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Sample records for bevatron

  1. Experiences with the Bevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofgren, Edward J.

    1956-04-05

    The Bevatron is still undergoing a process of gradual improvement to increase both the magnitude of the beam and the reliability. The operating conditions for optimum adjustment at the present stage of development are summarized.

  2. The Bevatron liquid nitrogen circulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.; Stover, G.

    1987-03-01

    A nitrogen liquefier and computer controlled valving system have been added to the Bevatron cryoliner vacuum system to cut operating costs by reducing liquid nitrogen consumption. The computer and interface electronic systems, which control the temperatures of twenty-eight liquid nitrogen circuits, have been chosen and designed to operate in the Bevatron's pulsating magnetic field. The nitrogen exhaust is routed back to a liquefier, of about five kilowatt capacity, liquefied, and rerouted through the cooling circuits. A description of the system and operating results are presented

  3. BERKELEY: Farewell to the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Nearly a hundred current and former Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory employees gathered at the Bevatron accelerator on 21 February to watch Ed Lofgren turn off the beam for the last time. Lofgren, in charge of the venerable machine from its completion in 1954 until his retirement in 1979, pushed a button that someone long ago labeled ''atom smasher offer'', bringing to an end four decades of accomplishment in high energy and heavy ion physics. Owen Chamberlain, who shared the 1959 physics Nobel with Emilio Segré for the discovery of the antiproton at the Bevatron, was among those present at the closing ceremony. The shutdown came 39 years to the week after Bevatron beam first circulated, and a touching moment came just after Lofgren shut the machine down when the poignant strains of the ''Taps'' salute wafted out over the PA system. The Bevatron - or Bevalac, as it was called after being linked to the Super HILAC linear accelerator in the 1970s - made major contributions in four distinct areas of research: high energy physics, heavy ion physics, medical research and therapy, and space-related studies of radiation damage and heavy particles in space. As well as the discovery of the antiproton, the early years of the Bevatron saw classic studies of the kaon, leading to a deeper understanding of both strong and weak interaction physics. With Luis Alvarez' development of Donald Glaser's original bubble chamber idea into a prolific physics technique, the Bevatron was a major focus of the heady days of resonance hunting in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Most recently the Bevalac (Bevatron-SuperHILAC combination) pioneered relativistic heavy ion physics. The central focus of this research programme was the production and study of extreme conditions in nuclear matter. Highlights include the first definitive evidence of collective flow of nuclear matter at high temperatures and densities, studies of the nuclear

  4. Heavy ion source development at the Bevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, R.M.; Zajec, E.

    1975-10-01

    The Bevatron 20 MeV duoplasmatron source is currently being modified with the goal of producing 1 mA of 20 Neon 3+ . Initial tests at 420 keV show a total beam of 20 mA of which 400 μA is 20 Neon 3+ . The quantity of beam in various charge states is determined with a pulse field magnetic spectrometer. Titanium sublimation and cryogenic pumping of the PIG source in the High Voltage Terminal and its resultant effects on the acceleration of carbon and nitrogen are discussed

  5. Improving the Bevatron vacuum to 10-10 torr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.; Elioff, T.; Grunder, H.

    1981-03-01

    Pressure of approx. 10 -10 torr is needed in the Bevatron to accelerate partially-stripped very-heavy ions (e.g. U 69+ ) in the Bevatron without significant loss due to interactions with the residual gas. This ultra-high vacuum will be achieved by installing (summer and fall 1981) a cryogenic liner, mostly 12 0 K, surrounding the Bevatron circulating beam. The novel construction features are presented along with results from successful tests of prototype sections. This is believed to be the largest application of cryogenic pumping to particle accelerators yet undertaken

  6. Improved Bevatron local injector ion source performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Zajec, E.

    1985-05-01

    Performance tests of the improved Bevatron Local Injector PIG Ion Source using particles of Si 4 + , Ne 3 + , and He 2 + are described. Initial measurements of the 8.4 keV/nucleon Si 4 + beam show an intensity of 100 particle microamperes with a normalized emittance of .06 π cm-mrad. A low energy beam transport line provides mass analysis, diagnostics, and matching into a 200 MHz RFQ linac. The RFQ accelerates the beam from 8.4 to 200 keV/nucleon. The injector is unusual in the sense that all ion source power supplies, the ac distribution network, vacuum control equipment, and computer control system are contained in a four bay rack mounted on insulators which is located on a floor immediately above the ion source. The rack, transmission line, and the ion source housing are raised by a dc power supply to 80 kilovolts above earth ground. All power supplies, which are referenced to rack ground, are modular in construction and easily removable for maintenance. AC power is delivered to the rack via a 21 kVA, 3-phase transformer. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, G.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes his work in the 1950s on the Bevatron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory using photographic emulsion stacks to track kaons, pions, tau and theta particles. He later managed to produce track evidence of an antiproton annihilation event, the first recorded of its kind. (UK)

  8. Initial operation of the new bevatron local injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Dwinell, R.; Gough, R.

    1985-01-01

    Initial operational characteristics of a new Bevatron injector system are described. It is capable of providing an independent source of ions to the Bevatron through mass 40. The new injector consists of a sputter ion PIG source, operating on a 60 kV DC platform, an RFQ linac, and two Alvarez linacs, all operating at 199 MHz. Beams with q/A greater than or equal to 0.14 are accelerated to 200 keV/n in the RFQ and to 800 keV/n in the first Alvarez tank. Each Alvarez operates in the 2βlambda mode, and each is followed by a foil stripper. Beams with a q/A greater than or equal to 0.32 are accelerated through the second Alvarez to 5 MeV/n, fully stripped, and injected into the Bevatron. Because the Bevatron can be efficiently switched between this injector and the Super HILAC injector, a more efficient operations schedule is made possible to meet the increasingly diverse needs of the Biomedical and Nuclear Science research programs

  9. Initial operation of the new Bevatron local injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Dwinell, R.; Gough, R.

    1985-05-01

    Initial operational characteristics of a new Bevatron injector system are described. It is capable of providing an independent source of ions to the Bevatron through mass 40. The new injector consists of a sputter ion PIG source, operating on a 60 kV dc platform, an RFQ linac, and two Alvarez linacs, all operating at 199 MHz. Beams with q/A greater than or equal to 0.14 are accelerated to 200 keV/n in the RFQ and to 800 keV/n in the first Alvarez tank. Each Alvarez operates in the 2βlambda mode, and each is followed by a foil stripper. Beams with a q/A greater than or equal to 0.32 are accelerated through the second Alvarez to 5 MeV/n, fully stripped, and injected into the Bevatron. Because the Bevatron can be efficiently switched between this injector and the SuperHILAC injector, a more efficient operations schedule is made possible to meet the increasingly diverse needs of the Biomedical and Nuclear Science research programs. 5 refs

  10. Bevatron/Bevalac user's handbook: biology and medicine. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The Bevalac Biomedical Facility develops a source of near-relativistic heavy ions for applications to radiation biology, radiation therapy and diagnostic radiology. Pulsed beams of high LET heavy ions with variable pulse width, frequency, intensity and energy are produced and delivered to the Biomedical Facility by the Bevatron/Bevalac accelerator complex. Dosimetry equipment under computer control provides accurate determinations of absorbed doses in all regions of the Bragg curve. Depth-dose modifying devices and precise specimen positioning equipment are available. Animal housing and tissue culture facilities are convenient to the experimenter. This handbook is designed to provide the user with the relevant information for planning, proposing and executing an experiment

  11. Induced radioactivity in Bevatron concrete radiation shielding blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, G.C.; Donahue, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The Bevatron accelerated protons up to 6.2 GeV and heavy ions up to 2.1 GeV/amu. It operated from 1954 to 1993. Radioactivity was induced in some concrete radiation shielding blocks by prompt radiation. Prompt radiation is primarily neutrons and protons that were generated by the Bevatron's primary beam interactions with targets and other materials. The goal was to identify the gamma-ray emitting nuclides (t 1/2 > 0.5 yr) that could be present in the concrete blocks and estimate the depth at which the maximum radioactivity presently occurs. It is shown that the majority of radioactivity was produced via thermal neutron capture by trace elements present in concrete. The depth of maximum thermal neutron flux, in theory, corresponds with the depth of maximum induced activity. To estimate the depth at which maximum activity occurs in the concrete blocks, the LAHET Code System was used to calculate the depth of maximum thermal neutron flux. The primary beam interactions that generate the neutrons are also modeled by the LAHET Code System

  12. Thirty years at the forefront: a perspective on the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    The operational experience of the Bevatron can be divided into four major periods: first, the commissioning and early experimental period, when the Bevatron was among the highest-energy machines available (1954-1962); second, a period of increasing beam intensity and higher sophistication in the experimental program (1963-1973); third, the light-ion (A less than or equal to 56) period (1974-1981; and finally, the ongoing heavy-ion period. Reference material for this paper was taken mainly from internal LBL reports and log books

  13. Ground motion measurements at the LBL Light Source site, the Bevatron and at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Majer, E.I.; More, V.D.; O'Connell, D.R.; Shilling, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the technique for measuring ground motion at the site of the 1.0 to 2.0 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Facility which was known as the Advanced Light Source (in 1983 when the measurements were taken). The results of ground motion measurements at the Light Source site at Building 6 at LBL are presented. As comparison, ground motion measurements were made at the Byerly Tunnel, the Bevatron, Blackberry Canyon, and SLAC at the Spear Ring. Ground Motion at the Light Source site was measured in a band from 4 to 100 Hz. The measured noise is primarily local in origin and is not easily transported through LBL soils. The background ground motion is for the most part less than 0.1 microns. Localized truck traffic near Building 6 and the operation of the cranes in the building can result in local ground motions of a micron or more for short periods of time. The background motion at Building 6 is between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher than ground motion in a quiet seismic tunnel, which is representative of quiet sites worldwide. The magnitude of the ground motions at SLAC and the Bevatron are comparable to ground motions measured at the Building 6 Light Source site. However, the frequency signature of each site is very different

  14. A proposal to pulse the Bevatron/Bevalac main guide field magnet with SCR power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias, B.; Alonso, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lothrop, F.

    1989-01-01

    The Bevatron/Bevalac Main Guide Field Power Supply was originally designed to provide a 15,250 Volt DC. at sign 8400 Ampere peak magnet pulse. Protons were accelerated to 6.2 Gev. The 128 Megawatt (MW) pulse required two large motor-generator (MG) sets with 67 ton flywheels to store 680 Megajoules of energy. Ignitron rectifiers are used to rectify the generator outputs. Acceleration of heavy ions results in an operating schedule with a broad range of peak fields. The maximum field of 12.5 kilogauss requires a peak pulse of 80 MW. Acceleration of ions to 1.0 kilogauss requires an 8 MW peak pulse. One MG set can provide pulses below 45 MW. Peak pulses of less than 15 MW are now a large block of the operating schedule. A proposal has been made to replace the existing MG system with eight SCR power supplies for low field operation. The SCR supplies will be powered directly from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's 12.3 KV. power distribution system. This paper describes the many advantages of the plan. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Simulations of the neutron energy-spectra at the Olympus Gate Environmental Monitoring Station due to historical Bevatron operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Thomas, R.H.; Zeman, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Offsite neutron fluences resulting from Bevatron operations reached a maximum in 1959, prior to the addition of a permanent concrete roof shield, which was constructed in 1962. From the first operation of the Bevatron measurements of neutron fluence were made at locations around the perimeter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) campus. Since the late 1950's measurements made at several locations, and particularly at the site of what is now called the Olympus Gate Environmental Monitoring Station, have been routinely reported and published. Early measurements were used to establish the shape of the neutron-energy spectrum from which an energy-averaged fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficient could be derived. This conversion coefficient was then applied to a measured total neutron fluence to obtain the appropriate dose equivalent quantity required by regulation. Recent work by Thomas et al. (2000) have compared the early conversion coefficients used in the sixties with those accepted today and suggest suggested that ''the dose equivalents reported in the late fifties and early sixties were conservative by factors between two and four. In any current review of the historical data, therefore it would be prudent to reduce the reported dose equivalents by at least a factor of two.'' However, that analysis was based on the ''state of the art'' neutron energy-spectra of the '60s. This paper provides a detailed knowledge of the neutron energy spectrum at the site boundary paper thus removing any uncertainty in the analysis of Thomas et al., which might be caused by the use of the early neutron energy-spectra. Detailed Monte Carlo analyses of the interactions of 6.2 GeV protons in thick, medium-A targets are described. In the computer simulations, neutrons produced were allowed to scatter in the atmosphere. Detailed neutron energy spectra were calculated at a distance and elevation corresponding to the location of the Olympus Gate EMS. Both older

  16. A reappraisal of the reported dose equivalents at the boundary of the University of California Radiation Laboratory during the early days of Bevatron operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Smith, Alan R.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2000-01-01

    Accelerator-produced radiation levels at the perimeter of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (the Berkeley Laboratory) reached a maximum in 1959. Neutrons produced by the Bevatron were the dominant component of the radiation field. Radiation levels were estimated from measurements of total neutron fluence and reported in units of dose equivalent (rem). Accurate conversion from total fluence to dose equivalent demands knowledge of both the energy spectrum of accelerator-produced neutrons and the appropriate conversion coefficient functions for different irradiation geometries. At that time (circa 1960), such information was limited, and it was necessary to use judgment in the interpretation of measured data. The Health Physics Group of the Berkeley Laboratory used the best data then available and, as a matter of policy, reported the most conservative (largest) values of dose equivalent supported by their data. Since the early sixties, significant improvements in the information required to compute dose equivalent, particularly in the case of conversion coefficients, have been reported in the scientific literature. This paper reinterprets the older neutron measurements using the best conversion coefficient data available today. It is concluded that the dose equivalents reported in the early sixties would be reduced by at least a factor of two using current methods of analysis

  17. I. The theory of aberrations of quadrupole focusing arrays. II. Ion optical design of high quality extracted synchrotron beams with application to the bevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meads, Jr, Philip Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1963-05-15

    In Part One they formulate in a general way the problem of analyzing and evaluating the aberrations of quadrupole magnet beam systems, and of characterizing the shapes and other properties of the beam envelopes in the neighborhood of foci. They consider all aberrations, including those due to misalignments and faulty construction, through third order in small parameters, for quadrupole beam systems. One result of this study is the development of analytic and numerical techniques for treating these aberrations, yielding useful expressions for the comparison of the aberrations of different beam systems. A second result of this study is a comprehensive digital computer program that determines the magnitude and nature of the aberrations of such beam systems. The code, using linear programming techniques, will adjust the parameters of a beam system to obtain specified optical properties and to reduce the magnitude of aberrations that limit the performance of that system. They examine numerically, in detail, the aberrations of two typical beam systems. In Part Two, they examine the problem of extracting the proton beam from a synchrotron of 'H' type magnet construction. They describe the optical studies that resulted in the design of an external beam from the Bevatron that is optimized with respect to linear, dispersive, and aberration properties and that uses beam elements of conservative design. The design of the beam is the result of the collaboration of many people representing several disciplines. They describe the digital computer programs developed to carry out detailed orbit studies which were required because of the existence of large second order aberrations in the beam.

  18. Ripple reduction activities in the MG room at the Bevatron, August 1991 to August 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasbalg, M.; Bennett, M.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: magnet - voltage dividers temperature ampersand voltage influence error calculation; magnet filters summarized data table; magnet transfer function measurement setup and connection diagrams; response of existing magnet system including ripple reduction filters - Dec 1991; magnet filters - mutual inductance problem; and damping the magnet filters

  19. Spill control and intensity monitoring for the Bevatron--Bevalac external particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, J.J.; Crebbin, K.C.

    1975-03-01

    Time-intensity modulation in beam spill can be of primary concern in some experiments. The major source of this beam structure is from main-guide field-magnet power supply ripple. If the time constants are appropriate, then final control of beam structure can be accomplished by closed loop control of the intensity of beam spill. The response characteristics of the feedback system will determine the final structure. At high beam fluxes signal to noise ratio of beam detectors, in the feedback loop, can be improved by at least four orders of magnitude by using photomultiplier tubes and a water Cherenkov counter in place of the normal secondary emission monitor. At beam fluxes below 10 10 particles per second (PPS), a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube are used in the feedback system. A plastic scintillator and photomultiplier are also used in the beam as intensity monitors. At intensities below about 10 7 PPS standard counting techniques are used. For intensities between 10 6 to 110 9 PPS, the photomultiplier is used as a current source driving an integrating circuit which is then calibrated to read the number of particles per pulse. (U.S.)

  20. High intensity uranium beams from the superHILAC and the bevatron: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The two injectors formerly used at the SuperHILAC were a 750-kV air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton (EVE) and a 2.5-MV pressurized HV multiplier (ADAM). The EVE injector can deliver adequate intensities of ions up to mass 40 (argon). The ADAM injector can accelerate ions with lower charge-to-mass ratios, and they can produce beams of heavier ions. The intensity of these beams decreases as the mass number increases, with the lowest practical intensity being achieved with lead beams. Experience with the two existing injectors provided substantial help in defining the general requirements for a new injector which would provide ample beams above mass 40. The requirements for acceptance by the first tank of the SuperHILAC are a particle velocity #betta# = 0.0154 (corresponding to an energy of 113 keV/amu) and a charge-to-mass ratio of 0.046 or larger. Present ion source performance dictates an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton as a pre-accelerator because of its easy accessibility and its good overall reliability. The low charge state ions then receive further acceleration and, if necessary, subsequent stripping to the required charge state before injection into the SuperHILAC. A low-beta linac of the Widereoe type has been built to perform this acceleration. The injector system described consists of a Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector, injection beam lines and isotope analysis, a low-velocity linear accelerator, and SuperHILAC control center modifications

  1. Milla Baldo Ceolin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2002-10-10

    Oct 10, 2002 ... was especially due to the development and diffusion of the nuclear emulsion ... expectations, tensions, struggles, and gratifications. ...... tion was just being achieved at the Berkeley Bevatron, an important milestone in.

  2. Accelerator Division annual report, January 1976--September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerator operations of the Bevatron/Bevalac, the SuperHILAC, and the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron are described. The PEP storage ring is described. The superconducting accelerator (ESCAR) construction is reported, and experiments in heavy ion fusion are described

  3. The Bevalac Upgrade Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Dwinell, R.D.; Feinberg, B.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes a proposed upgrade of the Bevalac accelerator complex in which the present Bevatron is replaced with a modern, strong-focusing 17 T-m synchrotron. This new ring is designed to accelerate all ions throughout the periodic table with intensities 100 to 1000 times higher than the present Bevatron. It will also provide a substantially improved beam spill structure and will reduce operating costs. A fast extraction capability can be used to inject a future heavy ion storage ring. Pulse-to-pulse switching of energy and ion species is an important goal. The existing injectors, shielding, experimental facilities and utilities of the present Bevalac will remain substantially intact

  4. A plea for unity, by Leon Lederman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Last November saw the 30th anniversary of the discovery of the antiproton using the Bevatron at the University of California's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then called the Radiation Laboratory). Fermilab Director Leon Lederman was in sparkling form at the banquet, where in his inimitable way he made an impassioned plea for scientific unity in these difficult times.

  5. UC-Berkeley-area citizens decry waste transfer from lab.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nakasato, L

    2002-01-01

    Residents are working to stop the transfer of potentially hazardous and radioactive material from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The lab has begun to dismantle the Bevatron which has been shut down since 1993 and says eight trucks per day will move material offsite (1 page).

  6. A plea for unity, by Leon Lederman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Last November saw the 30th anniversary of the discovery of the antiproton using the Bevatron at the University of California's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then called the Radiation Laboratory). Fermilab Director Leon Lederman was in sparkling form at the banquet, where in his inimitable way he made an impassioned plea for scientific unity in these difficult times

  7. The Bevalac accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacal, A.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the characteristics of the Bevatron and SuperHilac heavy ion accelerators in a very general manner. Some aspects of their application in the field of biological medicine and some of the interesting results obtained in experiments on nuclear physics are mentioned. (Author). 20 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. A Wideroee pre-accelerator for the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Alonso, J.; Behrsing, G.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Olivier, M.; Spence, D.; Yourd, R.

    1976-01-01

    Plans to upgrade both the Bevatron vacuum system and the SuperHILAC ion sources and injectors have been formulated. A proposed new pre-accelerator based on an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton and a Wideroee linac is presented

  9. Bevalac operations update. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Activities are reported in these areas: Bevatron operations (including a list of major experimental runs), user support at the Bevalac, modifications to the local injector, accelerator improvements at the Super HILAC, and general Bevalac upgrading. Modifications are reported for six individual beam lines

  10. Fragmentation of nitrogen-14 nuclei at 2.1 Gev per nucleon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, H. H.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Bieser, F. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out at the bevatron on the nuclear fragmentation of nitrogen-14 ions at an energy of 2.1 billion electron volts (Gev) per nucleon. Because of the near equality of the velocities of the nitrogen-14 beam and the fragmentation products at an angle of 0 deg, we find it possible to identify the nuclear fragments isotopically.

  11. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Operations of the SuperHILAC, the Bevatron/Bevalac, and the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron during the period from October 1977 to September 1978 are discussed. These include ion source development, accelerator facilities, the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System, and Bevelac biomedical operations

  12. Heavy-ion-spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    LBL safety policy (Pub 300 Appendix E) states that every research operation with a Class A risk potential (DOE 5484.1) should identify potentially hazardous procedures associated with the operation and develop methods for accomplishing the operation safely without personnel injury or property damage. The rules and practices that management deems to be minimally necessary for the safe operations of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) in the Bevatron Experimental Hall (51B) are set forth in this Operation Safety Procedures

  13. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered

  14. The discovery of the antiproton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Owen

    1989-01-01

    A number of groups of particle physicists competed to provide track evidence of the existence of Dirac's postulated antiproton in the mid-1950s. The work of the several teams is described briefly. The author describes the work of his own group on the Bevatron in more detail, and how they finally observed the antiproton. The article finishes with an assessment of the importance of this discovery. (UK)

  15. Heavy-ion-spectrometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    LBL safety policy (Pub 300 Appendix E) states that every research operation with a Class A risk potential (DOE 5484.1) should identify potentially hazardous procedures associated with the operation and develop methods for accomplishing the operation safely without personnel injury or property damage. The rules and practices that management deems to be minimally necessary for the safe operations of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) in the Bevatron Experimental Hall (51B) are set forth in this Operation Safety Procedures (OSP).

  16. Wideroe pre-accelerator for the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Alonso, J.; Behrsing, G.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Olivier, M.; Spence, D.; Yourd, R.

    1976-09-01

    In 1971 the Bevatron successfully accelerated low-intensity heavy ion beams up to neon to energies of 2.1 GeV/amu. More recently, beams up to argon have been accelerated using the SuperHILAC as an injector to the Bevatron--the Bevalac concept. With increasing scientific interest in high-energy high-intensity beams of heavier ions, plans to upgrade both the Bevatron vacuum system and the SuperHILAC ion sources and injectors have been formulated. A proposed new pre-accelerator based on an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton and a Wideroe linac is presented. The Wideroe linac uses the design concepts established at UNILAC, modified for frequency and energy requirements. U 7 + from the ion source is accelerated from 12 keV/amu to 113 keV/amu and stripped to a mean charge state acceptable to the first tank of the SuperHILAC. The expected intensity improvement over the present pressurized injector is a factor of 100 at the highest masses. The physical modeling of the Wideroe linac structure will be kept to a minimum. Computer models predicting the characteristics of the structure have improved to the point where the probability of satisfactory performance is high

  17. An historian's interest in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers the sociological and historical implications of early particle physics. The author explains the nature of historical research and its application to scientific developments and the limitations of personal recollections as research tools. Taking the Bevatron as an example, the paper asks a number of questions about the reasons it was built and why and who benefitted from its use. The article finishes by questioning the relevance of prizes to scientific research and considers the language that particle physicists have adopted in their work from the Greek derivations to the quark types, asking whether physicists' view of themselves has changed and been reflected in their use of language. (UK)

  18. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of biophysicist Cornelius A. Tobias, Ph.D., January 16, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Cornelius A. Tobias was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). He was chosen for this interview because of his extensive biophysics and medical physics research activities while he was employed by the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco and at the Donner Laboratory. He discusses his involvement in wartime studies of effects of high altitude on aviators, carbon monoxide with radioactive tracers, blood studies with radioactive iron, human use committees, heavy-ion research with the Bevatron, boron isotope research, classified research involving human subjects, heavy-particle radiography, heavy- particle beams and medical research, and pituitary irradiation studies,

  19. Improved techniques for the analysis of experiments with polarized targets. [1 to 2 GeV/c, polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrelet, E.

    1975-06-01

    An experiment was performed at the Bevatron to measure the polarization in the reaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/n from a polarized target, at beam momenta between 1 and 2 GeV/c. Concentration is placed on the original aspects of our analysis, in particular: the geometrical reconstruction of the elastic events; the use of the high analyzing power of the reaction studied to probe the polarization of the target in magnitude and distribution; a study of the statistical estimation of the polarization parameter; a detailed study of the quasielastic background. (JFP)

  20. Versatile rf controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.

    1985-05-01

    The low level rf system developed for the new Bevatron local injector provides precise control and regulation of the rf phase and amplitude for three 200 MHz linac cavities. The main features of the system are: extensive use of inexpensive, off-the-shelf components, ease of maintenance, and adaptability to a wide range of operation frequencies. The system utilizes separate function, easily removed rf printed circuit cards interconnected via the edge connectors. Control and monitoring are available both locally and through the computer. This paper will describe these features as well as the few component changes that would be required to adapt the techniques to other operating frequencies. 2 refs

  1. Study of the two-body dissociation of light nuclei in nuclear fields. Progress report, January 1, 1975--December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, P.N.; Huggett, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the experiment is to measure the frequency with which nucleons within a parent nucleus coalesce into clusters. The experiment will be carried out at the Bevatron with heavy ion beams of 2.1 GeV per nucleon. The extracted heavy ion beam will be directed onto a target in which many interactions will occur. The interactions of interest will be those in which the incident nucleus fragments into two daughter nuclei. These events will be selected from the background by scintillation counters and associated fast electronics. A list of projects started or completed at LSU the past year is given

  2. Study of the two body dissociation of light nuclei in nuclear fields. Progress report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, P.N.; Huggett, R.W.

    The object of the experiment is to measure the frequency with which nucleons within a parent nucleus coalesce into clusters. The experiment is being carried out at the Bevatron with heavy ion beams of 2.1 GeV kinetic energy per nucleon. The extracted heavy ion beam is directed onto a target in which many interactions occur. The interactions of interest are those in which the incident nucleus fragments into two daughter nuclei. These events are selected from the background by scintillation counters and associated fast electronics

  3. Bevalac beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.; Behrsing, G.; Morgado, R.; Rondeau, D.; Salsig, W.; Selph, F.; Staples, J.; Yourd, R.

    1975-03-01

    The Bevalac consists of, in part, a 200 meter long transfer line between the SuperHILAC and the Bevatron, which are at differing elevation. Unique features in the construction of the transfer line are described. The line, located largely outside, must cope with a natural environment. Part of the line passes through a hillside, requiring some unique support and alignment techniques. The dipoles are of the tape-wound variety and the steering magnets use printed circuit conductors. The vacuum system and an inexpensive and effective destructive monitoring system are described. (U.S.)

  4. The postwar political economy of high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper looks at the interfaces of politics, economics and particle physics in the period after the second world war. Particle accelerators were expensive to build, so politicians, before voting money to the Atomic Energy Commission, needed reassurance that personnel and the accelerators themselves could be put to immediate military use in the event of war. The creation of CERN in Geneva, a European project using big machines, gave impetus to American proposals for accelerators such as the Cosmotron, Bevatron and alternating-gradient synchrotron. (UK)

  5. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of biophysicist Cornelius A. Tobias, Ph.D., January 16, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Cornelius A. Tobias was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). He was chosen for this interview because of his extensive biophysics and medical physics research activities while he was employed by the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco and at the Donner Laboratory. He discusses his involvement in wartime studies of effects of high altitude on aviators, carbon monoxide with radioactive tracers, blood studies with radioactive iron, human use committees, heavy-ion research with the Bevatron, boron isotope research, classified research involving human subjects, heavy-particle radiography, heavy- particle beams and medical research, and pituitary irradiation studies,.

  6. Lead-ion collisions: the LHC achieves a new energy record

    CERN Multimedia

    John Jowett

    2015-01-01

    After the Bevatron (Berkeley, 1954) – which broke the energy barrier of billions of electronvolts – and the Tevatron (Fermilab, 1987) – which reached a trillion electronvolts – the LHC is now reaching the peta- (quadrillion) electronvolt level with its heavy-ion collisions (see here). However, one should remember that the average energy per colliding nucleon pair, within the 1 PeV “fireball”, is 5 TeV (compared to 13 TeV in the recent proton-proton collisions).   Heavy-ion collision events from the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments. Two of the great particle accelerators of the past were named after the symbolic energy barrier that they broke. The Bevatron (for "billions of electronvolts synchrotron"), at Berkeley in 1954, was the first to break the barrier of a billion electronvolts or BeV (now known as a gigaelectronvolt or GeV) in the centre-of-mass, by a large enough margin to create the laboratory’s ...

  7. Light-ion therapy in the US: From the Bevalac to ??

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Castro, Joseph R.

    2002-01-01

    While working with E.O. Lawrence at Berkeley, R.R. Wilson in 1946 noted the potential for using the Bragg-peak of protons (or heavier ions) for radiation therapy. Thus began the long history of contributions from Berkeley to this field. Pioneering work by C.A. Tobias et al at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron led ultimately to clinical applications of proton and helium beams, with over 1000 patients treated through 1974 with high-energy plateau radiation; placing the treatment volume (mostly pituitary fields) at the rotational center of a sophisticated patient positioner. In 1974 the SuperHILAC and Bevatron accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were joined by the construction of a 250-meter transfer line, forming the Bevalac, a facility capable of accelerating ions of any atomic species to relativistic energies. With the advent of these new beams, and better diagnostic tools capable of more precise definition of tumor volume and determination of the stopping point of charged-particle beams, large-field Bragg-peak therapy with ion beams became a real possibility. A dedicated Biomedical experimental area was developed, ultimately consisting of three distinct irradiation stations; two dedicated to therapy and one to radiobiology and biophysics. These facilities included dedicated support areas for patient setup and staging of animal and cell samples, and a central control area linked to the main Bevatron control room

  8. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures

  9. Design of the ESCAR injection beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, J.; Staples, J.; Yourd, R.

    1975-01-01

    The design features of the elements of the ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerator Ring) injection beam line are described. The junction of the proton transport system with the ESCAR injection straight section requires the design of mechanical elements compatible with the 10 -11 torr vacuum requirements of the main ring. These elements include a novel septum magnet whose salient design features include a current-carrying septum of tapered thicknesses to reduce the overall power requirements and total enclosure of the magnet coil in a metal can for vacuum compatibility. Other elements are a wire electro-static septum and several fast-rise ''bump magnets''. A transition cryopump is designed to separate the main ring vacuum from the relatively poor 10 -6 torr vacuum of the conventional beam transport line. A brief description of the conventional beam transport line from the 50 MeV proton linac, recently installed for Bevatron injection,is also included. (U.S.)

  10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewett, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    This article looks into the history of the design, construction and operation of four of the large particle accelerators of the 1950s, the Cosmotron and more powerful alternating-gradient synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven, the Bevatron at Berkeley and the CERN proton synchrotron in Geneva with which the author was involved. The author's own contribution was in magnet design for the Cosmotron and the radiofrequency accelerating system. He later worked on linear accelerators and strong focusing later used in the AGS with Nick Christofilos from Athens. Collaboration between CERN and Brookhaven continued following a British study of alternating-gradient focusing which showed up possible resonance problems. In 1953, the ''phase transition'' problem was overcome. The author's personal contribution to the AGS project completes the article. (UK)

  11. Advanced accelerator research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Research and development on the Positron-Electron Project (PEP), the electron rings, the superconducting accelerator (ESCAR), and the superconductivity program are reported. Efforts relating to the proposed PEP include work on: (1) the injection system; (2) the rf system; (3) the main-ring bend magnets; (4) the magnet power supplies and controls; (5) alignment; (6) radiation and shielding; (7) the vacuum system; and (8) conventional facilities (utilities, etc.). Experimental and theoretical work continued on the development of suitably intense electron rings as vehicles for the collective acceleration of ions. The most difficult problem was found to be the longitudinal (negative mass) instability. Design work was begun for ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerating Ring), a small proton synchrotron and storage ring using superconducting magnets, which should aid in the design of future large superconducting facilities. Magnet development was largely directed toward the detailed design of the dipole units. A superconducting beam transport line was installed at the Bevatron. (PMA)

  12. ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradner, H.; Solmitz, F.

    1958-01-01

    Since its invention by Glaser in 1953, the bubble chamber has become a most valuable tool in high-energy physics. It combines a number of advantages of various older methods of particle detection: it offers high spatial resolution, rapid accumulation of data, some time resolution, and some choice of the nucleus whose interaction one wants to study (bubble chambers have been made to operate with a large number of different liquids, including H 2 , D 2 , He, Xe, and several hydrocarbons). In order to exploit the advantages of spatial resolution and rapid data accumulation, high-speed high-precision analysis procedures must be developed. In this article they discuss some of the problems posed by such analysis. The discussion is based largely on experience gained in performing hydrogen bubble chamber experiments with the University of California's Bevatron (6-Bev proton synchrotron)

  13. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975. [LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.L. (ed.)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures. (RWR)

  14. Measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium (U90+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, H.; Munger, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    The production in 1983 of a beam of bare U 92+ at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac, the Bevatron and Super-HILAC operating in tandem, demonstrated the feasibility of experiments using few-electron uranium. In 1984 x rays from radiative electron capture into the K shell of uranium was observed by Anholt et. al., and in the same year x rays from n = 2 → n = 1 transitions in hydrogenlike uranium (U 91+ ) and heliumlike uranium (U 90+ ) were observed by Munger and Gould. In this article the authors discuss their recent measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium. Their value of 70.4 (8.1) eV for the one-electron Lamb shift in uranium is in agreement with the theoretical value of 75.3 (0.4) eV. 20 refs.; 5 figs

  15. Impact of storage rings on elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trilling, G.H.

    1979-03-01

    It is well known that new experimental discoveries often closely follow the development of new technology. There is hardly a better example of this than the close coupling between new discoveries in the frontiers of elementary particle physics and the development of the art and science of making high-energy accelerators. It is almost twenty-five years since the construction of the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the antiproton; and, since that time, knowledge and understanding of particle physics has made enormous strides in step with new developments in both the accelerator and the detector arts. An attempt is made to document how intimately many of the recent advances have been tied to the success in the development of storage rings and colliding beams

  16. Milla Baldo Ceolin (1924-2011)

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    At the end of November the particle physics community lost one of its most inquisitive, enthusiastic and active members when Milla Baldo Ceolin, emeritus professor at the University of Padua, passed away after several months of disabling illness.   After graduating from Padua in 1952, Milla began her scientific career in research with balloon-borne nuclear emulsions exposed to cosmic rays in the high atmosphere. Using a pion beam from the Bevatron at Berkeley, in 1958 Milla and D J Prowse discovered the first antihyperon: the antilambda. At the beginning of the 1960s she decided to change detection technique and began experiments with bubble chambers at Argonne, CERN and the Institute for Theoretcial and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Moscow to investigate selection rules and conservation laws in the kaon system with higher statistics. In the meantime, her group in Padua grew steadily, working in international collaborations. The main field of her investigations changed to neutrino physics ...

  17. Clinical results of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle radiosurgery for intracranial angiographically occult vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-12-01

    Angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain have been recognized for many years to cause neurologic morbidity and mortality. They generally become symptomatic due to intracranial hemorrhage, focal mass effect, seizures or headaches. The true incidence of AOVMs is unknown, but autopsy studies suggest that they are more common than high-flow angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have developed stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of inoperable intracranial vascular malformations, using the helium ion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron and Bevatron. This report describes the protocol for patient selection, radiosurgical treatment planning method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the method. 10 refs., 1 fig

  18. Clinical results of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle radiosurgery for intracranial angiographically occult vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-12-01

    Angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain have been recognized for many years to cause neurologic morbidity and mortality. They generally become symptomatic due to intracranial hemorrhage, focal mass effect, seizures or headaches. The true incidence of AOVMs is unknown, but autopsy studies suggest that they are more common than high-flow angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have developed stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of inoperable intracranial vascular malformations, using the helium ion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron and Bevatron. This report describes the protocol for patient selection, radiosurgical treatment planning method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the method. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Beam profile monitor system for the bevalac transfer line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.

    1985-01-01

    Incorporated in the current Bevalac transfer line upgrade project is a proposal for a new electronic beam monitoring system. It will be designed to amplify, convert, and transmit the signals of twelve 16 by 16 multi-wire grids to a central computer located in the Bevatron control room. Each station will contain interface amplifiers and a local microprocessor to convert wire grid currents into digitized values which will then be transmitted via a serial data channel to the main computer. The system will have a large dynamic range (1 nano to 1 milli-ampere of beam current), be designed for distributed operation, and will be easily expandable. This paper describes the basic electronic hardware and software components of the proposed system

  20. RFQ development at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, S.; Brodzik, D.; Gough, R.A.; Howard, D.; Lancaster, H.; Mac Gill, R.; Rovanpera, S.; Schneider, H.

    1983-01-01

    The radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a structure which can efficiently focus, bunch and accelerate low velocity ion beams. It has many features which make it particularly attractive for applications in the biomedical and nuclear sciences. There are two projects in progress at LBL where the incorporation of heavy ion RFQ technology offers substantial benefits: in the upgrade of the Bevatron local injector, and in the design of a dedicated heavy ion medical accelerator. In order to meet the requirements of these two important applications, a 200 MHz RFQ structure has been designed for ions with charge to mass ratios as low as 0.14, and a low RF power scale model has been built and tested. Construction of the high power model has begun. The status of this project is reviewed and a summary of technical specifications given

  1. Fluence to Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Evaluation of Accelerator Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of a set of conversion functions for the expression of neutron fluence measurements in terms of Effective Dose, E, is described. Four functions in analytical form are presented, covering the neutron energy range from 2.5 10-8 to 10+4 MeV, for the interpretation of fluence measurements in the typical irradiation conditions experienced around high-energy proton accelerators such as the Bevatron. For neutron energies below 200 MeV the analytical functions were modeled after the ISO and ROT conversion coefficients in ICRU 57. For neutron energies above 200 MeV, the analytical function was derived from an analysis of recent published data. Sample calculations using either the analytical expressions or the tabulated conversion coefficients from which the analytical expressions are derived show agreement to better than plus/minus 5%

  2. Κ-meson decays and parity violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    Between 1948 and 1954 many Κ-meson decay modes were observed, including the tau, pion and xi positives, in emulsion experiments all with masses around 500 MeV. An attempt was made to rationalize the various names for the new particles being discovered. A period of experimental consolidation followed. An attempt was then made to determine the spin parity of the three-pion system from tau plus decay using matrix calculations. New stripped emulsion techniques now permitted a secondary-particle track to be followed to its endpoint. Stacked emulsions were flown in balloons to study Κ mesons and hyperons using cosmic radiation. Later similar work used the new particle accelerators, the Cosmotron and the Bevatron as sources. The author showed that the tau plus and theta plus were competing decay modes of the same Κ + meson, but this meant that parity conservation was violated. Later theoreticians T D Lee and C N Yang provided evidence for this surprising idea from their work on semileptonic weak interactions. (UK)

  3. π π scattering by pole extrapolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, F.W. III.

    1978-01-01

    A 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber was used at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevatron to produce 300,000 pictures of π + p interactions at an incident momentum of the π + of 2.67 GeV/c. The 2-prong events were processed using the FSD and the FOG-CLOUDY-FAIR data reduction system. Events of the nature π + p→π + pπ 0 and π + p→π + π + n with values of momentum transfer to the proton of -t less than or equal to 0.238 GeV 2 were selected. These events were used to extrapolate to the pion pole (t = m/sub π/ 2 ) in order to investigate the π π interaction with isospins of both T=1 and T=2. Two methods were used to do the extrapolation: the original Chew-Low method developed in 1959 and the Durr-Pilkuhn method developed in 1965, which takes into account centrifugal barrier penetration factors. At first it seemed that, while the Durr-Pilkuhn method gave better values for the total π π cross section, the Chew-Low method gave better values for the angular distribution. Further analysis, however, showed that, if the requirement of total OPE (one-pion-exchange) was dropped, then the Durr-Pilkuhn method gave more reasonable values of the angular distribution as well as for the total π π cross section

  4. π π scattering by pole extrapolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, F.W. III.

    1977-01-01

    A 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber was used at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevatron to produce 300,000 pictures of π + p interactions at an incident momentum of the π + of 2.67 GeV/c. The 2-prong events were processed using the FSD and the FOG-CLOUDY-FAIR data reduction system. Events of the nature π + p → π + pπ 0 and π + p → π + π + n with values of momentum transfer to the proton of -t less than or equal to 0.238 GeV 2 were selected. These events were used to extrapolate to the pion pole (t = m/sub π/ 2 ) in order to investigate the π π interaction with isospins of both T = 1 and T = 2. Two methods were used to do the extrapolation: the original Chew-Low method developed in 1959 and the Durr-Pilkuhn method developed in 1965 which takes into account centrifugal barrier penetration factors. At first it seemed that, while the Durr-Pilkuhn method gave better values for the total π π cross section, the Chew-Low method gave better values for the angular distribution. Further analysis, however, showed that if the requirement of total OPE (one-pion-exchange) were dropped, then the Durr-Pilkuhn method gave more reasonable values of the angular distribution as well as for the total π π cross section

  5. Embryonic effects transmitted by male mice irradiated with 512 MeV/u 56Fe nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, L.M.; Van Beek, M.E.A.B.; Raabe, O.G.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy, high-charge nuclei may contribute substantially to the yearly equivalent dose in space flight from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) at solar minimum. The largest single heavy-ion component is 56 Fe. We used the mouse embryo chimera assay to test 512 MeV/u 56 Fe nuclei for effects on the rate of proliferation of embryonic cells transmitted by sperm from irradiated mice. Male CD1 mice were acutely irradiated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 Gy (LET, 184 keV/μm; fluence, 3.5 x 10 4 -3.3 x 10 5 nuclei/cm 2 ; average dose rate, 0.02 Gy/min) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory BEVATRON/BEVALAC Facility in Berkeley, CA. Irradiated males were bred weekly for 7 weeks to nonirradiated females and their four-cell embryos were paired with control embryos, forming aggregation chimeras. After 30-35 h of culture, chimeras were dissociated to obtain open-quotes proliferation ratiosclose quotes (number of cells contributed by the embryo from the irradiated male/total number of cells in the chimera). Significant dose-dependent decreases in proliferation ratios were obtained across all three dose groups for postirradiation week 2 (P 56 Fe nuclei. However, up to 47% of sperm during postirradiation weeks 1 and 2 transmitted proliferation ratios that were at or below one standard deviation from control mean proliferation ratios. 26 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs

  6. The SuperHILAC heavy ion intensity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.

    1987-03-01

    A high current MEtal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source is to be installed in the third injector (Abel) at the SuperHILAC, representing the first accelerator use of this novel ion source. The MEVVA source has produced over 1 A of uranium in all charge states, with more than 100 electrical mA (emA) of U 5+ . Transport of the space-charge dominated beam through the charge-state analysis dipole will be enhanced by a 100 kV extractor voltage and neutralization by secondary electrons. In addition to the MEVVA source, other improvements already in place include a lower pressure in the Low Energy Beam Transport line (15.8 keV/AMU) to reduce charge exchange for the heavy elements, and the addition of a second 23 MHz buncher upstream of the Wideroe linac and two 70 MHz bunchers between the 23 MHz Wideroe and the 70 MHz Alvarez linacs. The project is expected to result in a fivefold increase in beam delivered to Bevatron experiments, increasing the extracted uranium beam to 5 x 10 7 ions/pulse

  7. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report

  8. Bevalac, a high-energy heavy-ion facility: status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.

    1974-01-01

    The high-energy heavy-ion facility, which has commonly been referred to as the Bevalac, is a synchrotron with B rho of 9000 [kG-in or 2.3 x 10 2 kG-m] having special injectors. The synchrotron has three injectors. The 50 MeV proton injector, originally from BNL, is a tool left over from the high-energy high-intensity days of this productive synchrotron. The 20 MeV linac is a proton linac, designed so conservatively that it was possible to accelerate modest but useful beams of 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O as well as deuterons and alpha particles in the 2 β lambda mode. This was accomplished in 1971. After our first trials, a suggestion made earlier by A. Ghiorso to inject from the SuperHILAC into the synchrotron was actively pursued. Reasons as to why the SuperHILAC is being used as injector to the Bevatron are given

  9. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

  10. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given. (RWR)

  11. Bevalac extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.; Tekawa, M.; Cowles, D.; Byrne, T.

    1992-02-01

    This report will describe some of the general features of the Bevatron extraction system, primarily the dependence of the beam parameters and extraction magnet currents on the Bevalac field. The extraction magnets considered are: PFW, XPl, XP2, XS1, XS2, XM1, XM2, XM3, XQ3A and X03B. This study is based on 84 past tunes (from 1987 to the present) of various ions (p,He,O,Ne,Si,S,Ar,Ca,Ti,Fe,Nb,La,Au and U), for Bevalac fields from 1.749 to 12.575 kG, where all tunes included a complete set of beam line wire chamber pictures. The circulating beam intensity inside the Bevalac is measured with Beam Induction Electrodes (BIE) in the South Tangent Tank. The extracted beam intensity is usually measured with the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) in the F1-Box. For most of the tunes the extraction efficiency, as given by the SEM/BIE ratio, was not recorded in the MCR Log Book, but plotting the available Log Book data as a function of the Bevalac field, see Fig.9, we find that the extraction efficiency is typically between 30->60% with feedback spill

  12. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.D.

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations

  13. Massimiliano Ferro-Luzzi (1932 - 2013)

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Massimiliano (Max) Ferro-Luzzi, a well-known CERN physicist, passed away on 18 March. He grew up in Asmara (Eritrea) and studied at Rome University, where he joined the nuclear emulsion group of Edoardo Amaldi and graduated in 1955. His research work was an investigation of antiproton reactions in emulsions exposed at Berkeley's Bevatron. Right from the start, as would be typical throughout his career, he combined careful analysis of data with special attention to technical improvements (the automation of track measurement in this case) and better instruments.   Starting in 1960 Max spent three years at Berkeley in Alvarez's legendary group, where he focussed on the role of kaons in strong interactions. In 1963 he moved to CERN, where he spent the rest of his working life, with the exception of a sabbatical year at SLAC in 1976. As one of the leaders in the Track Chamber division, his most important contribution, using data from bubble chambers, was the discovery and study of ...

  14. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e + e - colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given

  15. Memories of Professor Sugimoto and isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Usual magnetic isotope-separators select the particles with the same Z/A value which may include different nuclides. Identification of the isotope with the same Z/A value but different Z or A value is an universal requirement for nuclear physics experiments. If one knows, together with the A/Z value, the dE/dx or the range of the isotope in some energy absorber, which are the function of Z 2 /A, its nuclide can be specified. This idea can be realized by arranging proper energy-absorber at the focal point of magnetic analyzer. The author proposes another novel method in which two dipole-magnets are excited with some difference, and an energy absorber corresponding to that energy difference is situated between two magnets. It can also be devised so that the dispersion at the final focal-point depends only on the emission angle of the isotope at production. Professor Sugimoto recognized the significance of this scheme and proposed to employ it in the experiment at BEVATRON. The unbalanced two dipole-magnets method is employed at RIKEN and RCNP, Osaka University. The author's creative idea originated in Sugimoto Laboratory at Osaka University. (author)

  16. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report

  17. Study of the reaction π-p → eta n in the region of the N*(1688)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaffee, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    In an experiment performed at the Bevatron, a negative-pion beam incident on a 20-cm liquid-hydrogen target produced reactions of the form π/sup -/p → neutral final state. The final-state neutron was detected by plastic-scintillator counters. The final-state photons were detected by lead-plate spark chambers, which covered about 3.7 π solid angle, or by lead-scintillator sandwich counters, which covered most of the open face of the spark-chamber array. For this analysis, a kinematic fit was done on the L. B. L. computer for each event in which two photons were detected. For each momentum, events which fit the hypothesis π/sup -/p → eta n were binned according to the calculated production cosine, and the resulting distributions were corrected by comparing to the results of a Monte-Carlo calculation for the same reaction. The differential cross section was calculated for each bin, and the values for each momentum were fit to a sum of Legendre polynomials in production cosine. In the final chapter, the Legendre polynomial coefficients, the total cross section, and the differential cross sections extrapolated to 0 0 and 180 0 are compared to the results of other experiments, and some speculations are offered as to the spin-parity states which affect the measured behavior of the reaction. The conclusion is drawn that the N (1688) does not contribute, but that the N (1670) does, with a cross section of (0.84 +- 0.21) mb. (U.S.)

  18. Annual report 1975 University of Lund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In the Department of Cosmic High Energy Physics proton-nucleus interactions at 200-400 GeV are studied in nuclear emulsions exposed at the Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory in an international collaboration. The angular distribution of shower particles and the correlation between the number of shower particles and heavy prongs are studied and compared with interactions models. Multiplicities in proton-tungsten interactions at 200-400 GeV are studied in emulsion with embedded tungsten wires. 160-nucleus interactions are studied in emulsions exposed at the Berkeley Bevatron at 2.1 and 0.25 GeV/nucleon. An investigation of the primary cosmic ray charge spectrum in the interval 14 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28 has been finished and measurements of the isotopic composition of cosmic ray boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon and iron are in progress. Thecosmic ray composition is studied with nuclear emulsion detectors and high resolution nuclear track photometers. The photonuclear group has continued the study of medium energy photonuclear reactions. During the year simple reactions of type (γ,p), (γ, d), (γ,t): (γ, α), (γ, γ) and (γ, π) which give information on the primary photon interaction in nuclei and secondary effects have been studied. More complex reactions have also been studied and the parameters in the cascade-evaporation process investigated. The photo yield of 24 Na has been measured as a function of the target mass number looking for photo-fragmentation. Medium-energy photofission studies have given knowledge about the competition between neutron evaporation, symmetric fission and asymmetric fission. At low photon energies, single particle excitations have been studied using monoenergetic photons from nuclear reactions. The programme of fission barrier studies with photons at energies below the barrier height using bremsstrahlung from the 6.5 MeV KTH microtron has continued. (author)

  19. Status of the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Selph, F.B.

    1976-09-01

    The SuperHILAC is an Alvarez linear accelerator designed to accelerate all ions to a maximum energy of 8.5 MeV/u. It functions as an essential part of two research programs of national importance--first, as a supplier of beams for research at less than 10 MeV/u, secondly as an injector for the Bevalac facility, for nuclear physics and medical research at energies greater than 200 MeV/u. This duplication of effort from a single accelerator is made possible by the utilization of a technique known as timeshare--two different ion beams are accelerated independently through the same linac structure. Recent operation has been in the mass range 12 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 136. Usually, a heavy ion (A greater than 40) is delivered to the SuperHILAC experimental area for nuclear physics experiments while concurrently delivering a lighter ion (A less than or equal to 40) to the Bevatron for further acceleration (max. 2.5 GeV/u) to be used in experiments exploring the physics of very high energy heavy ions, in investigations of radiation biology, and in preclinical tests as a tool for cancer treatment. Recent operating experience is reviewed. Also discussed are recent major improvements which have been made to the accelerator, and a proposed improvement which will increase reliability and beam intensity for the very heavy ions (A greater than or equal to 84) by adding a third injector of improved design

  20. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers

  1. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: from the BEVALAC to RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    I briefly describe the initial goals of relativistic nuclear collision research, focusing on the LBL Bevatron/Bevalac facility in the 1970s. An early concept of high hadronic density fireball formation, and subsequent isentropic decay (preserving information of the high-density stage), led to an outline of physics observables that could determine the nuclear matter equation of state at several times the nuclear ground state matter density. With the advent of QCD the goal of locating and characterizing the hadron-parton deconfinement phase transformation suggested the need for higher √s, the research thus shifting to the BNL AGS and CERN SPS, and finally to RHIC at BNL. A set of physics observables is discussed where present data span the entire √s domain, from Bevalac and SIS at GSI, to high RHIC energy. Referring, selectively, to data concerning bulk hadron production, the overall √s evolution of directed and radial flow observables, and of pion pair Bose-Einstein correlation is discussed. The hadronization process is studied in the grand canonical statistical model. The resulting hadronization points in the plane T versus μ B converge onto the parton-hadron phase boundary predicted by finite μ B lattice QCD, from high SPS to RHIC energy. At lower SPS and high AGS energy a steep strangeness maximum occurs at which the Wroblewski parameter λ s ∼ 0.6; a possible connection to the QCD critical point is discussed. Finally the unique new RHIC physics is addressed: high-p T hadron suppression and jet 'tomography'

  2. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

  3. Coulomb dissociation in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Targets of 12 C, 59 Co, 89 Y, 197 Au and 238 U were bombarded by 2.1 GeV/A 1 H, 12 C and 20 Ne projectiles using the SuperHILAC and BEVATRON facilities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The beam flux was calculated by monitoring the decay of 11 C produced from the 12 C(projectile,projectile n) 11 C reaction. Residual gamma-ray activity from the Co, Y, Au and U targets was collected in order to trace the decay of several reaction products. The experiment focused on the calculation of cross sections for the formation of products with one neutron removed from the various target nuclei. Corrections to the saturation activity of each product were made for detector efficiency, gamma-ray absorption in the target, gamma-ray branching, beam geometry and secondary reactions. These date are shown to be inconsistent with a geometrical form given by sigma varies as (A/sub p/sup 1/3/ + A/sub t/sup 1/3/ - b) where b is a universal constant. In fact the data indicates the b = A/sub t/sup 1/3/. Instead the data can be fit quite well by a simple empirical relation, sigma/sub emp/ = 12.0 mb A/sub p/sup 1/3/ A/sub t/sup 1/3/. It is demonstrated that an empirical fit which varies as A/sub t/sup 1/3/ is also consistent with projectile fragmentation data measured by a group at LBL. In addition these data are compared to a theoretical prediction which is the sum of a renormalized Glauber term and a term which represents the contribution due to Coulomb or electromagnetic dissociation (ED). The theoretical predictions are quite low for the 12 C projectile data and high for the 20 Ne projectile data. The systematic trends from the comparison seem to indicate that theoretical prediction for the ED contribution is rising too fast as a function of projectile for a given target

  4. The luminescent chamber and its use in high-energy physics experiments; La chambre a luminescence: son emploi dans les experiences de physique des hautes energies; Lyuminestsentnaya kamera i ee ispol'zovanie v ehksperimentakh, provodimykh v fizike vysokikh ehnergij; La camara luminiscente y su empleo en experimentos de fisica de elevada energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L W; Perl, M L [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1962-04-15

    A luminescent chamber has been employed for the first time in experiments in high-energy particle physics. At the Bevatron of the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, particle tracks in activated sodium-iodide crystals were photographed using a cascade system of three-image intensifier tubes. In one experiment, elastic pion-proton scattering was studied using two arrays of scintillator, each 20 cm long, one to observe the scattered pion and the other the recoil proton from a liquid hydrogen target. Scintillation counters selected only nearly-coplanar events to be recorded; however the final criteria for elastic scattering were the kinematics of the recorded tracks. About 1000 elastic events were photographed at each of three incident pion moments up to 2.5 MeV/c. In a second experiment a single-scintillator array 10 x 10 x 20 cm{sup 3} was used to observe stopping recoil protons from inelastic pion scattering (single pion production) at three incident pion momenta. Again several thousand events were recorded. The range and angle of the recoil proton uniquely determined the momentum transfer and the centre-of-mass energy of the di-pion system which were the relevant kinematical parameters in this problem. In these experiments post-event triggering and five-microsecond time-resolution were achieved by gating the second image tube on a signal from the scintillation-counter electronics. The design and successful execution of these experiments are discussed in this paper, with particular reference to the relevant details of the image tubes, the scintillation counters and the electronic systems. Experience has also been gained in the analysis of the track photographs, particularly regarding the accuracy obtainable and reliability of the physics thus obtained. In conclusion, the future evolution of the luminescent chamber is explored, considering the image intensifier tubes and scintillators under current development. The role of the luminescent chamber in future highenergy

  5. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-01-01

    compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18, at

  6. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16

    treatment volume compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers

  7. On the symmetry of nuclear identity between relativistic primary and secondary nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, L.

    2002-01-01

    Do secondary hadrons, freshly created in the collision of a relativistic heavy ion nucleus, have the same properties of nuclear interaction as those of an otherwise identical primary? To explore this question two types of experiments were performed, one in fact and one in fiction. The first was the scanning and measurement of an emulsion stack exposed to a 1.8 A GeV 40 Ar beam from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevatron. This emulsion experiment is the first full-stack scan of a major exposure ever performed and includes 1418 stars of primary interactions, 1850 secondary stars, and tens of thousands of shower and slow heavily ionizing particles. As such it constitutes a dataset uniquely powerful in exploring questions of symmetry between primary and secondary populations. One of the emulsion results is the experimental determination (and to a particularly high accuracy for Z=2) that total (geometric) cross-section does not change with generation for the secondaries under study. The 'fictional' experiments are a set of Monte-Carlo simulations based on the transport code RHIP, itself built upon the results of the emulsions experiment. RHIP is designed to attack a number of problems ranging from particle physics to NASA's need to model the nuclear cascades induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays impinging on manned spacecraft. The major version of RHIP dealt with here is BFHL, a detailed modeling of a 1.8 A GeV 40 Ar beam on cylindrically symmetric sets of Cu targets. BFHL was then applied to the Copper Calorimetry Experiments also performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The exhaustive simulation and analysis presented here shows that all but one of the variables considered can neither quantitatively nor qualitatively explain the results of the Copper Calorimetry Experiments. Amongst many others these failures of fit include all transport variables, the total cross-section (i.e. short mean free path), and a higher than normal Pt for shower particles. Instead, the Copper

  8. Pions to Quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  9. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-01-01

    the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history of high energy physics. My aim here is to provide an additional corrective to such views as well as further information about the web of connections that allows

  10. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    equipment that cost $100,000 by the 1970s alongside work at the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history

  11. Obituary: Gerson Goldhaber (1924-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennypacker, Carl

    2011-12-01

    entire size of the visible Universe - ~ 1029 cm. Goldhaber was also widely regarded as one of the kindest, most open, and friendly physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and his collegiality and attempts to build group esprit-de-corp were a large part of the group's success, when financial and other issues were always on the verge of ending the work. Indeed, Goldhaber led considerable weight to the effort. Goldhaber was born in Chemnitz, Germany, Feb. 20, 1924, and moved with his family to Cairo, Egypt, in 1933 to escape Nazi persecution. He earned his Master's of Science degree in physics at Hebrew University, Jerusalem, in 1947 and his Ph.D. in 1950 from the University of Wisconsin. He became a naturalized United States citizen in 1953 while working as an instructor at Columbia University. Later that same year, he joined the UC Berkeley Physics Department and the research staff at its Radiation Laboratory, which would later morph into Berkeley Lab, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory. Goldhaber first rose to major scientific prominence with his contributions to the discovery of the antiproton. In collaboration with his first wife, nuclear chemist/physicist Sulamith Löw, Goldhaber led a group that used a photographic emulsion detector technique he developed to confirm the discovery of the antiproton at Berkeley Lab's Bevatron accelerator by the research group of Emilio Segrè and Owen Chamberlain. Segrè and Chamberlain received the Nobel Prize in 1959 for this discovery. In 1960, Goldhaber and physicist George Trilling formed the Trilling-Goldhaber experimental particle-physics group, which included his wife, Sulamith. In 1963, the group discovered the A meson, a subatomic particle Goldhaber named after his son, Amos Nathaniel. "The wisest professional decision I ever made was to join Gerson in a collaboration whose success resulted almost entirely from his extraordinary insight into where to find new and important science," said Trilling. "He was a