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Sample records for bevalac

  1. Bevalac user's handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a users manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment

  2. Bevalac biomedical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the physical layout of the Bevalac Facility and the research programs carried out at the facility. Beam time on the Bevalac is divided between two disciplines: one-third for biomedical research and two-thirds for nuclear science studies. The remainder of the paper discusses the beam delivery system including dosimetry, beam sharing and beam scanning

  3. Bevalac external beamline optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested

  4. Bevalac operations update. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities are reported in these areas: Bevatron operations (including a list of major experimental runs), user support at the Bevalac, modifications to the local injector, accelerator improvements at the Super HILAC, and general Bevalac upgrading. Modifications are reported for six individual beam lines

  5. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described

  6. Relativistic uranium beams - the Bevalac experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1983-03-01

    This paper will address areas where relativistic heavy ion accelerators differ from proton facilities. Salient areas are: (1) the specialized injectors for heavy ions; ion sources, structures for very low charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) ions, and stripper optimization; (2) special requirements for the synchrotron ring; ultrahigh vacuum, flexible controls and instrumentation. These areas are discussed in the context of the Bevalac, as well as our idea for a next-generation relativistic heavy ion accelerator.

  7. Operations experience at the Bevalac radiotherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the first years of Bevalac operation the biomedical effort concentrated on radiobiology work, laying the foundation for patient radiotherapy. A dedicated radiotherapy area was created in 1978, and in 1979 full-scale patient treatment was begun. As of now over 500 treatments with carbon, neon and argon beams have been delivered to about 50 patients, some as boosts from other modalities and some as complete heavy ion treatments. Up to 12 patients per day have been treated in this facility. Continuing efforts in refining techniques and operating procedures are increasing efficiency and accuracy of treatments, and are contributing to the alleviation of scheduling difficulties caused by the unique requirements of radiotherapy with human patients

  8. Bevatron/Bevalac user's handbook: biology and medicine. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bevalac Biomedical Facility develops a source of near-relativistic heavy ions for applications to radiation biology, radiation therapy and diagnostic radiology. Pulsed beams of high LET heavy ions with variable pulse width, frequency, intensity and energy are produced and delivered to the Biomedical Facility by the Bevatron/Bevalac accelerator complex. Dosimetry equipment under computer control provides accurate determinations of absorbed doses in all regions of the Bragg curve. Depth-dose modifying devices and precise specimen positioning equipment are available. Animal housing and tissue culture facilities are convenient to the experimenter. This handbook is designed to provide the user with the relevant information for planning, proposing and executing an experiment

  9. Experiments with heavy beams at the Berkeley Bevalac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-10-01

    Some of the early results obtained with heavy beams (A greater than or approx. = 100) at the Bevalac are presented. My intention is to give you a flavor of the research program that has developed in the early 1980's with the capability of accelerating nuclei spanning the full periodic table. 11 references, 8 figures.

  10. Relativistic radioactive heavy ion beams at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bevalac has been demonstrated to be an efficient source of radioactive beams of good quality, and is attracting a growing body of users of this capability. Immediately on the table are an increasing demand by biomedical experimenters, leading up to eventual clinical use; and two most interesting nuclear science experiments. We are anticipating a substantial increase in interest and demand in coming years, and are planning beam line improvements to enhance transmission and purification efficiencies. 8 references, 3 figures

  11. Equipment proposal for Bevalac experiments. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been developed as a part of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS). This facility is being used for the study of relativistic nuclear collisions at the Bevalac of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. We have measured for MUSIC a single event resolution of 15% for Fe beam and a charge resolution better than 0.5 units of charge for a Ne beam. These results indicate that a charge resolution of one unit from Z = 7 to Z = 100 should be achieved with the present detector

  12. Monitoring relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam fluence in high intensity proton and electron accelerators is usually measured with Secondary Emission Monitors (SEM) calibrated by an activation method. These were no such activation measurements available for relativistic heavy ion beams. Secondary electron production and energy loss of a charged particle in passing through material are a result of Coulomb interaction between the projectile field and electrons in the material. Therefore range measurements and secondary emission yield should follow the same functional relationship of velocity and charge as given by the Bethe-Bloch equation. A substantial amount of data on range in water for various ions has been collected at the Bevalac Biomedical facility. Using the same calculations that convert measured proton ranges to ion ranges and comparing the calculated values to measured values, provides an indirect way to verify the validity of the SEM calibration. The results of these measurements are discussed in this paper

  13. Physics and medicine: the Bevatron/Bevalac experience, 1979-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion radiobiology has been integrated successfully into the research program at the Bevatron/Bevalac for the past several years. During the 1979 to 1980 year radiotherapy trials have been conducted side-by-side with the demanding program of heavy ion nuclear science research at this national facility. Careful attention is given to the scheduling of research on the SuperHILAC and Bevatron/Bevalac so that the nuclear science and biomedical programs at the Bevatron/Bevalac and the program at the SuperHILAC are served to maximum effect. Efforts to maximize the researchers' time have resulted in hardware, software, and operating improvements that offer a total machine availability of about 90% and a user availability of about 80%. Fast beam switching and beam sharing permit virtually simultaneous use of the Bevatron/Bevalac by two or more users. Current beam delivery systems will be augmented in FY 1981 to provide two ion energies per Bevatron/Bevalac pulse

  14. Operating results for the beam profile monitor system currently in use at Bevalac Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three stations of a soon to be completed multi-station, multi-wire beam monitoring system have been installed in the Bevalac transfer line. The following article will provide a cursory analysis of the electronic circuitry, discuss new design additions and summarize the operating results obtained over the last year

  15. Present status of the Bevalac and design outline of proposed medical accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bevalac currently supports a strong and diverse program of scientific research with beams of relativistic heavy ions in the Biomedical and Nuclear Sciences. These programs utilize ions throughout the Periodic Table that range in energy from a few MeV to 2 GeV/nucleon, including radioactive secondary beams, such as neon-19. This paper first provides a brief overview of the Bevalac, its present operational status and the accelerator improvement program, followed by a rationale for the proposed construction of a hospital-based modern synchrotron dedicated to applications in Biomedicine, including the radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer and other human disorders. An outline of the proposed design for the new machine is given, including discussion of the design philosophy, a review of major accelerator components, and the expected performance and operating characteristics

  16. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery

  17. High energy nucleus--nucleus studies at the Berkeley Bevalac. [Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A survey of high-energy nucleus--nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac Facility is presented. Experimental results are divided into the general areas of peripheral and central collisions. Results on projectile and target fragmentation, total cross-section measurements, pion and photon production, and charged-particle multiplicities are stressed. Recently, there have been theoretical predictions concerning the possibility of observing new phenomena such as shock waves, pion condensates, or collapsed nuclear matter. Existing data relevant to some of these speculations are discussed. A brief discussion of future developments with high-energy nuclear beams is also presented. 27 figures, 1 table.

  18. Dilepton production from p-p to Ca-Ca at the Bevalac

    CERN Document Server

    Matis, H S; Bougteb, M; Carroll, J; Christie, W; Gong, W; Hallman, T; Heilbronn, L; Huang, H; Kirk, P N; Krebs, G; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Madansky, L; Manso, F; Miller, J; Naudet, C J; Porter, R J; Prunet, M; Roche, G; Schröder, L S; Seidl, P; Wang, Z F; Welsh, R; Wilson, W K; Yegneswaran, A

    1995-01-01

    The DLS collaboration has recently completed a high statistics study of dilepton production at the Bevalac. In particular, we have measured dielectrons (e+e-) from p-p and p-d collisions to understand the basic dilepton production mechanisms in the energy range from 1.05 - 4.9 GeV. These data can be used to determine the basic processes which contribute to nucleon-nucleon dilepton production such as hadronic bremsstrahlung, vector meson processes, and hadronic Dalitz decay. The data show that a simple elastic bremsstrahlung calculation is insufficient to explain the data. Theoretical models are compared with the data. A new high statistics study of Ca-Ca at 1.05 A GeV has been made to study the collectivity of A-A collisions.

  19. Light-ion therapy in the U.S.: From the Bevalac to ??

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Castro, Joseph R.

    2002-09-24

    While working with E.O. Lawrence at Berkeley, R.R. Wilson in 1946 noted the potential for using the Bragg-peak of protons (or heavier ions) for radiation therapy. Thus began the long history of contributions from Berkeley to this field. Pioneering work by C.A. Tobias et al at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron led ultimately to clinical applications of proton and helium beams, with over 1000 patients treated through 1974 with high-energy plateau radiation; placing the treatment volume (mostly pituitary fields) at the rotational center of a sophisticated patient positioner. In 1974 the SuperHILAC and Bevatron accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were joined by the construction of a 250-meter transfer line, forming the Bevalac, a facility capable of accelerating ions of any atomic species to relativistic energies. With the advent of these new beams, and better diagnostic tools capable of more precise definition of tumor volume and determination of the stopping point of charged-particle beams, large-field Bragg-peak therapy with ion beams became a real possibility. A dedicated Biomedical experimental area was developed, ultimately consisting of three distinct irradiation stations; two dedicated to therapy and one to radiobiology and biophysics. These facilities included dedicated support areas for patient setup and staging of animal and cell samples, and a central control area linked to the main Bevatron control room.

  20. A proposal to pulse the Bevatron/Bevalac main guide field magnet with SCR power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bevatron/Bevalac Main Guide Field Power Supply was originally designed to provide a 15,250 Volt DC. at sign 8400 Ampere peak magnet pulse. Protons were accelerated to 6.2 Gev. The 128 Megawatt (MW) pulse required two large motor-generator (MG) sets with 67 ton flywheels to store 680 Megajoules of energy. Ignitron rectifiers are used to rectify the generator outputs. Acceleration of heavy ions results in an operating schedule with a broad range of peak fields. The maximum field of 12.5 kilogauss requires a peak pulse of 80 MW. Acceleration of ions to 1.0 kilogauss requires an 8 MW peak pulse. One MG set can provide pulses below 45 MW. Peak pulses of less than 15 MW are now a large block of the operating schedule. A proposal has been made to replace the existing MG system with eight SCR power supplies for low field operation. The SCR supplies will be powered directly from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's 12.3 KV. power distribution system. This paper describes the many advantages of the plan. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  1. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Light-ion therapy in the US: From the Bevalac to ??

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While working with E.O. Lawrence at Berkeley, R.R. Wilson in 1946 noted the potential for using the Bragg-peak of protons (or heavier ions) for radiation therapy. Thus began the long history of contributions from Berkeley to this field. Pioneering work by C.A. Tobias et al at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron led ultimately to clinical applications of proton and helium beams, with over 1000 patients treated through 1974 with high-energy plateau radiation; placing the treatment volume (mostly pituitary fields) at the rotational center of a sophisticated patient positioner. In 1974 the SuperHILAC and Bevatron accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were joined by the construction of a 250-meter transfer line, forming the Bevalac, a facility capable of accelerating ions of any atomic species to relativistic energies. With the advent of these new beams, and better diagnostic tools capable of more precise definition of tumor volume and determination of the stopping point of charged-particle beams, large-field Bragg-peak therapy with ion beams became a real possibility. A dedicated Biomedical experimental area was developed, ultimately consisting of three distinct irradiation stations; two dedicated to therapy and one to radiobiology and biophysics. These facilities included dedicated support areas for patient setup and staging of animal and cell samples, and a central control area linked to the main Bevatron control room

  3. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977. [Planning for use for radiotherapy and as radiation source for diagnostic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, S. (ed.)

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery.

  4. The Bevalac accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are the characteristics of the Bevatron and SuperHilac heavy ion accelerators in a very general manner. Some aspects of their application in the field of biological medicine and some of the interesting results obtained in experiments on nuclear physics are mentioned. (Author). 20 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Measurements of e+e- pair production at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete kinematic description of a lepton pair requires 6 independent variables, in contrast to the case of a real photon, where there are only 3 independent variables. The mass and momentum of the virtual photon may be specified independently, with the remaining variables being the two angles specifying its production direction, and the two angles of the decay in its rest frame. It has become customary to use as kinetics variables: the mass, M; the transverse momentum, Pt; and a longitudinal variable, either the rapidity -- Y, or the scaling variable -- X. Data are almost always presented as a function of only one of these variables. This may be due to the difficulty inherent in presenting multi-dimensional data, to poor statistics, to limited experimental acceptance, or to some combination of these reasons. It should be noted, however, that these one-dimensional projections always represent integrations over the remaining variables -- integrations within which the shape and limits of the acceptance of the experimental apparatus must be taken into account. The effects of the acceptance must be understood in comparing experimental data either to theory or to results from experiments with different coverage of the total phase space. Although we have a strong interest in studying nucleus-nucleus collisions using the tool, most of the discussion presented here will be about our measurements in p+Be collisions. It was necessary for us to make these measurements because, in the relevant range of incident energies, the yield of electron pairs from nucleon-nucleon collisions had not been measured, nor was the hadronic production mechanism understood. A brief discussion of lepton production in hadronic collision will help put out our results in a proper framework. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Heavy ion physics challenges at Bevalac/SIS energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses where the future of higher energy heavy ion acceleration may lead in terms of understanding the nucleus. The discussion concerns obstacles to formulating an equation of state for nuclear matter at high temperature and density. Implications of this research for astrophysical problems is also presented

  7. A history of central collisions at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You have heard a great deal about Plastic Ball results at this conference. There were talks on the first morning by Hans-Georg Ritter and Karl-Heinz Kampert on the Plastic Ball at Berkeley, there will be a talk next week by Rudi Schmidt on the Plastic Ball at CERN, and many other speakers have mentioned Plastic Ball results. The young students may think that when the new field of relativistic heavy ion physics opened up, an ideal detector was designed and built, data immediately analyzed, and results produced. The theme of my talk is to show that this is incorrect. The experiments proceeded in logical stages, one building upon the other, increasing in complexity and sophistication. The analysis techniques and the theory developed along with the experiments. If the more senior people in the audience easily remember this history of the development of the relativistic heavy ion field, they may spend their time during this talk thinking about what is happening now and what will happen in the future in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion field, where I believe history is repeating itself. 18 refs., 18 figs

  8. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A. (eds.)

    1980-11-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980. (KRM)

  9. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980

  10. Experiments on the TASS and HISS spectrometers at the Bevalac. Annual progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achievements during the period from April 1, 1983 to March 31, 1984 by the intermediate energy nuclear physics group at Louisiana State University are discussed. These include: backward-forward proton correlation measurements, search for pionic instability, search for anomalous target fragments, and mid-rapidity pions in Ca-Ca collisions at 1.05 GeV

  11. Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations

  12. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations

  13. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations

  14. Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskanzer, A.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Lofdahl, J.B. (eds.)

    1991-04-01

    This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  15. Accelerator and fusion research division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  16. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. (ed.)

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  17. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  18. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  19. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  20. Nucleus-nucleus collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities during the past year have been centered around: the analysis of existing experimental data from the Bevalac streamer chamber and from the Kent state neutron flow experiment 848H; transport model comparisons with these data and with published results from other experiments; and development of future Bevalac experiments, with particular emphasis on the EOS TPC. Activities under and above have led to 10 papers either published or submitted for publication in journals or conference proceedings during the 12-month period ending in March 1990. The PI is spokesperson for one of three beam-time proposals for the first round of experiments at the EOS TPC, to be considered by the Bevalac PAC in June 1990. Planned activities for the coming budget period include a continuation of strong emphasis on the TPC, and the initiation of participation in a planned RHIC experiment

  1. Nucleus-nucleus collisions and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities during the period of support have been centered around (1) the analysis of existing experimental data from the Bevalac streamer chamber and from the Kent State neutron flow experiment 848H; (2) work at the interface between theory and experiment, including transport model comparisons with the above data and with published results from other experiments, a new model to probe the possible use of spectator recoil to measure properties of the equation of state, and new methodologies for study of flow and HBT correlations, and (3) development of future Bevalac experiments, with particular emphasis on the EOS TPC

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations

  3. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed

  4. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations

  5. Fractional charge resolution in music

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results obtained with MUSIC (MUltiple Sampling Ionization Chamber) for La and Ar beams at the Bevalac show resolutions better than ΔZ(FWHM) = 0.3 e. These results suggest the use of MUSIC in future ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

  6. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  7. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered include: Super HILAC and Bevalac operations; high intensity uranium beams line item; advanced high charge state ion source; 184-inch synchrocyclotron; VENUS project; positron-electron project; high field superconducting accelerator magnets; beam cooling; accelerator theory; induction linac drivers; RF linacs and storage rings; theory; neutral beam systems development; experimental atomic physics; neutral beam plasma research; plasma theory; and the Tormac project

  8. First nondestructive measurements of power MOSFET single event burnout cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique to nondestructively measure single event burnout cross sections for N-channel power MOSFETs is presented. Previous measurements of power MOSFET burnout susceptibility have been destructive and thus not conducive to providing statistically meaningful burnout probabilities. The nondestructive technique and data for various device types taken at several accelerators, including the LBL Bevalac, are documented. Several new phenomena are observed

  9. Radiological physics of heavy charged-particle beams used for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beams available for biological investigations at the Bevatron or at the Bevalac range from helium to iron ions. However, only carbon, neon, and argon beams have been used for therapy. The treatment techniques are arbitrarily divided into two categories: small field and large field irradiation. Examples of the small field treatments are pituitary irradiation, which generaly utilizes the plateau portion of the helium depth-dose curve, and treatment of ocular melanoma, which uses a modified Bragg peak of the helium beam. Large field treatments for cancer therapy generally requires a beam that has a large uniform transverse profile and a modified Bragg peak. Procedures and instrumentation for patient irradiations at the Bevatron/Bevalac have been based on the prior experience obtained at the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron, and for that reason both facilities are discussed

  10. Comparison of methods of producing very highly stripped uranium beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is made between the production of high intensity beams of helium-like uranium ions, U90+, by conventional and exotic ion sources, and by the foil stripping of highly accelerated ions output from the Bevalac. The parameter requirements are specified and compared to the parameters achievable by present day ion source technology. The EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source) comes closest to satisfying the necessary parameters, and this possibility is considered in some detail. We conclude that existing and near-future ion source technology does not provide a means of production of high intensity U90+ beams. Foil stripping of lower charge state species that have been accelerated through the Bevalac provides a convenient approach

  11. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report

  12. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e+e- pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings

  13. Observation of anomalous reaction mean free paths of nuclear-projectile fragments in research emulsion from 2 A GeV heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From an analysis of 1460 projectile fragment collisions in nuclear research emulsion exposed to 2.1 A GeV 16O and 1.9 A GeV 56Fe at the Bevalac, evidence is presented for the existence of an anomalously short interaction mean free path of projectile fragments for the first several cm after emission. The result is significant to beyond the 3 standard deviation confidence level

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers

  15. Software quality assurance and software safety in the Biomed Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biomed Control System is a hardware/software system used for the delivery, measurement and monitoring of heavy-ion beams in the patient treatment and biology experiment rooms in the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This paper describes some aspects of this system including historical background philosophy, configuration management, hardware features that facilitate software testing, software testing procedures, the release of new software quality assurance, safety and operator monitoring. 3 refs

  16. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1978-01-01

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers. (RWR)

  17. Central collisions of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R ampersand D project was performed

  18. Heavy ion effects on mammalian cells: Inactivation measurements with different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In track segment experiments, the inactivation of different mammalian cells by heavy charged particles between helium and uranium in the energy range between 1 and 1000 MeV/u has been measured at the heavy ion accelerator Unilac, Darmstadt, the Tandem Van de Graaf, Heidelberg and the Bevalac, Berkeley. The inactivation cross sections calculated from the final slope of the dose effect curves are given as a function of the particle energy and the LET. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

  20. Using MUSIC to study relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been developed as a part of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS). This facility is being used for the study of relativistic nuclear collisions at the Bevalac of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Preliminary data from MUSIC indicate that a charge resolution of one unit should be achieved from Z approximately equal to 7 to Z approximately equal to 100. (author)

  1. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1987-07-01

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e/sup +/e/sup -/ pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings.

  2. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven. PMID:27345198

  3. Single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a Bevalac experiment to measure the single electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic (0.5 1, and fully stripped, N0, ion beams emerging from the targets. Separate counters measured the number of ions in each charge state. The ratios N1/N0 for different target thicknesses were fit to a simple growth curve to yield electron attachment and stripping cross sections. The data are compared to relativistic extrapolations of available theories. Clear evidence for two separate attachment processes, radiative and non-radiative, is found. Data are compared to a recently improved formulation for the stripping cross sections

  4. [Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs

  5. (Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Nuclear Physics with RIB's: How it all started

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanihata, Isao

    2016-04-01

    Neutron halos were discovered through measurements of interaction cross sections and fragmentation cross sections of nuclei near the neutron drip line. Such measurements became possible with the use of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) produced though projectile fragmentations of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. RIBs were invented 30 years ago at the Bevalac facility in Berkeley. In this article, I describe how they were invented and how neutron halos were discovered. What happened at that time was a series of small serendipities guiding us to the present prosperous field of RIB science.

  7. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  8. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) during the period between July 1, 1979 and June 30, 1980. The principal objective of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, complemented with programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development. The division continues to operate the 88 Inch Cyclotron as a major research facility that also supports a strong outside user program. Both the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators, operated as national facilities by LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, are also important to NSD experimentalists

  9. Status of the HISS MUSIC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note describes the status of a new type of high resolution large area charged particle detector constructed for use at the Bevalac HISS facility. High charge resolution is attained by measuring many samples of the ionization produced along the path of a particle as it traverses 144 cm of P10 gas. A Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) detector was selected for use at HISS because it can cover a large area(1M x 1M) at relatively low cost and return individual charge identification for multiple fragments emitted from relativistic heavy ion interactions

  10. Light Fragment Production and Power Law Behavior in Au + Au Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using charged-particle-exclusive measurements of Au+Au collisions in the LBL Bevalac's EOS time projection chamber, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity, and beam energy. Most features of these densities above a transverse momentum threshold are consistent with momentum-space coalescence, and, in particular, the increase in sideward flow with fragment mass is generally well described by a momentum-space power law

  11. Effect of final state interactions on subthreshold K- production in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, experiments were carried out at Bevalac to detect K- in heavy-ion (Si-Si) collisions at an incident energy of 2.1 GeV/nucleon. The threshold for K- production in the nucleon-nucleon collision is approx. 2.5 GeV. The observation of K- at subthreshold energies in heavy-ion collisions implies that more than one projectile nucleon must be involved in converting their kinetic energies into the mass of K-. This experiment provides therefore the possibility of studying nuclear collective effects, such as Fermi motions, coherent production, and multiple collisions. Preliminary data can be largely explained by conventional rescattering theory

  12. A TPC [Time Projection Chamber] detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity (∼ 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Research overview 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The accelerator and fusion research division is not only the largest scientific division at LBL, but also one of the most diverse. Major efforts in this report are discussed. Investigations in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy; Design, construction, and commissioning of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron-radiation facility; Theoretical and applied studies of accelerator physics; Research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and Operation of a heavy-ion accelerator complex, the Bevalac, for nuclear science and biomedical research.

  14. Experimental study of collective flow phenomena in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhaidze, L V; Kharkhelauri, L L

    2002-01-01

    The results of the experimental study of collective flow phenomena, such as the sideward and elliptic flow of nuclear matter, discovered during the last 10-15 years in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are presented in this review. Sideward (often termed directed) and elliptic flows have been observed for protons, antiprotons, light nuclei, pions, kaons, and lambdas emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 0.1-1.8 GeV/nucleon of LBL Bevalac and GSI/SIS by Plastic-Ball, Streamer Chamber, EOS-NPC, FOPI, LAND, TAPS, and KAOS collaborations; at 2-4 GeV/nucleon of Dubna JINR by SKM-200-GIBS, Propane Buble Chamber, and Emulsion Chamber collaborations; at 2-14 GeV/nucleon of BNL AGS, by the E877, E895, and E917 collaborations; and at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon of CERN SPS, by the WA98 and NA49 collaborations and more recently by the STAR at RHIC BNL. In the review, the results of the SKM-200-GIBS collaboration of JINR are presented and compared with the results of different experiments by Bevalac, GSI/SIS, BNL, and...

  15. Stopping of relativistic heavy ions in various media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, C. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Crawford, H. J.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Heckman, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The residual ranges of (900 + or - 3)-MeV/amu gold nuclei accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac have been measured in several different media. The energy of the beam of nuclei was measured directly using a new time-of-flight system. The ranges were measured by absorption in linear wedges of polyethylene, carbon, aluminum, copper, tin, and lead and in circular wedges of polystyrene, aluminum, and gold, and by total absorption in nuclear emulsion. The measured ranges were significantly different from those calculated from the best available theoretical estimates of the energy loss of highly charged nuclei. It is concluded that at present energy losses and residual ranges of relativistic heavy ions in an arbitrary medium cannot be predicted with better than an approximately 2 percent accuracy.

  16. High energy beams of radioactive nuclei and their biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of high-energy beams of radioactive species is the most recent advancement in the field of accelerator physics. One of the primary interactions experienced by relativistic heavy ions is the peripheral nuclear collision. Thus, radioactive nuclei are produced as secondary particles from peripheral nuclear fragmentation reactions. These nuclei have trajectories and energies differing little from that of the parent particle. Various radioactive beams produced as a result of these reactions, now available on a regular basis from the Bevalac, are: 11C, 13N, 15O, and 19Ne with sufficient intensity. Besides the interest in such beams for nuclear physics, important applications in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology and in nuclear medicine are discussed

  17. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is described in three areas corresponding to carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; and DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration. Approximately 200 rats were exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons (2.0 Mev) was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. For double skin thickness irradiations electrons there was an unusually large excess of connective tissue tumors, fibromas and sarcomas. Presumably the latter tumors are occurring, because more connective tissue is exposed by deeply penetrating, i.e., energetic, beams. 13 refs

  18. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4π detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented

  19. Intermediate energy heavy ions: An emerging multi-disciplinary research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the ten years that beams of intermediate energy (∼50 MeV/amu≤E≤∼2 GeV/amu) heavy ions (Z≤92) have been available, an increasing number of new research areas have been opened up. Pioneering work at the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, still the world's only source of the heaviest beams in this energy range, has led to the establishment of active programs in nuclear physics, atomic physics, cosmic ray physics, as well as biology and medicine, and industrial applications. The great promise for growth of these research areas has led to serious planning for new facilities capable of delivering such beams; several such facilities are now in construction around the world. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Mapping the HISS Dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal component of the Bevalac HISS facility is a large super-conducting 3 Tesla dipole. The facility's need for a large magnetic volume spectrometer resulted in a large gap geometry - a 2 meter pole tip diameter and a 1 meter pole gap. Obviously, the field required detailed mapping for effective use as a spectrometer. The mapping device was designed with several major features in mind. The device would measure field values on a grid which described a closed rectangular solid. The grid would be a regular with the exact measurement intervals adjustable by software. The device would function unattended over the long period of time required to complete a field map. During this time, the progress of the map could be monitored by anyone with access to the HISS VAX computer. Details of the mechanical, electrical, and control design follow

  1. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, D A; Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target a...

  2. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, D A B R

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and ...

  3. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  4. The effects of accelerated heavy nuclei of neon and argon on mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of human T-1 kidney cells in high-energy neon (400MeV/nucleon) and argon (500MeV/nucleon) beams has been studied at the Berkeley Bevalac. Cells were plated in monolayers on glass and studied at different residual-range values. The survival curves depend on LET and on particle velocity. The effectiveness of the beams increases as the range decreases, except for argon beams with very low range values, where the effectiveness decreases again. The 'oxygen effect' is high at high particle energies (2.6 for neon and 2.4 for argon); it decreases to values between 1.1 and 1.3 near the Bragg peak. (author)

  5. Field characterization and personal dosimetry at a high energy ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of a variety of dosimeters was evaluated in the radiation field outside the shielding of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac Biomedical Facility. The primary beam was 580 MeV/center dot/A neon ions, incident upon a 30.5-cm polyethylene cube. The field was characterized by a neutron spectrometer consisting of Bonner spheres and other detectors and by estimates of charged particle fluences in NTA film and in the Berklet spectrometer. The responses of American Acrylics CR-39 track-etch plastic detectors and AECL (Canada) type BD-100 Bubble Detectors were compared to those of NTA film, Andersson-Braun remmeter and recombination-chamber results as well as to reference dose equivalents based upon the unfolded neutron spectrum. Evaluations of these dosimeters are discussed. 7 refs., 4 figs

  6. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.W. (ed.); Wozniak, G.J. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  7. Radiation effects in Caenorhabditis elegans - Mutagenesis by high and low LET ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Schubert, Wayne W.; Marshall, Tamara M.; Benton, Eric R.; Benton, Eugene V.

    1989-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans was used to measure the effectiveness of high-energy ionized particles in the induction of three types of genetic lesions. Recessive lethal mutations in a 40-map unit autosomal region, sterility, and X-chromosome nondisjunction or damage were investigated. Induction rates were measured as a function of linear energy transfer, LET(infinity), for nine ions of atomic nunmber 1-57 accelerated at the BEVALAC accelerator. Linear kinetics were observed for all three types of lesions within the dose/fluence ranges tested and were found to vary strongly as a function of particle LET(infinity). Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of up to 4.2 were measured, and action cross sections were calculated and compared to mutagenic responses in other systems.

  8. Squeeze-out of nuclear matter as a function of projectile energy and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutbrod, H. H.; Kampert, K. H.; Kolb, B.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, H. R.

    1990-08-01

    Squeeze-out, a component of the collective flow of nuclear matter, is the preferential emission of particles out of the reaction plane. Using the sphericity method the out-of-plane/in-plane ratio of the kinetic energy flow has been analyzed as a function of multiplicity and beam energy for Ca+Ca, Nb+Nb, and Au+Au collisions measured with the Plastic Ball detector at the Bevalac. Also, azimuthal distribution of the particles around the flow axis are presented together with the extracted out-of-plane/in-plane ratios. Finally, the rapidity dependence of the out-of-plane/in-plane ratio has been investigated with a new method using the transverse momentum components of the particles.

  9. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D.; Friedlander, E.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Stokstad, R.G. (eds.)

    1981-03-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) during the period between July 1, 1979 and June 30, 1980. The principal objective of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, complemented with programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development. The division continues to operate the 88 Inch Cyclotron as a major research facility that also supports a strong outside user program. Both the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators, operated as national facilities by LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, are also important to NSD experimentalists. (WHK)

  10. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane. PMID:2657842

  11. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics. (WRF)

  12. Current and future uses of accelerators in particle astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of artificially accelerated heavy ions, p, bar p, e- and e+ currently available at (and planned for) numerous facilities around the world are a valuable resource to the Cosmic Ray community. Such beams have been used to test detector concepts, calibrate balloon-borne and space flight experiments and to measure fundamental nuclear physics parameters necessary for the interpretation of Cosmic Ray data. As new experiments are flown the quality and extent of Cosmic Ray measurements will continue to improve. It will be necessary to increase activity at ground based accelerators in order to test/calibrate these new instruments and to maintain (or possibly improve) our ability to interpret these data. In this area, the newly formed Transport Collaboration, supported by NASA, will be providing new nuclear interaction cross section measurements for beams with Z ≤ 58 and supporting new instrument calibrations at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac accelerator. 4 figs

  13. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  14. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics

  15. Nuclear Science Division annual report for the period October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1989-10-01

    Highlights of the low energy research program included the identification of new super-deformed bands in gadolinium and palladium isotopes using the HERA array. Other work at the 88-Inch Cyclotron involved studies of the fragmentation of light nuclei; the spectroscopy of nuclear far from stability and interesting new experiments on the properties of the heaviest elements. Two other programs deserve special mention, the new program in Nuclear Astrophysics and the spectroscopic studies being carried out at OASIS. This isotope separator is now in full operation at the SuperHILAC after many yeas of development. At the Bevalac, important new results were obtained on the properties of hot dense nuclear matter produced in central collisions of heavy ions. First measurements were made using the di-lepton spectrometer which provide the most direct access to the conditions at the earliest stage of the reaction. New results on pion interferometry have been obtained using the Janus spectrometer and surprises continue to be found in careful analysis of data from the Plastic Ball detector, most recently the identification of a new component of hydrodynamic flow. Also at the Bevalac the intermediate energy program continued to grow, studying the evolution of the reaction mechanism from incomplete fusion to the fireball regime, as did the spectroscopic studies using secondary radioactive beams. The third major component of the experimental program is the study of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions using the CERN SPS. This year saw the completing of analysis of the first round of experiments with important results being obtained on general particle production, the space-time evolution of the system and strangeness production.

  16. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  17. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A. (eds.)

    1982-04-01

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser.

  18. Nuclear Science Division annual report for the period October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the low energy research program included the identification of new super-deformed bands in gadolinium and palladium isotopes using the HERA array. Other work at the 88-Inch Cyclotron involved studies of the fragmentation of light nuclei; the spectroscopy of nuclear far from stability and interesting new experiments on the properties of the heaviest elements. Two other programs deserve special mention, the new program in Nuclear Astrophysics and the spectroscopic studies being carried out at OASIS. This isotope separator is now in full operation at the SuperHILAC after many yeas of development. At the Bevalac, important new results were obtained on the properties of hot dense nuclear matter produced in central collisions of heavy ions. First measurements were made using the di-lepton spectrometer which provide the most direct access to the conditions at the earliest stage of the reaction. New results on pion interferometry have been obtained using the Janus spectrometer and surprises continue to be found in careful analysis of data from the Plastic Ball detector, most recently the identification of a new component of hydrodynamic flow. Also at the Bevalac the intermediate energy program continued to grow, studying the evolution of the reaction mechanism from incomplete fusion to the fireball regime, as did the spectroscopic studies using secondary radioactive beams. The third major component of the experimental program is the study of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions using the CERN SPS. This year saw the completing of analysis of the first round of experiments with important results being obtained on general particle production, the space-time evolution of the system and strangeness production

  19. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser

  20. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  1. The isotopes of neon in the galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Simpson, J. A.; Wefel, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the results obtained by the University of Chicago instrument on board the IMP 7 satellite used to measure the abundances of Ne-20 and Ne-22 in the galactic cosmic rays during 1973-1977, over the general energy range of 60-230 MeV per nucleon. It is reported that the instrument shows a mass resolution of 0.7 amu(sigma) which was confirmed by calibrating a backup instrument at the LBL Bevalac with separated beams of neon isotopes. Through the use of standard solar modulation and cosmic-ray propagation models, the cosmic-ray source ratio inferred is Ne-22/Ne-20 = 0.38 = or -0.07 which is significantly greater than the present solar system ratio. It is concluded that propagation effects or cross-section uncertainties cannot account for such a large abundance of Ne-22, and thus this measurement provides evidence that the cosmic rays come from a source region where the Ne-22 abundance is substantially greater than in solar system material.

  2. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

  3. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin: Progress report, February 1, 1988-January 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is described in 3 general areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal, including DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; and carcinogenesis in rat skin induced by the neon ion beam. Numerous experiments have established that DNA strand breaks per unit dose in the rat epidermis are reduced by about 60% when the radiation penetration is reduced from 1.0 mm to 0.2 mm. The activation of oncogenes in the radiation-induced rat skin cancers followed a pattern. Four highly malignant cancers exhibited activation of K-ras and c-myc oncogenes, while the remaining 8 cancers exhibited only one or the other of these 2 oncogenes. Of 5 squamous carcinomas, 4 showed K-ras activation and 1 showed c-myc activation. Approximately 200 rats were exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons (2.0 MeV) was determined in conjunction with the neon ion experiment. It is too early to evaluate tumor incidence in the neon ion experiment, but for electrons an unusually large excess of connective tissue tumors, fibromas and sarcomas, have been observed so far. 59 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F. (Argonne National Lab. (USA)); Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)); Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-10-09

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.).

  5. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  6. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-03-31

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  7. Dilepton production and reaction dynamics in heavy-ion collisions at SIS energies from coarse-grained transport simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Stephan; Weil, Janus; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Dilepton invariant-mass spectra for heavy-ion collisions at SIS 18 and BEVALAC energies are calculated using a coarse-grained time evolution from the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model. The coarse-graining of the microscopic simulations enables to calculate thermal dilepton emission rates by application of in-medium spectral functions from equilibrium quantum-field theoretical calculations. The results show that extremely high baryon chemical potentials dominate the evolution of the created hot and dense fireball. Consequently, a significant modification of the $\\rho$ spectral shape becomes visible in the dilepton invariant-mass spectrum, resulting in an enhancement in the low-mass region $M_{ee} = 200$ to 600 MeV/$c^{2}$. This enhancement, mainly caused by baryonic effects on the $\\rho$ spectral shape, can fully describe the experimentally observed excess above the hadronic cocktail contributions in Ar+KCl ($E_{\\mathrm{lab}}=1.76$ $A$GeV) reactions as measured by the HADES collaborat...

  8. Superhilac upgrade project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.

    1985-05-01

    This project will increase the uranium output of the Bevalac heavy-ion facility from the currently available 10/sup 7/ to 5 x 10/sup 7/ ions/pulse, allowing accurate Lamb shift measurements to be made in U/sup 90 +/ and U/sup 91 +/ with important applications to the testing of quantum electrodynamics and the development of an x-ray laser. The injected beam intensity will be increased to make better use of the 10emA output space-charge limit of the Wideroe linac. Components will include a new high current MEtal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source along with an improved high current, high voltage Cockcroft-Walton power supply to handle the increased beam current. The Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line will be upgraded with additional focusing to manage the increased space-charge forces and with an improved vacuum to reduce charge exchange losses. Finally, the phase matching between the 23MHz Wideroe linac and the 70MHz Alvarez linac will be improved by the addition of the appropriate buncher cavities. Physics design is underway and detailed engineering is scheduled to begin in October 1985, with installation slated for the 1986 summer shutdown.

  9. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the β-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; β-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report

  11. Failla Memorial Lecture: the future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive review, with over 100 references, of the use of accelerator techniques in radiobiology is presented. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. These radiobiological properties, combined with the ability to deliver highly localized internal doses, make accelerated heavy ions potentially important radiotherapeutic tools. Other novel approaches include the utilization of radioactive heavy beams as instant tracers. Heavy-ion radiography and microscopy respond to delicate changes in tissue electron density. The authors laboratory is in the process of proposing a research biomedical heavy-ion accelerator; the availability of such machines would greatly accelerate cancer and brain research with particle beams

  12. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Report of the Nuclear Science Division describes the scientific research that has been carried out within the Division during the period between July 1, 1978 and June 30, 1979. The principal objective of the Nuclear Science Division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, both for their intrinsic application in developing understanding of microscopic and macroscopic nuclear science and for their use in the synthesis of new exotic isotopes and new chemical elements. Complementary programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development are also pursued. The Division operates the 88-inch cyclotron as a major research facility which also supports a strong outside user program; experimentalists within the Division also use the Super HILAC and the Bevalac accelerators for their studies. Experimental research was carried out on nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and scattering, and relativistic heavy ions (projectile and target fragmentation, central collisions), with lesser effort devoted to atomic physics, the isotopes project, and other activities. The theoretical study of nuclear collisions involved both nonrelativistic and relativistic reactions. Other work was devoted to the subjects of accelerator operations and development and nuclear instrumentation. Publications lists are also included. 30 items with significant information were abstracted and indexed individually

  13. Nuclear moments and nuclear structure. Annual progress report, August 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a review of the activities of the period from August 1, 1981 through August 31, 1982. The final analysis of pi-zero production in heavy ion collisions representing experiments at the Bevalac with a system previously described is completed. The main results involve cross sections for central collisions resulting in the production of pi-zeros, charged pions, and proton multiplicities, and some results of correlations and low energy gamma radiation. Results from the alpha-alpha experiment at the CERN ISR are included in the form of a published paper and an outline of papers that are in press. A short report of a collision effect in an anomalon experiment is included as well. The energetic particle spectra from μ--capture in medium heavy nuclei were studied at TRIUMF, using the large scintillation counters for neutron and proton detection and multiple Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) counters. The preliminary analysis indicates the presence of such an unusual energetic component. The measurement of the particle and γ-ray correlation in π--capture in 165Ho was completed during this year, and the data analysis is continuing in order to elucidate the discrete spectral features, high spin generation and other correlations. A measurement was finished in our search for a new type of strong perturbation of pionic x-ray by the use of coincidences between pionic x-rays and γ-rays from a deformed nuclei

  14. Use of the Meta-analysis in the Finding of Singularities of a Nuclear Matter Created in Ultra-relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kizka, V A

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical foundation of the method not by eye comparison of an experimental data with theoretical predictions is presented in this article. The rule of mixing of different theories to increase a predictive power of theory is presented also. The method of separation of subprocesses having insignificant, negligible contribution to the total process is shown. The published theoretical data of few models (PHSD/HSD both with and without chiral symmetry restoration), applied to experimental data from collisions of nuclei from SIS to LHC energies, were used for demonstration of this method, what allowed to localize a possible phase singularities of nuclear matter created in the central nucleus-nucleus collisions: The ignition of the Quark-Gluon Plasma's (QGP) drop begins already at SIS/BEVALAC energies. This drop of QGP occupies only small part of the whole volume of a fireball created at SIS energies. The phase transition between QGP and Quarkyonic matter was found at energy around $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\,=\\,$3.5 Ge...

  15. Research in theoretical nuclear physics. Progress report, September 1983-August 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is briefly reported on the following studies: anomalously short mean free paths in peripheral relativistic collisions, spin-dependent effects in heavy ion reactions, polarization potential for heavy ions, form factors for the collision of deformed nuclei, geometrical calculation of nucleus-nucleus reaction cross section, gamma decay of the giant quadrupole resonance, form factors for α-transfer reactions, the effect of channel coupling on sub-barrier fusion, study of shock and detonation waves, dynamical aspects of the nuclear matter-quark matter phase transition, study of reaction mechanisms at the energy region of BEVALAC, three-cluster resonating-group method of alpha plus two s-shell cluster systems in the coupled-channel formalism, multi-configuration resonating group study of the seven-nucleon system with realistic cluster wave functions, distortion effects in the d + 3H system, π+ - π- mass difference at finite temperature, is a spontaneously broken supersymmetry restored at positive temperature, electron-positron pair production and chiral symmetry in the hot QCD plasma, birth of the QCD plasma in a supersaturated pion vapor, proton stopping power of heavy nuclei (dynamics of proton-nucleus reactions), hydrodynamics of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, status of the theory of QCD plasma, pion interferometry for exploding sources, and nucleation rate for black holes. Proposed work is summarized, and publications are listed

  16. Dosimetry for radiobiological experiments using energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of the Bevalac facility of energetic heavy ions with range greater than the size of small mammals makes possible the determination of the biological effects of relatively well defined high LET, whole body irradiation. With the increasing application of high-energy heavy ions in radiobiology there is a corresponding need to develop reliable techniques of both relative and absolute absorbed dose measurement. This paper describes dosimetry studies by the Health Physics Department of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with activation detectors, ionization chambers, nuclear emulsion, thermoluminescent dosimeters and X-ray film. The application of these techniques to an experiment designed to study the leukemogenic effect of the whole-body irradiation of mice by 250 MeV/amu carbon ions is briefly described. Values of absorbed dose in tissue, obtained during this experiment, with a nitrogen filled ionization chamber and 7LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters are compared and shown to be in good agreement. As a result of this work a value for the average energy to produce an ion pair (W) in nitrogen by 250 MeV/amu 6+C ions of 37 +- eV was determined. Values of the efficiency of 7LiF relative to 60Co γ-rays for ions with dE/dx in the range 110-260 MeV g-1 cm2 are reported

  17. /sup 20/neon ion- and x-ray-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Baum, J.W.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the proposed uses of heavy ion irradiation is to image lesions of the human female breast. The rat model system was chosen to assess the carcinogenic potential of heavy ion irradiation in the belief that data obtained from rat studies would have a qualitatively predictive value for the human female. Accordingly, female rats were exposed to /sup 20/Ne ions at the BEVALAC and studied for the development of mammary neoplasia for 312 +- 2 days at Brookhaven along with rats exposed concurrently to x-irradiation or to no irradiation. As the dose of either type of radiation was increased the percent of rats with mammary adenocarcinomas, and the percent of rats with mammary fibroadenomas, tended to increase. At a prevalence of 20%, the RBE for /sup 20/Neon ions for mammary adenocarcinomas was estimated to be larger than 5 and for mammary fibroadenomas the RBE was estimated to be less than 2. No conclusion was reached concerning whether or not the RBE might vary with dose. We suggest that /sup 20/Ne ions do have a carcinogenic potential for rat mammary tissue and that this carcinogenic potential is likely to be greater than for x-irradiation. (DT)

  18. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  19. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

  20. Homage to Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    It was with deep sadness that we learned of the death of Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson, an internationally recognized scientist, beloved colleague and friend. He passed away on Wednesday January 13th at the Lund University Hospital, surrounded by his loved ones, after a short battle against cancer. This is a great loss for all of us in ALICE and the whole heavy ion community. Hans-Åke, Professor at Lund University, was one of the pioneers of heavy ion physics with relativistic beams since its very beginning. He started his research at CERN, as a fellow at the ISOLDE ion beam facility, and immediately after, in the early 1980 joined the Plastic Ball collaboration at the Bevalac. One of the seminal papers of the field on the discovery of collective flow in relativistic nuclear collisions, co-authored by Hans-Åke, Hans Gutbrod and colleagues, stems from this period. From that point on he was always at the forefront of research with relativistic nuclear beams, being for three de...

  1. Coulomb dissociation in nonrelativistic and relativistic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic excitations in the Coulomb field of nuclei have been studied using quantum as well as semiclassical methods. Even at relatively modest incident energies, the Coulomb dissociation cross sections of projectiles with relatively low particle thresholds could be of sizeable order of magnitude. Such a study complements our knowledge about radiative capture processes, which are of interest for nuclear astrophysics. Quite a few questions remain to be answered, like the importance of nuclear interactions for small angle scattering, interference of different multipolarities for triple differentiial cross sections and distortion effects on the three-body final states. In the case of dissociation at relativistic energies it is shown that only for the total cross section both semiclassical and quantim-mechanical methods yield the same results. As an example the Primakoff effect is considered, where in an M1 excitation of ≅ 80 MeV a Λ hyperion is converted into a Σo hyperion by means of the virtual photon field of heavy target nuclei. Virtual photon spectra for all multipolarities can be calculated. This provides a sound basis for the analysis of electromagnetic dissociation experiments at relativistic heavy ion accelerators, like the BEVALAC. 10 figs., 25 refs

  2. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/μm to over 1000 keV/μm. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/μm. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  3. The discovery of nuclear compression phenomena in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article has attempted to review more than 15 years of research on shock compression phenomena, which is closely related to the goal of determining the nuclear EOS. Exciting progress has been made in this field over the last years and the fundamental physics of relativistic heavy ion-collisions has been well established. Overwhelming experimental evidence for the existence of shock compression has been extracted from the data. While early, inclusive measurements had been rather inconclusive, the advent of 4π-detectors like the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball had enabled the outstanding discovery of collective flow effects, as they were predicted by fluid-dynamical calculations. The particular case of conical Mach shock waves, anticipated for asymmetric collisions, has not been observed. What are the reasons? Surprisingly, the maximum energy of 2.1 GeV/nucleon for heavy ions at the BEVALAC had been found to be too low for Mach shock waves to occur. The small 20Ne-nucleus is stopped in the heavy Au target. A Mach cone, however, if it had developed in the early stage of the collision will be wiped out by thermal motion in the process of slowing the projectile down to rest. A comparison of the data with models hints towards a rather hard EOS, although a soft one cannot be excluded definitively. A quantitative extraction is aggravated by a number in-medium and final-state effects which influence the calculated observables in a similar fashion as different choices of an EOS. Thus, as of now, the precise knowledge of the EOS of hot and dense matter is still an open question and needs further investigation. (orig.)

  4. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C. (eds.)

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy.

  5. Structure and reactions of drip-line nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, P.G. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Secondary radioactive beams produced at intermediate-energy heavy-ion accelerators have in a short time span added a new dimension to the research on nuclear species at the limits of particle stability, and new detection techniques have made it possible to study reactions caused by incident beams of as little as one particle per second. Imminent developments such as the M.S.U. Coupled-Cyclotron Facility are expected to extend the range and to permit the observation of many previously inaccessible species. For a perspective on the progress in this area one only needs to go about fifteen years back to a time when it had just become possible to study the radioactivity of rare nuclear species such as {sup 11}Li. In presenting early experiments with secondary beams produced in fragmentation James Symons said {open_quotes}... In the introduction to this paper we questioned the applicability of high-energy heavy-ion accelerators to this field. Our experience at the Bevalac leads us to believe that this question does indeed have a positive answer. If the physics interest justifies it, then high-energy heavy-ion beams can certainly be expected to play a role in the study of nuclei at the limits of stability.{close_quotes} At the time, very few, if any, realized how prophetic this remark was. In the present paper the interpretation of the longitudinal-momentum distributions from the nuclear fragmentation of single-nucleon halos is discussed. It is pointed out that these measurements, at least for the cases studied so far, directly reflect the halo wave function, and that there is no direct contribution from the reaction mechanism. This is an important difference from the radial momentum distributions, for which diffractive processes play an important role. The author discusses stripping reactions of {sup 11}Be and {sup 8}B on light nuclei yielding {sup 10}Be and {sup 7}Be.

  6. Editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2016-06-01

    Ground based radiation research facilities are indispensable for a better understanding of the biological principles governing the responses of living organisms to space radiation and for advancing our knowledge in space radiation dosimetry and protection. 2015 marked the 20th anniversary of the first acquisition of space radiation biology and physics data at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. Use of the BNL AGS was the product of a collaborative agreement between NASA and BNL to promote the goals of NASA to "expand human presence in the solar system and to the surface of Mars and to advance exploration, science, innovation and benefits to humanity and international collaboration". This collaborative agreement signed on April 8th, 1994 built on previous work at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Bevalac and paved the way for the approval and construction of a dedicated space radiation laboratory at BNL, the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). In this volume we present three review articles: on the history of the creation of the NSRL, by Walter Schimmerling; on the physics-related research at the AGS and NSRL, by Jack Miller and Cary Zeitlin; and on the identification and evaluation of biomarkers for modeling cancer risk after exposure to space radiation, by Janice Pluth and her colleagues. It is the hope of the editors that our readers, and especially those relatively new to the field, will find these articles to be informative and interesting and that they will foster an appreciation of the importance of ground based radiation research in protecting the health of crew members as they venture out into the solar system in the coming decades.

  7. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  8. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  9. Data-analysis center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes at the data analysis center are summarized. The most dramatic change in the operation of the Data-Analysis Center (DAC) has been the implementation of a VAX cluster. The cluster is a network of loosely coupled VAX computers tied together with a high-speed network and sharing common disks. System software was enhanced with the addition of DECalc, a spread-sheet program for the VAX. EUNICE, a UNIX environment package that is layered on VMS, was added to VAX machine MPFG0. Networking capabilities in the DAC were significantly increased during 1984. Specifically, access to remote networks, such as TELENET, was made easier through the C-Division computers. In addition, the DAC acquired dial-out modems and software so that users could transfer files between DAC machines and other computers over phone lines. A major project in the data-acquisition section in the past year was a special-purpose multiprocessor system to analyze data generated at LAMPF. During the year requirements for the system have been defined, hardware for a prototype system (PDP-11/730s and Ethernet) has been selected, and the system software has been designed. During 1984 both Q replay and data acquisition using VAXes and the VMS operating system were fully implemented and released to users. VAX data acquisition was used successfully in experiments at EPICS at LAMPF, at the Bates Linear Accelerator in Massachusetts, and at the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The EPICS VAX-11/730 system was upgraded to a VAX-11/750 at the end of 1984 to improve on-line response and performance. Another VAX-11/750 is being purchased for HRS

  10. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics: Technical progress report, 1 April 1988--31 March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year of activity under DOE Grant DE-FG05-84ER40147 at Louisiana State University we have made significant progress in the data analysis, in hardware development for the Bevalac and in new experimental runs. We now have reliable longitudinal momentum distributions for 16O at three energies, 225, 170 and 360 MeV/nucleon. Combining these results with previous data shows an unexpected energy dependence of the momentum widths for A = 12--15 fragments. The widths peak at /approximately/100 MeV/nucleon projectile energy. We have also finished the analysis for 3 of the 4 energy points from the 6/87 28Si investigation of the total charge changing cross sections. These results also show an energy dependence. With the University of Siegen group, we have analyzed the test data from a new drift chamber system and used the system to provide trajectory measurements for the 28Si run in B40. The test data demonstrated position resolution of better than 100μm in some operating modes, and a study of the resolution dependence on timing mode, discriminator setting and wire voltage has been prepared for publication. The 28Si run provided 30-50% of the data we had hoped to obtain. There were significant beam and beamline tuning problems at our rigidity. Nevertheless, a relatively complete dataset for 245 MeV/n 28Si was obtained, processed and calibrations are in progress. In addition, we have participated in a HISS run at 2.1 GeV/n obtaining data on the fragmentation of 4He and 20Ne. All of the datasets, both B40 and HISS, are being analyzed and significant progress has been achieved. 20 figs

  11. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT+ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references

  12. Heavy particle clinical radiotherapy trial at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Progress report, July 1975-July 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The primary objectives of the clinical radiotherapy program are: to evaluate the potential of improved dose localization particularly as exemplified by helium ion irradiation; and to evaluate the combined potential of improved dose localization and increased biologic effect available with heavier ions such as carbon, neon, and argon. It was possible to make modifications rapidly to provide for large field, fractionated, Bragg peak irradiation at the 184-inch cyclotron with the helium ion beam. This allowed the opportunity to gain experience with charged particle irradiation treatment techniques, patient immobilization techniques, treatment planning and dosimetry studies including the utilization of CT scanning for tumor localization and charged particle dose distributions as well as beginning studies in compensating for tissue inhomogeneities in the beam path. These treatment techniques have been directly transferable to the Bevalac facility where a similar patient positioner has been installed for human irradiation with heavier particles. For the studies both with helium and now with heavier particles, patients with multiple skin and subcutaneous metastatic nodules for evaluation of skin RBE data and patients with locally advanced and/or unresectable tumors unlikely to be effectively treated by any conventional modality were sought. In order to facilitate intercomparison with megavoltage irradiation techniques, a conventional dose fractionation scheme has been adopted. A few exceptions to this dose specification scheme have been patients in which pulmonary, subcutaneous or skin nodules have been irradiated with larger fraction sizes ranging up to 400 rads per fraction in order to obtain clinical RBE studies in 8 to 10 fractions of heavy particles.

  13. Heavy particle clinical radiotherapy trial at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Progress report, July 1975-July 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objectives of the clinical radiotherapy program are: to evaluate the potential of improved dose localization particularly as exemplified by helium ion irradiation; and to evaluate the combined potential of improved dose localization and increased biologic effect available with heavier ions such as carbon, neon, and argon. It was possible to make modifications rapidly to provide for large field, fractionated, Bragg peak irradiation at the 184-inch cyclotron with the helium ion beam. This allowed the opportunity to gain experience with charged particle irradiation treatment techniques, patient immobilization techniques, treatment planning and dosimetry studies including the utilization of CT scanning for tumor localization and charged particle dose distributions as well as beginning studies in compensating for tissue inhomogeneities in the beam path. These treatment techniques have been directly transferable to the Bevalac facility where a similar patient positioner has been installed for human irradiation with heavier particles. For the studies both with helium and now with heavier particles, patients with multiple skin and subcutaneous metastatic nodules for evaluation of skin RBE data and patients with locally advanced and/or unresectable tumors unlikely to be effectively treated by any conventional modality were sought. In order to facilitate intercomparison with megavoltage irradiation techniques, a conventional dose fractionation scheme has been adopted. A few exceptions to this dose specification scheme have been patients in which pulmonary, subcutaneous or skin nodules have been irradiated with larger fraction sizes ranging up to 400 rads per fraction in order to obtain clinical RBE studies in 8 to 10 fractions of heavy particles

  14. Failla Memorial lecture. The future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C A

    1985-07-01

    Interplanetary space contains fluxes of fast moving atomic nuclei. The distribution of these reflects the atomic composition of the universe, and such particles may pose limitations for space flight and for life in space. Over the past 50 years, since the invention of Ernest Lawrence's cyclotron, advances in accelerator technology have permitted the acceleration of charged nuclei to very high velocities. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. Recently, new areas of particle physics research relating to the mechanisms of spallation and fission have opened up for investigation, and it is now realistic to search for nuclear super-dense states that might be produced in heavy nuclear collisions. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Individual heavy ions can also interrupt the continuity of membraneous regions in cells. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Cells attempt to repair these lesions, and many of the deleterious effects are due to misrepair or misrejoining of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects, and hypoxic cells in necrotic regions have nearly the same sensitivity as cells in well-oxygenated tissues. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. Heavy ions are also strong enhancers of viral-induced cell transformation, a process that requires integration of foreign DNA. Some cell

  15. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  16. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley's Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, π+π- annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to α-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 μ) for better mass resolution, in particular in the ρ region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, α-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt)α dependence with α ≅ 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the ρ, ω vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs

  17. Failla Memorial lecture. The future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C A

    1985-07-01

    Interplanetary space contains fluxes of fast moving atomic nuclei. The distribution of these reflects the atomic composition of the universe, and such particles may pose limitations for space flight and for life in space. Over the past 50 years, since the invention of Ernest Lawrence's cyclotron, advances in accelerator technology have permitted the acceleration of charged nuclei to very high velocities. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. Recently, new areas of particle physics research relating to the mechanisms of spallation and fission have opened up for investigation, and it is now realistic to search for nuclear super-dense states that might be produced in heavy nuclear collisions. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Individual heavy ions can also interrupt the continuity of membraneous regions in cells. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Cells attempt to repair these lesions, and many of the deleterious effects are due to misrepair or misrejoining of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects, and hypoxic cells in necrotic regions have nearly the same sensitivity as cells in well-oxygenated tissues. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. Heavy ions are also strong enhancers of viral-induced cell transformation, a process that requires integration of foreign DNA. Some cell

  18. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A; Spectroscopie des dileptons aux energies intermediaires; la reaction carbone - carbone A 1 GeV/A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prunet, M.

    1995-06-01

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley`s Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to {alpha}-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 {mu}) for better mass resolution, in particular in the {rho} region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, {alpha}-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt){sup {alpha}} dependence with {alpha} {approx_equal} 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the {rho}, {omega} vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs.

  19. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history of high energy physics. My aim here is to provide an additional corrective to such views as well as further information about the web of connections that allows

  20. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards

  1. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  2. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    equipment that cost $100,000 by the 1970s alongside work at the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history