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Sample records for bevalac

  1. Bevalac extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.; Tekawa, M.; Cowles, D.; Byrne, T.

    1992-02-01

    This report will describe some of the general features of the Bevatron extraction system, primarily the dependence of the beam parameters and extraction magnet currents on the Bevalac field. The extraction magnets considered are: PFW, XPl, XP2, XS1, XS2, XM1, XM2, XM3, XQ3A and X03B. This study is based on 84 past tunes (from 1987 to the present) of various ions (p,He,O,Ne,Si,S,Ar,Ca,Ti,Fe,Nb,La,Au and U), for Bevalac fields from 1.749 to 12.575 kG, where all tunes included a complete set of beam line wire chamber pictures. The circulating beam intensity inside the Bevalac is measured with Beam Induction Electrodes (BIE) in the South Tangent Tank. The extracted beam intensity is usually measured with the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) in the F1-Box. For most of the tunes the extraction efficiency, as given by the SEM/BIE ratio, was not recorded in the MCR Log Book, but plotting the available Log Book data as a function of the Bevalac field, see Fig.9, we find that the extraction efficiency is typically between 30->60% with feedback spill

  2. Bevalac user's handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report is a users manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment

  3. Bevalac computer support group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, C.; Bronson, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past year, a group was created and placed under the leadership of Charles McParland. This is an expansion of previous Bevalac software efforts and has responsibilities in three major hardware and software areas. The first area is the support of the existing data acquisition/analysis VAX 11/780s at the Bevalac. The second area is the continued support of present data acquisition programs. The third principal area of effort is the development of new data acquisition systems to meet the increasing needs of the Bevalac experimental program

  4. Bevalac external beamline optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested.

  5. Bevalac external beamline optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested

  6. The Bevalac Upgrade Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Dwinell, R.D.; Feinberg, B.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes a proposed upgrade of the Bevalac accelerator complex in which the present Bevatron is replaced with a modern, strong-focusing 17 T-m synchrotron. This new ring is designed to accelerate all ions throughout the periodic table with intensities 100 to 1000 times higher than the present Bevatron. It will also provide a substantially improved beam spill structure and will reduce operating costs. A fast extraction capability can be used to inject a future heavy ion storage ring. Pulse-to-pulse switching of energy and ion species is an important goal. The existing injectors, shielding, experimental facilities and utilities of the present Bevalac will remain substantially intact

  7. Bevalac operations update. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Activities are reported in these areas: Bevatron operations (including a list of major experimental runs), user support at the Bevalac, modifications to the local injector, accelerator improvements at the Super HILAC, and general Bevalac upgrading. Modifications are reported for six individual beam lines

  8. The Bevalac long flattop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Abbott, S.; Bennett, M.; Bordua, M.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Howard, D.; Hunt, D.; Feinberg, B.; Force, R.; Frias, R.; Kalnins, J.; Lewis, S.; Nyman, M.; Shalz, L.; Solomons, S.R.; Tekawa, M.

    1992-10-01

    Until July of 1992, the maximum length of the Bevalac flattop was 2 seconds, limiting the beam spill to 1.5 seconds. The normal running condition was a 1.5 second flattop, with a 1.0 second beam spill. If we define the duty factor as the spill length (in time) divided by the synchrotron pulse length, that is, the percentage of time the Bevalac can deliver beam to experiments, the duty factor for the 1.5 second flattop ranged from 17% (at full field, i.e., 12575 G) to 25% (low field). The purpose of the Long Flattop Project was to increase the length of the flattop, thus increasing the duty factor of the machine, and its efficiency for experiments. This has been done, with resultant increase in the duty factor and experimental data rate. It is now possible to run with duty factor of about 80% for low fields, falling to about 60% at 10 kG, and 34% at full field. This report documents what was done, and its limitations. It should be noted that increasing the length of the beam spill is only possible if the source can produce more beam per pulse than is usable by the experimenter. Experimenters running at full intensity with a short flattop (1.5 seconds) cannot benefit from a longer flattop. This paper describe the changes that have been made to Bevalac systems to make the long flattop possible, the limits put on the length of the flattop by existing hardware, and the procedure for tuning for the long flattop

  9. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described

  10. Bevalac beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.; Behrsing, G.; Morgado, R.; Rondeau, D.; Salsig, W.; Selph, F.; Staples, J.; Yourd, R.

    1975-03-01

    The Bevalac consists of, in part, a 200 meter long transfer line between the SuperHILAC and the Bevatron, which are at differing elevation. Unique features in the construction of the transfer line are described. The line, located largely outside, must cope with a natural environment. Part of the line passes through a hillside, requiring some unique support and alignment techniques. The dipoles are of the tape-wound variety and the steering magnets use printed circuit conductors. The vacuum system and an inexpensive and effective destructive monitoring system are described. (U.S.)

  11. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described.

  12. Bevalac operations update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The Bevalac passed the recent Tiger Team assessment with flying colors, thanks to the unremitting effort of countless people over the last several months, pulling miles of cables, sending tons of ''valuable'' junk to salvage, painting, pushing brooms, writing operating procedures. It is time to look ahead now and plan for doing science again; however, it is not business as usual. The Bevalac survived, but not without changes. There are more procedures to be followed, safety appraisals to be made, training to be gone through. The primary goal is not just to get a task done, but to get it done in a safe manner according to code. If this means a delay in a run because enough time wasn't allotted for making a change in the setup, then the experiment will be delayed. Many of the obvious changes you will find the next time you come to work here are summarized in this newsletter. We will inform you of others as they are forthcoming. Also we will discuss these changes at our ''We Survived the Tigers, but hor-ellipsis'' Users' Information Meeting at the Washington APS meeting. Details are inside this report

  13. Bevalac user's handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    This report is a users manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment.

  14. Bevalac Minibeam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Alonso, J.; Morgado, R.; Tobias, C.A.; Grunder, H.; Upham, F.T.; Windsor, A.; Armer, R.A.; Yang, T.C.H.; Gunn, J.T.

    1977-03-01

    The Minibeam Facility is a biomedical heavy-ion beam area at the Bevalac designed to satisfy the following requirements: (1) provide a beam incident in a vertical plane for experiments where a horizontal apparatus significantly increases the convenience of performing an experiment or even determines its feasibility; (2) provide an area that is well shielded with respect to electronic interference so that microvolt signals can be detected with acceptable signal-to-noise ratios; (3) provide a beam of small diameter, typically a few millimeters or less, for various studies of cellular function; and (4) provide a facility for experiments that require long setup and preparation times and apparatus that must be left relatively undisturbed between experiments and that need short periods of beam time. The design of such a facility and its main components is described. In addition to the above criteria, the design was constrained by the desire to have inexpensive, simple devices that work reliably and can be easily upgraded for interfacing to the Biomedical PDP 11/45 computer

  15. Recent results from the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    In a collision between a 1.8 GeV/amu argon ion and a lead target, the overlapping regions of projectile and target undergo violent interaction while the non-overlapping regions either continue with beam velocity and break up into projectile fragments or remain at rest and break into target fragments. Projectile fragements are the easiest to study; the participants, in the mid-rapidity region, are the next easiest, while the target fragments have not been extensively studied, except by radiochemistry techniques. This talk concentrates (with the exception of a discussion of anomalous projectile fragments) on the participant region, where one would expect to find high densities and temperatures and where evidence of any phase transition might be found. The extensive evidence for a high degree of equilibration at Bevalac energies is omitted, even though the stopping power of nuclei is crucial for possible studies at higher energies

  16. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  17. Radioactive beam production at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; McMahan, M.A.; Tanihata, I.

    1989-10-01

    At the Bevalac radioactive beams are routinely produced by the fragmentation process. The effectiveness of this process with respect to the secondary beam's emittance, intensity and energy spread depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics and the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on to the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific reaction product. The on-going radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example with applications, present performance and plans for the future. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  18. High purity radioactive beams at the bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Chatterjee, A.; Tobias, C.A.

    1979-03-01

    Peripheral nuclear fragmentation reactions of primary Bevalac heavy ion beams are used to produce secondary beams of radioactive nuclei. The large cross section and small deflection of the projectile fragments lead to high production and delivery efficiency for these beams. Dispersive beam transport allows good separation and purification of the desired secondary beams. 11 C and 19 Ne beams of high purity and good intensity (almost 0.2% of the primary beam current) are presently being used for biomedical experiments

  19. Synchrotrons for heavy ions: Bevalac experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Gough, R.A.; Alonso, J.R.

    1980-10-01

    The Bevalac should be viewed not as a model of accelerator hardware - a modern heavy ion complex will look quite different, but as a model for an operating versatile multifaceted, multiuser heavy ion facility. Of value to the planning of a new accelerator such as MARIA is the knowledge of operating modes peculiar to heavy ions and specific hardware requirements to carry out its mission with the mandated flexibility and reliability. This paper starts with a discussion of parameters and machine characteristics most suitable for medical and nuclear science applications. It then covers experience in interleaving these two research programs, and finally, concentrates on accelerator configuratin questions; injectors, repetition rate, vacuum systems and cost criteria which will be relevant to the design of MARIA

  20. Dilepton (e+e-) production at Bevalac energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1990-09-01

    The use of dilepton production in p-A and A-A collisions as a probe of nuclear matter under extreme conditions is described. Recent results from the DLS collaboration at the Bevalac are presented. 10 refs., 2 figs

  1. BERKELEY: Farewell to the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Nearly a hundred current and former Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory employees gathered at the Bevatron accelerator on 21 February to watch Ed Lofgren turn off the beam for the last time. Lofgren, in charge of the venerable machine from its completion in 1954 until his retirement in 1979, pushed a button that someone long ago labeled ''atom smasher offer'', bringing to an end four decades of accomplishment in high energy and heavy ion physics. Owen Chamberlain, who shared the 1959 physics Nobel with Emilio Segré for the discovery of the antiproton at the Bevatron, was among those present at the closing ceremony. The shutdown came 39 years to the week after Bevatron beam first circulated, and a touching moment came just after Lofgren shut the machine down when the poignant strains of the ''Taps'' salute wafted out over the PA system. The Bevatron - or Bevalac, as it was called after being linked to the Super HILAC linear accelerator in the 1970s - made major contributions in four distinct areas of research: high energy physics, heavy ion physics, medical research and therapy, and space-related studies of radiation damage and heavy particles in space. As well as the discovery of the antiproton, the early years of the Bevatron saw classic studies of the kaon, leading to a deeper understanding of both strong and weak interaction physics. With Luis Alvarez' development of Donald Glaser's original bubble chamber idea into a prolific physics technique, the Bevatron was a major focus of the heady days of resonance hunting in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Most recently the Bevalac (Bevatron-SuperHILAC combination) pioneered relativistic heavy ion physics. The central focus of this research programme was the production and study of extreme conditions in nuclear matter. Highlights include the first definitive evidence of collective flow of nuclear matter at high temperatures and densities, studies of the nuclear

  2. Bevatron/Bevalac user's handbook: biology and medicine. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The Bevalac Biomedical Facility develops a source of near-relativistic heavy ions for applications to radiation biology, radiation therapy and diagnostic radiology. Pulsed beams of high LET heavy ions with variable pulse width, frequency, intensity and energy are produced and delivered to the Biomedical Facility by the Bevatron/Bevalac accelerator complex. Dosimetry equipment under computer control provides accurate determinations of absorbed doses in all regions of the Bragg curve. Depth-dose modifying devices and precise specimen positioning equipment are available. Animal housing and tissue culture facilities are convenient to the experimenter. This handbook is designed to provide the user with the relevant information for planning, proposing and executing an experiment

  3. Bevalac versatility: Operations achievements in the multi-tasking mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothrop, F.; Alonso, J.; Miller, R.; Tekawa, M.

    1989-03-01

    Demand for relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac has increased dramatically in the past two years. To keep pace, the Bevalac make use of five injectors, precise guide field control, preset beam transport line tunes, nine nuclear science target areas, and three biology/radiotherapy areas, along with elegant control computer algorithms, to achieve high operating efficiency. Routine operation includes as many as ten ion/energy/beamline changes per day, 15 major nuclear science experiments each year, radiotherapy on nearly a daily basis, with biology experiments operating biweekly. High operating efficiency and low failure rates combine to produce high annual research hours. 12 refs., 2 figs

  4. First results on dilepton production at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, G.; Claesson, G.; Hendrie, D.

    1987-12-01

    We report on preliminary results of direct electron pair measurements in p+Be at 4.9 GeV and 2.1 GeV and Ca+Ca at 1.95 GeVA collisions at the Bevalac. The results are compared to existing data in p+Be at 12.1 GeV and π - p at 15.9 and 16.9 GeV

  5. Design of a pulsed switching magnet for the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, S.; Alonso, J.; Brown, J.; Kalnins, J.; Krebs, G.; Reimers, R.

    1989-03-01

    The design and construction of a water cooled, pulsed, laminated core dipole magnet which has recently been installed at the Bevalac is described. This new, energy efficient magnet was funded by the DOE In-House Energy Management Program. The magnet has been specifically designed for maximum efficiency in power utilization and has replaced two dc powered magnets in the Bevalac switchyard. It will reduce energy usage by 747 MWh/yr, and it provides the capability of pulse-to-pulse switching in 0.7 seconds between two major beamline channels serving the nuclear science and radiotherapy programs at the /Bevalac. A unique feature of this magnet is the core design which utilizes an external structure that remains integral with the core laminations after assembly. The structure provides for both torsional and longitudinal rigidity of the core while also facilitating the precision assembly and compression of the core laminations without the use of special assembly fixtures. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Equipment proposal for Bevalac experiments. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, F.P.; Romero, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A large Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been developed as a part of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS). This facility is being used for the study of relativistic nuclear collisions at the Bevalac of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. We have measured for MUSIC a single event resolution of 15% for Fe beam and a charge resolution better than 0.5 units of charge for a Ne beam. These results indicate that a charge resolution of one unit from Z = 7 to Z = 100 should be achieved with the present detector

  7. Beam profile monitor system for the bevalac transfer line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.

    1985-01-01

    Incorporated in the current Bevalac transfer line upgrade project is a proposal for a new electronic beam monitoring system. It will be designed to amplify, convert, and transmit the signals of twelve 16 by 16 multi-wire grids to a central computer located in the Bevatron control room. Each station will contain interface amplifiers and a local microprocessor to convert wire grid currents into digitized values which will then be transmitted via a serial data channel to the main computer. The system will have a large dynamic range (1 nano to 1 milli-ampere of beam current), be designed for distributed operation, and will be easily expandable. This paper describes the basic electronic hardware and software components of the proposed system

  8. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: from the BEVALAC to RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    I briefly describe the initial goals of relativistic nuclear collision research, focusing on the LBL Bevatron/Bevalac facility in the 1970s. An early concept of high hadronic density fireball formation, and subsequent isentropic decay (preserving information of the high-density stage), led to an outline of physics observables that could determine the nuclear matter equation of state at several times the nuclear ground state matter density. With the advent of QCD the goal of locating and characterizing the hadron-parton deconfinement phase transformation suggested the need for higher √s, the research thus shifting to the BNL AGS and CERN SPS, and finally to RHIC at BNL. A set of physics observables is discussed where present data span the entire √s domain, from Bevalac and SIS at GSI, to high RHIC energy. Referring, selectively, to data concerning bulk hadron production, the overall √s evolution of directed and radial flow observables, and of pion pair Bose-Einstein correlation is discussed. The hadronization process is studied in the grand canonical statistical model. The resulting hadronization points in the plane T versus μ B converge onto the parton-hadron phase boundary predicted by finite μ B lattice QCD, from high SPS to RHIC energy. At lower SPS and high AGS energy a steep strangeness maximum occurs at which the Wroblewski parameter λ s ∼ 0.6; a possible connection to the QCD critical point is discussed. Finally the unique new RHIC physics is addressed: high-p T hadron suppression and jet 'tomography'

  9. Operating results for the beam profile monitor system currently in use at Bevalac Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Fowler, K.

    1987-03-01

    Three stations of a soon to be completed multi-station, multi-wire beam monitoring system have been installed in the Bevalac transfer line. The following article will provide a cursory analysis of the electronic circuitry, discuss new design additions and summarize the operating results obtained over the last year

  10. Collective flow and azimuthal correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, G.

    1993-09-01

    The EOS experiment at the Bevalac has recently carried out exclusive event-by-event measurements of relativistic heavy ion collisions with a variety of projectile, target and beam energy combinations. The data was obtained using the EOS Time Projection Chamber. We present preliminary results on inclusive spectra, collective flow and azimuthal correlations obtained from a study of Au + Au reactions with beam energies covering 0.6 - 1.2 A GeV

  11. Studies at LBL's Bevalac will help resolve uncertainties about radiation risks to astronauts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, J.

    1991-01-01

    Plans to operate the LBL's Bevalac facility for space research are discussed. The proposed program includes the use of cell cultures and animal models to assess the biological consequences of exposures to different particles that are components of the space radiation environment. Research will also be conducted on measures to counter radiation. Experiments will be carried out to examine how various materials that could be used in a spacecraft wall would alter the cascade of particles that would ultimately reach an astronaut

  12. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, S.

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery

  13. Workshop summary. Biomedical and Space-Related Research with Heavy Ions at the BEVALAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, W.; Curtis, S. B.

    1989-01-01

    The authors provide an overview of papers presented at a workshop on Biomedical and Space-Related Research with Heavy Ions at the BEVALAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Goals of the meeting were to determine the critical experiments using heavy ions as probes in radiation physics, radiation chemistry, macromolecular and cellular biology, evolution science, basic neurophysiology, and medical therapies; how beam lines and facilities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory can be improved for these experiments; and implications in priorities and funding for national policy. Workshop topics included physics and facilities, cellular and molecular biology, tissue radiobiology, and the future of heavy ion research.

  14. Relativistic nuclear collisions from the EOS experiment at the Bevalac: collective observables and multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insolia, A.

    1996-01-01

    The EOS Collaborations has completed an exclusive study of relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Bevalac using a variety of projectile, target and beam energy combinations. We report here results on directed sidewards flow in Au+Au between 0.25 AGeV and 1.2 AGeV, using a standard in-plane transverse momentum analysis. We also report on projectile fragmentation of Au in C at 1 AGeV. An analysis of fluctuations and critical exponents for small systems seems to support the idea that the multifragmentation regime is associated with a liquid gas phase transition in nuclear matter. (authors)

  15. Progress in collective flow studies from the onset to Bevalac/SIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisa, M.A.

    1995-03-01

    Collective flow in heavy ion collisions was first observed experimentally more than a decade ago at the Bevalac by the Plastic Ball collaboration. Although early calculations had suggested that measurement of the flow would place tight constraints on the nuclear equation of state, uncertainties in other input parameters of microscopic models, which also affect the flow, led to large ambiguities in the equation of state. This talk will discuss recent flow studies that attempt to overcome these difficulties. The EOS and FOPI experiments at the Bevalac and SIS accelerators have measured flow in the 200--2000 A-MeV bombarding energy range with better acceptance, particle identification, and systematics than was previously available. Meanwhile, programs at MSU and GANIL are studying the disappearance of flow around 50 A-MeV. Systematic comparison of these data with predictions of microscopic models is beginning to reduce the ambiguities in the extraction of physics quantities. Also, new directions in flow studies, such as the flow of produced particles and radial flow, offer the possibility of further information from flow studies. Recent accomplishments and new directions in flow studies are discussed, and areas where further study is needed are pointed out

  16. The scintillating optical fiber isotope experiment: Bevalac calibrations of test models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.J.; Binns, W.R.; Dowkontt, P.F.; Epstein, J.W.; Israel, M.H.; Klarmann, J.; Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO; Webber, W.R.; Kish, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Scintillating Optical Fiber Isotope Experiment (SOFIE) is a Cherenkov dE/dx-range experiment being developed to study the isotopic composition of cosmic rays in the iron region with sufficient resolution to resolve isotopes separated by one mass unit at iron. This instrument images stopping particles with a block of scintillating optical fibers coupled to an image intensified video camera. From the digitized video data the trajectory and range of particles stopping in the fiber bundle can be determined; this information, together with a Cherenkov measurement, is used to determine mass. To facilitate this determination, a new Cherenkov response equation was derived for heavy ions at energies near threshold in thick Cherenkov radiators. Test models of SOFIE were calibrated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac heavy ion accelerator in 1985 and 1986 using beams of iron nuclei with energies of 465 to 515 MeV/nucleon. This paper presents the results of these calibrations and discusses the design of the SOFIE Bevalac test models in the context of the scientific objectives of the eventual balloon experiment. The test models show a mass resolution of σ A ≅0.30 amu and a range resolution of σ R ≅250 μm. These results are sufficient for a successful cosmic ray isotope experiment, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the detector system. The SOFIE test models represent the first successful application in the field of cosmic ray astrophysics of the emerging technology of scintillating optical fibers. (orig.)

  17. A proposal to pulse the Bevatron/Bevalac main guide field magnet with SCR power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias, B.; Alonso, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lothrop, F.

    1989-01-01

    The Bevatron/Bevalac Main Guide Field Power Supply was originally designed to provide a 15,250 Volt DC. at sign 8400 Ampere peak magnet pulse. Protons were accelerated to 6.2 Gev. The 128 Megawatt (MW) pulse required two large motor-generator (MG) sets with 67 ton flywheels to store 680 Megajoules of energy. Ignitron rectifiers are used to rectify the generator outputs. Acceleration of heavy ions results in an operating schedule with a broad range of peak fields. The maximum field of 12.5 kilogauss requires a peak pulse of 80 MW. Acceleration of ions to 1.0 kilogauss requires an 8 MW peak pulse. One MG set can provide pulses below 45 MW. Peak pulses of less than 15 MW are now a large block of the operating schedule. A proposal has been made to replace the existing MG system with eight SCR power supplies for low field operation. The SCR supplies will be powered directly from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's 12.3 KV. power distribution system. This paper describes the many advantages of the plan. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Bevalac, a high-energy heavy-ion facility: status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.

    1974-01-01

    The high-energy heavy-ion facility, which has commonly been referred to as the Bevalac, is a synchrotron with B rho of 9000 [kG-in or 2.3 x 10 2 kG-m] having special injectors. The synchrotron has three injectors. The 50 MeV proton injector, originally from BNL, is a tool left over from the high-energy high-intensity days of this productive synchrotron. The 20 MeV linac is a proton linac, designed so conservatively that it was possible to accelerate modest but useful beams of 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O as well as deuterons and alpha particles in the 2 β lambda mode. This was accomplished in 1971. After our first trials, a suggestion made earlier by A. Ghiorso to inject from the SuperHILAC into the synchrotron was actively pursued. Reasons as to why the SuperHILAC is being used as injector to the Bevatron are given

  19. Metallic wedge degraders for rapid energy measurement of Bevalac heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, R.; Alonso, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    An ever-present need in an accelerator-based research program is knowing the energy of the beam delivered to the experimenter. Knowledge of accelerator parameters is generally good enough to predict the beam energy to within a few percent as it leaves the machine, but after passage through a complex switchyard, with air gaps, and non-destructive monitors, substantial changes in the energy can occur. Knowledge of the material in the beam path allows for calculations of expected energy loss, but this knowledge is not always complete, and the unforeseen often plays tricks on the unwary experimenter; for example, a section of beam-pipe inadvertently let up to air, or a monitor left in the beam-line from the previous run. Although such occurrences are rare, to say they do not happen would be grossly inaccurate. The only defense of the experimenter, then, is to have an accurate technique for determining the beam energy at his target location, a technique which requires little beam time and which is non-disruptive of his experimental setup. The device described meets all of these criteria, and is now used extensively in the Nuclear Science and Biomedical programs at the Bevalac.

  20. Metallic wedge degraders for rapid energy measurement of Bevalac heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, R.; Alonso, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    An ever-present need in an accelerator-based research program is knowing the energy of the beam delivered to the experimenter. Knowledge of accelerator parameters is generally good enough to predict the beam energy to within a few percent as it leaves the machine, but after passage through a complex switchyard, with air gaps, and non-destructive monitors, substantial changes in the energy can occur. Knowledge of the material in the beam path allows for calculations of expected energy loss, but this knowledge is not always complete, and the unforeseen often plays tricks on the unwary experimenter; for example, a section of beam-pipe inadvertently let up to air, or a monitor left in the beam-line from the previous run. Although such occurrences are rare, to say they do not happen would be grossly inaccurate. The only defense of the experimenter, then, is to have an accurate technique for determining the beam energy at his target location, a technique which requires little beam time and which is non-disruptive of his experimental setup. The device described meets all of these criteria, and is now used extensively in the Nuclear Science and Biomedical programs at the Bevalac

  1. Light-ion therapy in the US: From the Bevalac to ??

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Castro, Joseph R.

    2002-01-01

    While working with E.O. Lawrence at Berkeley, R.R. Wilson in 1946 noted the potential for using the Bragg-peak of protons (or heavier ions) for radiation therapy. Thus began the long history of contributions from Berkeley to this field. Pioneering work by C.A. Tobias et al at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron led ultimately to clinical applications of proton and helium beams, with over 1000 patients treated through 1974 with high-energy plateau radiation; placing the treatment volume (mostly pituitary fields) at the rotational center of a sophisticated patient positioner. In 1974 the SuperHILAC and Bevatron accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were joined by the construction of a 250-meter transfer line, forming the Bevalac, a facility capable of accelerating ions of any atomic species to relativistic energies. With the advent of these new beams, and better diagnostic tools capable of more precise definition of tumor volume and determination of the stopping point of charged-particle beams, large-field Bragg-peak therapy with ion beams became a real possibility. A dedicated Biomedical experimental area was developed, ultimately consisting of three distinct irradiation stations; two dedicated to therapy and one to radiobiology and biophysics. These facilities included dedicated support areas for patient setup and staging of animal and cell samples, and a central control area linked to the main Bevatron control room

  2. Design of the Bevalac heavy ion spectrometer system and its performance in studying /sup 12/C fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelage, J; Crawford, H J; Flores, I; Baumgartner, M E; Beleal, E; Bieser, F; Bronson, M; Greiner, D E; Greiner, L; Lindstrom, P J

    1989-05-01

    A description is given of the design and operation of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac. The general characteristics of the apparatus, which include a large superconducting magnet with drift chambers before and after for precise angle and momentum analysis of high multiplicity events and a large scintillation array for charge and velocity measurements, are explained. The performance of each part as measured in a /sup 12/C fragmentation experiment is discussed in detail. The main feature of the data-acquisition and apparatus-monitoring systems and of the off-line event reconstruction are given.

  3. Study of radiative effects in 1.8 GeV/n 40Ar incident on Pb (Bevalac Experiment E486H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, T.; McIntyre, E.; Madansky, L.; Carroll, J.; Mulera, T.; Sagle, A.; Koontz, R.; Roche, G.; Schroeder, L.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental setup, instrumentation, and results of Experiment 486H at Bevalac to test the feasibility of studying two photon inclusive and inclusive lepton pair production in the presence of a high multiplicity of background secondaries are described. Some preliminary observations are discussed

  4. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977. [Planning for use for radiotherapy and as radiation source for diagnostic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, S. (ed.)

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery.

  5. The Bevalac accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacal, A.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the characteristics of the Bevatron and SuperHilac heavy ion accelerators in a very general manner. Some aspects of their application in the field of biological medicine and some of the interesting results obtained in experiments on nuclear physics are mentioned. (Author). 20 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered

  7. Charge-exchange products of BEVALAC projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1982-11-01

    There is a substantial production of fragments of all masses lighter than the projectile, such fragments being centered in a narrow region of velocity space around the beam velocity. The exciting studies about anomalons deal with the curious enhanced reactivity of some of these secondary fragments. I direct attention here to the rather rare fragments of the same mass number as the projectile but differing in charge by one unit. We also keep track, as a frame of reference, of the products that have lost one neutron from the projectile

  8. Bevalac operations update: Pub. 496, No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    This report contains information on the following experiments: Beam 30-1 (Dilepton Spectrometer); Beam 30-2 (Janus Spectrometer); Beam 39 I Low Energy Program; Beam 39 II Irradiation Station; Beam 39 III Irradiation Station; Beam 40 I RTE; Beam 40 II NASA; Beam 42 I EOS; Beam 42 II Radioactive Beams-Nuclear Radii; Beam 42 III Fragmentation; Beam 42 IV TPC; Beam 42 V Time of Flight Wall; Beam 44 I Low Energy Program; Beam 44 II Radioactive Beams-Magnetic Moments; Beam 44 III Antiprotons; AIP 86-Uranium Intensity; AIP 87-SHILAC Drift Tubes; AIP 88-Computer Control Upgrade I; AIP 89-Computer Control Upgrade II; AIP 90-External Particle Beam Lines Control; AIP 91-Power Supplies; BEVAX Developments; Spiller Control; and, New Pulsed Switching Magnet. 20 figs

  9. Di-leptons at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matis, H.S.

    1988-03-01

    Recent results on the production of di-leptons measured by the Di-Lepton-Spectrometer (DLS) collaboration are discussed. Results are reported from observations made on p /plus/ Be collisions with proton beams from 1.0 to 4.9 GeV and on Ca collisions with calcium beams of 1.0 to 2.0 GeV/A. The shape of the distributions are similar to that at higher energies. The low mass cross section appears to be explained by π-π annihilation, but detailed calculations are needed to substantiate that hypothesis

  10. A history of central collisions at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskanzer, A.M.

    1989-07-01

    You have heard a great deal about Plastic Ball results at this conference. There were talks on the first morning by Hans-Georg Ritter and Karl-Heinz Kampert on the Plastic Ball at Berkeley, there will be a talk next week by Rudi Schmidt on the Plastic Ball at CERN, and many other speakers have mentioned Plastic Ball results. The young students may think that when the new field of relativistic heavy ion physics opened up, an ideal detector was designed and built, data immediately analyzed, and results produced. The theme of my talk is to show that this is incorrect. The experiments proceeded in logical stages, one building upon the other, increasing in complexity and sophistication. The analysis techniques and the theory developed along with the experiments. If the more senior people in the audience easily remember this history of the development of the relativistic heavy ion field, they may spend their time during this talk thinking about what is happening now and what will happen in the future in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion field, where I believe history is repeating itself. 18 refs., 18 figs

  11. From the Bevalac to RHIC: Recent results and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    There has been considerable theoretical progress and experimental development in the study of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions towards understanding the equation of state of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. At high energies, research has concentrated on the search for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and possible chiral symmetry restoration. In these lectures I comment on similarities and trends observed in recent results over a wide range of incident energies and attempt to provide a common framework where possible. I also point out future perspectives in the search for the QGP at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and in Particular focus on one experiment to be undertaken

  12. Heavy ion physics challenges at Bevalac/SIS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1987-11-01

    This paper discusses where the future of higher energy heavy ion acceleration may lead in terms of understanding the nucleus. The discussion concerns obstacles to formulating an equation of state for nuclear matter at high temperature and density. Implications of this research for astrophysical problems is also presented. (LSP)

  13. Spill control and intensity monitoring for the Bevatron--Bevalac external particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, J.J.; Crebbin, K.C.

    1975-03-01

    Time-intensity modulation in beam spill can be of primary concern in some experiments. The major source of this beam structure is from main-guide field-magnet power supply ripple. If the time constants are appropriate, then final control of beam structure can be accomplished by closed loop control of the intensity of beam spill. The response characteristics of the feedback system will determine the final structure. At high beam fluxes signal to noise ratio of beam detectors, in the feedback loop, can be improved by at least four orders of magnitude by using photomultiplier tubes and a water Cherenkov counter in place of the normal secondary emission monitor. At beam fluxes below 10 10 particles per second (PPS), a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube are used in the feedback system. A plastic scintillator and photomultiplier are also used in the beam as intensity monitors. At intensities below about 10 7 PPS standard counting techniques are used. For intensities between 10 6 to 110 9 PPS, the photomultiplier is used as a current source driving an integrating circuit which is then calibrated to read the number of particles per pulse. (U.S.)

  14. Evidence for anomalous nuclei among relativistic projectile fragments at Bevalac energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two independent emulsion experiments using beams of 16 O and 56 Fe at approximately 2 GeV/nucleon find that the reaction mean free paths of projectile fragments (PF) with Z between 3 and 26 are shorter for a few centimeters after their emission than at larger distances, or than predicted from experiments on beam nuclei. Under the assumption that there are two populations of PF, a best fit to the data is obtained when approximately 6% of the PF have an anomalously short mean free path. The anomalous property of PF persists in subsequent fragmentation reactions. 6 figures

  15. Operational results for the raster scanning power supply system constructed at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Halliwell, J.; Nyman, M.; Dwinell, R.

    1989-03-01

    A raster scanning power supply for controlling an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy-ion beam at the Biomedical Facility has been recently completed and is undergoing electrical testing before on- line operation in 1989. The scanner system will provide tightly controlled beam uniformity and off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions. This article will discuss original specifications, agreement with measured results and special device performance (i.e. GTOs, FET actuator assembly, etc.). 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-11-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980

  17. Use of a time-projection chamber in multifragmentation experiments at the BEVALAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porile, N.T.

    1991-01-01

    An exclusive study of multifragmentation is described. The moments of the fragment charge distribution are used to extract the critical exponents associated with the phase transition to which the breakup is ascribed. The fragmentation of 1 GeV/nucleon La and Au is studied by reverse kinematics using a carbon target. Fragments with Z ≤ 6 will be identified with the EOS time projection chamber (TPC) while heavier fragments will be identified with a multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC). The experimental setup using these detectors will be described

  18. Multi-wire chamber system for heavy ion beam monitoring at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuperus, J.; Morgado, R.

    1975-03-01

    Horizontal and vertical integrated beam-current profiles are generated by a system of multi-wire chambers (32 wires/profile) operating in either the ionization or proportional mode. Sixteen distinct displays (1024 words) are digitally stored and any four may be simultaneously displayed. A new display can be generated at 64 ms intervals. A central control unit selects the mode of operation, the amount of delay after an appropriate trigger, the chamber integration time, and the particular chambers to be displayed. Operating in the proportional mode, the system can detect relativistic heavy-ion beam intensities as low as 10 4 charges cm -2 sec -1 . (U.S.)

  19. Thirty years at the forefront: a perspective on the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    The operational experience of the Bevatron can be divided into four major periods: first, the commissioning and early experimental period, when the Bevatron was among the highest-energy machines available (1954-1962); second, a period of increasing beam intensity and higher sophistication in the experimental program (1963-1973); third, the light-ion (A less than or equal to 56) period (1974-1981; and finally, the ongoing heavy-ion period. Reference material for this paper was taken mainly from internal LBL reports and log books

  20. Mixing and matching Bevalac programs: Rapid-switching of ions and other operations highlights: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothrop, F.; Alonso, J.; Krebs, G.; Miller, R.; Stevenson, R.

    1987-03-01

    Rapid switching of ion, energy, and beam line has been accomplished on a routine basis; typical transfer time is 1 to 2 minutes in worst case situations. Operational efficiency has been improved by substantial reduction of inter-experiment tune time and improved optics in the external beam area installed in 1985. A comparison of current research efficiency and previous year efficiency is given. It is shown that compatibility and productivity for two simultaneous, independent research programs are not mutually exclusive

  1. FASTBUS based data acquisition system for the DI-lepton spectrometer at the BEVALAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matis, H.S.; Claesson, G.; Hendrie, D.

    1985-10-01

    A data acquisition system using FASTBUS has been developed. FASTBUS TDC's are used to record hits from a drift chamber, while FASTBUS ADC's digitize the pulse heights from the chambers. FASTBUS data are transferred to CAMAC and then written to a VAX 11/750 using a MBD. The performance of this system is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs

  2. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A. (eds.)

    1980-11-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980. (KRM)

  3. A raster scanning power supply system for controlling relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Nyman, M.; Halliwell, J.; Lutz, I.; Dwinell, R.

    1987-03-01

    A power supply system is currently being designed and constructed to sweep an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy ion beam in a raster scanning mode for radiotherapy use. Two colinear dipole magnets with orthogonally oriented magnetic fields are driven by the system to produce a rectangular field (40 x 40 cm max.) with a uniform dose (+-2.5%) to a target volume 6 meters away. The ''fast'' horizontal scanning magnet is driven by a single power supply which in conjunction with a triac bridge network and a current regulated linear actuator will produce a 1200 cm/sec max. sweep rate. The ''slow'' (40 cm/sec) vertical scanning magnet will be controlled by dual current regulated linear actuators in a push-pull configuration. The scanner system can provide off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions

  4. Excitation function of particle production from SIS/Bevalac to SPS energies; evidence for a phase transition?

    CERN Document Server

    Ströbele, H

    2005-01-01

    The second part of the title is meant as an incentive to scrutinize the data which will be presented in the following. If the threshold for creating the QGP in nuclear collisions is located in the SPS energy range, it will become evident only by carefully scanning energy and mass dependences of many observables and identifying non monotonous behaviour of several quantities consistently. This contribution, which is a sort of short update of an earlier article, is meant to review the current data on particle production in terms of total yields and ratios, as well transverse and longitudinal kinematical distributions from threshold up to SPS energies.

  5. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  6. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  7. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations

  8. Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskanzer, A.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Lofdahl, J.B. (eds.)

    1991-04-01

    This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  9. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations

  10. Accelerator Division annual report, January 1976--September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerator operations of the Bevatron/Bevalac, the SuperHILAC, and the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron are described. The PEP storage ring is described. The superconducting accelerator (ESCAR) construction is reported, and experiments in heavy ion fusion are described

  11. Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskanzer, A.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Lofdahl, J.B.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations

  12. Relativistic heavy-ion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1981-08-01

    Objectives of high energy nucleus-nucleus studies are outlined. Bevalac experiments on the formation of hot high-density equilibrated nuclear matter are discussed. Future programs are outlined, including research at the CERN ISR.

  13. Accelerator and fusion research division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  14. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  15. Nucleus-nucleus collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1990-01-01

    Activities during the past year have been centered around: the analysis of existing experimental data from the Bevalac streamer chamber and from the Kent state neutron flow experiment 848H; transport model comparisons with these data and with published results from other experiments; and development of future Bevalac experiments, with particular emphasis on the EOS TPC. Activities under and above have led to 10 papers either published or submitted for publication in journals or conference proceedings during the 12-month period ending in March 1990. The PI is spokesperson for one of three beam-time proposals for the first round of experiments at the EOS TPC, to be considered by the Bevalac PAC in June 1990. Planned activities for the coming budget period include a continuation of strong emphasis on the TPC, and the initiation of participation in a planned RHIC experiment

  16. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained

  17. Cellular and molecular radiobiology of heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Roots, R.J.; Yang, T.C.H.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Craise, L.M.; Yezzi, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Accelerated heavy particles are candidates for use in cancer radiotherapy, and the major goal of our program has been to characterize the biological potential of Bevalac beams for this purpose. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values and oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) properties of monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams with initial energies of several hundred MeV/u have been measured as a function of residual range. Bevalac beams with Bragg peaks modified to encompass tumors of various sizes have also been studied using cultured cells in vitro

  18. Nucleus-nucleus collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1991-01-01

    Activities during the period of support have been centered around (1) the analysis of existing experimental data from the Bevalac streamer chamber and from the Kent State neutron flow experiment 848H; (2) work at the interface between theory and experiment, including transport model comparisons with the above data and with published results from other experiments, a new model to probe the possible use of spectator recoil to measure properties of the equation of state, and new methodologies for study of flow and HBT correlations, and (3) development of future Bevalac experiments, with particular emphasis on the EOS TPC

  19. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C.

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed

  20. HISS spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    This talk describes the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. Three completed experiments and their results are illustrated. The second half of the talk is a detailed discussion of the response of drift chambers to heavy ions. The limitations of trajectory measurement over a large range in incident particle charge are presented

  1. Fractional charge resolution in music

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.L.; Brady, F.P.; Christie, B.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results obtained with MUSIC (MUltiple Sampling Ionization Chamber) for La and Ar beams at the Bevalac show resolutions better than ΔZ(FWHM) = 0.3 e. These results suggest the use of MUSIC in future ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

  2. A multi-channel waveform digitizer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieser, F.; Muller, W.F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on the design and performance of a multichannel waveform digitizer system for use with the Multiple Sample Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) Detector at the Bevalac. 128 channels of 20 MHz Flash ADC plus 256 word deep memory are housed in a single crate. Digital thresholds and hit pattern logic facilitate zero suppression during readout which is performed over a standard VME bus

  3. Flow of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, H.G.; Doss, K.G.R.; Gustafsson, H.A.

    1985-08-01

    The systems Nb + Nb and Au + Au have been measured at different energies at the Bevalac with the Plastic Ball spectrometer. Distributions of the flow angles as a function of charged particle multiplicity are presented. Also shown is a transverse momentum analysis for 400 MeV per nucleon Nb + Nb. 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Covariant computation of e+e- production in nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglin, K.; Kapusta, J.; Gale, C.

    1989-01-01

    Electron-positron production differential cross sections in nucleon-nucleon collisions are calculated analytically via meson exchange with a realistic pseudovector coupling including strong interaction form factors. These results are compared with newly obtained data from the DLS at the BEVALAC of proton on beryllium. A comparison with the soft photon approximation is also made. (orig.)

  5. Range-Energy Program for relativistic heavy ions in the region 1 < E < 3000 MeV/amu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes a computer program (developed for analysis of Bevalac data) that calculates stopping power, range, or energy, and which includes the necessary corrections for accuracy in the high Z 1 , β regime, as discussed in the theoretical and review papers of S.P. Ahlen. The program is also available on PSS at LBL's Computer Center

  6. Dilepton (e+e-) production recent pp and pd studies with DLS at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1991-09-01

    The use of dileptons as probes of hot, dense hadronic matter is described. Preliminary results on dileptons produced in p-p and p-d interactions at the Bevalac are presented along with potential ramifications for existing model calculations of dileptons at these energies. Future directions of the dilepton program at Berkeley are outlined. 14 refs., 3 figs

  7. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams

  8. Central collisions of heavy ion physics: Supplemental annual report, October 1, 1987-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, S.Y.

    1988-02-01

    This report briefly describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside in the six months from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1988. During this period, our program continues to focus on correlation studies in central collisions at the Bevalac and AGS energies, and neutrino interactions and oscillation studies at LAMPF

  9. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations

  10. Nuclear physics experiment at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo.

    1981-02-01

    Present activities at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS) are presented. Selected topics are from recent experiments by use of the INS cyclotron, experiments at the Bevalac facility under the INS-LBL collaboration program, and preparatory works for the Numatron project, a new project for the high-energy heavy-ion physics. (author)

  11. Deexcitation processes in nuclear reactions: The study of hot hadronic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porile, N.T.

    1993-01-01

    The research program involved continuing analysis of Fermilab E-735, search for quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in bar p-p collisions; experiments on multi-fragmentation using reverse kinematics at the Bevalac; continuing study of target fragments produced in the interaction of copper with intermediate-energy heavy ions; and detector R ampersand D for the STAR detector at RHIC

  12. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations

  13. Heavy ion reaction measurements with the EOS TPC (looking for central collisions with missing energy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, H.H.

    1994-05-01

    The EOS TPC was constructed for complete event measurement of heavy ion collisions at the Bevalac. We report here on the TPC design and some preliminary measurements of conserved event quantities such as total invariant mass, total momentum, total A and Z

  14. Control system oriented human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  15. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Topics covered include: Super HILAC and Bevalac operations; high intensity uranium beams line item; advanced high charge state ion source; 184-inch synchrocyclotron; VENUS project; positron-electron project; high field superconducting accelerator magnets; beam cooling; accelerator theory; induction linac drivers; RF linacs and storage rings; theory; neutral beam systems development; experimental atomic physics; neutral beam plasma research; plasma theory; and the Tormac project

  16. Acceleration of heavy ions to relativistic energies and their use in physics and biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    The uses of accelerated heavy ions in physics and biomedicine are listed. The special properties of high energy heavy ions and their fields of applications, the desirable ions and energies, requirements for a relativistic heavy ion accelerator, and AGS and Bevalac parameters are discussed. 26 references

  17. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Operations of the SuperHILAC, the Bevatron/Bevalac, and the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron during the period from October 1977 to September 1978 are discussed. These include ion source development, accelerator facilities, the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System, and Bevelac biomedical operations

  18. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  19. First nondestructive measurements of power MOSFET single event burnout cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique to nondestructively measure single event burnout cross sections for N-channel power MOSFETs is presented. Previous measurements of power MOSFET burnout susceptibility have been destructive and thus not conducive to providing statistically meaningful burnout probabilities. The nondestructive technique and data for various device types taken at several accelerators, including the LBL Bevalac, are documented. Several new phenomena are observed

  20. Investigation of nuclear matter properties by means of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, R.

    1985-09-01

    We review recent advances towards an understanding of high density nuclear matter, as created in central collisions of nuclei at high energy. In particular, information obtained for the nuclear matter equation of state will be discussed. The lectures focus on the Bevalac energy domain of 0.4 to 2 GeV per projectile nucleon. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W. D. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations.

  2. Nu shifts in betatron oscillations from uniform perturbations in the presence of non-linear magnetic guide fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crebbin, K.C.

    1985-05-01

    Uniform magnetic field perturbations cause a closed orbit distortion in a circular accelerator. If the magnetic guide field is non-linear these perturbations can also cause a Nu shift in the betatron oscillations. Such a shift in radial Nu values has been observed in the Bevalac while studying the low energy resonant extraction system. In the Bevalac, the radial perturbation comes from the quadrants being magnetically about 0.8% longer than 90 0 . The normal effect of this type of perturbation is a radial closed orbit shift and orbit distortion. The Nu shift, associated with this type of perturbation in the presence of a non-linear guide field, is discussed in this paper. A method of handling the non-linear n values is discussed as well as the mechanism for the associated Nu shift. Computer calculations are compared to measurements. 2 refs., 4 figs

  3. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 μsec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. Heavy ion effects on mammalian cells: Inactivation measurements with different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, H.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Miltenburger, H.G.; Kraft, G.

    1985-07-01

    In track segment experiments, the inactivation of different mammalian cells by heavy charged particles between helium and uranium in the energy range between 1 and 1000 MeV/u has been measured at the heavy ion accelerator Unilac, Darmstadt, the Tandem Van de Graaf, Heidelberg and the Bevalac, Berkeley. The inactivation cross sections calculated from the final slope of the dose effect curves are given as a function of the particle energy and the LET. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1987-07-01

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e + e - pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings

  6. Accelerator Disaster Scenarios, the Unabomber, and Scientific Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2008-01-01

    The possibility that experiments at high-energy accelerators could create new forms of matter that would ultimately destroy the Earth has been considered several times in the past quarter century. One consequence of the earliest of these disaster scenarios was that the authors of a 1993 article in "Physics Today" who reviewed the experiments that had been carried out at the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were placed on the FBI's Unabomber watch list. Later, concerns that experiments ...

  7. Using MUSIC to study relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    A large Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been developed as a part of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS). This facility is being used for the study of relativistic nuclear collisions at the Bevalac of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Preliminary data from MUSIC indicate that a charge resolution of one unit should be achieved from Z approximately equal to 7 to Z approximately equal to 100. (author)

  8. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1978-01-01

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers. (RWR)

  10. Software quality assurance and software safety in the Biomed Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.P.; Chu, W.T.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Marks, K.M.; Nyman, M.A.; Renner, T.R.; Stradtner, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Biomed Control System is a hardware/software system used for the delivery, measurement and monitoring of heavy-ion beams in the patient treatment and biology experiment rooms in the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This paper describes some aspects of this system including historical background philosophy, configuration management, hardware features that facilitate software testing, software testing procedures, the release of new software quality assurance, safety and operator monitoring. 3 refs

  11. Computed tomographic reconstruction of beam profiles with a multi-wire chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.; Chu, W.T.

    1979-03-01

    MEDUSA (MEdical Dose Uniformity SAmpler), a 16 plane multi-wire proportional chamber, has been built to accurately measure beam profiles. The large number of planes allows for reconstruction of highly detailed beam intensity structures by means of Fourier convolution reconstruction techniques. This instrument is being used for verification and tuning of the Bevalac radiotherapy beams, but has potential applications in many beam profile monitoring situations

  12. Deexcitation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porile, N.T.

    1992-09-01

    During the past year, our research program has involved continuing analysis of Fermilab E-735, search for quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in bar p-p collisions; continuing study of target fragments produced in the interaction of copper with intermediate-energy heavy ions; an exclusive study of multifragmentation using reverse kinematics at the Bevalac; and detector development for the STAR detector at RHIC

  13. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. Progress is described in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; (3) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration. 59 refs., 4 tabs

  14. Fluctuations in projectile fragment distributions from 1 GeV/nucleon Au + C multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.B.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, A.; Hirsch, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Fluctuations in cluster distributions play an important role in distinguishing critical and non-critical cluster forming phenomena. The magnitude of the reduced variance (γ 2 ) of a cluster distribution is a direct measure of the size of its fluctuations. Preliminary examinations of γ 2 are made for cluster distributions from 1 GeV/nucleon Au+C data obtained in the EOS experiment at the Bevalac. Values of γ 2 are compared to those from percolation and statistical multifragmentation models

  15. Review of ion beam therapy: Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    First therapy efforts at the Bevalac using neon ions took place in the 70's and 80's. Promising results led to construction of HIMAC in Chiba Japan, and more recently to therapy trials at GSI. Both these facilities are now treating patients with carbon beams. Advances in both accelerator technology and beam delivery have taken place at these two centers. Plans are well along for new facilities in Europe and Japan

  16. High energy nuclear beams at Berkeley: present and future possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary goal of the Bevalac research program continues to be the study of nuclear matter at extreme conditions of temperature and baryon density while still addressing more conventional aspects of nuclear physics. Future plans are for a colliding beam machine in the energy range of 20 GeV/n. The conceptual design and basin requirements for such a relativistic nuclear collider (RNC) are outlined. In addition the central physics themes to be addressed by an RNC are briefly discussed

  17. Report of TOF for 900 MeV/n Au ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, H J; Flores, I; Lindstrom, P J; Krebs, G

    1986-04-15

    We describe a measurement of the time of flight over an 18.5 m path of 900 MeV/n Au ions from the LBL Bevalac. We used two small scintillators viewed by XP2972 photomultiplier tubes without any light guides. The large light output allowed us to attain a resolution of 58 ps in the flight time and an energy resolution of 3 MeV/n. The system is being used in energy loss and machine performance studies.

  18. Experimental cross sections for the pickup of electrons by relativistic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Crawford, H.J.; Lindstroem, P.J.; Greiner, D.E.; Beiser, F.S.; Heckman, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for the pickup of electrons in a variety of targets have been measured with beams of 12 C (150, 250, 400 MeV/n), 20 Ne (250, 400, 1050, 2100 MeV/n) and 40 Ar (400, 1050 MeV/n) from the Bevalac accelerator. The interpretation of the results in terms of radiative and non-radiative capture, and the implications for cosmic ray propagation studies are discussed. (author)

  19. Report of TOF for 900 MeV/n Au ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.; Flores, I.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Krebs, G.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a measurement of the time of flight over an 18.5 m path of 900 MeV/n Au ions from the LBL Bevalac. We used two small scintillators viewed by XP2972 photomultiplier tubes without any light guides. The large light output allowed us to attain a resolution of 58 ps in the flight time and an energy resolution of 3 MeV/n. The system is being used in energy loss and machine performance studies. (orig.)

  20. Report of TOF for 900 MeV/n Au ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, H J; Flores, I; Lindstrom, P J; Krebs, G

    1986-04-15

    We describe a measurement of the time of flight over an 18.5 m path of 900 MeV/n Au ions from the LBL Bevalac. We used two small scintillators viewed by XP2972 photomultiplier tubes without any light guides. The large light output allowed us to attain a resolution of 58 ps in the flight time and an energy resolution of 3 MeV/n. The system is being used in energy loss and machine performance studies. (orig.).

  1. Looking for anomalons with a segmented Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.

    1984-10-01

    An experiment performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, Expt. 676H, to study the anomalon effect with a segmented total-internal-reflection Cerenkov detector is reported. Radiators of 3mm thick BK7W optical glass and 2mm thick fused silica and a beam of 40 Ca at 2.1 GeV/nucleon were used. Results are presented and discussed

  2. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers

  3. Guide to user facilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories' user facilities are described. Specific facilities include: the National Center for Electron Microscopy; the Bevalac; the SuperHILAC; the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility; the National Tritium Labeling Facility; the 88 inch Cyclotron; the Heavy Charged-Particle Treatment Facility; the 2.5 MeV Van de Graaff; the Sky Simulator; the Center for Computational Seismology; and the Low Background Counting Facility

  4. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

  5. Discovery of hydrodynamic behavior in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamagaki, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    The objective of high energy heavy ion collision experiments is creating high temperature and high density states to investigate hadron matter properties in such extreme conditions. Since the start of heavy ion collision experiments with BEVALAC, knowledge of the space-time evolution of collision has become indispensable for understanding the hadronic matter properties. This problem is reviewed here from the hydrodynamics view point. Although its importance has been generally recognized since the time of BEVALAC, the hydrodynamic description has not been successful because the hydrodynamic model assuming non-viscous or small fluid had not been considered to be enough to properly describe the space-time evolution of hadron-hadron collisions until the RHIC experiments. Items of the following titles are picked up and reviewed here: Development of heavy ion accelerations; Space-time evolution of hadron collision process and hydrodynamic model; Chemical freezing and kinematical freezing, including transverse momentum spectra at proton-proton collisions and particle spectra in heavy ion collisions; Elliptical azimuthal angle anisotropy; Discovery of hydrodynamic flow at BEVALAC; Problems of incident beam dependence of v2; Elliptic azimuthal angle anisotropy at RHIC; What is it that carries the elliptic anisotropy? Discussion of attainment of thermodynamical equilibrium state at RHIC; and finally investigations of fluid properties other than azimuthal anisotropy, such as, Fluid properties probed by heavy quarks and Observing QCD fluid responses. (S. Funahashi)

  6. A model for projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, G; Mallik, S; Gupta, S Das

    2013-01-01

    A model for projectile fragmentation is developed whose origin can be traced back to the Bevalac era. The model positions itself between the phenomenological EPAX parametrization and transport models like 'Heavy Ion Phase Space Exploration' (HIPSE) model and antisymmetrised molecular dynamics (AMD) model. A very simple impact parameter dependence of input temperature is incorporated in the model which helps to analyze the more peripheral collisions. The model is applied to calculate the charge, isotopic distributions, average number of intermediate mass fragments and the average size of largest cluster at different Z bound of different projectile fragmentation reactions at different energies.

  7. Heavy Ion Physics in the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamiya, Shoji [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Bevalac started its operation in 1970, which was an initiation of this field. Then, 15 years later (in 1985) both AGS and SPS started their operations. After further 15 or 25 years, RHIC (in 2000) and then LHC (in 2010) started operating. Present highlights are centered at these two facilities. However, how about the future direction in this field? Here, firstly the past achievements of RHIC and LHC are reviewed, and then the current and future issues are considered. Finally, the scope on the lower-energy region, in which I am currently involved, is described.

  8. Status of the HISS MUSIC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.; Flores, F.; Bieser, F.

    1984-01-01

    This note describes the status of a new type of high resolution large area charged particle detector constructed for use at the Bevalac HISS facility. High charge resolution is attained by measuring many samples of the ionization produced along the path of a particle as it traverses 144 cm of P10 gas. A Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) detector was selected for use at HISS because it can cover a large area(1M x 1M) at relatively low cost and return individual charge identification for multiple fragments emitted from relativistic heavy ion interactions

  9. Nuclear spallation of cosmic ray nuclei in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear spallation of cosmic rays during propagation is qualitatively reviewed. After the problem is defined, a discussion is presented of the relevant information obtainable from studying nuclear reactions, specifically, quantity and distribution of traversed matter, time and place of propagation, and source composition. Comments are offered on the cross sections and nuclear reactions that are critical for a complete understanding in this area. This is followed by a brief look at the present status of research and possibilities for further work using the Bevalac. (U.S.)

  10. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.; Friedlander, E.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Stokstad, R.G.

    1981-03-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) during the period between July 1, 1979 and June 30, 1980. The principal objective of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, complemented with programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development. The division continues to operate the 88 Inch Cyclotron as a major research facility that also supports a strong outside user program. Both the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators, operated as national facilities by LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, are also important to NSD experimentalists

  11. Measurement of energy deposition near heavy ion tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Brady, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.; Rapkin, M.

    1985-01-01

    In November of 1982 work was begun in collaboration with Columbia University and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to use microdosimetric methods to measure energy deposition of heavy ions produced at LBL's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. Last year the authors reported preliminary results indicating that secondary charged particle equilibrium was probably obtained using this experimental setup, but that there seemed to be poor spatial resolution in the solid state position-sensitive detector. Further analysis of the measurements taken in August 1983 shows that because of this electronic noise in the position-sensitive detector, only the 56 Fe data yielded useful microdosimetric spectra

  12. Fragmentation of the 56Fe in Al at 1.88A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.P.; Pal, P.; Basu, B.; Rakshit, R.; Mukherjee, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The production of fragmented nuclei from relativistic 56 Fe beam available from LBL Bevalac at 1.88A GeV has been studied using CR-39 (DOP) passive detector placed at an angle of 60 degrees with respect to the beam. The histogram showing the experimental frequency distribution of minor axes of the elliptic etch pit shows the presence of the fragmented nuclei produced with charge number Z from 25 up to 21. The histogram further reveals the presence of nuclei with Z=27 and 28. The production of nuclei heavier than 56 Fe is possibly due to the charge exchange or pick-up phenomena

  13. Present status and future plan of the research using HIMAC of NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawachi, Kiyomitsu

    1996-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) was completed in 1993, and since June of 1994 heavy ion therapy has made a new start at this facility after closed-down of the BEVALAC accelerator at LBL in Berkeley, California in 1992. The HIMAC is also opened for the researchers of outside of NIRS as well as the clinical trial of the heavy ion therapy. In this report, I will describe on the present status of HIMAC facility, the beam characteristics and the future developments of HIMAC. (author)

  14. Quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K. H.

    1994-10-15

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June.

  15. [Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs

  16. Charged particle multiplicity distributions in the reaction 139La + 139La at 1 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odyniec, G.; Bangert, D.; Brockmann, R.

    1984-01-01

    There is considerable interest in studying charged-particle production in heavy ion collisions. In this report the authors present preliminary results of the study of production and accompanying nuclear disintegration in the reaction 139 La + 139 La at 1 GeV/nucleon for two trigger modes. These correspond to impact parameters b < 6.76 fm (central trigger) and b < 11.9 fm (minimum bias trigger) in the geometrical model. The experiment was performed at the Bevalac using the Steamer Chamber Facility

  17. Production of 11C by the interaction of 375 MeV/amu Ne10+ ions with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.R.; Thomas, R.H.

    1975-06-01

    The reaction cross section for production of 11 C from 12 C in a polystyrene target has been measured with incident 375-MeV/amu Ne 10+ ions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. A broad beam irradiation was used, and both beam profile and absolute particle fluence were determined with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters, which had been calibrated by track counting in nuclear emulsions; the induced target activity was measured with a NaI(Tl)-crystal, γ-ray spectrometer. The reaction cross section was 75 +- 7 mb. (1 figure, 1 table) (U.S.)

  18. Fluctuations in the size of the largest projectile fragment produced in 1 GeV/nucleon Au + C collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, P.; Elliott, J.B.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, A.; Hirsch, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Large fluctuations in quantities such as density are characteristic of critical phenomena in the neighborhood of the critical point. Using the EOS apparatus at the Bevalac, we have performed an exclusive experiment in which the size of the largest projectile fragment produced in 1 GeV/nucleon Au+C collisions is studied as a function of the charged multiplicity of the event. A peak in the fluctuations is expected at the critical multiplicity. The data are compared to a percolation model and a statistical multifragmentation model

  19. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs

  20. Experimental studies with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, D.L.; Sree Krishna Murty, G.; Chandrasekhar Rao, M.V.S.

    1991-01-01

    The sources of information presented are essentially taken from the papers reported at several international seminars and those appeared in the Journal of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Production and usage of radioactive ion beams (RIB) in research have received the attention of scientists all over the world during the past six years. The first radioactive ion beams ( 19 Ne) were produced at Bevalac for the purpose of medical research using a primary beam of energy 800 MeV/a.m.u. (author). 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Interaction mean free path measurements for relativistic heavy ion fragments using CR39 plastic track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drechsel, H.; Brechtmann, C.; Dreute, J.; Sonntag, S.; Trakowski, W.; Beer, J.; Heinrich, W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment measuring the interaction mean free paths for charge changing nuclear collisions of relativistic heavy ion fragments. We use a stack of CR39 plastic nuclear track detectors that was irradiated with 1.8 GeV/nucleon 40 Ar ions at the Berkeley Bevalac. About 1.5 x 10 7 etch cones were measured in this experiment using an automatic measuring system. By tracing the etch cones over successive plastic foils the particle trajectories in the stack were reconstructed. For 14185 trajectories with 6444 nuclear collisions of fragments with charge 9-15 the interaction mean free path in the plastic was determined. (orig.)

  2. Particle production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, R.

    1985-05-01

    Recent data on the production of pions and strange particles at the Bevalac and Synchrophasotron accelerators are reviewed, covering pion spectra and multiplicity distributions, Λ, K + and K - yields and spectra, and Λ polarization. Emphasis is placed on recent progress in determining the equation of state of compressed fireball nuclear matter from the observed pion yield in central collisions. Further, the information derived from apparent spectral temperatures is critically examined, along with a discussion of thermal and chemical equilibrium attainment in the reactions, as revealed by particle spectra and yields. (orig.)

  3. Single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.

    1979-06-01

    The results of a Bevalac experiment to measure the single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic (0.5 1 , and fully stripped, N 0 , ion beams emerging from the targets. Separate counters measured the number of ions in each charge state. The ratios N 1 /N 0 for different target thicknesses were fit to a simple growth curve to yield electron attachment and stripping cross sections. The data are compared to relativistic extrapolations of available theories. Clear evidence for two separate attachment processes, radiative and non-radiative, is found. Data are compared to a recently improved formulation for the stripping cross sections

  4. Light Fragment Production and Power Law Behavior in Au + Au Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F.P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.A.; Chacon, A.D.; Chance, J.L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J.B.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, J.A.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.A.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D.L.; Partlan, M.D.; Porile, N.T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H.G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J.L.; Russo, G.V.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B.K.; Symons, T.J.M.; Tincknell, M.L.; Tuve, C.; Warren, P.G.; Weerasundara, D.; Wieman, H.H.; Wolf, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Using charged-particle-exclusive measurements of Au+Au collisions in the LBL Bevalac's EOS time projection chamber, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity, and beam energy. Most features of these densities above a transverse momentum threshold are consistent with momentum-space coalescence, and, in particular, the increase in sideward flow with fragment mass is generally well described by a momentum-space power law

  5. Central collisions of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R ampersand D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals

  6. Particle production in high energy nucleus--nucleus experiments at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A review of high energy nucleus-nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac is presented. Earlier results on projectile and target fragmentation and pion production are briefly summarized. More recent results on Coulomb effects in projectile fragmentation, heavy ion total cross-sections, γ-ray production, and charged particle multiplicities are presented. Also, recent experiments which may shed light on phenomena arising from the central collision of two energetic nuclei, including recent evidence for and against the observation of nuclear shock waves, are reviewed

  7. Research overview 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The accelerator and fusion research division is not only the largest scientific division at LBL, but also one of the most diverse. Major efforts in this report are discussed. Investigations in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy; Design, construction, and commissioning of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron-radiation facility; Theoretical and applied studies of accelerator physics; Research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and Operation of a heavy-ion accelerator complex, the Bevalac, for nuclear science and biomedical research

  8. Heavy-ion collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1993-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to study nucleus-nucleus collisions experimentally at intermediate and relativistic energies, with emphasis on measurement and interpretation of correlation effects that provide insight into the nuclear phase diagram and the nuclear equation of state. During the course of this reporting period, the PI returned to Kent from a 15-month leave at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, which had been devoted 100% to work on this research project. The EOS Time Projection Chamber at LBL's Bevalac accelerator has continued to be the major focus of research for all of the supported personnel; about a year ago, this detector successfully took data in production mode for the first time, and accumulated in excess of 1000 hours of beam time before the termination of the Bevalac in February 1993. Reduction and analysis of these data is currently our first priority. Effort has also been devoted to the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, in the form of contributions to the Conceptual Design Report, work on HV control hardware and software for use with the STAR Time Projection Chamber, and tracking software development

  9. [Studies of heavy-ion induced reactions]: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    An experiment was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, extending previous studies using inverse reactions to 50 MeV/u 139 La incident on targets of C and Al. Studies of excitation energy division in lower energy division in lower energy heavy-ion reactions were furthered using kinematic coincidences to measure the excitation energies of primary products in the Fe + Ho reaction at 12 MeV/u. These results will provide important systematics for comparisons with previous measurements at 9 MeV/u on the same system and at 15 MeV/u on the Fe + Fe and Fe + U systems. Also studied were different aspects of 15 MeV/u Fe-induced reactions, with experiments performed at the Oak Ridge HHIRF. The first three contributions of this report constitute a major portion of the results from this research. Finally, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac a large detector array for coincident detection of fragmentation products in heavy-ion collisions below 100 MeV/u is being built. A list of publications, personnel, and activities is provided

  10. Fully stripped heavy ion yield vs energy for Xe and Au ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieberger, P.; Wegner, H.E.; Alonzo, J.; Gould, H.; Anholt, R.E.; Meyerhof, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Bevalac is now capable of accelerating U-238 ions to approximately 1 GeV/amu and measurements have shown that fully stripped U-238 ions are produced with good yield at these energies. However, knowing the stripping yields at different energies for U-238 does not allow an accurate prediction for other, lower Z projectiles. Consequently, extensive stripping yield measurements were made for Au-197 and Xe-139 ions. In addition to the stripping measurements from the direct Bevalac beam, pickup measurements were also made with specially prepared bare, one electron, and two electron ions. Since many research groups are considering heavy ion storage rings and/or synchrotrons, the pickup cross section for bare ions is important to estimate beam lifetime in terms of the average machine vacuum. Since the Mylar target provides a pickup probability similar to air, a preliminary analysis of the Xe 54+ and U 92+ data are presented along with predictions for other ions ranging down to Fe 26+ . 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Fully stripped heavy ion yield vs energy for Xe and Au ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieberger, P.; Wegner, H.E.; Alonzo, J.; Gould, H.; Anholt, R.E.; Meyerhof, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Bevalac is now capable of accelerating U-238 ions to approximately 1 GeV/amu and measurements have shown that fully stripped U-238 ions are produced with good yield at these energies. However, knowing the stripping yields at different energies for U-238 does not allow an accurate prediction for other, lower Z projectiles. Consequently, extensive stripping yield measurements were made for Au-197 and Xe-139 ions. In addition to the stripping measurements from the direct Bevalac beam, pickup measurements were also made with specially prepared bare, one electron, and two electron ions. Since many research groups are considering heavy ion storage rings and/or synchrotrons, the pickup cross section for bare ions is important to estimate beam lifetime in terms of the average machine vacuum. Since the Mylar target provides a pickup probability similar to air, a preliminary analysis of the Xe/sup 54 +/ and U/sup 92 +/ data are presented along with predictions for other ions ranging down to Fe/sup 26 +/. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Report of the workshop for searching future direction of INS-LBL joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The workshop for searching the future direction of INS-LBL joint research was held from January 10 to 12, 1983, In Hakone. The Japan-USA joint experiment was started seven years ago at the Bevalac in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and four years have elapsed since the beginning of INS-LBL joint research. The five-year program of the INS-LBL joint research will end in the spring of 1984, therefore the progress and the results are reviewed, and the policy taken hereafter is reconsidered. The past ten years can be divided into two periods, and in the first period, the release of light particles from the core reaction of heavy ions was taken up. In the second period, the precise measurement of particle correlation and the study on rare events were the main subjects. The five-year program mentioned above was organized in the second period. The results obtained have been internationally evaluated high. Recently, the beam of heavy nuclei such as Xe and U has become to be accelerated by the Bevalac. It was proposed to shift to the nuclear physics of new isotopes from 1984 on. (Kako, I.)

  13. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy-particle radiography has clinical potential as a newly developed noninvasive low-dose imaging procedure that provides increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high-energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program for medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low-dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures, brain and spinal neoplasms, and the heart. The potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, is now proving to be an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, and for the early detection of small soft-tissue tumors at low radiation dose

  14. Squeeze-out of nuclear matter as a function of projectile energy and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Kampert, K.H.; Kolb, B.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Squeeze-out, a component of the collective flow of nuclear matter, is the preferential emission of particles out of the reaction plane. Using the sphericity method the out-of-plane/in-plane ratio of the kinetic energy flow has been analyzed as a function of multiplicity and beam energy for Ca+Ca, Nb+Nb, and Au+Au collisions measured with the Plastic Ball detector at the Bevalac. Also, azimuthal distribution of the particles around the flow axis are presented together with the extracted out-of-plane/in-plane ratios. Finally, the rapidity dependence of the out-of-plane/in-plane ratio has been investigated with a new method using the transverse momentum components of the particles

  15. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4π detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented

  16. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and 16O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.R.; Albrecht, R.; Claesson, G.; Bock, R.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.W.; Lund, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Lee, I.Y.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.; Sorensen, S.P.; Young, G.R.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Dragon, L.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Loehner, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Purschke, M.; Santo, R.; Franz, A.; Kristiansson, P.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Garpman, S.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Persson, S.; Stenlund, E.

    1988-01-01

    Target remnants with Z 16 O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon were measured in the angular range from 30 0 to 160 0 (-1.7 16 O-induced reactions (≅ 300 MeV/c) than in proton-induced reactions (≅ 130 MeV/c). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calculations at 60 GeV/nucleon 16 O+Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeV/nucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse momenta of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target fragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1-2 GeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  17. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and 16O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.R.; Albrecht, R.; Claesson, G.; Bock, R.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.W.; Lund, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Lee, I.Y.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.; Sorensen, S.P.; Young, G.R.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Dragon, L.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Loehner, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Purschke, M.; Santo, R.; Franz, A.; Kristiansson, P.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Garpman, S.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Persson, S.; Stenlund, E.

    1988-01-01

    Target remnants with Z 16 O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon were measured in the angular range from 30 0 to 160 0 (-1.7 16 O-induced reactions (= 300 MeV/c) than in proton-induced reactions (= 130 MeV/c). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calculations at 60 GeV/nucleon 16 O+Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeV/nucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse momenta of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target fragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1-2 GeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  18. A fragment separator at LBL for beta-NMR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuta, K.; Ozawa, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Minamisono, T.; Fukuda, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Ohtsubo, T.; Momota, S.; Fukuda, S.; Matsuo, Y.; Takechi, H.; Minami, I.; Sugimoto, K.; Tanihata, I.; Omata, K.; Alonso, J.R.; Krebs, G.F.; Symons, T.J.M.

    1992-03-01

    The Beam 44 fragment separator was built at the Bevalac of LBL for NMR studies of beta emitting nuclei. 37 K, 39 Ca, and 43 Ti fragments originating from 40 Ca and 46 Ti primary beams were separated by the separator for NMR studies on these nuclei. Nuclear spin polarization was created in 39 Ca and 43 Ti using the tilted foil technique (TFT), and the magnetic moment of 43 Ti was deduced. Fragment polarization was measured for 37 K and 39 Ca emitted to finite deflection angles. The Beam 44 fragment separator in combination with a proper polarization technique, such as TFT or fragment polarization, has been very effective for such NMR studies

  19. People and things. CERN Courier, Jul-Aug 1984, v. 24(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-07-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. Valuable information on collective nuclear matter has come from another GSI / Berkeley team working at the Bevalac, this time using a streamer chamber to measure pion production in heavy ion collisions and infer the properties of the compressed nuclear matter formed in the 10{sup -23} seconds following the collisions. Judged by the bubbling enthusiasm of its 260 users, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN continues to be a great success. Electron beams have been taken to 800 MeV in the Aladdin storage ring at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin- Madison. The UA 1 'Monojets ' were first past the post in this year's traditional 3.9 km relay race round the CERN site.

  20. The dynamics of fragment formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1994-09-01

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac's BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy

  1. Quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June

  2. Intermediate energy heavy ions: An emerging multi-disciplinary research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1988-10-01

    In the ten years that beams of intermediate energy (∼50 MeV/amu≤E≤∼2 GeV/amu) heavy ions (Z≤92) have been available, an increasing number of new research areas have been opened up. Pioneering work at the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, still the world's only source of the heaviest beams in this energy range, has led to the establishment of active programs in nuclear physics, atomic physics, cosmic ray physics, as well as biology and medicine, and industrial applications. The great promise for growth of these research areas has led to serious planning for new facilities capable of delivering such beams; several such facilities are now in construction around the world. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium (U90+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, H.; Munger, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    The production in 1983 of a beam of bare U 92+ at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac, the Bevatron and Super-HILAC operating in tandem, demonstrated the feasibility of experiments using few-electron uranium. In 1984 x rays from radiative electron capture into the K shell of uranium was observed by Anholt et. al., and in the same year x rays from n = 2 → n = 1 transitions in hydrogenlike uranium (U 91+ ) and heliumlike uranium (U 90+ ) were observed by Munger and Gould. In this article the authors discuss their recent measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium. Their value of 70.4 (8.1) eV for the one-electron Lamb shift in uranium is in agreement with the theoretical value of 75.3 (0.4) eV. 20 refs.; 5 figs

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory year-end-report on heavy-ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1977-01-01

    An intensive theoretical program was launched to try to understand the conditions for safe propagation of intense beam currents in focussing systems, such as continuous and interrupted solenoid lens systems, and quadrupole strong-focussing systems. Analytic methods have led to significant advances in understanding of the new problems; with computational techniques a large amount of new information has been generated on space-charge-dominated transport phenomena; also, at this time a new LBL particle numerical simulation code is almost ready to give new results. Because the Bevalac is an operating heavy ion linac and synchrotron facility with an ongoing R and D effort and in expectation of imminent upgrading to bring it up to a uranium-ion capability, it was a natural choice to make an addition to these activities to examine low-β rf accelerating structures and ion sources suitable for HIF. An experimental program on intense beam propagation was briefly discussed

  5. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  7. Collective flow measurements with HADES in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan, Behruz; Hades Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    HADES has a large acceptance combined with a good mass-resolution and therefore allows the study of dielectron and hadron production in heavy-ion collisions with unprecedented precision. With the statistics of seven billion Au-Au collisions at 1.23A GeV recorded in 2012, the investigation of higher-order flow harmonics is possible. At the BEVALAC and SIS18 directed and elliptic flow has been measured for pions, charged kaons, protons, neutrons and fragments, but higher-order harmonics have not yet been studied. They provide additional important information on the properties of the dense hadronic medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. We present here a high-statistics, multidifferential measurement of v1 and v2 for protons in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV.

  8. Stopping of relativistic heavy ions in various media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, C. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Crawford, H. J.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Heckman, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The residual ranges of (900 + or - 3)-MeV/amu gold nuclei accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac have been measured in several different media. The energy of the beam of nuclei was measured directly using a new time-of-flight system. The ranges were measured by absorption in linear wedges of polyethylene, carbon, aluminum, copper, tin, and lead and in circular wedges of polystyrene, aluminum, and gold, and by total absorption in nuclear emulsion. The measured ranges were significantly different from those calculated from the best available theoretical estimates of the energy loss of highly charged nuclei. It is concluded that at present energy losses and residual ranges of relativistic heavy ions in an arbitrary medium cannot be predicted with better than an approximately 2 percent accuracy.

  9. Automatic tuning of the LBL SuperHILAC third-injector transport line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pines, H.

    1983-03-01

    Testing of a new automatic tuning procedure in an LBL SuperHILAC beam transport line has been conducted with the third injector microcomputer control system. This technique is an advance over the sequential station-by-station automatic tuning method developed for the Bevalac transfer line. The computer now performs steering/focusing adjustments simultaneously on a number of quadrupole and dipole magnets comprising multiple-station sections of the injection line. New magnet currents are computed from equations governing beam optics in a real-time simulation of the beam line. The key to this emittance utilizing the same control magnets and beam profile monitors used for manual tuning of the line. This emittance calculation requires high resolution beam profile measurements using multi-wire profile monitors recently installed in the third injector line.

  10. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics. (WRF)

  11. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics

  12. People and things. CERN Courier, Jan-Feb 1984, v. 24(1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-01-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. 31 October 1983 saw the official groundbreaking for the new Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). This year's International Conference on High Energy Physics takes place in Leipzig, East Germany, from 19-25 July. The sixth international symposium on high energy spin physics will be held at the University of Luminy, Marseille, from 12-19 September. Bare uranium nuclei - uranium atoms with all 92 electrons removed — have been produced at the Berkeley Bevalac. A Workshop will be held from 26-30 March at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. It will focus on the requirements for the next generation of detectors that will be needed to search for the production of the quark-giuon plasma in central high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  13. n-particle transverse correlation and collectivity for collisions 1.2 A GeV Ar + KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjun; Jiang Yuzhen; Wang Shan; Liu Yiming; Fung, S.Y.; Chu, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    A method of n-particle transverse correlation function for the study of collective flow is proposed, which extends both the study of n-particle azimuthal correlations and the estimation of collectivity to the study including the magnitudes as well as the azimuthal angles for all the n-particle transverse momentum vectors. This method is more sensitive to the collectivity of collective flow than the method based on multi-particle azimuthal correlations. Using the new method, n-particle transverse correlations are analyzed for collisions of 1.2 A GeV Ar + KCl in the Bevalac streamer chamber, and the results have been compared with a Monte-Carlo simulation, which show that the collectivity for this experiment is between 85% and 95%

  14. Heavy-Ion Imaging Applied To Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J. I.; Tobias, C. A.; Capp, M. P.; Benton, E. V.; Holley, W. R.; Gray, Joel E.; Hendee, William R.; Haus, Andrew G.; Properzio, William S.

    1980-08-18

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  15. Multiple Coulomb scattering of high-energy heavy charged particle beams used in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.; Ludewigt, B.; Phillips, M.; Curtis, S.; Tobias, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors measured lateral displacement and angular distributions of high-energy heavy charged particles emerging from a target at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory BEVALAC with beams used in radiobiology experiments. Multiple Coulomb scattering occurring in the target material generally spreads the beam laterally and increases its divergence. The apparatus consists of four sets of position-sensitive semiconductor detectors located along the beam line. Each providing two position signals and one energy signal. The difference between the two position signals is used to determine the particle position in one dimension. The two position signals are constrained to add up to the energy deposition signal in order to reject multiple-particle traversals. The vector directions for the incident and emerging particles are reconstructed in three dimensions from their measured coordinated positions. Lateral and angular distributions are reported for beams of high-energy neon, iron and uranium ions incident on targets of aluminum, cooper, lead and water

  16. Strange particle measurements from the EOS TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justice, M.

    1995-02-01

    A high statistics sample of Λ's produced in 2 GeV/nucleon 5 8Ni + nat Cu collisions has been obtained with the EOS Time Projection Chamber at the Bevalac. The coverage of the EOS TPC is essentially 100% for y > y cm and extends down to P T = 0 where interesting effects such as collective radial expansion may be important. In addition, the detection of a majority of the charged particles in the TPC, along with the presence of directed flow for protons and heavier fragments at this beam energy, allows for the correlation of A production with respect to the event reaction plane. Our preliminary analysis indicates the first observation of a sidewards flow signature for A's. Comparisons with the cascade code ARC are made

  17. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs

  18. Correlative degree and collective side ward flow of final state particles in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weigang

    1999-01-01

    A concept of correlative degree is proposed. Using the method of particle-group correlation's function, the effects of the particles with different correlative degrees on collective side ward flow are studied for 1.2A GeV Ar + Bal 2 collisions at the Bevalac stream chamber. The studies indicate that correlative degree is an important parameter on describing collective side ward flow properties. The minority of correlative particles (or fragments) with larger correlative degrees can produce the effect arising from the collective side ward flow, but the effect arising from high-order collective flow correlations can not be dominated by these minority of particles (or fragments). It is results from the collective contribution of the majority of collective particles (or fragments) with various correlative degrees

  19. Pershore made CR-39(DOP) as a 1.015 GeV/n 197Au-ion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.P.; Chakrabarty, S.; Rakshit, R.; Basu, B.; Pal, P.; Biswas, S.

    1993-01-01

    Pershore made CR-39(DOP) stack was exposed at a zenith angle of 30deg by 197 Au-ions of energy 1.015 GeV/n using LBL BEVALAC beam. The top of the irradiated plate of the stack has been etched in 6.25N NaOH solution at 70degC for one hour. About 1202 cone lengths were optically measured. The estimated etch rate ratio of the incident 197 Au projectile beam in CR-39 has been found to be 27±2. The result has been compared with earlier observation. The charge resolution of the detector has been estimated from the average of double cone lengths and has been found to have a value of (0.58±0.03)e for 197 Au-ions. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D.; Friedlander, E.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Stokstad, R.G. (eds.)

    1981-03-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) during the period between July 1, 1979 and June 30, 1980. The principal objective of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, complemented with programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development. The division continues to operate the 88 Inch Cyclotron as a major research facility that also supports a strong outside user program. Both the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators, operated as national facilities by LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, are also important to NSD experimentalists. (WHK)

  1. Mapping the HISS Dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, C.; Bieser, F.

    1984-01-01

    The principal component of the Bevalac HISS facility is a large super-conducting 3 Tesla dipole. The facility's need for a large magnetic volume spectrometer resulted in a large gap geometry - a 2 meter pole tip diameter and a 1 meter pole gap. Obviously, the field required detailed mapping for effective use as a spectrometer. The mapping device was designed with several major features in mind. The device would measure field values on a grid which described a closed rectangular solid. The grid would be a regular with the exact measurement intervals adjustable by software. The device would function unattended over the long period of time required to complete a field map. During this time, the progress of the map could be monitored by anyone with access to the HISS VAX computer. Details of the mechanical, electrical, and control design follow

  2. Study of 12C interactions at HISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.

    1982-12-01

    Single-particle inclusive measurements in high-energy nuclear physics have provided the foundation for a number of models of interacting nuclear fluids. Such measurements yield information on the endpoints of the evolution of highly excited nuclear systems. However, they suffer from the fact that observed particles can be formed in a large number of very different evolutionary paths. To learn more about how interactions proceed we have performed a series of experiments in which all fast nuclear fragments are analyzed for each individual interaction. These experiments were performed at the LBL Bevalac HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System) facility where we studied the interaction of 1 GeV/nuc 12C nuclei with targets of C, CH 2 , Cu, and U. In this paper we describe HISS and present some preliminary results of the experiment

  3. People and things. CERN Courier, Jul-Aug 1984, v. 24(6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. Valuable information on collective nuclear matter has come from another GSI / Berkeley team working at the Bevalac, this time using a streamer chamber to measure pion production in heavy ion collisions and infer the properties of the compressed nuclear matter formed in the 10 -23 seconds following the collisions. Judged by the bubbling enthusiasm of its 260 users, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN continues to be a great success. Electron beams have been taken to 800 MeV in the Aladdin storage ring at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin- Madison. The UA 1 'Monojets ' were first past the post in this year's traditional 3.9 km relay race round the CERN site

  4. Charge resolution of a Hungarian brand CR-39(MA-ND) detector exposed to a 84Kr beam of energy 0.45A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.P.; Basu, B.; Pal, P.; Mukherjee, S.C.; Ganguly, A.K.; Hunyady, I.

    1990-01-01

    The Hungarian brand CR-39(MA-ND) plastic has been irradiated with a 84 Kr ion beam of energy 0.45A GeV and etched for four different etching times, viz. 4, 6, 8 and 12 h. The estimated charge resolution of a CR-39(MA-ND) detector for registering the nuclei 32 ≤ Z ≤ 36 was found to be 0.18e which is close to our previous observation of the response with a CR-39(DOP) Pershore made plate exposed to a 1.88A GeV 56 Fe beam at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. It was found that the estimated etch rate ratio V T /V G is independent of etching time. The cone length and minor axis of the etch pits has been found to increase with etching time. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  6. Deuterons and flow: At intermediate AGS energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, D.E.; Pang, Y.; Kahana, S.H.

    1996-06-01

    A quantitative model, based on hadronic physics and Monte Carlo cascading is applied to heavy ion collisions at BNL-AGS and BEVALAC energies. The model was found to be in excellent agreement with particle spectra where data previously existed, for Si beams, and was able to successfully predict the spectra where data was initially absent, for Au beams. For Si + Au collisions baryon densities of three or four times the normal nuclear matter density (ρ 0 ) are seen in the theory, while for Au + Au collisions, matter at densities up to 10 ρ 0 is anticipated. The possibility that unusual states of matter may be created in the Au beams and potential signatures for its observation, in particular deuterons and collective flow, are considered

  7. Heavy-ion collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to study nucleus-nucleus collisions experimentally at intermediate and relativistic energies, with emphasis on measurement and interpretation of correlation effects that provide insight into the nuclear phase diagram and the nuclear equation of state. During the past year, the PI has been on leave at Lawrence Berkeley Lab and has worked on this research project full-time. A large fraction of the effort of the PI and graduate students has gone into preparing for experiments using the Time Projection Chamber at LBL's Bevalac accelerator; in March 1992, this device successfully took data in production mode for the first time, and the first physics analysis is now under way. The PI has carried out simulations that help to define the physics performance and engineering specifications of the recently-approved STAR detector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and has identified a new capability of this device with the potential for being an important quark-gluon plasma signature. A Postdoctoral Fellow, jointly supported by this grant and Kent State University, has been recruited to augment these efforts. Since May 1991, 11 journal papers have been published or submitted for publication; 2 conference proceedings and 9 reports or abstracts have also been published during the past year. One paper in Phys. Rev. Left., one in Phys. Rev. C, and one conference proceedings are based on the thesis project of one of the PI's Ph.D. students who is expected to graduate later this year. Partly in response to the impending closure of the Bevalac, the PI's group has recently joined the NA49 experiment at CERN

  8. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A.

    1982-04-01

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser

  9. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report for the period October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1989-10-01

    Highlights of the low energy research program included the identification of new super-deformed bands in gadolinium and palladium isotopes using the HERA array. Other work at the 88-Inch Cyclotron involved studies of the fragmentation of light nuclei; the spectroscopy of nuclear far from stability and interesting new experiments on the properties of the heaviest elements. Two other programs deserve special mention, the new program in Nuclear Astrophysics and the spectroscopic studies being carried out at OASIS. This isotope separator is now in full operation at the SuperHILAC after many yeas of development. At the Bevalac, important new results were obtained on the properties of hot dense nuclear matter produced in central collisions of heavy ions. First measurements were made using the di-lepton spectrometer which provide the most direct access to the conditions at the earliest stage of the reaction. New results on pion interferometry have been obtained using the Janus spectrometer and surprises continue to be found in careful analysis of data from the Plastic Ball detector, most recently the identification of a new component of hydrodynamic flow. Also at the Bevalac the intermediate energy program continued to grow, studying the evolution of the reaction mechanism from incomplete fusion to the fireball regime, as did the spectroscopic studies using secondary radioactive beams. The third major component of the experimental program is the study of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions using the CERN SPS. This year saw the completing of analysis of the first round of experiments with important results being obtained on general particle production, the space-time evolution of the system and strangeness production

  11. Past and present of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, H.G.

    1994-05-01

    The subject of nuclear matter is interesting for many fields of physics ranging from condensed matter to lattice QCD. Knowing its properties is important for our understanding of neutron stars, supernovae and cosmology. Experimentally, we have the most precise information on ground state nuclear matter from the mass formula and from the systematics of monopole vibrations. This gives us the ground state density, binding energy and the compression modulus k at ground state density. However, those methods can not be extended towards the regime we are most interested in, the regime of high density and high temperature. Additional information can be obtained from the observation of neutron stars and of supernova explosions. In both cases information is limited by the rare events that nature provides for us. High energy heavy ion collisions, on the other hand, allow us to perform controlled experiments in the laboratory. For a very short period in time we can create a system that lets us study nuclear matter properties. Density and temperature of the system depend on the mass of the colliding nuclei, on their energy and on the impact parameter. The system created in nuclear collisions has at best about 200 constituents not even close to infinite nuclear matter, and it lasts only for collision times of ∼ 10 -22 sec, not an ideal condition for establishing any kind of equilibrium. Extended size and thermal and chemical equilibrium, however, axe a priori conditions of nuclear matter. As a consequence we need realistic models that describe the collision dynamics and non-equilibrium effects in order to relate experimental observables to properties of nuclear matter. The study of high energy nuclear collisions started at the Bevalac. I will try to summarize the results from the Bevalac studies, the highlights of the continuing program, and extension to higher energies without claiming to be complete

  12. Nuclear Science Division annual report for the period October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1989-10-01

    Highlights of the low energy research program included the identification of new super-deformed bands in gadolinium and palladium isotopes using the HERA array. Other work at the 88-Inch Cyclotron involved studies of the fragmentation of light nuclei; the spectroscopy of nuclear far from stability and interesting new experiments on the properties of the heaviest elements. Two other programs deserve special mention, the new program in Nuclear Astrophysics and the spectroscopic studies being carried out at OASIS. This isotope separator is now in full operation at the SuperHILAC after many yeas of development. At the Bevalac, important new results were obtained on the properties of hot dense nuclear matter produced in central collisions of heavy ions. First measurements were made using the di-lepton spectrometer which provide the most direct access to the conditions at the earliest stage of the reaction. New results on pion interferometry have been obtained using the Janus spectrometer and surprises continue to be found in careful analysis of data from the Plastic Ball detector, most recently the identification of a new component of hydrodynamic flow. Also at the Bevalac the intermediate energy program continued to grow, studying the evolution of the reaction mechanism from incomplete fusion to the fireball regime, as did the spectroscopic studies using secondary radioactive beams. The third major component of the experimental program is the study of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions using the CERN SPS. This year saw the completing of analysis of the first round of experiments with important results being obtained on general particle production, the space-time evolution of the system and strangeness production.

  13. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L.; Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G.; Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W.; Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F.; Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G.; Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.)

  14. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/μm to over 1000 keV/μm. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/μm. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  15. Research in theoretical nuclear physics. Progress report, September 1983-August 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayman, B.F.; Ellis, P.J.; Kapusta, J.I.; Tang, Y.C.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is briefly reported on the following studies: anomalously short mean free paths in peripheral relativistic collisions, spin-dependent effects in heavy ion reactions, polarization potential for heavy ions, form factors for the collision of deformed nuclei, geometrical calculation of nucleus-nucleus reaction cross section, gamma decay of the giant quadrupole resonance, form factors for α-transfer reactions, the effect of channel coupling on sub-barrier fusion, study of shock and detonation waves, dynamical aspects of the nuclear matter-quark matter phase transition, study of reaction mechanisms at the energy region of BEVALAC, three-cluster resonating-group method of alpha plus two s-shell cluster systems in the coupled-channel formalism, multi-configuration resonating group study of the seven-nucleon system with realistic cluster wave functions, distortion effects in the d + 3 H system, π + - π - mass difference at finite temperature, is a spontaneously broken supersymmetry restored at positive temperature, electron-positron pair production and chiral symmetry in the hot QCD plasma, birth of the QCD plasma in a supersaturated pion vapor, proton stopping power of heavy nuclei (dynamics of proton-nucleus reactions), hydrodynamics of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, status of the theory of QCD plasma, pion interferometry for exploding sources, and nucleation rate for black holes. Proposed work is summarized, and publications are listed

  16. Annual report of the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In this annual report, the research activities and technical developments carried out in the Institute for Nuclear Study during the period from January to December, 1981, are reviewed. Four research divisions are active at present, namely Low Energy Physics, High Energy Physics, Theoretical Physics and the Study Group of High Energy, Heavy Ion Project. The research facilities in the INS are open to all researchers in Japan. In the Low Energy Physics Division, the studies on nuclear structures and nuclear reactions were continued with the SF cyclotron. In the High Energy Physics Division, the studies on photo-reaction were continued with the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron. The Theoretical Physics Division sponsored various workshops, developed computer programs and promoted collaboration among physicists as a research center of theoretical nuclear and particle physics besides its own activities. The Study Group of High Energy, Heavy Ion Project redesigned the whole accelerator complex, and the studies on heavy ion beam accumulation were advanced, using the accumulator ring ''TARN''. The studies on high energy, heavy ion collision were continued at the Bevalac facility. (Kako, I.)

  17. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and /sup 16/O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeVnucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H R; Albrecht, R; Awes, T C; Baktash, C; Beckmann, P; Claesson, G; Berger, F; Bock, R; Dragon, L; Ferguson, R L; Franz, A; Garpman, S; Glasow, R; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H H; Kampert, K H; Kolb, B W; Kristiansson, P; Lee, I Y; Loehner, H; Lund, I; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Peitzmann, T; Persson, S; Plasil, F; Poskanzer, A M; Purschke, M; Ritter, H G; Santo, R; Siemiarczuk, T; Sorensen, S P; Stenlund, E; Young, G R

    1987-01-01

    Target remnants with Z<3 from proton-nucleus and /sup 16/O-nulceus reactions at 60 and 200 GeVnucleon were measured in the angular range from 30)degree) to 160)degree) (-1.7<)eta)1.3) employing the Plastic Ball detector. The excitation energy of the target spectator matter in central oxygen-induced collisions is found to be high enough to allow for complete disintegration of the target nucelus into fragments with Z<3. The average longtitudinal momentum transfer per proton to the target in central collisions is considerably higher in the case of /sup 16/O-induced reactions (approx.300 MeVc) than in proton-induced reactions (approx.130 MeVc). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calcualtions at 60 GeVnucleon /sup 16/O)plus)Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeVnucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse moments of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target gfragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1-2 GeVnucleon. 18 refs., 112 figs

  18. Fragmentation cross sections of relativistic 8436Kr and 10947Ag nuclei in targets from hydrogen to lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, B.S.; Waddington, C.J.; Cummings, J.R.; Garrard, T.L.; Klarmann, J.

    1995-01-01

    With the addition of krypton and silver projectiles we have extended our previous studies of the fragmentation of heavy relativistic nuclei in targets ranging in mass from hydrogen to lead. These projectiles were studied at a number of discrete energies between 450 and 1500A MeV. The total and partial charge-changing cross sections were determined for each energy, target, and projectile, and the values compared with previous predictions. A new parametrization of the dependence of the total charge-changing cross sections on the target and projectile is introduced, based on nuclear charge radii derived from electron scattering. We have also parametrized the energy dependence of the total cross sections over the range of energies studied. New parameters were found for a previous representation of the partial charge-changing cross sections in hydrogen and a new parametrization has been introduced for the nonhydrogen targets. The evidence that limiting fragmentation has been attained for these relatively light projectile nuclei at Bevalac energies is shown to be inconclusive, and further measurements at higher energies will be needed to address this question

  19. Some indications of structural damage in retina by heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.C.; Hayes, T.L.; Tobias, C.A.; Yang, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac Facility, iron nuclei were accelerated to an energy of 600 MeV/amu. The beam of iron thus obtained was used to irradiate living biological specimens in order to study possible microscopic tissue damage with the aid of SEM. The experiments involved total head irradiation of live rats which were subsequently returned to their cages to remain for 1 day and 30 days before further examination. After the 1 day and 30 day waits, both eyes were enucleated and placed in chemical fixative followed by ethanol dehydration and critical point drying. Retinas were carefully removed from the eye cups and loaded separately on aluminum stubs which were sputter coated. SEM of the 1 day and 30 day retinas revealed lesions which were not found at all in control retinas. The 1 day and 30 day retinas manifest regions where outer rod segments were missing or rearranged. A single energetic iron nucleus may be capable of generating a retinal lesion which becomes enlarged as biological processes intervene during the 1 day and 30 day waits. Being composed of highly specialized nerve cells, retinas cannot regenerate following irradiation which severely damages the rod cells. Thus one would expect the observed radiation induced retinal lesions to correspond to permanent tissue damage and possible loss of visual acuity in the intact animal

  20. Particle-gamma coincidence measurements in 12C+12C and 12C+Pb collisions at 2.1 GeV/nucleon incident energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, G.; Koontz, R.; Mulera, T.; Pugh, H.G.; Schroeder, L.S.; Hallman, T.; Madansky, L.; Carroll, J.; Chang, C.C.; Kirk, P.N.; Krebs, G.; Vicente, J.

    1985-01-01

    A particle-gamma coincidence experiment has been performed with a 2.1 GeV per nucleon 12 C beam from the Bevalac. Data were taken with C and Pb targets. The γ-ray spectra are almost independent of the energy or the kind of charged particles detected in coincidence, mainly protons and deuterons. These γ-ray spectra are interpreted as resulting from π 0 decay, and are consistent with known π 0 production rates. A search for a possible decay of singly-charged anomalons into a gamma and a deuteron (or unbound proton-neutron system) has been done by studying the γp and γd invariant mass distributions. The upper limits for such a process are found to be 2 to 20% of the deuteron production rate, for anomalon masses for 200 to 400 MeV above the deuteron mass, with an anomalon mean lifetime of up to 10 -9 s, depending on which kind of decay process is considered. (orig.)

  1. Particle-gamma coincidence measurements in /sup 12/C+/sup 12/C and /sup 12/C+Pb collisions at 2. 1 GeV/nucleon incident energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, G.; Koontz, R.; Mulera, T.; Pugh, H.G.; Schroeder, L.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Hallman, T.; Madansky, L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA)); Carroll, J. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA)); Chang, C.C. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA)); Kirk, P.N.

    1985-06-24

    A particle-gamma coincidence experiment has been performed with a 2.1 GeV per nucleon /sup 12/C beam from the Bevalac. Data were taken with C and Pb targets. The ..gamma..-ray spectra are almost independent of the energy or the kind of charged particles detected in coincidence, mainly protons and deuterons. These ..gamma..-ray spectra are interpreted as resulting from ..pi../sup 0/ decay, and are consistent with known ..pi../sup 0/ production rates. A search for a possible decay of singly-charged anomalons into a gamma and a deuteron (or unbound proton-neutron system) has been done by studying the ..gamma..p and ..gamma..d invariant mass distributions. The upper limits for such a process are found to be 2 to 20% of the deuteron production rate, for anomalon masses for 200 to 400 MeV above the deuteron mass, with an anomalon mean lifetime of up to 10/sup -9/ s, depending on which kind of decay process is considered.

  2. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews

  3. HEND: A Database for High Energy Nuclear Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D; Vogt, R

    2007-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. The database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. It should eventually contain all published data from older heavy-ion programs such as the Bevalac, AGS, SPS and FNAL fixed-target programs, as well as published data from current programs at RHIC and new facilities at GSI (FAIR), KEK/Tsukuba and the LHC collider. This data includes all proton-proton, proton-nucleus to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of experiments. To enhance the utility of the database, we propose periodic data evaluations and topical reviews. These reviews would provide an alternative and impartial mechanism to resolve discrepancies between published data from rival experiments and between theory and experiment. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support

  4. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, R.A.; Nurmia, M.J.; Westfall, G.D.

    1980-03-01

    This Annual Report of the Nuclear Science Division describes the scientific research that has been carried out within the Division during the period between July 1, 1978 and June 30, 1979. The principal objective of the Nuclear Science Division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, both for their intrinsic application in developing understanding of microscopic and macroscopic nuclear science and for their use in the synthesis of new exotic isotopes and new chemical elements. Complementary programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development are also pursued. The Division operates the 88-inch cyclotron as a major research facility which also supports a strong outside user program; experimentalists within the Division also use the Super HILAC and the Bevalac accelerators for their studies. Experimental research was carried out on nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and scattering, and relativistic heavy ions (projectile and target fragmentation, central collisions), with lesser effort devoted to atomic physics, the isotopes project, and other activities. The theoretical study of nuclear collisions involved both nonrelativistic and relativistic reactions. Other work was devoted to the subjects of accelerator operations and development and nuclear instrumentation. Publications lists are also included. 30 items with significant information were abstracted and indexed individually

  5. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  6. Embryonic effects transmitted by male mice irradiated with 512 MeV/u 56Fe nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, L.M.; Van Beek, M.E.A.B.; Raabe, O.G.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy, high-charge nuclei may contribute substantially to the yearly equivalent dose in space flight from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) at solar minimum. The largest single heavy-ion component is 56 Fe. We used the mouse embryo chimera assay to test 512 MeV/u 56 Fe nuclei for effects on the rate of proliferation of embryonic cells transmitted by sperm from irradiated mice. Male CD1 mice were acutely irradiated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 Gy (LET, 184 keV/μm; fluence, 3.5 x 10 4 -3.3 x 10 5 nuclei/cm 2 ; average dose rate, 0.02 Gy/min) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory BEVATRON/BEVALAC Facility in Berkeley, CA. Irradiated males were bred weekly for 7 weeks to nonirradiated females and their four-cell embryos were paired with control embryos, forming aggregation chimeras. After 30-35 h of culture, chimeras were dissociated to obtain open-quotes proliferation ratiosclose quotes (number of cells contributed by the embryo from the irradiated male/total number of cells in the chimera). Significant dose-dependent decreases in proliferation ratios were obtained across all three dose groups for postirradiation week 2 (P 56 Fe nuclei. However, up to 47% of sperm during postirradiation weeks 1 and 2 transmitted proliferation ratios that were at or below one standard deviation from control mean proliferation ratios. 26 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs

  7. Ataxia telangiectasia: LET dependence of cellular inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Human Ataxia telangiectasia cells (AT 2SF line) have been irradiated in vitro under aerobic and hypoxic conditions with heavy-ion beams accelerated at the Berkeley Bevalac as a part of a study to characterize the radiation responses of genetically sensitive and resistant cell lines to high LET radiations. Results from track-segment exposures to neon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams accelerated to initial energies of from 225 to 670 MeV/amu provided an LET range between 30 to 1,000 KeV/μm. The data indicate: (1) The sensitivity of AT cells increases with increasing LET, similar to resistant human lines (e.g., T-1 cells). However, due to efficient repair, T-1 cells are more resistant than AT cells at LET values below 200 keV/μm; (2) Maximum cell kill occurs for both lines at 100-200 keV/μm; at higher LET the sensitivity of the two lines approach each other; (3) There is only small variation in the sensitivity of AT cells to particles of various atomic numbers at the same LET; differences are more pronounced in the LET domain between 50 and 200 keV/μm; and (4) AT cells have slightly lower OER values than T-1 cells in the range of LET studied below 200 keV/μm

  8. Superhilac upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.

    1985-05-01

    This project will increase the uranium output of the Bevalac heavy-ion facility from the currently available 10 7 to 5 x 10 7 ions/pulse, allowing accurate Lamb shift measurements to be made in U 90+ and U 91+ with important applications to the testing of quantum electrodynamics and the development of an x-ray laser. The injected beam intensity will be increased to make better use of the 10emA output space-charge limit of the Wideroe linac. Components will include a new high current MEtal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source along with an improved high current, high voltage Cockcroft-Walton power supply to handle the increased beam current. The Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line will be upgraded with additional focusing to manage the increased space-charge forces and with an improved vacuum to reduce charge exchange losses. Finally, the phase matching between the 23MHz Wideroe linac and the 70MHz Alvarez linac will be improved by the addition of the appropriate buncher cavities. Physics design is underway and detailed engineering is scheduled to begin in October 1985, with installation slated for the 1986 summer shutdown

  9. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and16O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, R.; Awes, T. C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Claesson, G.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Dragon, L.; Ferguson, R. L.; Franz, A.; Garpman, S.; Glasow, R.; Gustafsson, H. Å.; Gutbrod, H. H.; Kampert, K. H.; Kolb, B. W.; Kristiansson, P.; Lee, I. Y.; Löhner, H.; Lund, I.; Obenshain, F. E.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Peitzmann, T.; Persson, S.; Plasil, F.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Purschke, M.; Ritter, H. G.; Santo, R.; Schmidt, H. R.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sorensen, S. P.; Stenlund, E.; Young, G. R.

    1988-03-01

    Target remnants with ZPlastic Ball detector. The excitation energy of the target spectator matter in central oxygen-induced collisions is found to be high enough to allow for complete disintegration of the target nucleus into fragments with Z<3. The average longitudinal momentum transfer per proton to the target in central collisions is considerably higher in the case of16O-induced reactions (≈300 MeV/c) than in proton-induced reactions (≈130 MeV/c). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calculations at 60 GeV/nucleon16O+Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeV/nucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse momenta of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target fragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1 2 GeV/nucleon.

  10. Homage to Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    It was with deep sadness that we learned of the death of Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson, an internationally recognized scientist, beloved colleague and friend. He passed away on Wednesday January 13th at the Lund University Hospital, surrounded by his loved ones, after a short battle against cancer. This is a great loss for all of us in ALICE and the whole heavy ion community. Hans-Åke, Professor at Lund University, was one of the pioneers of heavy ion physics with relativistic beams since its very beginning. He started his research at CERN, as a fellow at the ISOLDE ion beam facility, and immediately after, in the early 1980 joined the Plastic Ball collaboration at the Bevalac. One of the seminal papers of the field on the discovery of collective flow in relativistic nuclear collisions, co-authored by Hans-Åke, Hans Gutbrod and colleagues, stems from this period. From that point on he was always at the forefront of research with relativistic nuclear beams, being for three de...

  11. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report

  12. Wideroe pre-accelerator for the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Alonso, J.; Behrsing, G.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Olivier, M.; Spence, D.; Yourd, R.

    1976-09-01

    In 1971 the Bevatron successfully accelerated low-intensity heavy ion beams up to neon to energies of 2.1 GeV/amu. More recently, beams up to argon have been accelerated using the SuperHILAC as an injector to the Bevatron--the Bevalac concept. With increasing scientific interest in high-energy high-intensity beams of heavier ions, plans to upgrade both the Bevatron vacuum system and the SuperHILAC ion sources and injectors have been formulated. A proposed new pre-accelerator based on an air-insulated Cockcroft-Walton and a Wideroe linac is presented. The Wideroe linac uses the design concepts established at UNILAC, modified for frequency and energy requirements. U 7 + from the ion source is accelerated from 12 keV/amu to 113 keV/amu and stripped to a mean charge state acceptable to the first tank of the SuperHILAC. The expected intensity improvement over the present pressurized injector is a factor of 100 at the highest masses. The physical modeling of the Wideroe linac structure will be kept to a minimum. Computer models predicting the characteristics of the structure have improved to the point where the probability of satisfactory performance is high

  13. UCLA intermediate energy nuclear physics and relativistic heavy ion physics. Annual report, February 1, 1983-January 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In this contract year the UCLA Intermediate Energy Group has continued to pursue a general set of problems in intermediate energy physics using new research tools and theoretical insights. Our program to study N-N scattering and proton-light nucleus scattering has been enhanced by a new polarized target facility (both hydrogen and deuterium) at the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). This facility has been constructed by our group in collaboration with physicists from KEK, LAMPF and the University of Minnesota; and the first set of experiments studying polarized beam-polarized target scattering at the HRS were completed this summer and early fall. The HRS mode of operation has led to some unique design features which are described. At the Bevalac, a new beam line spectrometer will be constructed for us during this year and next to significantly enhance our capability to study subthreshold k + , k - and anti p production in relativistic heavy ion collisions and to search for fractionally charged particles. During this period a proposal is being prepared for a very large acceptance spectrometer and its associated beam line which will be used to detect dilepton pairs produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In concert with these experimental projects, theoretical advances in the understanding of new data from the HRS, particularly spin transfer data, have been made by the UCLA group and are described

  14. Rapid detailed characterization of concrete shielding blocks utilizing internal natural radionuclides for calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Hurley, D.L.; Norman, E.B.; Schoonover, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Following many years of productive research, the 184-inch Cyclotron, the SuperHILAC, and the BEVALAC accelerators at the Berkeley Laboratory were closed, leaving thousands of concrete shielding blocks available for reuse, recycling, or disposal. The process history of these blocks precludes free release pending radiological characterization. This paper describes a procedure whereby a high efficiency shielded germanium spectrometer is used to rapidly characterize natural and man-made activity within the blocks. The spectrometer is moved up to the block and 5 minutes of data are collected at the point on the block that registers highest on a micro-R meter. Sensitivity is better than 1 pCi/g (0.037 Bq/g) for Co-60 and Eu-152, the prominent man-made activities observed. One-time calibration of the detector system is obtained from a sample of concrete, drilled with a hammer drill, counted in our low-background facility, and compared to crushed rock with known U, Th, and K activity. A simple relationship exists between the counts/minute observed in a characteristic gamma-ray peak and the activity in the block. (author)

  15. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin: Progress report, February 1, 1988-January 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is described in 3 general areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal, including DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; and carcinogenesis in rat skin induced by the neon ion beam. Numerous experiments have established that DNA strand breaks per unit dose in the rat epidermis are reduced by about 60% when the radiation penetration is reduced from 1.0 mm to 0.2 mm. The activation of oncogenes in the radiation-induced rat skin cancers followed a pattern. Four highly malignant cancers exhibited activation of K-ras and c-myc oncogenes, while the remaining 8 cancers exhibited only one or the other of these 2 oncogenes. Of 5 squamous carcinomas, 4 showed K-ras activation and 1 showed c-myc activation. Approximately 200 rats were exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons (2.0 MeV) was determined in conjunction with the neon ion experiment. It is too early to evaluate tumor incidence in the neon ion experiment, but for electrons an unusually large excess of connective tissue tumors, fibromas and sarcomas, have been observed so far. 59 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  17. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

  18. BRENDA, the GSI RIB-facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1994-04-01

    In 1985 the decision was taken to build the Heavy-Ion Synchrotron (SIS) together with an Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) and a number of experimental facilities. The energy range covered by SIS is the same as the former BEVALAC. Higher beam intensities, better beam quality of SIS, the ESR, and the dedicated experiments allowed to plan an experimental programme going beyond what was done at LBL. The SIS filled to its space charge limit, and fast ramping times (1 s) promised high beam intensities. The field of exotic nuclei and secondary beams has been from the beginning an integral part of the planned new facility. A new high current injector modifying the UNILAC serving now as SIS-injector, a high dose target station at the end of SIS, and a fragment separator (FRS) for relativistic projectile fragments supplying all facilities with secondary beams were endorsed by the Machine- and Programme-Advisory Committees of the SIS-Project. Since 1991 Beams of Relativistic Exotic Nuclei from Darmstadt (BRENDA) are available with moderate intensities. Higher intensities wait for the projected, but not yet built high current injector. I show that interesting experiments were done nevertheless and why we were quite successful even with low intensity secondary beams. (orig.)

  19. 20neon ion- and x-ray-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Baum, J.W.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the proposed uses of heavy ion irradiation is to image lesions of the human female breast. The rat model system was chosen to assess the carcinogenic potential of heavy ion irradiation in the belief that data obtained from rat studies would have a qualitatively predictive value for the human female. Accordingly, female rats were exposed to 20 Ne ions at the BEVALAC and studied for the development of mammary neoplasia for 312 +- 2 days at Brookhaven along with rats exposed concurrently to x-irradiation or to no irradiation. As the dose of either type of radiation was increased the percent of rats with mammary adenocarcinomas, and the percent of rats with mammary fibroadenomas, tended to increase. At a prevalence of 20%, the RBE for 20 Neon ions for mammary adenocarcinomas was estimated to be larger than 5 and for mammary fibroadenomas the RBE was estimated to be less than 2. No conclusion was reached concerning whether or not the RBE might vary with dose. We suggest that 20 Ne ions do have a carcinogenic potential for rat mammary tissue and that this carcinogenic potential is likely to be greater than for x-irradiation. (DT)

  20. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the β-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; β-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC

  1. Cell survival in spheroids irradiated with heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Biological investigations with accelerated heavy ions have been carried out regularly at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac for the past four years. Most of the cellular investigations have been conducted on cell monolayer and suspension culture systems. The studies to date suggest that heavy charged particle beams may offer some radiotherapeutic advantages over conventional radiotherapy sources. The advantages are thought to lie primarily in an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and better tissue distribution dose. Experiments reported here were conducted with 400 MeV/amu carbon ions and 425 MeV/amu neon ions, using a rat brain gliosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids. Studies have been carried out with x-rays and high-energy carbon and neon ion beams. These studies evaluate high-LET (linear energy transfer) cell survival in terms of RBE and the possible contributions of intercellular communication. Comparisons were made of the post-irradiation survival characteristics for cells irradiated as multicellular spheroids (approximately 100 μm and 300 μm diameters) and for cells irradiated in suspension. These comparisons were made between 225-kVp x-rays, 400 MeV/amu carbon ions, and 425 MeV/amu neon ions

  2. Theory of RBE. Progress report, January 1, 1977--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1977-09-01

    Emulsion-processing combinations have been found which match the response of mammalian cells to x-rays. The grain size of these emulsions is in the implied range of sensitive element sizes in biological cells. The fading of the latent image may parallel biological repair. In consequence studies are under way of the variation in emulsion response to low LET radiations of different quality, of ''Elkind repair'', and of dose fractionation. Predictions of OER and RBE of mammalian cells to high LET radiations, from track structure theory, have been verified, once again, in Bevalac experiments. Experiment has now shown that high temperature traps in LiF respond favorably to neutrons, while low temperature traps respond favorably to gamma-rays. This result is consistent with our identification of supralinear high temperature traps as from an unidentified 2-hit trap structure. In collaboration with Oak Ridge colleagues, Monte-Carlo studies of the electron slowing down spectra of source electrons from 1 keV to 1 MeV in liquid water are being integrated into the theory of RBE. The yield of several different ions is nearly independent of the initial energy of source electrons. The results raise questions as to the physical basis for biological observations of RBE differences for x- and gamma-rays

  3. Distortion of two-pion interferometry by multipion correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.N.; Liu, Y.M.; Wang, S.; Liu, Q.J.; Jiang, J.; Keane, D.; Shao, Y.; Chu, S.Y.; Fung, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Multipion correlations arising from the symmetrization of the n-pion wave function affect the extracted information from two-pion correlation measurements. The influence of multipion correlations on a sample of like-pion pairs can be expressed as a multipion correlation factor, the distribution of which offers good sensitivity to the multipion correlation effect. Analyses of the multipion correlation factor for two Bevalac streamer chamber data samples of 2.1A GeV Ne+Pb and 1.8A GeV Ar+Pb collisions show that the multipion correlation effect in the former sample is greater than in the latter. This result mainly arises from the fact that the pion source for Ne projectiles is smaller than for Ar projectiles. The residual correlations in the reference sample are related to the multipion correlation factor in multipion events, which can be expressed as a residual correlation factor. The influence of multipion correlations on two-pion interferometry analyses arises from the ratio of the residual correlation factor to the multipion correlation factor

  4. Analysis method of high-order collective-flow correlations based on the concept of correlative degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weigang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the concept of correlative degree, a new method of high-order collective-flow measurement is constructed, with which azimuthal correlations, correlations of final state transverse momentum magnitude and transverse correlations can be inspected respectively. Using the new method the contributions of the azimuthal correlations of particles distribution and the correlations of transverse momentum magnitude of final state particles to high-order collective-flow correlations are analyzed respectively with 4π experimental events for 1.2 A GeV Ar + BaI 2 collisions at the Bevalac stream chamber. Comparing with the correlations of transverse momentum magnitude, the azimuthal correlations of final state particles distribution dominate high-order collective-flow correlations in experimental samples. The contributions of correlations of transverse momentum magnitude of final state particles not only enhance the strength of the high-order correlations of particle group, but also provide important information for the measurement of the collectivity of collective flow within the more constraint district

  5. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50--100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: the reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicity of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. 7 figs

  6. Proposal for a high-energy nuclear database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.; Vogt, R.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews. (author)

  7. Nuclear moments and nuclear structure. Annual progress report, August 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madansky, L.; Lee, Y.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report is a review of the activities of the period from August 1, 1981 through August 31, 1982. The final analysis of pi-zero production in heavy ion collisions representing experiments at the Bevalac with a system previously described is completed. The main results involve cross sections for central collisions resulting in the production of pi-zeros, charged pions, and proton multiplicities, and some results of correlations and low energy gamma radiation. Results from the alpha-alpha experiment at the CERN ISR are included in the form of a published paper and an outline of papers that are in press. A short report of a collision effect in an anomalon experiment is included as well. The energetic particle spectra from μ - -capture in medium heavy nuclei were studied at TRIUMF, using the large scintillation counters for neutron and proton detection and multiple Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) counters. The preliminary analysis indicates the presence of such an unusual energetic component. The measurement of the particle and γ-ray correlation in π - -capture in 165 Ho was completed during this year, and the data analysis is continuing in order to elucidate the discrete spectral features, high spin generation and other correlations. A measurement was finished in our search for a new type of strong perturbation of pionic x-ray by the use of coincidences between pionic x-rays and γ-rays from a deformed nuclei

  8. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.; Woodruff, K.H.; MacFarland, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    High energy, heavy-ion beams offer superior discrimination of tissue electron densities at very low radiation doses. This characteristic has potential for diagnostic medical imaging of neoplasms arising in the soft tissues and organs because it can detect smaller inhomogeneities than x rays. Heavy-ion imaging may also increase the accuracy of cancer radiotherapy planning involving use of accelerated charged particles. In the current physics research program of passive heavy-ion imaging, critical modulation transfer function tests are being carried out in heavy-ion projection radiography and heavy-ion computerized tomography. The research goal is to improve the heavy-ion imaging method until it reaches the limits of its theoretical resolution defined by range straggling, multiple scattering, and other factors involved in the beam quality characteristics. Clinical uses of the imaging method include the application of heavy-ion computerized tomography to heavy-ion radiotherapy planning, to the study of brain tumors and other structures of the head, and to low-dose heavy-ion projection mammography, particularly for women with dense breasts where other methods of diagnosis fail. The ions used are primarily 300 to 570 MeV/amu carbon and neon ions accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac

  9. Annual report of the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In this annual report, the works carried out at the INS during the calendar year 1984 are described. The INS is the research institute for interuniversity use, and the research facilities are open to all qualified scientists in Japan. The major facilities are a FM cyclotron of 55 MeV for protons, a SF cyclotron of up to 45 MeV for protons, an electron synchrotron of 1.3 GeV and the TARN of 8.56 MeV/nucleon. The SF cyclotron was successfully operated with emphasis on heavy ion research program, and the nuclear physics program became an important part in the utilization of the electron synchrotron. The research and development of accelerator technology was continued, and the stochastic cooling of low energy (7 MeV) proton beam was successfully achieved by using the TARN. The INS team was busy for constructing its shared parts of the TOPAZ detector of KEK. The INS-LBL collaboration at Bevalac was extended to this year. Two international symposia were organized in addition to symposia, workshops and schools. The reorganization of research divisions was planned. The activities of respective divisions are reported. (Kako, I.)

  10. Collective flow effects observed with the Plastic Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.

    1984-01-01

    At the Bevalac, collisions of Ca + Ca and Nb + Nb at 400 MeV/nucleon have been studied with the Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall detector. The Plastic Ball covers the angular region between 10 0 and 160 0 . It consists of 815 detectors where each module is a ΔE-E telescope capable of identifying the hydrogen and helium isotopes and positive pions. The ΔE measurement is performed with a 4-mm thick CaF crystal and the E counter is a 36-cm long plastic scintillator. Both signals are read out by a single photomultiplier tube. Due to the different decay times of the two scintillators, ΔE and E information can be separated by gating two different ADC-s at different times. The positive pions are additionally identified by measuring the delayed decay. The Platic Wall, placed 6 m downstream from the target, covers the angular range from 0 0 to 10 0 and measures time of flight, energy loss and position of the reaction products. In addition, the information from the inner counters (0 0 to 2 0 ) is used to produce a trigger signal. Data show two different collection effects

  11. Rapid detailed characterization of concrete shielding blocks utilizing internal natural radionuclides for calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Norman, E.B.; Cowles, D.

    1995-10-01

    Following many years of productive work, the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory were closed, leaving thousands of concrete shielding blocks available for reuse or disposal. The process history of these blocks as shielding precludes free release pending radiological characterization. This paper presents a method for the rapid characterization of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopes in large samples of earth-like materials: concrete shielding blocks in this case. Active regions are identified with a sensitive radiation-survey instrument and then examined in detail with a high-efficiency lead-shielded Ge spectrometer. Naturally-occurring gamma-ray emissions from the decays of uranium, thorium, and potassium are used to calibrate the spectrometer. A simple relationship exists between the observed counting rate in a characteristic gamma ray and the activity in the block. This method, taking only tens of minutes per sample at the nano-Curie/gram sensitivity level, replaces much of the expensive coring and laboratory analysis methods needed otherwise

  12. Radiobiological experiments with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.

    1988-11-01

    In experiments, performed at the Unilac, Bevalac, and Ganil a large body of radiobiological data, cross sections for cell inactivation and mutation, induction of both, chromosome aberrations, and strand breaks of DNA have been measured for different atomic numbers, from helium (Z=2) to uranium (Z=92), and at an LET range from 10 to 16000 keV/μm. These data exhibit a common feature: At LET values below 100 keV/μm all data points of one specific effect form one single curve as a function of LET, independent from the atomic number of the ion. In this LET range, the biological effects are independ from the particle energy or track structure and depend only on the energy transfer. Therefore, LET is a good parameter in this regime. For LET values greater than 100 keV/μm, the curves for the different ions separate from the common curve in order of increasing atomic numbers. In this regime LET is no longer a good parameter and the physical parameters of the formation of particle tracks are important. The similarity of the σ-LET curves for different endpoints shows that the 'hook-structure' is produced by physical and chemical effects which occur before the biologically relevant lesions are formed. For this part of the reaction chain only a very limited amount of data are available. (orig./MG)

  13. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

  14. Restriction of the spread of epileptic discharges in cats by means of Bragg peak, intracranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, C.T.; Montoya, V.J.; Lyman, J.T.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male cats with a single epileptic focus receive neon ion Bragg peak radiation at the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Bragg peak radiation is deposited in a thin disc of brain tissue beneath an epileptogenic focus produced with alumina cream. Paroxysmal electroencephalograms (EEGs) from the occipital cortex of cats confirm the biolectric changes in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Distant spread of seizure activity occurs when the cells in the cortical focus fire a series of relatively simultaneous spikes at high frequency with sufficient intensity to develop self-sustained discharges in remote brain areas. The development of a 'mirror focus' in the EEG records in the contralateral cortex gives a measure of the distances paroxysmal discharges spread. Interhemispheric responses (IHR) that travel from the alumina-treated cortex via the corpus callosum to the contralateral cortex are a second measure of pathways over which paroxysmal discharges spread. In cat studies Bragg peak radiation is positioned beneath the epileptic cortical focus. Various heavy ion doses are employed to test whether an absorbed dose per cat is sufficient to block the transmission of epileptic activity as a function of the post-irradiation time. The relationship between neon ion dose and the post-irradiation time for the loss of IHR is a measure of the physiological dissociation of the epileptic brain tissue from the remainder of the brain. The loss of the 'mirror focus' in EEG records agrees with the IHR findings. (author)

  15. Ultrarelativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    Studies with ultrarelativistic heavy ions combine aspects of cosmic ray physics, particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmogenesis. The leading theoretical concerns are the behavior of matter at very high-energy density and flux, the general behavior of space time in collisions, relativistic nuclear theory, and quantum chromodynamics. The field has developed over a period of more than thirty years, since the first observation of heavy nuclei in cosmic rays and the major developments of understanding of high-energy collisions made by Fermi and Landau in the early fifties. In the late sixties the discovery of the parton content of nucleons was rapidly followed by a great extension of high-energy collision phenomenology at the CERN ISR and subsequent confirmation of the QCD theory. In parallel the study of p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at very high energies, especially at the CERN PS, Fermilab and the Bevalac, and in cosmic rays demonstrated that studies involving the nucleus opened up a new dimension in studies of the hadronic interaction. It is now at a high level of interest on an international scale, with major new accelerators being proposed to dedicate to this kind of study

  16. Experimental problems of search for quark-gluon plasma in nucleus-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okonov, Eh.O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental problems for searching for quark-gluon (quagma) plasma in nucleus-nucleus interactions (NbNb,CaCa, ArPb, CnE, ONe) in the energy range E=0.4-1 GeV/A and 3.67 GeV/A and 200 GeV/A energies are discussed. Peculiarities of performing experiments on Dubna synchrophasotron and SPS Bevalac are discussed. The first results prove hadron matter thermalization sufficient for quagma manifestation. It is found that such characteristics of studied interactions as relative λ-hyperon yield, spectral (temperature) characteristics of λ k -hyperons (with higher values of transferred transverse momenta) and associatively produced peons are of greatest interest. The necessity of precise establishment of λ-hyperon group as excessive and differing in its origin from the other particles of the hadron phase is noted. It is shown that experimental approach used in Dubna research proved efficient and requires further development. It includes : selection of rare events (fluctuations) in central interactions of nuclei with high local excitation; search and research of peculiarities in the production of strange particles and in associative pion production; use of streamer spectrometer with a trigger system of rigid selection of central interactions

  17. A high-energy nuclear database proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.; Vogt, R.; UC Davis, CA

    2006-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews. (author)

  18. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R

    2005-01-01

    The authors propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, they propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews

  19. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunet, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley's Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, π + π - annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to α-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 μ) for better mass resolution, in particular in the ρ region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, α-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt) α dependence with α ≅ 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the ρ, ω vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs

  20. Structure and reactions of drip-line nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, P.G. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Secondary radioactive beams produced at intermediate-energy heavy-ion accelerators have in a short time span added a new dimension to the research on nuclear species at the limits of particle stability, and new detection techniques have made it possible to study reactions caused by incident beams of as little as one particle per second. Imminent developments such as the M.S.U. Coupled-Cyclotron Facility are expected to extend the range and to permit the observation of many previously inaccessible species. For a perspective on the progress in this area one only needs to go about fifteen years back to a time when it had just become possible to study the radioactivity of rare nuclear species such as {sup 11}Li. In presenting early experiments with secondary beams produced in fragmentation James Symons said {open_quotes}... In the introduction to this paper we questioned the applicability of high-energy heavy-ion accelerators to this field. Our experience at the Bevalac leads us to believe that this question does indeed have a positive answer. If the physics interest justifies it, then high-energy heavy-ion beams can certainly be expected to play a role in the study of nuclei at the limits of stability.{close_quotes} At the time, very few, if any, realized how prophetic this remark was. In the present paper the interpretation of the longitudinal-momentum distributions from the nuclear fragmentation of single-nucleon halos is discussed. It is pointed out that these measurements, at least for the cases studied so far, directly reflect the halo wave function, and that there is no direct contribution from the reaction mechanism. This is an important difference from the radial momentum distributions, for which diffractive processes play an important role. The author discusses stripping reactions of {sup 11}Be and {sup 8}B on light nuclei yielding {sup 10}Be and {sup 7}Be.

  1. Characteristic lesions in mouse retina irradiated with accelerated iron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malachowski, M.J.; Philpott, D.E.; Corbett, R.L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to determine the radiation hazards of HZE particles using the Bevalac, a heavy-ion accelerator at LBL. Our earlier work with helium, carbon, neon, and argon particles, and exposure to rats to HZE particles in space flight demonstrated some deleterious biological effects. TEM studies have shown that some visual cells were missing and dislocated; these were termed channel lesions. Recently obtained is evidence that a single iron HZE particle may affect a series of cells. Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 1, 10, or 25 rad of 590 MeV/amu initial kinetic energy iron particles in groups of 10 animals per dose point. Irradiated and control animals were sacrificed at intervals from one week to two years postirradiation. The eye samples were dehydrated, critical points dried with freon, fractured, and Au-Pd coated for SEM, or plastic embedded, sectioned, and stained for TEM. Additionally, dry fractured samples viewed with the SEM were embedded in plastic, sectioned, and stained for the TEM. Characteristic tunnel shaped lesions were observed with the SEM. Stereo pairs showed tunnels of various lengths up to 100 μm. Light microscopy of serially cut sections from the same material had vacuoles (V) extending the same length. TEM of the same specimen and specimens prepared only for TEM exhibited large vacuoles, greater than or equal to 2 μm, in the inner segment (IS) and outer segment (OS) layers. Severe membrane disruption was found bordering the vacuoles and gross nuclear degeneration (ND) and loose tissue (LT) were seen in the outer nuclear layer (ONL). The number of lesions increased with increasing dose. Microscopy of the control retina failed to demonstrate similar lesions

  2. Mutagenesis in human cells with accelerated H and Fe ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Amy

    1994-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to determine the risks of mutation induction and the spectra of mutations induced by energetic protons and iron ions at two loci in human lymphoid cells. During the three year grant period the research has focused in three major areas: (1) the acquisition of sufficient statistics for human TK6 cell mutation experiments using Fe ions (400 MeV/amu), Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and protons (250 MeV/amu); (2) collection of thymidine kinase- deficient (tk) mutants or hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient (hprt) mutants induced by either Fe 400 MeV/amu, Fe 600 MeV/amu, or H 250 MeV/amu for subsequent molecular analysis; and (3) molecular characterization of mutants isolated after exposure to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu). As a result of the shutdown of the BEVALAC heavy ion accelerator in December 1992, efforts were rearranged somewhat in time to complete our dose-response studies and to complete mutant collections in particular for the Fe ion beams prior to the shutdown. These goals have been achieved. A major effort was placed on collection, re-screening, and archiving of 3 different series of mutants for the various particle beam exposures: tk-ng mutants, tk-sg mutants, and hprt-deficient mutants. Where possible, groups of mutants were isolated for several particle fluences. Comparative analysis of mutation spectra has occured with characterization of the mutation spectrum for hprt-deficient mutants obtained after exposure of TK6 cells to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and a series of spontaneous mutants.

  3. Heavy particle clinical radiotherapy trial at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Progress report, July 1975-July 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The primary objectives of the clinical radiotherapy program are: to evaluate the potential of improved dose localization particularly as exemplified by helium ion irradiation; and to evaluate the combined potential of improved dose localization and increased biologic effect available with heavier ions such as carbon, neon, and argon. It was possible to make modifications rapidly to provide for large field, fractionated, Bragg peak irradiation at the 184-inch cyclotron with the helium ion beam. This allowed the opportunity to gain experience with charged particle irradiation treatment techniques, patient immobilization techniques, treatment planning and dosimetry studies including the utilization of CT scanning for tumor localization and charged particle dose distributions as well as beginning studies in compensating for tissue inhomogeneities in the beam path. These treatment techniques have been directly transferable to the Bevalac facility where a similar patient positioner has been installed for human irradiation with heavier particles. For the studies both with helium and now with heavier particles, patients with multiple skin and subcutaneous metastatic nodules for evaluation of skin RBE data and patients with locally advanced and/or unresectable tumors unlikely to be effectively treated by any conventional modality were sought. In order to facilitate intercomparison with megavoltage irradiation techniques, a conventional dose fractionation scheme has been adopted. A few exceptions to this dose specification scheme have been patients in which pulmonary, subcutaneous or skin nodules have been irradiated with larger fraction sizes ranging up to 400 rads per fraction in order to obtain clinical RBE studies in 8 to 10 fractions of heavy particles

  4. Nuclear matter and its equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, R.

    1985-11-01

    We can estimate the nuclear bulk compressibility from the excitation energy of the monopole vibration mode, which represents a density oscillation about rho 0 , of extremely small magnitude (a few percent) only. A description of the monopole excitation energy systematics has been obtained by assuming a parabolic shape about rho 0 for the energy-density relation of cold nuclear matter. This implies a linear pressure response to small density changes inside nuclear matter. It enables one to define a nuclear 'sound' mode and the sound velocity turns out to be vsub(s)proportional0.2 c. All of this could be known only for small excursions from rho 0 as long as we were unable to subject nuclei to extreme stresses. The study of head-on collisions of heavy nuclei at high energy has removed this limitation. In these reactions we are reproducing under laboratory conditions the extremely violent transformations of matter occuring in the cosmic and stellar evolution. From the quark-gluon stage of the Big Bang, prior to hadronic freeze-out, to the supernova these cosmic events require an understanding of matter bulk properties over an enormous range of density, from about 10 times rho 0 down to about 10 -3 rho 0 . We will approach them through the compression-expansion-freeze-out cycle of central nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range from 50 MeV per projectile nucleon, corresponding to the compression barrier, upwards to 225 GeV/A (the top energy of the CERN SPS), and further into the TeV/A range by observation of events induced by cosmic ray nuclei. In this article I describe some of the results recently obtained at the BEVALAC, i.e. in the GeV/A domain. (orig./HSI)

  5. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT + colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references

  6. The discovery of nuclear compression phenomena in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    This article has attempted to review more than 15 years of research on shock compression phenomena, which is closely related to the goal of determining the nuclear EOS. Exciting progress has been made in this field over the last years and the fundamental physics of relativistic heavy ion-collisions has been well established. Overwhelming experimental evidence for the existence of shock compression has been extracted from the data. While early, inclusive measurements had been rather inconclusive, the advent of 4π-detectors like the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball had enabled the outstanding discovery of collective flow effects, as they were predicted by fluid-dynamical calculations. The particular case of conical Mach shock waves, anticipated for asymmetric collisions, has not been observed. What are the reasons? Surprisingly, the maximum energy of 2.1 GeV/nucleon for heavy ions at the BEVALAC had been found to be too low for Mach shock waves to occur. The small 20 Ne-nucleus is stopped in the heavy Au target. A Mach cone, however, if it had developed in the early stage of the collision will be wiped out by thermal motion in the process of slowing the projectile down to rest. A comparison of the data with models hints towards a rather hard EOS, although a soft one cannot be excluded definitively. A quantitative extraction is aggravated by a number in-medium and final-state effects which influence the calculated observables in a similar fashion as different choices of an EOS. Thus, as of now, the precise knowledge of the EOS of hot and dense matter is still an open question and needs further investigation. (orig.)

  7. One-Boson Approach to Dilepton Production in Nucleon-Nucleon Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglin, Kevin Lee

    1990-01-01

    We calculate energy dependent nucleon-nucleon total elastic cross sections and invariant mass dependent electron-positron pair production differential cross sections for the processes pp to pp, np to np and pp to ppe ^+e^-, pn to pne^+e ^- at laboratory kinetic energies in the 1-5 GeV range. These calculations will be based on relativistic quantum field theory in the one-boson-exchange (pi,rho,omega,sigma,delta, eta) approximation to the nucleon-nucleon scattering problem. There are several independent Feynman diagrams for each process--twenty-five for the case np to npe^+e^ - and forty-eight for the case pp to ppe^+e^- --which, for evaluation, require taking the trace of as many as ten gamma matrices and evaluating an angular integral of a quotient of polynomial functions of initial and final energies, particle masses, coupling constants and so on. These mathematical operations are carried out with the aid of the following algebraic manipulators: for the trace operations we use REDUCE 3.3 on the VAX at the ACS facility and for testing the angular integration algorithms we use MAPLE on the Cray-2 at the Minnesota Supercomputer Institute. Finally, we use Cray-2 Fortran for the resulting numerical substitutions. Gauge invariance is strictly observed while including strong and electromagnetic form factors. The numerical results for these calculations are compared with existing data from the Particle Data Group Booklet and compared with recently released data from the Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) at the Bevalac of proton on Beryllium. For the latter comparison, the spectrometer's finite acceptance function is introduced before a rapidity and transverse momentum integration.

  8. The History and Role of Accelerators in Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alfred

    2003-04-01

    Over one million people are diagnosed with cancer (excluding skin cancer) each year in the United States - about half of those patients will receive radiation as part of their treatment. Radiation Oncology is the field of medicine that specializes in the treatment of cancer with radiation. The evolution of Radiation Oncology, and its success as a cancer treatment modality, has generally paralleled developments in imaging and accelerator technologies. Accelerators, the topic of this paper, have proven to be highly reliable, safe and efficient sources of radiation for cancer treatment. Advances in accelerator technology, especially those that have provided higher energies and dose rates, and more localized (to the tumor volume) dose distributions, have enabled significant improvements in the outcomes of cancer treatments. The use of Cobalt 60 beams has greatly declined in the past decade. Radiation beams used in cancer treatment include x-rays, electrons, protons, negative pions, neutrons, and ions of helium, carbon, neon and silicon. X-rays and electrons, produced by linear electron accelerators, have been the most widely used. The history of medical accelerators can be traced from Roentgen's discovery of x-rays in 1895. The evolution of medical electron accelerators will be discussed and the use of x-ray tubes, electrostatic accelerators, betatrons, and linear accelerators will be described. Heavy particle cancer treatments began in 1955 using proton beams from the Berkeley 184-inch cyclotron. Accelerators that have been used for heavy particle therapy include the Berkeley Bevalac, Los Alamos Pion Facility, Fermi Laboratory, and various research and medical cyclotrons and synchrotrons. Heavy particle accelerators and their application for cancer treatment will be discussed.

  9. Status of the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Selph, F.B.

    1976-09-01

    The SuperHILAC is an Alvarez linear accelerator designed to accelerate all ions to a maximum energy of 8.5 MeV/u. It functions as an essential part of two research programs of national importance--first, as a supplier of beams for research at less than 10 MeV/u, secondly as an injector for the Bevalac facility, for nuclear physics and medical research at energies greater than 200 MeV/u. This duplication of effort from a single accelerator is made possible by the utilization of a technique known as timeshare--two different ion beams are accelerated independently through the same linac structure. Recent operation has been in the mass range 12 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 136. Usually, a heavy ion (A greater than 40) is delivered to the SuperHILAC experimental area for nuclear physics experiments while concurrently delivering a lighter ion (A less than or equal to 40) to the Bevatron for further acceleration (max. 2.5 GeV/u) to be used in experiments exploring the physics of very high energy heavy ions, in investigations of radiation biology, and in preclinical tests as a tool for cancer treatment. Recent operating experience is reviewed. Also discussed are recent major improvements which have been made to the accelerator, and a proposed improvement which will increase reliability and beam intensity for the very heavy ions (A greater than or equal to 84) by adding a third injector of improved design

  10. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy

  11. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Projectile fragmentation experiments have been conducted at the LBL Bevalac accelerator, utilizing both the B40 and the HISS facilities, to produce a dataset of 36 beam/energy combinations covering projectiles from 4 He to 58 Ni and various energies from 170--2100 MeV/nucleon. While some runs were subject to beam instabilities, magnet problems or low statistics, there remains a large dataset which is still being analyzed. The results will be used to investigate the physics of the intermediate energy fragmentation process and will find application in the astrophysics of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy. An overview of the science goals and rationale is followed by presentation of the experimental techniques and apparatus that has been employed. Data analysis, including both detector subsystem and accelerator calibration, is discussed with emphasis on the unique features of the dataset and the analysis problems being addressed. Results from the experiments are presented throughout to illustrate the status of the analysis, e.g., momentum distribution widths. Total, Elemental and Isotopic cross sections from various beam/energy combinations are presented, including the first data on 32 S fragmentation and the complete isotopic fragmentation cross sections for 28 Si interacting in both Carbon and Hydrogen targets. The new results are compared to any existing data and to formulae used to predict unmeasured cross sections. The size and complexity of the dataset and the required detail of the analysis precluded finishing the full analysis under the subject grant. Plans for additional analysis are presented, and these will be carried out in coming years as time and resources permit

  12. Pion production and fragmentation of nuclei in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskarsson, A.

    1983-01-01

    In collisions between nuclei at high energies one can study the behaviour of nuclear matter under extreme conditions, regarding nuclear density and temperature. The Bevalac and the CERN SC beams have been used and nuclear emulsion and scintillation telescopes have measured the reaction products. Collisions at 50A-200A MeV and at 2A GeV have been investigated. Proton spectra from 12 C induced reactions at 85A MeV have been recorded for different targets. Energetic protons at large angles can be assumed to be emitted from a source moving with half the beam velocity and a temperature between 13 and 17 MeV, depending on the target. In collisions between nuclei, pions can be produced below 290A MeV due to the internal Fermi motion of the nucleons. Subthreshold pion production has been studied for 12 C induced reactions at 85A and 75A Mev. The cross-sections are consistent with a quasi-free nucleon-nucleon scattering picture, involving Fermi motion, Pauli blocking and pion reabsorption. 16 C induced reactions in emulsion have been studied at 75A, 175A and 2000A MeV. It is shown that the excitation of the parts of the nuclei which are not overlapping (the spectators) increases with the beam energy. The 16 O projectile frequently breaks up into multiple He fragments. These events are associated with large impact parameters. Central collisions with Ag, Br target at 50A-110A MeV have been analysed separately. It is shown that the momentum transfer to the target nucleus is limited to a value considerably lower than the full momentum transfer in a fusion reactions. Events are observed where there are numerous fragments with 3< Z<8. These multifragmentation events cannot be understood in a thermal approach. (author)

  13. Flow and spectra for light fragments from Au+Au collisions in the EOS TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisa, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    We study the effects of the collective motion (flow) on distributions and yields of light fragments produced in heavy ion collisions at the Bevalac/SIS energy range. p, d, t, 3 He and α fragments emitted from Au+Au collisions at 0.25 - 1.15 AGeV bombarding energy were measured with the EOS TPC. The TPC has high and seamless acceptance in the forward hemisphere of the CM system, and excellent particle identification for light fragments. Analyses of the sidewards flow, squeeze-out, and radial flow signals are presented as a function of bombarding energy and centrality of the collision. The fragment mass systematics of the flow signals are seen to be consistent with a simple coalescence picture for the light particles studied. A unifying framework for describing many of the systematic features of the different types of flow (e.g. the p T dependence of squeeze-out) in terms of 3 parameters is discussed. Consistent with previous studies, the parameter describing squeeze-out is seen to be most sensitive to the Equation of State within a Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. The effect on extracted temperature of various radial flow profiles is discussed. Finally, a preliminary study of light particle yields in terms of the Quantum Statistical Model (QSM) is presented. It is found that the beam energy dependence of the 'chemical' temperature obtained from the yields tracks with the 'kinetic' temperature obtained from the spectral fits, if one accounts for a flow profile. However, discrepancies between different implementations (computer codes) of the QSM must be resolved before drawing final conclusions about agreement. (authors)

  14. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  15. Collective phenomena in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan

    1998-12-01

    Collective motion in the final state of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, produced by the release of compressional energy built-up during the stage of maximum density, is widely accepted as a good observable to test models and a useful tool to probe the nuclear equation of state. This dissertation presents an experimental study of nuclear collisions at the Bevalac accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with special emphasis on collective phenomena. The main detector used is a time projection chamber with more than two million pixels. Using high statistics measurements of all charged final- state fragments in Au + Au reactions at 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.15A GeV, we present a new method to unify the description of light fragment spectra and the three main categories of collective motion: sideward flow, squeeze-out, and transverse expansion. In this alternative representation, the speed of collective expansion is shown to be slowest in the plane of the reaction, and is modulated sinusoidally according to fragment azimuth relative to this plane. This simple yet complete characterization of squeeze-out leads to its interpretation as an in-plane retardation of collective expansion. We test momentum space power law behavior by studying the momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4He. We conclude that the simple momentum-space power law consistently describes light participant fragment production at p⊥/A/ge0.2 GeV/c over a remarkably wide range of transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions and in particular, the increase in sideward flow with fragment mass is well described by a momentum- space power law under these conditions. This behavior is consistent with composite fragment formation through a statistical coalescence mechanism in momentum space. Our conclusion supports the use of models without composite formation to interpret flow

  16. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A; Spectroscopie des dileptons aux energies intermediaires; la reaction carbone - carbone A 1 GeV/A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prunet, M

    1995-06-01

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley`s Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to {alpha}-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 {mu}) for better mass resolution, in particular in the {rho} region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, {alpha}-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt){sup {alpha}} dependence with {alpha} {approx_equal} 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the {rho}, {omega} vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs.

  17. Pilot Study on Long Term Effects of HZE Exposure on the Canine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T.; Brennan, K.; Pearlstein, R.

    A ground-based pilot experiment was initiated in December 1992 to evaluate the long term effects on health and aging after HZE cosmic radiation of the canine brain. Six adult male beagle dogs (1 yr) from the UC Davis breeding colony at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research were researched in this study. Iron nuclei at 600 MeV/amu (180 keV/mm) were used to irradiate the whole brain. The fluence of 3 x 106 iron nuclei/ cm2 mimics the HZE exposure (all > He) for a 2- year mission to Mars. The HZE irradiation was a fully stripped iron particle beam at the LBNL BEVALAC. Using a Raster Scanner we were able to spread the beam to deliver a uniform dose over the brain. The total dose to the brain was 200 cGy. Four dogs were whole brain irradiated with iron and two dogs served as litter-mate controls. The control dogs received a similar amount of background neutron irradiation as the irradiated dogs. One of the control dogs died suddenly 3/98 of intestinal cancer unrelated to the brain irradiation. That brain was not harvested before autolysis had prevented analysis. Periodic PET metabolism and yearly MRI studies have been done on these dog's brain since irradiation. All dogs had yearly physical, neurological and blood chemistry work-ups. PET imaging was performed with the Donner 600-crystal high-resolution PET (2.6 mm resolution) and with the commercial PET, CTI/Siemens ECAT 951 PET Scanner (5 mm resolution). NMR imaging is performed with the 1 5T GE Signa at UCSF using T spoiled gradient imaging.1 sequences for T1 contrast at 1 mm resolution as well as a T2 weighted spin echo imaging sequence at 1 mm resolution. A major goal of this work is to present an accurate method for measuring surface areas and volumes of the irradiated vs the non-irradiated canine brain using MRI data which are isotropic in resolution at the 1 mm level. This allows us to monitor the changes in brain size with aging and radiation exposure. Nine years post irradiation, these dog brains

  18. Failla Memorial lecture. The future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C A

    1985-07-01

    Interplanetary space contains fluxes of fast moving atomic nuclei. The distribution of these reflects the atomic composition of the universe, and such particles may pose limitations for space flight and for life in space. Over the past 50 years, since the invention of Ernest Lawrence's cyclotron, advances in accelerator technology have permitted the acceleration of charged nuclei to very high velocities. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. Recently, new areas of particle physics research relating to the mechanisms of spallation and fission have opened up for investigation, and it is now realistic to search for nuclear super-dense states that might be produced in heavy nuclear collisions. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Individual heavy ions can also interrupt the continuity of membraneous regions in cells. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Cells attempt to repair these lesions, and many of the deleterious effects are due to misrepair or misrejoining of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects, and hypoxic cells in necrotic regions have nearly the same sensitivity as cells in well-oxygenated tissues. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. Heavy ions are also strong enhancers of viral-induced cell transformation, a process that requires integration of foreign DNA. Some cell

  19. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  20. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-01-01

    the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history of high energy physics. My aim here is to provide an additional corrective to such views as well as further information about the web of connections that allows

  1. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    equipment that cost $100,000 by the 1970s alongside work at the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history