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Sample records for bgo detectors

  1. L3 detector: BGO assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1989-01-01

    Explanation and presentation of its construction ( Feb-March 1989). The detector is a multi-layered cylindrical set of different devices, each of them measuring physical quantities relevant to the reconstruction of the collision under study. The three main outer layers are the electro-magnetic calorimeter (also called BGO because it's made of Bismuth Germanium Oxide), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon detector.

  2. L3 experiment's detector : BGO assembly hall

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1987-01-01

    The detector is a multi-layered cylindrical set of different devices, each of them measuring physical quantities relevant to the reconstruction of the collision under study. The three main outer layers are the electro-magnetic calorimeter (also called BGO because it's made of Bismuth Germanium Oxide), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon detector.

  3. Searches for axioelectric effect of solar axions with BGO-scintillator and BGO-bolometer detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Muratova, V N; Giorni, L; Nagorny, S S; Pattavina, L; Bakhlanov, S V; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Biassoni, M; Capelli, S; Clemenza, M; Dratchnev, I S; Ferri, E; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Kayunov, A S; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Pavan, M; Pirro, S; Semenov, D A; Sisti, M; Unzhakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    A search for axioelectric absorption of 5.5 MeV solar axions produced in the $p + d \\rightarrow {^3\\rm{He}}+\\gamma~(5.5~ \\rm{MeV})$ reaction has been performed with a BGO detectors. A model-independent limit on the product of axion-nucleon $g_{AN}^3$ and axion-electron $g_{Ae}$ coupling constants has been obtained: $| g_{Ae}\\times g_{AN}^3|< 1.9\\times 10^{-10}$ for 90\\% C.L..

  4. Improvement of light coupling in BGO detector module by optimization of the crystal shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detector shape optimization study was carried out for the high resolution 4x4 array BGO-PMT coupling scheme to be employed in the spherical positron emission tomograph. To improve the light collection efficiency in the BGO detector array, the authors have employed bullet nose shape BGO crystal in the front side as well as in the back side of detector the latter to be coupled to PMT's photocathode. First, it is believed that the smooth and round front side bullet nose shape could eliminate the sharp corners of the crystal thereby improves the light collection efficiency. Secondly, the bullet nose shape at the back side of crystal which to be coupled to PMT will provide optimal coupling between the crystal and PMT by the focusing property of the bullet nose shape of the crystal. Computer simulations and experimental study were carried out and results are reported

  5. The calibration and electron energy reconstruction of the BGO ECAL of the DAMPE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Dong, Jianing; Wei, Yifeng; Wen, Sicheng; Zhang, Yunlong; Li, Zhiying; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Shen, ZhongTao; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Junbin; Wang, Qi; Ma, SiYuan; Yang, Di; Jiang, Di; Chen, Dengyi; Hu, Yiming; Huang, Guangshun; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi; Gong, Yizhong

    2016-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a space experiment designed to search for dark matter indirectly by measuring the spectra of photons, electrons, and positrons up to 10 TeV. The BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is its main sub-detector for energy measurement. In this paper, the instrumentation and development of the BGO ECAL is briefly described. The calibration on the ground, including the pedestal, minimum ionizing particle (MIP) peak, dynode ratio, and attenuation length with the cosmic rays and beam particles is discussed in detail. Also, the energy reconstruction results of the electrons from the beam test are presented.

  6. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, F.; Biegun, A. K.; Dendooven, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Golnik, C.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Petzoldt, J.; Römer, K. E.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2015-09-01

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range assessment and even three-dimensional in vivo dosimetry. Multiple position sensitive gamma ray detectors arranged in scatter and absorber planes, together with an imaging algorithm, are required to reconstruct the prompt gamma emission density map. Conventional block detectors deployed in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which are based on Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO) and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillators, are suitable candidates for the absorber of a Compton camera due to their high density and absorption efficiency with respect to the prompt gamma energy range (several MeV). We compare experimentally LSO and BGO block detectors in clinical-like radiation fields in terms of energy, spatial and time resolution. The high energy range compensates for the low light yield of the BGO material and boosts significantly its performance compared to the PET scenario. Notwithstanding the overall superiority of LSO, BGO catches up in the field of prompt gamma imaging and can be considered as a competitive alternative to LSO for the absorber plane due to its lower price and the lack of intrinsic radioactivity.

  7. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range assessment and even three-dimensional in vivo dosimetry. Multiple position sensitive gamma ray detectors arranged in scatter and absorber planes, together with an imaging algorithm, are required to reconstruct the prompt gamma emission density map. Conventional block detectors deployed in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which are based on Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO) and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillators, are suitable candidates for the absorber of a Compton camera due to their high density and absorption efficiency with respect to the prompt gamma energy range (several MeV). We compare experimentally LSO and BGO block detectors in clinical-like radiation fields in terms of energy, spatial and time resolution. The high energy range compensates for the low light yield of the BGO material and boosts significantly its performance compared to the PET scenario. Notwithstanding the overall superiority of LSO, BGO catches up in the field of prompt gamma imaging and can be considered as a competitive alternative to LSO for the absorber plane due to its lower price and the lack of intrinsic radioactivity

  8. Fast γ-ray coincidence timing using a BGO detector array in a nuclear reaction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (7Li, 7Be) nuclear charge-exchange reaction has been investigated at E(7Li)=350 MeV. Coincidences were measured between the charged 7Be reaction products in the focal plane of a magnetic spectrometer and 430-keV Doppler-shifted γ-rays from the decay in flight of excited 7Be ejectiles. The latter were detected in a compact BGO detector array. Fast timing was used to optimize the separation between prompt and randoms events. The BGO output signals display the statistical distribution of the arrival times of individual photoelectrons from the photocathode in the photomultiplier tubes. A timing resolution of 6.5 ns relative to the accelerator RF was obtained. A simple model was successfully developed to simulate the BGO output signals with a statistical distribution of a predetermined number of photoelectrons modulated by the light output response of the scintillator and the single-photoelectron gain distribution and transit time through the photomultiplier tube. It is concluded that the timing resolution is primarily limited by the small number of photoelectrons. ((orig.))

  9. Testing and assessment of a large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/NGD), and other companies, to test their most sensitive system. This paper presents the results of trials in a specially created test facility at UKAEA Harwell with a large BGO detector. The detector's size and weight mean that it would be suitable for vehicle deployment but would be too large and heavy to carry in areas that could not be accessed by a vehicle. However, it would be possible to use the same methodology that is described here with a smaller detector capable of being carried in a backpack, albeit with reduced sensitivity for particle detection. The approach that we present is also applicable, with modifications, to the detection of offshore particles using a towed seabed detector

  10. Tests of prototype hexagon BGO detectors for the inner array of the γ-ray facility for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BGO detectors of hexagonal shape are planned for use in the inner array of the γ-ray facility currently under construction for ATLAS. Here, the results of tests performed on prototype detectors are reported. Four crystals obtained from the different manufacturers were tested for energy resolution, timing resolution and light collection efficiency

  11. A quantitative PGNAA study for use in aqueous solution measurements using Am-Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Ahmadi, P.; Doost-Mohammadi, V.

    2016-02-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system including an Am-Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector are used for quantitative analysis of bulk samples. Both Monte Carlo-simulated and experimental data are considered as input data libraries for two different procedures based on neural network and least squares methods. The results confirm the feasibility and precision of the proposed methods.

  12. Development of a detector setup based on BGO single crystals to measure high energy gamma spectra of neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation detectors based on Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) single crystal scintillators have many applications, mainly in high-energy physics, and nuclear industry. The BGO possesses several advantages including high density, large effective atomic number Zeff, small radiation length, high radiation hardness, stability of chemical properties, non-hygroscopic nature and much smaller afterglow which make these crystals indispensable in many applications. These crystals are the best choices for the spectroscopy of high energies gamma rays which are usually produced from (γ, n) reactions in various neutron sources. The major applications of these crystals in high energy physics and to detect high energy gammas require large size crystals. It has been well known that the signal output from BGO crystals is strongly governed by the purity and crystal defects. To grow high quality single crystals with large size and minimum number of defects has always been a daunting task for crystal growers. In this communication, we describe the growth and characterization BGO single crystals. Fabrication of a setup based on BGO scintillator useful to measure gamma-rays from an Am-Be neutron source is discussed

  13. Simulation and study on the γ response spectrum of BGO detector by the application of monte carlo code MOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of Monte Carlo method to build spectra library is useful to reduce experiment workload in Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The new Monte Carlo Code MOCA was used to simulate the response spectra of BGO detector for gamma rays from 137Cs, 60Co and neutron induced gamma rays from S and Ti. The results were compared with general code MCNP, show that the agreement of MOCA between simulation and experiment is better than MCNP. This research indicates that building spectra library by Monte Carlo method is feasible. (authors)

  14. The BGO Calorimeter of BGO-OD Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Bieling, J.; Bleckwenn, M.; Böse, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.-Th; Burdeynyi, D.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Geffers, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Girolami, B.; Glazier, D.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.-F.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I.; Mandaglio, G.; Mei, P.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.-G.; Zimmermann, T.

    2015-02-01

    The BGO Rugby Ball is a large solid angle electromagnetic calorimeter now installed in the ELSA Facility in Bonn. The BGO is operating in the BGO-OD experiment aiming to study meson photoproduction off proton and neutron induced by a Bremsstrahlung polarized gamma beam of energies from 0.2 to 3.2 GeV and an intensity of 5 × 107 photons per second. The scintillating material characteristics and the photomultiplier read-out make this detector particularly suited for the detection of medium energy photons and electrons with very good energy resolution. The detector has been equipped with a new electronics read-out system, consisting of 30 sampling ADC Wie-Ne-R modules which perform the off-line reconstruction of the signal start-time allowing for a good timing resolution. Performances in linearity, resolution and time response have been carefully tested at the Beam Test Facility of the INFN National Laboratories in Frascati by using a matrix of 7 BGO crystals coupled to photomultipliers and equipped with the Wie-Ne-R sampling ADCs.

  15. WA80 BGO calorimetry electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes instrumentation designed for BGO scintillator-based calorimetry of particles covering a very wide range of energies (from less than 50 MeV to 50 GeV). The instrumentation was designed to have a measurement accuracy of 0.1% over as much of the energy range as possible so the energy resolution of BGO would be the limiting factor. Two 1.5-cm2 photodiodes were used per 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 25 cm BGO crystal. Both a charge-sensitive preamplifier and a pulse processor were developed specifically for the needs of the WA80 experiment. The preamplifier was designed for high detector capacitance (100 to 700 pF), low integral and differential non-linearity and low power consumption (200 mW). The pulse processor is a time-invariant shaping amplifier with integral peak-detect-and-hold and automatic gain selection circuits. The amplifier use quasi-triangular shaping with 4 μs peaking time, and the hold circuit is gated with a fast first level trigger. The system has more than 20 bits of effective resolution when used with an external 12-bit ADC. Results from beam tests at CERN are presented. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  16. Simulation of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Russell [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The goal of the BGO Open-Dipole (BGO-OD) project is the systematic investigation of the photoproduction of mesons off the nucleon. These processes are related to the structure of both the mesons and the baryons involved in reactions typical of low-energy hadronic physics. In order to fully understand and accurately interpret the results of the BGO-OD experiment it will be necessary to have a full detector and reaction simulation so that effects from detector resolution and acceptance can be accounted for in the final results. The simulation of the BGO-OD will be be undertaken with the Explora Virtual Monte-Carlo (VMC) software framework. This allows for one common user code to be implemented under Geant4, Geant3 and Fluka. The simulation software is also an analysis tool and such flexibility will be key to an efficient final analysis of the data from the BGO-OD experiment. Presented here are current status of the simulation software for the BGO-OD project and the relevant geometry of the BGO-OD, including the central BGO rugby ball detector with the dual-layer Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and the forward spectrometer, consisting of a large dipole magnet, tracking detectors and the Time-of-Flight walls. Simulation of the magnetic field will also be covered.

  17. Multilayer passive shielding of scintillation detectors based on BGO, NaI(Tl), and stilbene crystals operating in intense neutron fields with an energy of 14.1 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Valkovic, V.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Ivanov, I. Zh.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Krylov, A. R.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the issues related to choosing the optimum type of passive shielding of scintillation detectors based on BGO, NaI(Tl), and stilbene crystals from the direct penetration of neutron radiation with an energy of 14.1 MeV that was emitted isotropically into a solid angle of 4π. A series of experimental measurements of the count-rate suppression factor that may be obtained for the indicated detectors through the use of various shielding filters comprising iron, lead, and borated polyethylene layers with a total thickness not exceeding 50 cm are conducted.

  18. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF sub 2 :Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Devol, T A; Fjeld, R A

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF sub 2 :Eu; CaF sub 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu (63-90 mu m) and ZnS:Ag (10 mu m), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover.

  19. A novel compact Ge-BGO Compton-suppression spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, M.J.A. de [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Bacelar, J.C. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Micek, S.L. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Schotanus, P. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Verhoef, B.A.W. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Wintraecken, Y.J.E. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Vermeulen, P. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Lammerdries 25, Olen (Belgium)

    1995-03-15

    A novel Compton-suppression spectrometer has been designed and its performance has been tested experimentally. The device consists of a single BGO crystal with a cylindrical well that holds a Ge crystal without interfering material between the crystals. Both crystals are cooled to an equilibrium temperature of 104 K which allows a proper performance of the Ge detector. The BGO crystal is read out by a single PM tube. Photodiodes have been applied to investigate the light yield and timing properties of BGO at low temperature. The light transport phenomena were well reproduced by computer simulations. The photopeak-to-total ratio amounts to 0.74 with an average suppression factor of 10.1 for a {sup 137}Cs source and 0.60 and 6.4, respectively, for a {sup 60}Co source. These results are well reproduced by Monte Carlo codes simulating the {gamma}-ray interactions, also taking into account some charge-collection inefficiency. ((orig.)).

  20. A novel compact Ge-BGO Compton-suppression spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Compton-suppression spectrometer has been designed and its performance has been tested experimentally. The device consists of a single BGO crystal with a cylindrical well that holds a Ge crystal without interfering material between the crystals. Both crystals are cooled to an equilibrium temperature of 104 K which allows a proper performance of the Ge detector. The BGO crystal is read out by a single PM tube. Photodiodes have been applied to investigate the light yield and timing properties of BGO at low temperature. The light transport phenomena were well reproduced by computer simulations. The photopeak-to-total ratio amounts to 0.74 with an average suppression factor of 10.1 for a 137Cs source and 0.60 and 6.4, respectively, for a 60Co source. These results are well reproduced by Monte Carlo codes simulating the γ-ray interactions, also taking into account some charge-collection inefficiency. ((orig.))

  1. BGO front-end electronics and signal processing in the MXGS instrument for the ASIM mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skogseide, Yngve; Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Genov, Georgi;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Bismuth Germanate Oxide (BGO) front-end electronics design and signal processing in Modular X- and Gamma ray sensor (MXGS) instrument onboard the Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM) mission, funded by the European Space Agency. University of Bergen is responsible for...... the design and development of the detector layers and readout electronics for the MXGS instrument. The principal objective of the instrument is to detect Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs), which are related to thunderstorm activity. The digital pulse processing scheme used in the MXGS BGO detector...... gives it a significantly higher rate capability than what has been achieved in other instruments used in the study of terrestrial gamma flashes. The front-end electronics for the BGO detector layer in MXGS system also uses fewer components compared to conventional analog front-ends for BGO detectors...

  2. Activation of BGO crystals with 1. 5 GeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rester, A.C.; Bamford, G.J.; Coldwell, R.L. (Florida Univ., Alachua, FL (USA). Inst. for Astrophysics and Planetary Exploration); Trombka, J.I. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Lab. for Astronomy and Solar Physics)

    1990-11-15

    A cylindrical bismuth germanate (BGO) detector (7.5 cm diameter x 7.5 cm long) and a cylindrical bare crystal of BGO (2.5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm long) were exposed to a fluence of 1.1x10{sup 8} protons cm{sup -2} at 1.5 GeV energy, roughly equivalent to that expected on an interplanetary journey to Mars. No degradation in the energy resolution or counting efficiency of the BGO detector was observed, although the background continuum increased significantly. Events emanating from the bare crystal were counted externally with a high-resolution germanium detector. The activation lines identified were compared to a spectrum from an externally counted BGO detector taken on a high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica. (orig.).

  3. Activation of BGO crystals with 1.5 GeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical bismuth germanate (BGO) detector (7.5 cm diameter x 7.5 cm long) and a cylindrical bare crystal of BGO (2.5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm long) were exposed to a fluence of 1.1x108 protons cm-2 at 1.5 GeV energy, roughly equivalent to that expected on an interplanetary journey to Mars. No degradation in the energy resolution or counting efficiency of the BGO detector was observed, although the background continuum increased significantly. Events emanating from the bare crystal were counted externally with a high-resolution germanium detector. The activation lines identified were compared to a spectrum from an externally counted BGO detector taken on a high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica. (orig.)

  4. Design of the Readout Electronics for the Qualification Model of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Junbin; Gao, Shanshan; Yang, Di; Zhang, Yunlong; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite being developed in China, aimed at cosmic ray study, gamma ray astronomy, and searching for the clue of dark matter particles, with a planned mission period of more than 3 years and an orbit altitude of about 500 km. The BGO Calorimeter, which consists of 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxid) crystal bars, 616 PMTs (photomultiplier tubes) and 1848 dynode signals, has approximately 32 radiation lengths. It is a crucial sub-detector...

  5. A BGO scintillating bolometer for gamma and alpha spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Cardani, Laura; Di Domizio, Sergio; Gironi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    A 891 g BGO scintillating bolometer has been tested at 10 mK in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). The discrimination capability, the radio-purity of the compound and the main features of the crystal have been studied in order to demonstrate the excellent performances obtained by operating a scintillating bolometer in the field of gamma and alpha spectroscopy. The sensitivity of this detector in the study of extremely low surface contaminations has been investigated.

  6. Structure design and enviromental test of BGO calorimeter for satellite DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiming; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the new Innovation 2020 program of Chinese Academy of Sciences. As the most important payload of China's first scientific satellite for detecting dark matter, the primary purposes of BGO calorimeter is to measure the energy of incident high energy electrons and gamma rays (5GeV-10TeV) and to identify hadron and electronics. BGO calorimeter also provides an important background discriminator by measuring the energy deposition due to the particle shower that produced by the e^{±}, γ and imaging their shower development profile. Structure design of BGO calorimeter is described in this paper. The new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO crystals coupled with photomultiplier tubes on its two ends. The envelop size of the BGO calorimeter is 907.5mm×907.5mm×494.5mm,and the weight of which is 1051.4Kg. The most important purpose of mechanical design is how to package so heavy crystals into a detector as required arrangement and to make sure reliability and safety. This paper describes the results of vibration tests using the Flight Module of the BGO Calorimeter for the DAMPE satellite. During the vibration tests, no degradation of the mechanical assembly was observed. After random or sinusoidal vibrations, there was no significant changes of the frequency signatures observed during the modal surveys. The comparison of results of cosmic ray tests before and after the vibration shows no change in the performance of the BGO calorimeter.

  7. A BGO scintillating bolometer for γ and α spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 891 g BGO (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillating bolometer has been tested at 10 mK in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). The discrimination capability, the radio-purity of the compound and the main features of the crystal have been studied in order to demonstrate the excellent performances obtained by operating a scintillating bolometer in the field of γ and α spectroscopy. The sensitivity of this detector in the study of extremely low surface contaminations has been investigated.

  8. The BGO collaboration progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large solid angle BGO calorimeter is under contruction for photo-nuclear experiments at intermediate energy facilities. In this note the status progress of the project, the technical steps undertaken in the construction of the apparatus and the goals of this initiative are reviewed

  9. Imaging performance of silicon photomultipliers coupled to BGO and CsI:Na arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging performance of a silicon photomultiplier array (ArraySL-4) photodetector for possible PET and potentially SPECT applications using BGO and CsI(Na) pixellated scintillators. Our main objectives are: i) the comparison of the ArraySL-4 to the older version SensL's SPMArray4 photo detector in terms of energy resolution and peak to valley ratio of a row profile in the flood image and ii) the study of the effect of different coupling schemes using ultra transmitting glass windows of various thicknesses. We acquired raw images from two pixellated scintillators (BGO with 2 × 2×5 mm3 and CsI:Na with 1 × 1×5 mm3 pixel sizes) irradiated with 511 keV and 1274.5 keV γ-rays from a 22Na source. The SiPM array detector allowed the clear visualization of the discrete 2 × 2 mm2 pixellated BGO and 1 × 1 mm2 CsI:Na scintillator elements at room temperature (no cooling). The energy resolution of the new SensL ArraySL-4 detector for the 2 × 2×5 mm3 BGO pixellated scintillator array is improved for rather 6 percentage points (energy resolution improvement equal to 22%) and the peak to valley ratio is measured higher for both scintillator arrays (for BGO 68% (1.7 × ) and for CsI:Na 154% (2.5 × )) compared with SPMArray4. The clear identification of the 1 × 1 mm2 CsI:Na scintillator elements provides evidence that the combination of those SiPMs with even smaller arrays can be used as an efficient imaging detector module. Optical coupling significantly improves image uniformity, while the use of BK7 ultra transmitting glass window with 1.35 mm thickness provided the best measure energy resolution equal to 21.5%

  10. Readout Electronics for BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE: Status during the First Half-year after Launching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Siyuan; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Deliang; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientic satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objective of DAMPE mission is indirect searching for dark matter by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) calorimeter, which is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, was developed for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It is composed of 308 BGO crystal logs, with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. Each PMT incorporates a three dynode pick off to achieve a large dynamic range, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The main function of readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE(Front End Electronics) modules, is to precisely measure the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) to generate triggers for the payload. The calibration of the BGO calorimeter is composed of pedestal testing and electronic linear scale, which are executed frequently in the space after launching. The data of the testing is transmitted to ground station in the form of scientific data. The monitor status consists of temperature, current and status words of the FEE, which are measured and recorded every 16 seconds and packed in the engineering data, then transmitted to ground station. The status of the BGO calorimeter can be evaluated by the calibration

  11. Temperature Dependence Calibration and Correction of the DAMPE BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yifeng; Zhang, Yunlong; Wen, Sicheng; Wang, Chi; Li, Zhiying; Feng, Changqing; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Huang, Guangshun; Liu, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    A BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is built for the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) mission. The effect of temperature on the BGO ECAL was investigated with a thermal vacuum experiment. The light output of a BGO crystal depends on temperature significantly. The temperature coefficient of each BGO crystal bar has been calibrated, and a correction method is also presented in this paper.

  12. Performances of large BGO crystals below 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the performances of large tapered BGO crystals to low energy photons of 6 to 20 MeV. The read-out of the crystals was made with large area photodiodes associated to shaping amplifiers

  13. Computer modelling of radiation generated defects in BGO scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a computer modelling study of bismuth germanate, Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO), a material of current interest in applications as a scintillator for photon and electron detection. A potential is derived by fitting to the structure of the material, and this potential is then used to calculate formation energies of basic defects in BGO. This information is then used to draw conclusions about the defect properties of the material

  14. A compact Ge-BGO coincidence array for ultra-sensitive in-beam gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-weak resonances in nuclear reactions impose a challenge on experimentalists. The present work describes the setup used in the first direct measurement of extremely weak low energy resonances of the 18O(α, γ)22Ne reaction. A Clover HPGe detector in coincidence with specified energy windows in BGO counters covering a large solid angle, and combined with large plastic veto counters led to a significantly improved sensitivity, thus allowing for the clear identification of specific γ-transitions. Different modes of operation have been tested for optimizing the final experimental setup

  15. Performance of a dual readout calorimeter with a BGO electromagnetic section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dual readout technique has been tested on a hybrid calorimeter. The electromagnetic section of this instrument consists of 100 BGO crystals and the hadronic section is made out scintillating and Cherenkov fibers embedded in a copper matrix (DREAM). The electromagnetic fraction of hadronic showers is evaluated on an event-by-event basis from the relative amounts of Cherenkov and scintillation lights produced in the shower development. The performance of such a calorimeter in terms of energy resolution is presented. Effects of side leakage on detector performance are also studied.

  16. Imaging properties of a positron tomograph with 280 BGO crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic imaging properties of the Donner 280-BGO-Crystal positron tomograph were measured and compared with the same system when it was equipped with 280 NaI(T1) crystals. The NaI(T1) crystals were 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep, sealed in 10 mm wide stainless steel cans. The BGO crystals are 9.5 mm x 32 mm x 32 mm deep and as they are not hygroscopic do not require sealed cans. With a shielding gap of 3 cm (section thickness 1.7 cm FWHM) the sensitivity of the BGO system is 55,000 events per sec for 1 μCi per cm3 in a 20 cm cylinder of water, which is 2.3 times higher than the NaI(T1) system. For a 200 μCi/cm line source on the ring axis in a 20 cm diameter water cylinder, the BGO system records 86% of the scatter fraction and 66% of the accidental fraction of the NaI(T1) system. The lower light yield and poorer time resolution of BGO requires a wider coincidence timing window than NaI(T1). However, the ability to use full-energy pulse height selection with a 2.3-fold improvement in sensitivity results in an overall reduction in the fraction of accidental events recorded. The in-plane resolution of the BGO system is 9 to 10 mm FWHM within the central 30 cm diameter field, and the radial elongation at the edge of the field in the NaI(T1) system has been nearly eliminated

  17. Imaging properties of a positron tomograph with 280 BGO crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Vuletich, T.

    1980-11-01

    The basic imaging properties of the Donner 280-BGO-Crystal positron tomograph were measured and compared with the same system when it was equipped with 280 NaI(T1) crystals. The NaI(T1) crystals were 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep, sealed in 10 mm wide stainless steel cans. The BGO crystals are 9.5 mm x 32 mm x 32 mm deep and as they are not hygroscopic do not require sealed cans. With a shielding gap of 3 cm (section thickness 1.7 cm FWHM) the sensitivity of the BGO system is 55,000 events per sec for 1 ..mu..Ci per cm/sup 3/ in a 20 cm cylinder of water, which is 2.3 times higher than the NaI(T1) system. For a 200 ..mu..Ci/cm line source on the ring axis in a 20 cm diameter water cylinder, the BGO system records 86% of the scatter fraction and 66% of the accidental fraction of the NaI(T1) system. The lower light yield and poorer time resolution of BGO requires a wider coincidence timing window than NaI(T1). However, the ability to use full-energy pulse height selection with a 2.3-fold improvement in sensitivity results in an overall reduction in the fraction of accidental events recorded. The in-plane resolution of the BGO system is 9 to 10 mm FWHM within the central 30 cm diameter field, and the radial elongation at the edge of the field in the NaI(T1) system has been nearly eliminated.

  18. Temperature dependence calibration and correction of the DAMPE BGO electromagnetic calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, C.; Li, Z. Y.; Feng, C. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Huang, G. S.; Liu, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    A BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is built for the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) mission. The temperature effect on the BGO ECAL was investigated with a thermal vacuum experiment. The light output of a BGO crystal depends on temperature significantly, and the readout system is also affected by temperature. The temperature coefficient of each BGO detection unit has been calibrated, and a correction method is also presented in this paper.

  19. Single event effect hardness for the front-end ASICs in the DAMPE satellite BGO calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan-Shan, Gao; Di, Jiang; Chang-Qing, Feng; Kai, Xi; Shu-Bin, Liu; Qi, An

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a Chinese scientific satellite designed for cosmic ray studies with a primary scientific goal of indirect detection of dark matter particles. As a crucial sub-detector, the BGO calorimeter measures the energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In order to implement high-density front-end electronics (FEE) with the ability to measure 1848 signals from 616 photomultiplier tubes on the strictly constrained satellite platform, two kinds of 32-channel front-end ASICs, VA160 and VATA160, are customized. However, a space mission period of more than 3 years makes single event effects (SEEs) become threats to reliability. In order to evaluate SEE sensitivities of these chips and verify the effectiveness of mitigation methods, a series of laser-induced and heavy ion-induced SEE tests were performed. Benefiting from the single event latch-up (SEL) protection circuit for power supply, the triple module redundancy (TMR) technology for the configuration registers and the optimized sequential design for the data acquisition process, 52 VA160 chips and 32 VATA160 chips have been applied in the flight model of the BGO calorimeter with radiation hardness assurance. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WK2030040048)

  20. Study on FPGA SEU Mitigation for Readout Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhongtao; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Jiang, Di; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The BGO calorimeter, which provides a wide measurement range of the primary cosmic ray spectrum, is a key sub-detector of Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). The readout electronics of calorimeter consists of 16 pieces of Actel ProASIC Plus FLASH-based FPGA, of which the design-level flip-flops and embedded block RAMs are single event upset (SEU) sensitive in the harsh space environment. Therefore to comply with radiation hardness assurance (RHA), SEU mitigation methods, including partial triple modular redundancy (TMR), CRC checksum, and multi-domain reset are analyzed and tested by the heavy-ion beam test. Composed of multi-level redundancy, a FPGA design with the characteristics of SEU tolerance and low resource consumption is implemented for the readout electronics.

  1. Energy correction for the BGO calorimeter of DAMPE using an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wei, Yi-Feng; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Yun-Long; Wen, Si-Cheng; Wang, Xiao-Lian; Xu, Zi-Zong; Huang, Guang-Shun

    2016-08-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer is an orbital indirect dark matter search experiment which measures the spectra of photons, electrons and positrons originating from deep space. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), made of bismuth germinate (BGO), is one of the key sub-detectors of DAMPE, and is designed for energy measurement with a large dynamic range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In this paper, methods for energy correction are discussed, in order to reconstruct the primary energy of the incident electrons. Different methods are chosen for the appropriate energy ranges. The correction results of Geant4 simulation and beam test data (at CERN) are presented. Supported by the Chinese 973 Program (2010CB833002), the Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Science (XDA04040202-4) and 100 Talents Program of CAS

  2. Search for axioelectric effect of solar axions using BGO scintillating bolometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derbin, A.V.; Kayunov, A.S.; Muratova, V.N.; Semenov, D.A.; Unzhakov, E.V. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Gironi, L.; Biassoni, M.; Capelli, S.; Clemenza, M.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Pavan, M.; Sisti, M. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Nagorny, S.S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila, AQ (Italy); Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Drachnev, I.S. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Gran Sasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila, AQ (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    A search for axioelectric absorption of solar axions produced in the p + d → {sup 3}He + γ(5.5 MeV) reaction has been performed with a BGO detector placed in a low-background setup. A model-independent limit on the combination of axion.nucleon and axion.electron coupling constants has been obtained: vertical stroke g{sub Ae} x g{sup 3}{sub AN} vertical stroke < 1.9 x 10{sup -10} for 90 % confidence level. The constraint of the axion.electron coupling constant has been obtained for hadronic axion with masses of (0.1.1) MeV: vertical stroke g{sub Ae} vertical stroke ≤ (0.96. 8.2) x 10{sup -8}. (orig.)

  3. A study of energy correction for the electron beam data in the BGO ECAL of the DAMPE

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhiying; Wei, Yifeng; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Yunlong; Wen, Sicheng; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Huang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is an orbital experiment aiming at searching for dark matter indirectly by measuring the spectra of photons, electrons and positrons originating from deep space. The BGO electromagnetic calorimeter is one of the key sub-detectors of the DAMPE, which is designed for high energy measurement with a large dynamic range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In this paper, some methods for energy correction are discussed and tried, in order to reconstruct the primary energy of the incident electrons. Different methods are chosen for the appropriate energy ranges. The results of Geant4 simulation and beam test data (at CERN) are presented.

  4. First results from the commissioning of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA accelerator facility in Bonn combines the highly segmented BGO calorimeter with a particle tracking magnetic spectrometer at forward angles. An extensive physics program using an energy tagged Bremsstrahlung photon beam is planned. The commissioning phase of the experiment is recently complete, enhancements for the BGO-OD experiment are nevertheless in development. Recent results from the analysis of the commissioning data, which includes particle track reconstruction in the forward spectrometer and momentum reconstruction with the BGO calorimeter are presented.

  5. Study on Radiation Condition in DAMPE Orbit by Analyzing the Engineering Data of BGO Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Changqing; Liu, Shubin; Zhang, Yunlong; Ma, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objectives of the DAMPE mission are primary cosmic ray, gamma ray astronomy and dark matter particles, by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO calorimeter is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It utilizes 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) crystal logs with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log, to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. In order to achieve a large dynamic range, each PMT base incorporates a three dynode (2, 5, 8) pick off, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE (Front End Electronics) modules, was developed. Its main functions are based on the Flash-based FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chip and low power, 32-channel VA160 and VATA160 ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) for precisely measuring the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals as well. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) and the hit rates of each layer is real-timely recorded by counters and packed into the engineering data, which directly reflect the flux of particles which fly into or pass through the detectors. In order to mitigate the SEU (Single Event Upset) effect in radioactive space environment, certain protecting methods, such as TMR

  6. Onboard calibration circuit for the DAMPE BGO calorimeter front-end electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Liang; Feng, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Wang, Qi; Ma, Si-Yuan; Shen, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Di; Gao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yun-Long; Guo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-05-01

    DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which is mainly aimed at indirectly searching for dark matter in space. One critical sub-detector of the DAMPE payload is the BGO (bismuth germanium oxide) calorimeter, which contains 1848 PMT (photomultiplier tube) dynodes and 16 FEE (Front-End Electronics) boards. VA160 and VATA160, two 32-channel low power ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), are adopted as the key components on the FEEs to perform charge measurement for the PMT signals. In order to monitor the parameter drift which may be caused by temperature variation, aging, or other environmental factors, an onboard calibration circuit is designed for the VA160 and VATA160 ASICs. It is mainly composed of a 12-bit DAC (Digital to Analog Converter), an operational amplifier and an analog switch. Test results showed that a dynamic range of 0–30 pC with a precision of 5 fC (Root Meam Square, RMS) was achieved, which covers the VA160’s input range. It can be used to compensate for the temperature drift and test the trigger function of the FEEs. The calibration circuit has been implemented for the front-end electronics of the BGO Calorimeter and verified by all the environmental tests for both Qualification Model and Flight Model of DAMPE. The DAMPE satellite was launched at the end of 2015 and the calibration circuit will operate periodically in space. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4), and National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of China (2010CB833002) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11273070)

  7. Background reduction of a HPGe-BGO anti-Compton system and its application to soil contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate gamma spectrometry is widely performed by HPGe detectors. The limit of detection of gamma spectrometry system is determined by two main factors: the detector efficiency and its background. To obtain higher efficiencies, larger detectors have to be used, but their price become forbidding, thus it is common to try to reduce their background. For static laboratory systems optimal shielding can be used, but massive shielding is not practical for mobile systems intended to be operated outdoors, as for ground contamination survey. The main contribution to the background in an HPGe gamma spectrometer (except the background radiation) is due to the Compton scattering. When photons are Compton scattered in the detector, only a part of their energy is transmitted to the detector, and the pulse will not contribute to the main photo-peak, but will appear at a lower energy, as part of the background. A lower energy gamma peak will be superposed on this background, and its limit of detection will be higher. A practical way to solve the problem is to position an additional detector around the HPGe and operate it in anti-coincidence with the HPGe detector. Coincident pulses from both detectors, mostly from Compton-scattering, will not be counted, and the background will be reduced. This setup is called anti-Compton, and the characteristic of an anti-Compton system based on a HPGe detector, surrounded by a BGO scintillator, is presented in this work. Its application to ground monitoring is also presented

  8. Design of composite detectors for energetic γ ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiencies of clover and cluster composite detectors using NaI and BGO crystals as the media for detection of energetic γ ray are systematically simulated with Monte Carlo method. It is showed that the efficiency of the composite BGO detector is much higher than that of the composite NaI detector in the same geometry of detection media concerned. NaI crystal is not thought as a suitable medium of composite detectors for high energy γ ray duo to low efficiency, Doppler broadening and distortion to γ spectrum with comparison to BGO crystal. The composite BGO detectors have many advantages such as large photopeak efficiency, small Doppler effect and regular γ spectrum. As to the clover and cluster composite detectors made with the cylinders of BGO crystal in original size Φ76 x 127, the intrinsic photopeak efficiencies are over 40% and the enhanced factor of absolute efficiencies are as high as 2.4 and 2.7, respectively, for γ ray at 22 MeV. Furthermore, the enhanced factor of absolute efficiency increases fast with γ ray energy

  9. Response of BGO sectors to protons up to 170 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to monoenergetic protons of 24 cm long pyramidal BGO sectors, designed for a 4π spectrometer, was measured up to 173 MeV by scattering 200 MeV protons off a polyethylene target. The experimental results are compared with lower energy results and Monte Carlo calculations performed with a modified version of the GEANT code. (orig.)

  10. Properties of BGO thin films under the influence of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to know the behaviour of materials under the influence of radiation for the effective design of novel sensor systems. Optical properties of bismuth germinate (Bi4Ge3O12-BGO) thin films were investigated in terms of their perception to gamma radiation exposure. An Edwards E306A vacuum thermal coating system was used for thin films deposition. BGO films with a thickness of 200 nm were exposed to a disk-type 137Cs gamma radiation source with an activity of 370 kBq. Optical properties of the films were investigated using CARY IE UV-Visible Spectrophotometer. Calculated optical band gap for as-deposited BGO thin film was 1.95 eV. Gamma radiation induced changes in the optical properties of thin films, which could be explained by the variation in the degree of disorder. From the density-of-state model, it is known that optical band gap decreases with an increasing degree of disorder of the amorphous phase. Electrical properties of BGO thin films were recorded in real time using a low power capacitive interface system with a high resolution, which is based on Delta-sigma modulator. At doses from 0 to 1.5 mGy little if any changes in the capacitance were measured. This could be explained by co-existence of two processes, namely creation and annihilation of defects under the influence of radiation. After a threshold dose of 1.5 mGy creation of defects becomes more prevailing and the BGO film capacitance has gradually increased in value from 2.97 pF to 7.09 pF after irradiation with a 2.44 mGy dose

  11. Single Event Effect Hardness for the Front-end ASICs Applied in BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shan-Shan; Feng, Chang-Qing; Xi, Kai; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a Chinese scientific satellite designed for cosmic ray study with a primary scientific goal of indirect search of dark matter particles. As a crucial sub-detector, BGO calorimeter measures the energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In order to implement high-density front-end electronics (FEE) with the ability to measure 1848 signals from 616 photomultiplier tubes on the strictly constrained satellite platform, two kinds of 32-channel front-end ASICs, VA160 and VATA160, are customized. However, a space mission period of more than 3 years makes single event effect (SEE) a probable threat to reliability. In order to evaluate the SEE sensitivity of the chips and verify the effectiveness of mitigation methods, a series of laser-induced and heavy ion-induced SEE tests were performed. Benefiting from the single event latch-up (SEL) protection circuit for power supply, the triple module redundancy (TMR) technology for the configuration regist...

  12. Forward production of J//psi/ in hadronic interactions and calibration of a large BGO electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this thesis, we describe an analysis of J//psi/ produced in the forward direction in the reaction πN → μ+μ/sup /minus//X. The data for this analysis were collected by Fermilab experiment E615. We measured the cross section for J//psi/ production and the angular distribution of muons from J//psi/ decay. We found evidence for longitudinal polarization of J//psi/ produced in the kinematic limit where the J//psi/ carries a large fraction of the incident pion's longitudinal momentum. This is the first experimental observation of longitudinal polarization of J//psi/ produced in hadronic interactions. In the second part of this thesis, we describe the construction and calibration of a large Bismuth Germanante (BGO) electromagnetic calorimeter designed to study e+e/sup /minus// collisions at center-of-mass energies near the Z0 mass. The calorimeter is a subdetector of the L3 detector and will be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) of the European Organization for Nuclear Research. We present the results of a calibration of the calorimeter in an electron test beam at electron energies of 2, 10, and 50 GeV. We show that the accuracy of the calibration is 0.8% at 2 GeV, improving to better than 0.5% at 10 GeV and above. 65 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs

  13. Phase I of a BGO sum-energy/multiplicity spectrometer and multi-Compton-suppression spectrometer system. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the performance testing and design of BGO hexagonal modules, the use of photosensitive diodes as a substitute for PMT's, and design and testing of a Ge Comptons suppressed spectrometer is summarized

  14. Measurements of photon mass attenuation coefficients for Ge and BGO crystals at 10 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photon mass attenuation coefficients of the important materials for γ-ray detection, Ge and BGO (Bi4Ge3O12) crystals, have been measured for 10.0 MeV γ-rays. The measurement system using the laser-Compton backscattering γ-rays and the high-resolution high-energy photon spectrometer has been developed and utilized. The effectiveness of the system achieving the total systematic uncertainties of 0.5% for the measurements of the photon mass attenuation coefficients was demonstrated. It was shown that the measured photon mass attenuation coefficients, 318.1±1.7 [cm2/g] for the Ge crystal and 425.2±2.4 [cm2/g] for the BGO crystal, agree within the achieved experimental uncertainties with the evaluated values including atomic and nuclear processes at 10.0 MeV. (author)

  15. Testing and assessment of large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; Rigollet, C.; Maleka, P.P.; Jones, D.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/N

  16. Design of a high dynamic range photomultiplier base board for the BGO ECAL of DAMPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A base board for photomultiplier tube (PMT) with multi-dynode readout has been developed for the BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). In order to cover a high dynamic range of energy measurements, the signals are read out from different sensitive dynodes 2, 5, and 8 (Dy2, Dy5 and Dy8). The performance of this new type of base board is studied with a light-emitting diode (LED) system and cosmic rays. A wide measuring range from 0.5 to 1.0×105 MIPs can be achieved using the VA32 readout Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC)

  17. Detector for the positron-emission tomographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The γ-detector has been tested with two HPM-30/II and a series of heavy crystals (BGO, GSO and CeF3). The results of tests are presented. The best spatial resolution of 2.3 mm and 3 mm has been obtained with GSO and CeF3 crystals, respectively. Possibilities of using the drift time measurement technique for the location of γquanta conversions are considered. 13 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Onboard Calibration Circuit for the Front-end Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, De-Liang; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Wang, Qi; Ma, Si-Yuan; Gao, Shan-Shan; Shen, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Di; Guo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    An onboard calibration circuit has been designed for the front-end electronics (FEE) of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter. It is mainly composed of a 12 bit DAC, an operation amplifier and an analog switch. Test results showed that a dynamic range of 0 ~ 30 pC with a precision of 5 fC was achieved, which meets the requirements of the front-end electronics. Furthermore, it is used to test the trigger function of the FEEs. The calibration circuit has been implemented and verified by all the environmental tests for both Qualification Model and Flight Model of DAMPE. The DAMPE satellite will be launched at the end of 2015 and the calibration circuit will perform onboard calibration in space.

  19. Possible use of a BGO array for neutron stimulated emission computed tomography by summing adjacent signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is a new approach for biological spectroscopy and imaging. Since the gamma-ray photons emitted from stimulated element have energies from 100 keV to about 6 MeV, previous reports have proposed that the projection path can be defined by the neutron beam. In this paper, another possible method has been applied and the performance presented through simulations. When using signals from a single BGO crystal it is impossible to achieve good energy resolution for such high-energy photons. When summing additional signals from adjacent crystals, the energy spectrum becomes much better. Using an energy window with energy resolution of 90 keV, an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 3.938 mm FWHM is obtained

  20. SU-C-201-01: Investigation of the Effects of Scintillator Surface Treatment On Light Output Measurements with SiPM Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, Y; Prout, D; Chatziioannou, A [University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of different scintillator surface treatments (BGO crystals) on the fraction of scintillation photons that exit the crystal and reach the photodetector (SiPM). Methods: Positron Emission Tomography is based on the detection of light that exits scintillator crystals, after annihilation photons deposit energy inside these crystals. A considerable fraction of the scintillation light gets trapped or absorbed after going through multiple internal reflections on the interfaces surrounding the crystals. BGO scintillator crystals generate considerably less scintillation light than crystals made of LSO and its variants. Therefore, it is crucial that the small amount of light produced by BGO exits towards the light detector. The surface treatment of scintillator crystals is among the factors affecting the ability of scintillation light to reach the detectors. In this study, we analyze the effect of different crystal surface treatments on the fraction of scintillation light that is detected by the solid state photodetector (SiPM), once energy is deposited inside a BGO crystal. Simulations were performed by a Monte Carlo based software named GATE, and validated by measurements from individual BGO crystals coupled to Philips digital-SiPM sensor (DPC-3200). Results: The results showed an increment in light collection of about 4 percent when only the exit face of the BGO crystal, is unpolished; compared to when all the faces are polished. However, leaving several faces unpolished caused a reduction of at least 10 percent of light output when the interaction occurs as far from the exit face of the crystal as possible compared to when it occurs very close to the exit face. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the advantages on light collection from leaving unpolished the exit face of BGO crystals. The configuration with best light output will be used to obtain flood images from BGO crystal arrays coupled to SiPM sensors.

  1. Effect of refraction index and thickness of the light guide in the position-sensitive gamma-ray detector using compact PS-PMTs

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, K; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Nagai, Y; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S

    2000-01-01

    We constructed a position-sensitive gamma-ray detector consisting of an array of BGO scintillators, a light guide and compact PS-PMTs. The effects of refractive index and thickness of the light guide of a glass plate on the detector performance were investigated. A light guide with higher refractive index and smaller thickness is found better for a good spatial resolution.

  2. MCNP modelling of scintillation-detector gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Maucec, M; de Meijer, RJ

    2002-01-01

    gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides are simulated for a BGO detector in a borehole geometry using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All gamma-ray emissions of the decay of K-40 and the series of Th-232 and U-238 are used to describe the source. A procedure is proposed which excludes the time-consumi

  3. Range-energy relation, range straggling and response function of CsI(Tl), BGO and GSO(Ce) scintillators for light ions

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeichikov, V; Jakobsson, B; Rodin, A M; Ter-Akopian, G M

    2000-01-01

    Range-energy relations and range straggling of sup 1 sup , sup 2 sup , sup 3 H and sup 4 sup , sup 6 He isotopes with the energy approx 50A MeV are measured for the CsI(Tl), BGO and GSO(Ce) scintillators with an accuracy better than 0.2% and 5%, respectively. The Si-Sci/PD telescope was exposed to secondary beams from the mass separator ACCULINNA. The experimental technique is based on the registration of the 'jump' in the amplitude of the photodiode signal for ions passing through the scintillation crystal. Light response of the scintillators for ions 1<=Z<=4 is measured in energy range (5-50)A MeV, the results are in good agreement with calculations based on Birks model. The energy loss straggling for particles with DELTA E/E=0.01-0.50 and mass up to A=10 in 286 mu m DELTA E silicon detector is studied and compared with theoretical prescriptions. The results allow a precise absolute calibration of the scintillation crystal and to optimize the particle identification by the DELTA E-E(Sci/PD) method.

  4. Gamma-ray detectors for intelligent, hand-held radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small radiation detectors based on HgI2, bismuth germanate (BGO), plastic, or NaI(Tl) detector materials were evaluated for use in small, lighweight radiation monitors. The two denser materials, HgI2 and BGO, had poor resolution at low-energy and thus performed less well than NaI(Tl) in detecting low-energy gamma rays from bare, enriched uranium. The plastic scintillator, a Compton recoil detector, also performed less well at low gamma-ray energy. Two small NaI(Tl) detectors were suitable for detecting bare uranium and sheilded plutonium. One became part of a new lightweight hand-held monitor and the other found uses as a pole-mounted detector for monitoring hard-to-reach locations

  5. The effect of radiation damage on optical and scintillation properties of BGO crystals grown by the LTG Cz technique

    CERN Document Server

    Gusev, V A; Kupriyanov, I N; Kuznecov, G N; Shlegel, V N; Antsygin, V D; Vasiliev, Y V

    2002-01-01

    BGO crystals grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique (LTG Cz) exhibit two distinct types of behavior upon radiation damage and recovery. The crystals termed as of L-type remain colorless after gamma-radiation doses as high as 10 Mrad. As the irradiation dose increases the scintillation light output shows a weak monotonous degradation to 15-25%, saturating at around several hundreds krad doses. The crystals termed as of N-type attain yellow coloration after irradiation. The light output drops abruptly for 35-50% as early as after 1 krad and does not change further on. The present work is devoted to the study of radiation damage effects, self-recovery, optically stimulated recovery and thermo-stimulated current in the L- and N-type BGO crystals produced by LTG Cz.

  6. Calorimetry of the CMD-3 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, V. E.; Akhmetshin, R. R.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    CMD-3 is a general purpose detector designed to study e+e- annihilation into hadrons. It is mounted at VEPP-2000 collider which operates in the wide energy range, E c . m . s = 0.32 - 2 GeV. The calorimetry at the detector is based on three subsystems: closest to the beam pipe barrel Liquid Xenon calorimeter, outer barrel calorimeter based on CsI scintillation crystals and the endcap calorimeter made of BGO scintillation crystals. We describe the structure of the calorimeters, their electronics and the energy calibration procedures.

  7. Geometry dependence of the light collection efficiency of BGO crystal scintillators read out by avalanche photo diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light collection efficiency from BGO crystal scintillators of various sizes and shapes was measured by reading them using 1×1 cm2 avalanche photo diodes. When the crystals have simple geometry, the light collection efficiency was found to depend on their size, shape and the read-out position through a rather well-defined empirical scaling relation. The light collection efficiency of tapered crystals was seen to depend on both the position of γ-ray irradiation, and the read-out position of the avalanche photo diodes. Using optical Monte-Carlo simulations, the relation was reproduced assuming plausible proper parameters for surface conditions and the attenuation length. This results were reproduced with a reasonable accuracy by optical Monte-Carlo simulations. Simple physical explanations are given to these geometrical effects. -- Highlights: • We studied light output of different shapes and size BGO crystals with an APD. • With a Monte-Carlo simulation, we successfully reproduced measured light outputs of BGO. • We derived a scaling law of a rectangle crystal volume and surface area APD attached. • We measured a dependence of the light output on a position with non-rectangle crystal

  8. GEANT4 Simulation of Neutron Detector for DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M.; Ma, T.; Chang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zang, J. J.; Wu, J.; Dong, T. K.

    2016-01-01

    During recent tens of years dark matter has gradually become a hot topic in astronomical research field, and related theory researches and experiment projects change with each passing day. The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) of our country is proposed under this background. As the probing object involves high energy electrons, appropriate methods must be taken to distinguish them from protons in order to reduce the event probability of other charged particles (e.g. a proton) being mistaken as electrons. The experiments show that, the hadronic shower of high energy proton in BGO electromagnetic calorimeter, which is usually accompanied by the emitting of large number of secondary neutrons, is significantly different from the electromagnetic shower of high energy electron. Through the detection of secondary neutron signal emitting from the bottom of BGO electromagnetic calorimeter and the shower shape of incident particles in BGO electromagnetic calorimeter, we can effectively distinguish whether the incident particles are high energy protons or electrons. This paper introduces the structure and detecting principle of DAMPE neutron detector. We use Monte-Carlo method with GEANT4 software to simulate the signal emitting from protons and electrons at characteristic energy in the neutron detector, and finally summarize the neutron detector's ability to distinguish protons and electrons under different electron acception efficiencies.

  9. Monte-Carlo optimisation of a Compton suppression system for use with a broad-energy HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, R., E-mail: r.britton@surrey.ac.uk [University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Burnett, J.L.; Davies, A.V. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Regan, P.H. [University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-21

    Monte-Carlo simulations are used to evaluate and optimise multiple components of a Compton Suppression System based upon a Broad-energy HPGe primary detector. Several materials for the secondary crystal are evaluated, including NaI(Tl), BGO and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce). BGO was found to be the most effective across the required energy range, with the sizes of the proposed veto detector then optimised to extract the maximum performance for a given volume of material. Suppression factors are calculated for a range of nuclides (both single and cascade emitters) with improvements of 2 for the Compton Suppression Factors, and 10 for the continuum reduction when compared to the Compton suppression system currently in use. This equates to a reduction in the continuum by up to a factor of ∼240 for radionuclides such as {sup 60}Co, which is crucial for the detection of low-energy, low-activity γ emitters typically swamped by such a continuum. -- Highlights: •Monte Carlo simulations utilised to design and optimise a Compton Suppression system. •NaI(Tl), LaBr(Ce), and BGO materials are evaluated for their effectiveness as veto. •Photon tracking routine is developed to identify where photons typically scatter. •A 3 component BGO based veto is optimised for use with a planar HPGe detector. •Continuum of Co-60 reduced by <240 times, a 10 fold improvement on existing design.

  10. Studying the relationship of working condition of neutron generator and selection of detector specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of main elements were determined by prompt γ neutron activation analysis with neutron generator, when the analyzing samples, the multi-channel analyzer and the testing time are all under the same condition, compare the measurement between the BGO detectors with different specifications, the resolution and detective efficiency are different due to the different specifications detectors. In the ordinary conditions, the smaller the size has the higher resolution and the lower detective efficiency, on the contrary, the bigger one has the higher detective efficiency and the lower resolution. And use the higher resolution, need the less neutron flux. So the higher resolution BGO detector could prolong service life of neutron generator. (authors)

  11. Systematics in the light response of BGO, CsI(Tl) and GSO(Ce) scintillators to charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeichikov, V; Nikitin, V A; Nomokonov, V P; Wegner, A

    2002-01-01

    The light response of a BGO crystal has been measured for particles Z=1-8, A=1-16 in the energy range approx 2-60 A MeV. The reaction products are identified by a DELTA E(Si)-E(Sci/PD) telescope. The position of the jump in the value of the signal from the PD at the punch-through points is used to calibrate both the DELTA E(Si) and E(Sci/PD) scales in MeV. The dependence of the light output on the energy E, ion atomic number Z and mass A is parameterized by the power law relation, L(Z,A,E)=a sub 1 (Z,A)E sup a sup sub 2 sup ( sup Z sup , sup A sup ). The parameters a sub 1 and a sub 2 have a smooth dependence on Z for all three crystals. The mass dependence of a sub 1 ,a sub 2 is deduced as a simple analytical expression. The systematics of these parameters is presented for BGO, CsI(Tl) and GSO(Ce) scintillators as a function of Z,A. Calculations of the response function, based on the Murray-Mayer model provide an excellent description of the shape of L(Z,A,E) versus E dependence, but show some deviations in ...

  12. Design of New Complex Detector Used for Gross Beta Measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of gross β for radioactive aerosol in the containment of nuclear plants can indicate how serious the radioactive pollution is in the shell, and it can provide evidence which shows whether there is the phenomenon of leak in the boundaries of confined aquifer of the primary coolant circuit equipment.In the process of measuring, the counting of gross β is influenced by γ. In order to avoid the influence of γ, a new method was introduced and a new detector was designed using plastic scintillator as the major detecting component and BGO as the sub-component. Based on distinctive difference of light attenuation time, signal induced in them can be discriminated. γ background in plastic scintillator was subtracted according to the counting of γ in BGO. The functions of absolute detection efficiency were obtained. The simulation for Monte-Carlo method shows that the influence of γ background is decreased about one order of magnitude. (authors)

  13. Optimization of scintillation-detector timing systems using Monte Carlo analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo analysis is used to model statistical noise associated with scintillation-detector photoelectron emissions and photomultiplier tube operation. Additionally, the impulse response of a photomultiplier tube, front-end amplifier, and constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) is modeled so the effects of front-end bandwidth and constant-fraction delay and fraction can be evaluated for timing-system optimizations. Such timing-system analysis is useful for detectors having low photo-electron-emission rates, including Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems. Monte Carlo timing resolution for a BGO / photomultiplier scintillation detector, CFD timing system is presented as a function of constant-fraction delay for 511-keV coincident gamma rays in the presence of Compton scatter. Monte Carlo results are in good agreement with measured results when a tri-exponential BGO scintillation model is used. Monte Carlo simulation is extended to include CFD energy-discrimination performance. Monte Carlo energy-discrimination performance is experimentally verified along with timing performance (Monte Carlo timing resolution of 3.22 ns FWHM versus measured resolution of 3.30 ns FWHM) for a front-end rise time of 10 ns (10--90%), CFD delay of 8 ns, and CFD fraction of 20%

  14. Choice of detectors for in vivo elemental analysis by counting natural and neutron-induced gamma rays for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Body fat is measured by detecting C and O in vivo through fast neutron inelastic scattering. A sealed D-T neutron generator is used for the pulsed (4-10 kHz) production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen are detected by counting the 4.44 and 6.13 MeV gamma rays resulting from the inelastic scattering of the fast neutrons from 12C and 16O. Large Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystal detectors (127x76 mm) are used for the gamma ray detection during the 10 μs neutron burst. BGO detectors improved the signal to background ratio for the carbon detection by a factor of six compared to 152x152 mm NaI (Tl) detectors. Exposure to scattered neutrons did not affect the gain stability of the BGOs. Thermal neutrons from a moderated 238Pu-Be source are used for the measurement of total body nitrogen (and thus protein). The resulting high energy prompt gamma rays from nitrogen (10.83 MeV) are detected simultaneously with the irradiation. BGO detectors have superior stability operating in an environment of variable neutron exposure and high counting rates. However, the presence of neutrons creates a 10.2 MeV gamma ray peak from 73Ge in the BGO detector which interferes with the nitrogen peak. Whole body gamma ray counters, consisting of NaI(Tl) crystal detectors in a shielded room, are used to measure the natural radioactivity of the body due to 40K. They are also used to measure body Ca, P, Na and Cl, following total body exposure to thermal neutrons. ((orig.))

  15. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm3, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm3, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization

  16. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  17. Performance evaluation of continuous blood sampling system for PET study. Comparison of three detector-systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Shinoda, Masaki; Sakamoto, Setsu; Senda, Michio [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Kobe City Coll. of Technology (Japan); Tarutani, Kazumasa; Minato, Kotaro [Nara Inst. of Science and Technology, Ikoma (Japan). Graduate School of Information Science

    2002-11-01

    To measure cerebral blood flow with {sup 15}O PET, it is necessary to measure the time course of arterial blood radioactivity. We examined the performance of three different types of continuous blood sampling system. Three kinds of continuous blood sampling system were used: a plastic scintillator-based beta detector (conventional beta detector (BETA)), a bismuth germinate (BGO)-based coincidence gamma detector (Pico-count flow-through detector (COINC)) and a Phoswich detector (PD) composed by a combination of plastic scintillator and BGO scintillator. Performance of these systems was evaluated for absolute sensitivity, count rate characteristic, sensitivity to background gamnra photons, and reproducibility for nylon tube geometry. The absolute sensitivity of the PD was 0.21 cps/Bq for {sup 68}Ga positrons at the center of the detector. This was approximately three times higher than BETA, two times higher than COINC. The value measured with BETA was stable, even when background radioactivity was increased. The count rate characteristic of the PD and COINC was linear up to 8 kcps. The reproducibility of sensitivity for nylon tube geometry of COINC was the smallest (coefficient of variation (C.V.)=1.00%) among the three. PD was the weights the least (3.5 kg) among the three, which is convenient for clinical use. Each detector has unique characteristics derived from its own structure. Although the performance of all three detectors meets clinical requirement, PD had the highest physical performance. (author)

  18. Monte-Carlo optimisation of a Compton suppression system for use with a broad-energy HPGe detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, R.; Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.; Regan, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    Monte-Carlo simulations are used to evaluate and optimise multiple components of a Compton Suppression System based upon a Broad-energy HPGe primary detector. Several materials for the secondary crystal are evaluated, including NaI(Tl), BGO and LaBr3(Ce). BGO was found to be the most effective across the required energy range, with the sizes of the proposed veto detector then optimised to extract the maximum performance for a given volume of material. Suppression factors are calculated for a range of nuclides (both single and cascade emitters) with improvements of 2 for the Compton Suppression Factors, and 10 for the continuum reduction when compared to the Compton suppression system currently in use. This equates to a reduction in the continuum by up to a factor of ~240 for radionuclides such as 60Co, which is crucial for the detection of low-energy, low-activity γ emitters typically swamped by such a continuum.

  19. Development of high performance Avalanche Photodiodes and dedicated analog systems for HXI/SGD detectors onboard the Astro-H mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard X-ray Imager and Soft Gamma-ray Detector are being developed as onboard instruments for the Astro-H mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2014. In both detectors, BGO scintillators play key roles in achieving high sensitivity in low Earth orbit (LEO), by generating active veto signals to reject cosmic-ray events and gamma-ray backgrounds from radio-activated detector materials. In order to maximize background rejection power, it is also important to minimize the energy threshold of this shield. As a readout sensor of weak scintillation light from a number of BGO crystals in a complicated detector system, high performance, reverse-type Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs), with an effective area of 10×10mm2 are being employed, instead of bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs).Another advantage of using APDs is their low power consumption, although the relatively low gain of APDs (compared to conventional PMTs) requires dedicated analog circuits for noise suppression. In this paper, we report on the development and performance of APD detectors specifically designed for the Astro-H mission. In addition to APD performance, various environmental tests, including radiation hardness and qualification thermal cycling, will be described in detail. Moreover, a dedicated charge sensitive amplifier and analog filters are newly developed and tested here to optimize the performance of APDs to activate fast veto signals within a few μs from the BGO trigger. We will also report on overall performance testing of a prototype BGO detector system that mimics the data acquisition system onboard Astro-H.

  20. A comparison of PET detector modules employing rectangular and round photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have compared the high resolution BGO detector blocks from the EXACT HR PET system which use two dual-cathode rectangular photomultiplier (PM) tubes with a new block design, the EXACT HR PLUS, which uses four round PM tubes. Despite the lower coupling area between photocathode and scintillator, the HR PLUS block compares favorably with the HR block. The energy resolution averages 20% for the HR PLUS block and 23% for the HR block, with efficiency variations of 17% in both blocks. Additional measurements were carried out on the HR PLUS block to characterize depth of interaction effects and cross-talk between elements. Coincidence line spread function measurements had a FWHM of 3.0 mm in the axial direction and 2.9 mm in the transaxial direction. In light of these results, limitations of the BGO block design are discussed and some solutions proposed

  1. A study on the technique of a new type of neutron detector prototype with a high detection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on that the neutron detectors used now have some disadvantages such as low detection efficiency, long response time, etc, studied the new development of neutron detection a new type of neutron detector prototype using plastic scintillator BC454 and inorganic scintillator BGO as the detection medium was proposed. Simulation of its detection efficiency and other parameters was done using Monte Carlo general code MCNP (Version 4B). This new kind of portable neutron detector with high detection efficiency and sensitivity is strongly needed. (authors)

  2. A DOI Detector With Crystal Scatter Identification Capability for High Sensitivity and High Spatial Resolution PET Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Z; Prout, D. L.; Silverman, R W; Herman, H; Dooraghi, A.; Chatziioannou, A F

    2015-01-01

    A new phoswich detector is being developed at the Crump Institute, aiming to provide improvements in sensitivity, and spatial resolution for PET. The detector configuration is comprised of two layers of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays, a glass light guide and a light detector. The annihilation photon entrance (top) layer is a 48 × 48 array of 1.01 × 1.01 × 7 mm3 LYSO crystals. The bottom layer is a 32 × 32 array of 1.55 × 1.55 × 9 mm3 BGO crystals. A tapered, multiple-element glass ligh...

  3. Performance evaluation of continuous blood sampling system for PET study. Comparison of three detector-systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, K; Sakamoto, S; Senda, M; Yamamoto, S; Tarutani, K; Minato, K

    2002-01-01

    To measure cerebral blood flow with sup 1 sup 5 O PET, it is necessary to measure the time course of arterial blood radioactivity. We examined the performance of three different types of continuous blood sampling system. Three kinds of continuous blood sampling system were used: a plastic scintillator-based beta detector (conventional beta detector (BETA)), a bismuth germinate (BGO)-based coincidence gamma detector (Pico-count flow-through detector (COINC)) and a Phoswich detector (PD) composed by a combination of plastic scintillator and BGO scintillator. Performance of these systems was evaluated for absolute sensitivity, count rate characteristic, sensitivity to background gamnra photons, and reproducibility for nylon tube geometry. The absolute sensitivity of the PD was 0.21 cps/Bq for sup 6 sup 8 Ga positrons at the center of the detector. This was approximately three times higher than BETA, two times higher than COINC. The value measured with BETA was stable, even when background radioactivity was incre...

  4. PoGOLino: a scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of $65^\\circ$), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  5. PoGOLino: A scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Merlin, E-mail: merlin@particle.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Chauvin, Maxime [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Fukazawa, Yasushi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito [Tokuyama Corporation, Shunan, Yamaguchi (Japan); Jackson, Miranda [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kamae, Tune [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Noriaki [Tokuyama Corporation, Shunan, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawano, Takafumi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kiss, Mózsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Takahashi, Hiromitsu [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-01-11

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of 65°), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  6. A depth-encoded PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on radial blurring in high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) can be reduced by measuring the PET photon's depth of interaction within a detector crystal. Simulations show that dividing the crystal into two equi-probable regions of interaction almost eliminates this blurring. This has been done using a black band placed around a 3 cm BGO crystal, 1 cm from the front. A PMT collects light from the rear of the crystal for energy and timing measurement. Another PMT collects light through a light guide from the top-front of the crystal to find the depth of interaction. Gamma rays interacting in the front of the crystal produce a strong, signal in the depth-sending PMT, while interactions behind the band produced (<10%) signal. The intensity of the light recorded by the energy PMT is almost constant (within ±3%) for interactions at any depth in the crystal

  7. Design studies for a PET detector module using a PIN photodiode to measure depth of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present design studies of a multi-layer PET detector module that uses an 8x8 array of 3 mm square PIN photodiodes to both identify the crystal of interaction and measure the depth of interaction. Each photodiodes coupled to one end of a 3x3x30 mm BGO crystal, with the opposite ends of 64 such crystals attached to a single 1 inch square photomultiplier tube that provides a timing signal and energy discrimination. Each BGO crystal is coated with a lossy reflector, so the ratio of light detected in the photodiode and photomultiplier tube depends on the interaction depth in the crystal, and is used to determine this depth of interaction on an event by event basis. A test module with one 3x3x30 mm BGO crystal, one 3 mm square PIN photodiode, and one photomultiplier tube is operated at -20 C with an amplifier peaking time of 4 μs, and a depth of interaction resolution of 5 to 8 mm fwhm measured. Simulations predict that this virtually eliminates radial elongation in a 60 cm diameter BGO tomograph. The photodiode signal corresponding to 511 keV energy deposit varies linearly with excitation position, ranging from 1,250 electrons (e-) at the end closest to the photodiode to 520 e- at the opposite end. The electronic noise is a position independent 330 e- fwhm, so the signal to noise ratio is sufficient to reliably identify the crystal of interaction in a 64 element module

  8. A position-sensitive scintillation detector for two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation using metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed and tested a prototype of a new position sensitive γ-ray detector which consists of an array of 2.6x2.6x18 mm3 BGO scintillator blocks, a light guide, and four metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (R5900-00-C8) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. Scalability of the detector of this type makes it possible to construct a larger detector using many PS-PMTs, which will be useful for the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus

  9. A position-sensitive scintillation detector for two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation using metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, K; Saito, H; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a prototype of a new position sensitive gamma-ray detector which consists of an array of 2.6x2.6x18 mm sup 3 BGO scintillator blocks, a light guide, and four metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (R5900-00-C8) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. Scalability of the detector of this type makes it possible to construct a larger detector using many PS-PMTs, which will be useful for the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus.

  10. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Min, E-mail: ramilab2011@gmail.com; Joo, Koan Sik

    2015-05-01

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for {sup 22}Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications.

  11. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications

  12. Design of a Silicon Photomultiplier Based Compact Radiation Detector for Homeland Security Screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and improvement of reliability of the detector with purpose of developing of radiation protection technology and military application. The radiation detector which was used previously had some limitations due to the bulky size, limited range and the environment of radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector under this study which has adopted the silicon photomultiplier seems to be suitable for the application because of its physical excellence which are characterized by its small size, high sensitivity and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based Scintillation detector has been made as a part of basic study of military radiation detector development. The detector has been tested for obtaining the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variation of parameter values and the efficiency of detection in accordance with the factor of measurement environment of radiation. The two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with the LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillator were made and the detectors were analyzed with the variation of operating characteristics as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field that are depend on environmental changes of radiation measurement. The results of three scintillators for a photon count rate and spectra were compared with each other. It was found that there are variations of radiation detection which are characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. Also, It was found that there were the 11.9 % for the LYSO, 15.5 % for BGO and 13.5 % for CsI:Tl energy resolution using array SiPM, and 18 % for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM, respectively when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. The results demonstrate the potential of SiPM based compact radiation detector to be used widely for Homeland Security applications. (authors)

  13. Formation of slab waveguides in eulytine type BGO and CaF2 crystals by implantation of MeV nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation, compared with other waveguide fabrication methods, has some unique advantages. It has proved to be a universal technique for producing waveguides in most optical materials. The authors of the present article reported fabrication of channel and slab waveguides in an Erbium-doped tungsten tellurite glass by implantation of MeV energy N+ ions. The present article reports successful adaptation of the same technique to the fabrication of slab waveguides in eulytine type bismuth germanate (BGO) and CaF2 crystals. This is the first report on successful waveguide fabrication in these materials using 3.5 MeV N+ ions at implanted fluences between 5 × 1015 and 4 × 1016 ions/cm2. Spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements revealed the existence of guiding structures in both materials. M-line spectroscopic measurements indicated guiding effect in the as-implanted BGO up to 1550 nm and up to 980 nm in the as-implanted CaF2. Ion implantation induced the appearance of three peaks in the UV/Vis absorption spectrum of CaF2, that can be attributed to colour centres.

  14. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, I. C.; Engler, A.; Ferguson, T.; Filthaut, F.; Kraemer, R. W.; Merk, M.; Rippich, C.; Shi, X.; Shukla, J.; Sutton, R. B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Vogel, H.; You, J.; Lecoq, P.; Bobbink, G. J.; Buskens, J.; Cerjak, I.; Groenstege, H.; Koffeman, E.; Linde, F. L.; Raven, G.; Rewiersma, P.; Schuijlenberg, H. W. A.; de Waard, A.; Commichau, V.; Hangarter, K.; Schmitz, P.

    1996-02-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e +e - annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e +e - (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry.

  15. Luminosity Measurement in the L3 Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Brock, I C; Ferguson, T; Filthaut, Frank; Krämer, R W; Merk, M; Rippich, C; Shi, X; Shukla, J; Sutton, R B; Tsipolitis, G; Vogel, H; You, J; Lecoq, P; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Buskens, J; Cerjak, I; Groenstege, H L; Koffeman, E; Linde, Frank L; Raven, G; Rewiersma, P A M; Schuijlenburg, H; De Waard, A; Commichau, V; Hangarter, K; Schmitz, P

    1996-01-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e+e- annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e+e-(Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry.

  16. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, I.C.; Engler, A.; Ferguson, T.; Filthaut, F.; Kraemer, R.W.; Merk, M.; Rippich, C.; Shi, X.; Shukla, J.; Sutton, R.B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Vogel, H.; You, J.; Lecoq, P.; Bobbink, G.J.; Buskens, J.; Cerjak, I.; Groenstege, H.; Koffeman, E.; Linde, F.L.; Raven, G.; Rewiersma, P.; Schuijlenberg, H.W.A.; Waard, A. de; Commichau, V.; Hangarter, K.; Schmitz, P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[CERN, Geneve (Switzerland)]|[Nat. Inst. for High Energy Phys., NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[RWTH Aachen (Germany). 3. Phys. Inst.

    1996-11-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e{sup +}e{sup -} (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry. (orig.).

  17. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e+e- annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e+e- (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for 'Super ACAR'. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  19. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for `Super ACAR`. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.P. Jr. [Bell Labs. Murray Hill, NJ (United States); West, R.N.; Hyodo, Toshio

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  20. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  1. Experimental Comparison between High Purity Germanium and Scintillator Detectors for Determining Burnup, Cooling Time and Decay Heat of Used Nuclear Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Peter; Grape, Sophie; Tobin, Steve; Liljenfeldt, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A experimental study of the gamma-ray energy spectra from used nuclear fuel has been performed. Four types of detectors were used to measure spectra from three PWR used fuel assemblies stored at the interim storage for used fuel in Sweden, CLAB: HPGe, LaBr3, NaI and BGO. The study was performed in the context of used fuel characterization for the back end of the fuel cycle in Sweden. Specifically, the purpose was to evaluate the behaviour of the different scintillator detectors (LaBr3, NaI an...

  2. Crystal detectors in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors review the principal characteristics driving the design of precision calorimeters composed of inorganic crystal scintillators now in operation (L3, CLEO 2) or developed for the next generation of particle physics experiments. The unique discovery potential of these detectors (1.5 to 50 m3 of crystals; 104 to > 105 elements) is the result of their high electron and photon energy resolution over a wide energy range, uniform hermetic acceptance and fine granularity. Experiments at CERN's multi-TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will search for the Higgs particles thought to be responsible for mass, and for many other new physics processes. In order to exploit the intrinsically high resolution of crystal detectors, exceptionally high speed (1 to 30 ns decay time) and radiation resistance are required. BaF2 and CeF3 are currently the preferred choices, and higher density alternatives such as PbWO4 are under investigation. Lower energy, high luminosity experiments that will measure rare particle decays, and explore the violation of the fundamental ''CP'' symmetry that may be related to the predominance of matter over antimatter in their universe, have chosen Cesium Iodide for its combination of high light output, speed, and radiation resistance. Recent developments by Caltech include the use of photons generated by an H- beam from an RFQ accelerator to calibrate and provide sub-percent resolution in the L3 BGO calorimeter, and an in situ optical bleaching technique that renders large BaF2 crystals now mass produced in China radiation hard up to dose levels approx-gt 10 MegaRads. 65 refs

  3. A gamma- and X-ray detector for cryogenic, high magnetic field applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, R L; Bales, M J; Bass, C D; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Byrne, J; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Dewey, M S; Fu, C; Gentile, T R; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B; Pulliam, K; Thompson, A K; Wietfeldt, F E

    2012-01-01

    As part of an experiment to measure the spectrum of photons emitted in beta-decay of the free neutron, we developed and operated a detector consisting of 12 bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The detector was operated near liquid nitrogen temperature in the bore of a superconducting magnet and registered photons with energies from 5 keV to 1000 keV. To enlarge the detection range, we also directly detected soft X-rays with energies between 0.2 keV and 20 keV with three large area APDs. The construction and operation of the detector is presented, as well as information on operation of APDs at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel ionization detector for use in X-ray tomography is described in detail. To achieve the ultimate resolution, the use of small detectors is necessary and, for ionization detectors, this implies using xenon gas at high pressure. Conventional small detectors can suffer from ''bowing'' but the present design overcomes their problems. (U.K.)

  5. Recent developments in photomultipliers for nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the recent developments in Hamamatsu photomultipliers for nuclear radiation detectors is a small photomultiplier developed for positron CT in nuclear medicine having excellent timing properties; the time resolution with BGO and CsF scintillators was observed for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays to be 2.24 ns and 0.34 ns, respectively. Two types of new photomultipliers having special structures have recently been developed. One is a photomultiplier for high pressure use capable of withstanding up to 600 atm pressure while another is a 'large-angle-of-view' photomultiplier for a proton decay experiment having a 20' diameter hemispherical photocathode. A newly developed proximity focus type of microchannel plate photomultiplier provides a very fast time response of 130 ps and is usable in strong magnetic fields such as in calorimeters. (orig.)

  6. A Study of Active Shielding Optimized for 1-80 keV Wide-Band X-ray Detector in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Furuta, Yoshihiro; Hiraga, Junko S; Sasano, Makoto; Murakami, Hiroaki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Active shielding is an effective technique to reduce background signals in hard X-ray detectors and to enable observing darker sources with high sensitivity in space. Usually the main detector is covered with some shield detectors made of scintillator crystals such as BGO (Bi$_4$Ge$_3$O$_{12}$), and the background signals are filtered out using anti-coincidence among them. Japanese X-ray observing satellites "Suzaku" and "ASTRO-H" employed this technique in their hard X-ray instruments observing at > 10 keV. In the next generation X-ray satellites, such as the NGHXT proposal, a single hybrid detector is expected to cover both soft (1-10 keV) and hard (> 10 keV) X-rays for effectiveness. However, present active shielding is not optimized for the soft X-ray band, 1-10 keV. For example, Bi and Ge, which are contained in BGO, have their fluorescence emission lines around 10 keV. These lines appear in the background spectra obtained by ASTRO-H Hard X-ray Imager, which are non-negligible in its observation energy b...

  7. Detector, shielding and geometric design factors for a high-resolution PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated the resolution, efficiency and scatter rejection on a new high resolution PET system designed for animal studies which is based on a 2-D modular detector system. A digital positioning system was evaluated by testing different encoding methods. Tungsten inter-plane septa of different thicknesses and geometries were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. The detector system consists of a 6 x 8 array of BGO crystals coupled to 2 dual photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The crystals are 3.5 mm wide with 4 mm spacing transaxially and are 6.25 mm long with 6.75 mm spacing axially. PMT outputs are digitized and Anger camera type logic is used to determine the X and Y location of the scintillation event

  8. Compton background suppression with a multi-element scintillation detector using high speed data acquisition and digital signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-element scintillation detector, consisting of eight NaI(Tl)/BGO scintillators surrounding a single NaI(Tl)/CsI(Tl) scintillator, was initially developed for locating and measuring concealed special nuclear materials that emit primarily low energy photons. Signal digitizers and LabView virtual instrument (VI) subroutines process and analyze pulses from each of the dual scintillators to suppress Compton interactions occurring in the central detector and discriminate between low and high energy photon events occurring within NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) crystals, respectively. Digital signal processing significantly improved the signal-to-noise ratio of the central detector and greatly reduced the analog electronic equipment required in the same time. (author)

  9. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ∼5mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ∼1mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET “magnifying glass” configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration. -- Highlights: ► We examine the use of position-sensitive silicon detectors in magnifying PET geometries. ► A demonstrator using silicon detectors and BGO scintillation detectors was constructed. ► Both single-slice and volume PET configurations were tested. ► For a 4.5 cm field-of-view, resolutions <1mm were achievable. ► Resolution will improve further with higher resolution silicon detectors.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of determining porosity by using dual gamma detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current formation elements spectroscopy logging technology utilize 241Am-Be neutron source and single BGO detector to determine elements contents. It plays an important role in mineral analysis and lithology identification of unconventional oil and gas exploration, but information measured is relatively ld. Measured system based on 241Am-Be neutron and dual detectors can be developed to realize the measurement of elements content as well as determine neutron gamma porosity by using ratio of gamma count between near and far detectors. Calculation model is built by Monte Carlo method to study neutron gamma porosity logging response with different spacing and shields. And it is concluded that measuring neutron gamma have high counts and good statistical property contrasted with measuring thermal neutron, but the sensitivity of porosity decrease. Sensitivity of porosity will increase as the spacing of dual detector increases. Spacing of far and near detectors should be around 62 cm and 35 cm respectively. Gamma counts decrease and neutron gamma porosity sensitivity increase when shield is fixed between neutron and detector. The length of main shield should be greater than 10 cm and associated shielding is about 5 cm. By Monte Carlo Simulation study, the result provides technical support for determining porosity in formation elements spectroscopy logging using 241Am-Be neutron and gamma detectors. (authors)

  11. Study of large area Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode in a γ-ray scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out study of a large area (10x10mm2), reverse-type avalanche photodiode (APD) recently developed by Hamamatsu photonics. It has low dark current of 3nA at room temperature, and the gain stability was almost the same as prototypical APDs reported in our previous paper. We studied the performance as a γ-ray detector with four scintillators, CsI(Tl), BGO, GSO(Ce), and YAP(Ce) crystals. For example we obtained the best energy resolution of 4.9±0.2% (FWHM) for 662keV γ-rays, as measured with a 10x10x10mm3 CsI(Tl) crystal. The minimum detectable energy was as low as 10keV at 20-bar C and 3.1keV at -20-bar C. Thanks to its large effective area, this APD can effectively read out photons from larger size scintillators. When coupling to a 300x48mm2 BGO plate of 3mm thickness, an FWHM energy resolution of 20.9±0.2% was obtained for 662keV γ-rays, with the minimum detectable energy of about 60keV at -150C. These results suggest that our prototype APD can be a promising device for various applications replacing traditional PMTs such as use in space for Japan's future X-ray astronomy mission NeXT

  12. Transmutation detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, Jan; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 632, č. 1 (2011), s. 109-111. ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Transmutation detector * Activation method * Neutron detector * Neutron fluence Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  13. Gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Hans Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    Detector physics and operational aspects of gaseous detectors will be discussed. Topics such as ionization processes, gas amplification and its limitations, pulse formation and decoupling, related electronics constraints, operational stability and ageing phenomena will be touched with the aim at some quantitative understanding.

  14. Metal Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  15. Measurement of the L/K electron capture ratio of the {sup 207}Bi decay to the 1633 keV level of {sup 207}Pb with a BGO scintillating bolometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coron, N.; Gironnet, J.; Marcillac, P. de; Martinez, M.; Redon, T.; Torres, L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11 et CNRS (UMR 8617), Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay (France); Cuesta, C.; Garcia, E.; Ginestra, C.; Ortigoza, Y.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.L. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Watrin, A. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Universite Louis Pasteur, Ecole nationale superieure de physique de Strasbourg (ENSPS), Illkirch (France)

    2012-06-15

    The ROSEBUD Collaboration has dedicated several underground runs to study different types of bolometers, mainly for the search of dark matter. Some of these runs, profiting from the good energy resolution of one bolometer of BGO and the ultra-low background of the underground laboratory of Canfranc (LSC), allowed the measurement of the L/K electron capture ratio of the {sup 207}Bi decay to the 1633 keV level of {sup 207}Pb. This paper constitutes the first published measurement of this magnitude. (orig.)

  16. Balloon Flight Background Measurement with Actively-Shielded Planar and Imaging CZT Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Jenkins, J A; Perrin, M; Murray, R; Grindlay, J E

    2001-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as ``CZT1,'' consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, ``CZT2,'' comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed backgro...

  17. MS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  18. Photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF2 windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission

  19. Photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  20. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-D image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source - detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl) and BGO scintillation crystals with pixel size ranging from 1 x 1 cm2 to 10 x 10 μm2 and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that result in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. (author)

  1. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-D image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Santanna, Claudio Reis de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: borges@ien.gov.br; santanna@ien.gov.br; Braz, Delson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br; Carvalho, Denise Pires de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Fisiologia Endocrina]. E-mail: dencarv@ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source - detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl) and BGO scintillation crystals with pixel size ranging from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 10 x 10 {mu}m{sup 2} and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that result in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. (author)

  2. Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on Board Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, T; Endo, M; Endo, Y; Ezoe, Y; Fukazawa, Y; Hamaya, M; Hirakuri, S; Hong, S; Horii, M; Inoue, H; Isobe, N; Itoh, T; Iyomoto, N; Kamae, T; Kasama, D; Kataoka, J; Kato, H; Kawaharada, M; Kawano, N; Kawashima, K; Kawasoe, S; Kishishita, T; Kitaguchi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Kokubun, M; Kotoku, J; Kouda, M; Kubota, A; Kuroda, Y; Madejski, G; Makishima, K; Masukawa, K; Matsumoto, Y; Mitani, T; Miyawaki, R; Mizuno, T; Mori, K; Mori, M; Murashima, M; Murakami, T; Nakazawa, K; Niko, H; Nomachi, M; Okada, Y; Ohno, M; Oonuki, K; Ota, N; Ozawa, H; Sato, G; Shinoda, S; Sugiho, M; Suzuki, M; Taguchi, K; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, I; Takeda, S; Tamura, K; Tamura, T; Tanaka, T; Tanihata, C; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Tominaga, S; Uchiyama, Y; Watanabe, S; Yamaoka, K; Yanagida, T; Yonetoku, D

    2006-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and th...

  3. Development of position sensitive γ-ray detectors for 2D-ACAR apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a development of two kinds of position-sensitive γ-ray detectors using position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT) for 2D-ACAR apparatus; (1) a 5 mm thick, 50 mm diameter Gd2SiO5 (GSO) single crystal disc coupled to a PS-PMT (Hamamatsu R2487), (2) an 2D-array of small Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystal blocks off sizes 2.2 mm x 2.2 mm x 15 mm (25 x 21 pieces in 2.4 mm pitch) coupled to a PS-PMT (Hamamatsu R3941). We employed the type (2) for our new 2D-ACAR. The method of the analysis of the data obtained by the new apparatus and the results are reported. (orig.)

  4. Cosmic-ray muons as a calibration source for high-energy gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a measurement of the directional distribution of cosmic-ray muons, at the latitude of Stockholm, is reported. In fitting the measured flux to a simple analytical expression, the distribution was found to be symmetric around a line approximately to the northwest at 4.2±0.7 degrees from zenith. The east-west asymmetry amounted to a difference in the total intensity of 20±4% at the zenith angle of 45 degrees. The spectra of energies deposited by the muons in a BGO-detector orientated at different angles, are obtained through a Monte Carlo-simulation, where the muon distribution is used as a weight function for sampling muons in different directions. (author)

  5. Calorimeter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  6. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  7. MAMA Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  8. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objects of the invention are, first, to provide an ionization detector having a three chamber structure characterised by a built-in feedback path that regeneratively stabilizes the operating point of the detector. Secondly, to provide a specially designed chamber construction including electrodes shaped so as to enhance the efficiency of the chamber and reduce ion recombination. The ionization chamber described has a chamber structure with a first closed chamber and a second chamber able to receive gases from outside. These two chambers have a common boundary including a common electrode. One electrode associated with the second chamber, and one within the first chamber, define a third chamber within the first chamber allowing an ionization path between. A radioactive source provides ionizing radiation for all three chambers and establishes an ionization current. There is a detector coupled to the common electrode for detecting changes in this current. (U.K.)

  9. Performance of a PET detector module utilizing an array of silicon photodiodes to identify the crystal of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors initial performance results for a new multi-layer PET detector module consisting of an array of 3 mm square by 30 mm deep BGO crystals coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube and on the opposite end to an array of 3 mm square silicon photodiodes. The photomultiplier tube provides an accurate timing pulse and energy discrimination for all the crystals in the module, while the silicon photodiodes identify the crystal of interaction. When a single BGO crystal at +25 C is excited with 511 keV photons, the authors measure a photodiode signal centered at 700 electrons (e-) with noise of 375 e- fwhm. When a four crystal/photodiode module is excited with a collimated line source of 511 keV photons, the crystal of interaction is correctly identified 82% of the time. The misidentification rate can be greatly reduced and an 8 x 8 crystal/photodiode module constructed by using thicker depletion layer photodiodes or cooling to 0 C

  10. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e+e- annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  11. A Study on Determination of an Optimized Detector for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak; Mardanshahi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    The detector is a critical component of the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for giving accurate information from the exact pattern of radionuclide distribution in the target organ. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was utilized for the simulation of a Siemen's dual head variable angle SPECT imaging system with a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator. The Planar and SPECT scans for a (99m)Tc point source and a Jaszczak Phantom with the both experiment and simulated systems were prepared and after verification and validation of the simulated system, the similar scans of the phantoms were compared (from the point of view of the images' quality), namely, the simulated system with the detectors including bismuth germanate (BGO), yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), yttrium aluminum perovslite (YAP:Ce), lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG:Ce), cerium activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), and sodium iodide activated with thallium [NaI(Tl)]. The parameters of full width at half maximum (FWHM), energy and special resolution, sensitivity, and also the comparison of images' quality by the structural similarity (SSIM) algorithm with the Zhou Wang and Rouse/Hemami methods were analyzed. FWHMs for the crystals were calculated at 13.895, 14.321, 14.310, 14.322, 14.184, and 14.312 keV and the related energy resolutions obtained 9.854, 10.229, 10.221, 10.230, 10.131, and 10.223 %, respectively. Finally, SSIM indexes for comparison of the phantom images were calculated at 0.22172, 0.16326, 0.18135, 0.17301, 0.18412, and 0.20433 as compared to NaI(Tl). The results showed that BGO and LuAG: Ce crystals have high sensitivity and resolution, and better image quality as compared to other scintillation crystals. PMID:26912973

  12. A new 64-channel area detector for neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-channel photomultiplier (Philips XP 1702) can be utilized as a high resolution area detector for thermal neutrons and high energy gamma rays. This detector type is needed e.g. for special neutron scattering experiments and for the PET method applied to small animals. In various test measurements this will be demonstrated by coupling suitable scintillators (NaI, BGO, and 6LiI single crystals and 6Li-glass) and disperse to the photocathode and by feeding the 64 output signals of the PM into a resistor network via voltage-to-current converters. The final interpolated position per event is determined by pulse height division of he four amplified signals taken from the corners of the network. Experimental results concerning the achievable spatial resolution, the homogeneity and the linearity of the detector response and of the quantum efficiencies will be presented. Light experiments with well collimated pulsed rays and with beams of different spot sizes at the photocathode are helpful to explain the measured properties of this new neutron and gamma ray detector

  13. The effect of the rotational orientation of circular photomultipliers in a PET camera block detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a study of the effects of geometric asymmetries in circular photomultipliers (PMT) on the design of PET position-sensitive block detectors. The dynodes of linear-focus circular PMT's are asymmetric relative to the axis of the photocathode, despite the rotational symmetry of the photocathode. Hence, there are regional photocathode differences in the anode signal, which affect the decoding characteristics of position sensitive block detectors. This orientation effect, as well as the effect of introducing light diffusers, are studied in a block detector design (BGO) using the PMT-quadrant-sharing configuration. The PMT studied is the Philips XP-1911 (19mm diameter). Seven symmetrical and representative orientations of the four decoding PMT were investigated, as well as one asymmetric orientation. The measurements performed include block-composite pulse-height spectra and crystal decoding maps. Two orientation effects were observed: (A) distortion variation in decoding maps, and (B) decoding resolution variation. The introduction of circular plastic pieces, used as light diffusers, prove to be useful by improving the decoding of crystals on the periphery of the detector block and minimizing distortion in the decoding map. These measurements have shown optimal PMT orientations for the PMT-quadrant-sharing design, as well as for conventional block designs

  14. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  15. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will present and overview of the basic techniques and underlying physical principles of particle detectors, applied to current and future high energy physics experiments. Illustrating examples, mainly from the field of collider experiments, will demonstrate the performance and limitations of the various techniques. After and introduction we shall concentrate on particle tracking. Wire chambers, drift chambers, micro gaseous tracking devices and solid state trackers will be discussed. It follows and overview of scintillators, photon detection, fiber tracking and nuclear emulsions. One lecture will deal with the various techniques of calorimetry. Finally we shall focus on methods developed for particle identification. These comprise specific energy loss, time of flight Cherenkov and transition radiation detectors.

  16. A new hybrid photomultiplier tube as detector for scintillating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have attentively studied the performance of a new hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) as detector for photons from scintillating crystals. The HPMT is equipped with a YAP window in order to improve light collection and increase measured light response from scintillating crystals. Several measurements have been performed on BGO, LSO, CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) planar crystals having three different surface treatments as well as on YAP : Ce and CsI(Tl) matrices. Such crystals have been coupled to two HPMTs, one equipped with a YAP window (Y-HPMT) and the other with a conventional quartz window (Q-HPMT). Measurements on crystals coupled to the Y-HPMT have shown a consistent improvement of the light response, thanks to the presence of the YAP window. Indeed, the light response measured with the Y-HPMT was on average equal to 1.5, 2.1 and 2.6 times that obtained with the Q-HPMT for planar crystals with white painted (diffusive), fine ground and polished rear surfaces, respectively. With regards to crystal matrices, we measured a light response increase of about 1.2 times

  17. A position-sensitive gamma-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, K; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Nagai, Y; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S; Masuda, K

    2002-01-01

    A new position-sensitive gamma-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi sub 4 Ge sub 3 O sub 1 sub 2 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mmx2.6 mmx18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV gamma-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mmx160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the gamma-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation gamma-rays.

  18. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koji; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota; Masuda, Keisuke

    2002-07-01

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mm×2.6 mm×18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mm×160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays.

  19. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mmx2.6 mmx18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mmx160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays

  20. Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic activities of the Department of Nuclear Electronics in 2005 were concentrated on following areas: · studies of new scintillation techniques and their application in nuclear medicine and border monitoring, · contribution to the FWVI European projects, · scientific contracts with European industry in respect to detection techniques · electronics for experiments in High Energy Physics, · development of γ-ray spectrometry apparatus, · development of new generation State of the Art USB based and PCI based multi-channel analysers, · development, investigation and production of silicon detectors · normalisation activities. Most of the scientific achievements of the Department were summarized in 24 publications (released or being in press) and 6 publications submitted. The papers were published mainly in IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. and Nucl. Instr. Methods. Besides that, our scientists presented 11 contributions at international conferences - 5 presentations on IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging 2005 in Puerto Rico. It should also be stressed that prof. M. Moszynski was honoured with the title of IEEE Fellow and M. Kapusta has received PhD degree. There also were normalization activities in preparation of polish versions of European Standards in the field of electronics Studies on new scintillation techniques were addressed mainly to their application in a nuclear medicine and a border monitoring, induced by the European projects, realized within FWVI. The study of new prospects for a Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography, carried out within BioCare project, strongly suggested that the time-of-flight PET, based on LSO crystals, is a realistic proposition for the further development. Moreover, the comparative study of several scintillators allowed selecting LaBr3 crystal as a potential candidate to a common PET/CT detector. A comparative study of a large NaI(Tl) and BGO crystals allowed, in turn, selecting the 5''x 5''x 10'' Na

  1. PHAROS A pluri-detector, high-resolution, analyser of radiometric properties of soil

    CERN Document Server

    Rigollet, C

    2002-01-01

    PHAROS is a new type of core logger, designed to measure activity concentrations of sup 4 sup 0 K, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs in sediment and rock cores with a spatial resolution of a few centimetres along the core. PHAROS has been developed as a non-destructive alternative to the traditional slicing of cores into sub-samples and their analysis on an HPGe detector. The core is scanned at fixed increments by three BGO scintillation detectors and the spectra analysed by the full spectrum analysis method. The core logger is also equipped with a collimated lead castle and a sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source for transmission measurements. In this paper, we report on the properties of the core logger and its detectors, and on the analysis techniques used for the determination of the radionuclides activity concentrations. Results from initial measurements are presented and discussed.

  2. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  3. A novel depth-of-interaction block detector for positron emission tomography using a dichotomous orthogonal symmetry decoding concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Yan, Han; Baghaei, Hossain; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally, a dual-end depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detector readout requires two two-dimensional silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, one on top and one on the bottom, to define the XYZ positions. However, because both the top and bottom SiPM arrays are reading the same pixels, this creates information redundancy. We propose a dichotomous orthogonal symmetric (DOS) dual-end readout block detector design, which removes this redundancy by reducing the number of SiPMs and still achieves XY and DOI (Z) decoding for positron emission tomography (PET) block detector. Reflecting films are used within the block detector to channel photons going to the top of the block to go only in the X direction, and photons going to the bottom are channeled along the Y direction. Despite the unidirectional channeling on each end, the top readout provides both X and Y information using two one-dimensional SiPM arrays instead of a two-dimensional SiPM array; similarly, the bottom readout also provides both X and Y information with just two one-dimensional SiPM arrays. Thus, a total of four one-dimensional SiPM arrays (4  ×  N SiPMs) are used to decode the XYZ positions of the firing pixels instead of two two-dimensional SiPM arrays (2  ×  N  ×  N SiPMs), reducing the number of SiPM arrays per block from 2N2 to 4 N for PET/MR or PET/CT systems. Moreover, the SiPM arrays on one end can be replaced by two regular photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), so that a block needs only 2 N SiPMs  +  2 half-PMTs; this hybrid-DOS DOI block detector can be used in PET/CT systems. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to study the performance of our DOS DOI block detector design, including the XY-decoding quality, energy resolution, and DOI resolution. Both BGO and LSO scintillators were studied. We found that 4 mm pixels were well decoded for 5  ×  5 BGO and 9  ×  9 LSO arrays with 4 to 5 mm DOI resolution and 16-20% energy resolution. By

  4. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Weilin [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The HERMES Collaboration at HERA constructed and installed a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the existed spectrometer. This detector is designed to measure recoil protons in hard exclusive processes which provide access to the orbital angular momentum of quarks. The Recoil Detector consists of a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and a photon detector. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnet which provides a 1 T longitudinal magnetic field. The Recoil Detector was installed in January 2006 and data taking lasted until the end of HERA operation in June 2007. Results on the detector performance will be presented here.

  5. Improved germanium well detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanium well detectors with metal surface barrier contact are comparable for general use with conventional germanium coaxial detectors. They offer very high sensitivity, the highest presently available

  6. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  7. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  8. Development of a positron-imaging detector with background rejection capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-operative probes have recently become important instruments in nuclear medicine. In such an application, the radiopharmaceutical F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is promising. For the FDG-guided surgery, we developed and tested a positron-imaging detector with background rejection capability. The detector consists of an array of phoswich scintillators, a multi-channel position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT) and an electronic circuit. The scintillators and the PSPMT are encased in a tungsten shield and replaceable collimators are mounted on the top of the detector. Positrons are detected by the plastic scintillators while annihilation photons are detected by the bismuth germanates (BGOs). By employing a pulse-shape analysis, we can distinguish the true events (positrons) from background gamma events. The dimensions of each plastic scintillator are 2 mm x 2 mm x 3 mm and those of the BGO are 2 mm x 2 mm x 15 mm. These scintillators are optically coupled to each other and combined in an 8 x 8 array, which is optically coupled to a 1-inch square 8 x 8 multi-channel PSPMT via optical fibers. Position determination of the positrons is performed by 64-channel threshold circuits while the pulse shape analysis is applied for the summing signal. The spatial resolution was measured by positioning an F-18 point source onto one pixel of the detector and found than the spillover to the neighbor pixel was less than 20%. The background count rate was less than 2 cps for a 20-cm diameter, 20-cm long cylinder phantom containing 3.7 MBq of F-18. These results indicated that the developed positron-imaging detector will be useful for FDG-guided surgery. (author)

  9. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  10. A high resolution animal PET scanner using compact PS-PMT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high resolution PET scanner dedicated to animal studies has been designed, built and tested. The system utilizes 240 block detectors, each of which consists of a new compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and an 8 x 4 BGO array. A total number of 7,680 crystals (480 per ring) are positioned to form a 508 mm diameter of 16 detector rings with 7.2 mm pitch and 114 mm axial field of view (FOV). The system is designed to perform activation studies using a monkey in a sitting position. The data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D mode, where the slice collimators are retracted in 3D mode. The transaxial resolution is 2.6 mm FWHM at the center of the FOV, and the average axial resolution on the axis of the ring is 3.3 mm FWHM in the direct slice and 3.2 mm FWHM in the cross slice. The scatter fraction, sensitivity and count rate performance were evaluated for a 10 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. The total system sensitivity is 2.3 kcps/kBq/ml in 2D mode and 22.8 kcps/kBq/ml in 3D mode. The noise equivalent count rate with 3D mode is equivalent to that with 2D mode at five times higher radioactivity level. The applicable imaging capabilities of the scanner was demonstrated by animal studies with a monkey

  11. Optical fiber readout of scintillator arrays using a multi-channel PMT: A high resolution PET detector for animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the results from a new high resolution gamma ray imaging detector designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) system dedicated to small animal imaging. The detectors consist of an 8 x 8 array of 2 x 2 x 10 mm bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled by 2 mm diameter double clad optical fibers to a 64 pixel multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT). A charge division readout board is used to convert the 64 output channels into four position sensitive signals which determine the crystal of interaction. Measurements with a pair of these detectors demonstrate an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.4 mm, a coincidence timing resolution of 15 ns and an energy resolution ranging between 35 and 60%. Based on these encouraging results, the design for a dedicated animal PET tomograph is proposed and simulations of this system project a reconstructed resolution of less than 2 mm within a 5 cm diameter transaxial field of view

  12. A New Brain Positron Emission Tomography Scanner With Semiconductor Detectors for Target Volume Delineation and Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PETCONVWB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PETNEWBR). Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PETNEWBR and the PETCONVWB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PETCONVWB and PETNEWBR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PETCONVWB (GTVCONV) images or PETNEWBR (GTVNEW) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. Results: The average absolute volume (±standard deviation [SD]) of GTVNEW was 15.7 ml (±9.9) ml, and that of GTVCONV was 34.0 (±20.5) ml. The average GTVNEW was significantly smaller than that of GTVCONV (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLANNEW) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy treatment planning.

  13. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  14. The MINOS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Grashorn, A H E W

    2005-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment's primary goal is the precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric neutrino sector. This long-baseline experiment uses Fermilab's NuMI beam, measured with a Near Detector at Fermilab, and again 735 km later using a Far Detector in the Soudan Mine Underground Lab in northern Minnesota. The detectors are magnetized iron/scintillator calorimeters. The Far Detector has been operational for cosmic ray and atmospheric neutrino data from July of 2003, the Near Detector from September 2004, and the NuMI beam started in early 2005. This poster presents details of the two detectors.

  15. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  16. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  17. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klaus Mönig

    2007-11-01

    Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  18. JADE muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.).

  19. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  20. Gamma ray detector optimization for mobile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Research and Development Administration supports a program enabling a rapid response to situations requiring a mobile, detection-at-a-distance capability for locating lost or stolen nuclear materials. For this application, man-portable, vehicular-borne, and airborne detection systems are used. For gamma ray detection, NaI detectors are usually used. Because weight is a serious constraint, many systems employ unshielded detectors. Results of optimization studies to determine a suitable thickness for 12.7 cm diameter NaI detectors that are commonly used in these applications are presented

  1. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  2. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  3. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  4. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hulse, Charlotte, E-mail: charlotte@inwfsun1.UGent.b [Gent University Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-11-01

    In order to allow for the detection of low momentum particles, originating from the scattering of a 27.6 GeV lepton beam off a fixed gaseous target at the HERMES experiment at DESY in Hamburg (Germany), a dedicated recoil detector was installed. It consists of a silicon strip detector, located inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and a photon detector, around a 150 mm long target cell made out of a 75{mu}m thick aluminum tube. The full detector assembly is mounted inside a 1 T super-conducting solenoid and is able to detect protons and pions with momenta up to 1.40 GeV/c and photons in the region surrounding the target cell. The detector has been operational from February 2006 until June 2007. The commissioning and performance of the detector are presented in this paper.

  5. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R.

    2006-07-01

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007.

  6. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007

  7. Intelligent detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  8. Intelligent Detector Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  9. Neutrino factory near detector

    OpenAIRE

    Bogomilov, M.; Y. Karadzhov; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Laing, A.; F.J.P. Soler

    2013-01-01

    The neutrino factory is a facility for future precision studies of neutrino oscillations. A so-called near detector is essential for reaching the required precision for a neutrino oscillation analysis. The main task of the near detector is to measure the flux of the neutrino beam. Such a high intensity neutrino source like a neutrino factory provides also the opportunity for precision studies of various neutrino interaction processes in the near detector. We discuss the design concepts of suc...

  10. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm2), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  11. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  12. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  13. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  14. Detector support head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The support head of detectors for densitometric measurements of the regional function of lungs using gamma radiation consists of a group of detectors placed in a common rack. The detectors are placed on holders with adjustable height which allow side movement. The holders are slidably connected to the converging quide rail on the frame via arms. Between the holders and the rack is fitted the drive mechanism consisting of a screw. The design allows the stable adjustment of detectors on the lung field during examination and thereby allows the comparison of results of measurements carried out at different times. (J.B.). 2 figs

  15. Superconducting quantum interference detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detector is made of a lead foil whose surface is finished with mineral acids. Coiling the foil wh+ch is inductively bonded to a resonance oscillating circuit forms a system of Josephson tunnel contacts. The detector signal was experimentally shown to be many times higher than signals from niobium detectors with point contacts. The detector described is suitable for measuring voltages in the order of 10-14 to 10-15 V, currents of the same order, magnetic fields, etc. (J.B.)

  16. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  17. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075808; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  18. Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The basic activities of the Department of Nuclear Electronics in 2007 were concentrated on the following areas: ·studies of new scintillation techniques and their application to nuclear medicine and border monitoring, ·contribution to the FWVI European projects, ·scientific contracts with European industry in respect to detection techniques ·electronics for experiments in High Energy Physics, ·development of γ-ray spectrometry apparatus, ·development of new generation State of the Art USB based multi-channel analysers supplied with Ethernet port and wireless connection, ·development, investigation and production of silicon detectors ·normalisation activities. Most of the scientific achievements of the Department were summarized in 24 publications (released or in press) and 8 submitted publications. The papers were published mainly in IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. and Nucl. Instr. Methods. Besides that, our scientists presented 20 contributions at international conferences - 7 presentations on IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging 2007 in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Also, normalization activities in preparation of Polish versions of European Standards in the field of electronics were supported. The study of new scintillation techniques covered measurements of non-proportionality of organic scintillators in comparison to BGO, a study of the light pulse decays of CsI(T1) at low energies and its relation to the non-proportionality and the summary of earlier measurements showing an influence of slow components of light pulses on the intrinsic resolution of scintillators. Within the studies addressed to the BioCare European project, realized within FWVI, studies analysing the influence of different parameters of fast photomultipliers and scintillators on time resolution of PET detectors for TOF PET were performed. The study was also supported by a contract with Photonis, France. Further study of the common PET/CT detector based on APD array was

  19. Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The basic activities of the Department of Nuclear Electronics in 2008 were concentrated in the following areas: · studies of new scintillation techniques and their application to nuclear medicine and border monitoring, · contribution to the FWVI European projects, · scientific contracts with European industry in respect to detection techniques · electronics for experiments in High Energy Physics, · development of γ - ray spectrometry apparatus, · development of new generation State of the Art USB based multi-channel analyzers supplied with Ethernet port and wireless connection, · development, investigation and production of silicon detectors · properties of European standards in the field of electronics. Most of the scientific achievements of the Department were summarized in 33 reviewed publications and 6 non-reviewed publications. The papers were published mainly in IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. and Nucl. Instr. Methods. Besides that, our scientists presented 29 contributions at international conferences - 9 presentations at the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging 2008 in Dresden, Germany. In addition, normalization activities in the preparation of Polish versions of European Standards in the field of electronics were supported. The study of new scintillation techniques covered measurements of non-proportionality of organic with scintillators in a comparison BGO, a study of the light pulse decays of CsI(Tl) at low energies and its relation to non-proportionality and the summarizing of earlier measurements showing an influence of slow components of the light pulses on the intrinsic resolution of scintillators. Within the work performed for the BioCare European project, realized within FWVI, wide studies analyzing the influence of different parameters of fast photomultipliers and scintillators on the time resolution of PET detectors for TOF PET were carried out. This study was also supported by a contract with Photonis, France. A further

  20. The ATLAS pixel detector

    OpenAIRE

    Cristinziani, M.

    2007-01-01

    After a ten years planning and construction phase, the ATLAS pixel detector is nearing its completion and is scheduled to be integrated into the ATLAS detector to take data with the first LHC collisions in 2007. An overview of the construction is presented with particular emphasis on some of the major and most recent problems encountered and solved.

  1. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  2. The TESLA Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Moenig, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    For the superconducting linear collider TESLA a multi purpose detector has been designed. This detector is optimised for the important physics processes expected at a next generation linear collider up to around 1 TeV and is designed for the specific environment of a superconducting collider.

  3. Alkali ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  4. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  5. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  6. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  7. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  8. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ties Behnke; LDC Concept Group

    2007-11-01

    In preparation of the experimental program at the international linear collider (ILC), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design force behind the LDC is the particle flow concept.

  9. LHCb detector performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinol, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazzquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are descri

  10. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  11. Introduction to detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Walenta, Albert H

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for momentum measurements,particle identification and energy measurements (calorimeters) as well for imaging applications in medecine, biology and industry (non destructive testing) will be put into relation to the specific detection princip In particular the resolution for position, time, energy and intensity measurement and the efficiency will be discussed. Signal extraction,electronic signal processing and principles of information capture will close the logic circle to the input : the radiation properties.The lecture will provide some sources for data tables and small demonstration computer programs f The basic detector physics as interaction of radiation with matter, information transport via free charges,photons and phonons and the signal formation will be presented in some depth with emphasis on the influence on specific parameters for detector The lecture will cover the most popular detector principles, gas detectors (ion chambers,MPWC's and MSGC's), semiconductor detectors scintillators and ...

  12. Advanced far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > λ > 50 μm are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide

  13. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  14. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  15. The HERMES recoil detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  16. Advanced superconducting optical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated advanced superconducting optical and infrared detectors for their integration with superconductive active circuits. The detectors are based on ultra-thin NbN striplines. NbN is the material of choice for single photon optical and infrared detectors, as already demonstrated in the literature. The detectors so far proposed are based on conceptually simple, although difficult to realize, sub-micrometric meander type structures. Most applications of such detectors require some treatment of the signal generated, either as pulse shaping or signal amplification, to fully exploit the detection capabilities, such as sub-ns response time and proportional response. We have developed a room temperature process that, while preserving reasonable superconducting properties of NbN, allows a simple integration of the detectors in Nb-based circuits. Moreover we have developed a passivation technique, by using a protective AlN layer on top of the NbN one. The developed technology allows complex detector configurations, such as integrated RSFQ circuits or SQUID readout, to be relatively easily realized. The response of our NbN strip to photon irradiation will be presented

  17. Profile detectors of GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design phase of GANIL, which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beam lines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The profile detectors are unavoidable tools in displaying the GANIL beams for adaptation and adjustment of the beam line optics. The installed detector assembly (about 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beams extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beams (VHIB), secondary ion beams emitted by LISE and SPEG spectrometers targets, different lines of SPIRAL project (HE, BE, ME): This detector assembly must meet the following standard requirements: flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; identical analog electronics for all the detectors with networking; unique visualization system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (the beam profile and ion packet length allow an in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability

  18. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  19. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  20. The HERMES recoil detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  1. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  2. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  3. Performance of GLD detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Yoshioka

    2007-12-01

    Most of the important physics processes to be studied in the international linear collider (ILC) experiment have multi-jets in the final state. In order to achieve better jet energy resolution, the so-called particle flow algorithm (PFA) will be employed and there is a general consensus that PFA derives overall ILC detector design. Four detector concepts for the ILC experiment have been proposed so far in the world; the GLD detector that has a large inner calorimeter radius, which is considered to have an advantage for a PFA, is one of them. In this paper, general scheme and performance of the GLD-PFA will be presented.

  4. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multicell X-ray or gamma detector is used in computer tomography. To achieve good spatial resolution, the electrode plates are narrowly spaced in each cell and are designed identical over the whole length of the detector group. The uniform spacing and precise check of the angles between the electrodes and accurate control of the dimensions of the whole detector structure are achieved by depositing, in the fabrication process, a viscous, resin type material (e.g., epoxy resin) or glue at selected points between the electrodes and insulators. (ORU)

  5. Lithium germanium detectors reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convenient method to regenerate the characteristics of damaged Ge(li) detectors, that has been applied in the authors' laboratory, is described. The procedure consists in warming-up the crystal in its cryostat to temperatures between 10 deg C and 30 deg C above room temperature, in order to clean its surface. Subsequent cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperature, followed by one or more clean-up drifting processes, are applied to the crystals. This paper summarizes the results obtained with several detectors; this method was applied successfully to 15 detectors more. (author)

  6. Nuclear radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a nuclear detector for neutrons and gamma rays. They are generally self quenching. They come back to initial state after the traversal of the particle which has triggered a detection. The detectors which deliver the higher charges are those which work in the regime of Geiger-Mueller. However, one does not know in the present state of the technique a gas detector which is sensitive to neutrons working in the Geiger-Mueller regime, self quenching and sensitive to neutrons and γ rays. The aim of the present invention is to overcome these difficulties

  7. The Silicon Cube detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  8. Microwave Radiation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  9. Simplified phase detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Tanlick sine-wave phase detector gives dc output voltage nearly proportional to phase difference between oscillator signal and reference signal. Device may be used for systems in which signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  10. Control rod position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention can save blowers for compulsory cooling. That is, the control rod position detector comprises (1) a control rod driving shaft made of a ferromagnetic material moving in a pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor and (2) detector coils arranged to the outside of the pressure vessel each at an identical distance over the moving stroke of the driving shaft for detecting the position of the driving shaft by the change of inductance. In addition, heat insulation materials are disposed between the detector coils and the reactor pressure vessel. Then, heat from the reactor pressure vessel can be insulated. Accordingly, temperature of the detector coils can be reduced by natural cooling. As a result, since it is no more necessary to dispose compulsory cooling fans as required in a conventional case, the entire device can be constituted economically, and the reliability of the device is improved. (I.S.)

  11. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. PMID:26943904

  12. Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The end goal of this project is to develop proof-of-concept infrared detectors which can be integrated in future infrared instruments engaged in remote...

  13. Pendulum detector testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs

  14. Modular optical detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Brent A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  15. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  16. The Advanced LIGO Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschel, Peter

    2016-03-01

    After decades of development, the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are now operating, and they completed their first observational run in early 2016. Advanced LIGO consists of two 4-km scale interferometric detectors located at separate sites in the US. The first year of detector commissioning that led to the first observation run produced instruments that have several times better sensitivity to gravitational-wave strain than previous instruments. At their final design sensitivity, the detectors will be another factor of 2-3x more sensitive than current performance. This talk will cover the design of Advanced LIGO, explain how the sensitivity improvements have been achieved, and lay out the path to reaching final design sensitivity.

  17. The pixelated detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Sutton, C

    1990-01-01

    "Collecting data as patterns of light or subatomic particles is vitally important in all the sciences. The new generation of solid-state detectors called pixel devices could transform experimental research at all levels" (4 pages).

  18. The LUX Prototype Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bedikian, S; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Cahn, S; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Clark, K; Classen, T; Curioni, A; Dahl, C E; Dazeley, S; deViveiros, L; Dragowsky, M; Druszkiewicz, E; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Hall, C; Faham, C; Holbrook, B; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Kwong, J; Lander, R; Leonard, D; Malling, D; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D; Mock, J; Morii, M; Nikkel, J; Phelps, P; Shutt, T; Skulski, W; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Steigler, T; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01

    The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) detector is a two-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) designed to search for WIMP-nucleon dark matter interactions. As with all noble element detectors, continuous purification of the detector medium is essential to produce a large ($>$1ms) electron lifetime; this is necessary for efficient measurement of the electron signal which in turn is essential for achieving robust discrimination of signal from background events. In this paper we describe the development of a novel purification system deployed in a prototype detector. The results from the operation of this prototype indicated heat exchange with an efficiency above 94% up to a flow rate of 42 slpm, allowing for an electron drift length greater than 1 meter to be achieved in approximately two days and sustained for the duration of the testing period.

  19. ATLAS Inner Detector developments

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector consists of three layers of silicon pixels, four double layers of silicon microstrips and a Transition Radiation Tracker (straw tubes). The good performance of the track and vertex reconstruction algorithms is a direct consequence of the small radius (4.3, 10.1 and 13.2 cm), fine pitch ($50 \\times 300~\\mu$m) and low occupancy ($<3 \\times 10^{-4}$ at design luminosity) of the pixel detectors, and of the good tracking capabilities of the SCT and the TRT. The full detector simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the detector and of the reconstruction algorithms. Results are presented on track and vertex reconstruction efficiencies and resolutions, and on the separation between $b$-jets and jets produced by light quarks.

  20. Recent ATLAS Detector Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    de Nooij, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    During the recent LHC shutdown period, ATLAS performed vital maintenance and improvements on the various sub-detectors. For the calorimeters, repairs were carried out on front-end electronics and power supplies to recover detector coverage that had been lost since the last maintenance period. The ALFA luminosity detector was installed along the beam line and is currently being commissioned. Smaller scale repairs were needed on the Inner Detector. Maintenance on the muon system included repairs on the readout as well as updates and leak checks in the gas systems. Six TGC chambers were also replaced. This poster summarizes the repairs and their expected improvement for physics performance and reliability of ATLAS for the upcoming LHC run.

  1. ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Christensen, C

    2013-01-01

    The Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) extends the coverage for multiplicity of charge particles into the forward regions - giving ALICE the widest coverage of the 4 LHC experiments for these measurements.

  2. Improved CO [lidar detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  3. Novel Photo-Detectors and Photo-Detector Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Danilov, M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in photo-detectors and photo-detector systems are reviewed. The main emphasis is made on Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM) - novel and very attractive photo-detectors. Their main features are described. Properties of detectors manufactured by different producers are compared. Different applications are discussed including calorimeters, muon detection, tracking, Cherenkov light detection, and time of flight measurements.

  4. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; S. Belostotski(St. Petersburg, INP); Borissov, A; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J; Capitani, G.P.; V. Carassiti; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M; R.Leo

    2013-01-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct ...

  5. Silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main scope of this laboratory is to give the students an introduction of some special characteristics of silicon microstrip detectors. The students will perform some exercises using different instruments to appreciate the properties of these detectors, especially its great position resolution. An overview of different instruments such as an oscilloscope, wave function generator as others will be also given as important devices in any experimental laboratory

  6. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  7. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  8. Modelling semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K

    2001-01-01

    expected after 200 ps in most cases. The effect of reducing the charge carrier lifetime and examining the charge collection efficiency has been utilised to explore how these detectors would respond in a harsh radiation environment. It is predicted that over critical carrier lifetimes (10 ps to 0.1 ns) an improvement of 40 % over conventional detectors can be expected. This also has positive implications for fabricating detectors, in this geometry, from materials which might otherwise be considered substandard. An analysis of charge transport in CdZnTe pixel detectors has been performed. The analysis starts with simulation studies into the formation of contacts and their influence on the internal electric field of planar detectors. The models include a number of well known defect states and these are balanced to give an agreement with a typical experimental I-V curve. The charge transport study extends to the development of a method for studying the effect of charge sharing in highly pixellated detectors. The ...

  9. Alkali metal ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  10. Detectors for CBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss some current approaches to a large solid angle detector. An alternative approach for utilizing the high rate of events at CBA is to design special purpose detectors for specific physics goals which can be pursued within a limited solid angle. In many cases this will be the only way to proceed, and then high luminosity has a different significance. The total rate in the restricted acceptance is less likely to be a problem, while the need for high luminosity to obtain sufficient data is obvious. Eight such experiments from studies carried out in the community are surveyed. Such experiments could be run on their own or in combination with others at the same intersection, or even with a large solid angle detector, if a window can be provided in the larger facility. The small solid angle detector would provide the trigger and special information, while the facility would provide back-up information on the rest of the event. We consider some possibilities of refurbishing existing detectors for use at CBA. This discussion is motivated by the fact that there is a growing number of powerful detectors at colliding beam machines around the world. Their builders have invested considerable amounts of time, money and ingenuity in them, and may wish to extend the useful lives of their creations, as new opportunities arise

  11. Protecting Detectors in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Mateusz Lechman, Mateusz; Chochula, Peter; Di Mauro, Antonio; Jirden, Lennart Stig; Schindler, Heinrich; Rosinsky, Peter; Moreno, Alberto; Kurepin, Alexander; Pinazza, Ombretta; De Cataldo, Giacinto

    2011-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneva. It is composed of many sophisticated and complex detectors mounted very compactly around the beam pipe. Each detector is a unique masterpiece of design, engineering and construction and any damage to it could stop the experiment for months or even for years. It is therefore essential that the detectors are protected from any danger and this is one very important role of the Detector Control System (DCS). One of the main dangers for the detectors is the particle beam itself. Since the detectors are designed to be extremely sensitive to particles they are also vulnerable to any excess of beam conditions provided by the LHC accelerator. The beam protection consists of a combination of hardware interlocks and control software and this paper will describe how this is implemented and handled in ALICE. Tools have also been developed to support operators and shift leaders in the decision making related...

  12. ATLAS Inner Detector (Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker)

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    To raise awareness of the basic functions of the Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker in the ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN. This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the detector, seeing critical pieces of the detector and hearing short explanations of how each works.

  13. On the time response of background obtained in γ-ray spectroscopy experiments using LaBr3(Ce) detectors with different shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régis, J.-M.; Dannhoff, M.; Jolie, J.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Saed-Samii, N.

    2016-03-01

    Employing the γ-γ fast-timing technique with LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detectors allows the direct determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states with a lower limit of about 5 ps. This limit is increased as soon as background is present in the coincidence spectra underneath the full-energy peaks of the γ-γ cascade. Our aim was to identify the components of the γ-ray background by systematic γ-γ fast-timing measurements using different types of γ shielding within a large γ-ray spectrometer. The energy dependent physical zero-time response was measured using background-free full-energy peak events from the 152Eu γ-ray source. This is compared with the time response of the (Compton-) background distribution as obtained using the prompt 60Co γ-ray source. The time response of the typical Compton background is about 15 ps faster than the time response of background-free full-energy peak events. Below about 500 keV, a second type of background contributes by the detection of Compton-scattered γ rays generated in the materials of the spectrometer around the detector. Due to the additional time-of-flight of the Compton-scattered γ rays, this low-energy background is largely delayed. Compared with a bare cylindrical 1.5 in . × 1.5 in . LaBr3(Ce) detector, the BGO-shielded detector in the Compton-suppression mode improves the peak-to-total ratio by a factor of 1.66(5), while the Pb-shielded detector only slightly reduces the low-energy background.

  14. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography

  15. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Christensen, Christian; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan; Sogaard, Carsten;

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4......The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4...

  16. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  17. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannheim, D.

    2015-03-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration.

  18. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R and D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration

  19. Detectors for proton counting. Si-APD and scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased intensity of synchrotron radiation requests users to prepare photon pulse detectors having higher counting rates. As detectors for photon counting, silicon-avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) and scintillation detectors were chosen for the fifth series of detectors. Principle of photon detection by pulse and need of amplification function of the detector were described. Structure and working principle, high counting rate measurement system, bunch of electrons vs. counting rate, application example of NMR time spectroscopy measurement and comments for users were described for the Si-APD detector. Structure of scintillator and photomultiplier tube, characteristics of scintillator and performance of detector were shown for the NaI detector. Future development of photon pulse detectors was discussed. (T. Tanaka)

  20. Front end electronics for a variable field PET camera using the PMT-quadrant-sharing detector array design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an electronic design for a PET camera with 8 arrays of position sensitive detectors. Each array has 16 BGO blocks (each block is composed of 49 crystals). The design goals are component and space reduction. Each PMT has its fast amplifier and triggered integrator. Nine flash ADC serve an array of 27 PMT and 784 crystals. The fast signals from one or more PMT clusters are summed. The fast summed signals are thresholded and sent to a programmable logic to determines the probable scintillation zone (4 blocks) and to turn on the associated 9 PMT integrators. After integration, the logic also drives a set of ultra-fast analog switches to connect the flash ADC set to the PMT integration channels in the scintillation zone. The 9 ADC output (integrated pulses with good photon statistics) are latched and compared. The comparator result determines which block in the zone is firing and the appropriate 4 ADC are selected and bused into a position decoder. The decoder outputs the image-slice address and the crystal address. The circuit is pipelined and driven by a 250 MHz master clock. The maximum event-processing rate for the circuit and a random radiation source is 2 x 106/sec (with 10:1 randomness allowance)

  1. A Balloon-borne Measurement of High Latitude Atmospheric Neutrons Using a LiCAF Neutron Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mózsi; Moretti, Elena; Salinas, Maria Fernanda Muñoz; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    PoGOLino is a scintillator-based neutron detector. Its main purpose is to provide data on the neutron flux in the upper stratosphere at high latitudes at thermal and nonthermal energies for the PoGOLite instrument. PoGOLite is a balloon borne hard X-ray polarimeter for which the main source of background stems from high energy neutrons. No measurements of the neutron environment for the planned flight latitude and altitude exist. Furthermore this neutron environment changes with altitude, latitude and solar activity, three variables that will vary throughout the PoGOLite flight. PoGOLino was developed to study the neutron environment and the influences from these three variables upon it. PoGOLino consists of two Europium doped Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (Eu:LiCAF) scintillators, each of which is sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. This allows the neutron flux to be measured even in high rad...

  2. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Belostotski, S; Borissov, A; Borisenko, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capitani, G P; Carassiti, V; Ciullo, G; Clarkson, A; Contalbrigo, M; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Guler, H; Gregor, I M; Hartig, M; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Jo, H S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kisselev, A; Krause, B; Krauss, B; Lagamba, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lu, S; Lu, X -G; Lumsden, S; Mahon, D; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nowak, W -D; Naryshkin, Y; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrov, A; Pickert, N; Prahl, V; Protopopescu, D; Reinecke, M; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Schnell, G; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shutov, V; Statera, M; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Varanda, M; Veretennikov, D; Vilardi, I; Vikhrov, V; Vogel, C; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yu, W; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B

    2013-01-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1 Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end...

  3. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy

  4. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaj, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carini, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carron, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Haller, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hart, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Herrmann, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kenney, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Segal, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tomada, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  5. The Delphi outer detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design criteria, construction and performance of the Delphi outer detector are discussed. The detector is a 5-layer, 5 m long, 2 m inner radius, 2.1 m outer radius 'cylindrical' drift chamber consisting of 3480 individual 1.65x1.65 cm2 drift tubes operating in limited streamer mode. The drift time-distance relationship for a single tube has been measured using a pulsed laser as a function of both track angle and longitudinal magnetic field. These data have been used to reconstruct cosmic rays in a completed detector module and yield a transverse resolution of 80 μm per point over most of the cell, rising to 90 μm near the corners of the tubes. The detection efficiency per cell for minimum ionising particles is greater than 98.5%. (orig.)

  6. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eric Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flory, Adam E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarche, Brian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weiland, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  7. Transition Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic features of transition radiation and how they are used for the design of modern Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). The discussion will include the various realizations of radiators as well as a discussion of the detection media and aspects of detector construction. With regard to particle identification we assess the different methods for efficient discrimination of different particles and outline the methods for the quantification of this property. Since a number of comprehensive reviews already exist, we predominantly focus on the detectors currently operated at the LHC. To a lesser extent we also cover some other TRDs, which are planned or are currently being operated in balloon or space-borne astro-particle physics experiments.

  8. OPERA: Electronic Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jollet, C

    2010-01-01

    OPERA is an hybrid detector for the ni-tau appearance search in a direct way, and the Electronic Detectors (ED) have the crucial role of triggerring for the neutrino events and of localizing such an interaction inside the target. Another very important task of the ED is to identify the muon since only a correct matching of such a track with a track in the emulsion connected to the vertex of the event allows to reduce the charm background to the desired level. The ED, fully working since 2006, consist of a target tracker (scintillator strips) and a spectrometer (RPC and drift tubes). The different sub-detectors are de- scribed in the poster, as well as their performance both on Monte Carlo (MC) and real data.

  9. The H1 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H1 detector presently operating at the HERA e-p collider is described. A general overview of the detector is given with particular emphasis on the calorimeters, the main element of which is a liquid Argon calorimeter enclosed within a large radius solenoid. Calorimetry in the proton direction, close to the beam-pipe is provided by a copper-silicon pad hadronic calorimeter. In the electron direction a lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter closes the solid angle between the rear part of the liquid Argon calorimeter and the beam-pipe. An iron limited streamer tube tail catcher using the return yoke of the solenoid as absorber completes the calorimetry of the detector. The hardware triggers derived from the calorimeters are also described and some performance details of the calorimeters are given

  10. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  11. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  12. The MINOS calibration detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the MINOS calibration detector (CalDet) and the procedure used to calibrate it. The CalDet, a scaled-down but functionally equivalent model of the MINOS Far and Near detectors, was exposed to test beams in the CERN PS East Area during 2001-2003 to establish the response of the MINOS calorimeters to hadrons, electrons and muons in the range 0.2-10GeV/c. The CalDet measurements are used to fix the energy scale and constrain Monte Carlo simulations of MINOS

  13. High efficiency photoionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  14. Liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G

    2001-01-01

    The liquid argon imaging technique, as proposed for the ICARUS detector, offers the possibility to perform complementary and simultaneous measurements of neutrinos, as those of CERN to Gran Sasso beam (CNGS) and those from cosmic ray events. For the currently allowed values of the Super-Kamiokande results, the combination of both CNGS and atmospheric data will provide a precise determination of the oscillation parameters. Since one can observe and unambiguously identify nu /sub e/, nu /sub mu / and nu /sub tau / components, this technology allows to explore the full (3*3) mixing matrix. The same class of detector can be proposed for high precision measurements at a neutrino factory. (3 refs).

  15. The KEDR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anashin, V. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Baldin, E. M.; Barladyan, A. K.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Baru, S. E.; Basok, I. Yu.; Bedny, I. V.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrov, A. V.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bondar, A. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Gulevich, V. V.; Dneprovsky, L. V.; Zhilich, V. N.; Zhulanov, V. V.; Karpov, G. V.; Karpov, S. V.; Kononov, S. A.; Kotov, K. Yu.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Kulikov, V. F.; Kuper, E. A.; Levichev, E. B.; Maksimov, D. A.; Malyshev, V. M.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Medvedko, A. S.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nikitin, S. A.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Oreshkin, S. B.; Orlov, I. O.; Osipov, A. A.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pivovarov, S. G.; Poluektov, A. O.; Pospelov, G. E.; Prisekin, V. G.; Rodyakin, V. A.; Ruban, A. A.; Savinov, G. A.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Smalyuk, V. V.; Snopkov, R. G.; Sokolov, A. V.; Sukharev, A. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tayursky, V. A.; Telnov, V. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Usov, Yu. V.; Kharlamova, T. A.; Shamov, A. G.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Shusharo, A. I.; Yushkov, A. N.

    2013-07-01

    The KEDR detector is a universal magnetic detector designed for studying the c- and b-quarks and two-photon physics, and is employed at the VEPP-4M e + e - collider. A specific feature of the experiment is the measurement of absolute beam energy using two methods: the resonant depolarization and the faster but less precise Compton backscattering of laser photons. This allowed a large series of measurements to be performed, in which the accuracy of determination of such fundamental parameters of particles as mass and total and leptonic widths was improved.

  16. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  17. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Pachmayer, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is the main electron detector in ALICE. In conduction with the TPC and the ITS, it provides the necessary electron identification capability to study: - Production of light and heavy vector mesons as well as the continuum in the di-electron channel, - Semi leptonic decays of hadrons with open charm and open beauty via the single-electron channel using the displaced vertex information provided by the ITS, - Correlated DD and BB pairs via coincidences of electrons in the central barrel and muons in the forward muon arm, - Jets with high Pτ tracks in one single TRD stack.

  18. Gallium arsenide pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, R.; DaVia, C.; O`Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Smith, K. [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Campbell, M.; Cantatore, E.; Heijne, E.M.; Middelkamp, P.; Ropotar, I.; Scharfetter, L.; Snoeys, W. [CERN, ECP Div., CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); D`Auria, S.; Papa, C. del [Department of Physics, University of Udine and INFN Trieste, Via delle Scienze 208, I-33100 Udine (Italy); RD8 Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    GaAs detectors can be fabricated with bidimensional single-sided electrode segmentation. They have been successfully bonded using flip-chip technology to the Omega-3 silicon read-out chip. We present here the design features of the GaAs pixel detectors and results from a test performed at the CERN SpS with a 120 GeV {pi}{sup -} beam. The detection efficiency was 99.2% with a nominal threshold of 5000 e{sup -}. (orig.) 10 refs.

  19. Report of the compact detector subgroup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses different detector designs that are being proposed for Superconducting Super Collider experiments. The detectors discussed are: Higgs particle detector, Solid State Box detector, SMART detector, muon detection system, and forward detector. Also discussed are triggering strategies for these detectors, high field solenoids, barium fluoride option for EM calorimetry, radiation damage considerations, and cost estimates

  20. The Upgraded D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U.

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  1. Particle detectors and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author recalls the elevator experiment which ultimately led Einstein to his formulation of General Relativity. In addition to the classical falling weights, flashlights, etc, the author suggests the experimenter also take along a particle detector. This detector will be a particularly simple detector consisting of a Schroedinger particle of mass m in a box with walls impermeable to the detector particle. From the equivalence principle, the detector particle in the accelerated elevator will be in an effective potential maz where z is the coordinate in the direction of the acceleration a, measured from let's say, the center of the detector. The author gives a derivation of the detection process. (Auth.)

  2. The Upgraded D0 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahmed, S N; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, J T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Angstadt, R; Anosov, V; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, Trevor C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bardon, O; Barg, W; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bhattacharjee, M; Baturitsky, M A; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Baumbaugh, B; Beauceron, S; Begalli, M; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Beutel, D; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Bishoff, A; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Bockenthein, E; Bodyagin, V; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Bonamy, P; Bonifas, D; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Boswell, C; Bowden, M; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, D; Butler, J M; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Bystrický, J; Canal, L; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Casey, D; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chi, E; Chiche, R; Cho, D K; Choate, R; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Churin, I; Cisko, G; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Colling, D J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; Davis, W; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; de La Taille, C; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Del Signore, K; De Maat, R; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doets, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dvornikov, O; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fagan, J; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Fein, D; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Ferreira, M J; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fitzpatrick, T; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Flores, R; Foglesong, J; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, C; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Gao, M; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Geurkov, G; Ginther, G; Gobbi, B; Goldmann, K; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Golovtsov, V L; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Gómez, R; Goodwin, R W; Gornushkin, Y; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graham, D; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Gray, K; Greder, S; Green, D R; Green, J; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grinstein, S; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gu, W; Guglielmo, J; Sen-Gupta, A; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haggard, E; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hance, R; Hanagaki, K; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, C; Hays, J; Hazen, E; Hebbeker, T; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hou, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Hynek, V; Huffman, D; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jacquier, Y; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jayanti, R; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Jiang, Y; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnson, P; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Jouravlev, N I; Juárez, M; Juste, A; Kaan, A P; Kado, M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Kalmani, S D; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Ke, Z; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Kim, H; Kim, K H; Kim, T J; Kirsch, N; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Komissarov, E V; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Kuznetsov, O; Krane, J; Kravchuk, N; Krempetz, K; Krider, J; Krishnaswamy, M R

    2005-01-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  3. Gaseous wire detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations

  4. Temperature stabilized phase detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The construction, tests, and performance of a temperature stabilized phase detector are discussed. It has a frequency stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power at 100 MHz, with a temperature step of 20 C (15 to 35 C).

  5. Pixel detector insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of the Pixel Tracker, the 66-million-channel device used to pinpoint the vertex of each colliding proton pair, located at the heart of the detector. The geometry of CMS is a cylinder lying on its side (22 meters long and 15 meters high in dia

  6. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

    The RPC system is operating with a very high uptime, an average chamber efficiency of about 95% and an average cluster size around 1.8. The average number of active channels is 97.7%. Eight chambers are disconnected and forty are working in single-gap mode due to high-voltage problems. The total luminosity lost due to RPCs in 2012 is 88.46 pb–1. One of the main goals of 2012 was to improve the stability of the endcap trigger that is strongly correlated to the performances of the detector, due to the 3-out-3 trigger logic. At beginning of 2011 the instability of the detector efficiency was about 10%. Detailed studies found that this was mainly due to the strong correlation between the performance of the detector and the atmospheric pressure (P). Figure XXY shows the linear correlation between the average cluster size of the endcap chamber versus P. This effect is expected for gaseous detectors and can be reduced by correcting the applied high-voltage working point (HVapp) according to the followi...

  7. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

  8. First ALICE detectors installed!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Detectors to track down penetrating muon particles are the first to be placed in their final position in the ALICE cavern. The Alice muon spectrometer: in the foreground the trigger chamber is positioned in front of the muon wall, with the dipole magnet in the background. After the impressive transport of its dipole magnet, ALICE has begun to fill the spectrometer with detectors. In mid-July, the ALICE muon spectrometer team achieved important milestones with the installation of the trigger and the tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer. They are the first detectors to be installed in their final position in the cavern. All of the eight half planes of the RPCs (resistive plate chambers) have been installed in their final position behind the muon filter. The role of the trigger detector is to select events containing a muon pair coming, for instance, from the decay of J/ or Y resonances. The selection is made on the transverse momentum of the two individual muons. The internal parts of the RPCs, made o...

  9. Ionization chamber smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One kind of smoke detector, the ionization-type, is regulated by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) because it uses a radioactive substance in its mechanism. Radioactivity and radiation are natural phenomena, but they are not very familiar to the average householder. This has led to a number of questions being asked of the AECB. These questions and AECB responses are outlined

  10. Ionic smoke detectors

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Ionic smoke detectors are products incorporating radioactive material. This article summarises the process for their commercialization and marketing, and how the activity is controlled, according to regulations establishing strict design and production requisites to guarantee the absence of radiological risk associated both with their use and their final handling as conventional waste. (Author)

  11. Diamond Pixel Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foster, J.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Gobbi, B.; Grim, G.P.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Lander, R.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Lynne, L.M.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L. E-mail: perera@physics.rutgers.edu; Pirollo, S.; Plano, R.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rott, C.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2001-06-01

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles.

  12. Diamond pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bognai, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Doroshenko, J; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foster, J; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Gobbi, B; Grim, G P; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lander, R; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Plano, R; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rott, C; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles. (3 refs).

  13. Diamond Pixel Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles

  14. Solid state parallel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss semiconductors phoso-sensitive arrays and channel plate electron multiplier detectors. Currents applications include light detection in the spectral range from visible to X-rays, with sensitivity threshold from 103 to a single photon, and single electron/ion detection. (A.C.A.S.)

  15. Solid state detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a position sensitive, semi-conductor detector for use in a gamma camera system is discussed in detail. Explicit descriptions are also given of the electronic circuitry required to produce 2-dimensional position information and of the method of data processing. The problems and limitations introduced by noise are discussed in full. (U.K.)

  16. A large Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several problems, e.g. a test of nucleon conservation and high-energy neutrino detection of interest to us at Case Institute, have led to the construction of a large Cerenkov detector. This device consists of a tank 2.4 m in diameter and 2.1 m high which is painted with a white reflecting coat. The 7400-l water-volume used as the filling at present is viewed from above by 52 type-6364 Dumont multiplier phototubes. Internal to the detector as it is being currently used is a 200-l liquid scintillation-counter enclosed in an 8000-kg Fe shield. In this paper we describe constructional details and the response of the detector using cosmic-ray muons as a probe. We also present results on the effectiveness of the detector as an anti-coincidence blanket and will discuss the relevance of these numbers to the question of detecting high-energy neutrinos-both cosmic and man-made. (author)

  17. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of determining the energy-dependent detection probability with measurements using Ge (Li) and high-grade germanium detectors is described. The paper explains which standards are best for a given purpose and given requirements as to accuracy, and how to assess measuring geometry variations and summation corrections. (DG)

  18. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  19. Development of new radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The works on the development of radiation detectors performed at Waseda University are described. As the fundamental studies on radiation detectors, measurement was made for the Z3 dependence of the power of metal targets to stop alpha particles or C-ions, the Fano factor in rare gas, the peak value of the energy given by fast charged particles to materials and its fluctuation, the W-value and the Fano factor of liquid rare gas, and the LET dependence of the luminescence efficiency of liquid rare gas by radiation. The development of liquid rare gas detectors has been made. The considered detector types were a pulse ionization chamber with grid (liquid Xe), a proportional luminescent counter (liquid Xe), an electromagnetic calorimeter (liquid Ar, liquid Xe), and a photo-ionization detector. The development of silicon detectors is also in progress. The silicon detectors under development are a silicon detector telescope for satellite experiment, a silicon shower detector for balloon experiment, and a micron strip silicon detector for synchrotron radiation or elementary particle experiment. The use of plastic track detectors for cosmic ray observation has been examined. The discrimination of isotopes by using a new plastic CR-39 was able to be done. The detectors for low level alpha and gamma spectroscopy have been investigated. For alpha particles, a pulse ionization chamber with a cylindrical grid has been used. For gamma-ray, a Compton-suppressed Ge(Li) detector has been used. (Kato, T.)

  20. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  1. OPAL detector end-cap

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    An end-cap of the OPAL detector with its electromagnetic calorimeter. The calorimeter consists of 566 Cherenkov lead glass counters and weighs 10 tonnes. The OPAL detector ran on the LEP accelerator between 1989 and 2000.

  2. Fire Emulator/Detector Evaluator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The fire emulator/detector evaluator (FE/DE) is a computer-controlled flow tunnel used to re-create the environments surrounding detectors in the early...

  3. Fundamental principles of particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper goes through the fundamental physics of particles-matter interactions which is necessary for the detection of these particles with detectors. A listing of 41 concepts and detector principles are given. 14 refs., 11 figs

  4. Radiation detectors laboratory; Laboratorio de detectores de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  5. Workshops on radiation imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochinskii, N.V.; Sun, G.C.; Kostamo, P.; Silenas, A.; Saynatjoki, A.; Grant, J.; Owens, A.; Kozorezov, A.G.; Noschis, E.; Van Eijk, C.; Nagarkar, V.; Sekiya, H.; Pribat, D.; Campbell, M.; Lundgren, J.; Arques, M.; Gabrielli, A.; Padmore, H.; Maiorino, M.; Volpert, M.; Lebrun, F.; Van der Putten, S.; Pickford, A.; Barnsley, R.; Anton, M.E.G.; Mitschke, M.; Gros d' Aillon, E.; Frojdh, C.; Norlin, B.; Marchal, J.; Quattrocchi, M.; Stohr, U.; Bethke, K.; Bronnimann, C.H.; Pouvesle, J.M.; Hoheisel, M.; Clemens, J.C.; Gallin-Martel, M.L.; Bergamaschi, A.; Redondo-Fernandez, I.; Gal, O.; Kwiatowski, K.; Montesi, M.C.; Smith, K

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies that were presented at the international workshop on radiation imaging detectors. 9 sessions were organized: 1) materials for detectors and detector structure, 2) front end electronics, 3) interconnected technologies, 4) space, fusion applications, 5) the physics of detection, 6) industrial applications, 7) synchrotron radiation, 8) X-ray sources, and 9) medical and other applications.

  6. Workshops on radiation imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the transparencies that were presented at the international workshop on radiation imaging detectors. 9 sessions were organized: 1) materials for detectors and detector structure, 2) front end electronics, 3) interconnected technologies, 4) space, fusion applications, 5) the physics of detection, 6) industrial applications, 7) synchrotron radiation, 8) X-ray sources, and 9) medical and other applications

  7. Characterizations of GEM detector prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Rajendra Nath; Rudra, Sharmili; Bhattacharya, P; Sahoo, Sumanya Sekhar; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Nayak, T K; Sahu, P K; Sahu, S

    2015-01-01

    At NISER-IoP detector laboratory an initiative is taken to build and test Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for ALICE experiment. The optimisation of the gas flow rate and the long-term stability test of the GEM detector are performed. The method and test results are presented.

  8. The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Christian Holm; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Sogaard, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4 < \\eta < 5.1$. It is placed around the beam pipe at small angles to extend the charged particle acceptance of ALICE into the forward regions, not covered by the central barrel detectors.

  9. New electronically black neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two neutron detectors are described that can function in a continuous radiation background. Both detectors identify neutrons by recording a proton recoil pulse followed by a characteristic capture pulse. This peculiar signature indicates that the neutron has lost all its energy in the scintillator. Resolutions and efficiencies have been measured for both detectors

  10. Multisensor mine detector for peacekeeping: improved landmine detector concept (ILDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, John E.; Carruthers, Al

    1996-05-01

    The Improved Landmine Detector Concept Project was initiated in Autumn 1994 to develop a prototype vehicle mounted mine detector for low metal content and nonmetallic mines for a peacekeeping role on roads. The system will consist of a teleoperated vehicle carrying a highly sensitive electromagnetic induction (EMI) detector, an infrared imager (IR), ground probing radar (GPR), and a thermal neutron activation (TNA) detector for confirmation. The IR, EMI and TNA detectors have been under test since 1995 and the GPR will be received in June 1996. Results of performance trials of the individual detectors are discussed. Various design configurations and their tradeoffs are discussed. Fusion of data from the detectors to reduce false alarm rate and increase probability of detection, a key element to the success of the system, is discussed. An advanced development model of the system is expected to be complete by Spring 1997.

  11. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  12. Portable Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, General Pneumatics Corporation's Western Research Center satisfied a NASA need for a non-clogging Joule-Thomson cryostat to provide very low temperature cooling for various sensors. This NASA-supported cryostat development played a key part in the development of more portable high-purity geranium gamma-ray detectors. Such are necessary to discern between the radionuclides in medical, fuel, weapon, and waste materials. The outcome of the SBIR project is a cryostat that can cool gamma-ray detectors, without vibration, using compressed gas that can be stored compactly and indefinitely in a standby mode. General Pneumatics also produces custom J-T cryostats for other government, commercial and medical applications.

  13. GERmanium detector array, GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed to search for 'neutrinoless double beta decay' (0ν2β) in 76Ge. The high-purity segmented Ge detectors will be directly submerged and operated in liquid N2 or Ar. The measurement of the half-life time of 0ν2β decay will provide information about the absolute neutrino mass scale and indirectly, the hierarchy. The design goal of GERDA is to reach a sensitivity of 0.2 eV on the effective Majorana neutrino mass (mββ). The GERDA experiment is located in hall A of the Grand Sasso national lab (LNGS) and the construction will start in 2006

  14. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  15. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  16. Ultrafast neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  17. Memristive fuzzy edge detector

    CERN Document Server

    Merrikh-Bayat, Farnood

    2011-01-01

    Fuzzy inference systems always suffer from the lack of efficient structures or platforms for their hardware implementation. In this paper, we tried to overcome this problem by proposing new method for the implementation of those fuzzy inference systems which use fuzzy rule base to make inference. To achieve this goal, we have designed a multi-layer neuro-fuzzy computing system based on the memristor crossbar structure by introducing some new concepts like fuzzy minterms. Although many applications can be realized through the use of our proposed system, in this study we show how the fuzzy XOR function can be constructed and how it can be used to extract edges from grayscale images. Our memristive fuzzy edge detector (implemented in analog form) compared with other common edge detectors has this advantage that it can extract edges of any given image all at once in real-time.

  18. Aerogel for FARICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnyakov, A.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Barnyakov, M.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marks 20, Novosibirsk 630073 (Russian Federation); Bobrovnikov, V.S.; Buzykaev, A.R.; Gulevich, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Danilyuk, A.F. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kononov, S.A.; Kravchenko, E.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kuyanov, I.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Lopatin, S.A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Onuchin, A.P.; Ovtin, I.V.; Podgornov, N.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marks 20, Novosibirsk 630073 (Russian Federation); Porosev, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrentieva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Predein, A.Yu.; Protsenko, R.S. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-01

    We present our current experience in preparation of focusing aerogels for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detector. Multilayer focusing aerogel tiles have been produced in Novosibirsk by a collaboration of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis since 2004. We have obtained 2–3–4-layer blocks with the thickness of 30–45 mm. In 2012, the first samples of focusing blocks with continuous density (refractive index) gradient along thickness were produced. This technology can significantly reduce the contribution from the geometric factor of the radiator thickness to the resolution of the measured Cherenkov angle in the FARICH detector. The special installation was used for automatic control of reagents ratio during the synthesis process. The first samples were tested using the digital radiography method and on the electron beam with the FARICH prototype.

  19. UA1 central detector

    CERN Multimedia

    The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  20. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    Since September, the muon alignment system shifted from a mode of hardware installation and commissioning to operation and data taking. All three optical subsystems (Barrel, Endcap and Link alignment) have recorded data before, during and after CRAFT, at different magnetic fields and during ramps of the magnet. This first data taking experience has several interesting goals: •    study detector deformations and movements under the influence of the huge magnetic forces; •    study the stability of detector structures and of the alignment system over long periods, •    study geometry reproducibility at equal fields (specially at 0T and 3.8T); •    reconstruct B=0T geometry and compare to nominal/survey geometries; •    reconstruct B=3.8T geometry and provide DT and CSC alignment records for CMSSW. However, the main goal is to recons...

  1. The LUCID detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lasagni Manghi, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Starting from 2015 LHC will perform a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side A–side C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  2. The LUCID detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lasagni Manghi, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Starting from 2015 LHC is performing a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side-A-side-C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  3. Development of Portable Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the “Contractor”) and Sense Holdings, Inc. (the “Participant”) was for the development of hand-held detectors with high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of explosives, toxic industrial chemicals and materials, and other materials of interest for security applications. The two parties built a series of demonstration and prototype handheld sensors based upon micoelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with electronic readout.

  4. Biological detector and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  5. Biological detector and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  6. Polysiloxane based neutron detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Dalla Palma, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, neutron detection has been attracting the attention of the scientific community for different reasons. On one side, the increase in the price of 3He, employed in the most efficient and the most widely used neutron detectors. On the other side, the harmfulness of traditional xylene based liquid scintillators, used in extremely large volumes for the detection of fast neutrons. Finally, the demand for most compact and rough systems pushed by the increased popularity of neutro...

  7. Lasers, Spectrographs, and Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlant, Fred

    The introduction of Raman spectroscopy into new fields has been driven largely by advances in the underlying technology. While the spectrometer is still comprised of a light source, a wavelength selector, and a detector, the improvement in functionality of each of these components has had dramatic impacts on areas where Raman was once thought impractical, if not impossible. In addition, esoteric techniques once confined to academic spectroscopy labs are now finding wide application.

  8. Biological detector and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  9. High energy neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.

    1948-04-27

    It is the purpose of this paper to describe a neutron detector suitable for monitoring a flux of neutrons whose energy is greater than about 50 MeV. Detection of the neutrons is accomplished by their ability to induce fission in heavy elements. Kelly and Wiegand studied the neutron fission of Bi, Pb, Ti, Hg, Au, and Pt at various neutron energies and the presently described counter is an application of this work.

  10. Extruded Plastic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pla-Dalmau, A; Mellott, K L; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.

    1999-01-01

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  11. DEMON: Modular Neutron Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEMON is a liquid scintillator neutron multidetector devoted to study particular aspects of the dynamics of heavy-ion reactions. The problems of measuring neutron energy spectra, angular distributions and neutron multiplicities are described. Efficiency measurements, time-of-flight measurements and the experimental programme of the detector are presented. The document consists of transparencies presented at the workshop, text is missing. (K.A.) 12 figs

  12. Quantum Cascade Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Baumann, Esther; Graf, Marcel; Yang, Quankui; Manz, Christian; Köhler, Klaus; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Linfield, Edmund; Davies, Alexander G.; Fedoryshyn, Yuriy; Jackel, Heinz; Fischer, Milan; Faist, Jérôme; Hofstetter, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum cascade detectors. They are tailorable infrared photodetectors based on intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum wells that do not require an external bias voltage due to their asymmetric conduction band profile. They thus profit from favorable noise behavior, reduced thermal load, and simpler readout circuits. This was demonstrated at wavelengths from the near infrared at 2 μm to THz radiation a...

  13. LHCb velo detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01 : L. to r.: D. Malinon, Summer Student, J. Libby, Fellow, J. Harvey, Head of CERN LHCb group, D. Schlatter, Head of the EP Division in front of the LHCb velo detector test beam (on the right). Photo 02 : L. to r.: J. Harvey, D. Schlatter, W. Riegler (staff), H.J. Hilke, LHCb Technical Coordinator in front of the muon chamber test beam

  14. The ZEUS central tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Tracking Detector (CTD) of ZEUS covers a wide angular range, whilst the Forward Detector - comprising the Forward Tracking Detector (FTD) and electron identification by transition radiation - concentrates on the important forward cone. The RTD (Rear Tracking Detector) provides accurate angle measurement of the recoil electron and the vertex detector (VXD) aims to find particles from heavy flavour decay. To measure momentum accurately the CTD sits in a high magnetic field (B=1,8 T) within the ZEUS calorimeter. (orig./HSI)

  15. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle.

    The DT system is ready for the LHC start up. The status of detector hardware, control and safety, of the software for calibration and monitoring and of people has been reviewed at several meetings, starting with the CMS Action Matrix Review and with the Muon Barrel Workshop (October 5 to 7). The disconnected HV channels are at a level of about 0.1%. The loss in detector acceptance because of failures in the Read-Out and Trigger electronics is about 0.5%. The electronics failure rate has been lower this year: next year will tell us whether the rate has stabilised and hopefully will confirm that the number of spares is adequate for ten years operation. Although the detector safety control is very accurate and robust, incidents have happened. In particular the DT system suffered from a significant water leak, originated in the top part of YE+1, that generated HV trips in eighteen chambers going transversely down from the top sector in YB+2 to the bottom sector in YB-2. All chambers recovered and all t...

  16. Optical ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  17. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    RPC detector calibration, HV scan Thanks to the high LHC luminosity and to the corresponding high number of muons created in the first part of the 2011 the RPC community had, for the first time, the possibility to calibrate every single detector element (roll).The RPC steering committee provided the guidelines for both data-taking and data analysis and a dedicated task force worked from March to April on this specific issue. The main goal of the RPC calibration was to study the detector efficiency as a function of high-voltage working points, fit the obtained “plateau curve” with a sigmoid function and determine the “best” high-voltage working point of every single roll. On 18th and 19th March, we had eight runs at different voltages. On 27th March, the full analysis was completed, showing that 60% of the rolls had already a very good fit with an average efficiency greater than 93% in the plateau region. To improve the fit we decided to take three more runs (15th April...

  18. Detector array and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector array and method are described in which sets of electrode elements are provided. Each set consists of a number of linear extending parallel electrodes. The sets of electrode elements are disposed at an angle (preferably orthogonal) with respect to one another so that the individual elements intersect and overlap individual elements of the other sets. Electrical insulation is provided between the overlapping elements. The detector array is exposed to a source of charged particles which in accordance with one embodiment comprise electrons derived from a microchannel array plate exposed to photons. Amplifier and discriminator means are provided for each individual electrode element. Detection means are provided to sense pulses on individual electrode elements in the sets, with coincidence of pulses on individual intersecting electrode elements being indicative of charged particle impact at the intersection of the elements. Electronic readout means provide an indication of coincident events and the location where the charged particle or particles impacted. Display means are provided for generating appropriate displays representative of the intensity and locaton of charged particles impacting on the detector array

  19. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    During data-taking in 2010 the RPC system behaviour was very satisfactory for both the detector and trigger performances. Most of the data analyses are now completed and many results and plots have been approved in order to be published in the muon detector paper. A very detailed analysis of the detector efficiency has been performed using 60 million muon events taken with the dedicated RPC monitor stream. The results have shown that the 96.3% of the system was working properly with an average efficiency of 95.4% at 9.35 kV in the Barrel region and 94.9% at 9.55 kV in the Endcap. Cluster size goes from 1.6 to 2.2 showing a clear and well-known correlation with the strip pitch. Average noise in the Barrel is less than 0.4 Hz/cm2 and about 98% of full system has averaged noise less then 1 Hz/cm2. A linear dependence of the noise versus the luminosity has been preliminary observed and is now under study. Detailed chamber efficiency maps have shown a few percent of chambers with a non-uniform efficiency distribu...

  20. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  1. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed

  2. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  3. UA1 prototype detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Prototype of UA1 central detector inside a plexi tube. The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  4. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  5. The DELPHI Detector (DEtector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification)

    CERN Multimedia

    Crawley, B; Munich, K; Mckay, R; Matorras, F; Joram, C; Malychev, V; Behrmann, A; Van dam, P; Drees, J K; Stocchi, A; Adam, W; Booth, P; Bilenki, M; Rosenberg, E I; Morton, G; Rames, J; Hahn, S; Cosme, G; Ventura, L; Marco, J; Tortosa martinez, P; Monge silvestri, R; Moreno, S; Phillips, H; Alekseev, G; Boudinov, E; Martinez rivero, C; Gitarskiy, L; Davenport, M; De clercq, C; Firestone, A; Myagkov, A; Belous, K; Haider, S; Hamilton, K M; Lamsa, J; Rahmani, M H; Malek, A; Hughes, G J; Peralta, L; Carroll, L; Fuster verdu, J A; Cossutti, F; Gorn, L; Yi, J I; Bertrand, D; Myatt, G; Richard, F; Shapkin, M; Hahn, F; Ferrer soria, A; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Sekulin, R; Timmermans, J; Baillon, P

    2002-01-01

    % DELPHI The DELPHI Detector (Detector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification) \\\\ \\\\DELPHI is a general purpose detector for physics at LEP on and above the Z$^0$, offering three-dimensional information on curvature and energy deposition with fine spatial granularity as well as identification of leptons and hadrons over most of the solid angle. A superconducting coil provides a 1.2~T solenoidal field of high uniformity. Tracking relies on the silicon vertex detector, the inner detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the outer detector and forward drift chambers. Electromagnetic showers are measured in the barrel with high granularity by the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) and in the endcaps by $ 1 ^0 $~x~$ 1 ^0 $ projective towers composed of lead glass as active material and phototriode read-out. Hadron identification is provided mainly by liquid and gas Ring Imaging Counters (RICH). The instrumented magnet yoke serves for hadron calorimetry and as filter for muons, which are identified in t...

  6. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivers, M. (UC)

    2011-09-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  7. SOIKID, SOI pixel detector combined with superconducting detector KID

    CERN Document Server

    Ishino, Hirokazu; Kida, Yosuke; Yamada, Yousuke

    2015-01-01

    We present the development status of the SOIKID, a detector combining the SOI pixel detector and the superconducting detector KID (Kinetic Inductance Detector). The aim of the SOIKID is to measure X-ray photon energy with the resolution better than that of the semiconductor detector. The silicon substrate is used as the X-ray photon absorber. The recoiled electron creates athermal phonons as well as the ionizing electron-hole pairs. The KID formed at one side of the substrate surface detects the phonons to measure the total energy deposited, while the SOI pixel detector formed on the other side of the substrate detects the ionized carries to measure the position. Combining the position and energy measurements, it is in principle possible to have the extremely high energy resolution.

  8. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  9. Department of Radiation Detectors - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work carried out in 1996 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. The Departamental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors, adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments. These objectives were accomplished in 1996 by: research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. a spherical set of particle detectors silicon ball), detectors for particle identification), development of technology of high-resistivity silicon detectors HRSi (grant proposal), development of thermoelectric cooling systems (grant proposal), research on p-i-n photodiode-based personal dosimeters, study of applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. The Department conducts research on the design and technology involved in producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. Various tube models and their power supplies were developed. Some work has also been devoted to the detection and dosimetry of X-rays. X-ray tube generators are applied to non-destructive testing and are components of analytical systems such as: X-ray fluorescence chemical composition analysis, gauges of layer thickness and composition stress measurements, on-line control of processes, others where an X-ray tube may replace a radio-isotope source. In 1996, the Department: reviewed the domestic demand for X-ray generators, developed an X-ray generator for diagnosis of ostheroporosis of human limbs, prepared a grant proposal for the development of a new instrument for radiotherapy, the so-called needle-like X-ray tube. (author)

  10. Hydrogen gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A differential thermocouple hydrogen gas detector has one thermocouple junction coated with an activated palladium or palladium-silver alloy catalytic material to allow heated hydrogen gas to react with the catalyst and raise the temperature of that junction. The other juction is covered with inert glass or epoxy resin, and does not experience a rise in temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas. A coil heater may be mounted around the thermocouple junctions to heat the hydrogen, or the gas may be passed through a heated block prior to exposing it to the thermocouples

  11. Flexible composite radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, Edward B.

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  12. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection...

  13. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  14. The BABAR Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, JM; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; T. Le Flour(LAPP, Annecy); Lees, JP; Lieunard, S; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V.

    2001-01-01

    This is the pre-print version of the Article. The official published version can be accessed from the link below. Copyright @ 2002 Elsevier. BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e+e− B Factory operating at the (4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photon...

  15. Forward Wall Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Forward Wall Detector is designed to identify projectile like fragments from heavy ion reactions at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala, Sweden. The FWD consist of 96 detection modules covering azimuthal angle from 3.9o to 11.7o with efficiency of 81%. The detection module can be either of phoswitch type (10 mm fast plastic + 80 mm CsI(Tl)) or standard ΔE-E telescope (750 μm Si + 88 mm CsI(Tl)). It is expected to have charge identification up to Z=18, mass resolution for H and He isotopes and energy resolution ∼ 8%. (author)

  16. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  17. A detector for neutron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, C L; Wintenberg, A L; Warmack, R J; McKnight, T E; Frank, S S; Cooper, R G; Dudney, N J; Veith, G M; Stephan, A C

    2004-01-01

    A bright neutron source such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) places extreme requirements on detectors including excellent 2-D spatial imaging and high dynamic range. Present imaging detectors have either shown position resolutions that are less than acceptable or they exhibit excessive paralyzing dead times due to the brightness of the source. High neutron detection efficiency with good neutron- gamma discrimination is critical for applications in neutron scattering research where the usefulness of the data is highly dependent on the statistical uncertainty associated with each detector pixel.. A detector concept known as MicroMegas (MicroMEsh GAseous Structure) has been developed at CERN in Geneva for high- energy physics charged-particle tracking applications and has shown great promise for handling high data rates with a rather low-cost structure. We are attempting to optimize the MicroMegas detector concept for thermal neutrons and have designed a 1-D neutron strip detector which we have tested In ...

  18. Scalar top study: Detector optimization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Milsténe; A Sopczak

    2007-11-01

    A vertex detector concept of the linear collider flavour identification (LCFI) collaboration, which studies pixel detectors for heavy quark flavour identification, has been implemented in simulations for -quark tagging in scalar top studies. The production and decay of scalar top quarks (stops) is particularly interesting for the development of the vertex detector as only two -quarks and missing energy (from undetected neutralinos) are produced for light stops. Previous studies investigated the vertex detector design in scenarios with large mass differences between stop and neutralino, corresponding to large visible energy in the detector. In this study we investigate the tagging performance dependence on the vertex detector design in a scenario with small visible energy for the international linear collider (ILC).

  19. Infrared detectors for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Wolfgang; Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Haiml, Markus; Hanna, Stefan; Hübner, Dominique; Höhnemann, Holger; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Thöt, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The motivation and intended benefits for the use of infrared (IR) detectors for space applications are highlighted. The actual status of state-of-the-art IR detectors for space applications is presented based on some of AIM's currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength IR (SWIR) to the long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and very long-wavelength IR (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP and the IR detectors for the Sentinel 3 SLSTR will be elaborated. Additionally, dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC, will be addressed.

  20. Photon detectors with gaseous amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous photon detectors, including very large 4π-devices such as those incorporated in SLD and DELPHI, are finally delivering physics after many years of hard work. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photoelectrons. Among detector builders, there is hardly anybody who did not make mistakes in this area, and who does not have a healthy respect for the problems involved. This point is stressed in this paper, and it is suggested that only a very small operating phase space is available for running gaseous photon detectors in a very large system with good efficiency and few problems. In this paper the authors discuss what was done correctly or incorrectly in first generation photon detectors, and what would be their recommendations for second generation detectors. 56 refs., 11 figs

  1. Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2011-01-01

    Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors in 'Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 Time of Flight Measurements 3.3.2.1 Scintillator hodoscopes 3.3.2.2 Parallel plate ToF detectors 3.3.3 Cherenkov Radiation 3.3.3.1 ...

  2. Intercomparison of retrospective radon detectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, R. W.; Steck, D J; Parkhurst, M A; Mahaffey, J A; Alavanja, M C

    1999-01-01

    We performed both a laboratory and a field intercomparison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, (210)Pb, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the alpha-emission of a (210)Pb-decay product, (210)Po. Th...

  3. The CMS detector before closure

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2006-01-01

    The CMS detector before testing using muon cosmic rays that are produced as high-energy particles from space crash into the Earth's atmosphere generating a cascade of energetic particles. After closing CMS, the magnets, calorimeters, trackers and muon chambers were tested on a small section of the detector as part of the magnet test and cosmic challenge. This test checked the alignment and functionality of the detector systems, as well as the magnets.

  4. The 4th concept detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Hauptman

    2007-12-01

    The 4th concept detector consists of four detector subsystems, a small-pixel vertex detector, a high-resolution TPC, a new multiple-readout fiber calorimeter and a new dual-solenoid iron-free muon system. We discuss the design of a comprehensive facility that measures and identifies all partons of the standard model, including hadronic → and → decays, with high precision and high e±ciency. We emphasis here the calorimeter and muon systems.

  5. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2012-01-01

      Although the year 2012 is the third year without access to the chambers and the Front-End electronics, the fraction of good channels is still very high at 99.1% thanks also to the constant care provided by the on-site operation team. The downtime caused to CMS as a consequence of DT failures is to-date <2%. The intervention on the LV power supplies, which required a large number of CAEN modules (137 A3050, 13 A3100, and 3 MAO) to be removed from the detector, reworked and tested during this Year-End Technical Stop, can now, after a few months of stable operation of the LV, be declared to have solved once-and-for-all the persistent problem with the overheating LV Anderson connectors. Another piece of very good news is that measurements of the noise from single-hit rate outside the drift-time box as a function of the LHC luminosity show that the noise rate and distribution are consistent with expectations of the simulations in the Muon TDR, which have guided the detector design and constru...

  6. Barrier infrared detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  7. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The earliest collision data in 2011 already show that the CSC detector performance is very similar to that seen in 2010. That is discussed in the DPG write-up elsewhere in this Bulletin. This report focuses on a few operational developments, the ME1/1 electronics replacement project, and the preparations at CERN for building the fourth station of CSC chambers ME4/2. During the 2010 LHC run, the CSC detector ran smoothly for the most part and yielded muon triggers and data of excellent quality. Moreover, no major operational problems were found that needed to be fixed during the Extended Technical Stop. Several improvements to software and configuration were however made. One such improvement is the automation of recovery from chamber high-voltage trips. The algorithm, defined by chamber experts, uses the so-called "Expert System" to analyse the trip signals sent from DCS and, based on the frequency and the timing of the signals, respond appropriately. This will make the central DCS shifters...

  8. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    During the last 3 months the RPC group has made impressive improvements in the refinement of the operation tools and understanding of the detector. The full barrel and part of the plus end cap participated systematically to global runs producing millions of trigger on cosmics. The main monitoring tools were robust and efficient in controlling the detector and in diagnosis of problems. After the refinement of the synchronization procedure, detailed studies of the chamber performances, as a function of high voltage and front-end threshold, were pursued. In parallel, new tools for the prompt analysis were developed which have enabled a fast check of the data at the CMS Centre. This effort has been very valuable since it has helped in discovering many minor bugs in the reconstruction software and database which are now being fixed. Unfortunately, a large part of the RE2 station has developed increasing operational current. Some preliminary investigation leads to the conclusion that the serial gas circulation e...

  9. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon

    Following the opening of the CMS detector, commissioning of the cathode strip chamber (CSC) system resumed in earnest. Some on-chamber electronics problems could be fixed on the positive endcap when each station became briefly accessible as the steel yokes were peeled off. There was no opportunity to work on the negative endcap chambers during opening; this had to wait instead until the yokes were again separated and the stations accessible during closing. In March, regular detector-operating shifts were resumed every weekday evening during which Local Runs were taken using cosmic rays to monitor and validate repairs and improvements that had taken place during the day. Since April, the CSC system has been collecting cosmic data under shift supervision 24 hours a day on weekdays, and 24/7 operation began in early June. The CSC system arranged shifts for continuous running in the entire first half of 2009. One reward of this effort is that every chamber of the CSC system is alive and recording events. There...

  10. PAU camera: detectors characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Jiménez, Jorge; Maiorino, Marino; Pío, Cristóbal; Sevilla, Ignacio; de Vicente, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The PAU Camera (PAUCam) [1,2] is a wide field camera that will be mounted at the corrected prime focus of the William Herschel Telescope (Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain) in the next months. The focal plane of PAUCam is composed by a mosaic of 18 CCD detectors of 2,048 x 4,176 pixels each one with a pixel size of 15 microns, manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. This mosaic covers a field of view (FoV) of 60 arcmin (minutes of arc), 40 of them are unvignetted. The behaviour of these 18 devices, plus four spares, and their electronic response should be characterized and optimized for the use in PAUCam. This job is being carried out in the laboratories of the ICE/IFAE and the CIEMAT. The electronic optimization of the CCD detectors is being carried out by means of an OG (Output Gate) scan and maximizing it CTE (Charge Transfer Efficiency) while the read-out noise is minimized. The device characterization itself is obtained with different tests. The photon transfer curve (PTC) that allows to obtain the electronic gain, the linearity vs. light stimulus, the full-well capacity and the cosmetic defects. The read-out noise, the dark current, the stability vs. temperature and the light remanence.

  11. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size

  12. The DEMON detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DEMON neutron detector was first put into operation in the summer of 1994 and used in three experiments studying: the excitation energy partition between quasi-target and quasi-projectile, the existence limits of hot residues, and the study of the halo exotic nuclei like 19C. The first experiment was performed at Strasbourg, the other two were developed at Caen. In 1995, after stages by the VIVITRON and SARA experiments and after experiments concerning the fission (the neutrons from pre- and post-scission), the extra-push, fusion, etc, the DEMON was bound to Louvain. Afterwards, DEMON came back by the VIVITRON and then at GANIL for experiments of neutron-neutron interferometry and the continuation of the study of neutron halo nuclei (14B, 17C, 19B, 22C). From the spring of 1996 several DEMON detectors were used at Saclay for systematic measurements of angular distributions and energy of the neutrons produced in spallation reactions, conducted by IN2P3-CNRS to explore the possibility of processing the long-life nuclear wastes by neutron irradiation

  13. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Document Server

    C. Fernandez Bedoya and M. Dallavalle

    2010-01-01

    The DT system operation since the 2010 LHC start up is remarkably smooth.
 All parts of the system have behaved very satisfactorily in the last two months of operation with LHC pp collisions. Disconnected HV channels remain at the level of 0.1%, and the loss in detector acceptance because of failures in the readout and Trigger electronics is about 0.4%. The DT DCS-LHC handshake mechanism, which was strengthened after the short 2009 LHC run, operates without major problems. A problem arose with the opto-receivers of the trigger links connecting the detector to USC; the receivers would unlock from transmission for specific frequencies of the LHC lock, in particular during the LHC ramp. For relocking the TX and RX a “re-synch” command had to be issued. The source of the problem has been isolated and cured in the Opto-RX boards and now the system is stable. The Theta trigger chain also has been commissioned and put in operation. Several interventions on the system have been made, pro...

  14. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    The RPC muon detector and trigger are working very well, contributing positively to the high quality of CMS data. Most of 2011 has been used to improve the stability of our system and the monitoring tools used online and offline by the shifters and experts. The high-voltage working point is corrected, chamber-by-chamber, for pressure variation since July 2011. Corrections are applied at PVSS level during the stand-by mode (no collision) and are not changed until the next fill. The single detector calibration, HV scan, of February and the P-correction described before were very important steps towards fine-tuning the stability of the RPC performances. A very detailed analysis of the RPC performances is now ongoing and from preliminary results we observe an important improvements of the cluster size stability in time. The maximum oscillation of the cluster size run by run is now about 1%. At the same time we are not observing the same stability in the detection efficiency that shows an oscillation of about ...

  15. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli.

    Substantial progress has been made on the RPC system resulting in a high standard of operation. Impressive improvements have been made in the online software and DCS PVSS protocols that ensure robustness of the configuration phase and reliability of the detector monitoring tasks. In parallel, an important upgrade of CCU ring connectivity was pursued to avoid noise pick-up and consequent  data transmission errors during operation with magnetic field. While the barrel part is already well synchronized thanks to the long cosmics runs, some refinements are still required on the forward part. The "beam splashes" have been useful to cross check  the existing delay constants, but further efforts will be made as soon as a substantial sample of beam-halo events is available. Progress has been made on early detector performance studies. The RPC DQM tool is being extensively used and minor bugs have been found. More plots have been added and more people have been tr...

  16. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT group is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance and for detec-tor upgrade. Maintenance interventions on chambers and minicrates require close collaboration between DT, RPC and HO, and are difficult because they depend on the removal of thermal shields and cables on the front and rear of the chambers in order to gain access. The tasks are particularly critical on the central wheel due to the presence of fixed services. Several interventions on the chambers require extraction of the DT+RPC package: a delicate operation due to the very limited space for handling the big chambers, and the most dangerous part of the DT maintenance campaign. The interventions started in July 2013 and will go on until spring 2014. So far out of the 16 chambers with HV problems, 13 have been already repaired, with a global yield of 217 recovered channels. Most of the observed problems were due to displacement of impurities inside the gaseous volume. For the minicrates and FE, repairs occurred on 22 chambe...

  17. Chopper-stabilized phase detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Phase-detector circuit for binary-tracking loops and other binary-data acquisition systems minimizes effects of drift, gain imbalance, and voltage offset in detector circuitry. Input signal passes simultaneously through two channels where it is mixed with early and late codes that are alternately switched between channels. Code switching is synchronized with polarity switching of detector output of each channel so that each channel uses each detector for half time. Net result is that dc offset errors are canceled, and effect of gain imbalance is simply change in sensitivity.

  18. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  19. The controlled-drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, A; Guazzoni, C; Longoni, A; Rehak, P; Strüder, L

    2000-01-01

    A new position-sensing X-ray detector is presented. The novel device is called Controlled-Drift Detector (CDD). The detector is fully depleted and is operated by switching between integration and drift modes. The relevant details of the detector design are discussed. A complete experimental characterization of the fast readout of the integrated signal charges achievable with static drift fields in the range 100-400 V/cm has been carried out. Preliminary measurements to evaluate the charge-handling capacity are also shown. The CDD can provide unambiguous two-dimensional position measurement, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time resolution below 1 ms.

  20. Tomography of Spatial Mode Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrov, Ivan; Markov, Anton; Straupe, Stanislav; Kulik, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Transformation and detection of photons in higher-order spatial modes usually requires complicated holographic techniques. Detectors based on spatial holograms suffer from non-idealities and should be carefully calibrated. We report a novel method for analyzing the quality of projective measurements in spatial mode basis inspired by quantum detector tomography. It allows us to calibrate the detector response using only gaussian beams. We experimentally investigate the inherent inaccuracy of the existing methods of mode transformation and provide a full statistical reconstruction of the POVM (positive operator valued measure) elements for holographic spatial mode detectors.

  1. Detector developments at DESY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderer, Cornelia B; Allahgholi, Aschkan; Bayer, Matthias; Bianco, Laura; Correa, Jonathan; Delfs, Annette; Göttlicher, Peter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Jack, Stefanie; Klyuev, Alexander; Lange, Sabine; Marras, Alessandro; Niemann, Magdalena; Pithan, Florian; Reza, Salim; Sheviakov, Igor; Smoljanin, Sergej; Tennert, Maximilian; Trunk, Ulrich; Xia, Qingqing; Zhang, Jiaguo; Zimmer, Manfred; Das, Dipayan; Guerrini, Nicola; Marsh, Ben; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Cautero, Giuseppe; Giuressi, Dario; Menk, Ralf; Khromova, Anastasiya; Pinaroli, Giovanni; Stebel, Luigi; Marchal, Julien; Pedersen, Ulrik; Rees, Nick; Steadman, Paul; Sussmuth, Mark; Tartoni, Nicola; Yousef, Hazem; Hyun, HyoJung; Kim, KyungSook; Rah, Seungyu; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Mezza, Davide; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Krueger, Hans; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joem; Graafsma, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of free-electron lasers (FELs) enabling revolutionary science with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon sensitivity with low probability of false positives and (multi)-megapixels. At DESY, one ongoing development project - in collaboration with RAL/STFC, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Diamond, and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory - is the CMOS-based soft X-ray imager PERCIVAL. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active-pixel sensor back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 cm × 10 cm, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within 27 µm pixels to measure 1 to ∼100000 (500 eV) simultaneously arriving photons. DESY is also leading the development of the AGIPD, a high-speed detector based on hybrid pixel technology intended for use at the European XFEL. This system is being developed in collaboration with PSI, University of Hamburg, and University of Bonn. The AGIPD allows single-pulse imaging at 4.5 MHz frame rate into a 352-frame buffer, with a dynamic range allowing single-photon detection and detection of more than 10000 photons at 12.4 keV in the same image. Modules of 65k pixels each are configured to make up (multi)megapixel cameras. This review describes the AGIPD and the PERCIVAL concepts and systems, including some recent results and a summary of their current status. It also gives a short overview over other FEL-relevant developments where the Photon Science Detector Group at DESY is involved. PMID:26698052

  2. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Z. Szillasi and G. Gomez.

    2013-01-01

    When CMS is opened up, major components of the Link and Barrel Alignment systems will be removed. This operation, besides allowing for maintenance of the detector underneath, is needed for making interventions that will reinforce the alignment measurements and make the operation of the alignment system more reliable. For that purpose and also for their general maintenance and recalibration, the alignment components will be transferred to the Alignment Lab situated in the ISR area. For the track-based alignment, attention is focused on the determination of systematic uncertainties, which have become dominant, since now there is a large statistics of muon tracks. This will allow for an improved Monte Carlo misalignment scenario and updated alignment position errors, crucial for high-momentum muon analysis such as Z′ searches.

  3. Imaging alpha particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  4. Imaging with coincidence detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a dual-detector, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system that could be modified to perform coincidence imaging of positron-emitting radiotracers has resulted in a renaissance in the nuclear medicine community. In 1996, ADAC Laboratories introduced their Molecula Coincidence Detection (MCD) system at the Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual General Meeting in Denver. This ushered in a new era in nuclear medicine imaging. The ability of these coincidence systems to image 18FDG promises to make this type of imaging 'just another nuclear medicine procedure', possible within the next decade. This advancement is arguably the biggest news in nuclear medicine since the development of SPECT. In August 1997, Lion's Gate Hospital in North Vancouver acquired the MCD upgrade to their ADAC Vertex camera - the first and only to date in Canada. This article introduces coincidence imaging and describes the experiences of those pioneering the use of this new modality in Canada

  5. Moving Detectors in Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Obadia, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider two-level detectors, coupled to a quantum scalar field, moving inside cavities. We highlight some pathological resonant effects due to abrupt boundaries, and decide to describe the cavity by switching smoothly the interaction by a time-dependent gate-like function. Considering uniformly accelerated trajectories, we show that some specific choices of non-adiabatic switching have led to hazardous interpretations about the enhancement of the Unruh effect in cavities. More specifically, we show that the emission/absorption ratio takes arbitrary high values according to the emitted quanta properties and to the transients undergone at the entrance and the exit of the cavity, {\\it independently of the acceleration}. An explicit example is provided where we show that inertial and uniformly accelerated world-lines can even lead to the same ``pseudo-temperature''.

  6. Radiation level detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free surface of a fluid (e.g. molten steel) dense to particular ionising radiations and contained within a vessel (e.g. a casting mould) is monitored by a device which includes a radio active source (A) on oneside of the vessel and, on the other side, a detector head having a casing housing a photo-multiplier having a photo cathode coupled to a phosphor scintillator (B) of sufficient length to cover the predicted range of movement of the liquid free surface. (A) may be a point gamma source. (B) may be an activated organic crystal. The photomultiplier may operate at a constant voltage to provide linear high impedance output signals which are transformed to a low tension electric current. Low tension power supplied through a terminal is converted to high tension for the photomultiplier. (author)

  7. Encapsulated scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillation detector crystal is encapsulated in a hermetically sealed housing having a light-transmitting window at one end. The window is mounted within a ring, which is in turn welded to the end of a tubular body portion of the housing along thin weld flanges to reduce the amount of weld heat which must be applied. A thermal barrier is provided to resist the flow of welding heat from the weld to the seal between the ring and the window. Such thermal barrier includes a zone of relatively thin section located between the weld zone and the seal through which weld heat must flow. The zone of relatively thin cross section is in some embodiments, provided by a groove cut partially through the wall of the ring. (author)

  8. Encapsulated scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillation detector crystal is encapsulated in a hermetically sealed housing having a glass window. The window may be mounted in a ring by a compression seal formed during cooling of the ring and window after heating. The window may be chemically bonded to the ring with or without a compression seal. The ring is welded to the housing along thin weld flanges to reduce the amount of weld heat which must be applied. A thin section is provided to resist the flow of welding heat to the seal between the ring and the window thereby forming a thermal barrier. The thin section may be provided by a groove cut partially through the wall of the ring. A layer of PTFE between the tubular body and the crystal minimizes friction created by thermal expansion. Spring washers urge the crystal towards the window. (author)

  9. Space-based detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.;

    2014-01-01

    planned for 2015. This mission and its payload “LISA Technology Package” will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical......The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is...... bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of...

  10. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    A new set of muon alignment constants was approved in August. The relative position between muon chambers is essentially unchanged, indicating good detector stability. The main changes concern the global positioning of the barrel and of the endcap rings to match the new Tracker geometry. Detailed studies of the differences between track-based and optical alignment of DTs have proven to be a valuable tool for constraining Tracker alignment weak modes, and this information is now being used as part of the alignment procedure. In addition to the “split-cosmic” analysis used to investigate the muon momentum resolution at high momentum, a new procedure based on reconstructing the invariant mass of di-muons from boosted Zs is under development. Both procedures show an improvement in the momentum precision of Global Muons with respect to Tracker-only Muons. Recent developments in track-based alignment include a better treatment of the tails of residual distributions and accounting for correla...

  11. SOI monolithic pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, T.; Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Ikemoto, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tauchi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel detector using fully-depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel process technology. The SOI substrate is high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions and another layer is a low resistivity silicon for SOI-CMOS circuitry. Tungsten vias are used for the connection between two silicons. Since flip-chip bump bonding process is not used, high sensor gain in a small pixel area can be obtained. In 2010 and 2011, high-resolution integration-type SOI pixel sensors, DIPIX and INTPIX5, have been developed. The characterizations by evaluating pixel-to-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency (QE), dark noise, and energy resolution were done. A phase-contrast imaging was demonstrated using the INTPIX5 pixel sensor for an X-ray application. The current issues and future prospect are also discussed.

  12. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  13. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  14. Radiation detector with spodumene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amorim, Raquel Aline P.O.; Lima, Hestia Raissa B.R.; Souza, Susana O. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Sasaki, Jose M., E-mail: sasaki@fisica.ufc.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, {beta}-spodumene potentiality as a radiation detector was evaluated by making use of thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) techniques. The pellets were obtained from the {beta}-spodumene powder mixed with Teflon followed by a sintering process of thermal treatments of 300 deg/30 min and 400 deg/1.5 h. The samples were irradiated in standard gamma radiation beams with doses between 5 Gy and 10 kGy. The TL emission curve showed a prominent peak at 160 deg and in the case of TSEE a prominent peak at 145 Celsius approximately. Initial results show that the material is promising for high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  15. Alpine Pixel Detector Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Delebecque, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Geffroy, N; Massol, N; Rambure, T; Todorov, T

    2013-01-01

    A description of an optimized layout of pixel sensors based on a stave that combines both barrel and endcap module orientations. The mechanical stiffness of the structure is provided by carbon fiber shells spaced by carbon foam. The cooling of the modules is provided by two-phase $CO_{2}$ flowing in a thin titanium pipe glued inside the carbon fiber foam. The electrical services of all modules are provided by a single stave flex. This layout eliminates the need for separate barrel and endcap detector structures, and therefore the barrel services material in front of the endcap. The transition from barrel to endcap module orientation is optimized separately for each layer in order to minimize the active pixel area and the traversed material. The sparse module spacing in the endcap part of the stave allows for multiple fixation points, and for a stiff overall structure composed only of staves interconnected by stiff disks.

  16. A low temperature gravitational radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. O.

    1971-01-01

    The beginning design of an experiment is discussed for studying gravitational radiation by using massive detectors which are cooled to ultralow temperatures in order to improve the signal to noise ratios and the effective range and stability of the detectors. The gravitational detector, a low detection system, a cooled detector, magnetic support, superconducting shielding, and superconducting accelerometer detector are described.

  17. Neutron detector and fabrication method thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Harish B.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Ovechkina, Olena E.

    2016-08-16

    A neutron detector and a method for fabricating a neutron detector. The neutron detector includes a photodetector, and a solid-state scintillator operatively coupled to the photodetector. In one aspect, the method for fabricating a neutron detector includes providing a photodetector, and depositing a solid-state scintillator on the photodetector to form a detector structure.

  18. Space-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  19. Photon detector for MEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this past August and September, we had beam time at LAMPF for an engineering study of the second prototype cylindrical photon pair spectrometer for MEGA. All of the scintillators in the detector, a total of 40, and 40% of the drift chamber cells were instrumented for this run. The main photon arm activities during the run were to compare event patterns in the chamber to our Monte Carlo generated events, to study the trigger rate and to determine the background rates in the various detector elements. At low beam intensity, the event patterns from the chamber closely resembled those generated from the Monte Carlo. The background rates in the scintillators and the innermost drift chamber layer were close to those anticipated from previous studies. However the background rates in the outer two drift chamber layers were substantially higher than we had expected. This high rate was traced to low energy photons interacting with field and sense wires. The trigger studies during the run have led us to consider alternative strategies including two different first stage triggers and a second stage trigger. The combination of the second stage trigger with either of the two first stage triggers is expected to provide good detection efficiency while keeping the raw trigger rate below that required by the data acquisition system. Detailed discussions of both the background and trigger studies are discussed in this report. Since the run, our work on methods to obtain the z-position in the photon arm drift chambers has continued. Our goal is to obtain the z coordinate to 5 mm FWHM. At this level, the z uncertainty makes a negligible contribution to the overall photon energy resolution and only a small contribution to the angular resolution. We have been studying an option which uses delay lines to provide a direct z determination. The results of our study are discussed in this report

  20. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the

  1. Phase Detector For Rectangular Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dischert, Robert A.; Walter, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Phase detector for use with phase-locked-loops, servocontrol, and other electronic circuits designed to avoid disadvantages of other phase detectors. Used with both intermittent and continuous input signals. Circuit offers several advantages; reference signals continuous, burst of few pulses, or single pulse. Circuit "coasts" in absence of reference signal. Generates no steady-state output waveform at lock which makes filtering easier.

  2. Performance of the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falaleev, V P; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Karyukhin, A N; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Perevozchikov, V; Pernegger, H; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Belokopytov, Yu; Charpentier, Ph; Gavillet, Ph; Gouz, Yu; Jarlskog, Ch

    1996-01-01

    DELPHI (DEtector with Lepton, Photon and Hadron Identification) is a detector for e^+e^- physics, designed to provide high granularity over a 4\\pi solid angle, allowing an effective particle identification. It has been operating at the LEP (Large Electron-Positron) collider at CERN since 1989. This article reviews its performance.

  3. Radiation damage in semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraner, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    A survey is presented of the important damage-producing interactions in semiconductor detectors and estimates of defect numbers are made for MeV protons, neutrons and electrons. Damage effects of fast neutrons in germanium gamma ray spectrometers are given in some detail. General effects in silicon detectors are discussed and damage constants and their relationship to leakage current is introduced.

  4. The VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the VENUS detector is described. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the central tracking chamber and the electromagnetic shower calorimeters. Referring to computer simulations and test measurements with prototypes, the expected performance of our detector system is discussed. The contents are, for the most part, taken from the VENUS proposal /2/. (author)

  5. Cryogenic detectors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive introduction to cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is presented, covering conventional detectors cooled to low temperature (scintillators and semiconductors), superconductive and thermal sensitive devices, as well as the basics of cold electronics. After giving a critical overview of current work, we elaborate on possible new ways for further improvements and briefly evaluate the feasibility of the main proposed applications

  6. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagrande, L. E-mail: luca.casagrande@cern.ch; Abreu, M.C.; Bell, W.H.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D' Ambrosio, N.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O' Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M

    2002-01-21

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, 'resuscitate' when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the 'Lazarus effect'. The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors.

  7. Detector simulation for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detector simulation activities for SSC detector designs are described. Topics include the extensive work to date using existing programs. In addition, the several efforts to extend the capabilities of today's programs are described, as the practical and experimental use of new computing platforms for simulation. Finally, progress in the field is compared with the recommendations of the first workshop in this series in 1987

  8. ALICE Time Of Flight Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Alici, A

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time Of Flight (TOF) detector. The time measurement with the TOF, in conjunction with the momentum and track length measured by the tracking detector, is used to calculate the particle mass.

  9. Micro-channel plate detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  10. Dense detector for baryon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our studies indicate that the dense detector represents a potentially powerful means to search for baryon decay and to study this process, if it occurs. The detector has good angular resolution and particle identification properties for both showering and non-showering events. Its energy resolution is particularly good for muons, but pion, electron and photon energies can also be measured with resolutions of at least 25 percent (standard deviation). The dense detector has strong logistical advantages over other proposed schemes. These advantages imply not only a lower cost but also faster construction and higher reliability. A particular advantage is that the dense detector can be prototyped in order to optimize its characteristics prior to the construction of a large module. Subsequent modules can also be added easily, while the initial detector continues operation

  11. ENSTAR detector for -mesic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chatterjee; B J Roy; V Jha; P Shukla; H Machnder; GEM Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    We have initiated a search for a new type of nuclear matter, the -mesic nucleus, using beams from the multi-GeV hadron facility, COSY at Juelich, Germany. A large acceptance scintillator detector, ENSTAR has been designed and built at BARC, Mumbai and fully assembled and tested at COSY. A test run for calibration and evaluation has been completed. In this contribution we present the design and technical details of the ENSTAR detector and how it will be used to detect protons and pions (the decay products of -mesic bound state). The detector is made of plastic scintillators arranged in three concentric cylindrical layers. The readout of the detectors is by means of optical fibres. The layers are used to generate - spectra for particle identification and total energy information of stopped particles. The granularity of the detector allows for position ( and ) determination making the event reconstruction kinematically complete.

  12. The D0 detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab collider program is undergoing a major upgrade of both the accelerator complex and the two detectors. Operation of the Tevatron at luminosities upwards of ten time that currently provided will occur in early 1999 after the commissioning of the new Fermilab Main Injector. The D0 upgrade program has been established to deliver a detector that will meet the challenges of this environment. A new magnetic tracker consisting of a superconducting solenoid, a silicon vertex detector, a scintillating fiber central tracker, and a central preshower detector will replace the current central tracking and transition radiation chambers. We present the design and performance capabilities of these new systems and describe results from physics simulations that demonstrate the physics reach of the upgraded detector

  13. The PHOBOS detector at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Basilev, S.; Baum, R.; Betts, R. R.; Białas, A.; Bindel, R.; Bogucki, W.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Ceglia, M.; Chang, Y.-H.; Chen, A. E.; Coghen, T.; Connor, C.; Czyż, W.; Dabrowski, B.; Decowski, M. P.; Despet, M.; Fita, P.; Fitch, J.; Friedl, M.; Gałuszka, K.; Ganz, R.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Godlewski, J.; Gomes, C.; Griesmayer, E.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halik, J.; Halliwell, C.; Haridas, P.; Hayes, A.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hollis, R.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Kita, W.; Kotuła, J.; Kraner, H.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Law, C.; Lemler, M.; Ligocki, J.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Neal, M.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Patel, M.; Pernegger, H.; Plesko, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Ross, D.; Rosenberg, L.; Ryan, J.; Sanzgiri, A.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Scaduto, J.; Shea, J.; Sinacore, J.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Straczek, A.; Stodulski, M.; Strek, M.; Stopa, Z.; Sukhanov, A.; Surowiecka, K.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zalewski, K.; Żychowski, P.; Phobos Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    This manuscript contains a detailed description of the PHOBOS experiment as it is configured for the Year 2001 running period. It is capable of detecting charged particles over the full solid angle using a multiplicity detector and measuring identified charged particles near mid-rapidity in two spectrometer arms with opposite magnetic fields. Both of these components utilize silicon pad detectors for charged particle detection. The minimization of material between the collision vertex and the first layers of silicon detectors allows for the detection of charged particles with very low transverse momenta, which is a unique feature of the PHOBOS experiment. Additional detectors include a time-of-flight wall which extends the particle identification range for one spectrometer arm, as well as sets of scintillator paddle and Cherenkov detector arrays for event triggering and centrality selection.

  14. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cornat, R

    2012-01-01

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  15. Plastic neutron detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Tiffany M.S; King, Michael J.; Doty, F. Patrick

    2008-12-01

    This work demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of semiconducting {pi}-conjugated organic polymers for fast neutron detection via n-p elastic scattering. Charge collection in conjugated polymers in the family of substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPV) was evaluated using band-edge laser and proton beam ionization. These semiconducting materials can have high H/C ratio, wide bandgap, high resistivity and high dielectric strength, allowing high field operation with low leakage current and capacitance noise. The materials can also be solution cast, allowing possible low-cost radiation detector fabrication and scale-up. However, improvements in charge collection efficiency are necessary in order to achieve single particle detection with a reasonable sensitivity. The work examined processing variables, additives and environmental effects. Proton beam exposure was used to verify particle sensitivity and radiation hardness to a total exposure of approximately 1 MRAD. Conductivity exhibited sensitivity to temperature and humidity. The effects of molecular ordering were investigated in stretched films, and FTIR was used to quantify the order in films using the Hermans orientation function. The photoconductive response approximately doubled for stretch-aligned films with the stretch direction parallel to the electric field direction, when compared to as-cast films. The response was decreased when the stretch direction was orthogonal to the electric field. Stretch-aligned films also exhibited a significant sensitivity to the polarization of the laser excitation, whereas drop-cast films showed none, indicating improved mobility along the backbone, but poor {pi}-overlap in the orthogonal direction. Drop-cast composites of PPV with substituted fullerenes showed approximately a two order of magnitude increase in photoresponse, nearly independent of nanoparticle concentration. Interestingly, stretch-aligned composite films showed a substantial decrease in

  16. Plastic neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of semiconducting π-conjugated organic polymers for fast neutron detection via n-p elastic scattering. Charge collection in conjugated polymers in the family of substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPV) was evaluated using band-edge laser and proton beam ionization. These semiconducting materials can have high H/C ratio, wide bandgap, high resistivity and high dielectric strength, allowing high field operation with low leakage current and capacitance noise. The materials can also be solution cast, allowing possible low-cost radiation detector fabrication and scale-up. However, improvements in charge collection efficiency are necessary in order to achieve single particle detection with a reasonable sensitivity. The work examined processing variables, additives and environmental effects. Proton beam exposure was used to verify particle sensitivity and radiation hardness to a total exposure of approximately 1 MRAD. Conductivity exhibited sensitivity to temperature and humidity. The effects of molecular ordering were investigated in stretched films, and FTIR was used to quantify the order in films using the Hermans orientation function. The photoconductive response approximately doubled for stretch-aligned films with the stretch direction parallel to the electric field direction, when compared to as-cast films. The response was decreased when the stretch direction was orthogonal to the electric field. Stretch-aligned films also exhibited a significant sensitivity to the polarization of the laser excitation, whereas drop-cast films showed none, indicating improved mobility along the backbone, but poor π-overlap in the orthogonal direction. Drop-cast composites of PPV with substituted fullerenes showed approximately a two order of magnitude increase in photoresponse, nearly independent of nanoparticle concentration. Interestingly, stretch-aligned composite films showed a substantial decrease in photoresponse

  17. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs

  18. Detector instrumentation for nuclear fission studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil Jhingan

    2015-09-01

    The study of heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions require nuclear instrumentation that include particle detectors such as proportional counters, ionization chambers, silicon detectors, scintillation detectors, etc., and the front-end electronics for these detectors. Using the detectors mentioned above, experimental facilities have been developed for carrying out fusion–fission experiments. This paper reviews the development of detector instrumentation at IUAC.

  19. Replacement of HANARO Neutron Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Seung Gyu; Choe, Yeong San; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Hyung Kyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    In 1994, HANARO(High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) Neutron Detector of Wide-range Fission Chamber type by Gamma-Metrics were installed in HANARO Reactor Protection System(RPS) and Reactor Regulating System(RRS). HANARO selected the wide-range Fission Chamber which is better than Ionization Chamber at mechanical performance. Ionization Chamber is using the guide tube in underwater. Besides Ionization Chamber need the shutter mechanism for correction of detector. But wide-range Fission Chamber is not necessary the guide tube and shutter mechanism. HANARO Neutron Detectors are generating the electrical signal for using to operate the HANARO. We found the abnormal condition of the electrical signal in 2004 and that is considerably affecting the HANARO RPS and RRS. Therefore, we checked electrical signal and electrical insulation resistance in HANARO neutron detectors. Consequently, because the electrical insulation resistance was decreased, HANARO neutron detectors were operating the abnormal condition. So, we changed neutron detector. This paper will describe the procedure and results of changing neutron detectors.

  20. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  1. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    2010-01-01

    During the technical stop, the RPC team was part of the CMS task force team working on bushing replacements in the Endcap cooling system, also validating the repairs in terms of connectivity (HV, LV and signal cables), and gas leak, on RE chambers. In parallel, the RPC team profited from the opportunity to cure several known problems: six chambers with HV problems (1 off + 5 single gaps) were recovered on both gaps; four known HV problems were localized at chamber level; additional temperature sensors were installed on cooling pipes on negative REs; one broken LV module in RE-1 was replaced. During the last month, the RPC group has made big improvements in the operations tools. New trigger supervisor software has substantially reduced the configuration time. Monitoring is now more robust and more efficient in providing prompt diagnostics. The detector has been under central DCS control for two weeks. Improvements have been made to both functionality and documentation and no major problems were found. Beam s...

  2. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

      2011 data-taking was very satisfactory for both the RPC detector and trigger. The RPC system ran very smoothly in 2011, showing an excellent stability and very high data-tacking efficiency. Data loss for RPC was about 0.37%, corresponding to 19 pb−1. Most of the performance studies, based on 2011 data, are now completed and the results have been already approved by CMS to be presented at the RPC 2012 conference (February 2012 at LNF). During 2011, the number of disconnected chambers increased from six to eight corresponding to 0.8% of the full system, while the single-gap-mode chambers increased from 28 to 31. Most of the problematic chambers are due to bad high-voltage connection and electronic failures that can be solved only during the 2013-2014 Long Shutdown. 98.4% of the electronic channels were operational. The average detection efficiency in 2011 was about 95%, which was the same value measured during the HV scan done at the beginning of the 2011 data-taking. Efficiency has be...

  3. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    R.Carlin

    2010-01-01

    DT operation during 2010 LHC collisions, both in proton-proton and heavy ions, has been outstanding. The DT downtime has been below 0.1% throughout the whole year, mainly caused by the manual Resync commands that took around a minute for being processed. An automatic resynchronisation procedure has been enabled by August 27 and since then the downtime has been negligible (though constantly monitored). The need for these Resync commands is related to sporadic noise events that occasionally fill the RO buffers or unlock the readout links. Their rate is low, in the order of a few per week. Besides that, only one pp collisions run (1 hour 30 minutes run) has been marked as bad for DT, because of an incident with a temperature sensor that triggered a false alarm and powered off one wheel. Nevertheless, quite a large number of interventions (>30) have been made in the cavern during the year, in order to keep such a large fraction of the detector operational. Most of those are due to the overheating of the ...

  4. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The CSC detector continued to operate well during the March-June 2011 period. As the luminosity has climbed three orders of magnitude, the currents drawn in the CSC high-voltage system have risen correspondingly, and the current trip thresholds have been increased from 1 μA to 5 μA (and 20 in ME1/1 chambers). A possible concern is that a long-lasting and undesirable corona is capable of drawing about 1 μA, and thus may not be detected by causing current trips; on the other hand it is easily dealt with by cycling HV when detected. To better handle coronas, software is being developed to better detect them, although a stumbling block is the instability of current measurements in some of the channels of the CAEN supplies used in ME1/1. A survey of other issues faced by the CSC Operations team was discussed at the 8th June 2011 CSC Operations/DPG meeting (Rakness). The most important issues, i.e. those that have caused a modest amount of downtime, are all being actively addressed. These are:...

  5. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    S. Szillasi

    2013-01-01

    The CMS detector has been gradually opened and whenever a wheel became exposed the first operation was the removal of the MABs, the sensor structures of the Hardware Barrel Alignment System. By the last days of June all 36 MABs have arrived at the Alignment Lab at the ISR where, as part of the Alignment Upgrade Project, they are refurbished with new Survey target holders. Their electronic checkout is on the way and finally they will be recalibrated. During LS1 the alignment system will be upgraded in order to allow more precise reconstruction of the MB4 chambers in Sector 10 and Sector 4. This requires new sensor components, so called MiniMABs (pictured below), that have already been assembled and calibrated. Image 6: Calibrated MiniMABs are ready for installation For the track-based alignment, the systematic uncertainties of the algorithm are under scrutiny: this study will enable the production of an improved Monte Carlo misalignment scenario and to update alignment position errors eventually, crucial...

  6. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT collaboration is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance – after three years since the last access to the chambers and their front-end electronics – and upgrade. The most critical maintenance interventions are chambers and Minicrate repairs, which have not begun yet, because they need proper access to each wheel of the CMS barrel, meaning space for handling the big chambers in the few cases where they have to be extracted, and, more in general, free access from cables and thermal shields in the front and back side of the chambers. These interventions are planned for between the coming Autumn until next spring. Meanwhile, many other activities are happening, like the “pigtail” intervention on the CAEN AC/DC converters which has just taken place. The upgrade activities continue to evolve in good accordance with the schedule, both for the theta Trigger Board (TTRB) replacement and for the Sector Collector (SC) relocation from the UXC to the US...

  7. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierluigi Paolucci

    2013-01-01

    In the second part of 2013 the two main activities of the RPC project are the reparation and maintenance of the present system and the construction and installation of the RE4 system. Since the opening of the barrel, repair activities on the gas, high-voltage and electronic systems are being done in parallel, in agreement with the CMS schedule. In YB0, the maintenance of the RPC detector was in the shadow of other interventions, nevertheless the scaffolding turned out to be a good solution for our gas leaks searches. Here we found eight leaking channels for about 100 l/h in total. 10 RPC/DT modules were partially extracted –– 90 cm –– in YB0, YB–1 and YB–2 to allow for the replacement of FE and LV distribution boards. Intervention was conducted on an additional two chambers on the positive endcap to solve LV and threshold control problems. Until now we were able to recover 0.67% of the total number of RPC electronic channels (1.5% of the channels...

  8. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Redondo Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    The DT system has operated successfully during the entire 2011 data-taking: the fraction of good channels was always >99.4 % and the downtime caused to CMS amounts to a few inverse picobarns. This excellent performance does not come without a price: the DT group requested more than 30 short accesses to the underground experimental cavern (UXC).  A large fraction of interventions was for dealing with overheated LV Anderson connectors, whose failure can affect larger sections of the detector (a whole chamber, or half a wheel of the CMS barrel, etc.). A crash programme for reworking those connections will take place during the Year-End Technical Stop. The system of six vd chambers (VDC) that were installed on the DT exhaust gas line have operated successfully. The VDCs are small drift chambers the size of a shoebox that measure the drift velocity every 10 minutes. Possible deviations from the nominal value could be caused by a contamination of the gas mixture or changes in pressure or temperat...

  9. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    The RPC group has invested a large effort in the study of trigger spikes observed during CRAFT data taking. The chambers are susceptible to noise generated by the flickering of fluorescent and projector lamps in the cavern (with magnetic field on). Soon after the end of CRAFT, it was possible to reproduce the phenomena using a waveform generator and to study possible modifications to be implemented in the grounding schema. Hardware actions have been already taken in order to reduce the detector sensitivity: star washers on the chamber front panels and additional shielding have been added where possible. During the shutdown maintenance activity many different problems were tackled on the barrel part. A few faulty high voltage connector/cable problems were fixed; now only two RPC chambers are left with single-gap mode operation. One chamber in YB+2 was replaced due to gas leakage. All the front-end electronic boards were replaced in 3 chambers (stations MB2 and MB3 in YB-2), that had been damaged after the coo...

  10. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Breedon

    Figure 2: Five ME4/2 chambers mounted on the +endcap. At the end of June, five large, outer cathode strip chambers (CSC) that were produced as spares during the original production were mounted on part of the disk space reserved for ME4/2 on the positive endcap (Fig. 2). The chambers were cabled, attached to services, and fully integrated and commissioned into the CSC DAQ and trigger systems. Comprising almost a full trigger sector, CMS will be able to test the significant improvement the trigger efficiency of the EMU system that the presence of the full ME4/2 ring is expected to bring. The return of beam in November was observed as “splash” events in the CSCs in which the detectors were showered with a huge number of particles at the same time. Although the CSCs were operating at a lower standby voltage the multiple hits on a strips could not be individually distinguished.&am...

  11. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Redondo

    2011-01-01

    During the second quarter of 2011, the DT system has continued to operate successfully with a high fraction of good channels (>99 %) and causing extremely little downtime to CMS. The high fraction of operated channels did not come for free: DT requested 18 short UXC accesses in the 3 months from March to May 2011. The dominant causes for these interventions were HV related interventions (7), which typically affect a small fraction of a chamber, and interventions for dealing with overheated LV Anderson connectors (7), whose failure could affect larger fractions of the detector (a whole chamber, half a wheel). With respect to the CMS downtime, a successful effort with colleagues from the DT Track Finder of the Level-1 Trigger system allowed to overcome a relatively relevant source of downtime from DTTF FED Out-Of-Sync errors, which would appear randomly during data-taking. The DT group developed a system configuration that would make it possible to reproduce the error without beam, thereby sparing lumin...

  12. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Fernandez Bedova and M. Dallavalle

    2010-01-01

    After successful operation during the 2009 LHC run, a number of fixes and improvements were carried out on the DT system the winter shutdown. The main concern was related with the impact of the extensive water leak that happened in October in YE+1. Opening of CMS end-caps allowed the DT crew to check if any Minicrates (containing the first level of readout and trigger electronics) in YB+2 and YB-2 were flooded with water. The affected region from top sectors in YB+2 reaches down to the bottom sectors in YB-2 following the water path in the barrel from end to end. No evidence of water penetration was observed, though the passage of water left oxidation and white streaks on the iron and components. In particular, large signs of oxidation have been seen on the YB-2 MB1 top and bottom stations. Review of the impact in YB+1 remains for future openings of CMS wheels, and at present, effort is focused on setting up the water leak detection system in the detector. Another important issue during this shutd...

  13. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  14. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Fernandez Bedoya

    2012-01-01

      The major activity of the DT group during this Year-End Technical Stop has been the reworking of LV modules. It has been a large campaign, carefully planned, to try to solve, once and for all, the long-standing problem of Anderson Power connectors overheating. The solution involved removing the 140 CAEN modules from the detector (6.5 kg each), soldering of “pigtails” in a temporary workshop in USC, and thorough testing of all the modules in a local system installed in USC. The operation has been satisfactorily smooth, taking into account the magnitude of the intervention. The system is now back in good shape and ready for commissioning. In addition, HV boards have been cleaned up, HV USC racks have been equipped with water detection cables, and the gas and HV have been switched back on smoothly. Other significant activities have also taken place during this YETS, such as the installation of a new and faster board for the Minicrates secondary link and the migration to Scienti...

  15. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Pugliese

    2010-01-01

    In the second half of 2010 run, the overall behavior of the RPC system has been very satisfactory, both in terms of detector and trigger performance. This result was achieved through interventions by skilled personnel and fine-tuned analysis procedures. The hardware was quite stable: both gas and power systems did not present significant problems during the data-taking period, confirming the high reliability achieved. Only few interventions on some HV or LV channels were necessary during the periodical technical accesses. The overall result is given by the stable percentage of active channels at about 98.5%. The single exception was at beginning of the ion collisions, when it dipped to 97.4% because of the failure of one LV module, although this was recovered after a few days. The control and monitoring software is now more robust and efficient, providing prompt diagnostics on the status of the entire system. Significant efforts were made in collaboration with the CMS cooling team to secure proper working ...

  16. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2013-01-01

    During LS1, the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) collaboration is focusing its efforts on installation and commissioning of the fourth endcap station (RE4) and on the reparation and maintenance of the present system (1100 detectors). The 600 bakelite gaps, needed to build 200 double-gap RE4 chambers are being produced in Korea. Chamber construction and testing sites are located at CERN, in Ghent University, and at BARC (India). At present, 42 chambers have been assembled, 32 chambers have been successfully tested with cosmic rays runs and 7 Super Modules, made by two chambers, have been built at CERN by a Bulgarian/Georgian/Italian team and are now ready to be installed in the positive endcap. The 36 Super Modules needed to complete the positive endcap will be ready in September and installation is scheduled for October 2013. The Link-Board system for RE4 is under construction in Naples. Half of the system has been delivered at CERN in June. Six crates (Link-Board Boxes) and 75 boards, needed to instrument t...

  17. Peak reading detector circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peak reading detector circuit serves for picking up the instants during which peaks of a given polarity occur in sequences of signals in which the extreme values, their time intervals, and the curve shape of the signals vary. The signal sequences appear in measuring the foetal heart beat frequence from amplitude-modulated ultrasonic, electrocardiagram, and blood pressure signals. In order to prevent undesired emission of output signals from, e. g., disturbing intermediate extreme values, the circuit consists of the series connections of a circuit to simulate an ideal diode, a strong unit, a discriminator for the direction of charging current, a time-delay circuit, and an electronic switch lying in the decharging circuit of the storage unit. The time-delay circuit thereby causes storing of a preliminary maximum value being used only after a certain time delay for the emission of the output signal. If a larger extreme value occurs during the delay time the preliminary maximum value is cleared and the delay time starts running anew. (DG/PB)

  18. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle

    In the past months, the DT electronics has run in a stable and reliable way, demonstrated again through the CRAFT exercise. Operation when the CMS magnetic field was on has been satisfactory. The detector safety control and monitoring is improving constantly as the DT group accumulates running experience. The DT DAQ and DCS systems proved very stable during the intensive CRAFT period. The few issues that were identified by the DCS and on-line monitoring did not prevent the run to continue, so that the record of the DT in the data taking efficiency was very good. The long running period was also used to continue the transition from a system run by experts to one run by shifters, which was in the large part successful. Improvements, mostly in consolidation of error reporting, were identified and will be addressed in the coming shut-down. During the CRAFT data taking, DT triggered about 300 million cosmics with the magnet at 3.8T and the silicon strip tracker in the readout. Although a dedicated configuratio...

  19. Thermoluminescent Detectors in Mixed Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mala, P; Biskup, B; Roeed, K

    2012-01-01

    This note reports on using of thermoluminescent detectors for radiation monitoring in the LHC tunnel and in the shielded areas around the tunnel. The accumulated annual doses in these areas vary a lot so a dosimeter used there should cover a large dose range. TL detectors can measure dose from 0.1 mGy to few kGy (with a recently proposed new technique which needs more studies up to 1 MGy). This report presents studies of these detectors in mixed fields similar to radiation field in the LHC and the possible usage of their results for calculation of high energy hadron and thermal neutron fluence.

  20. Radiation tests of semiconductor detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Chmill, Valery

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the response of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) detectors to ionizing irradiation. Detectors based on π-υ junction formed by deep level centers doping. The detectors have been irradiated with 137Cs γ-rays up to 110 kGy, with 6 MeV mean energy neutron up to approximately 6 · 1014 n/cm2, with protons and mixed beam up to 1015 p/cm2. Results are presented for the effects on leakage currents and charge collection efficiencies for minimum ionizing electrons and alpha particles. Th...

  1. Cryogenic operation of silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, P. E-mail: paula.collins@cern.ch; Barnett, I.B.M.; Bartalini, P.; Bell, W.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Buontempo, S.; Borer, K.; Bowcock, T.; Buytaert, J.; Casagrande, L.; Chabaud, V.; Chochula, P.; Cindro, V.; Via, C. Da; Devine, S.; Dijkstra, H.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Dormond, O.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Frei, R.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O' Shea, V.; Palmieri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Parkes, C.; Ruggiero, G.; Ruf, T.; Saladino, S.; Schmitt, L.; Smith, K.; Stavitski, I.; Verbitskaya, E.; Vitobello, F.; Zavrtanik, M

    2000-06-01

    This paper reports on measurements at cryogenic temperatures of a silicon microstrip detector irradiated with 24 GeV protons to a fluence of 3.5x10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} and of a p-n junction diode detector irradiated to a similar fluence. At temperatures below 130 K a recovery of charge collection efficiency and resolution is observed. Under reverse bias conditions this recovery degrades in time towards some saturated value. The recovery is interpreted qualitatively as changes in the effective space charge of the detector causing alterations in the depletion voltage.

  2. Cryogenic operation of silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, P; Bartalini, P; Bell, W; Berglund, P; de Boer, Wim; Buontempo, S; Borer, K; Bowcock, T J V; Buytaert, J; Casagrande, L; Chabaud, V; Chochula, P; Cindro, V; Da Vià, C; Devine, S R H; Dijkstra, H; Dezillie, B; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Dormond, O; Eremin, V V; Esposito, A P; Frei, R; Granata, V; Grigoriev, E; Hauler, F; Heising, S; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Mikuz, M; Niinikoski, T O; O'Shea, V; Palmieri, V G; Paul, S; Parkes, C; Ruggiero, G; Ruf, T; Saladino, S; Schmitt, L; Smith, K; Stavitski, I; Verbitskaya, E; Vitobello, F; Zavrtanik, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements at cryogenic temperatures of a silicon microstrip detector irradiated with 24 GeV protons to a fluence of 3.5*10/sup 14/ p/cm/sup 2/ and of a p-n junction diode detector irradiated to a similar fluence. At temperatures below 130 K a recovery of charge collection efficiency and resolution is observed. Under reverse bias conditions this recovery degrades in time towards some saturated value. The recovery is interpreted qualitatively as changes in the effective space charge of the detector causing alterations in the depletion voltage. (17 refs).

  3. Detector materials: germanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1981 Nuclear Science Symposium. The basic physical properties of elemental semiconductors are reviewed. The interaction of energetic radiation with matter is discussed in order to develop a feeling for the appropriate semiconductor detector dimensions. The extremely low net dopant concentrations which are required are derived directly from the detector dimensions. A survey of the more recent techniques which have been developed for the analysis of detector grade semiconductor single crystals is presented

  4. Cooling in the ALICE detector

    OpenAIRE

    Almén, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    At CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland, a new modern particle accelerator called the LHC, Large Hadron Collider, is being projected. One of the four large detectors of the LHC, ALICE, consists of many sub-detectors. Temperature stability in ALICE is of great importance for the experiments performed here.  In the ALICE sub-detector TPC, Time Projection Chamber, there is a great risk for thermal instability.  This will cause false data in the experiments, a...

  5. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the detector in the radiation environment are discussed. The device has been taking colliding beams data since May of 1992, performing at its best design specifications and enhancing the physics program of CDF. (orig.)

  6. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  7. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  8. SSC muon detector group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on results from the Muon Detector Group which met to discuss aspects of muon detection for the reference 4π detector models put forward for evaluation at the Snowmass 1986 Summer Study. We report on: suitable overall detector geometry; muon energy loss mechanisms; muon orbit determination; muon momentum and angle measurement resolution; raw muon rates and trigger concepts; plus we identify SSC physics for which muon detection will play a significant role. We conclude that muon detection at SSC energies and luminosities is feasible and will play an important role in the evolution of physics at the SSC

  9. Electromagnetic shower detector-calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the state-of-the-art of electromagnetic calorimeters is presented. The choice of detector based on the experimental requirements in cost, spatial resolution, energy resolution, and hadron rejection is discussed

  10. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  11. Computational studies of BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salathe, Marco [Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay within the active volume of germanium detectors. Simulations of the physical processes within such detectors are vital to gain a better understanding of the measurements. The simulation procedure follows three steps: First it calculates the electric potential, next it simulates the electron and hole drift within the germanium crystal and finally it generates a corresponding signal. The GERDA collaboration recently characterized newly produced Broad Energy Germanium Detectors (BEGe) in the HADES underground laboratory in Mol, Belgium. A new pulse shape simulation library was established to examine the results of these measurements. The library has also proven to be a very powerful tool for other applications such as detector optimisation studies. The pulse shape library is based on ADL 3.0 (B. Bruyneel, B. Birkenbach, http://www.ikp.uni-koeln.de/research/agata/download.php) and m3dcr (D. Radford, http://radware.phy.ornl.gov/MJ/m3dcr).

  12. Simple dynamic electromagnetic radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Detector monitors gamma dose rate at particular position in a radiation facility where a mixed neutron-gamma environment exists, thus determining reactor power level changes. Device also maps gamma intensity profile across a neutron-gamma beam.

  13. Microscopic Simulation of Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, Heinrich

    Detailed computer simulations are indispensable tools for the development and optimization of modern particle detectors. The interaction of particles with the sensitive medium, giving rise to ionization or excitation of atoms, is stochastic by its nature. The transport of the resulting photons and charge carriers, which eventually generate the observed signal, is also subject to statistical fluctuations. Together with the readout electronics, these processes - which are ultimately governed by the atomic cross-sections for the respective interactions - pose a fundamental limit to the achievable detector performance. Conventional methods for calculating electron drift lines based on macroscopic transport coefficients used to provide an adequate description for traditional gas-based particle detectors such as wire chambers. However, they are not suitable for small-scale devices such as micropattern gas detectors, which have significantly gained importance in recent years. In this thesis, a novel approach, bas...

  14. Detector Fundamentals for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-03

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy course and provides an overview of the following concepts: detector system components, intrinsic and absolute efficiency, resolution and linearity, and operational issues and limits.

  15. Gas chromatography: mass selective detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of mass spectrometry technique directed for detecting molecular structures is described, with some considerations about its operational features. This mass spectrometer is used as a gas chromatography detector. (author)

  16. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrino Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the use of neutrino detectors to monitor nuclear reactors is currently a very active field of research. While neutrino detectors located close to reactors have been used to provide information about the global performance of the reactors, a general improvement of the technique is needed in order to use it in a practical way to monitor the fissile contents of the fuel of the nuclear reactors or the thermal power delivered. I describe the current status of the Angra Neutrino Project, aimed to building a low-mass neutrino detector to monitor the Angra II reactor of the Brazilian nuclear power plant Almirante Alvaro Ramos in order to explore new approaches to reactor monitoring with neutrino detectors.

  17. Postcolumn reaction detectors for HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, R.W.; Jansen, H.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1985-12-01

    Currently, the best and most reliable HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) detectors are UV-VIS absorbance, fluorescence, and electrochemical detectors. It is attractive to try to expand their range of application by using suitable chemical derivatization techniques to convert the analytes of interest with their originally poor detection properties into compounds that can be detected with high sensitivity with these detectors. Besides an improvement of the detection properties, the chemical reaction can also enhance the selectivity of the total analytical method. The derivatization can be carried out either prior to the HPLC separation or by doing the reaction in an on-line postcolumn mode. Comparative advantages and disadvantages of these two approaches have been discussed previously. This paper will discuss on-line postcolumn derivatization. A general scheme of an HPLC system equipped with an on-line postcolumn reaction detector is given. 40 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Scintillation detector of secondary electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detector is based on powder or single crystal scintillators and is formed by a scintillator shaped as a cone, a truncated cone or a flat disk plate. The scintillator is accommodated in the cylindrical cage of the detector under the level of the cage's front, and is attached to the front of a light guide which is coaxially aligned in the cylindrical detector cage. To increase the collecting efficiency for secondary electrons impinging on the scintillator, an electron-optical diaphragm with a positive voltage is positioned in the detector cage and screened by means of a screening tube with a ground potential. This diaphragm also contributes to secondary electron focusing to the scintillator centre. (Z.S). 2 figs

  19. Nano-strip Metal Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we consider a design of a Nano-strip Metal Detector (NMD) for applications based on micro-beams of charged particles or synchrotron radiation (microbiology, radiation therapy, new construction materials etc

  20. X spectrometry with pulse detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is made of various types of pulse X-ray detectors (scintillators + photomultipliers, proportional counters, ionisation chambers, semi-conductor detectors: Si (Li) and Ge (Li) ) as well as of their associated electronic equipment, from the point of view of the resolving power, the detection efficiency and the working surface, for photons of from 100 eV to 100 KeV. Semiconductor detectors (Si (Li) up to 50 KeV, Ge (Li) from 10 KeV up to 100 KeV) should rapidly find uses in all cases where an excellent resolving power is necessary (in X-fluorescence for example), whereas proportional counters present greater advantages for applications calling for a high detection surface, and also for very soft X-rays because the window of the detector can be very thin. (author)

  1. Rapid Multiplex Microbial Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC, in collaboration with Lucigen, proposes a rapid nucleic acid-based detector for spaceflight water systems to enable simultaneous quantification of multiple...

  2. A Rapid Coliform Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC, in collaboration with Lucigen, proposes a rapid genetic detector for spaceflight water systems to enable real-time detection of E-coli with minimal...

  3. Signal processing for semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A balanced perspective is provided on the processing of signals produced by semiconductor detectors. The general problems of pulse shaping to optimize resolution with constraints imposed by noise, counting rate and rise time fluctuations are discussed

  4. Physics and detector simulation requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the computing environment needed to meet the requirements for high energy physics Monte Carlo Calculations for the simulation of Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory physics and detectors

  5. Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Gagan B

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by a vertex detector, which comprises two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector that is aimed to be commissioned towards the middle of 2017.

  6. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALICE experiment is designed to study the properties of hadron and nucleus collisions in a new energy regime at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A fundamental observable in such collisions is the multiplicity distribution of charged particles. A forward multiplicity detector has been designed to extend the charged particle multiplicity coverage of the ALICE experiment to pseudorapidities of -3.4<η<-1.7 and 1.7<η<5.0. This detector consists of five rings, each containing 10240 Si strips, divided into sectors comprised of Si sensors bonded and glued to hybrid PC boards equipped with radiation hard preamplifiers. The output of these preamplifiers is multiplexed into custom-made fast ADC chips located directly behind the Si sensors on the detector frame. These ADCs are read out, via optical fibers, to a data acquisition farm of commodity PCs. The design and characteristics of the ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector will be discussed

  7. Radiation Hazard Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  8. Properties of Micromegas pad detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micromegas detectors with a resistive strip layout are well suited to measure particle tracks in high rate environments. However, classical Micromegas with a 2D strip readout structure can lead to ambiguities in the track reconstruction. This problem can be solved by adding an additional Micromegas layer with a pad readout structure. In this talk first results obtained with a 10 x 10 cm2 Micromegas detector with 500 pads are presented. Two different layouts are compared and discussed.

  9. Wide-angle electron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, functioning, and main calibration, characteristics of a wide-angle detector, capable of recording electrons with energies >= 8 keV and insensitive to u.v. solar radiation are described. A description of the sensor (electron trap) and its electronics in the analog (DEGAFOC) and counting (DEGAFOI) modes is given. Examples of telemetry recordings, illustrating the operation of the detector are included. (Auth.)

  10. Standardization of detector control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current and future detectors for high-energy and/or nuclear physics experiments require highly intelligent detector control systems. In order to reduce resources, the construction of a standardized template for the control systems based on the commercially available superviser control and data acquisition (SCADA) system has been proposed. The possibility of constructing this template is discussed and several key issues for evaluation of SCADA as the basis for such a template are presented. (author)

  11. Coal-shale interface detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coal-shale interface detector for use with coal cutting equipment is described. The detector consists of a reciprocating hammer with an accelerometer to measure the impact of the hammer as it penetrates the ceiling or floor surface of a mine. Additionally, a pair of reflectometers simultaneously view the same surface, and the outputs from the accelerometer and reflectometers are detected and jointly registered to determine when an interface between coal and shale is being cut through.

  12. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  13. A calorimeter with array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5 x 25 = 125 detector array has been designed for a calorimeter. Each element is consisted of a graphite block and a chromel-alumel. A new '0'-point set up was designed by using the critical temperature of the liquid nitrogen as the '0'-point of the temperature. A FY-1 data acquisition system was used for the detector array. The energy distribution of the electron beam has been measured on large-area diode with the system

  14. New class of neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czirr, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    An optimized neutron scattering instrument design must include all significant components, including the detector. For example, useful beam intensity is limited by detector dead time; detector pixel size determines the optimum beam diameter, sample size, and sample to detector distance; and detector efficiency vs. wavelength determines the available energy range. As an example of the next generation of detectors that could affect overall instrumentation design, we will describe a new scintillator material that is potentially superior to currently available scintillators. We have grown and tested several small, single crystal scintillators based upon the general class of cerium-activated lithium lanthanide borates. The outstanding characteristic of these materials is the high scintillation efficiency-as much as five times that of Li-glass scintillators. This increase in light output permits the practical use of the exothermic B (n, alpha) reaction for low energy neutron detection. This reaction provides a four-fold increase in capture cross section relative to the Li (n, alpha) reaction, and the intriguing possibility of demanding a charged-particle/gamma ray coincidence to reduce background detection rates. These new materials will be useful in the thermal and epithermal energy ran at reactors and pulsed neutron sources.

  15. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  16. DUAL-BAND INFRARED DETECTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    As the infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. Both HgCdTe detectors and quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs photodetectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolor capability in these regions. The main challenges facing all multicolor devices are more complicated device structtures, thicker and multilayer material growth, and more difficult device fabrication, especially when the array size gets larger and pixel size gets smaller. In the paper recent progress in development of two-color HgCdTe photodiodes and quantum well infrared photodetectors is presented.More attention is devoted to HgCdTe detectors. The two-color detector arrays are based upon an n-P-N (the capital letters mean the materials with larger bandgap energy) HgCdTe triple layer heterojunction design. Vertically stacking the two p-n junctions permits incorporation of both detectros into a single pixel. Both sequential mode and simultaneous mode detectors are fabricated. The mode of detection is determined by the fabrication process of the multilayer materials.Also the performances of stacked multicolor QWIPs detectors are presented. For multicolor arrays, QWIP's narrow band spectrum is an advantage, resulting in low spectral crosstalk. The major challenge for QWIP is developing broadband or multicolor optical coupling structures that permit efficient absorption of all required spectral bands.

  17. Department of Radiation Detectors: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (full text) Work carried out in 1997 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification using Ion and Plasma Beams. Semiconductor detectors: Semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation are among the basic tools utilized in such fields of research and industry as nuclear physics, high energy physics, medical (oncology) radiotherapy, radiological protection, environmental monitoring, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence non-destructive analysis of chemical composition, nuclear power industry. The Department all objectives are: - search for new types of detectors, - adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, - producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, - manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments, - scientific development of the staff. These 1997 objectives were accomplished particularly by: - research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. transmission type Si(Li) detectors with extremely thin entrance and exit window), - development of technology of high-resistivity (HRSi) silicon detectors and thermoelectric cooling systems (KBN grant), - study of the applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, - manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. In accomplishing of the above, the Department cooperated with interested groups of physicists from our Institute (P-I and P-II Departments), Warsaw University, Warsaw Heavy Ion Laboratory and with some technology Institutes based in Warsaw (ITME, ITE). Some detectors and services have been delivered to customers on a commercial basis. X-Rat tube generators: The Department conducts research on design and technology of producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. In 1997, work on a special

  18. Performance of Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cartiglia, N; Ely, S; Fadeyev, V; Galloway, Z; Marchetto, F; Mazza, G; Ngo, J; Obertino, M; Parker, C; Rivetti, A; Shumacher, D; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Seiden, A; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2013-01-01

    The development of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors has opened up the possibility of manufacturing silicon detectors with signal larger than that of traditional sensors. In this paper we explore the timing performance of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, and in particular we demonstrate the possibility of obtaining ultra-fast silicon detector with time resolution of less than 20 picosecond.

  19. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  20. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  1. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported

  2. 4π dipole detector for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 4π dipole detector is considered for the study of intermediate and high Pt physics at the SSC. Dipole detectors emphasize physics over a large rapidity interval, and are typically superior to solenoid detectors for the measurement of forward charged particles. The strengths of solenoid and dipole detectors are largely orthogonal, and suggest that these detectors form a complimentary pair for the study of high Pt phenomena at the SSC

  3. The EXO-200 detector, part I: Detector design and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Barbeau, P S; Bartoszek, L; Baussan, E; Beauchamp, E; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Chauhan, D; Cleveland, B; Conley, R; Cook, J; Cook, S; Coppens, A; Craddock, W; Daniels, T; Davis, C G; Davis, J; deVoe, R; Dobi, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Franco, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hagemann, C; Hall, C; Hall, K; Hargrove, C; Herrin, S; Hodgson, J; Hughes, M; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Kirk, J; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K; Leonard, D S; Leonard, F; LePort, F; Mackay, D; MacLellan, R; Marino, M; Merkle, K; Mong, B; Díez, M Montero; Müller, A R; Neilson, R; Odian, A; O'Sullivan, K; Oullet, C; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Pushkin, K; Rivas, A; Rollin, E; Rowson, P C; Sabourov, A; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Slutsky, S; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Swift, M; Tosi, D; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Vuilleumier, J -M; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wichoski, U; Wodin, J; Wright, J D; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R

    2012-01-01

    EXO-200 is an experiment designed to search for double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with a single-phase, liquid xenon detector. It uses an active mass of 110 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in the isotope 136 in an ultra-low background time projection chamber capable of simultaneous detection of ionization and scintillation. This paper describes the EXO-200 detector with particular attention to the most innovative aspects of the design that revolves around the reduction of backgrounds, the efficient use of the expensive isotopically enriched xenon, and the optimization of the energy resolution in a relatively large volume.

  4. Accelerating ROP detector layout optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ADORE (Alternating Detector layout Optimization for REgional overpower protection system) algorithm for performing the optimization of regional overpower protection (ROP) system for CANDU® reactors have been recently developed. The simulated annealing (SA) stochastic optimization technique is utilized to come up with a quasi optimized detector layout for the ROP systems. Within each simulated annealing history, the objective function is calculated as a function of the trip set point (TSP) corresponding to the detector layout for that particular history. The evaluation of the TSP is done probabilistically using the ROVER-F code. Since during each optimization execution thousands of candidate detector layouts are evaluated, the overall optimization process is time consuming. Since for each ROVER-F evaluation the number of fuelling ripples controls the execution time, reducing the number of fuelling ripples used during the calculation of TSP will reduce the overall optimization execution time. This approach has been investigated and the results are presented in this paper. The challenge is to construct a set of representative fuelling ripples which will significantly speedup the optimization process while guaranteeing that the resulting detector layout has similar quality to the ones produced when the complete set of fuelling ripples is employed. Results presented in this paper indicate that a speedup of up to around 40 times is attainable when this approach is utilized. (author)

  5. Status of diamond particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To continue the exciting research in the field of particle physics new accelerators and experiments are under construction. In some of these experiments, e.g. ATLAS and CMS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or HERA-B at DESY, the detectors have to withstand an extreme environment. The detectors must be radiation hard, provide a very fast signal, and be as thin as possible. The properties of CVD diamond allow to fulfill these requirements and make it an ideal material for the detectors close to the interaction region of these experiments, i.e. the vertex detectors or the inner trackers. The RD42 collaboration is developing diamond detectors for these applications. The program of RD42 includes the improvement of the charge collection properties of CVD diamond, the study of the radiation hardness and the development of low-noise radiation hard readout electronics. An overview of the progress achieved during the last years will be given. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Progress on CMS detector lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    It was an amazing engineering challenge - the lowering of the first hugeendcap disc (YE+3) of the CMS detector slowly and carefully 100 metres underground. The spectacular descent took place on 30 November and was documented by a film crew from Reuters news group. The uniquely shaped slice is 16 m high, about 50 cm thick, and weighs 400 tonnes. It is one of 15 sections that make up the complete CMS detector. The solid steel structure of the disc forms part of the magnet return yoke and is equipped on both sides with muon chambers. A special gantry crane lowered the element, with just 20 cm of leeway between the edges of the detector and the walls of the shaft! On 12 December, a further section of the detector (YE+2) containing the cathode strip chamber made the 10-hour journey underground. This piece is 16 m high and weighs 880 tonnes. There are now four sections of the detector in the experimental cavern, with a further 11 to follow. The endcap disc YE+3 (seen in the foreground) begins its journey down the ...

  7. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  8. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  9. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    The commissioning effort is presently addressing two main areas: the commissioning of the hardware components at the pit and the coordination of the activities of the newly constituted Detector Performance groups (DPGs). At point 5, a plan regarding the service cavern and the commissioning of the connections of the off-detector electronics (for the data collection line and trigger primitive generation) to the central DAQ and the central Trigger has been defined. This activity was started early February and will continue until May. It began with Tracker electronics followed so far by HCAL and CSC. The goal is to have by May every detector commission, as much as possible, their data transfer paths from FED to Central DAQ as well as their trigger setups between TPGs and Global Level 1 trigger. The next focus is on connections of front-ends to the service cavern. This depends strongly on the installations of services. Presently the only detector which has its link fibers connected to the off-detector electr...

  10. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on 3He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type

  11. Causal particle detectors and topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate particle detector responses in some topologically non-trivial spacetimes. We extend a recently proposed regularization of the massless scalar field Wightman function in four-dimensional Minkowski space to arbitrary dimension, to the massive scalar field, to quotients of Minkowski space under discrete isometry groups and to the massless Dirac field. We investigate in detail the transition rate of inertial and uniformly accelerated detectors on the quotient spaces under groups generated by (t,x,y,z)-bar (t,x,y,z+2a), (t,x,y,z)-bar (t,-x,y,z), (t,x,y,z)-bar (t,-x,-y,z), (t,x,y,z)-bar (t,-x,-y,z+a) and some higher dimensional generalizations. For motions in at constant y and z on the latter three spaces the response is time dependent. We also discuss the response of static detectors on the RP3 geon and inertial detectors on RP3 de Sitter space via their associated global embedding Minkowski spaces (GEMS). The response on RP3 de Sitter space, found both directly and in its GEMS, provides support for the validity of applying the GEMS procedure to detector responses and to quotient spaces such as RP3 de Sitter space and the RP3 geon where the embedding spaces are Minkowski spaces with suitable identifications

  12. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  13. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  14. The ATLAS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Schlenker, S; Kersten, S; Hirschbuehl, D; Braun, H; Poblaguev, A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Talyshev, A; Zimmermann, S; Franz, S; Gutzwiller, O; Hartert, J; Mindur, B; Tsarouchas, CA; Caforio, D; Sbarra, C; Olszowska, J; Hajduk, Z; Banas, E; Wynne, B; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Nemecek, S; Thompson, PD; Mandic, I; Deliyergiyev, M; Polini, A; Kovalenko, S; Khomutnikov, V; Filimonov, V; Bindi, M; Stanecka, E; Martin, T; Lantzsch, K; Hoffmann, D; Huber, J; Mountricha, E; Santos, HF; Ribeiro, G; Barillari, T; Habring, J; Arabidze, G; Boterenbrood, H; Hart, R; Marques Vinagre, F; Lafarguette, P; Tartarelli, GF; Nagai, K; D'Auria, S; Chekulaev, S; Phillips, P; Ertel, E; Brenner, R; Leontsinis, S; Mitrevski, J; Grassi, V; Karakostas, K; Iakovidis, G.; Marchese, F; Aielli, G

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. Twelve different sub-detectors as well as the common experimental infrastructure are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS enables equipment supervision of all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the order of 106 operational parameters. Higher level control system layers allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling, and manage the communication with external systems such as the LHC. This contribution firstly describes the status of the ATLAS DCS and the experience gained during the LHC commissioning and the first physics data taking operation period. Secondly, the future evolution and maintenance constraints for the coming years an...

  15. Method of manufacturing radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for manufacturing the detector for ionizing radiation and/or photons provides for an insulating layer of Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, Be2O3, varnish or plastic to be surfaced and above it a metal coating e.g. by means of planar technique or photoetching technique. Thereby metal insulation contacts (MIS contacts) will be created. The metal or resistance layer may be strip-shaped. In order to use the detector as neutron flux detector it is possible to put an additional strip- or raster-shaped coating of 10B or 6Li on the insulating resp. the metal layer. (DG)

  16. The ALICE detector data link

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, G; Csató, P; Dénes, E; Kiss, T; Meggyesi, Z; Sulyán, J; Vesztergombi, G; Eged, B; Gerencsér, I; Novák, I; Soós, C; Tarján, D; Telegdy, A; Tóth, N

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE detector data link has been designed to cover all the needs for data transfer between the detector and the data-acquisition system. It is a 1 Gbit/s, full-duplex, multi-purpose fibre optic link that can be used as a medium for the bi-directional transmission of data blocks between the front-end electronics and the data- acquisition system and also for the remote control and test of the front-end electronics, In this paper the concept, the protocol, the specific test tools, the prototypes of the detector data link and the read-out receiver card, their application in the ALICE-TPC test system and the integration with the DATE software are presented. The test results on the performance are also shown. (14 refs).

  17. Automatic control of movable detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An invention is described, relating to a microprocessor based control system for a plurality of movable detectors e.g. a nuclear reactor flux mapping system. It consists of two operationally independent electronic subsystems each including a microprocessor which controls the positioning of separate groups of in-core detectors within core thimbles. A communications link, in the form of auxiliary bases and buffers, is provided between the two subsystems to enable one subsystem and its associated group of detectors to assume the flux mapping responsibility of the other subsystem in the event of a subsystem malfunction. Normally, this communication involves presentation of system status information from one subsystem to a multi-port memory in the other system for coordinate control of both systems. This arrangement provides increased system availability as compared to the prior art systems. (author)

  18. Semiconductor radiation detectors. Device physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from basic principles, the author, whose own contributions to these developments have been significant, describes the rapidly growing field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This development was stimulated by requirements in elementary particle physics where it has led to important scientific discoveries. It has now spread to many other fields of science and technology. The book is written in a didactic way and includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. The working principles of semiconductor radiation detectors are explained in an intuitive way, followed by formal quantitative analysis. Broad coverage is also given to electronic signal readout and to the subject of radiation damage. The book is the first to comprehensively cover the semiconductor radiation detectors currently in use. It is useful as a teaching guide and as a reference work for research and applications. (orig.)

  19. UCNB and Nab Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeck, Bryan; UCNB Collaboration; Nab Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The UCNB and Nab experiments, designed to measure correlations in neutron beta decay, will detect the charged decay particles with segmented, large area, thick silicon detectors with thin dead layers. Development of the detector mount and the associated preamplifier and data acquisition system has been ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the LANSCE Ultracold Neutron facility. A 24 channel prototype preamplifier and data acquisition system has been demonstrated to meet performance specifications, including a 10 keV trigger threshold (required to detect the decay protons), a 3 keV FWHM particle kinetic energy resolution (required to measure the decay electron energy spectrum to sufficient accuracy), and a 40 ns pulse rise time (required to identify the direction of travel of decay electrons). Results of timing and coincidence studies, a report on progress to a fully instrumented detection system, and a final design for the detector mount compatible with the Nab experimental setup will be presented.

  20. A xenon solar neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgadze, A. Sh.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Päs, H.; Zdesenko, Yu. G.

    1997-06-01

    The neutrino capture by 131Xe with the threshold at 352 keV as reaction to detect solar neutrinos is examined. The most important feature of this process is its high sensitivity to beryllium neutrinos, that contribute approximately 40% to the total capture rate predicted in the Standard Solar Model (45 SNU). Also the procedure of extraction of the daughter cesium atoms from liquid xenon as well as other technical problems concerning preparation of the cesium sample, low background measurements and side reactions for a possible realization as a solar neutrino detector are discussed. The expected counting rate from the SSM for a xenon detector is ≈ 1500 events/yr·kt. Combining the results of such a detector with other experimental data it will be possible to test the existence of vacuum oscillations and the MSW effect and/or input parameters of the Standard Solar Models.

  1. Solid-state track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention has been aimed at a solid-state track detector on the basis of cellulose nitrate with an improved signal-to-noise ratio for the ionizing corpuscular radiation detection in a neutron field. The detector can be applied in particular to the local radiation field imaging, to induced autoradiography, e.g. on geological samples, semiconducting materials or metals, to nuclear physics and nuclear engineering, to radiometry and dosimetry. The new detector consists of cellulose nitrate in which the nitrogen with a natural isotopic composition has been replaced by the isotope 15N either completely or partly. It is suitable for a neutron dosimeter by combining foils of varying 15N content

  2. Radiation Hardening of Silicon Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Leroy, C; Glaser, M

    2002-01-01

    %RD48 %title\\\\ \\\\Silicon detectors will be widely used in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider where high radiation levels will cause significant bulk damage. In addition to increased leakage current and charge collection losses worsening the signal to noise, the induced radiation damage changes the effective doping concentration and represents the limiting factor to long term operation of silicon detectors. The objectives are to develop radiation hard silicon detectors that can operate beyond the limits of the present devices and that ensure guaranteed operation for the whole lifetime of the LHC experimental programme. Radiation induced defect modelling and experimental results show that the silicon radiation hardness depends on the atomic impurities present in the initial monocrystalline material.\\\\ \\\\ Float zone (FZ) silicon materials with addition of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, germanium and tin were produced as well as epitaxial silicon materials with epilayers up to 200 $\\mu$m thickness. Their im...

  3. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  4. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Allison, J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Ashton, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Bahan, G.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Baines, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Banks, J.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barlow, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barnett, S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Beeston, C. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Chrin, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Clowes, S.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Davies, O.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Duerdoth, I.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hinde, P.S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hughes-Jones, R.E. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Lafferty, G.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Loebinger, F.K. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Macbeth, A.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; McGowan, R.F. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Moss, M.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Murphy, P.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Nijjhar, B. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; O`Dowd, A.J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Pawley, S.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Phillips, P.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Richards, G.E.

    1995-04-21

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.)).

  5. Silicon Detector Letter of Intent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

    2010-05-26

    This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

  6. Silicon Detectors for Neutron Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uher, J.; Frojdh, Ch.; Holý, T.; Jakůbek, J.; Petersson, S.; Pospíšil, S.; Thungstrom, G.; Vavřík, Daniel; Vykydal, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 958, č. 7 (2007), s. 101-104. ISSN 0168-9002. [International Summer School on Nuclear Physics Methods and Accelerators in Biology and Medicine . Praha, 08.07.2007-19.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Grant ostatní: GAMPO(CZ) 1H-PK2/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : neutron detectors * neutron imaging * 3D detector Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.114, year: 2007

  7. New science with new detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graafsma, H.; Grubel, G.; Ryan, A.; Dautet, H.; Longoni, A.; Fiorini, H.; Vacchi, A.; Broennimann, C.; Gruner, S.; Berar, J.F.; Boudet, N.; Clemens, J.C.; Delpierre, P.; Siddons, P.; O' Connor, P.; Geronimo, G. de; Rehak, P.; Ryan, C.; Poulsen, H.F.; Wulff, M.; Lorenc, M.; Kong, Q.; Lo Russo, M.; Cammarata, M.; Reichenbach, W.; Eybert, L.; Claustre, L.; Miao, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Riekel, C.; Monaco, G.; Cloetens, P.; Huotari, S.; Albergamo, F.; Henriquet, C.; Graafsma, H.; Ponchut, C.; Vanko, G.; Verbeni, R.; Mokso, R.; Ludwig, W.; Boller, E.E.; Hignette, O.; Lambert, J.; Bohic, S

    2005-07-01

    The ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility), with the help of the user community, is in the process of developing its long term strategy, covering the next 10 to 20 years. A central role in this strategy will be given to detector developments, since it is clear that the biggest possible improvement in performance is by increasing the overall detection capabilities. These improvements can be both quantitative, meaning more and larger detectors, and qualitative, meaning new detection concepts. This document gathers the abstracts and transparencies of most presentations of this workshop.

  8. Development of the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZEUS is a detector for esup(±)p collisions at HERA. It is designed with the best possible hadronic energy resolution in mind. A depleted-uranium calorimeter provides a resolution of 0.35 Esup(-1/2) + .02 and hermetic coverage. Charged particles are tracked to resolution σsub(p)/p = 0.002p + 0.003 (900) and -3. Silicon calorimeter pads and transition radiation detectors provide excellent electron identification. The luminosity monitor also tags photons at Q2 = O, and leading protons are detected over a wide momentum range. (author)

  9. High-efficiency photoionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-05-12

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 +- 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20/sup 0/C.

  10. New science with new detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility), with the help of the user community, is in the process of developing its long term strategy, covering the next 10 to 20 years. A central role in this strategy will be given to detector developments, since it is clear that the biggest possible improvement in performance is by increasing the overall detection capabilities. These improvements can be both quantitative, meaning more and larger detectors, and qualitative, meaning new detection concepts. This document gathers the abstracts and transparencies of most presentations of this workshop

  11. Low-temperature tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Anbinderis, P; Anbinderis, T; D'Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, M; Buontempo, S; Chen, W; Cindro, V; Dezillie, B; Dierlamm, A; Eremin, V; Gaubas, E; Gorbatenko, V; Granata, V; Grigoriev, E; Grohmann, S; Hauler, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Hempel, O; Herzog, R; Härkönen, J; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Kalesinskas, V; Kapturauskas, J; Laiho, R; Li, Z; Luukka, Panja; Mandic, I; De Masi, R; Menichelli, D; Mikuz, M; Militaru, O; Nüssle, G; O'Shea, V; Pagano, S; Paul, S; Perea-Solano, B; Piotrzkowski, K; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, K; Rahman, M; Rato-Mendes, P; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Sousa, P; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Vaitkus, J; Verbitskaya, E; Da Vià, C; Vlasenko, L; Vlasenko, M; Wobst, E; Zavrtanik, M

    2004-01-01

    RD39 collaboration develops new detector techniques for particle trackers, which have to withstand fluences up to 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -2 / of high-energy particles. The work focuses on the optimization of silicon detectors and their readout electronics while keeping the temperature as a free parameter. Our results so far suggest that the best operating temperature is around 130 K. We shall also describe in this paper how the current-injected mode of operation reduces the polarization of the bulk silicon at low temperatures, and how the engineering and materials problems related with vacuum and low temperature can be solved. (9 refs).

  12. Low-temperature tracking detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinikoski, T.O. E-mail: tapio.niinikoski@cern.ch; Abreu, M.; Anbinderis, P.; Anbinderis, T.; D' Ambrosio, N.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chen, W.; Cindro, V.; Dezillie, B.; Dierlamm, A.; Eremin, V.; Gaubas, E.; Gorbatenko, V.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Grohmann, S.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Hempel, O.; Herzog, R.; Haerkoenen, J.; Ilyashenko, I.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Kalesinskas, V.; Kapturauskas, J.; Laiho, R.; Li, Z.; Luukka, P.; Mandic, I.; De Masi, R.; Menichelli, D.; Mikuz, M.; Militaru, O.; Nuessle, G.; O' Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Paul, S.; Perea Solano, B.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rahman, M.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rouby, X.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sousa, P.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Vaitkus, J.; Verbitskaya, E.; Via, C. da; Vlasenko, L.; Vlasenko, M.; Wobst, E.; Zavrtanik, M

    2004-03-11

    RD39 collaboration develops new detector techniques for particle trackers, which have to withstand fluences up to 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} of high-energy particles. The work focuses on the optimization of silicon detectors and their readout electronics while keeping the temperature as a free parameter. Our results so far suggest that the best operating temperature is around 130 K. We shall also describe in this paper how the current-injected mode of operation reduces the polarization of the bulk silicon at low temperatures, and how the engineering and materials problems related with vacuum and low temperature can be solved.

  13. The Super-Kamiokande detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Super-Kamiokande is the world's largest water Cherenkov detector, with net mass 50,000 tons. During the period April, 1996 to July, 2001, Super-Kamiokande I collected 1678 live-days of data, observing neutrinos from the Sun, Earth's atmosphere, and the K2K long-baseline neutrino beam with high efficiency. These data provided crucial information for our current understanding of neutrino oscillations, as well as setting stringent limits on nucleon decay. In this paper, we describe the detector in detail, including its site, configuration, data acquisition equipment, online and offline software, and calibration systems which were used during Super-Kamiokande I

  14. Silicon detectors in imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it is described some to those characteristics of silicon detectors which make them very useful in the fields of Medical Physics. The main application of these devices are in detecting low energy X-ray radiation (from 10 to 100 KeV). This range of energy is enough in many applications on crystallographic and on medical imaging. This paper also briefly refers to the readout system for acquiring the radiation events for imaging purposes. Finally, it is discussed the different kinds of silicon detectors which are silicon strip, pixel and drift

  15. Detector light response modeling for a thick continuous slab detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a method to improve the position decoding for thick crystal versions (i.e., ≥8mm) of the continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) PET detector by more accurately modeling the detector light response function (LRF). The LRF for continuous detectors varies with the depth of interaction (DOI) of the detected photon. This variation in LRF can result in a positioning error for two-dimensional positioning algorithms. We explore a method to improve positioning performance by deriving two lookup tables, corresponding to the front and back regions of the crystal. The DETECT2000 simulation package was used to investigate the light response characteristics for a 48.8 mm by 48.8 mm by 10 (8) mm slab of LSO coupled to a 64-channel, flat-panel PMT. The data are then combined to produce the two-dimensional light collection histograms. Light collection histograms that have markedly non-Gaussian distributions are characterized as a combination of two Gaussian functions, where each Gaussian function corresponds to a DOI region of the crystal. The results indicate that modest gains in positioning accuracy are achieved near the central region of the crystal. However, significant improvements in spatial resolution and positioning bias are achieved for the corner section of the detector. (author)

  16. Study of oxide facing at silicone detectors of ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of oxide facing on silicone in discrete phases of technological preparation of detectors and interaction of gold (aluminium) steamed with SiOx layer were studied. The homogeneity of Au and Si)x layers and interface Au-SiOx and SiOx-Si were examined. The methods SIMS, and partially XPS, AES and RBS were used

  17. Conceptual Design Studies for a CEPC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S V

    2016-01-01

    The physics potential of the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) can be significantly strengthened by two detectors with complementary designs. A promising detector approach based on the Silicon Detector (SiD) designed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is presented. Several simplifications of this detector for the lower energies expected at the CEPC are proposed. A number of cost optimizations of this detector are illustrated using full detector simulations. We show that the proposed changes will enable to reach the physics goals at the CEPC.

  18. ST ECS error handling and detector safety

    CERN Document Server

    Esperante Pereira, D

    2010-01-01

    This note describes the automatic operation sequences that the ECS implements in order to operate the ST detector in a safe and reliable way. First, the start-up sequences to set the detector in a well known state are described. In addition the possible ST detector states based on the status of the different detector elements will be defined. The states are of crucial interest for the safe operation of the detector when the LHC beam is ready. Besides, the ECS automatic actions taken in case of abnormal status of any of the detector elements are reported. Next, the operational alarm ranges and the error recovery mechanisms are mentioned.

  19. Temperature-Stabilized Phase Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeeman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Precise temperature stabilized phase detector for clock signal distribution maintains 100-MHz signal with stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power even for step changes of 20 degrees C in ambient temperature. Stabilization achieved by heating unit to 45 degrees C and maintaining temperature through bridge circuit.

  20. The LHeC Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Kostka, Peter; Polini, Alessandro; South, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) is a proposed upgrade to the LHC, to provide high energy, high luminosity electron-proton collisions to run concurrently with Phase 2 of the LHC. The baseline design of a detector for the LHeC is described, driven by the requirements from the projected physics programme and including some preliminary results from first simulations.