and early 1980s, were used by an international team of glaciologists and other scientists to study various geographic regions and (or) to discuss related glaciological topics. In each glacierized geographic region, the present areal distribution of glaciers is compared, wherever possible, with historical information about their past extent. The atlas provides an accurate regional inventory of the areal extent of glacier ice on our planet during the 1970s as part of a growing international scientific effort to measure global environmental change on the Earth?s surface. The chapter is divided into seven geographic parts and one topical part: Glaciers of the Former Soviet Union (F-1), Glaciers of China (F-2), Glaciers of Afghanistan (F?3), Glaciers of Pakistan (F-4), Glaciers of India (F-5), Glaciers of Nepal (F?6), Glaciers of Bhutan (F-7), and the Paleoenvironmental Record Preserved in Middle-Latitude, High-Mountain Glaciers (F-8). Each geographic section describes the glacier extent during the 1970s and 1980s, the benchmark time period (1972-1981) of this volume, but has been updated to include more recent information. Glaciers of the Former Soviet Union are located in the Russian Arctic and various mountain ranges of Russia and the Republics of Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Kazakstun. The Glacier Inventory of the USSR and the World Atlas of Ice and Snow Resources recorded a total of 28,881 glaciers covering an area of 78,938 square kilometers (km2). China includes many of the mountain

  6. Diversity of the Ty-1 copia retrotransposon Tos17 in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and the AA genome of the Oryza genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Julie; Bourgeois, Emmanuelle; Stenger, Wilfried; Bès, Martine; Droc, Gaétan; Meynard, Donaldo; Courtois, Brigitte; Ghesquière, Alain; Sabot, François; Panaud, Olivier; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel

    2009-12-01

    . longistaminata. The presence of Tos17 at three insertion sites was confirmed by retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) in a sample of O. sativa accessions. The first insertion, located on chromosome 3 was only found in two japonica accessions from the Bhutan region while the second insertion, located on chromosome 10 was specific to the varietal groups 1, 2, and 5. The third insertion located on chromosome 7 corresponds to the only insertion shown active in rice so far, notably in cv. Nipponbare, where it has been extensively used for insertion mutagenesis. This copy was only found in a few varieties of the japonica group 6 and in one group 5 accession. Taken together, these results confirm that Tos17 was probably present in the ancestor of A-genome species and that some copies of the element remained active in some Oryza lineages--notably in O. rufipogon and O. longistaminata--as well as in the indica and japonica O. sativa L. lineages.

  7. 野牛的种群现状、生态习性及致危因素∗%Population status,ecological habit and threatened factors of wild gaurs (Bos gaurus):a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹峰; 马凯; 刘定震

    2015-01-01

    野牛(Bos gaurus)主要分布于中国、印度、孟加拉、尼泊尔、不丹、越南、老挝、柬埔寨、泰国、缅甸和马来西亚。据评估,其全球种群数量约13000~30000头。在我国主要分布于云南省,1996—2000年的调查显示共有约480头,种群下降趋势严重,灭绝风险较大。栖息地丧失和破碎化、盗猎和非法贸易、种群衰退和杂交污染以及疾病和传染病是其主要威胁。建议加强野牛的生态学研究,加大栖息地保护力度,打击非法贸易并加强管理和监控,促进野牛种群的恢复。%The wild gaur (Bos gaurus)is a rare and most endangered species in China.This species is also listed in the IUCN Red Data Book as vulnerable and in Appendix I by CITES.Now wild gaurs are restricted to tiny,fragmented populations in areas of Southern and Southeastern Asia including China,India,Bangladesh, Nepal,Bhutan,Vietnam,Laos,Cambodia,Thailand,Myanmar and Malaysia.The global population is estimated to be 13 000 30 000 with a total of 5 200 18 000 mature individuals.A survey conducted by the Chinese government in 1996 2000 showed a total of 480 gaurs in Xishuangbanna and Puer of Yunnan Province. This paper reviews the population status and impacting environmental factors on the wild gaur by referring to both literature and field investigation in 2013. Currently, there are four major factors threatening the subsistence of wild gaurs:1 )habitat loss and fragmentation,2 )poaching and illegal trade,3 )population decline and hybridizing contamination,4)diseases including infectious diseases.Wild gaur population is declining continuously,the species is on the brink of extinction.The status of gaur population has drawn attention from scientists and governmental officers in recent years.Consequently some efforts have been made including constructing biological corridors between different habitats in which gaur habituated.However,the efficacy of those works is not easy to evaluate due to the

  8. Molecular systematics of six genera of Papilionidae (Lepidoptera) based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and Cyt b gene sequences%基于CO Ⅰ和Cyt b基因序列的凤蝶科六属分子系统学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦峰; 付文博; 周善义

    2011-01-01

    对凤蝶科6属25种的COI基因和20种Cytb基因的部分序列进行测定和分析,探讨它们之间的系统发育关系;以茶小卷叶蛾 Adoxophyes honmai为外群,用邻接法(neighbor-joining,NJ)、最大简约法(maximum parsimony,MP)和贝叶斯法(Bayesian inference,BI)重建了凤蝶科6属的分子系统树.结果表明:COI基因部分序列长度为661bp,其中保守位点417个,可变位点244个,简约信息位点191个;A+T的平均含量为70.3%,明显高于C+G的平均含量29.6%.Cytb基因部分序列长度为433bp,其中保守位点239个,可变位点194个,简约信息位点135个;A+T的平均含量为74.2%,明显高于C+G的平均含量25.7%.分子系统树表明,凤蝶属Papilio、斑凤蝶属Chilasa、尾凤蝶属Bhutanitis、珠风蝶属Pachliopta和喙凤蝶属Teinopalpus为单系性,与传统形态分类结果相一致.但青凤蝶属Graphium单系性不够明确,需要进一步探讨.研究结果为我国凤蝶科分子系统学研究积累了资料.%Partial sequences of CO I genes of 25 species and Cyt b genes of 20 species in six genera of Papilionoidea were sequenced and analyzed for exploring their phylogenetic relationships. Adoxophyes honmai was used as outgroup to reconstruct the phylogenetic trees of six genera with neighbor-joining ( NJ),maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) methods. The results indicated that CO I genes are 661 bp in length by alignment, including 417 conserved, 244 variable and 191 parsimonious-informative sites, and the average percentage of A + T is 70.3%, much higher than that of C + G (29.6%). The Cytb genes are 433 bp in length by alignment, including 239 conserved, 194 variable and 135 parsimoniousinformative sites; and the average percentage of A + T is 74. 2%, much higher than that of C + G (25.7%). The molecular phylogenetic trees showed that the genera Papilio, Chilasa, Bhutanitis,Pachliopta and Teinopalpus are all monophyletic clades and separated from each other in the

  9. A Multihazard Regional Level Impact Assessment for South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Giriraj; Alahacoon, Niranga; Aggarwal, Pramod; Smakhtin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    spatial distribution of various climate-related hazards in 1,398 subnational areas of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. An analysis of country-level population exposure showed that approximately 750 million people are affected from combined climate-hazards. Of the affected population 72% are in India, followed by 12% each from Bangladesh and Pakistan. Due in part to the economic importance of agriculture, it was found to be most vulnerable and exposed to climate extremes. An analysis of individual hazards indicates that floods and droughts) are the dominant hazards impacting agricultural areas followed by extreme rainfall, extreme temperature and sea-level rise. Based on this vulnerability assessment, all the regions of Bangladesh and the Indian States in Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Orissa; Ampara, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Mannar and Batticaloa in Sri Lanka; Sind and Baluchistan in Pakistan; Central and East Nepal; and the transboundary river basins of Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra are among the most vulnerable regions in South Asia.

  10. Mapping rice-fallow cropland areas for short-season grain legumes intensification in South Asia using MODIS 250 m time-series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumma, Murali Krishna; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Teluguntla, Pardhasaradhi G.; Rao, Mahesh N.; Mohammed, Irshad A.; Whitbread, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    study established cropland classes based on the every 16-day 250 m normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series for one year (June 2010–May 2011) of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, using spectral matching techniques (SMTs), and extensive field knowledge. Map accuracy was evaluated based on independent ground survey data as well as compared with available sub-national level statistics. The producers’ and users’ accuracies of the cropland fallow classes were between 75% and 82%. The overall accuracy and the kappa coefficient estimated for rice classes were 82% and 0.79, respectively. The analysis estimated approximately 22.3 Mha of suitable rice-fallow areas in South Asia, with 88.3% in India, 0.5% in Pakistan, 1.1% in Sri Lanka, 8.7% in Bangladesh, 1.4% in Nepal, and 0.02% in Bhutan. Decision-makers can target these areas for sustainable intensification of short-duration grain legumes.

  11. 南亚地缘环境的空间格局与分异规律研究%The Spatial Pattern and Differentiation Laws of Geo-setting in South Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志丁; 葛岳静; 鲍捷; 于伟

    2013-01-01

    The geopolitical setting study is the second attempt to revive the political geography of the geographical circles,also it reflects the political geography studied from a single element to multiple elements and integrated development.Based on the two "geopolitical setting" international seminar which held in Beijing and the early geographical environment research,the geo-setting is defined which contains geographical environment,geographical relations and geographical structure in this article.Geographical environment is consist of the natural environment,economic and population environment,and the social and cultural environment.Geopolitical relations includes economic relations,political and military relations,and social and cultural environment.The geographical structure contains political military structure,economic structure and space structure.And then,the article uses a combination of AHP decision-making analysis and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method to evaluate the geo-setting of South Asia quantitatively.The results show that:In South Asia there exists significant space divided differences in the geographical environment,geopolitical relations and geo-structures,which eventually led to the geo-setting in South Asia can be divided into four categories,India for a class,Pakistan and Bangladesh for a class,Bhutan and Nepal for a class,Sri Lanka and Maldives as a class.There are three reasons which caused this spatial differentiation,which are geographic determinism,interdependence theory and institutional theory.%地缘环境研究是中国地理学界复兴政治地理学的第二次尝试,也是政治地理学从单一要素向多要素、综合化发展的体现.基于对在北京召开的两次“地缘环境”国际研讨会和对早期地缘环境研究归纳的基础,将地缘环境界定为由地理环境、地缘关系和地缘结构3部分组成,其中,地理环境由自然环境、人口经济环境和社会文化环境构成,地缘关系包

  12. 地缘环境单元划分方法及实例研究%Building and application of a geopolitical environment unit regionalization method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周秋文; 杨胜天; 廖华; 马龙生; 韦小茶; 颜红

    2016-01-01

    China's surrounding geopolitical environment is extremely complex, the geopolitical environment analysis and research based on the spatial dif-ferentiation are needed. Existing geopolitical environment studies, however, neither put forward a complete geopolitical environment regionalization meth-ods, nor give a corresponding geopolitical environment regionalization map. This study integrated geopolitics, international relations, geography and oth-er disciplines’knowledge, and draw lessons from the conventional regionaliza-tion method in geography, then build a geographical spatial unit regionaliza-tion method. The method consists of three parts, regionalization principle, process and multi-index comprehensive evaluation model. With this method, the four countries (India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan) of South Asia are divided into four levels of geopolitical environmental unit, 19 of level 3 units and 11 of level 4 units. The results show that, this method helps to quickly grasp the overall pattern of surrounding geopolitical environment, especially deepen the understanding of geopolitical environment situation in the key areas.%中国处于亚洲东部中央,邻国众多,周边地缘环境极其复杂,需要开展以空间分异为基础的地缘环境分析与研究。然而,现有的地缘环境研究并没有提出完整的地缘环境区划方法,也没有给出相应的地缘环境单元划分方案。本研究综合地缘政治、国际关系、地理学等学科的知识,参考地理学中传统区划方法的思路,构建地缘单元划分方法。该方法包括地缘环境单元划分原则、地缘环境单元划分流程、多指标综合评价模型三个部分。应用于南亚四国后,将南亚四国划分为四级地缘环境单元,其中三级地缘环境单元有19个,四级地缘环境单元有 9个。南亚四国地缘环境单元分区的实例研究表明,该方法有助于快速把握周边地缘环境的总体格局

  13. 21st century Himalayan hydropower: Growing exposure to glacial lake outburst floods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus; Korup, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    . Everest and Lulana regions of Nepal and Bhutan, respectively. Together with the dense, cascading sequence of hydropower stations along several river networks in these areas, the combination of GLOFs and artificial reservoirs in steep terrain may result in increasing threats to downstream communities. Hydropower stations are infrastructural investments with minimum design lives of several decades, and our results suggest that their planning should be orchestrated with projected changes in glacier response to future climate change. Our data underline the preponderance of glacial lakes in areas with high glacial retreat rates and a commensurate exposure of hydropower stations to GLOFs. To ensure sustainable water resources use at minimum risk implications for on-site downstream communities, potential changes in GLOF hazard should be taken seriously when planning hydropower stations in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya.

  14. The carbon budget of South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Patra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The source and sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 due to anthropogenic and natural biospheric activities were estimated for the South Asia region (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Flux estimates were based on top-down methods that use inversions of atmospheric data, and bottom-up methods that use field observations, satellite data, and terrestrial ecosystem models. Based on atmospheric CO2 inversions, the net biospheric CO2 flux in South Asia (equivalent to the Net Biome Productivity, NBP was a sink, estimated at −104 ± 150 Tg C yr−1 during 2007–2008. Based on the bottom-up approach, the net biospheric CO2 flux is estimated to be −191 ± 193 Tg C yr−1 during the period of 2000–2009. This last net flux results from the following flux components: (1 the Net Ecosystem Productivity, NEP (net primary production minus heterotrophic respiration of −220 ± 186 Tg C yr−1 (2 the annual net carbon flux from land-use change of −14 ± 50 Tg C yr−1, which resulted from a sink of −16 Tg C yr−1 due to the establishment of tree plantations and wood harvest, and a source of 2 Tg C yr−1 due to the expansion of croplands; (3 the riverine export flux from terrestrial ecosystems to the coastal oceans of +42.9 Tg C yr−1; and (4 the net CO2 emission due to biomass burning of +44.1 ± 13.7 Tg C yr−1. Including the emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels of 444 Tg C yr−1 for the decades of 2000s, we estimate a net CO2 land-to-atmosphere flux of 297 Tg C yr−1. In addition to CO2, a fraction of the sequestered carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is released to the atmosphere as CH4. Based on bottom-up and top-down estimates, and chemistry-transport modeling, we estimate that 37 ± 3.7 Tg C

  15. The carbon budget of South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Patra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The source and sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 due to anthropogenic and natural biospheric activities were estimated for the South Asian region (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Flux estimates were based on top-down methods that use inversions of atmospheric data, and bottom-up methods that use field observations, satellite data, and terrestrial ecosystem models. Based on atmospheric CO2 inversions, the net biospheric CO2 flux in South Asia (equivalent to the Net Biome Productivity, NBP was a sink, estimated at −104 ± 150 Tg C yr−1 during 2007–2008. Based on the bottom-up approach, the net biospheric CO2 flux is estimated to be −191 ± 193 Tg C yr−1 during the period of 2000–2009. This last net flux results from the following flux components: (1 the Net Ecosystem Productivity, NEP (net primary production minus heterotrophic respiration of −220 ± 186 Tg C yr−1 (2 the annual net carbon flux from land-use change of −14 ± 50 Tg C yr−1, which resulted from a sink of −16 Tg C yr−1 due to the establishment of tree plantations and wood harvest, and a source of 2 Tg C yr−1 due to the expansion of croplands; (3 the riverine export flux from terrestrial ecosystems to the coastal oceans of +42.9 Tg C yr−1; and (4 the net CO2 emission due to biomass burning of +44.1 ± 13.7 Tg C yr−1. Including the emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels of 444 Tg C yr−1 for the 2000s, we estimate a net CO2 land–atmosphere flux of 297 Tg C yr−1. In addition to CO2, a fraction of the sequestered carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is released to the atmosphere as CH4. Based on bottom-up and top-down estimates, and chemistry-transport modeling, we estimate that 37 ± 3.7 Tg C yr−1

  16. Analysis on Genetic Diversity and Trait Association of Different Types of Azuki Bean(Vigna angularisi)by SSR Markers%不同类型小豆种质SSR标记遗传多样性及性状关联分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵波; 叶剑; 金文林; 曾潮武; 吴宝美; 濮绍京; 潘金豹; 万平

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] It is very important to make studies on the genetic diversity of wild, semi-wild and cultivated azuki beans for further detecting the origin, evolution and diffusion of azuki bean and effectively utilizing these germplasms and serving for azuki bean improvement. [ Method] Eleven higher polymorphic SSR primers screened from 69 SSR primer pairs of azuki bean and black gram were used in amplification of 558 wild, semi-wild and cultivated azuki bean accessions from China, Japan, South Korea, Bhutan and Burma. The analysis of genetic diversity and trait association was done. [Result] Eighty-six polymorphic bands were generated. An average of 7.28 polymorphic bands were detected from 1 pair SSR primers. The number of alleles changed from 6 to 10. There were specific bands were observed in wild, semi-wild and cultivated azuki beans. Specific bands of cultivated azuki bean were predominantly produced by Chinese cultivars and landraces. Specific bands of wild azuki bean were detected in accessions from China, Bhutan and South Japan. The order of genetic dispersion was wild>semi-wild>cultivated azuki beans.Semi-wild accessions has closer genetic relationship with wild azuki bean. The 558 accessions were divided into five main groups by cluster analysis according to genetic distance. The result of cluster appeared that the genetic types of azuki beans have obviously associated with different geographical regions. Japanese cultivated azuki beans have closer genetic relationship with wild and semi-wild accessions from Japan and South Korea. Wild accessions from Southwest China are closely related to wild accessions from Southeast Asia and landraces of Jiangsu Province. Trait association analysis showed that black gram BG 111 marker located on linkage group 7 of azuki bean explained 49%, 44%, 31%, and 18% traits of number of nods on main stem, diameter of stem, top stem twining and branching numbers in wild and weedy types. BG48 of linkage group 1 and BG

  17. Bangladesh Sundarbans: Present status of the environment and Biota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz

    2015-07-01

    from 1989 to 2010 at the extreme northern part of Khulna and Chandpai Ranges revealed the formation of a large number of small rivers and creeks some time before 2000 that reduce the 443 km2 forestland by 3.61%, approximately 16 km2, and decreasing H. fomes by 28.75% and total tree cover by over 3.0%. The number of the relatively low-priced plants Bruguiera sexangula, Excoecaria agallocha and Sonneratia apetala, has, on the other hand, increased. Similar degradation could be occurring in other ranges, thereby putting the survivability of the Bangladesh Sundarbans at risk. The growing stock of 296 plants per ha in 1959 had been reduced to 144 by 1996. Trend analysis using “Table Curve 2D Programme,” reveals a decreased number of 109 plants by the year 2020. The degradation of the Bangladesh Sundarbans has been attributed to reduced sediment-laden freshwater discharge through the BSMF river system since commissioning the Farakka Barrage on 21 April 1975 in India. To reduce salinity and forestland erosion, the maintenance of sediment-laden freshwater discharge through its river system has been suggested to re-create its pre-1975 environment for the growth of H. fomes, a true mangrove and the highest carbon-storing plant of the Sundarbans. This may possibly be achieved by proper sharing of the Ganges water from the Farakka Barrage, forming a consortium of India, Nepal, Bhutan and China, and converting parts or whole of the Ganges River into water reservoir(s. The idea is to implement the Ganges Barrage project about 33 km downstream, dredging sediments of the entire Gorai River and distributaries in the Ganges floodplain, thus allowing uniform sediment-laden freshwater flow to maintain an oligohaline environment for the healthy growth of mangroves. The system will also create healthy hinterlands of the Ganges floodplain with increased crop production and revenue. The expenditure may be met through carbon trading, as Bangladesh is a signatory of the Copenhagen Accord

  18. 适宜机播深度及覆土厚度提高苦荞幼苗素质%Appropriate mechanical sowing depth and soil-covering thickness improving seedling quality of tartary buckwheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向达兵; 邹亮; 彭镰心; 赵钢; 范昱; 韦爽; 宋超; 刘学仪; 海来吉木

    2014-01-01

    Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) is an edible and medicinal crop belonging to family Polygonaceae and it is native to southwest of China, northern India, Bhutan and Nepal. The seeds are widely consumed as daily diet and traditional medicine, such as tartary buckwheat flour, noodles, bread, tea, vinegar, sprouts, etc. Tartary buckwheat is one of the most complete and nutritional foods and rich in minerals, vitamins, proteins, dietary fiber, amino acids, trace elements, and various bioactive phytochemicals. Thus, interest in the use of tartary buckwheat for health benefits is growing, and the market demand is increasing. However, the major tartary buckwheat production is in hilly and high-cold mountainous areas. Because of the inconvenience in transportation and lack of communication with outside, the mechanization of farming in these areas is still under developed, which seriously limits the development of tartary buckwheat industry. As we known, mechanization for farming is important in increase of farm productivity and improving efficiency for modern agriculture production. In order to investigate the feasibility of mechanized seeding technology and the measures of improving the mechanical sowing quality of tartary buckwheat in the hilly areas, a field experiment with three sowing depth (2, 4, 6 cm) and soil-covering (no-covering as CK) was conducted to study quality of tartary buckwheat seedlings during the growing season of 2012 at the farm of Jintang county in Sichuan Province. The results showed that sowing depth was the most important factor, and the optimum depth was 4 cm. The emergence rate, seedling number, seedling rate, root activity, stem diameter, dry matter, area per plant and leaf chlorophyll content of the treatment of 2 cm sowing depth decreased significantly (p<0.05) as compared to 4 cm sowing depth. Besides, the 6 cm sowing depth resulted in significantly (p<0.05) lower emergence rate, plant height, dry matter weight, area per plant, stem

  19. Channel Flow Model of Extrusion of the Higher Himalaya- Successes & Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2009-04-01

    strain exponent of the rock. Did the HH rocks extrude as a Newtonian fluid? (6) An increase in the extrusion rate and a decrease in the ductile shear strain from the Main Central Thrust (MCT- the lower boundary of the HH) up to the lower boundary of the STDS, and then an increase in extrusion rate and a decrease in shear strain up to the upper boundary of the STDS are expected as per the channel flow model. Such a systematic and a detailed variation of the extrusion rate and shear strain have not yet been documented from the HH. (7) The detail geological information for individual sections of the HH is not taken care by the model. For example in the Sutlej section of the western Indian Himalaya, the HH rocks are divisible into a lower lithounit of higher viscosity and an upper lithounit of lower viscosity (Fig. 2 of Caddick et al., 2007; Figs. 3.2 and 3.11 of Mukherjee, 2007). What will be the velocity profiles of a pressure gradient guided extrusion through a two-viscous media? References Beaumont, C., Jamieson, R.A., Nguyen, M.H., Lee, B., 2001. Himalayan tectonics explaneed by extrusion of a low-viscosity crustal channel coupled to focused surface denudation. Nature 414, 738-742. Caddick, M.J., Bickle, M.J., Harris, N.B.W., Holland, T.J.B., Horstwood, M.S.A., Parrish, R.R., Ahmad, T., 2007. Burial and exhumation history of a Lesser Himalayan schist: Recording the formation of an inverted metamorphic sequence in NW India. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 264, 375-390. Grujic, D., Casey, M., Davidson, C., Hollister, L.S., Kündig, R., Pavlis, T., Schmid, S., 1996. Ductile extrusion of the Higher Himalayan Crystalline in Bhutan: evidence from quartz microfabrics. Tectonophysics 260, 21-43. Mukherjee, S. 2007. Geodynamics, Deformation and Mathematical Analysis of Metamorphic Belts, NW Himalaya. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee. pp. 75-149.