WorldWideScience

Sample records for bethe stopping power

  1. Simple polynomial approximation to modified Bethe formula low-energy electron stopping powers data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A., E-mail: ana.taborda@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Reis, M.A. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-08-01

    A recently published detailed and exhaustive paper on cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons clearly shows that electron phenomena occurring in parallel with X-ray processes may have been dramatically overlooked for many years, mainly when low atomic number species are involved since, in these cases, the fluorescence coefficient is smaller than the Auger yield. An immediate problem is encountered while attempting to tackle the issue. Accounting for electron phenomena requires the knowledge of the stopping power of electrons within, at least, a reasonably small error. Still, the Bethe formula for stopping powers is known to not be valid for electron energies below 30 keV, and its use leads to values far off experimental ones. Recently, a few authors have addressed this problem and both detailed tables of electron stopping powers for various atomic species and attempts to simplify the calculations, have emerged. Nevertheless, its implementation in software routines to efficiently calculate keV electron effects in materials quickly becomes a bit cumbersome. Following a procedure already used to establish efficient methods to calculate ionisation cross-sections by protons and alpha particles, it became clear that a simple polynomial approximation could be set, which allows retrieving the electronic stopping powers with errors of less than 20% for energies above 500 eV and less than 50% for energies between 50 eV and 500 eV. In this work, we present this approximation which, based on just six parameters, allows to recover electron stopping power values that are less than 20% different from recently published experimentally validated tabulated data.

  2. Mean excitation energies for use in Bethe's stopping-power formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review has been made of the mean excitation energies that can be derived from the analysis of stopping-power and range measurements, and from semi-empirical dipole oscillator-strength distributions for gases and dielectric-response functions for solids. On the basis of this review, mean excitation energies have been selected for 43 elemental substances and 54 compounds. Additivity rules have also been considered which allow one to estimate the mean excitation energies for compounds for which no direct data are available. These additivity rules are based on the use of mean excitation energies for atomic constituents which, to a certain extent, take into account the effects of chemical binding and physical aggregation

  3. Ion Stopping Powers and Ranges Whenever You Need Them

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Christensen, Casper; Tørresø, Jesper Rosholm

    A new app "Electronic Stopping Power" for Android mobile phones and tablets, looks up stopping powers using the ICRU 49 (protons and alphas) and the revised ICRU 73 (lithium and heavier ions) tables. In addition, also MSTAR and an implementation of the Bethe equation expanded to low energies...

  4. Nuclear stopping power of antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, Kai; Sundholm, Dage; Pyykkö, Pekka; Zambrano, Daniel Martinez; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2017-10-01

    The slowing down of energetic ions in materials is determined by the nuclear and electronic stopping powers. Both of these have been studied extensively for ordinary-matter ions. For antiprotons, however, there are numerous studies of the electronic stopping power, but none of the nuclear stopping power. Here, we use quantum-chemical methods to calculate interparticle potentials between antiprotons and different atoms, and derive from these the nuclear stopping power of antiprotons in solids. The results show that the antiproton nuclear stopping powers are much stronger than those of protons, and can also be stronger than the electronic stopping power at the lowest energies. The interparticle potentials are also implemented in a molecular dynamics ion range calculation code, which allows us to simulate antiproton transmission through degrader foil materials. Foil transmission simulations carried out at experimentally relevant conditions show that the choice of antiproton-atom interaction model has a large effect on the predicted yield of antiprotons slowed down to low (a few keV) energies.

  5. Fast-Projectile Stopping Power of Quantal Multicomponent Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester, D.; Tkachenko, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    The Bethe-Larkin formula for the fast-projectile stopping power is extended to multicomponent plasmas. The results are to contribute to the correct interpretation of the experimental data, which could permit us to test existing and future models of thermodynamic, static, and dynamic characteristics of strongly coupled Coulomb systems

  6. Stopping Power for Degenerate Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Jr., Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    This is a first attempt at calculating the BPS stopping power with electron degeneracy corrections. Section I establishes some notation and basic facts. Section II outlines the basics of the calculation, and in Section III contains some brief notes on how to proceed with the details of the calculation. The remaining work for the calculation starts with Section III.

  7. Low-energy proton stopping power of N2, O2 and water vapor and deviations from Bragg's rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A modified local plasma model, based on the works of Lindhard and Winther; and Bethe, Brown, and Walske, is established. The Gordon-Kim model for molecular electron density is used to calculate stopping power of N2, O2, and water vapor for protons of energy ranging from 40 keV to 2.5 MeV, resulting in good agreement with experimental data. Deviations from Bragg's rule are evaluated and are discussed under the present theoretical model.

  8. Ab initio electronic stopping power in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukri, Abdullah-Atef

    2015-01-01

    The average energy loss of an ion per unit path length when it is moving through the matter is named the stopping power. The knowledge of the stopping power is essential for a variety of contemporary applications which depend on the transport of ions in matter, especially ion beam analysis techniques and ion implantation. Most noticeably, the use of proton or heavier ion beams in radiotherapy requires the knowledge of the stopping power. Whereas experimental data are readily available for elemental solids, the data are much more scarce for compounds. The linear response dielectric formalism has been widely used in the past to study the electronic stopping power. In particular, the famous pioneering calculations due to Lindhard evaluate the electronic stopping power of a free electron gas. In this thesis, we develop a fully ab initio scheme based on linear response time-dependent density functional theory to predict the impact parameter averaged quantity named the random electronic stopping power (RESP) of materials without any empirical fitting. The purpose is to be capable of predicting the outcome of experiments without any knowledge of target material besides its crystallographic structure. Our developments have been done within the open source ab initio code named ABINIT, where two approximations are now available: the Random-Phase Approximation (RPA) and the Adiabatic Local Density Approximation (ALDA). Furthermore, a new method named 'extrapolation scheme' have been introduced to overcome the stringent convergence issues we have encountered. These convergence issues have prevented the previous studies in literature from offering a direct comparison to experiment. First of all, we demonstrate the importance of describing the realistic ab initio electronic structure by comparing with the historical Lindhard stopping power evaluation. Whereas the Lindhard stopping power provides a first order description that captures the general features of the

  9. Accurate evaluation of pressure effects on the electronic stopping cross section and mean excitation energy of atomic hydrogen beyond the Bethe approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R., E-mail: trujillo@fis.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. Postal 48-3, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62251 (Mexico); Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Ap. Postal 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Cruz, S.A., E-mail: cruz@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Ap. Postal 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-02-01

    Atomic hydrogen is used as a fundamental reference target system to explore pressure effects on the electronic stopping cross section, S{sub e}, of swift bare ions such as protons and α-particles. This is achieved by considering the hydrogen atom under pressure as a padded spherically-confined quantum system. Within this scheme, S{sub e} is calculated rigorously in the first Born approximation taking into account the full target excitation spectrum and momentum transfer distribution for different confinement conditions (pressures) and fixed projectile charge states. Pressure effects on the target mean excitation energy, I, are also formally calculated and compared with corresponding accurate calculations based on the Local Plasma Approximation (LPA). Even though atomic hydrogen is the simplest target system, its accurate treatment to account for the role of pressure in the stopping dynamics is found to provide useful means to understand the behavior of more complex systems under similar conditions. It is found that: (i) the region of projectile velocities for which the Bethe approximation remains valid is shifted towards higher values as pressure increases; (ii) shell corrections are enhanced relative to the free-atom case as pressure increases, and (iii) the LPA seems to underestimate I as pressure is increased. The results of this work for atomic hydrogen may serve as accurate benchmark reference values for studies of pressure effects on S{sub e} and I using different methodologies.

  10. Recent developments in the study of projectile structure and molecular bond effects on the stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera T, R.; Cruz, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In the penetration of charged particles in matter, the standard Bethe theory of deposition does not consider the projectile electronic structure, thus neglecting the projectile electrons interaction during the collision. Furthermore, in the case of molecular targets, it is customary to use the Bragg rule for the calculation of the stopping power, that is, the sum of the contribution of each atom in the molecule, therefore neglecting the chemical bond effects on the calculation of the energy deposition. In this talk, I will present relevant aspects leading to the development of current studies of energy deposition for projectiles with structure as well as the molecular bond effects on the stopping power of heavy ions. Finally, a discussion is presented on new challenges and possible future landscapes for research in the area of energy deposition. (Author)

  11. Electron mass stopping power in H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursa, Dmitry V.; Zammit, Mark C.; Threlfall, Robert L.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Calculations of electron mass stopping power (SP) of electrons in H2 have been performed using the convergent close-coupling method for incident electron energies up to 2000 eV. Convergence of the calculated SP has been established by increasing the size of the close-coupling expansion from 9 to 491 states. Good agreement was found with the SP measurements of Munoz et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 433, 253 (2007), 10.1016/j.cplett.2006.10.114].

  12. Atomic collisions in secondary ion production by hydrogen near the electronic stopping power maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, R.; Pereira, J. A. M.; Wünsch, R.; Jalowy, T.; Groeneveld, K. O.

    1999-06-01

    H + projectiles from a 2.5 MV van de Graaff accelerator were used to bombard a carbon target (500 Å) under high vacuum conditions. By varying the H + projectile energy (50-160 keV/u) it was possible to scan the low energetic Lindhard- Scharff- Schiøtt region (LSS), the maximum, and the high energetic Bethe- Bloch region (BB) of the electronic stopping power (d E/d x) e. The secondary ion yields Y(H +,C 2H x+,C 3H x+,C 4H x+,C 5H x+) from the beam entrance surface were measured with a time of flight spectrometer (TOF). The measurements reveal a non-linear behaviour between the electronic stopping power (d E/d x) e calculated with TRIM, in the maximum and the Bethe-Bloch region, and the secondary ion yields. However, the experimental results show good agreement with a new Pereira et al. [Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Proc. 174 (1998) 179] effective energy loss model.

  13. Stopping, goal-conflict, trait anxiety and frontal rhythmic power in the stop-signal task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Phoebe S-H; Thurlow, Jane K; McNaughton, Neil

    2011-12-01

    The medial right frontal cortex is implicated in fast stopping of an initiated motor action in the stop-signal task (SST). To assess whether this region is also involved in the slower behavioural inhibition induced by goal conflict, we tested for effects of goal conflict (when stop and go tendencies are balanced) on low-frequency rhythms in the SST. Stop trials were divided, according to the delays at which the stop signal occurred, into short-, intermediate-, and long-delay trials. Consistent with goal-conflict processing, intermediate-delay trials were associated with greater 7-8 Hz EEG power than short- or long-delay trials at medial right frontal sites (Fz, F4, and F8). At F8, 7-8 Hz power was linked to high trait anxiety and neuroticism. A separate 4-7 Hz power increase was also seen in stop, relative to go, trials, but this was independent of delay, was maximal at the central midline site Cz, and predicted faster stopping. Together with previous data on the SST, these results suggest that the right frontal region could be involved in multiple inhibition mechanisms. We propose a hierarchical model of the control of stopping that integrates the literature on the neural control of fast motor stopping with that on slower, motive-directed behavioural inhibition.

  14. Stopping power ratios less than unity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Lucas, M. W.; Kemmler, J.; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1990-03-01

    We present calculations of the stopping power ratio R for H2+ molecular ions incident on graphite. These calculations include contributions from both free valence electrons and bound core electrons. It is known from experiment [W. Brandt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 33 (1974) 1325; 35 (1975) 130] that R is greater than unity for ν > 1 (a.u.), although it can fall below unity at lower velocities [J.C. Eckhardt et al., J. Phys. C11 (1978) L851]. We predict, however, that in appropriately chosen conditions R can be less than unity for ν ⋍ 2, even though we have assumed the constituent protons to remain bare throughout the thin solid target so that this is not a charge state effect. We have used both pure and screened Coulomb potentials to describe the repulsion process of the two protons. We also compare our computations with the data of Steuer et al. [ IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-30 (1983) 1069] for H2+ on graphite, ν = 4. Unfortunately, their interesting results for N2+ and O2+ are obtained at velocities which are too low for our th be appropriate.

  15. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  16. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sobolevsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    introduced a collection of tools, e.g., inverse stopping power look-up as well as CSDA range calculation and its inverse. Results: On a standard desktop PC libdEdx calculates 22 million look-ups/sec. A web GUI (available at http://dedx.au.dk) provides easy access to libdEdx and download of stopping data...... from several well-known stopping power sources into one ready-to-use package being 1) freely available and 2) easy accessible via a web-based front end. Methods: Currently, stopping power data from PSTAR, ASTAR, MSTAR and ICRU49+73 are implemented along with a version of the Bethe formula. The library...... and graphs. For compounds, we observe that stopping power data are robust for variations in the mean excitation potential of the constituents as long as the total mean excitation potential is fixated. Conclusion: We released libdEdx (version number 1.2.1: http://sf.net/projects/libdedx/) with a web-based GUI...

  17. The Bethe wavefunction

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Michel Gaudin's book La fonction d'onde de Bethe is a uniquely influential masterpiece on exactly solvable models of quantum mechanics and statistical physics. Available in English for the first time, this translation brings his classic work to a new generation of graduate students and researchers in physics. It presents a mixture of mathematics interspersed with powerful physical intuition, retaining the author's unmistakably honest tone. The book begins with the Heisenberg spin chain, starting from the coordinate Bethe Ansatz and culminating in a discussion of its thermodynamic properties. Delta-interacting bosons (the Lieb-Liniger model) are then explored, and extended to exactly solvable models associated to a reflection group. After discussing the continuum limit of spin chains, the book covers six- and eight-vertex models in extensive detail, from their lattice definition to their thermodynamics. Later chapters examine advanced topics such as multi-component delta-interacting systems, Gaudin magnets and...

  18. Electron stopping power and mean free path in organic compounds over the energy range of 20-10,000 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Zhenyu E-mail: tzy@sdu.edu.cn; Xia Yueyuan; Zhao Mingwen; Liu Xiangdong; Li Feng; Huang Boda; Ji Yanju

    2004-07-01

    An empirical method to obtain optical energy loss functions is presented for a large number of organic compounds, for which optical data are not available, on the basis of structure feature analysis of the existed optical energy loss functions for certain organic compounds. The optical energy loss functions obtained by using this method are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the Penn's statistical model, a set of systematic expressions have been given for the calculation of the stopping powers and mean free paths of electrons penetrating into the organic compounds in the energy range of E{<=}10 keV. Detailed comparison of the calculated data with other theoretical results is presented. The stopping powers and mean free paths for a group of important polymers, without available optical data, have been calculated. In the calculations, three different cases have been considered, i.e. exchange correction not being considered, Ashley exchange correction being involved, and Born-Ochkur exchange correction being included. The results indicate that for these compounds the calculated stopping powers agree well with those obtained by using Bethe-Bloch theory at high-energy limit E=10 keV, as expected for a stopping power theory that should be converged to Bethe-Bloch theory at high energies.

  19. Nuclear stopping power at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, S.; Gyulassy, M.; Sumiyoshi, H.

    1985-03-01

    Recent p + A → p + X data are analyzed within the context of the multi-chain and additive quark models. We deduce the average energy loss of a baryon as a function of distance traversed in nuclear matter. Consistency of the multi-chain model is checked by comparing the predictions for p + A → π +- + X with data. We discuss the space-time development of baryon stopping and show how longitudinal growth limits the energy deposition per unit length. Predictions are made for the proton spectra to be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN and BNL. Finally, we conclude that the stopping domain for central collisions of heavy ions extends up to center of mass kinetic energies KEsub(em) asymptotically equals 3 +- 1 AGev. (author)

  20. Hans Bethe and the Global Energy Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ioffe, B. L.

    2005-01-01

    Bethe's view-point on the global energy problems is presented. Bethe claimed that the nuclear power is a necessity in future. Nuclear energetic must be based on breeder reactors. Bethe considered the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons as the main problem of long-range future of nuclear energetics. The solution of this problem he saw in heavy water moderated thermal breeders, using uranium-233, uranium-238 and thorium as a fuel.

  1. Stopping power of degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1985-01-01

    We calculate the stopping power of the degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities in the dielectric formalism. The strong Coulomb-coupling effects beyond the random-phase approximation are taken into account through the static and dynamic local-field corrections. It is shown that those strong-coupling and dynamic effects act to enhance the stopping power substantially in the low-velocity regime, leading to an improved agreement with experimental data. (author)

  2. Power handling capability of water-cooled beam stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran-Ngoc, T.

    1992-01-01

    Doubling the beam power on the RFQ1-1250 linear accelerator at Chalk River and designing a 40 kW beam diagnostic system for Tokamak de Varennes required a detailed investigation into the power handling capabilities of beam stops. Different techniques for augmentation of the critical heat flux on the cooling channel surface of beam stops are reviewed. In the case of a beam stop with twisted tape inserts, the swirl flow condition yields a higher critical heat flux than that of a straight axial flow. Although a critical heat flux in the order of 10 kW/cm 2 could be obtained at high flow velocities such as 45 m/s, such flows are not always practical in the design of beam stop cooling systems. At a water velocity of 4 m/s, the highest beam power density is estimated to be 1.4 kW/cm 2 for a beam stop design that uses double rows of cooling tubes. A similar design, where cooling channels are machined on a common copper block, would handle a power density up to 2.6 kW/cm 2 . Some preliminary hydraulic test results, related to a third design where high flow turbulence is created by two rows of intersected-channels, are also reported. (Author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  3. Simulation on effect of stopping nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Masayuki; Kumakura, Osamu; Sakurai, Norihisa; Nagata, Yutaka; Hattori, Tsuneaki

    1990-01-01

    The effects that the stopping of nuclear power generation exerts on the price of primary energy such as petroleum, LNG and coal and the trend of Japanese energy and economy are analyzed by using the medium term economy forecasting system. In the simulation, the case of stopping nuclear power generation in seven countries of OECD is supposed, and as for the process of stopping, two cases of immediate stopping and stopping by gradual reduction are set up. The models used for the simulation are the world energy model, the competition among energies model and the multiple category model. By the decrease of nuclear power generation, thermal power generation increases, and the demand of fossil fuel increases. As the result, the price of fossil fuel rises (the world energy model), and the price of fossil fuel imported to Japan rises. Also the quantity of fossil fuel import to Japan increase. These price rise and quantity increase exert deflation effect to Japanese economy (the multiple category model). The price rise of fossil fuel affects the competition among energies in Japan through the relative change of secondary energy price (the competition among energies model). The impact to the world and to Japan is discussed. (K.I.)

  4. Formulae for the secondary electron yield and total stopping power ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8−10 were compared with the values measured experimentally and it was concluded that the formula to estimate S0.8−10 was universal for metals. Keywords. Secondary electron yield; total stopping power; metal. PACS Nos 79.20.Hx; 81.90.

  5. Electronic stopping-power calculations for heavy ions in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkomoss, S. G.; Pape, A.; Unamuno, S.

    1990-05-01

    A model for ion stopping in semiconductors, which considers separate stopping contributions from valence and core electrons, and explicitly includes the effect of the gap, has been used to calculate the electronic stopping power of energetic B, P, and As in Si, Ge, GaAs, and CdTe for projectile energies 10 keV-100 MeV. Account was taken of the partially stripped incident ions by means of the effective charge. There is good agreement at low ion velocity with Lindhard and Scharff's [J. Lindhard and M. Scharff, Phys. Rev. 124, 128 (1961)] values which for heavy ions do not depend on effective charge theory, as well as with the semiempirical curves at energies E≥0.2 MeV/nucleon where they can be compared.

  6. Stopping power for heavy ions in gases: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwan, P.K.; Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Gurinder; Shyam Kumar

    1999-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of stopping power for heavy ions in gases is of paramount importance in nuclear reaction studies for the identification of reaction products involving ΔE-E telescope detectors. In the present work, it has been calculated the stopping power values for different heavy ions, such as Ne, Ar, Cu, Kr and Ag in various gas absorbers like H 2 , He, N 2 , Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe in the energy domain ∼ 2.5-6 MeV/n using the SRIM-98 code recently developed by Ziegler and the formulations of Benton and Henke, Hubert et al, Mukherjee and Nayak and Northcliffe and Schilling. This study has been undertaken in order to establish the validity of various semiempirical formulations for gas targets

  7. Stopping power of C, O and Cl in tantalum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barradas, Nuno P., E-mail: nunoni@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Laboratório de Engenharia Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal); Fonseca, M. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829- 516 Caparica (Portugal); ISLA Campus Lisboa| Laureate International Universities, 1500-210 Lisboa (Portugal); Siketić, Z.; Bogdanović Radović, I. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: •We measured the stopping power of C, O, and Cl in tantalum oxide. •A bulk sample method was used, with Bayesian inference data analysis. •Good agreement was found with SRIM2012 calculations. -- Abstract: Tantalum oxide is used in a variety of applications due to its high bandgap, high-K and high index of refraction. Unintentional impurities can change properties of tantalum oxide, and heavy ion elastic recoil detection is a method that can play a fundamental role in the quantification of those impurities. Furthermore, tantalum oxide is frequently part of the samples that also include other materials, which are often analysed with ion beam techniques. However, there are very few reported stopping power measurements for tantalum oxide, and data analysis relies not only on interpolation from a sparse data base but also on the Bragg rule. As is well known, the Bragg rule is often inaccurate for oxides, particularly when the difference in atomic numbers of the involved elements is very large as is case for Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We have used a bulk method, previously developed by us and applied successfully to other systems, to determine experimentally the stopping power of tantalum oxide for three different ion types: C, O and Cl. In the present paper the results of our measurements and bulk method analysis are presented.

  8. Topics in Bethe Ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunguang

    Integrable quantum spin chains have close connections to integrable quantum field. theories, modern condensed matter physics, string and Yang-Mills theories. Bethe. ansatz is one of the most important approaches for solving quantum integrable spin. chains. At the heart of the algebraic structure of integrable quantum spin chains is. the quantum Yang-Baxter equation and the boundary Yang-Baxter equation. This. thesis focuses on four topics in Bethe ansatz. The Bethe equations for the isotropic periodic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with N. sites have solutions containing ±i/2 that are singular: both the corresponding energy and the algebraic Bethe ansatz vector are divergent. Such solutions must be carefully regularized. We consider a regularization involving a parameter that can be. determined using a generalization of the Bethe equations. These generalized Bethe. equations provide a practical way of determining which singular solutions correspond. to eigenvectors of the model. The Bethe equations for the periodic XXX and XXZ spin chains admit singular. solutions, for which the corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors are ill-defined. We use a twist regularization to derive conditions for such singular solutions to bephysical, in which case they correspond to genuine eigenvalues and eigenvectors of. the Hamiltonian. We analyze the ground state of the open spin-1/2 isotropic quantum spin chain. with a non-diagonal boundary term using a recently proposed Bethe ansatz solution. As the coefficient of the non-diagonal boundary term tends to zero, the Bethe roots. split evenly into two sets: those that remain finite, and those that become infinite. We. argue that the former satisfy conventional Bethe equations, while the latter satisfy a. generalization of the Richardson-Gaudin equations. We derive an expression for the. leading correction to the boundary energy in terms of the boundary parameters. We argue that the Hamiltonians for A(2) 2n open quantum spin chains

  9. Subshell stopping power of the elements for protons in the Born approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The generalized oscillator-strength formulation of the Born approximation was used to generate a large sample of subshell excitation and ionization generalized oscillator strengths across the periodic table. These were used to calculate the excitation and ionization contributions to the proton stopping power by individual subshells. The subshell ionization stopping powers are expressed in scaled form, depending on the subshell ionization energy. Detailed comparison of the calculated total proton stopping power is in good agreement with experiment across the periodic table. Detailed calculations show the importance of outer-shell ionization and excitation to the total stopping power for protons with energy less than 10 MeV

  10. Monte Carlo Simulations on the water-to-air stopping power ratio for carbon ion dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkner, Katrin; Bassler, Niels; Sobolevsky, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    tables and ICRU reports. The stopping power ratio is calculated via track-length dose calculation with SHIELD-HIT07. In the calculations, the stopping power ratio is reduced to a value of 1.119 in the plateau region as compared to the cited value of 1.13 in IAEA TRS-398. At low energies the stopping...... power ratio increases by up to 6% in the last few tenths of a mm toward the Bragg peak. For a spread out Bragg peak of 13.5  mm width at 130  mm depth, the stopping power ratio increases by about 1% toward the distal end....

  11. Special issue: Hans Bethe

    CERN Multimedia

    Gottfried, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    "There are a handful of people who soar, whose accompalishments are so off-scale as to nearly defy belief. Hans Bethe (2 July 1906 - 6 March 2005) was of that caliber. As just one measure of his stature, imagine the task of copying his published opus by hand, for that is how he wrote most of it" (2 pages)

  12. The Bethe Wavefunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudin, M.; Caux, J.-S.

    2014-01-01

    Michel Gaudin's book La fonction d'onde de Bethe is a uniquely influential masterpiece on exactly solvable models of quantum mechanics and statistical physics. Available in English for the first time, this translation brings his classic work to a new generation of graduate students and researchers

  13. The calculation of proton and secondary electron stopping powers in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marouane, Abdelhak; Inchaouh, Jamal; Ouaskit, Said; Fathi, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The stopping power of energetic protons in liquid water has been calculated using a new model based on different theoretical and semi-empirical approaches. In this model, we consider the relativistic corrections along with the electronic and nuclear stopping power. The present work accounts for the different interactions made with electrons and nuclei inside the target. Interactions of the incident particle with the target's electrons dominate in the high energy regime; in the low energy regime, the interactions of the projectile with the target nuclei contribute importantly and are included in the calculation. We also compute the stopping cross sections and the stopping power of secondary electrons ejected from proton and hydrogen ionization impact, and generated by hydrogen electron loss processes. The consideration of secondary electrons' stopping power can contribute to the study of nano-dosimetry. Our results are in good agreement with existing experimental data. This calculation model can be useful for different applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadron therapy for cancer treatment or radiation protection for astronauts. - Highlights: ► We discussed the stopping cross sections at the Bragg peak region of primary and secondary processes. ► We considered the corrections of incident particle energy focusing on the Rudds semi-empirical model. ► We calculated the electronic and nuclear stopping power, and we deduced the total stopping power. ► We calculated the stopping power of the secondary electrons.

  14. Hans Bethe's early life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    2012-10-01

    In 1937, two years after he moved to the US to escape Nazi persecution, the physicist Hans Bethe sent a letter to his mother in Germany. In it, he wrote, "I think I am about the leading theoretician in America. [Eugene] Wigner is certainly better and [Robert] Oppenheimer and [Edward] Teller probably just as good. But I do more and talk more and that counts too."

  15. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  16. Influence of electron motion in target atom on stopping power for low-energetic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stopping power was calculated, representing the electrons of the target atom as an assembly of quantum oscillators. It was considered that the electrons in the atoms have some velocity before interaction with the projectile, which is the main contribution of this paper. The influence of electron velocity on stopping power for different projectiles and targets was investigated. It was found that the velocity of the electron stopping power has the greatest influence at low energies of the projectile.

  17. Stopping power of antiprotons in H, H2, and He targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    of the corrections to the first-order stopping number, the average energy transferred to the target electrons, and the relative importance of the excitation and the ionization process for the energy loss of the projectile was determined. Finally, the stopping powers of the H, H2, and He targets were directly...

  18. Nuclear forces the making of the physicist Hans Bethe

    CERN Document Server

    Schweber, Silvan S

    2012-01-01

    On the fiftieth anniversary of Hiroshima, Nobel-winning physicist Hans Bethe called on his fellow scientists to stop working on weapons of mass destruction. What drove Bethe, the head of Theoretical Physics at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project, to renounce the weaponry he had once worked so tirelessly to create? That is one of the questions answered by "Nuclear Forces", a riveting biography of Bethe's early life and development as both a scientist and a man of principle. As Silvan Schweber follows Bethe from his childhood in Germany, to laboratories in Italy and England, and on to Cornell University, he shows how these differing environments were reflected in the kind of physics Bethe produced. Many of the young quantum physicists in the 1930s, including Bethe, had Jewish roots, and Schweber considers how Liberal Judaism in Germany helps explain their remarkable contributions. A portrait emerges of a man whose strategy for staying on top of a deeply hierarchical field was to tackle only those problems h...

  19. Accurate stopping power measurements for (0.21–2.68) MeV/u {sup 1}H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions crossing thin Al foils; extraction of the (I, b) parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, D., E-mail: djamelmoussa@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-01-15

    The stopping powers of thin Al foils for H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions have been measured over the energy range E=(206.03–2680.05) keV/amu with an overall relative uncertainty better than 1% using the transmission method. The derived S(E) experimental data are compared to previous ones from the literature, to values derived by the SRIM-2008 code or compiled in the ICRU-49 report, and to the predictions of Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory. Besides, the S(E) data for H{sup +} ions together with those for He{sup 2+} ions reported by Andersen et al. (1977) have been analyzed over the energy interval E>1.0 MeV using the modified Bethe–Bloch stopping theory. The following sets of values have been inferred for the mean excitation potential, I, and the Barkas–Andersen parameter, b, for H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles, respectively: {(I=164±3)) eV, (b=1.40} and {(I=163±2.5)) eV, (b=1.38}. As expected, the I parameter is found to be independent of the projectile electronic structure presumably indicating that the contribution of charge exchange effects becomes negligible as the projectile velocity increases. Therefore, the I parameter must be determined from precise stopping power measurements performed at high projectile energies where the Bethe stopping theory is fully valid.

  20. Use of a range scaling method to determine alanine/water stopping power ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M.R.; Sephton, J.P.; Sharpe, P.H.G.; Shipley, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    A phantom composed of alanine dosimeter material has been constructed and depth-dose measurements made in a 10 MeV electron beam. The results have demonstrated the feasibility of using relative depth-dose measurements to determine stopping power ratios in materials of dosimetric interest. Experimental stopping power ratios for alanine dosimeter material and water agreed with the data of ICRU Report 37 within the uncertainty of the experiment (±1.2% at a 95% confidence level)

  1. Polarizational stopping power of heavy-ion diclusters in two-dimensional electron liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester, D.; Fuentes, A. M.; Tkachenko, I. M.

    2007-01-01

    The in-plane polarizational stopping power of heavy-ion diclusters in a two-dimensional strongly coupled electron liquid is studied. Analytical expressions for the stopping power of both fast and slow projectiles are derived. To go beyond the random-phase approximation we make use of the inverse dielectric function obtained by means of the method of moments and some recent analytical expressions for the static local-field correction factor

  2. Stopping power for particle therapy: the generic library libdEdx and clinically relevant stopping-power ratios for light ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Toftegaard, Jakob; Kantemiris, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    of the stopping power and to provide data for an extended number of target materials. The STPR for SOBP for different ions are found to be qualitatively the same which may allow for an analytical description valid for all ions. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09553002.2011.595877...

  3. Range and stopping power tables for 2.5-12MeV/nucleon heavy ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, F.; Fleury, A.; Bimbot, R.; Gardes, D.

    1978-12-01

    A semi-empirical procedure to compute heavy ion stopping powers is presented. The calculations use recent stopping power values for alpha particles and a new parameterization for the effective charge taking into account the effect to the stopping medium. Stopping powers and ranges are tabulated for moving ions of atomic number 2<=Z<=45 in the energy region 2.5<=E/A<=12 MeV/nucleon for 18 solid materials

  4. Obituary: Hans Albrecht Bethe, 1906-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijers, Ralph

    2007-12-01

    head-on and not allowing himself to be side-tracked by those who would deem the problem be much more complex and difficult, moving straight forward like an intellectual battleship ("The H.A. Bethe Way," as his collaborator Gerald E. Brown would dub the style). Bethe's involvement in the Project brought to light his abilities in the managerial and political arena, which he used later to much effect to influence the wider world; he was among those who fought hard during the Cold War to contain the impact of the terrible weapons he had helped invent. As his two children, Henry and Monica, were born, the war years also made him a family man. As his father did with him, he often took them on long walks, in the hills around Ithaca or further afield; he much enjoyed walking, and mountains. Just after the war, during and following the June 1947 Shelter Island Conference, Bethe made another of his great contributions to physics—some might say his greatest. The experiments by Willis Lamb and Robert Retherford, on what came to be known as the "Lamb shift," were discussed, and during the meeting the assembled crowd (Richard Feynman, Julian Schwinger, and Hendrick Kramers among them) got stuck on the infinities of QED. During the train ride home, Bethe managed to compute the correct answer by realizing that the complex QED machinery could be bypassed, the H.A. Bethe Way. His 1967 Nobel Prize spurred a brief revival of Bethe's interest in astrophysics, but his work in the following years continued to focus on nuclear physics and dense matter (and disarmament and nuclear power, of course). In 1978 he re-entered astrophysics with a bang: Bethe was losing interest in nuclear physics and, after a few years of trying, Gerry Brown lured him back to astrophysics during a stay at the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (NORDITA). The refugee from Hitler and the refugee from McCarthy jointly attacked the problem of supernova collapse. Bethe had the crucial insight that the low entropy

  5. Monte Carlo based water/medium stopping-power ratios for various ICRP and ICRU tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Varea, Jose M; Carrasco, Pablo; Panettieri, Vanessa; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Water/medium stopping-power ratios, s w,m , have been calculated for several ICRP and ICRU tissues, namely adipose tissue, brain, cortical bone, liver, lung (deflated and inflated) and spongiosa. The considered clinical beams were 6 and 18 MV x-rays and the field size was 10 x 10 cm 2 . Fluence distributions were scored at a depth of 10 cm using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The collision stopping powers for the studied tissues were evaluated employing the formalism of ICRU Report 37 (1984 Stopping Powers for Electrons and Positrons (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)). The Bragg-Gray values of s w,m calculated with these ingredients range from about 0.98 (adipose tissue) to nearly 1.14 (cortical bone), displaying a rather small variation with beam quality. Excellent agreement, to within 0.1%, is found with stopping-power ratios reported by Siebers et al (2000a Phys. Med. Biol. 45 983-95) for cortical bone, inflated lung and spongiosa. In the case of cortical bone, s w,m changes approximately 2% when either ICRP or ICRU compositions are adopted, whereas the stopping-power ratios of lung, brain and adipose tissue are less sensitive to the selected composition. The mass density of lung also influences the calculated values of s w,m , reducing them by around 1% (6 MV) and 2% (18 MV) when going from deflated to inflated lung

  6. Improved evaluation of proton stopping powers in solid elements for energies above 3 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Haruo

    1989-01-01

    Stopping powers of protons incident on Al, Cu, Ag, Au, and Pb have been evaluated and compared with ICRU 37 (1984) and experiemntal results. Improved procedure for the inner shell corrections has been adopted to adjust with recent experimental results by Andersen et al. (1977) and Ishiwari et al. (1979, 1984). The calculated results are in good agreement with Soerensen and Andersen (1973) above 10 MeV except Au and Pb. The uncertainties of calculated stopping powers are better than 0.5 % at energies 3 MeV to 18 MeV. The results correspond to uncertainties of mean excitation energies to within 2 %. It has become clear that previous inner shell corrections evaluated by Bichsel in ICRU 37 (1984) have uncertainties of about 0.5∼2 % in stopping powers. (author)

  7. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-16955

  8. Electronic stopping powers of molybdenum metal for sup 1 sup 9 F ions at low velocity

    CERN Document Server

    LiuXiangDong; Li Feng; Ying Min U; Zhao Min; Huang Bo Da; Li Chang Chun; Liu Ying Hon

    2002-01-01

    Electronic stopping powers for 80-350 keV sup 1 sup 9 F ions in molybdenum were obtained by range measurement. Depth profiles of sup 1 sup 9 F in molybdenum were measured by using the sup 1 sup 9 F(p,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 6 O resonant nuclear reaction at E sub R =872.1 keV. A proper convolution calculation method was used to extract the true distribution of fluorine from the experimental excitation yield curves. The electronic stopping powers were derived through fitting the projected range distributions, simulated by using the TRIM/XLL code, to the experimentally measured range distributions. The electronic stopping cross sections were compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo simulation codes.

  9. Stopping Power and Energy Straggling of Channeled He-Ions in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.; Ratajczak, R.; Pagowska, K.; Nowicki, L.; Stonert, A.; Caban, P.

    2011-01-01

    GaN epitaxial layers are usually grown on sapphire substrates. To avoid disastrous effect of the large lattice mismatch a thin polycrystalline nucleation layer is grown at 500 o C followed by the deposition of thick GaN template at much higher temperature. Remnants of the nucleation layer were visualized by transmission electron microscopy as defect agglomeration at the GaN/sapphire interface and provide a very useful depth marker for the measurement of channeled ions stopping power. Random and aligned spectra of He ions incident at energies ranging from 1.7 to 3.7 MeV have been measured and evaluated using the Monte Carlo simulation code McChasy. Impact parameter dependent stopping power has been calculated for channeling direction and its parameters have been adjusted according to experimental data. For virgin, i.e. as grown, samples, the ratio of channeled to random stopping power is constant and amounts to 0.7 in the energy range studied. Defects produced by ion implantation largely influence the stopping power. For channeled ions the variety of possible trajectories leads to different energy loss at a given depth, thus resulting in much larger energy straggling than that for the random path. Beam energy distributions at different depths have been calculated using the McChasy code. They are significantly broader than those predicted by the Bohr formula for random direction. (author)

  10. Stopping powers of gases for ions of energy below 200 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Akira

    1978-01-01

    There has been renewed interest in the stopping power of matters for ions in low energy region. But there is not an established theory in this energy region, and experimental data did not coincide with the curves in some data books. Therefore, precise experimental measurement is still necessary. In present neutron dosimetry, tissues are the object of measurement of absorbed dose. In this experiment, it was intended to use tissue equivalent gas as a target gas. In the experimental apparatus, ions come from the Cockcroft-Walton accelerator are applied to the cell, in which the target gas is admitted from gas source. Gas in the cell is observed with the electrostatic energy analyzer. Stopping power is calculated from the results of energy loss measurement. In this report, only the preliminary results are shown. The tissue equivalent gas is composed of CH 4 , CO 2 and N 2 , each percentage is 64.95, 32.2 and 2.85, respectively. It seems that the stopping powers of noble gases will be useful for the developments of the theory, and the stopping power for He + ions was measured. The results are shown in a figure, and the errors were estimated to be less than 1.5%. At the end of the report, some discussions among a few persons are added. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšová, Romana; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Slepička, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 354, JUL (2015), s. 205-209 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : stopping power * heavy ions * polypropylene * silicon nitride Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2015

  12. Interaction of heavy ion beams with a hydrogen plasma: plasma lens effect and stopping power enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, D.; Bimbot, R.; Della-Negra, S.; Dumail, M.; Kubica, B.; Richard, A.; Rivet, M.F.; Servajean, A.; Deutsch, C.; Maynard, G.

    1988-01-01

    By coupling a hydrogen plasma to a Tandem accelerator, transmission and energy losses of 2 MeV/u carbon and sulfur beams passing through a plasma target have been investigated. Fluctuations in beam transmission have been observed and attributed to a plasma lens effect. Moreover, energy loss measurements indicate an enhanced stopping power of the plasma relative to its cold matter equivalent

  13. Inventory of nuclear power plants and research reactors temporary or definitively stopped in industrialized countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauzon, J.; Vaubert, B.

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents data and information on the end of the life of nuclear reactors. One deals more particularly with installations of industrialized countries. This report gives the motivations which have involved the definitive shut down of nuclear power plants and of research reactors in the concerned countries. A schedule of definitive reactor shutdowns is presented. Then, one deals with nuclear power plants of which the construction has been stopped. The reasons of these situations are also given. The temporary difficulties met during the construction or the starting of nuclear power plants these last years are mentioned. Most times, there are economical or political considerations, or safety reasons. Finally, the nuclear power plants stopped for more than two years are mentioned [fr

  14. Analytical Solution for the Stopping Power of the Cherenkov Radiation in a Uniaxial Nanowire Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago A. Morgado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We derive closed analytical formulae for the power emitted by moving charged particles in a uniaxial wire medium by means of an eigenfunction expansion. Our analytical expressions demonstrate that, in the absence of material dispersion, the stopping power of the uniaxial wire medium is proportional to the charge velocity, and that there is no velocity threshold for the Cherenkov emission. It is shown that the eigenfunction expansion formalism can be extended to the case of dispersive lossless media. Furthermore, in the presence of material dispersion, the optimal charge velocity that maximizes the emitted Cherenkov power may be less than the speed of light in a vacuum.

  15. Stopping power in D6Li plasmas for target ignition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Ross J.; Cassibry, Jason T.

    2018-02-01

    The ability to calculate the range of charged fusion products in a target is critical when estimating driver requirements. Additionally, charged particle ranges are a determining factor in the possibility that a burn front will propagate through the surrounding cold fuel layer, igniting the plasma. Performance parameters of the plasma, such as yield, gain, etc therefore rely on accurate knowledge of particle ranges and stopping power over a wide range of densities and temperatures. Further, this knowledge is essential in calculating ignition conditions for a given target design. In this paper, stopping power is calculated for DD and D6Li plasmas using a molecular dynamics based model. Emphasis is placed on solid D6Li which has been recently considered as a fuel option for fusion propulsion systems.

  16. Electro-magnetically driven shock and dissociated hydrogen target for stopping power measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Moriyama, T.; Hasegawa, J.; Horioka, K.; Oguri, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A design study of electro-magnetic shock tube for dissociated gas targets is presented. Behind the shock front, there is a dissociated gas region without ionization. That is suitable target for the stopping power measurement when we have an appropriate shock velocity. The previous experiments showed that the dissociated target duration with uniform density and temperature profiles as long as microsecond was required for synchronization with projectile. A new shock tube with long drift section is proposed. The duration of shock heated region can be estimated to be 2μs in this design. This configuration enables us to measure the difference of the stopping power between molecules and dissociated atoms for heavy ion beams more reliably

  17. Stopping powers for channeled helium ions in silicon using electron densities from bandstructure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, P. W. L.; van Ijzendoorn, L. J.; de Koning, M.; Bobbert, P.; van Haeringen, W.; de Voigt, M. J. A.

    1994-03-01

    Stopping powers for channeled He ions have been calculated with a modified version of the Monte Carlo code LAROSE [J.H. Barrett, Phys. Rev. B 3 (1971) 1527]. The spatial distribution of the valence electron density in Si was obtained from bandstructure calculations. The stopping power was calculated using Lindhard's free-electron gas approach within the framework of the local density approximation. Spatial variations of the electron density along individual trajectories produce a significant contribution to the energy loss distribution. The average energy loss of 4 MeV He ions channeled in the axial , and directions have been calculated and compared with measured values. The contribution of the core electrons to the energy loss is investigated by adding the spherically symmetric Hartree-Fock-Slater electron densities of the closed shells to the valence electron density. Calculations show a high energy loss tail in the spectrum qualitatively in agreement with published experimental results.

  18. Charged Particle Stopping Power Effects on Ignition: Some Results from an Exact Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton Jr, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    A completely rigorous first-principles calculation of the charged particle stopping power has recently been performed by Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). This calculation is exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma number density, including an exact treatment of two-body quantum scattering. The BPS calculation is therefore extremely accurate in the plasma regime realized during the ignition and burn of an inertial confinement fusion capsule. For deuterium-tritium fusion, t...

  19. Ion energy loss at maximum stopping power in a laser-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayzac, W.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a new experimental setup for the measurement of the energy loss of carbon ions at maximum stopping power in a hot laser-generated plasma has been developed and successfully tested. In this parameter range where the projectile velocity is of the same order of magnitude as the thermal velocity of the plasma free electrons, large uncertainties of up to 50% are present in the stopping-power description. To date, no experimental data are available to perform a theory benchmarking. Testing the different stopping theories is yet essential for inertial confinement fusion and in particular for the understanding of the alpha-particle heating of the thermonuclear fuel. Here, for the first time, precise measurements were carried out in a reproducible and entirely characterized beam-plasma configuration. It involved a nearly fully-stripped ion beam probing a homogeneous fully-ionized plasma. This plasma was generated by irradiating a thin carbon foil with two high-energy laser beams and features a maximum electron temperature of 200 eV. The plasma conditions were simulated with a two-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic code, while the ion-beam charge-state distribution was predicted by means of a Monte-Carlo code describing the charge-exchange processes of projectile ions in plasma. To probe at maximum stopping power, high-frequency pulsed ion bunches were decelerated to an energy of 0.5 MeV per nucleon. The ion energy loss was determined by a time-of-flight measurement using a specifically developed chemical-vapor-deposition diamond detector that was screened against any plasma radiation. A first experimental campaign was carried out using this newly developed platform, in which a precision better than 200 keV on the energy loss was reached. This allowed, via the knowledge of the plasma and of the beam parameters, to reliably test several stopping theories, either based on perturbation theory or on a nonlinear T-Matrix formalism. A preliminary

  20. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike; Hill, Mark A.; Peach, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  treatment plans for a non-small cell lung cancer patient. The change in stopping power calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%-2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process.

  1. The measurement of proton stopping power using proton-cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmanski, P.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Gall, K.P.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system utilizing a proton beam has been developed and tested. The cone beam is produced by scattering a 160 MeV proton beam with a modifier that results in a signal in the detector system, which decreases monotonically with depth in the medium. The detector system consists of a Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb intensifying screen viewed by a cooled CCD camera. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is applied to the projection data to obtain the CT voxel data representing proton stopping power. The system described is capable of reconstructing data over a 16x16x16cm 3 volume into 512x512x512 voxels. A spatial and contrast resolution phantom was scanned to determine the performance of the system. Spatial resolution is significantly degraded by multiple Coulomb scattering effects. Comparison of the reconstructed proton CT values with x-ray CT derived proton stopping powers shows that there may be some advantage to obtaining stopping powers directly with proton CT. The system described suggests a possible practical method of obtaining this measurement in vivo. (author)

  2. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  3. Influence of molecular structure on stopping power of chemical species for He+ ions from a low-energy particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.

    1980-01-01

    Results are reported of a 10-year study of the stopping power of approx. 70 compounds in the vapor state for He + ions of energy 0.3-2.0 MeV. The compounds include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, n-alchols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, organic ring compounds, sulfur-containing organic and inorganic compounds, and halogen-containing organic and inorganic compounds, and simple gases, such as H 2 , O 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , CO, and CO 2 . The technique of the application of the Bragg Rule, which defines the stopping power of a 2-element compound as the additive sum of the atomic stopping power of the elements, was used to interpret the results. It is demonstrated in both measured and calculated atomic stopping power that the measured hierarchy of double bond ring structure single bond holds for C, O, and S with maximum differences of approx. 28%, 17%, and 5%, respectively

  4. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2015-01-01

    of detectors and the corresponding noise characteristics. Stopping power maps were calculated for all three scans, and compared with the ground truth stopping power from the phantoms. Results. Proton CT gave slightly better stopping power estimates than the dual energy CT method, with root mean square errors...... development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling...

  5. Measurement of stopping powers of gases for heavy ions of 3 to 13 MeV by nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orliange, I.

    1985-09-01

    The stopping powers of gases have been measured for incident 10 Ne, 18 Ar, 29 Cu, 36 Kr and 47 Ag ions of 3 to 13 MeV/u. These measurements have confirmed the existence of a gas-solid difference for the stopping powers (the stopping power of solids being larger than that of gazes). Such a difference was theoretically postulated by Bohr and Lindhard in 1954, and experimentally observed for the first time by Geissel in 1982. This effect can be qualitatively interpreted by a difference in the ion's effective charge in stopping power. However, the determination of charge state distribution for Ar and Fe ions in two particular cases (Ar + Nsub(2s)or Nsub(2g) and (Fe + Csub(s) or Csub(g)) from a theoric model and experimental cross sections for atomic collisions don't quantitatively account for observed differences [fr

  6. An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

  7. Basic experimental preparation for the measurement of the stopping power of heavy ions in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Brito Brum, H. de.

    1976-02-01

    To measure the stopping power of heavy ions in solid matter one must develop both an experimental apparatus and a data analysis program. This thesis discusses these preparatory works and the methods to be employed. The design, building and testing of a scattering chamber with many detectors; the preparation of thin solid films, their analysis by electron diffraction and their thickness measurements; the testing of the electronic system; the calibration of the 4 MeV Van de Graaf accelerator at PUC/RJ; and the development of an original data analysis computer program are presented. (Author) [pt

  8. Expanding the Bethe/Gauge dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullimore, Mathew; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Lukowski, Tomasz

    2017-11-01

    We expand the Bethe/Gauge dictionary between the XXX Heisenberg spin chain and 2d N = (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories to include aspects of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. We construct the wave functions of off-shell Bethe states as orbifold defects in the A-twisted supersymmetric gauge theory and study their correlation functions. We also present an alternative description of off-shell Bethe states as boundary conditions in an effective N = 4 supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Finally, we interpret spin chain R-matrices as correlation functions of Janus interfaces for mass parameters in the supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  9. Starting and stopping control on power conditioner in photovoltaic power system; Taiyoko hatsuden system ni okeru power conditioner no kido teishi seigyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, M.; Ishihara, Y.; Todaka, T.; Harada, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan); Oshiro, H.; Nakamura, H. [Japan Quality Assurance Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Studies are made about the control of the power conditioner over the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) function in a photovoltaic power generation system. The analysis is conducted by means of computer simulation into the effect of a start/stop function added to the control of MPPT and the effect on the generation of power of the setting of parameters in the start/stop function. The reduction in output power due to difference between the actual operation point and the optimum operation point is evaluated by use of a load matching correction factor. In this simulation, it is assumed that the solar cell array consists of 13 rows in 5 parallel columns, is capable of a normal output of 3.149kW, has a panel tilted at 30 degrees, and faces due south. The power conditioner is assumed to be a system rated at 3kVA, equipped with system interconnection and back flow features. As a result, it is learned that the stop voltage should be set at 180V or lower and the steady voltage near 185.5V for a good result and that there is not much need after all for the start/stop technique. 2 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Lattice preamorphization by ion irradiation: Fluence dependence of the electronic stopping power threshold for amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agullo-Lopez, F.; Garcia, G.; Olivares, J.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal-spike model has been applied to characterize the damage structure of the latent tracks generated by high-energy ion irradiations on LiNbO 3 through electron excitation mechanisms. It applies to ions having electronic stopping powers both below and above the threshold value for lattice amorphization. The model allows to estimate the defect concentrations in the heavily damaged (preamorphized) regions that have not reached the threshold for amorphization. They include the halo and tail surrounding the core of a latent track. The existence of the preamorphized regions accounts for a synergy between successive irradiations and predicts a dependence of the amorphization threshold on previous irradiation fluence. The predicted dependence is in accordance with irradiation experiments using N (4.53 MeV), O (5.00 MeV), F (5.13 MeV), and Si (5 and 7.5 MeV). For electronic stopping powers above the threshold value the model describes the generation of homogeneous amorphous layers and predicts the propagation of the amorphization front with fluence. A theoretical expression, describing this propagation, has been obtained that is in reasonable agreement with silicon irradiation experiments at 5 and 7.5 MeV. The accordance is improved by including in a simple phenomenological way the velocity effect on the threshold. At the highest fluences (or depths) a significant discrepancy appears that may be attributed to the contribution of the nuclear collision damage

  11. Stopping power of fluorides and semiconductor organic films for low-velocity protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkovic Loli, L. N.; Sanchez, E. A.; Grizzi, O.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the energy loss of protons in fluorides and organic films is presented. The measurements were performed in fresh AlF 3 , LiF, and N,N ' -bis(1-ethylpropyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxdiimide (EP-PTCDI) evaporated in situ on self-supported C or Ag foils, covering the very low energy range from 25 keV down to 0.7 keV. The transmission method is used in combination with time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometry. In the case of fluorides with large band gap energies (AlF 3 and LiF), the experimental stopping power increases almost linearly with the mean projectile velocity showing a velocity threshold at about 0.1 a.u. These features are well reproduced by a model based on quantum scattering theory that takes into account the velocity distribution and the excitation of the active 2p electrons in the F - anions, and the properties of the electronic bands of the insulators. In the case of the semiconductor organic film with a lower gap, the experimental stopping power increases linearly with the mean projectile velocity without presenting a clear threshold. This trend is also reproduced by the proposed model.

  12. Bethe vectors for XXX-spin chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdík, Čestmír; Fuksa, Jan; Isaev, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with algebraic Bethe ansatz for XXX-spin chain. Generators of Yang-Baxter algebra are expressed in basis of free fermions and used to calculate explicit form of Bethe vectors. Their relation to N-component models is used to prove conjecture about their form in general. Some remarks on inhomogeneous XXX-spin chain are included

  13. Bethe vectors for XXX-spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdík, Čestmír; Fuksa, Jan; Isaev, Alexei

    2014-11-01

    The paper deals with algebraic Bethe ansatz for XXX-spin chain. Generators of Yang-Baxter algebra are expressed in basis of free fermions and used to calculate explicit form of Bethe vectors. Their relation to N-component models is used to prove conjecture about their form in general. Some remarks on inhomogeneous XXX-spin chain are included.

  14. Practitioner Profile: An Interview with Beth Crittenden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martie Gillen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beth Crittenden offers financial wellness coaching to people who want growth both professionally and personally. Beth has been working with finances as a focus since 2009, after training in somatic psychology, healthy communication in relationship, and mindful meditation practices and theory.

  15. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9–3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damache, S. [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Djaroum, S. [Division de Technologie Nucléaire, CRNB, B.P. 180 Ain-Oussara, Djelfa (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Amari, L.; Moussa, D. [Université des Sciences et Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-09-15

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for E{sub p} ≈ (0.9–3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner’s binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the C−H, C=C and C=O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for E{sub p} ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr’s collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (E{sub p} < 1300 keV). However, they are significantly overestimated by these theories over the intermediate and high proton velocity regions, which may be due to bunching effect by inner shell electrons of the polymer target. Besides, our energy loss straggling data are in better overall consistency with the Yang, O’Connor and Wang empirical formula for E{sub p} > 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  16. The Bethe Sum Rule and Basis Set Selection in the Calculation of Generalized Oscillator Strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio; Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Fulfillment of the Bethe sum rule may be construed as a measure of basis set quality for atomic and molecular properties involving the generalized oscillator strength distribution. It is first shown that, in the case of a complete basis, the Bethe sum rule is fulfilled exactly in the random phase...... approximation. For an incomplete (computational) basis, some guidelines are developed for constructing higher angular momentum contributions to bases that will optimize the sum of generalized oscillator strengths and thus make the basis well suited for the calculation of stopping cross sections....

  17. Average stopping powers and the use of non-analyte spiking for the determination of phosphorus and sodium by PIPPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, C.; Morland, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    By using particle induced prompt photon spectrometry, PIPPS, the ratios of the average stopping powers in samples and standards can be used to determine elemental compositions. Since the average stopping powers in the samples are in general unknown, this procedure poses a problem. It has been shown that by spiking the sample with a known amount of a compound with known stopping power and containing a non-analyte element, appropriate stopping powers in the samples can be determined by measuring the prompt gamma-ray yields induced in the spike. Using 5-MeV protons and lithium compounds as non-analyte spikes, sodium and phosphorus were determined in ivory, while sodium was determined in geological samples. For the stopping power determinations in the samples the 429-keV 7 Li n(1,0) and 478-keV 7 Li (1,0) gamma rays were measured, while for phosphorus and sodium determinations the high yield 1,266-keV 31 P (1,0), 440-keV 23 Na (1,0), 1,634-keV, Na 23 α(1,0) and 1,637-keV 23 Na (2,1) gamma rays were used. The method was tested by analyzing the standard reference materials SRM 91, 120c and 694

  18. Fluence Correction Factors and Stopping Power Ratios for Clinical Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Sobolevsky, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Background. In radiation therapy, the principal dosimetric quantity of interest is the absorbed dose to water. Therefore, a dose conversion to dose to water is required for dose deposited by ion beams in other media. This is in particular necessary for dose measurements in plastic phantoms...... for increased positioning accuracy, graphite calorimetry being developed as a primary standard for dose to water dosimetry, but also for the comparison of dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations with those of pencil beam algorithms. Material and methods. In the conversion of absorbed dose to phantom...... material to absorbed dose to water the water-to-material stopping power ratios (STPR) and the fluence correction factors (FCF) for the full charged particle spectra are needed. We determined STPR as well as FCF for water to graphite, bone (compact), and PMMA as a function of water equivalent depth, zw...

  19. Stopping power of dense plasmas: The collisional method and limitations of the dielectric formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, C. F.; Arista, N. R.

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of the stopping power of plasmas using two main approaches: the collisional (scattering theory) and the dielectric formalisms. In the former case, we use a semiclassical method based on quantum scattering theory. In the latter case, we use the full description given by the extension of the Lindhard dielectric function for plasmas of all degeneracies. We compare these two theories and show that the dielectric formalism has limitations when it is used for slow heavy ions or atoms in dense plasmas. We present a study of these limitations and show the regimes where the dielectric formalism can be used, with appropriate corrections to include the usual quantum and classical limits. On the other hand, the semiclassical method shows the correct behavior for all plasma conditions and projectile velocity and charge. We consider different models for the ion charge distributions, including bare and dressed ions as well as neutral atoms.

  20. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, A. F., E-mail: afguerreror@uqvirtual.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Del Quindío Cra 15 # 12N Armenia, Quindío (Colombia); Mesa, J., E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu da UNESP Distrito de Rubião Jr. s/n°, 18618-000, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 10{sup 1} eV - 10{sup 10} eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  1. Defect creation by swift heavy ions: materials modifications in the electronic stopping power regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulemonde, M.

    1994-01-01

    The material modifications by swift heavy ions in the electronic stopping power regime are puzzling question: How the energy deposited on the electrons can induced material modifications? In order to answer to this question, the modifications induced in non-radiolytic materials are described and compared to the predictions. In first part the main experimental observations is presented taking into account the irradiation parameters. Then it is shown that the initial phases of the material are very important. Amorphous materials, whatever it is a metal, a semiconductor or an insulator, are till now all sensitive to the high electronic excitation induced by the slowing down of a swift heavy ion. All oxide materials, insulators or conductors, are also sensitive even the MgO, one of most famous exceptions. Crystalline metals or semiconductors are intermediate cases: some are insensitive like Cu and Si respectively while Fe and GeS are sensitive. The main feature is the different values of the electronic stopping power threshold of material modifications. The evolution of the damage creation is described showing that the damage morphology seems to be the same whatever the material is amorphous or crystalline. In second part a try of interpretation of the experimental results will be done on the behalf of the two following models: The Coulomb spike and the thermal spike models. It will be shown that there is some agreement with limited predictions made in the framework of the Coulomb spike model. But it appears that the thermal spike model can account for most of the experimental data using only one free parameter: The electron-phonon strength which is a physical characteristic of the irradiated material. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab., 64 refs

  2. Average stopping powers for electron and photon sources for radiobiological modeling and microdosimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Kry, Stephen F.; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2018-03-01

    This study concerns calculation of the average electronic stopping power for photon and electron sources. It addresses two problems that have not yet been fully resolved. The first is defining the electron spectrum used for averaging in a way that is most suitable for radiobiological modeling. We define it as the spectrum of electrons entering the sensitive to radiation volume (SV) within the cell nucleus, at the moment they enter the SV. For this spectrum we derive a formula that combines linearly the fluence spectrum and the source spectrum. The latter is the distribution of initial energies of electrons produced by a source. Previous studies used either the fluence or source spectra, but not both, thereby neglecting a part of the complete spectrum. Our derived formula reduces to these two prior methods in the case of high and low energy sources, respectively. The second problem is extending electron spectra to low energies. Previous studies used an energy cut-off on the order of 1 keV. However, as we show, even for high energy sources, such as 60Co, electrons with energies below 1 keV contribute about 30% to the dose. In this study all the spectra were calculated with Geant4-DNA code and a cut-off energy of only 11 eV. We present formulas for calculating frequency- and dose-average stopping powers, numerical results for several important electron and photon sources, and tables with all the data needed to use our formulas for arbitrary electron and photon sources producing electrons with initial energies up to  ∼1 MeV.

  3. ESTAR, PSTAR, ASTAR. A PC package for calculating stopping powers and ranges of electrons, protons and helium ions. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A PC package is documented for calculating stopping powers and ranges of electrons, protons and helium ions in matter for energies from 1 keV up to 10 GeV. Stopping powers and ranges for electrons can be calculated for any element, compound or mixture. Stopping powers and ranges of protons and helium ions can be calculated for 74 materials (26 elements and 48 compounds and mixtures). The files are stored on two HD diskettes in compressed form. Both executable files for IBM PC and Fortran-77 source files are provided. All three programs require 5.2 Mb of disk space. This set of two diskettes with detailed documentation is available upon request, cost free, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author). 25 refs, 4 tabs

  4. Correlation between molecular secondary ion yield and cluster ion sputtering for samples with different stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heile, A.; Muhmann, C.; Lipinsky, D.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2012-07-01

    In static SIMS, the secondary ion yield, defined as detected ions per primary ion, can be increased by altering several primary ion parameters. For many years, no quantitative predictions could be made for the secondary ion yield enhancement of molecular ions. For thick samples of organic compounds, a power dependency of the secondary ion yield on the sputtering yield was shown. For this article, samples with thick molecular layers and (sub-)monolayers composed of various molecules were prepared on inorganic substrates such as silicon, silver, and gold, and subsequently analyzed. For primary ion bombardment, monoatomic (Ne+, Ar+, Ga+, Kr+, Xe+, Bi+) as well as polyatomic (Bin+, Bin++) primary ions were used within an energy range of 10-50 keV. The power dependency was found to hold true for the different samples; however, the exponent decreased with increasing stopping power. Based on these findings, a rule of thumb is proposed for the prediction of the lower limit of the secondary ion yield enhancement as a function of the primary ion species. Additionally, effects caused by the variation of the energy deposition are discussed, including the degree of molecular fragmentation and the non-linear increase of the secondary ion yield when polyatomic primary ions are used.

  5. Quiet: The Power of Introvert in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Schat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Do you pay attention to the differences between extroversion and introversion? It can be fascinating to consider who is and is not aware of  the distinction between the two, as well as the significant formative role they both play in daily perceptions and interactions.  In my experience, more often than not it is the introverts who recognize and appreciate the difference, while too many extroverts remain unaware. In  Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking(2012, Susan Cain reminds us of the potency and power of the gift of introversion.  She challenges her readers to recognize and celebrate the unique insights and contributions that may be latent in communities and organizations—present, but hidden from view, and likely to remain so unless given the space to flourish and to find a voice. She also suggests that creating a space for the introvert voice may bring unforeseen blessings to an organization or community.

  6. Misconceptions impairing the validity of the stopping power tables in the SRIM library and suggestions for doing better in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The popular SRIM library delivers data and simulation codes for describing the slowing down of energetic atoms in matter. This study explored the validity of the tables containing cross sections for electronic and nuclear stopping together with the respective range parameters. The electronic stopping cross sections Se were produced, much like in previous and subsequent attempts of other groups, by bringing together the limited number of available experimental results in the form of ratios, r(Z1, He, υ) = Se(Z1, Z2, υ)/Se(He, Z2, υ). Z1 and Z2 denote the atomic numbers of projectiles (velocity υ) and target atoms, respectively. Reference data for He impact are available in reasonable volume only for about 15% of all solid targets; missing information has to be derived by interpolation. The concept of data evaluation is based on the assumption that the Bethe-Bloch (BB) theory, developed for bare projectiles, can serve as a guide at all velocities. For the purpose in question, the theory features an indispensible property: Z1 and Z2 appear as straight pre-factors, not in coupled form, Se,BB (υ) ∝ Z12 Z2 L (Z2, υ) , with L(Z2, υ) representing the stopping number. Therefore, Z2 and L(Z2, υ) cancel out when taking ratios for fixed Z1 so that data for arbitrary Z2 may be combined in one set of r-values to determine the best fit rfit(Z1, He, υ). The stopping cross sections of interest are then derived as Se(Z1, Z2, υ) = rfit(Z1, He, υ) Se(He, Z2, υ). At low energies these results were often refined, Se ⇒ Se,f, to account for experimental data that did not comply with the anticipated Z2-independent trend. Major findings and suggestions are as follows: (i) At high velocities, υ > 4Z12/3υ0 (Bohr velocity υ0), the SRIM predictions (have to) rely primarily on BB theory. (ii) At intermediate velocities, i.e., around the Bragg peak, SRIM appears to produce reasonable results (ca. ±15%). (iii) Below the Bragg peak the tabulated data often deviate strongly and

  7. Bethe's quantum numbers and rigged configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatol N. Kirillov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method to determine the quantum numbers, which we call the rigged configurations, for the solutions to the Bethe ansatz equations for the spin-1/2 isotropic Heisenberg model under the periodic boundary condition. Our method is based on the observation that the sums of Bethe's quantum numbers within each string behave particularly nicely. We confirm our procedure for all solutions for length 12 chain (totally 923 solutions.

  8. Quantum corrections to the string Bethe ansatz

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, R; Hernandez, Rafael; Lopez, Esperanza

    2006-01-01

    One-loop corrections to the energy of semiclassical rotating strings contain both analytic and non-analytic terms in the 't Hooft coupling. Analytic contributions agree with the prediction from the string Bethe ansatz based on the classical S-matrix, but in order to include non-analytic contributions quantum corrections are required. We find a general expression for the first quantum correction to the string Bethe ansatz.

  9. Efficiency improvement in proton dose calculations with an equivalent restricted stopping power formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Daniel; Bouchard, Hugo; Ozell, Benoît; Després, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The equivalent restricted stopping power formalism is introduced for proton mean energy loss calculations under the continuous slowing down approximation. The objective is the acceleration of Monte Carlo dose calculations by allowing larger steps while preserving accuracy. The fractional energy loss per step length ɛ was obtained with a secant method and a Gauss-Kronrod quadrature estimation of the integral equation relating the mean energy loss to the step length. The midpoint rule of the Newton-Cotes formulae was then used to solve this equation, allowing the creation of a lookup table linking ɛ to the equivalent restricted stopping power L eq, used here as a key physical quantity. The mean energy loss for any step length was simply defined as the product of the step length with L eq. Proton inelastic collisions with electrons were added to GPUMCD, a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code. The proton continuous slowing-down was modelled with the L eq formalism. GPUMCD was compared to Geant4 in a validation study where ionization processes alone were activated and a voxelized geometry was used. The energy straggling was first switched off to validate the L eq formalism alone. Dose differences between Geant4 and GPUMCD were smaller than 0.31% for the L eq formalism. The mean error and the standard deviation were below 0.035% and 0.038% respectively. 99.4 to 100% of GPUMCD dose points were consistent with a 0.3% dose tolerance. GPUMCD 80% falloff positions (R80 ) matched Geant’s R80 within 1 μm. With the energy straggling, dose differences were below 2.7% in the Bragg peak falloff and smaller than 0.83% elsewhere. The R80 positions matched within 100 μm. The overall computation times to transport one million protons with GPUMCD were 31-173 ms. Under similar conditions, Geant4 computation times were 1.4-20 h. The L eq formalism led to an intrinsic efficiency gain factor ranging between 30-630, increasing with the prescribed accuracy of simulations. The

  10. Influence of a strong laser field on Coulomb explosion and stopping power of energetic H3+ clusters in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guiqiu; Gao Hong; Wang Yaochuan; Yao Li; Zhong Haiyang; Cheng Lihong; Yang Kun; Liu Wei; E Peng; Xu Dianguo; Wang Younian; Hu Zhanghu

    2012-01-01

    The influence of a high-intensity laser field on the Coulomb explosion and stopping power for a swift H 3 + cluster ion in a plasma target is studied by means of the molecular dynamic (MD) method based on the linearized Vlasov–Poisson theory. Excitations of the plasma are described by the classical plasma dielectric function. In the presence of the laser field, the general expressions for the induced potential in the target and the interaction force among the ions within the cluster are derived. Based on the numerical solution of the equations of motion for the constituent ions, the Coulomb explosion patterns and the cluster's stopping power are discussed for a range of laser parameters. Numerical results show that the laser field affects the correlation between the ions and contributes to weaken the wake effect and the stopping power as compared to the laser-free case. On the other hand, the stopping power ratio of H 3 + cluster is higher than the situation of dicluster of H 2 + due to the vicinage effect in the cluster.

  11. Experimental observation of Bethe strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Wu, Jianda; Yang, Wang; Bera, Anup Kumar; Kamenskyi, Dmytro; Islam, A. T. M. Nazmul; Xu, Shenglong; Law, Joseph Matthew; Lake, Bella; Wu, Congjun; Loidl, Alois

    2018-02-01

    Almost a century ago, string states—complex bound states of magnetic excitations—were predicted to exist in one-dimensional quantum magnets. However, despite many theoretical studies, the experimental realization and identification of string states in a condensed-matter system have yet to be achieved. Here we use high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy to resolve string states in the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg-Ising chain SrCo2V2O8 in strong longitudinal magnetic fields. In the field-induced quantum-critical regime, we identify strings and fractional magnetic excitations that are accurately described by the Bethe ansatz. Close to quantum criticality, the string excitations govern the quantum spin dynamics, whereas the fractional excitations, which are dominant at low energies, reflect the antiferromagnetic quantum fluctuations. Today, Bethe’s result is important not only in the field of quantum magnetism but also more broadly, including in the study of cold atoms and in string theory; hence, we anticipate that our work will shed light on the study of complex many-body systems in general.

  12. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  13. Impact of joint statistical dual-energy CT reconstruction of proton stopping power images: comparison to image- and sinogram-domain material decomposition approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangyue; Han, Dong; Politte, David G; Williamson, Jeffrey F; O'Sullivan, Joseph A

    2018-03-23

    To assess the performance of a novel dual-energy CT (DECT) approach for proton stopping power ratio (SPR) mapping that integrates image reconstruction andmaterial characterization using a joint statistical image reconstruction (JSIR) method based on a linear basis vector model (BVM). A systematic comparison between the JSIR-BVM method and previously described DECT image- and sinogram-domain decomposition approaches is also carried out on synthetic data. The JSIR-BVM method was implemented to estimate the electron densities and mean excitation energies (I-values) required by the Bethe equation for SPR mapping. In addition, image- and sinogram-domain DECT methods based on three available SPR models including BVM were implemented for comparison. The intrinsic SPR modeling accuracy of the three models was first validated. Synthetic DECT transmission sinograms of two 330 mm diameter phantoms each containing 17 soft and bony tissues (for a total of 34) of known composition were then generated with spectra of 90 and 140 kVp. The estimation accuracy of the reconstructed SPR images were evaluated for the seven investigated methods. The impact of phantom size and insert location on SPR estimation accuracy was also investigated. All three selected DECT-SPR models predict the SPR of all tissue types with less than 0:2% RMS errors under idealized conditions with no reconstruction uncertainties. When applied to synthetic sinograms, the JSIR-BVM method achieves the best performance with mean and RMS-average errors of less than 0:05% and 0:3%, respectively, for all noise levels, while the image- and sinogram-domain decomposition methods show increasing mean and RMS-average errors with increasing noise level. The JSIR-BVM method also reduces statistical SPR variation by six-fold compared to other methods. A 25% phantom diameter change causes up to 4% SPR differences for the image-domain decomposition approach, while the JSIR-BVM method and sinogram-domain decomposition methods are

  14. A Web 2.0 Interface to Ion Stopping Power and Other Physics Routines for High Energy Density Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth

    2008-04-01

    We present a new Web 2.0-based interface to physics routines for High Energy Density Physics applications. These routines include models for ion stopping power, sputtering, secondary electron yields and energies, impact ionization cross sections, and atomic radiated power. The Web 2.0 interface allows users to easily explore the results of the models before using the routines within other codes or to analyze experimental results. We discuss how we used various Web 2.0 tools, including the Python 2.5, Django, and the Yahoo User Interface library. Finally, we demonstrate the interface by showing as an example the stopping power algorithms researchers are currently using within the Hydra code to analyze warm, dense matter experiments underway at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Optimal Stopping Problems with Power Function of Lévy Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surya, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    This talk is based on the joint paper with A.E. Kyprianou: "Kyprianou, A. E., and Surya, B. A. On the Novikov-Shiryaev optimal stopping problems in continuous time. Elect. Comm. in Probab., 10 (2005), 146-154.

  16. Validation of proton stopping power ratio estimation based on dual energy CT using fresh tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasti, Vicki T.; Michalak, Gregory J.; Hansen, David C.; Deisher, Amanda J.; Kruse, Jon J.; Krauss, Bernhard; Muren, Ludvig P.; Petersen, Jørgen B. B.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2018-01-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) has been shown, in theoretical and phantom studies, to improve the stopping power ratio (SPR) determination used for proton treatment planning compared to the use of single energy CT (SECT). However, it has not been shown that this also extends to organic tissues. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the accuracy of SPR estimation for fresh pork and beef tissue samples used as surrogates of human tissues. The reference SPRs for fourteen tissue samples, which included fat, muscle and femur bone, were measured using proton pencil beams. The tissue samples were subsequently CT scanned using four different scanners with different dual energy acquisition modes, giving in total six DECT-based SPR estimations for each sample. The SPR was estimated using a proprietary algorithm (syngo.via DE Rho/Z Maps, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) for extracting the electron density and the effective atomic number. SECT images were also acquired and SECT-based SPR estimations were performed using a clinical Hounsfield look-up table. The mean and standard deviation of the SPR over large volume-of-interests were calculated. For the six different DECT acquisition methods, the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for the SPR estimates over all tissue samples were between 0.9% and 1.5%. For the SECT-based SPR estimation the RMSE was 2.8%. For one DECT acquisition method, a positive bias was seen in the SPR estimates, having a mean error of 1.3%. The largest errors were found in the very dense cortical bone from a beef femur. This study confirms the advantages of DECT-based SPR estimation although good results were also obtained using SECT for most tissues.

  17. SU-E-J-149: Secondary Emission Detection for Improved Proton Relative Stopping Power Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J; Musall, B; Erickson, A [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This research investigates application of secondary prompt gamma (PG) emission spectra, resulting from nuclear reactions induced by protons, to characterize tissue composition along the particle path. The objective of utilizing the intensity of discrete high-energy peaks of PG is to improve the accuracy of relative stopping power (RSP) values available for proton therapy treatment planning on a patient specific basis and to reduce uncertainty in dose depth calculations. Methods: In this research, MCNP6 was used to simulate PG emission spectra generated from proton induced nuclear reactions in medium of varying composition of carbon, oxygen, calcium and nitrogen, the predominant elements found in human tissue. The relative peak intensities at discrete energies predicted by MCNP6 were compared to the corresponding atomic composition of the medium. Results: The results have shown a good general agreement with experimentally measured values reported by other investigators. Unexpected divergence from experimental spectra was noted in the peak intensities for some cases depending on the source of the cross-section data when using compiled proton table libraries vs. physics models built into MCNP6. While the use of proton cross-section libraries is generally recommended when available, these libraries lack data for several less abundant isotopes. This limits the range of their applicability and forces the simulations to rely on physics models for reactions with natural atomic compositions. Conclusion: Current end-of-range proton imaging provides an average RSP for the total estimated track length. The accurate identification of tissue composition along the incident particle path using PG detection and characterization allows for improved determination of the tissue RSP on the local level. While this would allow for more accurate depth calculations resulting in tighter treatment margins, precise understanding of proton beam behavior in tissue of various

  18. Ex vivo validation of a stoichiometric dual energy CT proton stopping power ratio calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunhe; Ainsley, Christopher; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; McDonough, James; Solberg, Timothy D.; Lin, Alexander; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2018-03-01

    A major source of uncertainty in proton therapy is the conversion of Hounsfield unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio relative to water (SPR). In this study, we measured and quantified the accuracy of a stoichiometric dual energy CT (DECT) SPR calibration. We applied a stoichiometric DECT calibration method to derive the SPR using CT images acquired sequentially at 80 kVp and 140 kVp . The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the effective atomic number (Z eff), relative electron density ({{ρ }e} ), and SPRs of phantom and biological materials. Two methods were used to verify the derived SPRs. The first method measured the sample’s water equivalent thicknesses to deduce the SPRs using a multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) device. The second method utilized Gafchromic EBT3 film to directly compare relative ranges between sample and water after proton pencil beam irradiation. Ex vivo validation was performed using five different types of frozen animal tissues with the MLIC and three types of fresh animal tissues using film. In addition, the residual ranges recorded on the film were used to compare with those from the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT derived SPRs. Bland-Altman analysis indicates that the differences between DECT and SPR measurement of tissue surrogates, frozen and fresh animal tissues has a mean of 0.07% and standard deviation of 0.58% compared to 0.55% and 1.94% respectively for single energy CT (SECT) and SPR measurement. Our ex vivo study indicates that the stoichiometric DECT SPR calibration method has the potential to be more accurate than SECT calibration under ideal conditions although beam hardening effects and other image artifacts may increase this uncertainty.

  19. The gaseous emission of polymers under swift heavy ion irradiation: effect of the electronic stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picq, V.

    2000-07-01

    This thesis contributes to a better understanding of the damaging processes, which occur in polymers under swift heavy ion irradiation. The present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power, (dE/dx)e, on the molecular emission under irradiation. The irradiated polymers are polyethylene, polypropylene and poly-butene. The (dE/dx)e of the projectiles used varies from 3.5*10 -3 MeV.mg -1 .cm 2 (electron) to 39 MeV.mg -1 .cm 2 ( 58 Ni). We used two different experimental approaches in order to identify the nature of the emitted gases: mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. The first technique is non selective, therefore, we could detect the emission of H 2 and heavy molecules; it also gives information on the diffusion kinetics of the molecules formed. The use of infrared spectroscopy for this kind of analysis is new and the technique was developed at the laboratory. It enables us to identify, without any ambiguity, molecules with up to three carbon atoms. The experimental spectra are analysed by using reference spectra of pure gases, measured in our laboratory. We have quantified precisely each identified gas, and we have followed the evolution of the radiochemical yields with increasing (dE/dx)e. The results, obtained at different (dE/dx)e, inform us on the different mechanisms of gas molecules formation, for example the side group departure and, at high (dE/dx)e, the fragmentation of the main chain which is due to multiple ionisation of the macromolecule. (author)

  20. Counting independent sets using the Bethe approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chandrasekaran, V [MIT; Gamarmik, D [MIT; Shah, D [MIT; Sin, J [MIT

    2009-01-01

    The authors consider the problem of counting the number of independent sets or the partition function of a hard-core model in a graph. The problem in general is computationally hard (P hard). They study the quality of the approximation provided by the Bethe free energy. Belief propagation (BP) is a message-passing algorithm can be used to compute fixed points of the Bethe approximation; however, BP is not always guarantee to converge. As the first result, they propose a simple message-passing algorithm that converges to a BP fixed pont for any grapy. They find that their algorithm converges within a multiplicative error 1 + {var_epsilon} of a fixed point in {Omicron}(n{sup 2}E{sup -4} log{sup 3}(nE{sup -1})) iterations for any bounded degree graph of n nodes. In a nutshell, the algorithm can be thought of as a modification of BP with 'time-varying' message-passing. Next, they analyze the resulting error to the number of independent sets provided by such a fixed point of the Bethe approximation. Using the recently developed loop calculus approach by Vhertkov and Chernyak, they establish that for any bounded graph with large enough girth, the error is {Omicron}(n{sup -{gamma}}) for some {gamma} > 0. As an application, they find that for random 3-regular graph, Bethe approximation of log-partition function (log of the number of independent sets) is within o(1) of corret log-partition - this is quite surprising as previous physics-based predictions were expecting an error of o(n). In sum, their results provide a systematic way to find Bethe fixed points for any graph quickly and allow for estimating error in Bethe approximation using novel combinatorial techniques.

  1. Calculation of the protons stopping power in water using dielectric formalism in the MELF-GOS approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Franciane; Mazer, Amanda Cristina; Hormaza, Joel Mesa

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate the stopping power of protons, there are many very successful models at high energies, which are extrapolated to low-energy regions. From the point of view of application of proton beam in cancer treatment is just this low energy region the most relevant due to the dose deposition profile in depth for protons. In this work, we present a calculation of the stopping power of protons in a water target using the dielectric formalism in MELF-GOS approach. The results when compared to other models show good agreement for energies above 100 keV and lower values below this energy. This result should impact the range of values of protons and the Bragg peak position. (author)

  2. Calculation of inelastic mean free path and stopping power for electrons in solids from an optical-data model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Mayol, R.; Salvat, F.; Liljequist, D.

    1992-11-01

    The numerical calculation of electron inelastic mean free path and stopping power from an optical-data model recently proposed by Fernandez-Varea et al. is described in detail. Explicit expressions for the one-electron total cross sections of the two-modes model of the free-electron gas and the δ-oscillator are derived. The inelastic mean free path and the stopping power are obtained as integrals of these one-electron total cross sections weighted by the optical as integrals of these one-electron total cross sections weighted by the optical oscillator strength. The integrals can be easily evaluated, with a selected accuracy, by using the FORTRAN 77 subroutine GABQ described here, which implements a 20-points Gauss adaptive bipartition quadrature method. Source listings of FORTRAN 77 subroutines to compute the one-electron total cross sections are also given

  3. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R. [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); UNQ – IMBICE – CCT – CONICET – LA PLATA (Argentina); Grosso, Mariela F. del [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Ibañez, Irene L. [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grasselli, Mariano [UNQ – IMBICE – CCT – CONICET – LA PLATA (Argentina); Bermúdez, Gerardo García [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2–22.1 MeV cm{sup 2} mg{sup −1} and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  4. Determination of electron penetration depth and stopping power of amorphous AlN using luminescence of Tm and Ho ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Muhammad; Kordesch, Martin

    2006-03-01

    Electron penetration depth and stopping power of amorphous AlN is determined using luminescence of Tm^+3 and Ho^+3 ions. Thin film bilayers of AlN:Ho and AlN:Tm are deposited on flat Silicon substrates by RF Magnetron sputtering at liquid nitrogen temperatures. In making a bilayer, 15.3 nm thick AlN:Ho film is first deposited on a flat Si(111) substrate of 2x2 cm^2 surface area. On the top of this AlN:Ho film 37.8 nm thick AlN:Tm film is deposited to make it a bilayer. Electron beam of different energies, obtained from electron gun of the CL apparatus, is allowed to penetrate in the AlN:Tm/AlN:Ho bilayer film. Blue emission from Tm^+3 as a result from ^1D2 -> ^3F4 transition and green emission from Ho^+3 as a result from ^5S2 -> ^5I8 transition were used to track the electron beam penetrating in the bilayer. Energy of the beam just crossing 37.8 nm AlN:Tm film is recorded to obtain the stopping power experimentally. Experimental results are compared to the theoretical value using the established mathematical equations for stopping power. A percent deviation of 6.6% is found in the experimental and theoretical results.

  5. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Ibañez, Irene L.; Behar, Moni; Grasselli, Mariano; Bermúdez, Gerardo García

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2-22.1 MeV cm2 mg-1 and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  6. Correction of stopping power and LET quenching for radiophotoluminescent glass dosimetry in a therapeutic proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Weishan; Koba, Yusuke; Katayose, Tetsurou; Yasui, Keisuke; Omachi, Chihiro; Hariu, Masatsugu; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    To measure the absorbed dose to water D w in proton beams using a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD), a method with the correction for the change of the mass stopping power ratio (SPR) and the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of radiophotoluminescent efficiency \\varepsilon LETRGD is proposed. The calibration coefficient in terms of D w for RGDs (GD-302M, Asahi Techno Glass) was obtained using a 60Co γ-ray. The SPR of water to the RGD was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, and \\varepsilon LETRGD was investigated experimentally using a 70 MeV proton beam. For clinical usage, the residual range R res was used as a quality index to determine the correction factor for the beam quality kQ,{{Q0}}RGD and the LET quenching effect of the RGD kLETRGD . The proposed method was evaluated by measuring D w at different depths in a 200 MeV proton beam. For both non-modulated and modulated proton beams, kQ,{{Q0}}RGD decreases rapidly where R res is less than 4 cm. The difference in kQ,{{Q0}}RGD between a non-modulated and a modulated proton beam is less than 0.5% for the R res range from 0 cm to 22 cm. \\varepsilon LETRGD decreases rapidly at a LET range from 1 to 2 keV µm‑1. In the evaluation experiments, D w using RGDs, Dw,QRGD showed good agreement with that obtained using an ionization chamber and the relative difference was within 3% where R res was larger than 1 cm. The uncertainty budget for Dw,QRGD in a proton beam was estimated to investigate the potential of RGD postal dosimetry in proton therapy. These results demonstrate the feasibility of RGD dosimetry in a therapeutic proton beam and the general versatility of the proposed method. In conclusion, the proposed methodology for RGDs in proton dosimetry is applicable where R res  >  1 cm and the RGD is feasible as a postal audit dosimeter for proton therapy.

  7. A Bayesian approach to solve proton stopping powers from noisy multi-energy CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Arthur; Bär, Esther; Bouchard, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    To propose a new formalism allowing the characterization of human tissues from multienergy computed tomography (MECT) data affected by noise and to evaluate its performance in estimating proton stopping powers (SPR). A recently published formalism based on principal component analysis called eigentissue decomposition (ETD) is adapted to the context of noise using a Bayesian estimator. The method, named Bayesian ETD, uses the maximum a posteriori fractions of eigentissues in each voxel to determine physical parameters relevant for proton beam dose calculation. Simulated dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) data are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method to estimate SPR and to compare it to the initially proposed maximum-likelihood ETD and to a state-of-the-art ρ e  - Z formalism. To test the robustness of each method towards clinical reality, three different levels of noise are implemented, as well as variations in elemental composition and density of reference tissues. The impact of using more than two energy bins to determine SPR is also investigated by simulating MECT data using two to five energy bins. Finally, the impact of using MECT over DECT for range prediction is evaluated using a probabilistic model. For simulated DECT data of reference tissues, the Bayesian ETD approach systematically gives lower root-mean-square (RMS) errors with negligible bias. For a medium level of noise, the RMS errors on SPR are found to be 2.78%, 2.76% and 1.53% for ρ e  - Z, maximum-likelihood ETD, and Bayesian ETD, respectively. When variations are introduced to the elemental composition and density, all implemented methods give similar performances at low noise. However, for a medium noise level, the proposed Bayesian method outperforms the two others with a RMS error of 1.94%, compared to 2.79% and 2.78% for ρ e  - Z and maximum-likelihood ETD, respectively. When more than two energy spectra are used, the Bayesian ETD is able to reduce RMS error on

  8. Structural Integrity Testing of Nuclear Power Plant Components Case Study: Stop Collars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, B.E.; Regan, C.

    2012-01-01

    Fuel channel creep elongation is a life-limiting mechanism in a few older Canadian CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors, which were designed with a welded stop collar on one face that does not accommodate axial elongation of the fuel channel on both reactor faces. To address this issue, channels will be cut and axially shifted to allow for additional travel; however, this new configuration will also change the applied loads on fuel channel components. In particular, the new configuration will increase the loads on the stop collar, a component whose primary function is to restrain the fuel channel from axial, torsional, and lateral/bending loads during regular service. To demonstrate conservatism in the detailed finite element (FE) analysis, comparing calculated stresses on the stop collar to ASME Code Section III Division I, Section NB-3200 requirements, a full scale mock-up of the fuel channel end-fitting and stop collar will also be tested under simulated design analysis conditions with multi-axial design loads at elevated temperatures while monitoring full-field strains.

  9. Professor Hans A Bethe - A Brief Homage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics. In fact his earliest major work, based on his doctoral studies with Sommerfeld, was actually in solid state physics, resulting in a seminal survey of the electronic theory of metals published in 1933 in the Handbuch der Physik. Bethe also had a major role to play in the creation of nuclear weapons as the Head of.

  10. Hans Bethe, the Sun and the Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 10. Hans Bethe, the Sun and the Neutrinos. G Rajasekaran. General Article Volume 10 Issue 10 October 2005 pp 49-66. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/10/0049-0066 ...

  11. Obituary: Hans Albrecht Bethe, 1906-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.

    2007-01-01

    One of the unquestioned giants of physics and astrophysics, Hans Bethe, died on 6 March 2005, at the venerable age of 98, in his home town of Ithaca, New York. Seven decades of contributing to research and a Nobel Prize for his work on stellar hydrogen burning make a listing of his honors

  12. Projectile- and charge-state-dependent electron yields from ion penetration of solids as a probe of preequilibrium stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothard, H.; Schou, Jørgen; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1992-01-01

    by investigating the "transport factor" beta, the energy spectrum of directly ejected recoil electrons and the evolution of ionic charge state inside solids. Estimates of the energy-loss fraction leading to electron emission and the effective charges of the ions near the surface allow a quantitative description......Kinetic electron-emission yields gamma from swift ion penetration of solids are proportional to the (electronic) stopping power gamma approximately Beta-S*, if the preequilibrium evolution of the charge and excitation states of the positively charged ions is taken into account. We show...

  13. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low...... sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the incoming electrons, thus prolongs the pellet life-time. As a result, the deep penetration of the pellet...... into the reactor center becomes possible....

  14. Dirty tricks: how the nuclear lobby stopped the development of wave power in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, J.

    1990-01-01

    It is claimed that by misrepresentation of the economic analysis of wave power generation of electricity the nuclear lobby in Britain has prevented development work to continue on wave power, in favour of nuclear power generation. The United Kingdom Department of Energy and the Central Electricity Generating Board, in favour of nuclear power, have not allowed the cost estimation of electricity from wave power generators, especially Salter's Ducks (a wave power generator generated by Professor Salter at Ednburgh University) to be known. Instead the cost (estimated at 4-12p/kWh) has been deliberately exaggerated. This has resulted in wind power becoming the favoured alternative renewable energy source of the future. (UK)

  15. Revision of Calibration Method of CT-Number to Stopping-Power-Ratio Conversion for Treatment Planning of Particle Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Mori, Shinichiro; Inaniwa, Taku

    A calibration method for CT-number to stopping-power-ratio conversion was recently proposed as a revision of the Japanese de facto standard method that has been used at particle therapy centers in Japan for over a decade. The revised method deals with 11 representative tissues of specific elemental composition and density, based on a latest compilation of standard tissue data. We report here how the revision was actually implemented into clinical practice. We applied the revised method to 7 CT-scanning conditions currently in use for treatment planning. For each condition, we derived CT numbers and stopping-power ratios of the representative tissues to constitute a polyline conversion function. We analyzed the change of target water-equivalent depth by the revision for 38 beams in treatment plans for 13 randomly sampled patients. The revision caused a mean change of +0.3 mm with a standard deviation of 0.4 mm. The maximum change was +1.2 mm or +0.5% of the depth, which may be clinically insignificant. The transition to the revised method was straightforward and would slightly improve the accuracy of the beam range in particle therapy.

  16. Modified energy-deposition model, for the computation of the stopping-power ratio for small cavity sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, A.C.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a modification to the Spencer-Attix theory, which allows application of the theory to larger cavity sizes. The modified theory is in better agreement with the actual process of energy deposition by delta rays. In the first part of the paper it is recalled how the Spencer-Attix theory can be derived from basic principles, which allows a physical interpretation of the theory in terms of a function describing the space and direction average of the deposited energy. A realistic model for the computation of this function is described and the resulting expression for the stopping-power ratio is calculated. For the comparison between the Spencer-Attix theory and this modified expression a correction factor to the ''Bragg-Gray inhomogeneous term'' has been defined. This factor has been computed as a function of cavity size for different source energies and mean excitation energies; thus, general properties of this factor have been elucidated. The computations have been extended to include the density effect. It has been shown that the computation of the inhomogeneous term can be performed for any expression describing the energy loss per unit distance of the electrons as a function of their energy. Thus an expression has been calculated which is in agreement with a quadratic range-energy relationship. In conclusion, the concrete procedure for computing the stopping-power ratio is reviewed

  17. Evaluation of possible means to stop production of nuclear power in northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaugen, Aud K.

    2007-08-01

    This note illuminates the status and some elements in the Russian efforts on use of nuclear power, with special emphasis on northwest Russia. In addition the report describes an evaluation of the possibilities of Norwegian influence on the nuclear power in northwest Russia and Kola Peninsula

  18. Stopping power measurements for {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F and {sup 28}Si ions in Mylar by a transmission technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekirine, M., E-mail: chekirine_mamoun@yahoo.fr [Departement de physique, Faculte des sciences, Universite Saad Dahleb, B.P. 270, route de Soumaa, Blida (Algeria); Ammi, H., E-mail: hakim_ammi@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2, Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Choudhury, R.K.; Biswas, D.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Physics Division, Mumbai (India); Tobbeche, S., E-mail: said_tobbeche@yahoo.com [Faculte des sciences, Universite El-Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria)

    2011-12-15

    Electronic energy loss of charged particles in materials is a fundamental process responsible for the unique response of materials in applications of advanced nuclear power, radiation detectors and advanced processing of electronic devices. In this study, stopping powers of {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F and {sup 28}Si heavy ions crossing thin Mylar foils have been determined in transmission geometry. The energy loss was measured over a continuous range of energies from 1.6 to 5.5 MeV/n (MeV per nucleon) using the data that was tagged by a surface barrier detector (SBD) with and without stopping foils. We have compared the obtained stopping values to those predicted by SRIM-2008 computer code, ICRU-73 stopping data tables and MSTAR calculations. The effective charge values of these heavy ions have been also deduced from the experimental set of data.

  19. Improving spatial resolution of high stopping power X- and gamma-ray cameras: fibers or slat-structured detectors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenmayer, J.-L.

    2000-01-01

    For medical imaging applications, the earliness of the detection is an essential factor to increase chances of recovery; in the field of industrial imaging, nondestructive testing with lower detectivity threshold to ensure quality and safe conduct. Accordingly, in all areas using the up-to-date compact (much less-expensive facilities) high-energy pulsed electron accelerators (HF or induction linac, Marx generator) to produce energetic photons (Bremsstrahlung), such as industrial and medical numerical imaging, flash radiography, radiotherapy positioning, computed tomography, detection of small- or low-contrasted details require two-dimensional (2D) detectors with an even more improved combination of sensitivity (which implies high stopping power), spatial resolution (millimetric or sub-millimetric) and speed, working in integrating mode (i.e. dose measurement) because Bremsstrahlung X-ray sources provide short pulses. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the issues involved in the development of high-performance position-sensitive X- and gamma-ray cameras for high-energy flash imaging. The basic idea is that, examining in detail the energy deposition and its statistics (quantum noise), we shall be able to determine in real detectors the following features, such as detectors composition and pixel size, which can simultaneously lead to good detection efficiency and good spatial resolution. In general, conclusions can be transposed to other particle imaging detectors as neutron imagers (changing 'dense' metal by 'high energy transfer' material). There are, of course, challenges to get such detectors, although new technologies have already provided some prototypes offering more than 30% stopping power and less than 2 mm spatial resolution (blur) for 50 ns long 5 MeV X-ray pulses. There are various detector-segmentation methods that can be applied in order to improve the stopping power (macroscopic cross-section) and reduce the effect of the lateral energy

  20. Hans Bethe : Des etoiles a la bombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.

    1996-06-01

    Il comprit le premier comment brillent les etoiles. Il fut aussi de cette poignee de scientifiques qui, dans le secret de Los Alamos, mirent au point la tristement celebre bombe atomique. Hans Bethe est l'un des derniers geants qui auront marque la physique de ce siecle d'une empreinte indelebile. C'est dans le bureau 01 du prestigieux laboratoire Kellog de l'institut Caltech qu'il a bien voulu retracer pour nous son impressionnante carriere, et revenir sur les motivations qui ont guide ses pas.

  1. Stopping power and energy loss cross section of a point charge penetrating through a dense medium of bound electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacem, A.; Sigmund, P.; Odense Univ.

    1989-01-01

    We have derived the dielectric function ε(k,ω) in the Lindhard approximation for a medium consisting of electrons individually bound by harmonic forces. The dielectric function is expressible in terms of a hypergeometric series and approaches well-known results in the limits of negligible binding, large momentum transfer, and long wavelength, respectively. The stopping power of a moving point charge scales very well with the shifted resonance frequency α 0 = (ω O 2 + ω P 2 ) 1/2 (ω O = oscillator frequency; ω P = plasma frequency) that follows from classical dispersion theory. The results differ noticeably from free-electron behavior even at rather high electron density. The discrete excitation levels of an isolated harmonic oscillator are increasingly shifted and broadened with increasing electron density. 15 refs., 2 figs

  2. Measurement of mass stopping power of chitosan polymer loaded with TiO2 for relativistic electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S. Ramesh; Badiger, N. M.; Karidurgannavar, M. Y.; Varghese, Jolly. G.

    2018-04-01

    The Mass Stopping Power (MSP) of relativistic electrons in chitosan loaded with TiO2 of different proportions has been measured by recording the spectrum of internal conversion electrons. The internal conversion electrons of energies 614 keV from Cs137, 942 keV and 1016 keV from Bi207 source are allowed to pass through chitosan-TiO2 alloy and transmitted electrons are detected with a Si (Li) detector coupled to an 8 K multichannel analyzer. By knowing the energies of incident electrons and transmitted electrons, the energy loss and the MSP are determined. Thus measured MSP values of the alloys are compared with the values calculated using Braggs additivity rule. The disagreement between theory and experiment is found to increases with increasing TiO2 concentration in chitosan, indicating the influence of chemical environment in the properties of such polymeric membrane.

  3. UWB Filtering Power Divider with Two Narrow Notch-bands and Wide Stop-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Wang, Xin-Yi; Zou, Xin Tong; Shi, Xiao Wei

    2017-12-01

    A compact filtering ultra-wideband (UWB) microstrip power divider (PD) with two sharply rejected notch-bands and wide stopband is analyzed and designed in this paper. The proposed UWB PD is based on a conventional Wilkinson power divider, while two stub loaded resonators (SLRs) are coupled into two symmetrical output ports to achieve a bandpass filtering response. The simplified composite right/left-handed (SCRLH) resonators are employed to generate the dual notched bands. Defected ground structure (DGS) is introduced to improve the passband performance. Good insertion/return losses, isolation and notch-band rejection are achieved as demonstrated in both simulation and experiment.

  4. Elongation of gold nanoparticles by swift heavy ion irradiation: Surface plasmon resonance shift dependence on the electronic stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerboua, C. Harkati; Lamarre, J.-M.; Chicoine, M.; Martinu, L.; Roorda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles embedded in a silica matrix were irradiated with 2 to 40 MeV Cu or Si ions at fluences ranging from 1 × 10 13 to 4 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 , and their deformation from spheres to prolate ellipsoids with major axis parallel to the ion beam was studied using P and S polarized light. For fixed ion energy, the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at 520 nm is red-shifted with an increase of the ion fluence up to a certain value where it reaches a plateau indicating that a maximum aspect ratio is obtained. This saturation in the wavelength shift was found to depend on the ion energy and reaches a maximum of 40 nm. The SPR shift was also used to measure the electronic stopping power dependent deformation rate and to deduce the electronic stopping power threshold of (1.9 ± 1.3) keV/nm required for shape transformation of the embedded gold nanoparticles. Ion track diameters of 0.18 to 1.4 nm were inferred from the fluence dependence of the SPR shift. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy shows that large (d > 10 nm) particles are more elongated than smaller ones. Our data are consistent with a mechanism of gold nanoparticle elongation requiring both the silica matrix and the nanoparticles to melt following the passage of the swift heavy ion and with elongation being due to the relief of stress in the gold nanoparticle which had built up as a consequence of the deformation of the surrounding silica matrix. - Highlights: ► We irradiated gold nanoparticles embedded in silica with swift heavy ions. ► Such treatment changes the shape of the particles, from spherical to nano-rods. ► Irradiation of the silica matrix leads to anisotropic growth, so-called hammering. ► Stress applied by the deformed silica onto the gold nanoparticles deforms them

  5. Calibration of a stopping power model for silicon based on analysis of neutron depth profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.gov; Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Lamaze, G.P.; Simons, D.S.; Thompson, P.E

    2002-06-01

    We measure the boron concentration versus depth profile within a silicon sample with four delta-doped planes by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In a neutron depth profiling (NDP) experiment, we illuminate the sample with a neutron beam. Nuclear reactions between the boron nuclei and neutrons produce alpha particles. Based on the measured boron concentration profile and models for the stopping power of the silicon sample, energy straggling, multiple scattering, and the observed energy resolution of the alpha particle detector, we predict the observed energy spectrum of the detected alpha particles. We predict the stopping power of silicon using the stopping and range of ions in matter code SRIM-2000. The predicted locations of the NDP energy peaks are consistently at lower energies than the locations of the observed peaks. This discrepancy is consistent with the claim that SRIM-2000 overestimates the actual stopping power of silicon. Empirically, we estimate a stopping power reduction factor to be 5.06%{+-}1.06%. When we reduce the SRIM-2000 prediction by this factor, we get good agreement between the observed and predicted NDP measurements.

  6. Centenary Birth Anniversary of E. W. Beth (1908-1964)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagni, Giorgio T.

    2008-01-01

    Evert Willem Beth (1908-1964) was a Dutch logician, mathematician and philosopher, whose work mainly concerned the foundations of mathematics. Beth was among the founders of the Commission Internationale pour l'Etude et l'Amelioration de l'Enseignement des Mathematiques and was a member of the Central Committee of the International Commission on…

  7. Coordinate Bethe ansatz for the string S-matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuw, M de [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-11-30

    We use the coordinate Bethe ansatz approach to derive the nested Bethe equations corresponding to the recently found S-matrix for strings in AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}, compatible with centrally extended su(2 vertical bar 2) symmetry.

  8. Hans Bethe, Quantum Mechanics, and the Lamb Shift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the world of physics, it is difficult to describe Bethe's ... His Nobel Prize. (in 1967), three decades after this great discovery, was a rather belated recognition of his genius. Some of Bethe's early works have become household words in physics textbooks. ... latter was a by-product of World War II in connection with the radar ...

  9. Obituary: Beth Brown (1969-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The astronomical community lost one of its most buoyant and caring individuals when Beth Brown died, unexpectedly, at the age of 39 from a pulmonary embolism. Beth Brown was born in Roanoke, Virginia where she developed a deep interest in astronomy, science, and science fiction (Star Trek). After graduating as the valedictorian of William Fleming High School's Class of 1987, she attended Howard University, where she graduated summa cum laude in 1991 with a bachelor's degree in astrophysics. Following a year in the graduate physics program at Howard, she entered the graduate program in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Michigan, the first African-American woman in the program. She received her PhD in 1998, working with X-ray observations of elliptical galaxies from the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT; Joel Bregman was her advisor). She compiled and analyzed the first large complete sample of such galaxies with ROSAT and her papers in this area made an impact in the field. Following her PhD, Beth Brown held a National Academy of Science & National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Subsequently, she became a civil servant at the National Space Science Data Center at GSFC, where she was involved in data archival activities as well as education and outreach, a continuing passion in her life. In 2006, Brown became an Astrophysics Fellow at GSFC, during which time she worked as a visiting Assistant Professor at Howard University, where she taught and worked with students and faculty to improve the teaching observatory. At the time of her death, she was eagerly looking forward to a new position at GSFC as the Assistant Director for Science Communications and Higher Education. Beth Brown was a joyous individual who loved to work with people, especially in educating them about our remarkable field. Her warmth and openness was a great aid in making accessible explanations of otherwise daunting astrophysical

  10. Stopping powers of LiF thin films deposited onto self-supporting Al foils for swift protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damache, Smail [Division de Physique, CRNA, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-gare, Algiers (Algeria); Moussa, Djamel [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, Saâd, E-mail: souichaoui@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, B.P. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-08-01

    The energy losses of ∼(0.273–3.334) MeV protons in LiF thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation onto self-supporting Al foils have been measured using the transmission method. The thicknesses of selected and used LiF/Al target samples were accurately determined via systematic energy loss measurements for alpha particles from a very thin mixed {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu/{sup 233}U radioactive source. The samples were investigated in detail for their stoichiometry and their impurity contents by backscattering Rutherford spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. Then, LiF stopping powers have been determined with overall relative uncertainty of less than 2.7% arising mainly from errors in the determination of target sample thicknesses. These S(E) data are reported and discussed in comparison to previous experimental data sets from the literature and to values calculated by the Sigmund–Schinner binary collision stopping theory both for molecular LiF, and for the LiF compound assuming Bragg–Kleeman’s additivity rule. Our S(E) data show to be in excellent agreement with the latter theory for molecular LiF over the whole proton energy range explored, which supports the use of modified electronic hydrogen wave functions for evaluating atomic shell corrections in the case of low-Z{sub 2} target materials. In contrast, they exhibit a slightly increasing deviation from theoretical values derived for the LiF compound with assuming stopping force additivity as the proton energy decreases from E ≈ 400 keV towards lower proton velocities. This deviation in excess relative to experimental data, amounting only up to (at most) ∼2.5%, can be ascribed to strong effects of 2s-state valence electrons of Li atoms within the LiF compound. Besides, the comparison to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 computer code indicates that this program satisfactorily accounts for our S(E) data above E ≈ 1.30 MeV but underestimates them with substantially increasing deviations (up to

  11. Glueballs from the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Alepuz, Helios; Fischer, Christian S.; Kellermann, Christian; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2015-08-01

    We formulate a framework to determine the mass of glueball states of the Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory in the continuum. To this end we derive a Bethe-Salpeter equation for two gluon bound states including the effects of Faddeev-Popov ghosts. We construct a suitable approximation scheme such that the interactions in the bound state equation match a corresponding successful approximation of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for the Landau gauge ghost and gluon propagators. Based upon a recently obtained solution for the propagators in the complex momentum plane we obtain results for the mass of the 0++ and 0-+ glueballs. In the scalar channel we find a mass value in agreement with lattice gauge theory.

  12. Empirical stopping power tables for ions from 3Li to 18Ar and from 0.001 to 1000 MeV/nucleon in solids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Helmut; Schinner, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    We present a table of stopping powers for moderately heavy ions, based on our large collection of experimental stopping powers taken from the literature and on our program MSTAR. We divide the stopping powers for a particular ion (nuclear charge Z 1 ) by those for α particles in the same element, as given in ICRU Report 49. After proper normalization, we obtain a single curve S rel (E 1 /A 1 ), approximately independent of the target atomic number Z 2 , where E 1 is the energy and A 1 is the mass number of the ion, if we treat solid and gaseous targets separately. These curves are then fitted by suitable functions of E 1 /A 1 , and the fitting parameters can in turn be fitted by functions of Z 1 . For solid targets, we can also determine a residual Z 2 -dependence of S rel . Using MSTAR, we tabulate the stopping powers of the elements contained in ICRU Report 49, plus nickel, for ions from 3 Li to 18 Ar. A few tables for compound targets are also given. Numerical estimates of the accuracy of the tables are presented, based on comparisons to the data. We find that the error for solids is 1-2% at high energy and becomes as large as 10-20% at low energy. For gases, the error is slightly larger. Text files of all the data presented here, and additionally for B, Zr, and Ta targets, are available through the journal's website

  13. Influence of a strong laser field on Coulomb explosion and stopping power of energetic H{sub 3}{sup +} clusters in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guiqiu; Gao Hong; Wang Yaochuan; Yao Li; Zhong Haiyang; Cheng Lihong; Yang Kun; Liu Wei [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China); E Peng; Xu Dianguo [Department of Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang Younian; Hu Zhanghu [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2012-09-15

    The influence of a high-intensity laser field on the Coulomb explosion and stopping power for a swift H{sub 3}{sup +} cluster ion in a plasma target is studied by means of the molecular dynamic (MD) method based on the linearized Vlasov-Poisson theory. Excitations of the plasma are described by the classical plasma dielectric function. In the presence of the laser field, the general expressions for the induced potential in the target and the interaction force among the ions within the cluster are derived. Based on the numerical solution of the equations of motion for the constituent ions, the Coulomb explosion patterns and the cluster's stopping power are discussed for a range of laser parameters. Numerical results show that the laser field affects the correlation between the ions and contributes to weaken the wake effect and the stopping power as compared to the laser-free case. On the other hand, the stopping power ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} cluster is higher than the situation of dicluster of H{sub 2}{sup +} due to the vicinage effect in the cluster.

  14. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to stopping-power-ratio estimation using dual-energy CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Lee, H. C.; Duan, X.; Shen, C.; Zhou, L.; Jia, X.; Yang, M.

    2017-09-01

    The dual-energy CT-based (DECT) approach holds promise in reducing the overall uncertainty in proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimation as compared to the conventional stoichiometric calibration approach. The objective of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to uncertainty in SPR estimation using the DECT-based approach and to derive a comprehensive estimate of the range uncertainty associated with SPR estimation in treatment planning. Two state-of-the-art DECT-based methods were selected and implemented on a Siemens SOMATOM Force DECT scanner. The uncertainties were first divided into five independent categories. The uncertainty associated with each category was estimated for lung, soft and bone tissues separately. A single composite uncertainty estimate was eventually determined for three tumor sites (lung, prostate and head-and-neck) by weighting the relative proportion of each tissue group for that specific site. The uncertainties associated with the two selected DECT methods were found to be similar, therefore the following results applied to both methods. The overall uncertainty (1σ) in SPR estimation with the DECT-based approach was estimated to be 3.8%, 1.2% and 2.0% for lung, soft and bone tissues, respectively. The dominant factor contributing to uncertainty in the DECT approach was the imaging uncertainties, followed by the DECT modeling uncertainties. Our study showed that the DECT approach can reduce the overall range uncertainty to approximately 2.2% (2σ) in clinical scenarios, in contrast to the previously reported 1%.

  15. Optimization of the stopping-power-ratio to Hounsfield-value calibration curve in proton and heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Matthias; Zink, Klemens [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz - IMPS, Giessen (Germany); Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Weber, Uli [Rhoen-Klinikum AG, Marburg (Germany); Kellner, Daniel [Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria). Inst. for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology

    2015-07-01

    For CT-based dose calculation in ion therapy a link between the attenuation coefficients of photons and the stopping-power of particles has to be provided. There are two commonly known approaches to establish such a calibration curve, the stoichiometric calibration and direct measurements with tissue substitutes or animal samples. Both methods were investigated and compared. As input for the stoichiometric calibration the data from ICRP-report 23 were compared to newly available data from ICRP-report 110. By employing the newer data no relevant difference could be observed. The differences between the two acquisition methods (direct measurement and stoichiometric calibration) were systematically analyzed and quantified. The most relevant change was caused by the exchange of carbon and oxygen content in the substitutes in comparison to the data of the ICRP-reports and results in a general overshoot of the Bragg peak. The consequence of the differences between the calibration curves was investigated with treatment planning studies and iso-range surfaces. Range differences up to 6 mm in treatment plans of the head were observed. Additionally two improvements are suggested which increase the accuracy of the calibration curve.

  16. A carbon CT system: how to obtain accurate stopping power ratio using a Bragg peak reduction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kano, Yosuke; Liu, Chang; Torikoshi, Masami; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the performance of the Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center’s ion computed tomography (CT) system, which measures the residual range of a carbon-ion beam using a fluoroscopy screen, a charge-coupled-device camera, and a moving wedge absorber and collects CT reconstruction images from each projection angle. Each 2D image was obtained by changing the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) thickness, such that all images for one projection could be expressed as the depth distribution in PMMA. The residual range as a function of PMMA depth was related to the range in water through a calibration factor, which was determined by comparing the PMMA-equivalent thickness measured by the ion CT system to the water-equivalent thickness measured by a water column. Aluminium, graphite, PMMA, and five biological phantoms were placed in a sample holder, and the residual range for each was quantified simultaneously. A novel method of CT reconstruction to correct for the angular deflection of incident carbon ions in the heterogeneous region utilising the Bragg peak reduction (BPR) is also introduced in this paper, and its performance is compared with other methods present in the literature such as the decomposition and differential methods. Stopping power ratio values derived with the BPR method from carbon-ion CT images matched closely with the true water-equivalent length values obtained from the validation slab experiment.

  17. Experimental verification of stopping-power prediction from single- and dual-energy computed tomography in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Christian; Russ, Tom; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Elter, Alina; Runz, Armin; Richter, Christian; Greilich, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    An experimental setup for consecutive measurement of ion and x-ray absorption in tissue or other materials is introduced. With this setup using a 3D-printed sample container, the reference stopping-power ratio (SPR) of materials can be measured with an uncertainty of below 0.1%. A total of 65 porcine and bovine tissue samples were prepared for measurement, comprising five samples each of 13 tissue types representing about 80% of the total body mass (three different muscle and fatty tissues, liver, kidney, brain, heart, blood, lung and bone). Using a standard stoichiometric calibration for single-energy CT (SECT) as well as a state-of-the-art dual-energy CT (DECT) approach, SPR was predicted for all tissues and then compared to the measured reference. With the SECT approach, the SPRs of all tissues were predicted with a mean error of (-0.84  ±  0.12)% and a mean absolute error of (1.27  ±  0.12)%. In contrast, the DECT-based SPR predictions were overall consistent with the measured reference with a mean error of (-0.02  ±  0.15)% and a mean absolute error of (0.10  ±  0.15)%. Thus, in this study, the potential of DECT to decrease range uncertainty could be confirmed in biological tissue.

  18. Off-diagonal Bethe ansatz for exactly solvable models

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yupeng; Cao, Junpeng; Shi, Kangjie

    2015-01-01

    This book serves as an introduction of the off-diagonal Bethe Ansatz method, an analytic theory for the eigenvalue problem of quantum integrable models. It also presents some fundamental knowledge about quantum integrability and the algebraic Bethe Ansatz method. Based on the intrinsic properties of R-matrix and K-matrices, the book introduces a systematic method to construct operator identities of transfer matrix.  These identities allow one to establish the inhomogeneous T-Q relation formalism to obtain Bethe Ansatz equations and to retrieve corresponding eigenstates. Several longstanding models can thus be solved via this method since the lack of obvious reference states is made up. Both the exact results and the off-diagonal Bethe Ansatz method itself may have important applications in the fields of quantum field theory, low-dimensional condensed matter physics, statistical physics and cold atom systems.

  19. Bethe Ansatz for the Ruijsenaars Model of BC_1-Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Chalykh

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider one-dimensional elliptic Ruijsenaars model of type $BC_1$. It is given by a three-term difference Schrödinger operator $L$ containing 8 coupling constants. We show that when all coupling constants are integers, $L$ has meromorphic eigenfunctions expressed by a variant of Bethe ansatz. This result generalizes the Bethe ansatz formulas known in the $A_1$-case.

  20. Overlaps of partial Néel states and Bethe states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O; Zarembo, K

    2016-01-01

    Partial Néel states are generalizations of the ordinary Néel (classical anti-ferromagnet) state that can have arbitrary integer spin. We study overlaps of these states with Bethe states. We first identify this overlap with a partial version of reflecting-boundary domain-wall partition function, and then derive various determinant representations for off-shell and on-shell Bethe states. (paper: quantum statistical physics, condensed matter, integrable systems)

  1. Model of pair aggregation on the Bethe lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baillet, M.V.-P.; Pacheco, A.F.; Gómez, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    We extend a recent model of aggregation of pairs of particles, analyzing the case in which the supporting framework is a Bethe lattice. The model exhibits a critical behavior of the percolation theory type.......We extend a recent model of aggregation of pairs of particles, analyzing the case in which the supporting framework is a Bethe lattice. The model exhibits a critical behavior of the percolation theory type....

  2. Effects of the projectile electronic structure on stopping parameters for nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damache, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Moussa, D.; Dib, A.

    2006-01-01

    The stopping powers of nickel foils for 1 H + , 2 H + and 4 He 2+ ions have been accurately measured over the energy range E ∼ (0.166-2.725) MeV/amu. The data were compared to those reported in the literature and to values derived by the SRIM-2003 code. They were analysed in the framework of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionisation potential, I, and the Barkas effect parameter, b. The values derived from the proton and the alpha particle data are {I (311.11 ± 2.61) eV, b = 1.38 ± 0.01} and {I (276.12 ± 2.84) eV, b = 1.58 ± 0.01}, respectively. They thus show opposite variations of the I and b parameters as the projectile charge increases, presumably due only to the incident ions electronic structure. Besides, the reduced stopping power data for incident deuterons show to be fully consistent with those for protons indicating no effect of the projectile isotopic structure on the target stopping parameters. These results are discussed in comparison with ones reported in the literature

  3. The tunneling theory of the electronic stopping power of the planar channeling of ions in the range of some ten kilo-electronvolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymann, P.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of the electronic stopping power in planar channeling recently presented in the case of the high energy range of the ion is now applied in the low energy case. Due to the different possible approximations in this case, it is shown that the localised density of charge induced on the walls of the channel during the passage of the ion is constant in width and the localised density function must oscillate with Z 1 and Z 2 . (Auth.)

  4. Pre-treatment patient-specific stopping power by combining list-mode proton radiography and x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Brousmiche, Sébastien; Hansen, David C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2017-09-01

    The relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the largest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work was to develop a systematic method that yields accurate and patient-specific RSPs by combining (1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and (2) daily proton radiography of the patient. The method was formulated as a penalized least squares optimization problem (argmin(\\Vert {A}{x}-{b}\\Vert _22 )). The parameter A represents the cumulative path-length crossed by the proton in each material, separated by thresholding on the HU. The material RSPs (water equivalent thickness/physical thickness) are denoted by x. The parameter b is the list-mode proton radiography produced using Geant4 simulations. The problem was solved using a non-negative linear-solver with {x}≥slant0 . A was computed by superposing proton trajectories calculated with a cubic or linear spline approach to the CT. The material’s RSP assigned in Geant4 were used for reference while the clinical HU-RSP calibration curve was used for comparison. The Gammex RMI-467 phantom was first investigated. The standard deviation between the estimated material RSP and the calculated RSP is 0.45%. The robustness of the techniques was then assessed as a function of the number of projections and initial proton energy. Optimization with two initial projections yields precise RSP (⩽1.0%) for 330 MeV protons. 250 MeV protons have shown higher uncertainty (⩽2.0%) due to the loss of precision in the path estimate. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the head, pelvis, and lung were subsequently evaluated. Accurate RSP has been obtained for the head (μ =0.21+/-1.63% ), the lung (μ=0.06+/-0.99% ) and the pelvis (μ=0.90+/-3.87% ). The range precision has been optimized using the calibration curves obtained with the algorithm, yielding a mean R80 difference to the reference of 0.11  ±0.09%, 0.28  ±  0.34% and 0.05 +/- 0.06% in the same order. The solution’s accuracy is limited by the

  5. Pre-treatment patient-specific stopping power by combining list-mode proton radiography and x-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Brousmiche, Sébastien; Hansen, David C; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2017-08-03

    The relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the largest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work was to develop a systematic method that yields accurate and patient-specific RSPs by combining (1) pre-treatment x-ray CT and (2) daily proton radiography of the patient. The method was formulated as a penalized least squares optimization problem (argmin([Formula: see text])). The parameter A represents the cumulative path-length crossed by the proton in each material, separated by thresholding on the HU. The material RSPs (water equivalent thickness/physical thickness) are denoted by x. The parameter b is the list-mode proton radiography produced using Geant4 simulations. The problem was solved using a non-negative linear-solver with [Formula: see text]. A was computed by superposing proton trajectories calculated with a cubic or linear spline approach to the CT. The material's RSP assigned in Geant4 were used for reference while the clinical HU-RSP calibration curve was used for comparison. The Gammex RMI-467 phantom was first investigated. The standard deviation between the estimated material RSP and the calculated RSP is 0.45%. The robustness of the techniques was then assessed as a function of the number of projections and initial proton energy. Optimization with two initial projections yields precise RSP (⩽1.0%) for 330 MeV protons. 250 MeV protons have shown higher uncertainty (⩽2.0%) due to the loss of precision in the path estimate. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the head, pelvis, and lung were subsequently evaluated. Accurate RSP has been obtained for the head ([Formula: see text]), the lung ([Formula: see text]) and the pelvis ([Formula: see text]). The range precision has been optimized using the calibration curves obtained with the algorithm, yielding a mean [Formula: see text] difference to the reference of 0.11  ±0.09%, 0.28  ±  0.34% and [Formula: see text] in the same order. The solution

  6. TU-FG-BRB-01: Dual Energy CT Proton Stopping Power Ratio Calibration and Validation with Animal Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y; Yin, L; Ainsley, C; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Lin, A; Teo, B [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conversion of Hounsfield Unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (SPR) is a main source of uncertainty in proton therapy. In this study, the SPRs of animal tissues were measured and compared with prediction from dual energy CT (DECT) and single energy CT (SECT) calibrations. Methods: A stoichiometric calibration method for DECT was applied to predict the SPR using CT images acquired at 80 kVp and 140 kVp. The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the SPRs of the materials. Tissue surrogates with known chemical compositions were used for calibration, and animal tissues (pig brain, liver, kidney; veal shank, muscle) were used for validation. The materials were irradiated with proton pencil beams, and SPRs were deduced from the residual proton range measured using a multi-layer ion chamber device. In addition, Gafchromic EBT3 films were used to measure the distal dose profiles after irradiation through the tissue samples and compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT predicted SPRs. Results: The differences in SPR between DECT prediction and measurement were −0.31±0.36% for bone, 0.47±0.42% for brain, 0.67±0.15% for liver, 0.51±0.52% for kidney, and −0.96±0.15% for muscle. The corresponding results using SECT were 3.1±0.12%, 1.90±0.45%, −0.66±0.11%, 2.33±0.21%, and −1.70±0.17%. In the film measurements, average distances between film and calculated distal dose profiles were 0.35±0.12 mm for DECT calibration and −1.22±0.12 mm for SECT calibration for a beam with a range of 15.79 cm. Conclusion: Our study indicates that DECT is superior to SECT for proton SPR prediction and has the potential to reduce the range uncertainty to less than 2%. DECT may permit the use of tighter distal and proximal range uncertainty margins for treatment, thereby increasing the precision of proton therapy.

  7. Stabilization of the 12 V onboard power supply. Ultracapacitors in start-stop systems; Stabilisierung des 12-V-Bordnetzes. Ultrakondensatoren in Start-Stopp-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, Rainer; Gilch, Markus [Unit Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Regensburg (Germany). Div. Powertrain Business; Auer, Juergen; Wieser, Christoph [Maxwell Technologies GmbH, Gilching (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The market of start-stop systems is growing fast and so strongly, that vehicle manufacturers want to remedy weaknesses, which they had accepted approvingly in the beginning. The lack of capacity of the AGM batteries limited considerably the operation and the active times of start-stop. Continental is now announcing a voltage stabilizing system for the 12 V onboard power supply to be ready for serial production, in order to remedy weaknesses. The supplier falls back onto improved double layer capacitors by Maxwell. In addition to the reduction of components of the current short-term memory, the production processes were optimized, which are meant to make the capacitor more reliable and more cost-effective during operation. (orig.)

  8. Quantum Waveguide Properties of Bethe Lattices with a Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Ping, Lin; Zhi-Lin, Hou; You-Yan, Liu

    2008-01-01

    Based on waveguide theory we investigate electronic transport properties of Bethe lattices with a mesoscopic ring threaded by a magnetic flux. The generalized eigen-function method (GEM) is used to calculate the transmission and reflection coefficients up to the fifth generation of Bethe lattices. The relationships among the transmission coefficient T, magnetic flux φ and wave vector kl are investigated in detail. The numerical results are shown by the three-dimensional plots and contour maps. Some resonant-transmission features and the symmetry of the transmission coefficient T to flux φ are observed and discussed. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. SU-E-T-280: Dose Evaluation in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power for Pencil Beam Planning and Treating IROC Proton Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syh, J; Ding, X; Rosen, L; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate any effects of converted CT density variation in treatment planning system (TPS) of spot scanning proton therapy with an IROC proton prostate phantom at our new ProteusOne Proton Therapy Center. Methods: A proton prostate phantom was requested from the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC), The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, where GAF Chromic films and couples of thermo luminescent dosemeter (TLD) capsules in target and adjacent structures were embedded for imaging and dose monitoring. Various material such as PVC, PBT HI polystyrene as dosimetry inserts and acrylic were within phantom. Relative stopping power (SP) were provided. However our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water in TPS. Phantom was irradiated and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The range of relative density was converted from SP into relative density of water as a new assigned material and tested. Results: The summary of TLD measurements of the prostate and femoral heads were well within 2% of the TPS and met the criteria established by IROC. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift in superior-inferior direction due to locking position of cylinder insert was off and was corrected. The converted CT density worked precisely to correlated relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton prostate phantom provided by IROC is a useful methodology to evaluate our new commissioned proton pencil beam and TPS within certain confidence in proton therapy. The relative stopping power was converted into relative physical density relatively to water and the results were satisfied

  10. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  11. Hans Bethe, Quantum Mechanics, and the Lamb Shift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    his book Birth and Death of the Sun). His Nobel Prize. (in 1967), three decades after this great discovery, was ... in crystals; ii) the order-disorder transition in alloys. (the Bethe--Peierls Approximation); iii) the ionization ... a region of the order of 1 cm, termed the microwave region, lying between the far infrared and short radio.

  12. Nucleosynthesis and Energy Production in Stars: Bethe's Crowning ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Indranil Mazumdar. On the 6th of March this year, the seemingly immortal Prof. Hans Bethe passed away, at the ripe age of ninety eight. His mighty mathemat- ical prowess, coupled with his amazing virtuos- ity in applying the tools of ...

  13. Bethe's Contributions to Solid State Theory· A Tribute

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. Bethe's Contributions to Solid State Theory: A Tribute. H R Krishnamurthy. General Article Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 55-69. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Experimental study on the influence of charge exchange on the stopping power in the interaction of chlorine with a gas and a deuterium plasma; Etude experimentale de l`influence des echanges de charges sur le pouvoir d`arret dans l`interaction d`ions chlore avec un gaz et un plasma de deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nectoux, Marie [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1998-01-06

    This thesis is placed in the context of the physics of energy deposition of a multicharged heavy ion beam in matter at intermediate energies. The experiment gave measurements of energy loss as a function of final charge state for chlorine ions at 1.7 MeV/u in deuterium gas or plasma. In this way, we explore the influence of charge state evolution, depending on experimentally measured capture and ionization cross sections and the electron density of the target, on energy loss. The target is cylindrical and enclosed by two fast valves. The plasma is created in the gas by a discharge, which induces a magnetic perturbation of the beam (lens effect). This effect induces a divergent and misaligned outgoing beam. A simulation including charge state and velocity evolution of the projectile in flight in the magnetic field has been made in order to optimize beam analysis, to reach a precision better than 10{sup -3} in energy measurement. This study led to removal of the target to the `Split Pole`, a refocusing magnetic spectrometer. The first results obtained clearly show the dependence of energy loss on exit charge and especially on its evolution in the target. This is explained in terms of the lengths covered by the projectile in its successive charge states in the target, which depends on target electron density and the medium considered. In plasma, we observed an energy distribution with exit charge twice that observed in gas, because of a strong decrease of charge exchange. A comparison of data obtained in gas with stopping power calculated from Bethe-Bloch-Barkas theory leads to the necessity of including spatial extension of the projectile charge in the theory. (author) 81 refs., 62 figs., 5tabs.

  15. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXX chain with triangular boundaries and Gaudin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilo António, N.; Manojlović, N.; Salom, I.

    2014-12-01

    We implement fully the algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXX Heisenberg spin chain in the case when both boundary matrices can be brought to the upper-triangular form. We define the Bethe vectors which yield the strikingly simple expression for the off shell action of the transfer matrix, deriving the spectrum and the relevant Bethe equations. We explore further these results by obtaining the off shell action of the generating function of the Gaudin Hamiltonians on the corresponding Bethe vectors through the so-called quasi-classical limit. Moreover, this action is as simple as it could possibly be, yielding the spectrum and the Bethe equations of the Gaudin model.

  16. New experimental stopping power data of 4He, 16O, 40Ar, 48Ca and 84Kr projectiles in different solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaska, W. H.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Perkowski, J.; Andrzejewski, J.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Kozulin, E. M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Mutterer, M.; Savelieva, E. O.

    2018-03-01

    New experimental data on energy loss of 4He, 16O, 40Ar, 48Ca and 84Kr ions in thin, self-supporting foils of C, Al, Ni, Ag, Lu, Au, Pb and Th are presented. The measurements, using the TOF-E method, were done in a very broad energy range around the stopping power maximum; typically from 0.1 to 11 MeV/u. When available, the extracted stopping power values are compared with the previously published data. The overall agreement is good although a fair comparison is difficult as the covered energy range is much larger than in previous measurements. The small error bars and a broad coverage allowed us to test the predictions of theoretical codes: PASS, CasP, and semi-empirical programs: SRIM, LET, MSTAR, and the Hubert table predictions. The deviations of PASS predictions from the experimental data do not exceed 20% for all the measured combinations. CasP predictions are within 15% from the data for heavier ions but diverge up to 40% for lighter ions. Semi-empirical approaches, including SRIM, deviate from the experimental data by less than 5% for the regions already covered by previous experiments but err by about 10-20% for the ion/target combinations that were not measured before: Ca in Lu as well as Kr in Lu, Pb, and Th.

  17. Studies of the nuclear stopping power in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Wohrmann, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    The energy flow at very high pseudorapidity in PbPb collisions is sensitive to the very low-x components of the nuclear wave-function. The CASTOR calorimeter extends the pseudorapidity coverage of CMS to -6.6, which is only 1.4 units away from the beam rapidity. A comparison of the centrality dependence of forward energy flow to that at lower pseudorapidities can shed light on the gluon saturation at low-x. This problem can also be approached by a direct comparison of PbPb and pp energy flow in the forward region. This analysis is based on data taken in 2010. The energy flow in the pseudorapidity range of -5.2 to -6.6 has been measured for 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions over a wide range of centrality and also for minium bias pp collisions. These data are compared to energy-flow measurements for pseudorapidities between -5.2 and +5.2. The very large angular coverage of the CMS detector allows for a test of limiting fragmentation of energy flow, and for an estimate of nuclear stopping. Finally, these data are compar...

  18. Euclidean to Minkowski Bethe-Salpeter amplitude and observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, J. [Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay Cedex (France); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, DCTA, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Karmanov, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    We propose a method to reconstruct the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in Minkowski space given the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter amplitude - or alternatively the light-front wave function - as input. The method is based on the numerical inversion of the Nakanishi integral representation and computing the corresponding weight function. This inversion procedure is, in general, rather unstable, and we propose several ways to considerably reduce the instabilities. In terms of the Nakanishi weight function, one can easily compute the BS amplitude, the LF wave function and the electromagnetic form factor. The latter ones are very stable in spite of residual instabilities in the weight function. This procedure allows both, to continue the Euclidean BS solution in the Minkowski space and to obtain a BS amplitude from a LF wave function. (orig.)

  19. Euclidean to Minkowski Bethe-Salpeter amplitude and observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Frederico, T.; Karmanov, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in Minkowski space given the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter amplitude - or alternatively the light-front wave function - as input. The method is based on the numerical inversion of the Nakanishi integral representation and computing the corresponding weight function. This inversion procedure is, in general, rather unstable, and we propose several ways to considerably reduce the instabilities. In terms of the Nakanishi weight function, one can easily compute the BS amplitude, the LF wave function and the electromagnetic form factor. The latter ones are very stable in spite of residual instabilities in the weight function. This procedure allows both, to continue the Euclidean BS solution in the Minkowski space and to obtain a BS amplitude from a LF wave function. (orig.)

  20. Massless AdS 2 scattering and Bethe ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, A.; Torrielli, A.

    2017-09-01

    We first analyse the integrable scattering theory describing the massless excitations of AdS 2 × S 2 × T 6 superstrings in the relativistic limit. The matrix part of the S-matrix is obtained in the BMN limit from the conjectured exact expression, and compared to known S-matrices with N=1 supersymmetry in 1 + 1 dimensions. A dressing factor, yet unknown for the complete theory, is here constructed based on relativistic crossing symmetry. We derive a Bethe-ansatz condition by employing a transfer-matrix technique based on the so-called free-fermion condition. This is known to overcome the problem of lack of a reference state. We then generalise the method to the massless non-relativistic case, and compare the resulting Bethe-ansatz condition with a simple massless limit of the one conjectured by Sorokin, Tseytlin, Wulff and Zarembo.

  1. Electronic stopping power of slow H{sup +} and He{sup 2+} ions in CdTe from first principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chang-kai [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Mao, Fei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Fu, Yan-long; Liao, Bin [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ouyang, Xiao-ping [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We study through time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) method the electronic stopping power of low-energy protons and helium ions moving through CdTe under the condition of channeling. The agreement between our calculated results and SRIM data roughly up to the stopping maximum for the proton along the 〈1 0 0〉 and 〈1 1 1〉 crystalline axes and for helium ions along 〈1 0 0〉 crystalline axis is satisfactory, which can be explained by the energy transfer mechanism that electron–hole excitation caused by ions in the solid. However, in the channel of 〈1 1 1〉 for helium ions, a transition between two velocities regimes is observed at about v = 0.4 a.u. This may be an indication of extra energy loss channel beyond the electron–hole excitation. To analyze it, we calculate the amount of electrons captured by the moving projectiles in real time. It is found that the soft transition between two velocities regimes can be attributed to the charge transfer and charge resonance between helium ion and host atoms of CdTe crystal, which are considered as additional energy loss channels.

  2. Bethe-Salpeter equation for a four fermion system I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.K.; Muller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1988-08-01

    The authors derive the Bethe-Salpeter equation for bound states of a four-body system. They treat only two-body interaction kernels in the ladder approximation. The equations should be applicable for the description of exotic meson states (q qq-barq-bar states) and the ''poly-positronium'' states discussed in connection with the interpretation of the narrow coincidence peaks in the spectra of electrons and positrons observed in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Excited charmonium states from Bethe-Salpeter Equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šauli, Vladimír; Bicudo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, 043 (2012), s. 1-10 ISSN 1824-8039. [International Workshop on QCD Green’s Functions. Tranto, 05.09.2011-09.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG11005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : charmonium * Bethe-Salpeter Equation Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http:// pos .sissa.it/archive/conferences/136/043/QCD-TNT-II_043.pdf

  4. Quantum graphs with the Bethe-Sommerfeld property

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Turek, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2017), s. 305-309 ISSN 2220-8054 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : periodic quantum graphs * gap number * delta-coupling * rectangular lattice graph * scale-invariant coupling * Bethe-Sommerfeld conjecture * golden mean Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect)

  5. Periodic quantum graphs from the Bethe-Sommerfeld perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Turek, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 45 (2017), č. článku 455201. ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : quantum graphs * Bethe-Sommerfeld conjecture * vertex coupling * Diophantine approximation * periodic structure Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2016

  6. SU-F-J-193: Efficient Dose Extinction Method for Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of Real Tissue Samples for Validation of CT HU to Stopping Power Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Baer, E; Jee, K; Sharp, G; Flanz, J; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For proton therapy, an accurate model of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) conversion is essential. In current practice, validation of these models relies solely on measurements of tissue substitutes with standard compositions. Validation based on real tissue samples would be much more direct and can address variations between patients. This study intends to develop an efficient and accurate system based on the concept of dose extinction to measure WEPL and retrieve RSP in biological tissue in large number of types. Methods: A broad AP proton beam delivering a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to irradiate the samples with a Matrixx detector positioned immediately below. A water tank was placed on top of the samples, with the water level controllable in sub-millimeter by a remotely controlled dosing pump. While gradually lowering the water level with beam on, the transmission dose was recorded at 1 frame/sec. The WEPL were determined as the difference between the known beam range of the delivered SOBP (80%) and the water level corresponding to 80% of measured dose profiles in time. A Gammex 467 phantom was used to test the system and various types of biological tissue was measured. Results: RSP for all Gammex inserts, expect the one made with lung-450 material (<2% error), were determined within ±0.5% error. Depends on the WEPL of investigated phantom, a measurement takes around 10 min, which can be accelerated by a faster pump. Conclusion: Based on the concept of dose extinction, a system was explored to measure WEPL efficiently and accurately for a large number of samples. This allows the validation of CT HU to stopping power conversions based on large number of samples and real tissues. It also allows the assessment of beam uncertainties due to variations over patients, which issue has never been sufficiently studied before.

  7. SU-F-J-193: Efficient Dose Extinction Method for Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of Real Tissue Samples for Validation of CT HU to Stopping Power Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R; Baer, E; Jee, K; Sharp, G; Flanz, J; Lu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For proton therapy, an accurate model of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) conversion is essential. In current practice, validation of these models relies solely on measurements of tissue substitutes with standard compositions. Validation based on real tissue samples would be much more direct and can address variations between patients. This study intends to develop an efficient and accurate system based on the concept of dose extinction to measure WEPL and retrieve RSP in biological tissue in large number of types. Methods: A broad AP proton beam delivering a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to irradiate the samples with a Matrixx detector positioned immediately below. A water tank was placed on top of the samples, with the water level controllable in sub-millimeter by a remotely controlled dosing pump. While gradually lowering the water level with beam on, the transmission dose was recorded at 1 frame/sec. The WEPL were determined as the difference between the known beam range of the delivered SOBP (80%) and the water level corresponding to 80% of measured dose profiles in time. A Gammex 467 phantom was used to test the system and various types of biological tissue was measured. Results: RSP for all Gammex inserts, expect the one made with lung-450 material (<2% error), were determined within ±0.5% error. Depends on the WEPL of investigated phantom, a measurement takes around 10 min, which can be accelerated by a faster pump. Conclusion: Based on the concept of dose extinction, a system was explored to measure WEPL efficiently and accurately for a large number of samples. This allows the validation of CT HU to stopping power conversions based on large number of samples and real tissues. It also allows the assessment of beam uncertainties due to variations over patients, which issue has never been sufficiently studied before.

  8. Electromagnetic Devices for Stopping Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Valouch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An effective way to stop a vehicle is to disrupt the operation of electronic systems using high power electromagnetic pulses, which can be generated using electromagnetic weapons. This article describes the design idea of a stationary generator of electromagnetic pulses that would be useful for stopping vehicles at the entrances to the object, at checkpoints, and in front of sensitive infrastructure. An important aspect of the proposal is the comparison of contemporary devices and systems used for stopping vehicles and analysis of the requirements of technical standards for electromagnetic immunity of vehicles.

  9. Electromagnetic Devices for Stopping Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Valouch

    2016-01-01

    An effective way to stop a vehicle is to disrupt the operation of electronic systems using high power electromagnetic pulses, which can be generated using electromagnetic weapons. This article describes the design idea of a stationary generator of electromagnetic pulses that would be useful for stopping vehicles at the entrances to the object, at checkpoints, and in front of sensitive infrastructure. An important aspect of the proposal is the comparison of contemporary devices and systems use...

  10. Bethe ansatz equations for open spin chains from giant gravitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepomechie, Rafael I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the open spin chain describing the scalar sector of the Y = 0 giant graviton brane at weak coupling. We provide a direct proof of integrability in the SU(2) and SU(3) sectors by constructing the transfer matrices. We determine the eigenvalues of these transfer matrices in terms of roots of the corresponding Bethe ansatz equations (BAEs). Based on these results, we propose BAEs for the full SO(6) sector. We find that, in the weak-coupling limit, the recently-proposed all-loop BAEs essentially agree with those proposed in the present work.

  11. Integrability in three dimensions: Algebraic Bethe ansatz for anyonic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Khachatryan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We extend basic properties of two dimensional integrable models within the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz approach to 2+1 dimensions and formulate the sufficient conditions for the commutativity of transfer matrices of different spectral parameters, in analogy with Yang–Baxter or tetrahedron equations. The basic ingredient of our models is the R-matrix, which describes the scattering of a pair of particles over another pair of particles, the quark-anti-quark (meson scattering on another quark-anti-quark state. We show that the Kitaev model belongs to this class of models and its R-matrix fulfills well-defined equations for integrability.

  12. Physics over easy Breakfasts with Beth and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Azaroff, L V

    2010-01-01

    During a sequence of meals, the author relates the principal features of physics in easy-to-understand conversations with his wife Beth. Beginning with the studies of motion by Galileo and Newton through to the revolutionary theories of relativity and quantum mechanics in the 20th century, all important aspects of electricity, energy, magnetism, gravity and the structure of matter and atoms are explained and illustrated. The second edition similarly recounts the more recent application of these theories to nanoparticles, Bose-Einstein condensates, quantum entanglement and quantum computers. By

  13. Bethe Ansatz Solutions of the Bose-Hubbard Dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Links

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Bose-Hubbard dimer Hamiltonian is a simple yet effective model for describing tunneling phenomena of Bose-Einstein condensates. One of the significant mathematical properties of the model is that it can be exactly solved by Bethe ansatz methods. Here we review the known exact solutions, highlighting the contributions of V.B. Kuznetsov to this field. Two of the exact solutions arise in the context of the Quantum Inverse Scattering Method, while the third solution uses a differential operator realisation of the su(2 Lie algebra.

  14. Studies of the nuclear stopping power in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Wöhrmann, Hauke

    2013-01-01

    The energy density, dE/dη, in PbPb collisions at 2.76 A TeV nucleus-nucleus center-of-mass energy is measured as a function of pseudorapidity, η, and collision centrality using the CMS detector at the LHC. The very large pseudorapidity coverage of this measurement is used as a powerful constraint for various hadronic interaction models. The CASTOR calorimeter extends the η coverage of CMS up to |η|=6.6, which is only 1.4 units away from the beam rapidity for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. This is comparable to the most forward measurements at RHIC. A comparison of the centrality dependence of the very forward energy density to that at smaller pseudorapidities is presented and compared to event generator predictions of models for nuclear collisions. The very wide pseudorapidity range of the presented measurement is unique at this center-of-mass energy and the average energy weighted pseudorapidity can be estimated which is compared with results at lower center-of-mass energy. The comparison shows the same ene...

  15. Correlation functions of the spin chains. Algebraic Bethe Ansatz approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitanine, N.

    2007-09-01

    Spin chains are the basic elements of integrable quantum models. These models have direct applications in condense matter theory, in statistical physics, in quantum optics, in field theory and even in string theory but they are also important because they enable us to solve, in an exact manner, non-perturbative phenomena that otherwise would stay unresolved. The method described in this work is based on the algebraic Bethe Ansatz. It is shown how this method can be used for the computation of null temperature correlation functions of the Heisenberg 1/2 spin chain. The important point of this approach is the solution of the inverse quantum problem given by the XXZ spin chain. This solution as well as a simple formulae for the scalar product of the Bethe states, have enabled us to get the most basic correlation functions under the form of multiple integrals. The formalism of multiple integrals open the way for asymptotic analysis for a few physical quantities like the probability of vacuum formation. It is worth noticing that this formalism can give exact results for two-point functions that are the most important correlation functions for applications. A relationship has been discovered between these multiple integrals and the sum of the form factors. The results have been extended to dynamical correlation functions. (A.C.)

  16. Off-diagonal Bethe ansatz solution of the XXX spin chain with arbitrary boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Junpeng; Yang, Wen-Li; Shi, Kangjie; Wang, Yupeng

    2013-01-01

    Employing the off-diagonal Bethe ansatz method proposed recently by the present authors, we exactly diagonalize the XXX spin chain with arbitrary boundary fields. By constructing a functional relation between the eigenvalues of the transfer matrix and the quantum determinant, the associated T–Q relation and the Bethe ansatz equations are derived

  17. The Bethe Sum Rule and Basis Set Selection in the Calculation of Generalized Oscillator Strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio; Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Fulfillment of the Bethe sum rule may be construed as a measure of basis set quality for atomic and molecular properties involving the generalized oscillator strength distribution. It is first shown that, in the case of a complete basis, the Bethe sum rule is fulfilled exactly in the random phase...

  18. Theoretical variance analysis of single- and dual-energy computed tomography methods for calculating proton stopping power ratios of biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M; Zhu, X R; Mohan, R; Dong, L; Virshup, G; Clayton, J

    2010-01-01

    We discovered an empirical relationship between the logarithm of mean excitation energy (ln I m ) and the effective atomic number (EAN) of human tissues, which allows for computing patient-specific proton stopping power ratios (SPRs) using dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. The accuracy of the DECT method was evaluated for 'standard' human tissues as well as their variance. The DECT method was compared to the existing standard clinical practice-a procedure introduced by Schneider et al at the Paul Scherrer Institute (the stoichiometric calibration method). In this simulation study, SPRs were derived from calculated CT numbers of known material compositions, rather than from measurement. For standard human tissues, both methods achieved good accuracy with the root-mean-square (RMS) error well below 1%. For human tissues with small perturbations from standard human tissue compositions, the DECT method was shown to be less sensitive than the stoichiometric calibration method. The RMS error remained below 1% for most cases using the DECT method, which implies that the DECT method might be more suitable for measuring patient-specific tissue compositions to improve the accuracy of treatment planning for charged particle therapy. In this study, the effects of CT imaging artifacts due to the beam hardening effect, scatter, noise, patient movement, etc were not analyzed. The true potential of the DECT method achieved in theoretical conditions may not be fully achievable in clinical settings. Further research and development may be needed to take advantage of the DECT method to characterize individual human tissues.

  19. Closing the stop gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czakon, Michal; Mitov, Alexander; Papucci, Michele; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Ruderman, Joshua T.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; New York Univ., NY; Weiler, Andreas; CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva

    2014-07-01

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R-parity conserving supersymmetry, by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ∝180 GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  20. Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Kenichi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    {pi} meson, (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone particle caused by a spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, was studied by use of Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation in the limits of effective model as a bound state of quark and antiquark. The effective model has nonlocal interaction and proved to satisfy the Gell-Mann-Oaks-Renner (GMOR) mass formula by treating correct Noether current in spite of loss of local chiral invariance of interaction term. GMOR mass formula: M{sub {pi}}{sup 2}f{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{approx_equal}-2m{sub 0} was realized as the result of the dynamical breaking and the clear breaking of chiral symmetry. M{sub {pi}}, f{sub {pi}}, m{sub 0}, and indicate mass of pseudo scalar meson, decay constant, mass of quark and vacuum condensation of quark and antiquark. (S.Y.)

  1. Low-temperature excitations within the Bethe approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biazzo, I; Ramezanpour, A

    2013-01-01

    We propose the variational quantum cavity method to construct a minimal energy subspace of wavevectors that are used to obtain some upper bounds for the energy cost of the low-temperature excitations. Given a trial wavefunction we use the cavity method of statistical physics to estimate the Hamiltonian expectation and to find the optimal variational parameters in the subspace of wavevectors orthogonal to the lower-energy wavefunctions. To this end, we write the overlap between two wavefunctions within the Bethe approximation, which allows us to replace the global orthogonality constraint with some local constraints on the variational parameters. The method is applied to the transverse Ising model and different levels of approximations are compared with the exact numerical solutions for small systems. (paper)

  2. Nuclear power and tomorrow's energy supply. The answer of Jacques Bouchard to Hubert Reeves: ''stop the useless disputes about nuclear power''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    In an interview given in April 2, 2002 to 'Le Monde' newspaper, the astrophysicist Hubert Reeves draws out a list of the constraints which, according to him, will clog the future development of nuclear energy: depletion of uranium reserves, accumulation of radioactive wastes, increase of production costs, public contestation etc.. Jacques Bouchard, president of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN), and head of the direction of nuclear energy (DEN) of the French atomic energy commission (CEA), contests this analysis and its conclusions and published an answer in the April 11 issue of Le Monde newspaper. This paper is a reprint of J. Bouchard answer who explains why nuclear energy has its place in the world supply of electric power, and how it can contribute to the sustainable development and to the protection of the environment. (J.S.)

  3. Material elemental decomposition in dual and multi-energy CT via a sparsity-dictionary approach for proton stopping power ratio calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenyang; Li, Bin; Chen, Liyuan; Yang, Ming; Lou, Yifei; Jia, Xun

    2018-02-05

    Accurate calculation of proton stopping power ratio (SPR) relative to water is crucial to proton therapy treatment planning, since SPR affects prediction of beam range. Current standard practice derives SPR using a single CT scan. Recent studies showed that dual-energy CT (DECT) offers advantages to accurately determine SPR. One method to further improve accuracy is to incorporate prior knowledge on human tissue composition through a dictionary approach. In addition, it is also suggested that using CT images with multiple (more than two) energy channels, i.e., multi-energy CT (MECT), can further improve accuracy. In this paper, we proposed a sparse dictionary-based method to convert CT numbers of DECT or MECT to elemental composition (EC) and relative electron density (rED) for SPR computation. A dictionary was constructed to include materials generated based on human tissues of known compositions. For a voxel with CT numbers of different energy channels, its EC and rED are determined subject to a constraint that the resulting EC is a linear non-negative combination of only a few tissues in the dictionary. We formulated this as a non-convex optimization problem. A novel algorithm was designed to solve the problem. The proposed method has a unified structure to handle both DECT and MECT with different number of channels. We tested our method in both simulation and experimental studies. Average errors of SPR in experimental studies were 0.70% in DECT, 0.53% in MECT with three energy channels, and 0.45% in MECT with four channels. We also studied the impact of parameter values and established appropriate parameter values for our method. The proposed method can accurately calculate SPR using DECT and MECT. The results suggest that using more energy channels may improve the SPR estimation accuracy. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. TU-FG-BRB-02: The Impact of Using Dual-Energy CT for Determining Proton Stopping Powers: Comparison Between Theory and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, E; Jee, K [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zhang, R; Yang, K; Sharp, G; Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lalonde, A [University of Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Royle, G [University College London, London, London (United Kingdom); Bouchard, H [Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) in determining proton stopping power ratios (SPR) and demonstrate advantages over conventional single-energy CT (SECT). Methods: SECT and DECT scans of tissue-equivalent plastics as well as animal meat samples are performed with a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash. The methods of Schneider et al. (1996) and Bourque et al. (2014) are used to determine proton SPR on SECT and DECT images, respectively. Waterequivalent path length (WEPL) measurements of plastics and tissue samples are performed with a 195 MeV proton beam. WEPL values are determined experimentally using the depth-dose shift and dose extinction methods. Results: Comparison between CT-based and experimental WEPL is performed for 12 tissue-equivalent plastic as well as 6 meat boxes containing animal liver, kidney, heart, stomach, muscle and bones. For plastic materials, results show a systematic improvement in determining SPR with DECT, with a mean absolute error of 0.4% compared to 1.7% for SECT. For the meat samples, preliminary results show the ability for DECT to determine WEPL with a mean absolute value of 1.1% over all meat boxes. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the potential in using DECT for determining proton SPR with plastic materials in a clinical context. Further work is required to show the benefits of DECT for tissue samples. While experimental uncertainties could be a limiting factor to show the benefits of DECT over SECT for the meat samples, further work is required to adapt the DECT formalism in the context of clinical use, where noise and artifacts play an important role.

  5. Stop smoking support programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... You can find out about smoking cessation programs from: Your ... Your employer Your local health department The National Cancer ...

  6. Calculation of the protons stopping power in water using dielectric formalism in the MELF-GOS approach; Calculo do poder de freamento de protons em agua utilizando o formalismo dieletrico na aproximacao MELF-GOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Franciane; Mazer, Amanda Cristina; Hormaza, Joel Mesa [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In order to calculate the stopping power of protons, there are many very successful models at high energies, which are extrapolated to low-energy regions. From the point of view of application of proton beam in cancer treatment is just this low energy region the most relevant due to the dose deposition profile in depth for protons. In this work, we present a calculation of the stopping power of protons in a water target using the dielectric formalism in MELF-GOS approach. The results when compared to other models show good agreement for energies above 100 keV and lower values below this energy. This result should impact the range of values of protons and the Bragg peak position. (author)

  7. CSDA range, stopping power and mean penetration depth energy relationships in some hydrocarbons and biologic materials for 10 eV to 100 MeV with the modified Rohrlich-Carlson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guemues, Hasan [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Samsun (Turkey); Bentabet, Abdelouahab [Bordj Bou Arreridj University, LCVRN, SNVSTU Faculty, El Anasser (Algeria)

    2017-05-15

    In this study, for some hydrocarbons and biological compounds, stopping power formula are presented, being valid for low and intermediate electron energies. In addition, calculation of the continuous slowing down approximation range (CSDA range) from the stopping power is also made. Calculation of the CSDA range for some hydrocarbons: C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (ethane), C{sub 4}H{sub 10} (butane), C{sub 6}H{sub 14} (hexane) C{sub 8}H{sub 18} (octane), C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5} (adenine) and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}O (guanine) have been introduced for incident electrons in the energy range 30 eV to 1 MeV. The range of electrons has been calculated within the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) using modified Rohrlich and Carlson formula of stopping power. Besides, we have calculated the mean penetration depths using a spherical geometric model developed by Bentabet (Vacuum 86:1855-1859, 35). The results have been compared with the other theoretical results, Monte Carlo code such as PENELOPE predictions and semi-empirical results. The calculated results of CSDA ranges for electrons in the energy range from 20 eV to 100 MeV are found to be in good agreement to within 10% with available date. (orig.)

  8. CSDA range, stopping power and mean penetration depth energy relationships in some hydrocarbons and biologic materials for 10 eV to 100 MeV with the modified Rohrlich-Carlson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Hasan; Bentabet, Abdelouahab

    2017-05-01

    In this study, for some hydrocarbons and biological compounds, stopping power formula are presented, being valid for low and intermediate electron energies. In addition, calculation of the continuous slowing down approximation range (CSDA range) from the stopping power is also made. Calculation of the CSDA range for some hydrocarbons: C2H6 (ethane), C4H10 (butane), C6H14 (hexane) C8H18 (octane), C5H5N5 (adenine) and C5H5N5O (guanine) have been introduced for incident electrons in the energy range 30 eV to 1 MeV. The range of electrons has been calculated within the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) using modified Rohrlich and Carlson formula of stopping power. Besides, we have calculated the mean penetration depths using a spherical geometric model developed by Bentabet (Vacuum 86:1855-1859, 35). The results have been compared with the other theoretical results, Monte Carlo code such as PENELOPE predictions and semi-empirical results. The calculated results of CSDA ranges for electrons in the energy range from 20 eV to 100 MeV are found to be in good agreement to within 10% with available date.

  9. Solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starostin, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    A solution is obtained of the Bethe--Salpeter equation for positronium in the field of linearly and circularly polarized plane electromagnetic waves at frequencies much higher than atomic. It is not assumed that the field is weak

  10. Cluster-Bethe-Lattice study of a planar antiferromagnet: Rb2NiF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.A.C. de la; Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the Cluster-Bethe-Lattice method is presented for a planar antiferromagnet for which the hamiltonian parameters are known and the one-magnon density of states may be computed exactly. All the square clusters of 1 to 121 atoms are studied both connected to and isolated from the Bethe lattices. It is shown that, even for the largest cluster treated, the approximation is still far from the exact result. It is discussed the limitations of the method [pt

  11. A cluster-bethe-lattice approach to spin-waves in dilute ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzberg, J.B.; Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Falicov, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The spin-wave spectra of a dilute ferromagnet within the cluster-bethe-lattice approximation is studied. Short range order effects for the alloy are included. A study of finite size clusters connected at their edges to Bethe lattices of the same coordination number allows one to determine:(i) the stability condition for the magnetic system; (ii) the continuum spin-wave local density of states and (iii) the existence of localized states below and above the continuum states

  12. Bethe, Oppenheimer, Teller and the Fermi Award: Norris Bradbury Speaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-28

    In 1956 the Enrico Fermi Presidential Award was established to recognize scientists, engineers, and science policymakers who gave unstintingly over their careers to advance energy science and technology. The first recipient was John von Neumann. .1 Among those scientists who were thought eligible for the award were Hans Bethe, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and Edward Teller. In 1959 Norris Bradbury was asked to comment on the relative merits of each these three men, whom he knew well from their affiliation with Los Alamos. Below is a reproduction of the letter Bradbury sent to Dr. Warren C. Johnson of the AEC’s General Advisory Committee(GAC) containing his evaluation of each man. The letter might surprise those not accustomed to Bradbury’s modus operandi of providing very detailed and forthright answers to the AEC. The letter, itself, was found in cache of old microfilm. Whether because of the age of the microfilm or the quality of the filming process, portions of the letter are not legible. Where empty brackets appear, the word or words could not be read or deduced. Words appearing in brackets are guesses that appear, from the image, to be what was written. These guesses, of course, are just that – guesses.

  13. Quarkonia in the Bethe--Salpeter formalism with background fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Y.K.; Mitra, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    A QCD-oriented Bethe--Salpeter (BS) equation for a q bar q system is formulated in which the quark 4-momenta p μ are modified as p μ →p μ -gA μ (x) in the inverse propagators therein, and a Fock--Schwinger (FS) gauge expansion is employed for the gluon fields A μ (x). The first term (∼x μ ) of the FS representation yields a harmonic kernel when the BS equation is reduced to a 3-dimensional level via the null-plane ansatz (NPA). It also generates a spin-dependent interaction proportional to (j 1 +s 1 )·(j 2 +s 2 ), in close parallel to a J·S term generated by a vector-like (γ (1) gamma(2)) harmonic model for the q bar q interaction proposed earlier by the Delhi Group. A possible mechanism for confinement in an asymptotically linear scene is proposed within the BS framework, taking cue partly from the suggestions of multiple correlation effects (Shifman), and partly from the postulation of stochastic fields (Simonov)

  14. A systematic approach to sketch Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Si-xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study meson properties, one needs to solve the gap equation for the quark propagator and the Bethe-Salpeter (BS equation for the meson wavefunction, self-consistently. The gluon propagator, the quark-gluon vertex, and the quark–anti-quark scattering kernel are key pieces to solve those equations. Predicted by lattice-QCD and Dyson-Schwinger analyses of QCD’s gauge sector, gluons are non-perturbatively massive. In the matter sector, the modeled gluon propagator which can produce a veracious description of meson properties needs to possess a mass scale, accordingly. Solving the well-known longitudinal Ward-Green-Takahashi identities (WGTIs and the less-known transverse counterparts together, one obtains a nontrivial solution which can shed light on the structure of the quark-gluon vertex. It is highlighted that the phenomenologically proposed anomalous chromomagnetic moment (ACM vertex originates from the QCD Lagrangian symmetries and its strength is proportional to the magnitude of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB. The color-singlet vector and axial-vector WGTIs can relate the BS kernel and the dressed quark-gluon vertex to each other. Using the relation, one can truncate the gap equation and the BS equation, systematically, without violating crucial symmetries, e.g., gauge symmetry and chiral symmetry.

  15. Agutaynen Glottal Stop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quakenbush, J. Stephen

    A study investigated the phonemic and morphophonemic patterning of the glottal stop in Agutaynen, a Meso-Philippine language, and some comparison with two northern Philippine languages. Agutaynen glottal stop has as its sole origin a neutralization of contrast rule, the operation of which can be noted in three different linguistic environments.…

  16. Stop the Cravings!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to know how a healthy diet improves health and fights disease—rely on qualified professionals in the field. More on This Topic Stop the Cravings! Eat Right! Feeling guilty after giving in to that chocolate craving? You can stop the cycle without giving ...

  17. FRICTION BUFFER STOP DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Guziur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Friction buffer stops are the favoured construction of buffer stop, mainly due to its high resistance and variety of layout. Last but not least is its manner of deceleration induced upon impact and during the braking what makes it smart solution in railway transport safety. The general approach of designing buffer stops is via usage of the kinetic energy and its conversion into work. Paper describes input parameters such as train velocity or buffer stop vicinity which is expressed by the safety coefficient implanted within the calculation. Furthermore, the paper shows the principle of calculation the friction buffer stop work, or to be more precise, the work of its braking jaws and optionally the work of additional braking jaws located behind the buffer stop. Last section of the paper is focused on the examples of designing friction buffer stops, points out the main complications and shows the charts of relation amongst braking distance, kinetic energy and braking force and the charts of relation between deceleration rate and braking distance.

  18. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  19. Spin-1 and -2 bilayer Bethe lattice: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic behaviors of bilayer with spin-1 and 2 Ising model on the Bethe lattice are investigated using the Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal magnetizations, the magnetic susceptibilities and the transition temperature of the bilayer spin-1 and 2 on the Bethe lattice are studied for different values of crystal field and intralayer coupling constants of the two layers and interlayer coupling constant between the layers. The thermal and magnetic hysteresis cycles are given for different values of the crystal field, for different temperatures and for different exchange interactions. - Highlights: • The magnetic properties of bilayer on the Bethe lattice have been investigated. • The transition temperature has been deduced. • The magnetic coercive filed has been established.

  20. Spin-1 and -2 bilayer Bethe lattice: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrour, R.; Jabar, A.; Benyoussef, A.; Hamedoun, M.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic behaviors of bilayer with spin-1 and 2 Ising model on the Bethe lattice are investigated using the Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal magnetizations, the magnetic susceptibilities and the transition temperature of the bilayer spin-1 and 2 on the Bethe lattice are studied for different values of crystal field and intralayer coupling constants of the two layers and interlayer coupling constant between the layers. The thermal and magnetic hysteresis cycles are given for different values of the crystal field, for different temperatures and for different exchange interactions. - Highlights: • The magnetic properties of bilayer on the Bethe lattice have been investigated. • The transition temperature has been deduced. • The magnetic coercive filed has been established.

  1. Bethe ansatz approach to quantum sine Gordon thermodynamics and finite temperature excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotos, X.

    1982-01-01

    Takahashi and Suzuki (TS) using the Bethe ansatz method developed a formalism for the thermodynamics of the XYZ spin chain. Translating their formalism to the quantum sine-Gordon system, the thermodynamics and finite temperature elementary excitations are analyzed. Criteria imposed by TS on the allowed states simply correspond to the condition of normalizability of the wave functions. A set of coupled nonlinear integral equations for the thermodynamic equilibrium densities for particular values of the coupling constant in the attractive regime is derived. Solving numerically these Bethe ansatz equations, curves of the specific heat as a function of temperature are obtained. The soliton contribution peaks at a temperature of about 0.4 soliton masses shifting downward as the classical limit is approached. The weak coupling regime is analyzed by deriving the Bethe ansatz equations including the charged vacuum excitations. It is shown that they are necessary for a consistent presentation of the thermodynamics

  2. Degeneration of Bethe subalgebras in the Yangian of gl_n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilin, Aleksei; Rybnikov, Leonid

    2018-04-01

    We study degenerations of Bethe subalgebras B( C) in the Yangian Y(gl_n), where C is a regular diagonal matrix. We show that closure of the parameter space of the family of Bethe subalgebras, which parameterizes all possible degenerations, is the Deligne-Mumford moduli space of stable rational curves \\overline{M_{0,n+2}}. All subalgebras corresponding to the points of \\overline{M_{0,n+2}} are free and maximal commutative. We describe explicitly the "simplest" degenerations and show that every degeneration is the composition of the simplest ones. The Deligne-Mumford space \\overline{M_{0,n+2}} generalizes to other root systems as some De Concini-Procesi resolution of some toric variety. We state a conjecture generalizing our results to Bethe subalgebras in the Yangian of arbitrary simple Lie algebra in terms of this De Concini-Procesi resolution.

  3. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  4. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  5. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will be infected and ...

  6. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  7. GameStop-kanta-asiakkuus

    OpenAIRE

    Arefi, Shahriar; Lehikoinen, Jami

    2012-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli kartoittaa ja kehittää GameStop Finland yhtiön uutta Euroopassa vuoden 2011 lopussa lanseerattua kanta-asiakaskorttia nimeltään PowerTrade. Työssä kerrotaan hieman taustaa GameStopista yhtiönä, kuinka se on saavuttanut pelialan isoimman jälleenmyyjän nimikkeen ja kuinka GameStopin PowerTrade-kortti eroaa Yhdysvaltojen GameStopin kanta-asiakkuuskortista PowerUp:sta. Työssä myös verrataan korttia Suomen isoimpien kauppojen bonuskortteihin. Työssä kerrot...

  8. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXZ Heisenberg spin chain with triangular boundaries and the corresponding Gaudin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlović, N.; Salom, I.

    2017-10-01

    The implementation of the algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXZ Heisenberg spin chain in the case, when both reflection matrices have the upper-triangular form is analyzed. The general form of the Bethe vectors is studied. In the particular form, Bethe vectors admit the recurrent procedure, with an appropriate modification, used previously in the case of the XXX Heisenberg chain. As expected, these Bethe vectors yield the strikingly simple expression for the off-shell action of the transfer matrix of the chain as well as the spectrum of the transfer matrix and the corresponding Bethe equations. As in the XXX case, the so-called quasi-classical limit gives the off-shell action of the generating function of the corresponding trigonometric Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms.

  9. Sneaky light stop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Eifert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  10. Siloxanes : A new class of candidate Bethe-Zel’dovich-Thompson fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, P.; Guardone, A.; Nannan, N.R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new class of Bethe-Zel’dovich-Thompson fluids, which are expected to exhibit nonclassical gasdynamic behavior in the single-phase vapor region. These are the linear and cyclic siloxanes, light silicon oils currently employed as working fluids in organic Rankine cycle turbines.

  11. One-stop shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, C

    1996-11-25

    The long-term-care industry's new mantras are "continuum of care" and "one-stop shopping." Companies are trying to please consumers who are clamoring for more senior-living options and managed-care organizations that want administratively simple contracting arrangements.

  12. Stopping the unstoppable

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How do you stop two very high energy proton beams circulating in opposite directions around a 27-kilometre ring? The answer is the beam dumps. Two tunnels, pointing in opposite directions, are being constructed at point 6 of the LHC. These will allow the beams to be directed into two large beam dumps housed at the ends of the tunnels.

  13. Bethe Ansatz for two-magnon scattering states in 2D and 3D Heisenberg-Ising ferromagnets

    OpenAIRE

    Bibikov, P. N.

    2017-01-01

    Various versions of the Bethe ansatz are suggested for evaluation of scattering two-magnon states in 2D and 3D Heisenberg-Ising ferromagnets. It is shown that for 2D square (3D qubic) finite-periodic or infinite lattices about a half (3/4) of states have a correctly 2D- (3D-) generalized Bethe form. The remaining scattering states are treated (on the infinite lattices only) within the degenerative discrete-diffractive modification of the Bethe ansatz previously suggested by the author.

  14. Inertial-confinement-fusion applications of ion-stopping theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Bailey, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Methods were developed to calculate: (1) the stopping power of a hot plasma target, (2) the charge-state of a fast ion projectile, and (3) the final disposition of the deposited energy. The first issue refers to the stopping power for protons. The proton stopping power is altered in high-density or high-temperature targets, especially at velocities below the stopping peak. The second issue concerns the application of a proton stopping curve to the arbitrary projectile. The third topic is more specialized to inertial fusion and concerns the partition of deposited energy between ion (nuclear motion) degrees of freedom and those corresponding to bound and free electrons. The question here is whether a thermal equilibrium plasma is produced

  15. Investigation of RADTRAN Stop Model input parameters for truck stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griego, N.R.; Smith, J.D.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    RADTRAN is a computer code for estimating the risks and consequences as transport of radioactive materials (RAM). RADTRAN was developed and is maintained by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy (DOE). For incident-free transportation, the dose to persons exposed while the shipment is stopped is frequently a major percentage of the overall dose. This dose is referred to as Stop Dose and is calculated by the Stop Model. Because stop dose is a significant portion of the overall dose associated with RAM transport, the values used as input for the Stop Model are important. Therefore, an investigation of typical values for RADTRAN Stop Parameters for truck stops was performed. The resulting data from these investigations were analyzed to provide mean values, standard deviations, and histograms. Hence, the mean values can be used when an analyst does not have a basis for selecting other input values for the Stop Model. In addition, the histograms and their characteristics can be used to guide statistical sampling techniques to measure sensitivity of the RADTRAN calculated Stop Dose to the uncertainties in the stop model input parameters. This paper discusses the details and presents the results of the investigation of stop model input parameters at truck stops

  16. Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... you can increase acceptance by helping to stop bullying of children with TS. Bullying doesn’t just ...

  17. Monte Carlo study of alternate mixed spin-5/2 and spin-2 Ising ferrimagnetic system on the Bethe lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabar, A.; Masrour, R.; Benyoussef, A.; Hamedoun, M.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties of alternate mixed spin-5/2 and spin-2 Ising model on the Bethe lattice have been studied by using the Monte Carlo simulations. The ground state phase diagrams of alternate mixed spin-5/2 and spin-2 Ising model on the Bethe lattice has been obtained. The thermal total magnetization and magnetization of spins-5/2 and spin-2 with the different exchange interactions, external magnetic field and temperatures have been studied. The critical temperature have been deduced. The magnetic hysteresis cycle on the Bethe lattice has been deduced for different values of exchange interactions, for different values of crystal field and for different sizes. The magnetic coercive field has been deduced. - Highlights: • The alternate mixed spin-5/2 and -2 on the Bethe lattice is studied. • The critical temperature has been deduced. • The magnetic coercive filed has been deduced.

  18. The Beer/Bethe/Uexküll paper (1899) and misinterpretations surrounding 'vitalistic behaviorism'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildenberger, Florian

    2006-01-01

    In the history of behaviorism the paper of the three physiologists Theodor Beer, Albrecht Bethe and Jakob von Uexküll from 1899 plays an important role. Many researchers were influenced by this paper and identified it as fundamental for objective psychological research. But during the period of its adoption (1900-1925) psychologists did not notice that Beer, Bethe and Uexküll had distanced themselves from their own paper, because it had been ignored in physiological and biological discussions. Moreover, one of the three (Beer) had to resign from the scientific community because of private scandal and another one (Uexküll) changed all of his views and left the base of objective science for subjective vitalism. However, this did not change his adoption of behaviorism.

  19. ODE/IM correspondence and Bethe ansatz for affine Toda field equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsushi Ito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the linear problem associated with modified affine Toda field equation for the Langlands dual gˆ∨, where gˆ is an untwisted affine Lie algebra. The connection coefficients for the asymptotic solutions of the linear problem are found to correspond to the Q-functions for g-type quantum integrable models. The ψ-system for the solutions associated with the fundamental representations of g leads to Bethe ansatz equations associated with the affine Lie algebra gˆ. We also study the A2r(2 affine Toda field equation in massless limit in detail and find its Bethe ansatz equations as well as T–Q relations.

  20. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for the quantum group invariant open XXZ chain at roots of unity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azat M. Gainutdinov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For generic values of q, all the eigenvectors of the transfer matrix of the Uqsl(2-invariant open spin-1/2 XXZ chain with finite length N can be constructed using the algebraic Bethe ansatz (ABA formalism of Sklyanin. However, when q is a root of unity (q=eiπ/p with integer p≥2, the Bethe equations acquire continuous solutions, and the transfer matrix develops Jordan cells. Hence, there appear eigenvectors of two new types: eigenvectors corresponding to continuous solutions (exact complete p-strings, and generalized eigenvectors. We propose general ABA constructions for these two new types of eigenvectors. We present many explicit examples, and we construct complete sets of (generalized eigenvectors for various values of p and N.

  1. Bethe Ansatz and exact form factors of the O(N) Gross Neveu-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babujian, Hrachya M.; Foerster, Angela; Karowski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We apply previous results on the O(N) Bethe Ansatz http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/45/5/055207, http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3479, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2013)089 to construct a general form factor formula for the O(N) Gross-Neveu model. We examine this formula for several operators, such as the energy momentum, the spin-field and the current. We also compare these results with the 1/N expansion of this model and obtain full agreement. We discuss bound state form factors, in particular for the three particle form factor of the field. In addition for the two particle case we prove a recursion relation for the K-functions of the higher level Bethe Ansatz.

  2. The q-deformed analogue of the Onsager algebra: Beyond the Bethe ansatz approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseilhac, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The spectral properties of operators formed from generators of the q-Onsager non-Abelian infinite-dimensional algebra are investigated. Using a suitable functional representation, all eigenfunctions are shown to obey a second-order q-difference equation (or its degenerate discrete version). In the algebraic sector associated with polynomial eigenfunctions (or their discrete analogues), Bethe equations naturally appear. Beyond this sector, where the Bethe ansatz approach is not applicable in related massive quantum integrable models, the eigenfunctions are also described. The spin-half XXZ open spin chain with general integrable boundary conditions is reconsidered in light of this approach: all the eigenstates are constructed. In the algebraic sector which corresponds to special relations among the parameters, known results are recovered

  3. On \\boldsymbol {AdS_2/CFT_1} transfer matrices, Bethe ansatz and scale invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    We explicitly calculate the \\renewcommand{\\r}ρ \\renewcommand{\\t}τ AdS2 × S2 × T6 transfer-matrix eigenvalues in the massless sector using the exact integrable S-matrix, for up to 5 particles. This enables us to conjecture the general pattern. We use the conjectured form of the eigenvalues to write down a set of massless Bethe ansatz equations. The same procedure applies to the relativistic as well as to the non-relativistic situation. In the relativistic case, the right and left modes decouple. We speculate that the relativistic massless Bethe ansatz we obtain in that case might capture the integrable structure of an underlying 2D critical theory. We finally take advantage of some remarkable simplifications to make progress in the massive case as well.

  4. Numerical studies of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for a two-fermion bound state

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, W.; Frederico, T.; Salmè, G.; Viviani, M.

    2018-03-01

    Some recent advances on the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) for a two-fermion bound system directly in Minkowski space are presented. The calculations are based on the expression of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in terms of the so-called Nakanishi integral representation and on the light-front projection (i.e. the integration of the light-front variable k - = k 0 - k 3). The latter technique allows for the analytically exact treatment of the singularities plaguing the two-fermion BSE in Minkowski space. The good agreement observed between our results and those obtained using other existing numerical methods, based on both Minkowski and Euclidean space techniques, fully corroborate our analytical treatment.

  5. Accuracy of the Bethe approximation for hyperparameter estimation in probabilistic image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Shouno, Hayaru; Okada, Masato; Titterington, D M

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of statistical-mechanical approximations for the estimation of hyperparameters from observable data in probabilistic image processing, which is based on Bayesian statistics and maximum likelihood estimation. Hyperparameters in statistical science correspond to interactions or external fields in the statistical-mechanics context. In this paper, hyperparameters in the probabilistic model are determined so as to maximize a marginal likelihood. A practical algorithm is described for grey-level image restoration based on a Gaussian graphical model and the Bethe approximation. The algorithm corresponds to loopy belief propagation in artificial intelligence. We examine the accuracy of hyperparameter estimation when we use the Bethe approximation. It is well known that a practical algorithm for probabilistic image processing can be prescribed analytically when a Gaussian graphical model is adopted as a prior probabilistic model in Bayes' formula. We are therefore able to compare, in a numerical study, results obtained through mean-field-type approximations with those based on exact calculation

  6. On the nuclear halo of a proton pencil beam stopping in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, Bernard; Cascio, Ethan W; Daartz, Juliane; Wagner, Miles S

    2015-01-01

    The dose distribution of a proton beam stopping in water has components due to basic physics and may have others from beam contamination. We propose the concise terms core for the primary beam, halo (see Pedroni et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 541–61) for the low dose region from charged secondaries, aura for the low dose region from neutrals, and spray for beam contamination.We have measured the dose distribution in a water tank at 177 MeV under conditions where spray, therefore radial asymmetry, is negligible. We used an ADCL calibrated thimble chamber and a Faraday cup calibrated integral beam monitor so as to obtain immediately the absolute dose per proton. We took depth scans at fixed distances from the beam centroid rather than radial scans at fixed depths. That minimizes the signal range for each scan and better reveals the structure of the core and halo.Transitions from core to halo to aura are already discernible in the raw data. The halo has components attributable to coherent and incoherent nuclear reactions. Due to elastic and inelastic scattering by the nuclear force, the Bragg peak persists to radii larger than can be accounted for by Molière single scattering. The radius of the incoherent component, a dose bump around midrange, agrees with the kinematics of knockout reactions.We have fitted the data in two ways. The first is algebraic or model dependent (MD) as far as possible, and has 25 parameters. The second, using 2D cubic spline regression, is model independent. Optimal parameterization for treatment planning will probably be a hybrid of the two, and will of course require measurements at several incident energies.The MD fit to the core term resembles that of the PSI group (Pedroni et al 2005), which has been widely emulated. However, we replace their T(w), a mass stopping power which mixes electromagnetic (EM) and nuclear effects, with one that is purely EM, arguing that protons that do not undergo hard single scatters continue to lose energy

  7. On the nuclear halo of a proton pencil beam stopping in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Bernard; Cascio, Ethan W.; Daartz, Juliane; Wagner, Miles S.

    2015-07-01

    The dose distribution of a proton beam stopping in water has components due to basic physics and may have others from beam contamination. We propose the concise terms core for the primary beam, halo (see Pedroni et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 541-61) for the low dose region from charged secondaries, aura for the low dose region from neutrals, and spray for beam contamination. We have measured the dose distribution in a water tank at 177 MeV under conditions where spray, therefore radial asymmetry, is negligible. We used an ADCL calibrated thimble chamber and a Faraday cup calibrated integral beam monitor so as to obtain immediately the absolute dose per proton. We took depth scans at fixed distances from the beam centroid rather than radial scans at fixed depths. That minimizes the signal range for each scan and better reveals the structure of the core and halo. Transitions from core to halo to aura are already discernible in the raw data. The halo has components attributable to coherent and incoherent nuclear reactions. Due to elastic and inelastic scattering by the nuclear force, the Bragg peak persists to radii larger than can be accounted for by Molière single scattering. The radius of the incoherent component, a dose bump around midrange, agrees with the kinematics of knockout reactions. We have fitted the data in two ways. The first is algebraic or model dependent (MD) as far as possible, and has 25 parameters. The second, using 2D cubic spline regression, is model independent. Optimal parameterization for treatment planning will probably be a hybrid of the two, and will of course require measurements at several incident energies. The MD fit to the core term resembles that of the PSI group (Pedroni et al 2005), which has been widely emulated. However, we replace their T(w), a mass stopping power which mixes electromagnetic (EM) and nuclear effects, with one that is purely EM, arguing that protons that do not undergo hard single scatters continue to lose

  8. The spin-3/2 Blume-Capel model on the Bethe lattice using the recursion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albayrak, Erhan; Keskin, Mustafa

    2000-01-01

    The spin-3/2 Blume-Capel model is solved on the Bethe lattice using the exact recursion equations. The nature of the variation of the Curie temperature with the ratio of the single-ion anisotropy term to the exchange-coupling constant is studied and the phase diagrams are constructed on the Bethe lattice with the co-ordination numbers q=3 and 6. A comparison is made with the results of the other approximation schemes

  9. The spin-3/2 Blume-Capel model on the Bethe lattice using the recursion method

    CERN Document Server

    Albayrak, E

    2000-01-01

    The spin-3/2 Blume-Capel model is solved on the Bethe lattice using the exact recursion equations. The nature of the variation of the Curie temperature with the ratio of the single-ion anisotropy term to the exchange-coupling constant is studied and the phase diagrams are constructed on the Bethe lattice with the co-ordination numbers q=3 and 6. A comparison is made with the results of the other approximation schemes.

  10. The Bethe Free Energy Allows to Compute the Conditional Entropy of Graphical Code Instances. A Proof from the Polymer Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Macris, Nicolas; Vuffray, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to explore the precise relationship between the Bethe free energy (or entropy) and the Shannon conditional entropy of graphical error correcting codes. The main result shows that the Bethe free energy associated with a low-density parity-check code used over a binary symmetric channel in a large noise regime is, with high probability, asymptotically exact as the block length grows. To arrive at this result we develop new techniques for rather general graphi...

  11. Correlation functions of the spin chains. Algebraic Bethe Ansatz approach; Fonctions de correlation des chaines de spin. Approche de l'ansatz de Bethe algebrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanine, N

    2007-09-15

    Spin chains are the basic elements of integrable quantum models. These models have direct applications in condense matter theory, in statistical physics, in quantum optics, in field theory and even in string theory but they are also important because they enable us to solve, in an exact manner, non-perturbative phenomena that otherwise would stay unresolved. The method described in this work is based on the algebraic Bethe Ansatz. It is shown how this method can be used for the computation of null temperature correlation functions of the Heisenberg 1/2 spin chain. The important point of this approach is the solution of the inverse quantum problem given by the XXZ spin chain. This solution as well as a simple formulae for the scalar product of the Bethe states, have enabled us to get the most basic correlation functions under the form of multiple integrals. The formalism of multiple integrals open the way for asymptotic analysis for a few physical quantities like the probability of vacuum formation. It is worth noticing that this formalism can give exact results for two-point functions that are the most important correlation functions for applications. A relationship has been discovered between these multiple integrals and the sum of the form factors. The results have been extended to dynamical correlation functions. (A.C.)

  12. O(N)-matrix difference equations and a nested Bethe ansatz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babujian, Hrachya M; Foerster, Angela; Karowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A system of O(N)-matrix difference equations is solved by means of the off-shell version of the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the nesting process, a new object, the Π-matrix, is introduced to overcome the complexities of the O(N)-group structure. The highest weight property of the solutions is proved and some explicit examples are discussed. (paper)

  13. Perturbation theory for the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starostin, V.S.; Litskevich, I.K.

    1990-01-01

    The completeness and orthogonality of the solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation is proven. A correct derivation of perturbation-theory equations is given. A generalization that includes the field of a plane electromagnetic wave is proposed. The rate of one-photon annihilation of positronium in this field is calculated. If the one-photon decay is allowed, the stationary states of the system are found (states of light-positronium)

  14. Comultiplication in ABCD algebra and scalar products of Bethe wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, A.

    1995-01-01

    The representation of scalar products of Bethe wave functions in terms of dual fields, plays an important role in the theory of completely integrable models. The proof is based on the explicit expression for the open-quotes seniorclose quotes coefficient, which was guessed in the Izergin paper and then proved to satisfy some recurrent relations, which determine it unambiguously. In this paper we present an alternative proof based on direct computation. It uses the operation of comultiplication in the ABCD-algebra

  15. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Geynisman, M; Bossert, R; Darve, C; Ewald, K D; Klebaner, A; Limon, P; Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high-field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up- stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo- design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon-stop prototype.

  16. Electronic structure of disordered binary alloys with short range correlation in Bethe lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    The determination of the electronic structure of a disordered material along the tight-binding model when applied to a Bethe lattice. The diagonal as well as off-diagonal disorder, are considered. The coordination number on the Bethe is fixed lattice to four (Z=4) that occurs in most compound semiconductors. The main proposal was to study the conditions under which a relatively simple model of a disordered material, i.e, a binary alloy, could account for the basic properties of transport or more specifically for the electronic states in such systems. By using a parametrization of the pair probability the behaviour of the electronic density of states (DOS) for different values of the short range order parameter, σ, which makes possible to treat the segregated, random and alternating cases, was analysed. In solving the problem via the Green function technique in the Wannier representation a linear chain of atoms was considered and using the solution of such a 1-D system the problem of the Bethe lattice which is constructed using such renormalized chains as elements, was solved. The results indicate that the obtained DOS are strongly dependent on the correlation assumed for the occupancy in the lattice. (author) [pt

  17. A generalized Uhlenbeck and Beth formula for the third cluster coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Sigurd Yves [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Lassaut, Monique [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Amaya-Tapia, Alejandro, E-mail: jano@icf.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Fi ´sicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 48-3, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62251 (Mexico)

    2016-11-15

    Relatively recently (Amaya-Tapia et al., 2011), we presented a formula for the evaluation of the third Bose fugacity coefficient–leading to the third virial coefficient–in terms of three-body eigenphase shifts, for particles subject to repulsive forces. An analytical calculation for a 1-dim. model, for which the result is known, confirmed the validity of this approach. We now extend the formalism to particles with attractive forces, and therefore must allow for the possibility that the particles have bound states. We thus obtain a true generalization of the famous formula of Uhlenbeck and Beth (Uhlenbeck and Beth, 1936; Beth and Uhlenbeck, 1937) and of Gropper (Gropper, 1936, 1937) for the second virial. We illustrate our formalism by a calculation, in an adiabatic approximation, of the third cluster in one dimension, using McGuire’s model as in our previous paper, but with attractive forces. The inclusion of three-body bound states is trivial; taking into account states having asymptotically two particles bound, and one free, is not.

  18. Symmetry preserving truncations of the gap and Bethe-Salpeter equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binosi, Daniele; Chang, Lei; Papavassiliou, Joannis; Qin, Si-Xue; Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-05-01

    Ward-Green-Takahashi (WGT) identities play a crucial role in hadron physics, e.g. imposing stringent relationships between the kernels of the one- and two-body problems, which must be preserved in any veracious treatment of mesons as bound states. In this connection, one may view the dressed gluon-quark vertex, Γμa , as fundamental. We use a novel representation of Γμa , in terms of the gluon-quark scattering matrix, to develop a method capable of elucidating the unique quark-antiquark Bethe-Salpeter kernel, K , that is symmetry consistent with a given quark gap equation. A strength of the scheme is its ability to expose and capitalize on graphic symmetries within the kernels. This is displayed in an analysis that reveals the origin of H -diagrams in K , which are two-particle-irreducible contributions, generated as two-loop diagrams involving the three-gluon vertex, that cannot be absorbed as a dressing of Γμa in a Bethe-Salpeter kernel nor expressed as a member of the class of crossed-box diagrams. Thus, there are no general circumstances under which the WGT identities essential for a valid description of mesons can be preserved by a Bethe-Salpeter kernel obtained simply by dressing both gluon-quark vertices in a ladderlike truncation; and, moreover, adding any number of similarly dressed crossed-box diagrams cannot improve the situation.

  19. The connection of two-particle relativistic quantum mechanics with the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazdjian, H.

    1986-02-01

    We show the formal equivalence between the wave equations of two-particle relativistic quantum mechanics, based on the manifestly covariant hamiltonian formalism with constraints, and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. This is achieved by algebraically transforming the latter so as to separate it into two independent equations which match the equations of hamiltonian relativistic quantum mechanics. The first equation determines the relative time evolution of the system, while the second one yields a three-dimensional eigenvalue equation. A connection is thus established between the Bethe-Salpeter wave function and its kernel on the one hand and the quantum mechanical wave function and interaction potential on the other. For the sector of solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation having non-relativistic limits, this relationship can be evaluated in perturbation theory. We also device a generalized form of the instantaneous approximation which simplifies the various expressions involved in the above relations. It also permits the evaluation of the normalization condition of the quantum mechanical wave function as a three-dimensional integral

  20. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Loop expansion around the Bethe approximation through the M-layer construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Ada; Chiara Angelini, Maria; Lucibello, Carlo; Parisi, Giorgio; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Rizzo, Tommaso

    2017-11-01

    For every physical model defined on a generic graph or factor graph, the Bethe M-layer construction allows building a different model for which the Bethe approximation is exact in the large M limit, and coincides with the original model for M=1 . The 1/M perturbative series is then expressed by a diagrammatic loop expansion in terms of so-called fat diagrams. Our motivation is to study some important second-order phase transitions that do exist on the Bethe lattice, but are either qualitatively different or absent in the corresponding fully connected case. In this case, the standard approach based on a perturbative expansion around the naive mean field theory (essentially a fully connected model) fails. On physical grounds, we expect that when the construction is applied to a lattice in finite dimension there is a small region of the external parameters, close to the Bethe critical point, where strong deviations from mean-field behavior will be observed. In this region, the 1/M expansion for the corrections diverges, and can be the starting point for determining the correct non-mean-field critical exponents using renormalization group arguments. In the end, we will show that the critical series for the generic observable can be expressed as a sum of Feynman diagrams with the same numerical prefactors of field theories. However, the contribution of a given diagram is not evaluated by associating Gaussian propagators to its lines, as in field theories: one has to consider the graph as a portion of the original lattice, replacing the internal lines with appropriate one-dimensional chains, and attaching to the internal points the appropriate number of infinite-size Bethe trees to restore the correct local connectivity of the original model. The actual contribution of each (fat) diagram is the so-called line-connected observable, which also includes contributions from sub-diagrams with appropriate prefactors. In order to compute the corrections near to the critical

  2. GMSB with Light Stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) is an elegant mechanism to transmit supersymmetry breaking from the hidden to the MSSM observable sector, which solves the supersymmetric flavor problem. However the smallness of the generated stop mixing requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass. Two possible ways out are: i) To extend GMSB by direct superpotential messenger-MSSM Yukawa couplings to generate sizeable mixing, thus reintroducing the flavor problem; ii) To extend the MSSM Higgs sector with singlets and/or triplets providing extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Singlets will not get any soft mass from GMSB and triplets will contribute to the $\\rho$ parameter which could be an issue. In this paper we explore the second way by introducing extra supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges $Y=(0,\\pm 1)$, with a tree-level custodial $SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R$ global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the $\\rho$ parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of ...

  3. Book Review: Stop, Write!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This book on writing grounded theory is intended for the empirical GT researcher who wants to pursue his/her research until publication. It is the first book devoted entirely to such a crucial issue as writing grounded theory. Thus, Stop, Write: Writing Grounded Theory, is a practical book that fills a gap in GT methodology. In the first chapter of the book, Dr. Glaser says, “Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long”. The book teaches the reader how to actually write a grounded theory by “simply” writing up the sorted memos. This requires efficient sorting that is dealt with in chapter two on Sorting Memos, which includes precious repetition from Theoretical Sensitivity (1978. How writing can be done effectively is outlined in chapter three The Working Paper. Then follows chapter four on how to rework the first draft with the different tasks of editing for language and professionalism. Thereafter Dr. Glaser discusses Writing Problems in chapter five where he gives useful guidance on how to overcome writing blocks and problems with supervisors and dissertation committees. The book also deals with publishing and with collaboration as experienced between Barney Glaser and the cofounder of grounded theory, Anselm Strauss.

  4. Development of methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for low energy conversion electrons; Desenvolvimento de uma metodologia para estimativa da dose absorvida e do poder de freamento para eletrons de conversao de baixa energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    1995-08-01

    The evaluation of absorbed dose in the case of external and internalcontamination due to radionuclides is sometimes hard, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 KeV in mucous membrane. In this work, a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polivinyl chloride - acetate) absorbers, for the 62.5 KeV and 84-88 KeV energy {sup 109} Cd conversion electrons, working with a 4 {pi} proportional pressurized detector, is presented. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves has been used to obtain a spectrum of a thin {sup 109} Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses if absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum with absorber from the spectrum without absorber, which were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  5. Optimal design of a beam stop for Indus-2 using finite element heat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The radiation source impinges ∼ 1 kW power on the beam stop and the heat transfer capabilities of the beam stop have been evaluated. Temperature distribution in the beam stop has been obtained under various cooling conditions using the finite element analysis calculations with ANSYS software. Design parameters of ...

  6. Nested Bethe Ansatz for Spin Ladder Model with Open Boundary Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Junfang; Zhang Chunmin; Yue Ruihong; Li Runling

    2005-01-01

    The nested Bethe ansatz (BA) method is applied to find the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the transfer matrix for spin-ladder model with open boundary conditions. Based on the reflection equation, we find the general diagonal solution, which determines the general boundary interaction in the Hamiltonian. We introduce the spin-ladder model with open boundary conditions. By finding the solution K ± of the reflection equation which determines the nontrivial boundary terms in the Hamiltonian, we diagonalize the transfer matrix of the spin-ladder model with open boundary conditions in the framework of nested BA.

  7. The electronic structure of the F-center in alkali-halides-The Bethe cluster - lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, S.L.A. de.

    1977-07-01

    The electronic structure of the F-center in alkali-halides with the NaCl structure has been studied using the Bethe Cluster lattice method. The central cluster has been taken as constituted by the vacancy and the nearest- and second-neighbors to it, respectively cations and anions. The optical transitions have been calculated and compared to experimental data on the location of the peak of the F-absorption band. The agreement obtained indicates that this method may be used to study properties of this defect in alkali halides. (Author) [pt

  8. Probabilistic image processing by means of the Bethe approximation for the Q-Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Titterington, D M

    2003-01-01

    The framework of Bayesian image restoration for multi-valued images by means of the Q-Ising model with nearest-neighbour interactions is presented. Hyperparameters in the probabilistic model are determined so as to maximize the marginal likelihood. A practical algorithm is described for multi-valued image restoration based on the Bethe approximation. The algorithm corresponds to loopy belief propagation in artificial intelligence. We conclude that, in real world grey-level images, the Q-Ising model can give us good results

  9. Stieltjes-Bethe equations in higher genus and branched coverings with even ramifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkin, Dmitry

    2018-02-01

    We describe projective structures on a Riemann surface corresponding to monodromy groups which have trivial SL (2) monodromies around singularities and trivial PSL (2) monodromies along homologically non-trivial loops on a Riemann surface. We propose a natural higher genus analog of Stieltjes-Bethe equations. Links with branched projective structures and with Hurwitz spaces with ramifications of even order are established. We find a higher genus analog of the genus zero Yang-Yang function (the function generating accessory parameters) and describe its similarity and difference with Bergman tau-function on the Hurwitz spaces.

  10. Bound states of quarks calculated with stochastic integration of the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.

    1992-07-01

    We have computed the masses, wave functions and sea quark content of mesons in their ground state by integrating the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a stochastic algorithm. This method allows the inclusion of a large set of diagrams. Inspection of the kernel of the equation shows that q-q-bar pairs with similar constituent masses in a singlet spin state exhibit a high bound state which is not present in other pairs. The pion, kaon and eta belongs to this category. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. A Cluster-Bethe lattice treatment for the F-center in alkali-halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, S.L.A. de; Koiller, B.; Maffeo, B.; Brandi, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    The electronic structure of the F-center in alkali-halides with the NaCl structure has been studied using the Cluster-Bethe lattice method. The central cluster has been taken as constituted by the vacancy and the nearest- and second- neighbors to it, respectively, cations and anions. The optical transitions have been calculated and compared to experimental data on the location of the peak of the F-absorption band. The agreement obtained indicates that this method may be used to study properties of this defect in alkali halides [pt

  12. Norm formulae for the Bethe Ansatz on root systems of small rank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante, M D; Diejen, J F van; Maza, A C de la

    2008-01-01

    The norms of the Bethe Ansatz eigenfunctions for the Lieb-Liniger quantum system of n Bosonic particles on a ring with pairwise repulsive delta potential interactions are given by a beautiful determinantal formula, first conjectured by Gaudin in the early seventies and then proven by Korepin about a decade later. Recently, E Emsiz formulated a similar conjecture generalizing the Gaudin-Korepin norm formula in terms of the root systems of complex simple Lie algebras. Here we confirm the validity of the conjecture in question for small root systems up to rank 3 (thus including the important test case of the exceptional root system G 2 )

  13. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  14. UDI STOP Femminicidio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Crivelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available L'UDI, Unione Donne in Italia, ha collaborato con l'Osservatorio dei Processi Comunicativi a un numero monografico della rivista scientifica M@gm@ dal titolo "Violenza maschile e femminicidio". Il numero monografico vuole mettere a disposizione le analisi, l’esperienza e la storia nostra e delle nostre interlocutrici, come contributo al nostro comune lavoro di sensibilizzazione, contrasto alla violenza maschile sulle donne – femminicidio. “UDI STOP femminicidio” è da anni la nostra campagna contro la violenza di genere, la collaborazione con l’Osservatorio dei Processi Comunicativi è parte integrante di questo sforzo. Il primo e dichiarato dei nostri progetti politici è il contrasto alla cultura e al potere ideologico che consente il femminicidio, la subordinazione culturale e sociale, la percezione della donna come oggetto di dominio, la riduzione in schiavitù di tante donne, comprese molte donne prostitute... Sappiamo di non voler tradire una “responsabilità di genere” che deve necessariamente concretizzarsi in tanti “gesti responsabili”, nella lunga pazienza quotidiana che consente la sedimentazione di un cambiamento radicale nelle coscienze. Vogliamo continuare ad essere l’associazione che coniuga insieme la soggettività personale e l'assunzione diretta di responsabilità, della progettualità a lungo termine che non trova “contraddittorio” misurarsi con la solidarietà concreta e quotidiana con le altre donne, nel tentativo di far nascere le nuove maniere di pensare.

  15. Mixed spin-((1)/(2)) and spin-1 Blume-Capel Ising ferrimagnetic system on the Bethe lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albayrak, Erhan; Keskin, Mustafa

    2003-01-01

    The mixed spin-((1)/(2)) and spin-1 Blume-Capel Ising ferrimagnetic system is studied on the Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion equations. Exact expressions for the magnetization, the quadrupolar moment, the Curie temperature and the free energy are found and the phase diagrams are constructed on the Bethe lattice with the coordination numbers q=3, 4, 5 and 6. The existence of a tricritical point is investigated for different values of q. The results are compared with those of other approximate methods and with the exact result on the Bethe lattice by using a discrete nonlinear map and also the exact results that are available for the case of the honeycomb lattice

  16. Nitrogen Research Programme STOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erisman, J.W.; Van der Eerden, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution is one of the main threats to the environment now in the Netherlands as well as other parts of Europe. In order to address the main gaps on the issues of nitrogen pollution related to the local scale, the Ministries of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment (VROM) and of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries (LNV) have initiated a research programme, the Dutch Nitrogen Research Programme (STOP), which aims to provide a scientific basis to develop and implement policy on a local scale for the realisation and conservation of the EHS ('Dutch Mainframe of Natural Landscapes'). The results of the programme show that the description of emissions from manure in the field is difficult to describe and show large uncertainties. On the contrary, emissions from housings could be modelled well, if local actual data were available. The OPS model to describe the dispersion and deposition was evaluated with the measurements and the limitations were quantified. It appears that the model works well on the long term, whereas on the short term (hours) and short distance (tenths of meters) there is large uncertainty, especially in complex terrain. Critical loads for nitrogen for ecosystems were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of management options was quantified. A method to determine critical loads as a function of soil conditions, such as acidification and water availability was derived. This resulted in a combination of the soil model SMART and the so-called 'nature planner' (Natuurplanner). It was concluded that the combination of SMART, the nature planner and OPS provide a good tool to develop and support policy on the local scale. 4 refs

  17. A Bethe ansatz solvable model for superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, K.E. [Centre for Mathematical Physics, University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia); Dunning, C. [Institute of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent (United Kingdom); Links, J. [Centre for Mathematical Physics, University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: jrl@maths.uq.edu.au

    2006-08-07

    We introduce a general Hamiltonian describing coherent superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons. For particular choices of the coupling parameters, the model is integrable. One integrable manifold, as well as the Bethe ansatz solution, was found by Dukelsky et al. [J. Dukelsky, G.G. Dussel, C. Esebbag, S. Pittel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 050403]. Here we show that there is a second integrable manifold, established using the boundary quantum inverse scattering method. In this manner we obtain the exact solution by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the case where the Cooper pair energies are degenerate we examine the relationship between the spectrum of these integrable Hamiltonians and the quasi-exactly solvable spectrum of particular Schrodinger operators. For the solution we derive here the potential of the Schrodinger operator is given in terms of hyperbolic functions. For the solution derived by Dukelsky et al., loc. cit. the potential is sextic and the wavefunctions obey PT-symmetric boundary conditions. This latter case provides a novel example of an integrable Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Fock space whose states map into a Hilbert space of PT-symmetric wavefunctions defined on a contour in the complex plane.

  18. A Bethe ansatz solvable model for superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, K. E.; Dunning, C.; Links, J.

    2006-08-01

    We introduce a general Hamiltonian describing coherent superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons. For particular choices of the coupling parameters, the model is integrable. One integrable manifold, as well as the Bethe ansatz solution, was found by Dukelsky et al. [J. Dukelsky, G.G. Dussel, C. Esebbag, S. Pittel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 050403]. Here we show that there is a second integrable manifold, established using the boundary quantum inverse scattering method. In this manner we obtain the exact solution by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the case where the Cooper pair energies are degenerate we examine the relationship between the spectrum of these integrable Hamiltonians and the quasi-exactly solvable spectrum of particular Schrödinger operators. For the solution we derive here the potential of the Schrödinger operator is given in terms of hyperbolic functions. For the solution derived by Dukelsky et al., loc. cit. the potential is sextic and the wavefunctions obey PT-symmetric boundary conditions. This latter case provides a novel example of an integrable Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Fock space whose states map into a Hilbert space of PT-symmetric wavefunctions defined on a contour in the complex plane.

  19. Solution to Bethe-Salpeter equation via Mellin-Barnes transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendes, Pedro [Concepcion Univ. (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Kniehl, Bernd [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kondrashuk, Igor; Rojas Medar, Marko [Univ. del Bio-Bio, Chillan (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Notte Cuello, Eduardo A. [Univ. de La Serena (Chile). Facultad de Ciencias

    2012-06-15

    We consider Mellin-Barnes transform of triangle ladder-like scalar diagram in d=4 dimensions. It is shown how multi-fold MB transform of the momentum integral corresponding to any number of rungs is reduced to two-fold MB transform. For this purpose we use Belokurov-Usyukina reduction method for four-dimensional scalar integrals in the position space. The result is represented in terms of Euler {psi}-function and its derivatives. We derive new formulas for MB two-fold integration in the complex planes of two complex variables. We demonstrate that these formulas solve Bethe-Salpeter equation. We comment on further applications of solution to Bethe-Salpeter equation for vertices in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We show that the recursive property of MB transforms observed in the present work for that kind of diagrams has nothing to do with quantum field theory, theory of integral transforms, or with theory of polylogarithms in general, but has an origin in a simple recursive property for smooth functions which can be shown by using basic methods of mathematical analysis.

  20. A Bethe ansatz solvable model for superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibberd, K.E.; Dunning, C.; Links, J.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a general Hamiltonian describing coherent superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons. For particular choices of the coupling parameters, the model is integrable. One integrable manifold, as well as the Bethe ansatz solution, was found by Dukelsky et al. [J. Dukelsky, G.G. Dussel, C. Esebbag, S. Pittel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 050403]. Here we show that there is a second integrable manifold, established using the boundary quantum inverse scattering method. In this manner we obtain the exact solution by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the case where the Cooper pair energies are degenerate we examine the relationship between the spectrum of these integrable Hamiltonians and the quasi-exactly solvable spectrum of particular Schrodinger operators. For the solution we derive here the potential of the Schrodinger operator is given in terms of hyperbolic functions. For the solution derived by Dukelsky et al., loc. cit. the potential is sextic and the wavefunctions obey PT-symmetric boundary conditions. This latter case provides a novel example of an integrable Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Fock space whose states map into a Hilbert space of PT-symmetric wavefunctions defined on a contour in the complex plane

  1. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for U(1) invariant integrable models: Compact and non-compact applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, M.J.; Melo, C.S.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the algebraic Bethe ansatz developed in our previous paper [C.S. Melo, M.J. Martins, Nucl. Phys. B 806 (2009) 567] to three different families of U(1) integrable vertex models with arbitrary N bond states. These statistical mechanics systems are based on the higher spin representations of the quantum group U q [SU(2)] for both generic and non-generic values of q as well as on the non-compact discrete representation of the SL(2,R) algebra. We present for all these models the explicit expressions for both the on-shell and the off-shell properties associated to the respective transfer matrices eigenvalue problems. The amplitudes governing the vectors not parallel to the Bethe states are shown to factorize in terms of elementary building blocks functions. The results for the non-compact SL(2,R) model are argued to be derived from those obtained for the compact systems by taking suitable N→∞ limits. This permits us to study the properties of the non-compact SL(2,R) model starting from systems with finite degrees of freedom.

  2. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for U(1) invariant integrable models: Compact and non-compact applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M. J.; Melo, C. S.

    2009-10-01

    We apply the algebraic Bethe ansatz developed in our previous paper [C.S. Melo, M.J. Martins, Nucl. Phys. B 806 (2009) 567] to three different families of U(1) integrable vertex models with arbitrary N bond states. These statistical mechanics systems are based on the higher spin representations of the quantum group U[SU(2)] for both generic and non-generic values of q as well as on the non-compact discrete representation of the SL(2,R) algebra. We present for all these models the explicit expressions for both the on-shell and the off-shell properties associated to the respective transfer matrices eigenvalue problems. The amplitudes governing the vectors not parallel to the Bethe states are shown to factorize in terms of elementary building blocks functions. The results for the non-compact SL(2,R) model are argued to be derived from those obtained for the compact systems by taking suitable N→∞ limits. This permits us to study the properties of the non-compact SL(2,R) model starting from systems with finite degrees of freedom.

  3. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected FR-om subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports

  4. Yangian symmetry, S-matrices and Bethe Ansatz for the AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} superstring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuw, M. de [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    We discuss the relation between the recently derived bound state S-matrices for the AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} superstring and Yangian symmetry. We will study the relation between this Yangian symmetry and the Bethe ansatz. In particular we can use it to derive the Bethe equations for bound states. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Stopping the Bottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also when doctors recommend switching from formula to cow's milk. It can be a natural transition to offer ... Skim Milk Provide the Same Nutrients as Whole Milk? Weaning Your Child Nutrition Guide for Toddlers Healthy Drinks for Kids Toddlers at the Table: Avoiding Power Struggles View ...

  6. LHC Availability 2017: Technical Stop 1 to Technical Stop 2

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; Walsh, David John; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 1 (TS1) to Technical Stop 2 (TS2) in 2017. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  7. Health Education: Smoke Stop Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ray

    The author examines the traditional emphasis of health educators in preventive approaches to smoking behavior and suggests (through a brief literature review) specific techniques that may be useful in aiding those who would stop smoking. (MJB)

  8. A whistle-stop tour of statistics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Everitt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    "Preface according to my Penguin English dictionary, whistle-stop, used before a noun means 'consisting of brief stops in several places' and this whistle-stop tour of statistics does just that, with...

  9. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  10. Probing Light Stops with Stoponium

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We derive new limits on light stops from diboson resonance searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $hh$ channels from the first run of the LHC. If the two-body decays of the light stop are mildly suppressed or kinematically forbidden, stoponium bound states will form in $pp$ collisions and subsequently decay via the pair annihilation of the constituent stops to diboson final states, yielding striking resonance signatures. Remarkably, we find that stoponium searches are highly complementary to direct collider searches and indirect probes of light stops such as Higgs coupling measurements. Using an empirical quarkonia potential model and including the first two $S$-wave stoponium states, we find that in the decoupling limit $m_{\\widetilde t_1} \\lesssim 130$ GeV is excluded for any value of the stop mixing angle and heavy stop mass by the combination of the latest resonance searches and the indirect constraints. The $\\gamma \\gamma$ searches are the most complementary to the indirect constraint...

  11. Second stop and sbottom searches with a stealth stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Li, Lingfeng; Qin, Qin [Department of Physics, University of California,Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-11-29

    The top squarks (stops) may be the most wanted particles after the Higgs boson discovery. The searches for the lightest stop have put strong constraints on its mass. However, there is still a search gap in the low mass region if the spectrum of the stop and the lightest neutralino is compressed. In that case, it may be easier to look for the second stop since naturalness requires both stops to be close to the weak scale. The current experimental searches for the second stop are based on the simplified model approach with the decay modes t̃{sub 2}→t̃{sub 1}Z and t̃{sub 2}→t̃{sub 1}h. However, in a realistic supersymmetric spectrum there is always a sbottom lighter than the second stop, hence the decay patterns are usually more complicated than the simplified model assumptions. In particular, there are often large branching ratios of the decays t̃{sub 2}→b̃{sub 1}W and b̃{sub 1}→t̃{sub 1}W as long as they are open. The decay chains can be even more complex if there are intermediate states of additional charginos and neutralinos in the decays. By studying several MSSM benchmark models at the 14 TeV LHC, we point out the importance of the multi-W final states in the second stop and the sbottom searches, such as the same-sign dilepton and multilepton signals, aside from the traditional search modes. The observed same-sign dilepton excesses at LHC Run 1 and Run 2 may be explained by some of our benchmark models. We also suggest that the vector boson tagging and a new kinematic variable may help to suppress the backgrounds and increase the signal significance for some search channels. Due to the complex decay patterns and lack of the dominant decay channels, the best reaches likely require a combination of various search channels at the LHC for the second stop and the lightest sbottom.

  12. On Condensation Properties of Bethe Roots Associated with the XXZ Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Karol K.

    2018-02-01

    I prove that the Bethe roots describing either the ground state or a certain class of "particle-hole" excited states of the XXZ spin-1/2 chain in any sector with magnetisation m \\in [0;1/2] exist, are uniquely defined, and form, in the infinite volume limit, a dense distribution on a subinterval of R. The results hold for any value of the anisotropy {Δ ≥ -1}. In fact, I establish an even stronger result, namely the existence of an all order asymptotic expansion of the counting function associated with such roots. As a corollary, these results allow one to prove the existence and form of the infinite volume limit of various observables attached to the model -the excitation energy, momentum, the zero temperature correlation functions, so as to name a few- that were argued earlier in the literature.

  13. Cluster-Bethe-lattice treatment of the interstitial boron centre in irradiated gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, P. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik)

    1984-08-01

    The radiation-induced interstitial defect B(1) in GaAs is theoretically analysed by a cluster-Bethe lattice treatment. Theoretical results obtained for a B-Ga dumbbell in gallium arsenide agree quite well with experimental data. The dumbbell coupling is about three times stiffer than the bonds between host-lattice atoms. The separation of the dumbbell atoms amounts to one lattice constant. Due to the isotopy of gallium atoms all B(1) bands should exhibit a double-peak structure with a small frequency split of about 1, 0.1, and 0.4 cm/sup -1/ for the A/sub 1/, B/sub 1/, and B/sub 2/ modes, respectively. A resolution of these splittings would supply additional evidence for the B(1) defect model discussed here.

  14. Improvements in the G W and Bethe-Salpeter-equation calculations on phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, F.; Ribeiro, R. M.

    2017-09-01

    Phosphorene is a bidimensional material that has properties useful for semiconductor devices. In this work we studied the electronic and optical properties of this material using the G W approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) methods. We stress the importance of a careful convergence study of the most relevant parameters, and we show how they affect the result of the calculations. A comparison with previous results is given. The QP band gap obtained was 2.06 eV and it is in good agreement with experimental results. BSE calculations were performed on top of G0W0 to include excitonic effects. The absorption spectrum was analyzed and an optical gap of 1.22 eV was obtained. The calculated excitonic binding energy is 0.84 eV, also in good agreement with experimental results.

  15. Bethe-Boltzmann hydrodynamics and spin transport in the XXZ chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulchandani, Vir B.; Vasseur, Romain; Karrasch, Christoph; Moore, Joel E.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum integrable systems, such as the interacting Bose gas in one dimension and the XXZ quantum spin chain, have an extensive number of local conserved quantities that endow them with exotic thermalization and transport properties. We discuss recently introduced hydrodynamic approaches for such integrable systems from the viewpoint of kinetic theory and extend the previous works by proposing a numerical scheme to solve the hydrodynamic equations for finite times and arbitrary locally equilibrated initial conditions. We then discuss how such methods can be applied to describe nonequilibrium steady states involving ballistic heat and spin currents. In particular, we show that the spin Drude weight in the XXZ chain, previously accessible only by rigorous techniques of limited scope or controversial thermodynamic Bethe ansatz arguments, may be evaluated from hydrodynamics in very good agreement with density-matrix renormalization group calculations.

  16. "Her mouth is medicine": Beth Brant and Paula Gunn Allen's decolonizing queer erotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Arianne

    2013-01-01

    This article asserts the need to recognize the complexity of the theoretical work of more lesbian Native American writers, focusing specifically Beth Brant (Bay of Quinte Mohawk) and Paula Gunn Allen (Laguna Pueblo). Their poetry and short stories provide a theoretically nuanced analysis of how heteronormativity is intertwined in and dependent on colonialism, and thus a methodology for Queer Theory that requires an understanding of it in relation to colonialism. They reject heteronormative Pocahontas fantasies about Native women, offering a lesbian-based tactic for decolonization through the expression of erotic desire. This article demonstrates the endless possibilities for fierce queer resistance, revolutionary change, and healing from the trauma of genocide and the accompanying colonialist heteropatriarchal disciplining of Native women's bodies.

  17. La cerámica Khirbet Kerak (Beth Yerah, Israel y la etnicidad: un enfoque alternativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Gandulla

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available La cerámica Khirbet Kerak, descubierta en el sudoeste del Mar de Galilea en 1930 por W. F. Albright, ha sido desde entonces motivo de muchas controversias. Las razones de las discusiones en torno a este estilo radican  en su carácter aparentemente intrusivo en Palestina, entre el 2800-2400  a.C., puesto que esta cerámica es típica en la Cultura Transcaucásica Temprana o Cultura Kura-Araxes y en Siria Septentrional, durante el Bronce Antiguo, siendo especialmente abundante en la etapa final de este período. Sin embargo los estudios realizados en Beth Shan (Chazan y McGovern, ver n. 17, muestran que los materiales Khirbet Kerak fueron de producción local lo que parece descartar su carácter intrusivo. Por tanto, desde nuestro punto de vista, el “fenómeno Khirbet Kerak” constituye así un hito de singular importancia en la conformación de las tradiciones culturales de Canaan a partir de un sustrato etnocultural común hurrita, en un eje de interacción cultural norte a sur desde la región del Lago Van, que habrá de proyectarse de distintas formas en la macrorregión alcanzando hasta los antiguos hebreos, en cuanto cananeos, como se reflejan en instituciones del derecho privado presentes en las narraciones del Génesis.Palabras clave: Canaán - Bronce Antiguo - Beth Yerah - Khirbet Kerak - Hurritas- Hebreos

  18. Log-gamma directed polymer with fixed endpoints via the replica Bethe Ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Thimothée; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2014-10-01

    We study the model of a discrete directed polymer (DP) on a square lattice with homogeneous inverse gamma distribution of site random Boltzmann weights, introduced by Seppalainen (2012 Ann. Probab. 40 19-73). The integer moments of the partition sum, \\overline{Z^n} , are studied using a transfer matrix formulation, which appears as a generalization of the Lieb-Liniger quantum mechanics of bosons to discrete time and space. In the present case of the inverse gamma distribution the model is integrable in terms of a coordinate Bethe Ansatz, as discovered by Brunet. Using the Brunet-Bethe eigenstates we obtain an exact expression for the integer moments of \\overline{Z^n} for polymers of arbitrary lengths and fixed endpoint positions. Although these moments do not exist for all integer n, we are nevertheless able to construct a generating function which reproduces all existing integer moments and which takes the form of a Fredholm determinant (FD). This suggests an analytic continuation via a Mellin-Barnes transform and we thereby propose a FD ansatz representation for the probability distribution function (PDF) of Z and its Laplace transform. In the limit of a very long DP, this ansatz yields that the distribution of the free energy converges to the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) Tracy-Widom distribution up to a non-trivial average and variance that we calculate. Our asymptotic predictions coincide with a result by Borodin et al (2013 Commun. Math. Phys. 324 215-32) based on a formula obtained by Corwin et al (2011 arXiv:1110.3489) using the geometric Robinson-Schensted-Knuth (gRSK) correspondence. In addition we obtain the dependence on the endpoint position and the exact elastic coefficient at a large time. We argue the equivalence between our formula and that of Borodin et al. As we will discuss, this provides a connection between quantum integrability and tropical combinatorics.

  19. Higgs-Stoponium Mixing Near the Stop-Antistop Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T; Wagner, Carlos E M

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model contain additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons that are coupled to heavy scalar top quarks (stops). This system exhibits interesting field theoretic phenomena when the Higgs mass is close to the stop-antistop production threshold. Existing work in the literature has examined the digluon-to-diphoton cross section near threshold and has focused on enhancements in the cross section that might arise either from the perturbative contributions to the Higgs-to-digluon and Higgs-to-diphoton form factors or from mixing of the Higgs boson with stoponium states. Near threshold, enhancements in the relevant amplitudes that go as inverse powers of the stop-antistop relative velocity require resummations of perturbation theory and/or nonperturbative treatments. We present a complete formulation of threshold effects at leading order in the stop-antistop relative velocity in terms of nonrelativistic effective field theory. We give detailed numerical calculations for the case in ...

  20. Stopped nucleons in configuration space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialas, Andrzej [Jagellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Bzdak, Adam [AGH - Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-05-09

    In this note, using the colour string model, we study the configuration space distribution of stopped nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. We find that the stopped nucleons from the target and the projectile end up separated from each other by the distance increasing with the collision energy. In consequence, for the center of mass energies larger than 6 or 10 GeV (depending on the details of the model) it appears that the system created is not in thermal and chemical equilibrium, and the net baryon density reached is likely not much higher than that already present in the colliding nuclei.

  1. Public inquiry related to the request by EDF of a definitive stopping and complete dismantling of the hardware storage installation of the Monts d'Arree nuclear power plant (INB n.162). Opinion and conclusions of the inquiry commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    After a recall of the project of stopping and dismantling of the hardware storage installation (INB n.162) which had been created after the stopping and dismantling of the Monts d'Arree heavy water nuclear reactor (INB n.28), this report analyzes the results of the public inquiry, and highlights the arguments of those in favour of this project and those opposed to it. Then, it states the Inquiry Commission's opinion which addresses the request for a national public debate, the project justification, the inquiry file, the site radiological status, the site radiological control during works, the impacts of dismantling, the various risks (for the population and the workers, in terms of fire risks), the issue of radioactive wastes, economic aspects (costs, jobs, local economy, tourism and site image), and site reconversion

  2. Correlated ion stopping in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicknagel, G.; Deutsch, C.

    1997-01-01

    The basic features of correlated ion stopping in plasmas are demonstrated by employing two opposite extremes of cluster structures, a statistical model with a spatial ion distribution of Gaussian shape and the highly regular configuration of N-ion chains and cubic boxes. In the case of the ion chains the resonant character of correlated stopping due to the interference of the excited wake fields is discussed in detail. The general behavior of correlation effects is summarized and its dependence on the ratio of cluster size and interion spacing to the screening length in the plasma, as well as the ratio of the cluster velocity to the mean electron velocity in the target, is stressed out. The validity and applicability of the dielectric response formalism used for describing correlated stopping is critically reviewed. A scheme is presented to extend the linear formalism to weak nonlinear situations that occur, in particular, for small highly charged clusters at moderate or low velocities. For the Gaussian cluster a fit formula is given, which allows a fast and accurate calculation of the enhancement of stopping due to correlation effects and applies for all degrees of degeneracy of the electrons and arbitrary cluster velocities. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Tunstall, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops ${\\tilde t}_1$, making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are ${\\tilde t_1}\\to t \\tilde \\chi^0_1$, ${\\tilde t_1}\\to W b \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ and ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$. We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ in a model-independent fashion, revealing the existence of large regions in parameter space which are excluded for any ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ branching ratio. This effect is then illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the LHC bounds from ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ searches are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing leads only to a modest increase in the allowed regions of parameter...

  4. In Defence of Thought Stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Gary Maria

    2009-01-01

    Thought stopping (TS) has a long and established history as an effective mental control technique among the cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT). Recent claims have arisen, particularly from acceptance and mindfulness-based authors, that thought suppression--and therefore TS--is counterproductive. These claims take the syllogistic form: TS is a…

  5. Computational studies of first-Born scattering cross sections. I - Spectral properties of Bethe surfaces. II - Moment-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margoliash, D. J.; Langhoff, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the spectral properties of Bethe surfaces to establish a basis for the formulation of alternatives to the conventional computational approach. The relevant scattering cross sections and closely related Van Hove autocorrelation functions are identified as spectral (Riemann-Stieltjes) integral properties of the corresponding atomic and molecular Bethe surfaces. Evaluation of these properties for hydrogenic targets provides a basis for clarifying the ranges of validity of the static, binary-encounter, and sum-rule approximations to differential and total inelastic cross sections generally employed in place of the correct Born results. A description is provided of moment-theory methods for calculations of the high-energy electron impact-excitation and -ionization cross sections and closely related Van Hove correlation functions of atomic and molecular targets. Attention is given to aspects of the Chebyshev-Stieltjes-Markoff moment theory and the Stieltjes and Chebyshev derivatives.

  6. Numerical Solutions of One Reduced Bethe-Salpeter Equation for the Coulombic Bound States Composed of Virtual Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao-Kai

    2018-04-01

    We present one reduction of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the bound states composed of two off-mass-shell constituents. Both the relativistic effects and the virtuality effects can be considered in the obtained spinless virtuality distribution equation. The eigenvalues of the spinless virtuality distribution equation are perturbatively calculated and the bound states e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-, μ+e-, and τ+e- are discussed.

  7. Communication: Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with intermolecular induction and dispersion energies from the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Christof; Klopper, Wim

    2017-11-01

    A method for calculating intermolecular induction and dispersion energies based on a GW description of the monomers and employing response functions from the Bethe-Salpeter equation is proposed. Calculations on a test set of 10 weakly bound complexes with GW-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (GW-SAPT) show an improved performance in comparison with symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on density-functional theory (DFT-SAPT).

  8. Non-ergodic delocalized phase in Anderson model on Bethe lattice and regular graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, V. E.; Altshuler, B. L.; Ioffe, L. B.

    2018-02-01

    We develop a novel analytical approach to the problem of single particle localization in infinite dimensional spaces such as Bethe lattice and random regular graph models. The key ingredient of the approach is the notion of the inverted order thermodynamic limit (IOTL) in which the coupling to the environment goes to zero before the system size goes to infinity. Using IOTL and Replica Symmetry Breaking (RSB) formalism we derive analytical expressions for the fractal dimension D1 that distinguishes between the extended ergodic, D1 = 1, and extended non-ergodic (multifractal), 0 graphs with the branching number K. We also employ RSB formalism to derive the analytical expression ln Styp-1 = - 〈 ln S 〉 ∼(Wc - W) - 1 for the typical imaginary part of self-energy Styp in the non-ergodic phase close to the Anderson transition in the conventional thermodynamic limit. We prove the existence of an extended non-ergodic phase in a broad range of disorder strength and energy and establish the phase diagrams of the models as a function of disorder and energy. The results of the analytical theory are compared with large-scale population dynamics and with the exact diagonalization of Anderson model on random regular graphs. We discuss the consequences of these results for the many body localization.

  9. The critical 1-arm exponent for the ferromagnetic Ising model on the Bethe lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydenreich, Markus; Kolesnikov, Leonid

    2018-04-01

    We consider the ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor Ising model on regular trees (Bethe lattice), which is well-known to undergo a phase transition in the absence of an external magnetic field. The behavior of the model at critical temperature can be described in terms of various critical exponents; one of them is the critical 1-arm exponent ρ which characterizes the rate of decay of the (root) magnetization as a function of the distance to the boundary. The crucial quantity we analyze in this work is the thermal expectation of the root spin on a finite subtree, where the expected value is taken with respect to a probability measure related to the corresponding finite-volume Hamiltonian with a fixed boundary condition. The spontaneous magnetization, which is the limit of this thermal expectation in the distance between the root and the boundary (i.e., in the height of the subtree), is known to vanish at criticality. We are interested in a quantitative analysis of the rate of this convergence in terms of the critical 1-arm exponent ρ. Therefore, we rigorously prove that ⟨σ0⟩ n +, the thermal expectation of the root spin at the critical temperature and in the presence of the positive boundary condition, decays as ⟨σ0 ⟩ n +≈n-1/2 (in a rather sharp sense), where n is the height of the tree. This establishes the 1-arm critical exponent for the Ising model on regular trees (ρ =1/2 ).

  10. A Binary-Encounter-Bethe Approach to Simulate DNA Damage by the Direct Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage is of crucial importance in the understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation. The main mechanisms of DNA damage are by the direct effect of radiation (e.g. direct ionization) and by indirect effect (e.g. damage by.OH radicals created by the radiolysis of water). Despite years of research in this area, many questions on the formation of DNA damage remains. To refine existing DNA damage models, an approach based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model was developed[1]. This model calculates differential cross sections for ionization of the molecular orbitals of the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates using the electron binding energy, the mean kinetic energy and the occupancy number of the orbital. This cross section has an analytic form which is quite convenient to use and allows the sampling of the energy loss occurring during an ionization event. To simulate the radiation track structure, the code RITRACKS developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center is used[2]. This code calculates all the energy deposition events and the formation of the radiolytic species by the ion and the secondary electrons as well. We have also developed a technique to use the integrated BEB cross section for the bases, sugar and phosphates in the radiation transport code RITRACKS. These techniques should allow the simulation of DNA damage by ionizing radiation, and understanding of the formation of double-strand breaks caused by clustered damage in different conditions.

  11. Beth-Uhlenbeck approach for repulsive interactions between baryons in a hadron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr; Motornenko, Anton; Gorenstein, Mark I.; Stoecker, Horst

    2018-03-01

    The quantum mechanical Beth-Uhlenbeck (BU) approach for repulsive hard-core interactions between baryons is applied to the thermodynamics of a hadron gas. The second virial coefficient a2—the "excluded volume" parameter—calculated within the BU approach is found to be temperature dependent, and it differs dramatically from the classical excluded volume (EV) model result. At temperatures T =100 -200 MeV, the widely used classical EV model underestimates the EV parameter for nucleons at a given value of the nucleon hard-core radius by large factors of 3-4. Previous studies, which employed the hard-core radii of hadrons as an input into the classical EV model, have to be re-evaluated using the appropriately rescaled EV parameters. The BU approach is used to model the repulsive baryonic interactions in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Lattice data for the second- and fourth-order net baryon susceptibilities are described fairly well when the temperature dependent BU baryonic excluded volume parameter corresponds to nucleon hard-core radii of rc=0.25 -0.3 fm. Role of the attractive baryonic interactions is also considered. It is argued that HRG model with a constant baryon-baryon EV parameter vN N≃1 fm3 provides a simple yet efficient description of baryon-baryon interaction in the crossover temperature region.

  12. Summary the race to reinvent energy and stop global warming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Complete summary of Fred Krupp and Miriam Horn's book: ""Earth: The Sequel: The Race to Reinvent Energy and Stop Global Warming"". This summary of the ideas from Fred Krupp and Miriam Horn's book ""Earth: The Sequel"" explains how capitalism, as the most powerful economic force in the world, is the only engine of change that has the strength to stop global warming. In their book, the authors demonstrate how this can be achieved by installing a cap-and-trade initiative, providing genuine economic incentives for companies and reducing their carbon footprint. This summary explains their theory in

  13. Light Stops at Exceptional Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldzak, Tamar; Mailybaev, Alexei A.; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2018-01-01

    Almost twenty years ago, light was slowed down to less than 10-7 of its vacuum speed in a cloud of ultracold atoms of sodium. Upon a sudden turn-off of the coupling laser, a slow light pulse can be imprinted on cold atoms such that it can be read out and converted into a photon again. In this process, the light is stopped by absorbing it and storing its shape within the atomic ensemble. Alternatively, the light can be stopped at the band edge in photonic-crystal waveguides, where the group speed vanishes. Here, we extend the phenomenon of stopped light to the new field of parity-time (P T ) symmetric systems. We show that zero group speed in P T symmetric optical waveguides can be achieved if the system is prepared at an exceptional point, where two optical modes coalesce. This effect can be tuned for optical pulses in a wide range of frequencies and bandwidths, as we demonstrate in a system of coupled waveguides with gain and loss.

  14. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting ...

  15. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your fingers and from your nails to your face and mouth. To help you stop biting your ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some ...

  16. Identification of stopping ions in a silicon Timepix detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2018-02-01

    Timepix detectors are increasingly used in space-based applications. Such detectors are low power, low mass, and provide a wealth of information necessary for characterizing the ionizing radiation environment in space for both humans and hardware. Stopping ions are shown to contribute to the energy loss spectrum in a thin, pixelated, Timepix detector, and this energy loss is shown to contribute to the LET spectrum near 14 keV/micron. Bulk data also indicates the presence of Hydrogen isotopes in the energy loss spectra. Individual track analysis can be used to identify the stopping ions and the related energy and isotope through comparison with theoretical energy loss curves. While this calculation is specific to the Timepix, the impact of stopping ions on other instruments can be estimated using the insight gained from this approach.

  17. Stopping of Ships Equipped with Azipods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Nowicki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a description of different possibilities of stopping a large ship equipped with azipods. The model tests were carried out to compare the effectiveness of stopping the ship using the different methods. The ship model used in stopping tests reproduces a large LNG carrier of capacity ~150 000 m3

  18. Shekgalagari stops and theories of phonological representation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to present some aspects of stop consonants, e.g. voice onset time (VOT) and F0 perturbation, and also to present phonological theories of stop representation in order to examine matters of Shekgalagari stop production and phonological representation. Of the phonological representation theories ...

  19. Log-gamma directed polymer with one free end via coordinate Bethe Ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Pascal

    2017-07-01

    The discrete polymer model with random Boltzmann weights with homogeneous inverse gamma distribution, introduced by Seppäläinen, is studied in the case of a polymer with one fixed and one free end. The model with two fixed ends has been integrated by Thiery and Le Doussal, using coordinate Bethe Ansatz techniques and an analytic-continuation prescription. The probability distribution of the free energy has been obtained through the replica method, even though the moments of the partition sum do not exist at all orders due to the fat tail in the distribution of Boltzmann weights. To extend this approach to the polymer with one free end, we argue that the contribution to the partition sums in the thermodynamic limit is localised on parity-invariant string states. This situation is analogous to the case of the continuum polymer with one free end, related to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation with flat boundary conditions and solved by Le Doussal and Calabrese. The expansion of the generating function of the partition sum in terms of numbers of strings can also be transposed to the log-gamma polymer model, with the induced Fredholm determinant structure. We derive the large-time limit of the rescaled cumulative distribution function, and relate it to the GOE Tracy-Widom distribution. The derivation is conjectural in the sense that it assumes completeness of a family of string states, and expressions of their norms, already useful in the fixed-end problem, and extends heuristically the order of moments of the partition sum to the complex plane.

  20. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    that the proof of Proposition 3.7 in [1] iswrong. Fortunately, the statment of that Proposition and the results depending on it stay correct. It is the purpose of this note to provide correct proofs.  [1] U. Fahrenberg and M. Raussen, Reparametrizations of continuous paths, J. Homotopy Relat. Struct. 2 (2007......In [1], we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reparametrization of the unit interval. I am indebted to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out tome...

  1. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    that the proof of Proposition 3.7 in [1] is wrong. Fortunately, the statement of that proposition and the results depending on it stay correct. It is the purpose of this note to provide correct proofs. [1] U. Fahrenberg and M. Raussen. Reparametrizations of continuous paths. J. Homotopy Relat. Struc. 2 (2007......In [1] we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reprametrizations of the unit interval. I am grateful to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out to me...

  2. Optimal design of a beam stop for Indus-2 using finite element heat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The radiation source impinges ∼ 1 kW power on the beam stop and the heat transfer capabilities of ... ring and will give out, from its bending magnets, a continuous spectrum of hard X-rays with critical photon ... safer side, in our calculations we have assumed 1.25 kW of power impinging on the beam stop. The size of the ...

  3. Revised emission factors for gas engines including start/stop emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Boll Illerup, J.; Birr-Petersen, K.

    2008-06-15

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has led to Danish gas engine plants increasingly converting to the spot and regulating power markets. In order to offer regulating power, plants need to be able to start and stop the engines at the plants quickly. The liberalisation causes a considerable change of operation practice of the engines e.g. less full load operation hours /year. The project provides an inventory determining the scale of the emissions during the start and stop sequence as well as proposals for engine modifications aimed at reducing start/stop emissions. This report includes calculation of emission factors as well as an inventory of total emissions and reduction potentials. (au)

  4. Bethe ansatz solution of an integrable, non-Abelian anyon chain with D(D{sub 3}) symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C.W.; Dancer, K.A.; Isaac, P.S. [Centre for Mathematical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia); Links, J., E-mail: jrl@maths.uq.edu.a [Centre for Mathematical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia)

    2010-09-11

    The exact solution for the energy spectrum of a one-dimensional Hamiltonian with local two-site interactions and periodic boundary conditions is determined. The two-site Hamiltonians commute with the symmetry algebra given by the Drinfeld double D(D{sub 3}) of the dihedral group D{sub 3}. As such the model describes local interactions between non-Abelian anyons, with fusion rules given by the tensor product decompositions of the irreducible representations of D(D{sub 3}). The Bethe ansatz equations which characterise the exact solution are found through the use of functional relations satisfied by a set of mutually commuting transfer matrices.

  5. Magnetization process in the exactly solved spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg model on decorated Bethe lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Strečka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg model on diamond-like decorated Bethe lattices is exactly solved in the presence of the longitudinal magnetic field by combining the decoration-iteration mapping transformation with the method of exact recursion relations. In particular, the ground state and low-temperature magnetization process of the ferrimagnetic version of the considered model is investigated in detail. Three different magnetization scenarios with up to two consecutive fractional magnetization plateaus were found, whereas the intermediate magnetization plateau may either correspond to the classical ferrimagnetic spin arrangement and/or the field-induced quantum ferrimagnetic spin ordering without any classical counterpart.

  6. Web-based description of the space radiation environment using the Bethe-Bloch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Calders, Stijn; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Space weather is a rapidly growing area of research not only in scientific and engineering applications but also in physics education and in the interest of the public. We focus especially on space radiation and its impact on space exploration. The topic is highly interdisciplinary, bringing together fundamental concepts of nuclear physics with aspects of radiation protection and space science. We give a new approach to presenting the topic by developing a web-based application that combines some of the fundamental concepts from these two fields into a single tool that can be used in the context of advanced secondary or undergraduate university education. We present DREADCode, an outreach or teaching tool to rapidly assess the current conditions of the radiation field in space. DREADCode uses the available data feeds from a number of ongoing space missions (ACE, GOES-13, GOES-15) to produce a first order approximation of the radiation dose an astronaut would receive during a mission of exploration in deep space (i.e. far from the Earth’s shielding magnetic field and from the radiation belts). DREADCode is based on an easy-to-use GUI interface available online from the European Space Weather Portal (www.spaceweather.eu/dreadcode). The core of the radiation transport computation to produce the radiation dose from the observed fluence of radiation observed by the spacecraft fleet considered is based on a relatively simple approximation: the Bethe-Bloch equation. DREADCode also assumes a simplified geometry and material configuration for the shields used to compute the dose. The approach is approximate and sacrifices some important physics on the altar of rapid execution time, which allows a real-time operation scenario. There is no intention here to produce an operational tool for use in space science and engineering. Rather, we present an educational tool at undergraduate level that uses modern web-based and programming methods to learn some of the most important

  7. Light stop squarks and b-tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Gabriele; Petersson, Christoffer; Torre, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    A significant part of the parameter space for light stop squarks still remains unconstrained by collider searches. For both R-Parity Conserving (RPC) and R-Parity Violating (RPV) scenarios there are regions in which the stop mass is around or below the top quark mass that are particularly challenging experimentally. Here we review the status of light stop searches, both in RPC and RPV scenarios. We also propose strategies, generally based on exploiting b-tagging, to cover the unconstrained regions.

  8. Organic materials irradiated at very low temperature and at different stopping powers: examples of polyethylene and of cyclohexane molecules trapped in matrix; Materiaux organiques irradies a tres basse temperature et a differents pouvoirs d'arret: cas du polyethylene et des molecules de cyclohexane isolees en matrice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melot, M

    2003-10-15

    This thesis concerns the formation mechanisms of defects created in organic materials during irradiation under vacuum, at very low temperature and at different electronic stopping powers. Analysis have been realised by infrared spectroscopy. The first part concerns polyethylene. Irradiating at 8 K allows to dissociate the direct irradiation effects (in cage reactions) and the radical recombination effects. According to the considered chemical groups, the radical mobility leads to very different changes for the formation radiochemical yields. The second part concerns the irradiation of cyclohexane molecules trapped in a solid argon matrix. We evaluate the contribution of intermolecular and intramolecular reactions. The intermolecular reactions have limited consequences when using low ionising radiations but are crucial for heavy ion irradiations. (author)

  9. Fast iterative solution of the Bethe-Salpeter eigenvalue problem using low-rank and QTT tensor approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Peter; Dolgov, Sergey; Khoromskaia, Venera; Khoromskij, Boris N.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose and study two approaches to approximate the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) by using structured iterative eigenvalue solvers. Both approaches are based on the reduced basis method and low-rank factorizations of the generating matrices. We also propose to represent the static screen interaction part in the BSE matrix by a small active sub-block, with a size balancing the storage for rank-structured representations of other matrix blocks. We demonstrate by various numerical tests that the combination of the diagonal plus low-rank plus reduced-block approximation exhibits higher precision with low numerical cost, providing as well a distinct two-sided error estimate for the smallest eigenvalues of the Bethe-Salpeter operator. The complexity is reduced to O (Nb2) in the size of the atomic orbitals basis set, Nb, instead of the practically intractable O (Nb6) scaling for the direct diagonalization. In the second approach, we apply the quantized-TT (QTT) tensor representation to both, the long eigenvectors and the column vectors in the rank-structured BSE matrix blocks, and combine this with the ALS-type iteration in block QTT format. The QTT-rank of the matrix entities possesses almost the same magnitude as the number of occupied orbitals in the molecular systems, No chain-type molecules, while supporting sufficient accuracy.

  10. THE MISSIONARY WOMEN IN THE INLAND OF AUSTRALIA AND THE AUSTRALIAN INLAND MISSION AS REPRESENTED IN BETH BECKETT’S LIFE MEMOIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Eliyanah

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the gender dimension of religious missions administered by the Presbyterian Church in the inland Australia as represented in Beth Beckett’s life memoir written in 1947-1955. It is aimed at obtaining general ideas on the involvement of women, as the wives of missionaries, Focusing on the experience of Beth Beckett, it argues that her position as a wife of a missionary is problematic: on the one hand she did transgress the traditional idea of staying-home wife by choosing to travel along with her husband, but at the same time, she was still bound by the domestic side of the job.

  11. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the dynamics of power in processes of creativity, and show its paradoxical nature as both a bridge and a barrier to creativity in organisations. Recent social psychological experimental research (Slighte, de Dreu & Nijstad, 2011) on the relation between power...... and floating source for empowering people in the organisation. We will explore and discuss here the potentials, challenges and pitfalls of power in relation to creativity in the life of organisations today. The aim is to demonstrate that power struggles may be utilised as constructive sources of creativity...

  12. Stopping atoms with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.N.; Wieman, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of light pressure to cool and stop neutral atoms has been an area of considerable interest recently. Cooled neutral atoms are needed for a variety of interesting experiments involving neutral atom traps and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. Laser cooling of sodium has previously been demonstrated using elegant but quite elaborate apparatus. These techniques employed stabilized dye lasers and a variety of additional sophisticated hardware. The authors have demonstrated that a frequency chirp technique can be implemented using inexpensive diode lasers and simple electronics. In this technique the atoms in an atomic beam scatter resonant photons from a counterpropagating laser beam. The momentum transfer from the photons slows the atoms. The primary difficulty is that as the atoms slow their Doppler shift changes, and so they are no longer in resonance with the incident photons. In the frequency chirp technique this is solved by rapidly changing the laser frequency so that the atoms remain in resonance. To achieve the necessary frequency sweep with a dye laser one must use an extremely sophisticated high-speed electrooptic modulator. With a diode laser, however, the frequency can be smoothly and rapidly varied over many gigahertz simply by changing the injection current

  13. Addressing production stops in the food industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Herbert, Luke Thomas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the challenges in the food industry which causes the production lines to stop, illustrated by a case study of an SME size company in the baked goods sector in Denmark. The paper proposes key elements this sector needs to be aware of to effectively address production stops......, and gives examples of the unique challenges faced by the SME food industry....

  14. Stop the Violence: Overcoming Self-Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nelson, Ed.

    The story of the Stop the Violence movement among rap music artists and music industry colleagues is told, along with the story of a video that was produced as part of this initiative. The Stop the Violence project grew out of the reaction to violence among concert goers at a 1987 rap concert on Long Island (New York). Rap musicians have joined…

  15. Analytical and Experimental Investigation on A Dynamic Thermo-Sensitive Electrical Parameter with Maximum dIC/dt during Turn-off for High Power Trench Gate/Field-Stop IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Luo, Haoze; Li, Wuhua

    2017-01-01

    collector current during turn-off process is developed in terms of the behavior characteristics of the inside storage carriers. Then, the inherent linear relationship between the maximum collector current falling rate dI{C}/dt and junction temperature T {j} is demonstrated and investigated. Fortunately......, benefitting from the presence of the intrinsic parasitic inductance L{rm eE} between the Kelvin and power emitters of IGBT modules, the maximum dI{C}/dt can be easily measured to validate the theoretical analysis. Consequently, the maximum dI{C}/dt during turn-off process is a promising DTSEP for IGBT module...

  16. A light sneutrino rescues the light stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chala, M. [Departament de Física Tèorica, Universitat de València and IFIC, Universitat de València-CSIC,Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (València) (Spain); Delgado, A. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nardini, G. [Albert Einstein Center (AEC), Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP), University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Quirós, M. [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats - ICREA, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-04-18

    Stop searches in supersymmetric frameworks with R-parity conservation usually assume the lightest neutralino to be the lightest supersymmetric particle. In this paper we consider an alternative scenario in which the left-handed tau sneutrino is lighter than neutralinos and stable at collider scales, but possibly unstable at cosmological scales. Moreover the (mostly right-handed) stop t̃ is lighter than all electroweakinos, and heavier than the scalars of the third generation lepton doublet, whose charged component, τ̃, is heavier than the neutral one, ν̃. The remaining supersymmetric particles are decoupled from the stop phenomenology. In most of the parameter space, the relevant stop decays are only into tτ̃τ, tν̃ν and bν̃τ via off-shell electroweakinos. We constrain the branching ratios of these decays by recasting the most sensitive stop searches. Due to the “double invisible” kinematics of the t̃→tν̃ν process, and the low efficiency in tagging the tτ̃τ decay products, light stops are generically allowed. In the minimal supersymmetric standard model with ∼ 100 GeV sneutrinos, stops with masses as small as ∼ 350 GeV turn out to be allowed at 95% CL.

  17. Application of the radtran 5 stop model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, R.L.; Weiner, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    A number of environmental impact analyzes with the RADTRAN computer code have shown that dose to persons at stops is one of the largest components of incident-free dose during overland carriage of spent fuel and other radioactive materials. The input data used in these analyses were taken from a 1983 study that reports actual observations of spent fuel shipments by truck. Early RADTRAN stop models, however, were insufficiently flexible to take advantage of the detailed information in the study. A more recent study of gasoline service stations that specialize in servicing large trucks, which are the most likely stop locations for shipments of Type B packages in the United States, has provided additional, detailed data on refueling/meal stops. The RADTRAN 5 computer code for transportation risk analysis allows exposures at stops to be more fully modelled than have previous releases of the code and is able to take advantage of detailed data. It is the intent of this paper first to compare results from RADTRAN 4 and RADTRAN 5 for the old, low-resolution form of input data, and then to demonstrate what effect the new data and input format have on stop-dose estimates for an individual stop and for a hypothetical shipment route. Finally, these estimated public doses will be contrasted with doses calculated for a special population group-inspectors. (authors)

  18. Application of the RADTRAN 5 stop model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, R.L.; Weiner, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A number of environmental impact analyses with the RADTRAN computer code have shown that dose to persons at stops is one of the largest components of incident-free dose during overland carriage of spent fuel and other radioactive materials (e.g., USDOE, 1994). The input data used in these analyses were taken from a 1983 study that reports actual observations of spent fuel shipments by truck. Early RADTRAN stop models, however, were insufficiently flexible to take advantage of the detailed information in the study. A more recent study of gasoline service stations that specialize in servicing large trucks, which are the most likely stop locations for shipments of Type B packages in the United States, has provided additional, detailed data on refueling/meal stops. The RADTRAN 5 computer code for transportation risk analysis allows exposures at stops to be more fully modeled than have previous releases of the code and is able to take advantage of detailed data. It is the intent of this paper first to compare results from RADTRAN and RADTRAN 5 for the old, low-resolution form of input data, and then to demonstrate what effect the new data and input format have on stop-dose estimates for an individual stop and for a hypothetical shipment route. Finally, these estimated public doses will be contrasted with doses calculated for a special population group -- inspectors

  19. Stop preaching to the converted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Asheley R.; Lull, Robert B.

    2017-08-01

    Traditional moral arguments fail to persuade conservative climate sceptics. Pope Francis' gifting of his climate encyclical to President Trump prior to his leaving the Paris Agreement shows that even a religious leader's persuasive power is constrained by how his message resonates with conservative moral values.

  20. Magnetic properties of the mixed ferrimagnetic ternary system with a single-ion anisotropy on the Bethe lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram [Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); School of Computational Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4120 (United States); Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr

    2009-05-15

    The magnetic properties of the ternary system ABC consisting of spins {sigma}=1/2 , S=1, and m=3/2 are investigated on the Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion relations. We consider both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. The exact expressions for magnetizations and magnetic susceptibilities are found, and thermal behaviors of magnetizations and susceptibilities are studied. We construct the phase diagrams and find that the system exhibits one, two or even three compensation temperatures depending on the values of the interaction parameters in the Hamiltonian. Moreover, the system undergoes a second-order phase transition for the coordination number q{<=}3 and a second- and first-order phase transitions for q>3; hence the system gives a tricritical point. The system also exhibits the reentrant behaviors.

  1. Magnetic properties of the mixed ferrimagnetic ternary system with a single-ion anisotropy on the Bethe lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Canko, Osman; Keskin, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the ternary system ABC consisting of spins σ=1/2 , S=1, and m=3/2 are investigated on the Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion relations. We consider both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. The exact expressions for magnetizations and magnetic susceptibilities are found, and thermal behaviors of magnetizations and susceptibilities are studied. We construct the phase diagrams and find that the system exhibits one, two or even three compensation temperatures depending on the values of the interaction parameters in the Hamiltonian. Moreover, the system undergoes a second-order phase transition for the coordination number q≤3 and a second- and first-order phase transitions for q>3; hence the system gives a tricritical point. The system also exhibits the reentrant behaviors

  2. Solutions Modulo p of Gauss–Manin Differential Equations for Multidimensional Hypergeometric Integrals and Associated Bethe Ansatz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Varchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Gauss–Manin differential equations for hypergeometric integrals associated with a family of weighted arrangements of hyperplanes moving parallel to themselves. We reduce these equations modulo a prime integer p and construct polynomial solutions of the new differential equations as p-analogs of the initial hypergeometric integrals. In some cases, we interpret the p-analogs of the hypergeometric integrals as sums over points of hypersurfaces defined over the finite field Fp. This interpretation is similar to the classical interpretation by Yu. I. Manin of the number of points on an elliptic curve depending on a parameter as a solution of a Gauss hypergeometric differential equation. We discuss the associated Bethe ansatz.

  3. Ab initio calculations of optical absorption spectra: solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation within density matrix perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Dario; Lu, Deyu; Galli, Giulia

    2010-10-28

    We describe an ab initio approach to compute the optical absorption spectra of molecules and solids, which is suitable for the study of large systems and gives access to spectra within a wide energy range. In this approach, the quantum Liouville equation is solved iteratively within first order perturbation theory, with a Hamiltonian containing a static self-energy operator. This procedure is equivalent to solving the statically screened Bethe-Salpeter equation. Explicit calculations of single particle excited states and inversion of dielectric matrices are avoided using techniques based on density functional perturbation theory. In this way, full absorption spectra may be obtained with a computational workload comparable to ground state Hartree-Fock calculations. We present results for small molecules, for the spectra of a 1 nm Si cluster in a wide energy range (20 eV), and for a dipeptide exhibiting charge transfer excitations.

  4. Non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices, algebraic Bethe ansatz, and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-type integrable systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2009-01-01

    We construct quantum integrable systems associated with non-skew-symmetric gl(2)-valued classical r-matrices. We find a new explicit multiparametric family of such the non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices. We consider two classes of examples of the corresponding integrable systems, namely generalized Gaudin systems with and without an external magnetic field. In the case of arbitrary r-matrices diagonal in a standard gl(2)-basis, we calculate the spectrum of the corresponding quantum integrable systems using the algebraic Bethe ansatz. We apply these results to a construction of integrable fermionic models and obtain a wide class of integrable Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type fermionic Hamiltonians containing the pairing and electrostatic interaction terms. We also consider special cases when the corresponding integrable Hamiltonians contain only pairing interaction term and are exact analogs of the 'reduced BCS Hamiltonian' of Richardson

  5. Solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation without empty electronic states: Applications to solids, nanostructures and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Dario; Ping, Yuan; Lu, Deyu; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    A method to solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation that avoids the explicit calculation of empty electronic states and the storage and inversion of dielectric matrices has been recently introduced [1-3]. This approach is suitable to compute the absorption spectra of large systems in a wide energy range and without relying on the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We show the accuracy and scalability of this method by presenting calculations of absorption spectra of solids, molecules and nanostructures, including Si quantum dots and nanowires. In the case of nanowires, we discuss the influence of size and surface reconstruction on the optical properties.[4pt] [1] D. Rocca, D. Lu, and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)[0pt] [2] D. Rocca, Y. Ping, R. Gebauer, and G. Galli, submitted to PRB [0pt] [3] Y. Ping, D. Rocca, D. Lu, and G. Galli, submitted to PRB

  6. Electronic stopping in oxides beyond Bragg additivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present stopping cross sections calculated by our PASS code for several ions in metal oxides and SiO2 over a wide energy range. Input takes into account changes in the valence structure by assigning two additional electrons to the 2p shell of oxygen and removing the appropriate number of electrons from the outer shells of the metal atom. Results are compared with tabulated experimental values and with two versions of Bragg's additivity rule. Calculated stopping cross sections are applied in testing a recently-proposed scaling rule, which relates the stopping cross section to the number of oxygen atoms per molecule.

  7. The stopping of protons and α-particles in compounds. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnokova, T.D.; Pucherov, N.N; Borzakovskij, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    The stopping power and ranges of 0.1-100 MeV protons and α-particles were calculated in some compounds: air, water, CO, CO 2 , CaF 2 , LiF, (Csub(2)Fsub(4))sub(n), SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , NaCl, KCl, NaI, KI, CsI, C 6 H 5 CH, C 14 H 10 , C 10 H 8 , CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , (Csub(2)Hsub(4))sub(n), (Csub(10)Hsub(8)Osub(4))sub(n), so values are given for parameters (n, a), which allow to calculate the ranges by means of expression (R(E)=aEsup(n). The compound stopping powers were calculated on the basis of additivity rule. The evaluation of stopping powers of elements was based on the semiempirical expressions, which were obtained due to the systematization and analysis of the experimental stopping powers of the elements. From the comparison with the experimental data the everage uncertainty of the evaluated stopping powers of compounds is found to be 3-5% and in some cases it doesn't exceed 1.3%. The tables allow to determine the particle energy loss in layes of the finite thickness [ru

  8. Nuclear waste. Last stop Siberia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, L.

    2006-01-01

    Safe and environmentally sound management of nuclear waste and spent fuel is an unresolved problem of nuclear power. But unlike other nuclear nations, Russia has much more problems with nuclear waste. Russia inherited these problems from the military programs and decades of nuclear fuel cycle development. Nuclear waste continue to mount, while the government does not pay serious enough attention to the solution of the waste problem and considers to increase the capacity of nuclear power plants (NPPs). There are more than 1000 nuclear waste storages in Russia.1 More than 70 million tons of the solid waste has been accumulated by the year 2005, including 14 million tons of tails of the decommissioned uranium mine in the North Caucasus. President Putin said that ''infrastructure of the waste processing is extremely insufficient''. (orig.)

  9. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... biting your nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some ...

  10. Port Authority of Allegheny County Transit Stops

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — All transit stops within the Port Authority of Allegheny County's service area for the November 20, 2016 - March (TBD) 2017 schedule period.

  11. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... figure out how to avoid these situations and develop a plan to stop. Just knowing when you’ ... a doctor. If you bite your nails and develop a skin or nail infection, consult a board- ...

  12. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spending money to keep your nails looking attractive may make you less likely to bite them. Alternatively, ... Just knowing when you’re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop ...

  13. Next Stop Adulthood: Tips for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print Share Next Stop Adulthood: Tips For Parents Page Content Article Body Becoming a young adult is exciting, difficult, and scary for both parents and teens. It is a time of increasing ...

  14. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Part 2: Origin Part 3: Function Textbook Study notes Image library 3-D animated image library Board ... gradually stop biting your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try ...

  15. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alternative payment models Fee schedule State policy State policy and ... recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting one set of nails, such as your thumb nails, ...

  16. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... public", "mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c How to stop biting your nails Nail biting typically ... to bite your nails, you can figure out how to avoid these situations and develop a plan ...

  17. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule ... your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting ...

  18. Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... I have friends and loved ones suffering from Alzheimer's. But I can imagine… and hope for… a ...

  19. Panel discussion on stopping of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baurichter, A.; Sigmund, P.; Soerensen, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    This is a condensed transscript of 90 minutes' discussion session marking the end of the International Symposium on Stopping of Heavy Ions (STOP01) held in Odense, Denmark, 5-8 August 2001. The time was divided up about equally between introductory and concluding remarks by the panel, and a general discussion involving most of the participants. The session was moderated by A.H. Soerensen. We have kept the contributions in the chronological order

  20. Clamped seismic metamaterials: ultra-low frequency stop bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaoui, Y.; Antonakakis, T.; Brûlé, S.; Craster, R. V.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2017-06-01

    The regularity of earthquakes, their destructive power, and the nuisance of ground vibration in urban environments, all motivate designs of defence structures to lessen the impact of seismic and ground vibration waves on buildings. Low frequency waves, in the range 1-10 Hz for earthquakes and up to a few tens of Hz for vibrations generated by human activities, cause a large amount of damage, or inconvenience; depending on the geological conditions they can travel considerable distances and may match the resonant fundamental frequency of buildings. The ultimate aim of any seismic metamaterial, or any other seismic shield, is to protect over this entire range of frequencies; the long wavelengths involved, and low frequency, have meant this has been unachievable to date. Notably this is scalable and the effects also hold for smaller devices in ultrasonics. There are three approaches to obtaining shielding effects: bragg scattering, locally resonant sub-wavelength inclusions and zero-frequency stop-band media. The former two have been explored, but the latter has not and is examined here. Elastic flexural waves, applicable in the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, can be designed to have a broad zero-frequency stop-band using a periodic array of very small clamped circles. Inspired by this experimental and theoretical observation, all be it in a situation far removed from seismic waves, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve elastic surface (Rayleigh) wave reflectors at very large wavelengths in structured soils modelled as a fully elastic layer periodically clamped to bedrock. We identify zero frequency stop-bands that only exist in the limit of columns of concrete clamped at their base to the bedrock. In a realistic configuration of a sedimentary basin 15 m deep we observe a zero frequency stop-band covering a broad frequency range of 0-30 Hz.

  1. Human factors in design modifications: panel alternative stop in Almaraz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Y.; Bote, J.

    2015-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering has acquired a crucial role in the development of any design modification (DM), where every aspect relative to any interaction with the human user has to be taken into account at any stage thereof. Considering this, during the last years, Almaraz Nuclear Powe Plants has developed a program of Human Factors Engineering in order to reach the internationally recognized standards or systematic collected on NUREG 0711 Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NRC). One of the most important projects of this program at Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant has been the implementation of the Alternative Stop Panel and their corresponding Transfer Panels. (Author)

  2. Processing of global and selective stop signals: application of Donders' subtraction method to stop-signal task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Maria C; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; van Boxtel, Geert J M; van der Molen, Maurits W

    2010-01-01

    This paper applied Donders' subtraction method to examine the processing of global and selective stop signals in the stop-signal paradigm. Participants performed on three different versions of the stop task: a global task and two selective tasks. A global task required participants to inhibit their response to a go signal whenever a stop signal was presented (Stop-a task). A selective stop task required participants to inhibit to one stop signal but not to the other (Stop-c task). Another selective stop task required them to inhibit when the response indicated by go and stop signals was the same but not when they were different (Stop-b task). Stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) was shortest for Stop-a and longest for Stop-b, with intermediate values for the Stop-c task. Additional control experiments that manipulated stop probability confirmed the robustness of global and selective stopping latencies even when the stop-signal probability varied. The current findings contribute to the conclusion that Donders' subtraction method provides a useful tool for estimating the durations of subprocesses that together comprise SSRT.

  3. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  4. Measurement of The Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, Andrea Davide

    2010-01-01

    During October-November 2008 the CMS Collaboration conducted a data-taking exercise in order to complete the commissioning of the experiment for extended operation. A large sample of cosmic ray triggered events has been recorded with the solenoid at its nominal axial field strength of 3.8~T. The events collected have been exploited to perform a measurement of specific energy loss of muons in lead tungstate - the electromagnetic calorimeter material - over a wide momentum range (from 5~GeV/c to 1~TeV/c). The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. A comparison of collision losses with radiative losses allowed for a first experimental determination of muon critical energy in lead tungstate, measured to be 160^{+5}_{-6}pm8~GeV, in agreement with expectations.

  5. Formulae for the secondary electron yield and total stopping power ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. XIE A G1 2 XIAO S Y1 WANG L1. School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210 044, China; Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, 20 Kwangwoon-gil, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-701, Republic of ...

  6. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  7. Formulae for the secondary electron yield and total stopping power ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on the range–energy relationship, the characteristics of secondary electron emis- sion, some relationship between the secondary electron yield δ and experimental results, the universal formulae for δ0.8−2 (the subscript indicates that the energy range of primary energy at the surface Wpo is from 0.8 keV to 2 ...

  8. The extent of the stop coannihilation strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zheng, Jiaming [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Many supersymmetric models such as the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) feature a strip in parameter space where the lightest neutralino χ is identified as the lightest supersymmetric particle, the lighter stop squark t{sub 1} is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP), and the relic χ cold darkmatter density is brought into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology by coannihilation with the lighter stop squark t{sub 1} NLSP. We calculate the stop coannihilation strip in the CMSSM, incorporating Sommerfeld enhancement effects, and we explore the relevant phenomenological constraints and phenomenological signatures. In particular, we show that the t{sub 1} may weigh several TeV, and its lifetime may be in the nanosecond range, features that are more general than the specific CMSSM scenarios that we study in this paper. (orig.)

  9. StopWatcher: A Mobile Application to Improve Stop Sign Awareness for Driving Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stop signs are the primary form of traffic control in the United States. However, they have a tendency to be much less effective than other forms of traffic control like traffic lights. This is due to their smaller size, lack of lighting, and the fact that they may become visually obscured from the road. In this paper, we offer a solution to this problem in the form of a mobile application implemented in the Android platform: StopWatcher. It is designed to alert a driver when they are approaching a stop sign using a voice notification system (VNS. A field test was performed in a snowy environment. The test results demonstrate that the application can detect all of the stop signs correctly, even when some of them were obstructed by the snow, which in turn greatly improves the user awareness of stop signs.

  10. Stopping Rules for Linear Stochastic Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takayuki; Itani, Takamitsu; Fujisaki, Yasumasa

    Stopping rules are developed for stochastic approximation which is an iterative method for solving an unknown equation based on its consecutive residuals corrupted by additive random noise. It is assumed that the equation is linear and the noise is independent and identically distributed random vectors with zero mean and a bounded covariance. Then, the number of iterations for achieving a given probabilistic accuracy of the resultant solution is derived, which gives a rigorous stopping rule for the stochastic approximation. This number is polynomial of the problem size.

  11. Security Requirements for One Stop Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Georg E.

    The highest ranking e-government solutions are based on one-window, one-click or one stop government concepts. For Europe, the EU services directive sets new requirements for e-government, that have to be met till December 2009. Simple, easy to understand and complete information is one requirement. The other requirements are, that the services covered by this directive shall be available electronically and at a distance (which means mostly “by Internet”). Acceptable solutions are digitally signed mails and, as an alternative or supplement, transaction oriented online services. To implement this, a one stop government with document safe is best practice.

  12. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.rebolini@kjemi.uio.no; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-03-07

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of the He and Be atoms and small molecules (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  13. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  14. Study of parent-child communication in joint-reading process according the investigation of Beth Ann Beschorner, foreign researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimova A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis carried out by Ph. D. Beth Ann Beschorner (University of Iowa, USA which concerns the training program for parents aimed at teaching them how to arrange the Dialogic reading with their childrenand and which makes it possible to conclude that due to the experience and direct contact with the written language in preschool age the idea of literacy was being formed. The article compares the empirical data obtained independently in different areas of scientific knowledge, i.e., philosophy and psychology: the study of B.A. Beschorner has a lot in common with the principles of cultural-historical psychology, formulated by L. Vygotsky, M. Lisina and other national psychologists. Although B. A. Beschorner do not stick directly to cultural-historical and activity theory, her results correspond with the basic provisions of these theories. The analysis of B.A. Beschorner’s works confirms the commonality of her findings to those obtained in terms of the cultural-historical theory. It proves that scientific thoughts even going in independent ways, may lead to similar results, which ultimately demonstrates the validity of the findings and the versatility of approaches to the problem

  15. Light-quarkonium spectra and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition in a Bethe-Salpeter-equation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A. [University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Institute of Physics, Graz (Austria); Gomez-Rocha, M. [ECT*, Villazzano, Trento (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    We investigate the light-quarkonium spectrum using a covariant Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter-equation approach to QCD. We discuss splittings among as well as orbital angular momentum properties of various states in detail and analyze common features of mass splittings with regard to properties of the effective interaction. In particular, we predict the mass of anti ss exotic 1{sup -+} states, and identify orbital angular momentum content in the excitations of the ρ meson. Comparing our covariant model results, the ρ and its second excitation being predominantly S-wave, the first excitation being predominantly D-wave, to corresponding conflicting lattice-QCD studies, we investigate the pion-mass dependence of the orbital-angular-momentum assignment and find a crossing at a scale of m{sub π} ∝ 1.4 GeV. If this crossing turns out to be a feature of the spectrum generated by lattice-QCD studies as well, it may reconcile the different results, since they have been obtained at different values of m{sub π}. (orig.)

  16. Ab initio calculations of optical spectra by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation without empty states.Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Dario; Lu, Deyu; Galli, Giulia

    2009-03-01

    We present a novel first principle approach to solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) that builds on recent progress in time-dependent density functional perturbation theory [1], and uses an eigenvalue decomposition representation of the dielectric matrix [2]. This approach does not require the explicit calculation of excited single particle electronic states, making it suitable for calculations involving large basis sets and/or a large number of transitions. The numerical solution of the BSE is obtained through a generalized, non-Hermitian Lanczos iterative algorithm and does not require the use of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. Furthermore, since Lanczos coefficients are frequency independent, optical spectra may be obtained in a very broad energy range. The efficiency and accuracy of the new approach are demonstrated by calculating the optical properties of silicon nanoclusters with up to 1 nm diameter. [1] D. Rocca, R. Gebauer, Y Saad, and S. Baroni, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 154105 (2008). [2] H.Wilson, F.Gygi and G.Galli, Phys. Rev. B 78, 113303 (2008).

  17. Physiology of safety deep stops and their importance during diving

    OpenAIRE

    Moravcová, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Title: Physiology ofdeep safety stops and their importance during diving Objective: Explanation of physiology of deep safety stops and their importance during diving. Presentation of the physiologically optima! method of accomplishing the deep stops. Methods: Summary of the available information concerning the physiology of deep safety stops and also the physic and physiology of diving connected with the subject. Follow-up clearing the importance ofthese stops for divers. Results: Inclusion o...

  18. Car Stopping Distance on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-01-01

    Stopping distances in car braking can be an intriguing topic in physics teaching. It illustrates some basic principles of physics, and sheds valuable light on students' attitude towards aggressive driving. Due to safety considerations, it can be difficult to make experiments with actual car braking. (Contains 2 figures.)

  19. Are Stopped Strings Preferred in Sad Music?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Huron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available String instruments may be played either with open strings (where the string vibrates between the bridge and a hard wooden nut or with stopped strings (where the string vibrates between the bridge and a performer's finger pressed against the fingerboard. Compared with open strings, stopped strings permit the use of vibrato and exhibit a darker timbre. Inspired by research on the timbre of sad speech, we test whether there is a tendency to use stopped strings in nominally sad music. Specifically, we compare the proportion of potentially open-to-stopped strings in a sample of slow, minor-mode movements with matched major-mode movements. By way of illustration, a preliminary analysis of Samuel Barber's famous Adagio from his Opus 11 string quartet shows that the selected key (B-flat minor provides the optimum key for minimizing open string tones. However, examination of a broader controlled sample of quartet movements by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven failed to exhibit the conjectured relationship. Instead, major-mode movements were found to avoid possible open strings more than slow minor-mode movements.

  20. Bystanders Are the Key to Stopping Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Sharon; Notar, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is the dominance over another. Bullying occurs when there is an audience. Peer bystanders provide an audience 85% of instances of bullying. If you remove the audience bullying should stop. The article is a review of literature (2002-2013) on the role of bystanders; importance of bystanders; why bystanders behave as they do; resources to…

  1. Stop! Look! Listen! for Effective Band Rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alfred S.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how band conductors can develop student skills in three areas: (1) when the conductor stops the band; (2) teaching the students to pay attention and watch the conductor; and (3) improving the student listening skills. Includes information on instructing students to play chorales. (CMK)

  2. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for (var c = 0; c How to stop biting your nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through ... effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting can make the skin around your nails feel ...

  3. Confessions of a Librarian or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Google

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnels, Claire B.; Sisson, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Have you ever stopped to think about life before Google? We will make the argument that Google is the first manifestation of Web 2.0, of the power and promise of social networking and the ubiquitous wiki. We will discuss the positive influence of Google and how Google and other social networking tools afford librarians leading-edge technologies…

  4. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  5. The TRIUMF stopped π-μ channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qazzaz, N.M.M.; Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The TRIUMF π-μ channel (M9) is described and the measured optical paramters are compared with design values. Measured beam characteristics of pions and muons for several different momenta are reported for protons incident on Be and Cu production targets. A beam of cloud muons at the channel momentum, from π decays near the production target, has been obtained having a high stopping density and small spot size. (auth)

  6. Finite Optimal Stopping Problems: The Seller's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mehdi; Smith, J. Cole

    2011-01-01

    We consider a version of an optimal stopping problem, in which a customer is presented with a finite set of items, one by one. The customer is aware of the number of items in the finite set and the minimum and maximum possible value of each item, and must purchase exactly one item. When an item is presented to the customer, she or he observes its…

  7. Intelligent Bus Stops in the Flexible Bus Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Razi Iqbal; Muhammad Usman Ghani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss Intelligent Bus Stops in a special Demand Responsive Transit (DRT), the Flexible Bus System. These Intelligent Bus Stops are more efficient and information rich than Traditional Bus Stops. The real time synchronization of the Flexible Bus System makes it unique as compared to Traditional Bus Systems. The Main concern is to make Bus Stops intelligent and information rich. Buses are informed about the no. of passengers waiting at the upcoming ...

  8. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons...... in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could...... antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestricted LET of about 4 keV/μm, which is very different from the expected 0.6 keV/μm of an equivalent primary proton beam. Even though the fluence of secondaries is a magnitude less than the fluence of primary particles, the increased stopping power...

  9. Experimental discrimination of ion stopping models near the Bragg peak in highly ionized matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, W; Frank, A; Ortner, A; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Bedacht, S; Bläser, C; Blažević, A; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Ding, J; Ehret, M; Fiala, P; Frydrych, S; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Helfrich, J; Jahn, D; Kjartansson, E; Knetsch, A; Kraus, D; Malka, G; Neumann, N W; Pépitone, K; Pepler, D; Sander, S; Schaumann, G; Schlegel, T; Schroeter, N; Schumacher, D; Seibert, M; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Wagner, F; Weih, S; Zobus, Y; Roth, M

    2017-06-01

    The energy deposition of ions in dense plasmas is a key process in inertial confinement fusion that determines the α-particle heating expected to trigger a burn wave in the hydrogen pellet and resulting in high thermonuclear gain. However, measurements of ion stopping in plasmas are scarce and mostly restricted to high ion velocities where theory agrees with the data. Here, we report experimental data at low projectile velocities near the Bragg peak, where the stopping force reaches its maximum. This parameter range features the largest theoretical uncertainties and conclusive data are missing until today. The precision of our measurements, combined with a reliable knowledge of the plasma parameters, allows to disprove several standard models for the stopping power for beam velocities typically encountered in inertial fusion. On the other hand, our data support theories that include a detailed treatment of strong ion-electron collisions.

  10. Moments of random sums and Robbins' problem of optimal stopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnedin, A.V.; Iksanov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Robbins' problem of optimal stopping is that of minimising the expected rank of an observation chosen by some nonanticipating stopping rule. We settle a conjecture regarding the value of the stopped variable under the rule that yields the minimal expected rank, by embedding the problem in a much

  11. Start-Stop Test Procedures on the PEMFC Stack Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzel, Jens; Nygaard, Frederik; Veltzé, Sune

    The test is addressed to investigate the influence on stack durability of a long stop followed by a restart of a stack. Long stop should be defined as a stop in which the anodic compartment is fully filled by air due to stack leakages. In systems, leakage level of the stack is low and time to fil...

  12. Multicritical phase diagrams of the spin-((3)/(2)) Blume-Emery-Griffiths model on the Bethe lattice using the recursion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekiz, Cesur; Albayrak, Erhan; Keskin, Mustafa.

    2003-01-01

    The multicritical behaviour of the spin-((3)/(2)) Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with bilinear and biquadratic exchange interactions and single-ion crystal field is studied on the Bethe lattice by introducing two-sublattices A and B within the exact recursion equations. Exact expressions for the free energy, the Curie or second-order phase transition temperatures, as well as for the magnetization and quadrupolar moment order parameters are obtained. The general procedure of investigation of critical properties is discussed and phase diagrams are obtained, in particular, for negative biquadratic couplings. The phase diagram of the model exhibits a rich variety of behaviours. Results are compared with other approximate methods

  13. Optical properties of bulk semiconductors and graphene/boron nitride: the Bethe-Salpeter equation with derivative discontinuity-corrected density functional energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jun; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) for optical properties of materials in the projector augmented wave method Grid-based projector-augmented wave method (GPAW). Single-particle energies and wave functions are obtained from the Gritsenko, Leeuwen, Lenthe......-dimensional systems of graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) we find good agreement with previous many-body calculations. For the graphene/h-BN interface we find that the fundamental and optical gaps of the h-BN layer are reduced by 2.0 and 0.7 eV, respectively, compared to freestanding h-BN. This reduction...

  14. Ionization of H2 and He in collision of 3 keV electrons and the Bethe binary-encounter peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied the energy distributions of double differential cross sections (DDCS) of electrons emitted in single-ionization of H2 and He induced by 3keVelectron impact in the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region for wide range of ejection angles.We compare the absolute cross sections for these two isoelectronic systems at high ejection energies. We demonstrate that while Compton profile causes undulation in the BE peak, the constructive interference effect enhances the overall cross section of H2 compared to that of atomic targets.

  15. Separation of contributions from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process in measurements on a hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, Z.

    2009-09-01

    Hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarized proton target is studied in an effort to elucidate generalized parton distributions. The data accumulated during the years 1996-2005 with the HERMES spectrometer are analyzed to yield asymmetries with respect to the combined dependence of the cross section on beam helicity and charge, thereby revealing previously unseparated contributions from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. The integrated luminosity is sufficient to show correlated dependences on two kinematic variables, and provides the most precise determination of the dependence on only the beam charge. (orig.)

  16. Biobjective Optimization and Evaluation for Transit Signal Priority Strategies at Bus Stop-to-Stop Segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new optimization framework for the transit signal priority strategies in terms of green extension, red truncation, and phase insertion at the stop-to-stop segment of bus lines. The optimization objective is to minimize both passenger delay and the deviation from bus schedule simultaneously. The objective functions are defined with respect to the segment between bus stops, which can include the adjacent signalized intersections and downstream bus stops. The transit priority signal timing is optimized by using a biobjective optimization framework considering both the total delay at a segment and the delay deviation from the arrival schedules at bus stops. The proposed framework is evaluated using a VISSIM model calibrated with field traffic volume and traffic signal data of Caochangmen Boulevard in Nanjing, China. The optimized TSP-based phasing plans result in the reduced delay and improved reliability, compared with the non-TSP scenario under the different traffic flow conditions in the morning peak hour. The evaluation results indicate the promising performance of the proposed optimization framework in reducing the passenger delay and improving the bus schedule adherence for the urban transit system.

  17. USABC Development of 12 Volt Battery for Start-Stop Application: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tataria, H.; Gross, O.; Bae, C.; Cunningham, B.; Barnes, J. A.; Deppe, J.; Neubauer, J.

    2015-02-01

    Global automakers are accelerating the development of fuel efficient vehicles, as a part of meeting regional regulatory CO2 emissions requirements. The micro hybrid vehicles with auto start-stop functionality are considered economical solutions for the stringent European regulations. Flooded lead acid batteries were initially considered the most economical solution for idle-stop systems. However, the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at lower state-of-charge (SOC) was limiting the life of the batteries. While improved lead-acid batteries with AGM and VRLA features have improved battery longevity, they do not last the life of the vehicle. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (or USABC, a consortium of GM, Ford, and Chrysler) analyzed energy storage needs for a micro hybrid automobile with start-stop capability, and with a single power source. USABC has analyzed the start-stop behaviors of many drivers and has developed the requirements for the start-stop batteries (Table 3). The testing procedures to validate the performance and longevity were standardized and published. The guideline for the cost estimates calculations have also been provided, in order to determine the value of the newly developed modules. The analysis effort resulted in a set of requirements which will help the battery manufacturers to develop a module to meet the automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) micro hybrid vehicle requirements. Battery developers were invited to submit development proposals and two proposals were selected for 50% cost share with USABC/DOE.

  18. Processing of global and selective stop signals: application of Donders’ subtraction method to stop-signal task performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, M.C.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van Boxtel, G.J.M.; van der Molen, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper applied Donders’ subtraction method to examine the processing of global and selective stop signals in the stop-signal paradigm. Participants performed on three different versions of the stop task: a global task and two selective tasks. A global task required participants to inhibit their

  19. Minimization of bus stop number on a bus station

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislav PALÚCH

    2013-01-01

    A bus station contains several bus stops. Only one bus can occupy a singlebus stop at a time. Buses of many trips arrive to the bus station during the day (or duringanother considered period) and every bus occupies a bus stop for a certain time interval.The set of available bus stops is limited. This paper studies a problem how to assign a busstop to every bus trip in order to minimize the number of assigned bus stops and in orderto comply several additional conditions. Several approaches to ...

  20. Early Stop Criterion from the Bootstrap Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan; Fog, Torben L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generalization error estimation in neural networks. A new early stop criterion based on a Bootstrap estimate of the generalization error is suggested. The estimate does not require the network to be trained to the minimum of the cost function, as required...... by other methods based on asymptotic theory. Moreover, in contrast to methods based on cross-validation which require data left out for testing, and thus biasing the estimate, the Bootstrap technique does not have this disadvantage. The potential of the suggested technique is demonstrated on various time...

  1. Jojoba could stop the desert creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-25

    The Sahara desert is estimated to be expanding at a rate of 5km a year. The Sudanese government is experimenting with jojoba in six different regions as the bush has the potential to stop this ''desert creep''. The plant, a native to Mexico, is long known for its resistance to drought and for the versatile liquid wax that can be extracted from its seeds. It is estimated that one hectare of mature plants could produce 3000 kg of oil, currently selling at $50 per litre, and so earn valuable foreign currency.

  2. [Abbreviations in daily language: stop it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbes, A C; Girbes, A R J

    2017-01-01

    Abbreviations are used more and more in physician common parlance and it seems they are on the way to becoming a new jargon. However, identical abbreviations may have different meanings, especially in different medical specialties. Moreover, many physicians do not know the meaning of specific abbreviations or are attributing the wrong meaning to the abbreviation. This will lead to misunderstanding and therefore danger to the patient. The authors are calling for a stop on the use of spoken abbreviations and for minimising the use of abbreviations in clinical notes and medical prescriptions.

  3. End-Stop Exemplar Based Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren I.

    2003-01-01

    An approach to exemplar based recognition of visual shapes is presented. The shape information is described by attributed interest points (keys) detected by an end-stop operator. The attributes describe the statistics of lines and edges local to the interest point, the position of neighboring int...... interest points, and (in the training phase) a list of recognition names. Recognition is made by a simple voting procedure. Preliminary experiments indicate that the recognition is robust to noise, small deformations, background clutter and partial occlusion....

  4. Frame by frame stop motion non-traditional approaches to stop motion animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gasek, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In a world that is dominated by computer images, alternative stop motion techniques like pixilation, time-lapse photography and down-shooting techniques combined with new technologies offer a new, tangible and exciting approach to animation. With over 25 years professional experience, industry veteran, Tom Gasek presents a comprehensive guide to stop motion animation without the focus on puppetry or model animation. With tips, tricks and hands-on exercises, Frame by Frame will help both experienced and novice filmmakers get the most effective results from this underutilized branch of animation

  5. Bethe, Hans Albrecht (1906-)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist, born in Strasburg, Germany (present-day France), Nobel prizewinner (1967). As professor of physics at Cornell University he worked out the nuclear reactions occurring in the Sun. He worked on the development of the atomic bomb in the Manhatten project, and, after the second World War, pursued again research on stellar nuclear energy sources and the origin of the chemical elements in th...

  6. Professor Hans A Bethe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-03-06

    Mar 6, 2018 ... way of reaching his decisions and conveying them and his willingness to listen to others, that despite having been associated with building the first bomb, he was admired by and respected by doves and hawks alike. I had the privilege of working closely with him for many years, first as his PhD student.

  7. Density matrix renormalization group simulations of SU(N ) Heisenberg chains using standard Young tableaus: Fundamental representation and comparison with a finite-size Bethe ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, Pierre; Mila, Frédéric

    2018-04-01

    We develop an efficient method to perform density matrix renormalization group simulations of the SU(N ) Heisenberg chain with open boundary conditions taking full advantage of the SU(N ) symmetry of the problem. This method is an extension of the method previously developed for exact diagonalizations and relies on a systematic use of the basis of standard Young tableaux. Concentrating on the model with the fundamental representation at each site (i.e., one particle per site in the fermionic formulation), we have benchmarked our results for the ground-state energy up to N =8 and up to 420 sites by comparing them with Bethe ansatz results on open chains, for which we have derived and solved the Bethe ansatz equations. The agreement for the ground-state energy is excellent for SU(3) (12 digits). It decreases with N , but it is still satisfactory for N =8 (six digits). Central charges c are also extracted from the entanglement entropy using the Calabrese-Cardy formula and agree with the theoretical values expected from the SU (N) 1 Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theories.

  8. Intelligent Bus Stops in the Flexible Bus Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss Intelligent Bus Stops in a special Demand Responsive Transit (DRT, the Flexible Bus System. These Intelligent Bus Stops are more efficient and information rich than Traditional Bus Stops. The real time synchronization of the Flexible Bus System makes it unique as compared to Traditional Bus Systems. The Main concern is to make Bus Stops intelligent and information rich. Buses are informed about the no. of passengers waiting at the upcoming Bus Stops. If there are no passengers to ride or get off on upcoming Bus Stop, the Bus can skip that Bus Stop and head towards the next Bus Stop where passenger is waiting, which will decrease the ride time of the passengers on the Bus and also the wait time of the passengers waiting on the upcoming Bus Stops. Providing more information at Bus Stops about the Destination (Time to Destination, Distance to Destination etc. and Buses (Bus Location, Arrival Time of Bus etc. makes it easier for the passengers to decide whether to ride a particular Bus or not.

  9. Remune trial will stop; new trials planned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1999-05-21

    A clinical trial using remune, the anti-HIV vaccine developed by the late Dr. Jonas Salk, has been ended. The study is a clinical-endpoint trial which looks for statistically significant differences in AIDS sickness or death between patients who add remune to their treatment regimens versus those who use a placebo. Agouron Pharmaceuticals and the Immune Response Corporation who were conducting the trial announced their decision to stop it after an analysis by the Data Safety Monitoring Board. No differences in clinical endpoints were found and it was projected that continuing the trial would likely not find any. The companies are now planning two new Phase III trials using viral load testing rather than clinical endpoints as study criteria.

  10. The Novel Microwave Stop-Band Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Chernobrovkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The stop-band filter with the new band-rejection element is proposed. The element is a coaxial waveguide with the slot in the centre conductor. In the frame of this research, the numerical and experimental investigations of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the filter are carried out. It is noted that according to the slot parameters the two typical resonances (half-wave and quarter-wave can be excited. The rejection band of the single element is defined by the width, depth, and dielectric filling of the slot. Fifth-order Chebyshev filter utilizing the aforementioned element is also synthesized, manufactured, and tested. The measured and simulated results are in good agreement. The experimental filter prototype exhibits the rejection band 0.86 GHz at the level −40 dB.

  11. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  12. Statistics of heavy-ion stopping

    CERN Document Server

    Glazov, L G; Schinner, A

    2002-01-01

    Energy-loss straggling of swift heavy ions penetrating through matter has been analysed on the basis of binary stopping theory as well as the modified Bohr model allowing for projectile screening. A program has been written which evaluates the generalized Bothe-Landau formula governing the energy-loss spectrum for penetration through a thin layer, allowing for charge exchange involving an arbitrary number of charge states. This program was generated on the basis of calculational schemes developed originally for swift light ions. Projectile screening and multiple-shell structure of target atoms are allowed for. Explicit energy-loss spectra are given for oxygen in carbon for charge states 6-8 and foil thickness 2, 10 and 50 mu g/cm sup 2. It is also demonstrated that frozen-charge straggling depends only weakly on charge state.

  13. Neural Architecture of Selective Stopping Strategies: Distinct Brain Activity Patterns Are Associated with Attentional Capture But Not with Outright Stopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Alexandra; Rössler, Kora; Wibral, Michael; Mobascher, Arian; Lieb, Klaus; Jung, Patrick; Tüscher, Oliver

    2017-10-04

    In stimulus-selective stop-signal tasks, the salient stop signal needs attentional processing before genuine response inhibition is completed. Differential prefrontal involvement in attentional capture and response inhibition has been linked to the right inferior frontal junction (IFJ) and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), respectively. Recently, it has been suggested that stimulus-selective stopping may be accomplished by the following different strategies: individuals may selectively inhibit their response only upon detecting a stop signal (independent discriminate then stop strategy) or unselectively whenever detecting a stop or attentional capture signal (stop then discriminate strategy). Alternatively, the discrimination process of the critical signal (stop vs attentional capture signal) may interact with the go process (dependent discriminate then stop strategy). Those different strategies might differentially involve attention- and stopping-related processes that might be implemented by divergent neural networks. This should lead to divergent activation patterns and, if disregarded, interfere with analyses in neuroimaging studies. To clarify this crucial issue, we studied 87 human participants of both sexes during a stimulus-selective stop-signal task and performed strategy-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses. We found that, regardless of the strategy applied, outright stopping displayed indistinguishable brain activation patterns. However, during attentional capture different strategies resulted in divergent neural activation patterns with variable activation of right IFJ and bilateral VLPFC. In conclusion, the neural network involved in outright stopping is ubiquitous and independent of strategy, while different strategies impact on attention-related processes and underlying neural network usage. Strategic differences should therefore be taken into account particularly when studying attention-related processes in stimulus

  14. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Schwientek, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Tripp, H. James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rinke, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Huntemann, Marcel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Visel, Axel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Kyrpides, Nikos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rubin, Edward [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  15. 20 CFR 662.430 - Under what conditions may One-Stop operators designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system established prior to the enactment of WIA be designated... DESCRIPTION OF THE ONE-STOP SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT One-Stop Operators § 662.430 Under what conditions may One-Stop operators designated to operate in a One-Stop delivery system...

  16. Profiling minorities: police stop and search practices in Toronto, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Meng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores police stop and search practices in Toronto using the 2003-2012 data from Toronto Police Service. The findings demonstrate that for black youth, the number of stops and the stops/arrests ratios increased significantly by 42.7% and 44.9% respectively between 2003 and 2012, while for white youth, both indices decreased steadily during the same period. Moreover, they show that police stops of black youth occur most excessively in neighbourhoods where more white people reside and/or have higher crime rates. This article argues for the importance of a contextualized examination of police stops within the spatial context of neighbourhoods and calls for open and free access to police stop data, regular internal review by police, and community policing in Toronto.

  17. VRLA automotive batteries for stop&go and dual battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, G. J.; Calasanzio, D.; Aliberti, R.

    The electrical power requirements for vehicles are continuing to increase and evolve. A substantial amount of effort has been directed towards the development of 36/42 V systems as a route to higher power with reduced current levels but high implementation costs have resulted in the introduction of these systems becoming deferred. In the interim, however, alternator power outputs at 14 V are being increased substantially and at the same time the requirements for batteries are becoming more intensive. In particular, stop&go systems and wire-based vehicle systems are resulting in new demands. For stop&go, the engine is stopped each time the vehicle comes to rest and is restarted when the accelerator is pressed again. This results in an onerous duty cycle with many shallow discharge cycles. Flooded lead-acid batteries cannot meet this duty cycle and valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are needed to meet the demands that are applied. For wire-based systems, such as brake-by-wire or steer-by-wire, electrical power has become more critical and although the alternator and battery provide double redundancy, triple redundancy with a small reserve battery is specified. In this case, a small VRLA battery can be used and is optimised for standby service rather than for repeated discharges. The background to these applications is considered and test results under simulated operating conditions are discussed. Good performance can be obtained in batteries adapted for both applications. Battery management is also critical for both applications: in stop&go service, the state-of-charge (SOC) and state-of-health (SOH) need to be monitored to ensure that the vehicle can be restarted; for reserve or back-up batteries, the SOC and SOH are monitored to verify that the battery is always capable of carrying out the duty cycle if required. Practical methods of battery condition monitoring will be described.

  18. A molecular brake, not a clutch, stops the Rhodobacter sphaeroides flagellar motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilizota, Teuta; Brown, Mostyn T.; Leake, Mark C.; Branch, Richard W.; Berry, Richard M.; Armitage, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacterial species swim by employing ion-driven molecular motors that power the rotation of helical filaments. Signals are transmitted to the motor from the external environment via the chemotaxis pathway. In bidirectional motors, the binding of phosphorylated CheY (CheY-P) to the motor is presumed to instigate conformational changes that result in a different rotor-stator interface, resulting in rotation in the alternative direction. Controlling when this switch occurs enables bacteria to accumulate in areas favorable for their survival. Unlike most species that swim with bidirectional motors, Rhodobacter sphaeroides employs a single stop-start flagellar motor. Here, we asked, how does the binding of CheY-P stop the motor in R. sphaeroides—using a clutch or a brake? By applying external force with viscous flow or optical tweezers, we show that the R. sphaeroides motor is stopped using a brake. The motor stops at 27–28 discrete angles, locked in place by a relatively high torque, approximately 2–3 times its stall torque. PMID:19571004

  19. Generalized cross-validation as a stopping rule for the Richardson-Lucy algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, S. J.

    The Richardson-Lucy (R-L) algorithm has been widely used to restore degraded astronomical images. This algorithm is nothing more than the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm applied to Poisson data. The R-L method is iterative in nature and converges to a (possibly local) maximum of the likelihood function. Unfortunately, because of the ill-conditioned nature of the problem, this maximum likelihood estimate may actually be a very poor restoration. One way to prevent degradation of the restoration is to stop the iteration before it reaches convergence. A number of methods have been proposed for determining the optimal stopping point. Cross-validation (CV) has previously been proposed as an advantageous method for determining the optimal stopping point. The present author proposes a different form of CV based on generalized cross-validation (GCV) that overcomes some of the difficulties of CV. He derives a GCV-based criterion for the R-L algorithm that can be efficiently evaluated at each iteration. He presents examples displaying the power of the stopping rule and discusses the abilities and shortcomings of the method.

  20. Driving While Non-White: Exploring Traffic Stops and Post-Stop Activities in North Carolina, 2005-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron D. Lippard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Research has established that Blacks face disproportionate amounts of traffic stops, searches, and arrests by police compared to Whites. However, few studies have ventured past the Black-White dichotomy and considered how Hispanics or other minorities may face the same disparities, especially in places where the Hispanic population has dramatically increased in recent years. Using traffic stop and post-stop data compiled by the North Carolina Department of Justice from 2005 to 2009, this study explored whether Hispanics, Blacks, as well as other racial minorities experienced a higher likelihood of traffic stops, citations, searches, and arrests compared to Whites within sample of city, county, and state law enforcement agencies. We found that generally all racial and ethnic minority groups face higher rates of traffic stops than Whites by almost every law enforcement agency sampled. We also found that rates of post-stop activities including searches, citations, and arrests are higher for all racial and ethnic minority groups examined compared to Whites, especially for Hispanics. Hispanic and non-White disparities in traffic stops also cannot be explained away when controlling for population size, type of law enforcement agency, or the reason stated for the traffic stop (e.g., DWI, speeding, or investigation. More important, however, is that the rate of searches for racial and ethnic minorities did not necessarily match the rates of citations and arrests minorities receive, suggesting that some stops could be racially or ethnically motivated.

  1. Variational state based on the Bethe-ansatz solution and a correlated singlet liquid state in the one-dimensional t-J model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ohe, C.; Iguchi, K.

    1996-01-01

    The one-dimensional t-J model is investigated by the variational Monte Carlo method. A variational wave function based on the Bethe-ansatz solution is proposed, where the spin-charge separation is realized and a long-range correlation factor of Jastrow-type is included. In most regions of the phase diagram, this wave function provides an excellent description of the ground-state properties characterized as a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid; both the amplitude and exponent of correlation functions are correctly reproduced. For the spin-gap phase, another trial state of correlated singlet pairs with a Jastrow factor is introduced. This wave function shows generalized Luther-Emery-liquid behavior, exhibiting enhanced superconducting correlations and exponential decay of the spin correlation function. Using these two variational wave functions, the whole phase diagram is determined. In addition, relations between the correlation exponent and variational parameters in the trial functions are derived. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Bethe binary-encounter peaks in the double-differential cross sections for high-energy electron-impact ionization of H2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-11-01

    We study the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region in the ejected-electron double-differential emission spectrum of H2 and He targets in collisions with 8-keV electrons. We compare the absolute cross sections for these isoelectronic systems at high emission energies. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of a state-of-the-art theoretical model based on a two-effective-center approximation. In the case of the H2 molecule the binary peak in the double-differential cross sections (DDCS) is enhanced due to the two-center Young-type interference. The observed undulation in the DDCS ratio is explained in terms of the combined contributions of the Compton profile mismatch and the interference effect. The influence of the interference effect is thus observed for higher-energy electrons compared to most of the earlier studies which focused on low-energy electrons produced in soft collisions.

  3. A cluster-separable Born approximation for the three-dimensional reduction of the three-fermion Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijtebier, J.

    2000-06-01

    We perform a three-dimensional (3D) reduction of the two-fermion Bethe-Salpeter equation based on Sazdjian's explicitly covariant propagator, combined with a covariant substitute of the projector on the positive-energy free states. We use this combination in the two fermions in an external potential and in the three-fermion problems. The covariance of the two-fermion propagators ensures the covariance of the two-body equations obtained by switching off the external potential, or by switching off all interactions between any pair of two fermions and the third one, even if the series giving the 3D potential is limited to the Born term or more generally truncated. The covariant substitute of the positive-energy projector preserves the equations against continuum dissolution without breaking the covariance.

  4. Exact Bethe ansatz solution of a nonlinear quantum field model in quasi-two dimensions linked to the Landau–Lifshitz equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Anjan, E-mail: anjan.kundu@saha.ac.in

    2016-12-15

    Integrable quantum field models are known to exist mostly in one space-dimension. Exploiting the concept of multi-time in integrable systems and a Lax matrix of higher scaling order, we construct a novel quantum field model in quasi-two dimensions involving interacting fields. The Yang–Baxter integrability is proved for the model by finding a new kind of commutation rule for its basic fields, representing nonstandard scalar fields along the transverse direction. In spite of a close link with the quantum Landau–Lifshitz equation, the present model differs widely from it, in its content and the result obtained. Using further the algebraic Bethe ansatz we solve exactly the eigenvalue problem of this quantum field model for all its higher conserved operators. The idea presented here should instigate the construction of a novel class of integrable field and lattice models and exploration of a new type of underlying algebras.

  5. Radiotherapy Proton Interactions in Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    A survey of physics useful to proton radiotherapy, centered on stopping, scattering and hard scatters: 1. Introduction 2. The fundamental formula dose = fluence x mass stopping power. Practical units, comments on effective stopping power. 3. Range: experimental definition, Beth-Bloch CSDA theory, range-energy tables and approximations, range straggling. 4. Multiple Coulomb Scattering: suggested reading, elements of Moliere theory, the Gaussian approximation, scattering power. 5. Hard scatters...

  6. Towards the end of the technical stop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After several weeks of hard work, the short technical stop of the LHC accelerator is coming to an end. Following a very intense campaign to repair and retest many thousand high voltage connectors, the upgraded magnet protection system is being commissioned. During this period, the current in the main dipole and quadrupole magnets is carefully increased up to 6kA, required to collide protons at 7TeV centre-of-mass energy. This has been achieved for most of the sectors.   The parameters of the upgraded magnet protection system are accurately calibrated. This operation is needed in order for the magnet protection system to be triggered only when a real problem occurs. The system is now able to detect a transition from superconducting to normal conducting state of the superconducting cable joints between magnets, a necessary condition to operate the magnet system above 2kA. Highly accurate measurements of the joint resistances have been performed by stepping up the current to 5kA. The magnets and the...

  7. Stop valve with automatic control and locking for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    This invention generally concerns an automatic control and locking stop valve. Specifically it relates to the use of such a valve in a nuclear reactor of the type containing absorber elements supported by a fluid and intended for stopping the reactor in complete safety [fr

  8. Stop and start control: a distinction within self-control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.J.; van Hooft, E.A.J.; Bakker, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical distinction within self-control, between stop control and start control, was investigated in two studies. Study 1 consisted of a pilot study in which expert ratings of existing self-control items were used to distinguish between stop and start control items and a confirmatory factor

  9. 77 FR 25788 - Request for Information Regarding Stop Loss Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Loss Insurance AGENCIES: Internal Revenue Service, Department of the Treasury; Employee Benefits... information regarding the use of stop loss insurance by group health plans and their plan sponsors, with a focus on the prevalence and consequences of stop loss insurance at low attachment points. Given the...

  10. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  11. Note on measuring electronic stopping of slow ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2017-11-01

    Extracting stopping cross sections from energy-loss measurements requires careful consideration of the experimental geometry. Standard procedures for separating nuclear from electronic stopping treat electronic energy loss as a friction force, ignoring its dependence on impact parameter. In the present study we find that incorporating this dependence has a major effect on measured stopping cross sections, in particular for light ions at low beam energies. Calculations have been made for transmission geometry, nuclear interactions being quantified by Bohr-Williams theory of multiple scattering on the basis of a Thomas-Fermi-Molière potential, whereas electronic interactions are characterized by Firsov theory or PASS code. Differences between the full and the restricted stopping cross section depend on target thickness and opening angle of the detector and need to be taken into account in comparisons with theory as well as in applications of stopping data. It follows that the reciprocity principle can be violated when checked on restricted instead of full electronic stopping cross sections. Finally, we assert that a seeming gas-solid difference in stopping of low-energy ions is actually a metal-insulator difference. In comparisons with experimental results we mostly consider proton data, where nuclear stopping is only a minor perturbation.

  12. 49 CFR 37.201 - Intermediate and rest stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... wheelchair, shall be permitted to leave and return to the bus on the same basis as other passengers. The... passenger to get on and off the bus at the stop (e.g., operate the lift and provide assistance with... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.201 Intermediate and rest stops. (a) Whenever an OTRB makes...

  13. 46 CFR 58.01-25 - Means of stopping machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of stopping machinery. 58.01-25 Section 58.01-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-25 Means of stopping machinery. Machinery driving forced-draft and induced-draft fans,...

  14. Sudden stops and current account reversals: the euro area experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svrtinov Vesna Georgieva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the impact of massive capital flows and possible sudden stops on current account reversals. The aim of this paper is to consider the relationship between sudden stops and current account reversals in the eurozone and to explain the possibility of a balance-of-payment crisis within a monetary union.

  15. Model Passengers’ Travel Time for Conventional Bus Stop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhao Xin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited number of berths can result in a subsequent bus stopping at the upstream of a bus stop when all berths are occupied. When this traffic phenomenon occurs, passengers waiting on the platform usually prefer walking to the stopped bus, which leads to additional walking time before boarding the bus. Therefore, passengers’ travel time consumed at a bus stop is divided into waiting time, additional walking time, and boarding time. This paper proposed a mathematical model for analyzing passengers’ travel time at conventional bus stop based on theory of stochastic service system. Field-measured and simulated data were designated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. By analyzing the results, conclusion was conducted that short headway can reduce passengers’ waiting time at bus stop. Meanwhile, the theoretical analysis explained the inefficiency of bus stops with more than three berths from the perspective of passengers’ additional walking time. Additional walking time will increase in a large scale when the number of berths at a bus stop exceedsthe threshold of three.

  16. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stop-work orders. 42.1303 Section 42.1303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of...

  17. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  18. Indirect Effect of Supersymmetric Triplets in Stop Decays

    CERN Document Server

    de Blas, J; Ostdiek, B; Quiros, M

    2014-01-01

    We study an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a zero hypercharge triplet, and the effect that such a particle has on stop decays. This model has the capability of predicting a 125.5 GeV Higgs even in the presence of light stops and it can modify the diphoton rate by means of the extra charged fermion triplet coupled to the Higgs. Working in the limit where the scalar triplet decouples, and with small values of mA, we find that the fermion triplet can greatly affect the branching ratios of the stops, even in the absence of a direct stop-triplet coupling. We compare the triplet extension with the MSSM and discuss how the additional fields affect the search for stop pair production.

  19. New stopping rules for dendrogram classification in TWINSPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Esmailzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to propose a modification of TWINSPAN algorithm with introducing new stopping rules for TWINSPAN. Modified TWINSPAN combines the analysis of heterogeneity of the clusters prior to each division to prevent the imposed divisions of homogeneous clusters and it also solved the limitation of classical TWINSPAN in which the number of clusters increases power of two. For this purpose, ecological groups of Box tree stands in Farim forests were classified with using classical and modified TWINSPAN basis of plant species cover percentage of 60 plots with 400 m2 surface area which were made by releve method (by consideration of indicator stand concept. In this relation, five different heterogeneity measures including Whittaker’s beta diversity and total inertia, Sorensen, Jaccard and Orlo´ci dissimilarity indices which representing diversity and distance indices respectively were involved. Sample plots were also classified from basis of topographical properties using cluster analysis with emphasizing Euclidean distance coefficient and Wards clustering method. Results showed that using of two sets of heterogeneity indices lead to different classification dendrograms. In this relation, results of Whittaker’s beta with total inertia as diversity indices were similar and the other three dissimilarity indices have shown similar behavior. Finally, our results reiterated that modified TWINSPAN did not alter the logic of the TWINSPAN classification, but it increased the flexibility of TWINSPAN dendrogram with changing the hierarchy of divisions in the final classification of ecological groups of Box tree stands in Farim forests.

  20. Global warming: What should we do to stop or slow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenalp, B.

    2006-01-01

    Earth is warming much faster than had been predicted. 2005 was the warmest year on record, surpassing 1998. The multinational Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) report recently concluded that in Alaska, western Canada, and eastern Russia, average temperatures have increased 3 to 4 degrees Celsius in the past 50 years. Rising temperatures have a dramatic impact on Arctic ice. Since 1978 Arctic sea ice area has shrunk by some 9 percent per decade, and thinned as well. There are three specific events especially worrisome and potentially imminent, although the time frames are a matter of dispute: dramatic sea level rise by the end of the century that would take tens of thousand years to reverse; widespread coral bleaching that could be damage the world's fisheries within three decades; and, within 200 years, a shutdown of the ocean current that moderates temperatures in northern Europe. Global warming is caused by human activities such as burning nature's vast store of coal, oil and nature gas which releases billions of tones carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) every year. If current trends continue, we will raise atmospheric CO 2 concentrations to double pre-industrial levels during this century. That will probably be enough to raise global temperatures by around 2 degree C to 5 degree C. Even if humans stop burning oil and coal tomorrow we have already spewed enough greenhouse gases into the atmosphere to cause temperatures to warm and sea levels to rise for at least another century. So what should we do? We can not continue drawing energy from fossil fuels and there is no chance that the renewable, wind, tide, and water power can provide enough energy and in time. Nuclear energy is the only one immediately available source does not cause global warming. In this presentation consequences and risks of global warming, as well as nuclear power comparisons will be discussed comprehensively

  1. Power vacuum tubes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Providing examples of applications, Power Vacuum Tubes Handbook, Third Edition examines the underlying technology of each type of power vacuum tube device in common use today. The author presents basic principles, reports on new development efforts, and discusses implementation and maintenance considerations. Supporting mathematical equations and extensive technical illustrations and schematic diagrams help readers understand the material. Translate Principles into Specific Applications This one-stop reference is a hands-on guide for engineering personnel involved in the design, specification,

  2. Stopping hormone replacement therapy: were women ill advised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Grant P; Currie, Heather D; Panay, Nick; Moncur, Rik; Lee, Amanda J

    2011-09-01

    To survey women who stopped hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after 2002, including those who later restarted. A questionnaire on the UK-based menopause website www.menopausematters.co.uk evaluating how women are influenced by HRT advice. Main outcome measures Answers to questions regarding stopping/restarting HRT in response to the advice in the early 2000s and advice given today. A total of 1100 responses were obtained. Of those who made the decision to stop HRT themselves, 56.4% (n = 425/754) said that they were influenced by the media. In those who would potentially most benefit from HRT, 72.8% (n = 220/302) stopped without medical advice. Overall, women aged under 50 years were significantly more likely to stop HRT themselves than women over 50 (P relationships being negatively affected and 29.2% (n = 286) said that symptoms affected their social relationships. Overall 46.5% of women (n = 485/1044) would not have stopped HRT given the current understanding of risk. Compared with women over 50, significantly more women under the age of 50 said that they would not have previously stopped their HRT based on their current understanding of risk (P impact of published research and its reporting from the early 2000s are being mitigated by current press coverage. Media reports appear to influence the younger woman more than the older woman. Health professionals and media must learn the lessons from the past.

  3. Spot the stop with a b-tag

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Gabriele; Petersson, Christoffer; Torre, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The LHC searches for light compressed stop squarks have resulted in considerable bounds in the case where the stop decays to a neutralino and a charm quark. However, in the case where the stop decays to a neutralino, a bottom quark and two fermions via an off-shell W-boson, there is currently a significant unconstrained region in the stop-neutralino mass plane, still allowing for stop masses in the range 90-140 GeV. In this paper we propose a new monojet-like search for light stops, optimized for the four-body decay mode, in which at least one b-tagged jet is required. We show that, already by using the existing 8 TeV LHC data set, such a search would cover the entire unconstrained region. Moreover, in the process of validating our tools against an ATLAS monojet search, we show that the existing limit can be extended to exclude also stop masses below 100 GeV.

  4. Nuclear power in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, Tim

    2018-01-01

    The Trump government promotes the further operation of aging nuclear power plants in the US by governmental support although several operators close their nuclear power plants due to economic reasons. The Trump government is also repowering the Yucca-Mountain-Project for radioactive waste disposal that was stopped by the Obama government based on geological problems in the region.

  5. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Furman, Magdalena Anna

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research...... into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity) from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active). In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our...

  6. A Phonemic and Acoustic Analysis of Hindko Oral Stops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Ur RASHID

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hindko is an Indo-Aryan language that is mainly spoken in Khyber Pukhtoonkhaw province of Pakistan. This work aims to identify the oral stops of Hindko and determine the intrinsic acoustic cues for them. The phonemic analysis is done with the help of minimal pairs and phoneme distribution in contrastive environments which reveals that Hindko has twelve oral stops with three way series. The acoustic analysis of these segments shows that intrinsically voice onset time (VOT, closure duration and burst are reliable and distinguishing cues of stops in Hindko.

  7. Start-Stop Moment Optimization of Range Extender and Control Strategy Design for Extended -Range Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-bo; Han, Bing-yuan; Bei, Shao-yi

    2017-10-01

    Range extender is the core component of E-REV, its start-stop control determines the operation modes of vehicle. This paper based on a certain type of E-REV, researched constant power control strategy of range extender in extended-range model, to target range as constraint condition, combined with different driving cycle conditions, by correcting battery SOC for range extender start-stop moment, optimized the control strategy of range extender, and established the vehicle and range extender start-stop control simulation model. Selected NEDC and UDDS conditions simulation results show that: under certain target mileage, the range extender running time reduced by 37.2% and 28.2% in the NEDC condition, and running time UDDS conditions were reduced by 40.6% and 33.5% in the UDDS condition, reached the purpose of meeting the vehicle mileage and reducing consumption and emission.

  8. Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work and School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work & School Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... can help slow the spread of influenza. At School Resources for Schools, Childcare Providers and Parents Information ...

  9. Optimal Stopping and Policyholder Behaviour in Life Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt

    we solve an auxiliary quadratic optimal stopping problem. We show that the solution to maximizing variance depends on whether randomized stopping times are included in the set of stopping times we maximize over. For some problems the inclusion of randomized stopping times increase the value function....... This parameter we denote the rationality parameter. We give sufficient conditions and a probabilistic proof that when the rationality parameter increases to infinity the corresponding prices converge to to classical arbitrage-free price. We conclude the chapter with partial differential equations for valuation...... on the profitability. We measure the profitability as the difference between the value of the insurance contract and the surrender value. The value of the insurance contract may be determined as a solution to a differential equation much similar to the Thiele differential equation. As in Chapter 4 the model contains...

  10. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fan, induced draft fan, blower of an inert gas system, fuel oil transfer pump, fuel oil unit, fuel oil service pump, and any other fuel oil pumps must have a stop control that is outside of the space...

  11. One-stop polymerase chain reaction (PCR): An improved PCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -cycling steps to visualize amplicons, decelerating PCR sample processing and result calling. “One-stop PCR” was developed by including both the loading buffer and nontoxic staining dye within a single PCR tube, allowing direct loading and ...

  12. How to stop smoking: Dealing with a slip up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000855.htm How to stop smoking: Dealing with a slip up To use the ... Read up on stress management and practice the techniques Join a support group or program to help ...

  13. Optimal Locations of Bus Stops Connecting Subways near Urban Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsuitable locations of bus stops which provide feeder transportation connecting subways near urban intersections usually lead to the low efficiency of public transport and level of passenger service. A multiobjective optimization model to distribute such stop locations is proposed to attain the shortest total walk distance of passengers and minimum delay time of cars through intersections and travel time of buses. The Pareto frontier and optimal solutions for the proposed model are given by the distance-based and enumerative methods. The Xizhimen bus stop is selected to implement case studies for verifying the validity of the proposed model. The analysis of sensitivity on possible solutions is also carried out in the case studies. The results show that the proposed model is capable of optimizing the locations of bus stops connecting subways near intersections and helpful to improve the level of passengers service and operational efficiency of public transportation.

  14. Observations of NC stop nets for bottlenose dolphin takes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To observe the NC stop net fishery to document the entanglement of bottlenose dolphins and movement of dolphins around the nets.

  15. Analysis of movable bus stop boarding and alighting areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This study explored the feasibility of using movable and reusable boarding and alighting (B&A) pads at bus stops. : Potential design alternatives in terms of materials and structural support for these pads were evaluated. The review : focused on the ...

  16. Transit bus stop pedestrian warning application : concept of operations document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-04

    This document describes the Concept of Operations (ConOps) for the Transit Bus Stop Pedestrian Warning (TSPW) application. The ConOps describes the current state of operations with respect to the integration of connected vehicle technology in transit...

  17. A compact beam stop for a rare kaon decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J.; Diwan, M.; Eckhause, M.; Guss, C.M.; Hancock, A.D.; Heinson, A.P.; Highland, V.L.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kettell, S.H.; Kuang, Y.; Lang, K.; McDonough, J.; McFarlane, W.K.; Molzon, W.R.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Winter, R.G.; Witkowski, M.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.D. E-mail: worm@fnal.gov; Yamashita, A

    1999-06-01

    We describe the development and testing of a novel beam stop for use in a rare kaon decay experiment at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The beam stop is located inside a dipole spectrometer magnet in close proximity to straw drift chambers and intercepts a high-intensity neutral hadron beam. The design process, involving both Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests of alternative beam-stop shielding arrangements, had the goal of minimizing the leakage of particles from the beam stop and the resulting hit rates in detectors, while preserving maximum acceptance for events of interest. The beam tests consisted of measurements of rates in drift chambers, scintillation counter hodoscopes, a gas threshold Cherenkov counter, and a lead glass array. Measurements were also made with a set of specialized detectors which were sensitive to low-energy neutrons, photons, and charged particles. Comparisons are made between these measurements and a detailed Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Good news is bad news: Leverage cycles and sudden stops

    OpenAIRE

    Akinci, Ozge; Chahrour, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We show that a model with imperfectly forecastable changes in future productivity and an occasionally binding collateral constraint can match a set of stylized facts about “sudden stop” events. “Good” news about future productivity raises leverage during times of expansion, increasing the probability that the constraint binds, and a sudden stop occurs, in future periods. The economy exhibits a boom period in the run-up to the sudden stop, with output, consumption, and investment all above tre...

  19. Mechanical stop mechanism for overcoming MEMS fabrication tolerances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Hussein; Bourbon, Gilles; Le Moal, Patrice; Lutz, Philippe; Haddab, Yassine

    2017-01-01

    A mechanical stop mechanism is developed in order to compensate MEMS fabrication tolerances in discrete positioning. The mechanical stop mechanism is designed to be implemented on SOI wafers using a common DRIE etching process. The various fabrication tolerances obtained due to the etching process are presented and discussed in the paper. The principle and design of the mechanism are then presented. Finally, experiments on microfabricated positioning prototypes show accurate steps unaffected by the fabrication tolerances. (technical note)

  20. Modeling Stop-and-Go Waves in Pedestrian Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Portz, Andrea; Seyfried, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Several spatially continuous pedestrian dynamics models have been validated against empirical data. We try to reproduce the experimental fundamental diagram (velocity versus density) with simulations. In addition to this quantitative criterion, we tried to reproduce stop-and-go waves as a qualitative criterion. Stop-and-go waves are a characteristic phenomenon for the single file movement. Only one of three investigated models satisfies both criteria.

  1. Stop state classification in intracortical brain-machine-interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tze Hui Koh; Libedinsky, Camilo; Cuntai Guan; Kai Keng Ang; So, Rosa Q

    2017-07-01

    Invasive brain-machine-interface (BMI) has the prospect to empower tetraplegic patients with independent mobility through the use of brain-controlled wheelchairs. For the practical and long-term use of such control systems, the system has to distinguish between stop and movement states and has to be robust to overcome non-stationarity in the brain signals. In this work, we investigates the non-stationarity of the stop state on neural data collected from a macaque trained to control a robotic platform to stop and move in left, right, forward directions We then propose a hybrid approach that employs both random forest and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Using this approach, we performed offline decoding on 8 days of data collected over the course of three months during joystick control of the robotic platform. We compared the results of using the proposed approach with the use of LDA alone to perform direct classifications of stop, left, right and forward. The results showed an average performance increment of 22.7% using the proposed hybrid approach. The results yielded significant improvements during sessions where LDA showed a heavy bias towards the stop state. This suggests that the proposed hybrid approach addresses the non-stationarity in the stop state and subsequently facilitates a more accurate decoding of the movement states.

  2. Lifts and stops in proficient and dysgraphic handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Villagrán, Vietminh; Danna, Jérémy; Velay, Jean-Luc

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the handwriting performances of dysgraphic children were compared to those of proficient children and adults. The task consisted in writing a single word at normal and fast speeds. A distinction was made between two kinds of pauses, which are often confounded: pen lifts, when the pen is above the paper, and pen stops, when it is immobile on the paper. The number and duration of lifts and stops were analyzed, together with the mean velocity. No difference in the number of lifts was observed between the three groups of writers, but the lift durations were shorter for adults. While dysgraphic children were able to write as fast as proficient children, their stops were more numerous and longer than those of proficient children who, themselves, made more stops than adults. A distinction was made between short, normal, and long, abnormal, stops. The results of this study suggest that pen stops are more appropriate than pen lifts in differentiating the handwriting fluency of dysgraphic and proficient children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stopped light in a cylindrical waveguide with metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yan Ling; Liu, Wei; Gu, Yiwei; School of Information Science; Tech Team

    2016-05-01

    The unique property of the novel type of left-handed material (LHM) is that it can support propagating wave with the group velocity and Poynting vector opposite to the wave vector. We propose a cylindrical waveguide with its core and cladding filled with right-handed material (RHM) and LHM, respectively, to investigate the sign-varying energy fluxes and their cancellation and to explore the new mechanism of stopping light. The normalized total energy flux is introduced as P =P1/+P2 |P1 | + |P2 | where Pi (i = 1,2) is the power confined in the waveguide core and cladding, respectively. There exist three situations: (1) P > 0 means P1 > |P2 | ; the propagation is in the forward mode; (2) P means P1 = |P2 | ; the energy fluxes in core and cladding fully cancels each other, the light-wave propagation comes to a complete standstill with the group velocity reducing to zero, and the energy is stored in the waveguide completely. For modes TE0n and TM0n we theoretically derive the expression of the normalized energy fluxes. As μ2 means the energy flux in the LHM cladding is negative, opposite to the phase velocity, the energy fluxes between the RHM core and LHM cladding may cancel each other. The total energy flux thus becomes zero. The numerical simulation shows that with appropriate electromagnetic frequency and waveguide core radius, the electromagnetic waves can reach a complete standstill. We consider two popularly used Drude models in the microwave and optical domains. This abstract is replacing DAMOP16-2016-000110.

  4. Global Partnership to Stop TB: a model of an effective public health partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, J; Heitkamp, P; Smith, I; Billo, N

    2004-01-01

    The Global Partnership to Stop TB. To describe the need for a partnership, its development, its aims and how it goes about its business. The international health community finds itself working under new constraints and in the presence of new actors and opportunities, including globalisation, economic and cultural changes, lack of resources, and the need for intersectoral collaboration. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared tuberculosis a global emergency in 1993. However, political commitment to controlling the growing pandemic was lacking, and TB continued to exact its remorseless toll. The Global Partnership to Stop TB can be seen as the result of the development over the last century of progressively more powerful forms of international organisations against tuberculosis. An outline is given of the current Global Partnership to Stop TB, including its goals, its progress from values to achievements and how it functions through various bodies. The Partnership is potentially an effective model for other public health issues. As such, it can contribute to and catalyse a new era of international cooperation.

  5. Approach to calculation of mass spectra and two-photon decays of c c¯ mesons in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shashank; Alemu, Lmenew

    2018-02-01

    In this work we calculate the mass spectra of charmonium for 1 P ,…,4 P states of 0++ and 1++, for 1 S ,…,5 S states of 0-+, and for 1 S ,…,4 D states of 1- along with the two-photon decay widths of the ground and first excited states of 0++ quarkonia for the process O++→γ γ in the framework of a QCD-motivated Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). In this 4 ×4 BSE framework, the coupled Salpeter equations are first shown to decouple for the confining part of the interaction (under the heavy-quark approximation) and are analytically solved, and later the one-gluon-exchange interaction is perturbatively incorporated, leading to mass spectral equations for various quarkonia. The analytic forms of wave functions obtained are used for the calculation of the two-photon decay widths of χc 0. Our results are in reasonable agreement with data (where available) and other models.

  6. Gluon saturation and baryon stopping in the SPS, RHIC, and LHC energy regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Feng Shengqin

    2012-01-01

    A new geometrical scaling method with a gluon saturation rapidity limit is proposed to study the gluon saturation feature of the central rapidity region of relativistic nuclear collisions. The net-baryon number is essentially transported by valence quarks that probe the saturation regime in the target by multiple scattering. We take advantage of the gluon saturation model with geometric scaling of the rapidity limit to investigate net baryon distributions, nuclear stopping power and gluon saturation features in the SPS and RHIC energy regions. Predictions for net baryon rapidity distributions, mean rapidity loss and gluon saturation feature in central Pb + Pb collisions at the LHC are made in this paper. (authors)

  7. Stopping times in cessation flows of Bingham plastics with slip at the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Maria; Damianou, Yiolanda; Kaoullas, George; Georgiou, Georgios C.

    2012-09-01

    We solve numerically the cessation of axisymmetric Poiseuille flow of a Bingham plastic assuming that slip occurs along the wall. A power-law expression is used to relate the wall shear stress to the slip velocity. The numerical results show that the velocity becomes and remains uniform before complete cessation and that the stopping time is finite only when the exponent sBingham number and the volumetric flow rate decays exponentially. When s>1, the decay is much slower, i.e. polynomial. The asymptotic expressions for the volumetric flow rate in the case of full-slip are also derived.

  8. Factors influencing the reasons why mothers stop breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Catherine R L; Dodds, Linda; Legge, Alexandra; Bryanton, Janet; Semenic, Sonia

    2014-05-09

    To explore the reasons why women stop breastfeeding completely before their infants are six months of age and to identify the factors associated with cessation and the timing of cessation. For all singleton live newborns born between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009 in two district health authorities in Nova Scotia, Canada, mother's self-reported breastfeeding status was collected at hospital discharge and at five follow-up visits until infants were six months of age. Mothers who stopped breastfeeding before six months were also questioned about the time of weaning and the reason they discontinued all breastfeeding. Eleven categories were created from the open-ended responses women provided. These data were linked with the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database in order to obtain information on maternal and neonatal characteristics. The relationship between maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal characteristics and each reason for stopping breastfeeding completely were examined. Of the 500 mothers who stopped breastfeeding completely before six months and provided a reason for discontinuing, the majority (73.6%) stopped within the first six weeks. The most common reasons cited were inconvenience or fatigue associated with breastfeeding (22.6%) and concerns about milk supply (21.6%). Return to work or school was associated with length of time that infants were breastfed: 20% of women who stopped after six weeks citing this as the reason. Most of the reasons, however, were not found to be associated with a specific duration of breastfeeding or with the examined maternal and infant characteristics. This study highlights factors associated with the reasons why women stop breastfeeding completely before six months and how these reasons varied with weaning age. The results will help inform future research aimed at identifying interventions to reduce early breastfeeding cessation.

  9. Stop identity cue as a cue to language identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Paula Lisa

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether language membership could potentially be cued by the acoustic-phonetic detail of word-initial stops and retained all the way through the process of lexical access to aid in language identification. Of particular interest were language-specific differences in CE and CF word-initial stops. Experiment 1 consisted of an interlingual homophone production task. The purpose of this study was to examine how word-initial stop consonants differ in terms of acoustic properties in Canadian English (CE) and Canadian French (CF) interlingual homophones. The analyses from the bilingual speakers in Experiment 1 indicate that bilinguals do produce language-specific differences in CE and CF word-initial stops, and that closure duration, voice onset time, and burst spectral SD may provide cues to language identity in CE and CF stops. Experiment 2 consisted of a Phoneme and Language Categorization task. The purpose of this study was to examine how stop identity cues, such as VOT and closure duration, influence a listener to identify word-initial stop consonants as belonging to Canadian English (CE) or Canadian French (CF). The RTs from the bilingual listeners in this study indicate that bilinguals do perceive language-specific differences in CE and CF word-initial stops, and that voice onset time may provide cues to phoneme and language membership in CE and CF stops. Experiment 3 consisted of a Phonological-Semantic priming task. The purpose of this study was to examine how subphonetic variations, such as changes in the VOT, affect lexical access. The results of Experiment 3 suggest that language-specific cues, such as VOT, affects the composition of the bilingual cohort and that the extent to which English and/or French words are activated is dependent on the language-specific cues present in a word. The findings of this study enhanced our theoretical understanding of lexical structure and lexical access in bilingual speakers

  10. Exploring the nearly degenerate stop region with sbottom decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Haipeng [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Walter Burke Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Gu, Jiayin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Wang, Lian-Tao [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics

    2016-11-15

    A light stop with mass almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino has important connections with both naturalness and dark matter relic abundance. This region is also very hard to probe at colliders. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of searching for such stop particles at the LHC from sbottom decays, focusing on two channels with final states 2l+E{sup miss}{sub T} and 1b1l+E{sup miss}{sub T}. We found that, if the lightest sbottom has mass around or below 1 TeV and has a significant branching ratio to decay to stop and W (b→tW), a stop almost degenerate with neutralino can be excluded up to about 500-600 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with 300 fb{sup -1} data. The searches we propose are complementary to other SUSY searches at the LHC and could have the best sensitivity to the stop-bino coannihilation region. Since they involve final states which have already been used in LHC searches, a reinterpretation of the search results already has sensitivity. Further optimization could deliver the full potential of these channels.

  11. Exploring the nearly degenerate stop region with sbottom decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Haipeng [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Gu, Jiayin [Center for Future High Energy Physics, Institute of High Energy Physics,19B YuquanLu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); DESY,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); Wang, Lian-Tao [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States); Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,5640 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States)

    2017-04-13

    A light stop with mass almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino has important connections with both naturalness and dark matter relic abundance. This region is also very hard to probe at colliders. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of searching for such stop particles at the LHC from sbottom decays, focusing on two channels with final states 2ℓ+E{sub T}{sup miss} and 1b1ℓ+E{sub T}{sup miss}. We found that, if the lightest sbottom has mass around or below 1 TeV and has a significant branching ratio to decay to stop and W (b̃→t̃ W), a stop almost degenerate with neutralino can be excluded up to about 500–600 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with 300 fb{sup −1} data. The searches we propose are complementary to other SUSY searches at the LHC and could have the best sensitivity to the stop-bino coannihilation region. Since they involve final states which have already been used in LHC searches, a reinterpretation of the search results already has sensitivity. Further optimization could deliver the full potential of these channels.

  12. Car Delay Model near Bus Stops with Mixed Traffic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaobao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model for estimating car delays at bus stops under mixed traffic using probability theory and queuing theory. The roadway is divided to serve motorized and nonmotorized traffic streams. Bus stops are located on the nonmotorized lanes. When buses dwell at the stop, they block the bicycles. Thus, two conflict points between car stream and other traffic stream are identified. The first conflict point occurs as bicycles merge to the motorized lane to avoid waiting behind the stopping buses. The second occurs as buses merge back to the motorized lane. The average car delay is estimated as the sum of the average delay at these two conflict points and the delay resulting from following the slower bicycles that merged into the motorized lane. Data are collected to calibrate and validate the developed model from one site in Beijing. The sensitivity of car delay to various operation conditions is examined. The results show that both bus stream and bicycle stream have significant effects on car delay. At bus volumes above 200 vehicles per hour, the curbside stop design is not appropriate because of the long car delays. It can be replaced by the bus bay design.

  13. Energy policy and nuclear power. Expectations of the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harig, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    In the opinion of the power industry, using nuclear power in Germany is a responsible attitude, while opting out of nuclear power is not. Electricity utilities will build new nuclear power plants only if the structural economic and ecological advantages of nuclear power are preserved and can be exploited in Germany. The power industry will assume responsibility for new complex, capital-intensive nuclear plants only if a broad societal consensus about this policy can be reached in this country. The power industry expects that the present squandering of nuclear power resources in Germany will be stopped. The power industry is prepared to contribute to finding a speedy consensus in energy policy, which would leave open all decisions which must not be taken today, and which would not constrain the freedom of decision of coming generations. The electricity utilities remain committed proponents of nuclear power. However, what they sell to their customers is electricity, not nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  14. Companion classroom activities for "stop faking it!" force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2011-01-01

    Never has it been so easy for educators to learn to teach physical science with confidence. Award-winning author Bill Robertson launched his bestselling Stop Faking It! series in 2002 with Force and Motion--offering elementary and middle school teachers a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching physical science with confidence. Combining easy-to-understand if irreverent explanations and quirky diagrams, Stop Faking It! Force and Motion helped thousands of teachers, parents, and homeschoolers conquer topics from Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. Now Companion Classroom Activities for Stop Faking It! Force and Motion proves an ideal supplement to the original book or a valuable resource of its own. The hands-on activities and highly readable explanations allow students to first investigate concepts, then discuss learned concepts, and finally apply the concepts to everyday situations. Robertson's wit and humor are sure to keep students and teachers entertained while they tackle topics ...

  15. Why do People Stop playing On-Line Games?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek; Razmerita, Liana

    2012-01-01

    The recent initial public offering of shares of Zynga, probably the most important on-line game provider, drew interest of potential investors but also of general public to their business model. What the most interested people learned so far is that if Zynga had not changed their accounting...... practice, they would be in red numbers for several months already. This is most likely caused by people stopping to play their games. This paper provides an estimate of what proportion of people, who played on-line games, already stopped playing them. Additionally, it analyzed the reasons why people...... stopped playing on-line games. It also compares Facebook and other on-line games....

  16. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  17. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  18. A Conceptual Approach for Optimising Bus Stop Spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Amita; Jain, S. S.; Garg, P. k.

    2017-06-01

    An efficient public transportation system is essential of any country. The growth, development and shape of the urban areas are mainly due to availability of good transportation (Shah et al. in Inst Town Plan India J 5(3):50-59, 1). In developing countries, like India, travel by local bus in a city is very common. The accidents, congestion, pollution and appropriate location of bus stops are the major problems arising in metropolitan cities. Among all the metropolitan cities in India, Delhi has highest percentage of growth of population and vehicles. Therefore, it is important to adopt efficient and effective ways to improve mobility in different metropolitan cities in order to overcome the problem and to reduce the number of private vehicles on the road. The primary objective of this paper is to present a methodology for developing a model for optimum bus stop spacing (OBSS). It describes the evaluation of existing urban bus route, data collection, development of model for optimizing urban bus route and application of model. In this work, the bus passenger generalized cost method is used to optimize the spacing between bus stops. For the development of model, a computer program is required to be written. The applicability of the model has been evaluated by taking the data of urban bus route of Delhi Transport Corporation (DTC) in Excel sheet in first phase. Later on, it is proposed to develop a programming in C++ language. The developed model is expected to be useful to transport planner for rational design of the spacing of bus stops to save travel time and to generalize operating cost. After analysis it is found that spacing between the bus stop comes out to be between 250 and 500 m. The Proposed Spacing of bus stops is done considering the points that they don't come nearer to metro/rail station, entry or exit of flyover and near traffic signal.

  19. Anatomy of maximal stop mixing in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Felix [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kraml, Sabine; Kulkarni, Suchita [CNRS/IN2P3, INPG, Grenoble (France). Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2012-05-15

    A Standard Model-like Higgs near 125 GeV in the MSSM requires multi-TeV stop masses, or a near-maximal contribution to its mass from stop mixing. We investigate the maximal mixing scenario, and in particular its prospects for being realized it in potentially realistic GUT models. We work out constraints on the possible GUT-scale soft terms, which we compare with what can be obtained from some well-known mechanisms of SUSY breaking mediation. Finally, we analyze two promising scenarios in detail, namely gaugino mediation and gravity mediation with non-universal Higgs masses.

  20. How to stop bullying in schools - a Dutch way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakema, C.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article contains information about a 5 pillar method to prevent and to stop violence in schools. Preventing violence in schools is a complex process. Not only does the victim need help, but those around the victim also need to understand the implications and learn to control the situation. Teachers, parents the aggressor, (the bully the victim and the classmates all need knowledge, rules and social skills that help them stop the psychological mechanisms of violence, commonly known as bullying. Bullying will not disappear, but can be controlled if people (start to work together cooperate. It asks commitment of everybody involved.

  1. International Symposium of Scientists for Nuclear test Stopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Problems discussed at International Symposium of Scientists for Nuclear Test Stopping in July 1986 in Moscow were considered. Scientists discussed complex of possible measures directed at strengthening of peace supporting mechanism, spoke in support of prohibition of all nuclear weapon tests. Necessity of measures preventing the weapon delivery to space, construction of the regime of using cosmic equipment exclusively for peace was noted. Attention was paid to the problem of control for test stopping (by means of sattelites and seismic methods), cooperation establishment between the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Council for the protection of the USA Natural Resources

  2. A Hierarchical Approach to Optimizing Bus Stop Distribution in Large and Fast Developing Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengdong Huang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Public transit plays a key role in shaping the transportation structure of large and fast growing cities. To cope with high population and employment density, such cities usually resort to multi-modal transit services, such as rail, BRT and bus. These modes are strategically connected to form an effective transit network. Among the transit modes, bus stops need to be properly deployed to maintain an acceptable walking accessibility. This paper presents a hierarchical process for optimizing bus stop locations in the context of fast growing multi-modal transit services. Three types of bus stops are identified hierarchically, which includes connection stops, key stops and ordinary stops. Connection stops are generated manually to connect with other transit facilities. Key stops and ordinary stops are optimized with coverage models that are respectively weighted by network centrality measure and potential demand. A case study in a Chinese city suggests the hierarchical approach may generate more effective stop distribution.

  3. P.R. and advertising campaign 'Let us stop smoking together'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacena, Michal

    1999-01-01

    CEZ is the main supplier of electricity in the Czech republic. (72% of production from coal, 22% of people agree to continue; 25% of production from nuclear, 55% of people agree to continue, but, it is much more politically sensitive). In 1998 a huge six-year ecological programme ended. The CEZ Communication targets are: to point the succesful finishing of the ecological program and its good results, to iprove the company image, to change the public opinion on pollution issues. Communication problems are: how to make the technical topic interesting and understandable to the general public, and how to avoid a criticism and contra-productivity of the advertising? The solution proposed are: to give the information a social 'added value'- our power plants are going to stop smoking. We know it is not easy, so that we want to motivate and help you - try it yourself together with us. 'Let us stop smoking together!'; to combine the advertising and P.R. activities. Now CEZ can continue with the communication about its activities and plans on the new level. The inspiration for the communication about nuclear power plants: 'NPPs do not smoke at a. Let us think about it together!'

  4. Medium modifications of mesons. Chiral symmetry restoration, in-medium QCD sum rules for D and ρ mesons, and Bethe-Salpeter equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilger, Thomas Uwe

    2012-04-11

    The interplay of hadron properties and their modification in an ambient nuclear medium on the one hand and spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration on the other hand is investigated. QCD sum rules for D and B mesons embedded in cold nuclear matter are evaluated. We quantify the mass splitting of D- anti D and B- anti B mesons as a function of the nuclear matter density and investigate the impact of various condensates in linear density approximation. The analysis also includes D{sub s} and D{sup *}{sub 0} mesons. QCD sum rules for chiral partners in the open-charm meson sector are presented at nonzero baryon net density or temperature. We focus on the differences between pseudo-scalar and scalar as well as vector and axial-vector D mesons and derive the corresponding Weinberg type sum rules. Based on QCD sum rules we explore the consequences of a scenario for the ρ meson, where the chiral symmetry breaking condensates are set to zero whereas the chirally symmetric condensates remain at their vacuum values. The complementarity of mass shift and broadening is discussed. An alternative approach which utilizes coupled Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations for quark-antiquark bound states is investigated. For this purpose we analyze the analytic structure of the quark propagators in the complex plane numerically and test the possibility to widen the applicability of the method to the sector of heavy-light mesons in the scalar and pseudo-scalar channels, such as the D mesons, by varying the momentum partitioning parameter. The solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equation in the Wigner-Weyl phase of chiral symmetry at nonzero bare quark masses are used to investigate a scenario with explicit but without dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

  5. Stimulus-response mappings shape inhibition processes: a combined EEG-fMRI study of contextual stopping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina F Lavallee

    Full Text Available Humans are rarely faced with one simple task, but are typically confronted with complex stimulus constellations and varying stimulus-relevance in a given situation. Through modifying the prototypical stop-signal task and by combined recording and analysis of electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we studied the effects of stimulus relevance for the generation of a response or its inhibition. Stimulus response mappings were modified by contextual cues, indicating which of two different stimuli following a go stimulus was relevant for stopping. Overall, response inhibition, that is comparing successful stopping to a stop-signal against go-signal related processes, was associated with increased activity in right inferior and left midfrontal regions, as well as increased EEG delta and theta power; however, stimulus-response conditions in which the most infrequent stop-signal was relevant for inhibition, were associated with decreased activity in regions typically involved in response inhibition, as well as decreased activity in the delta and theta bands as compared to conditions wherein the relevant stop-signal frequency was higher. Behaviorally, this (aforementioned condition, which demanded inhibition only from the most infrequent stimulus, was also associated with reduced reaction times and lower error rates. This pattern of results does not align with typical stimulus frequency-driven findings and suggests interplay between task relevance and stimulus frequency of the stop-signal. Moreover, with a multimodal EEG-fMRI analysis, we demonstrated significant parameterization for response inhibition with delta, theta and beta time-frequency values, which may be interpreted as reflecting conflict monitoring, evaluative and/or motor processes as suggested by previous work (Huster et al., 2013; Aron, 2011. Further multimodal results suggest a possible neurophysiological and behavioral benefit under conditions

  6. Torness: proposed nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The need for and desirability of nuclear power, and in particular the proposed nuclear power station at Torness in Scotland, are questioned. Questions are asked, and answered, on the following topics: position, appearance and cost of the proposed Torness plant, and whether necessary; present availability of electricity, and forecast of future needs, in Scotland; energy conservation and alternative energy sources; radiation hazards from nuclear power stations (outside, inside, and in case of an accident); transport of spent fuel from Torness to Windscale; radioactive waste management; possibility of terrorists making a bomb with radioactive fuel from a nuclear power station; cost of electricity from nuclear power; how to stop Torness. (U.K.)

  7. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kofoed Wind

    Full Text Available Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active. In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our methods are based exclusively on WiFi data. We study two months of WiFi data collected every two minutes by a smartphone, and infer stop-locations in the form of labelled time-intervals. For this purpose, we investigate two algorithms, both of which scale to large datasets: a greedy approach to select the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period.

  8. Negative Thought Stopping. A Key to Performance Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Susan G.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of mental training on skill acquisition and performance is currently emphasized in the study of sport psychology and motor learning. This article provides the teacher and coach with general guidelines for understanding and incorporating negative thought stopping training into athletic programs. (MT)

  9. Detector for recoil nuclei stopping in the spark chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksanyan, A.S.; Asatiani, T.L.; Ivanov, V.I.; Mkrtchyan, G.G.; Pikhtelev, R.N.

    1974-01-01

    A detector consisting of the combination of a drift and a wide gap spark chambers and designed to detect recoil nuclei stopping in the spark chamber gas is described. It is shown, that by using an appropriate discrimination the detector allows to detect reliably the recoil nuclei in the presence of intensive electron and γ-quanta beams

  10. Is one-stop surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Møller; Piil, Karin; Bashir, Asma

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate one-stop surgery (OSS) for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) regarding symptom relief and patient satisfaction. OSS in our setting means only one visit to the hospital for surgery and no hospital appointments for preassessment or follow-up. We hypothes...

  11. Stop the Tears of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimon, Jane; Gibson, Terry-Ann; Spear, Caile

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: By participating in this Stop the Tears teaching strategy, students will be able to: (1) analyze how alcohol and drug abuse could affect their lives as well as the lives of their friends and family and, (2) create a media message, such as a poster, pamphlet, poem, or song, in which alcohol and drug prevention is advocated specific to…

  12. Comparison of skid resistance testing to stopping distance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to statistically summarize the results of a side-by-side test of the skid resistance testing trailer utilized by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), and the stopping distance car utilized by the Oregon State Police...

  13. Faster comparison of stopping times by nested conditional Monte Carlo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickmann, Fabian; Schweizer, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    We show that deliberately introducing a nested simulation stage can lead to significant variance reductions when comparing two stopping times by Monte Carlo. We derive the optimal number of nested simulations and prove that the algorithm is remarkably robust to misspecifications of this number. The

  14. On a rational stopping rule for facilities location algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1984-01-01

    In the multifacility location problem, a number of new facilities are to be located so as to minimize a sum of weighted distances. Love and Yeong (1981) developed a lower bound on the optimal value for use in deciding when to stop an iterative solution procedure. The authors develop a stronger...

  15. Assessing One-stop-shop Best Practices for South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One stop shop (OSS) models are an investment process that came about to create a centralised place for the voluminous documentation required in international trade between companies. Bureaucracy has proven to be a major barrier to the development of international trade, particularly in African countries that still lag ...

  16. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH...

  17. Annihilation of antiprotons stopped in liquid hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalkarov, O.D.; Kerbikov, B.O.; Markushin, V.E.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed analysis is given of stopping antiproton annihilation in liquid hydrogen and deuterium. Connection between capture schedule and properties of bound states in nucleon-antinucleon system is established. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data which appeared in 1971-75

  18. Inferring Stop-Locations from WiFi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Furman, Magdalena Anna; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility patterns are inherently complex. In terms of understanding these patterns, the process of converting raw data into series of stop-locations and transitions is an important first step which greatly reduces the volume of data, thus simplifying the subsequent analyses. Previous research into the mobility of individuals has focused on inferring 'stop locations' (places of stationarity) from GPS or CDR data, or on detection of state (static/active). In this paper we bridge the gap between the two approaches: we introduce methods for detecting both mobility state and stop-locations. In addition, our methods are based exclusively on WiFi data. We study two months of WiFi data collected every two minutes by a smartphone, and infer stop-locations in the form of labelled time-intervals. For this purpose, we investigate two algorithms, both of which scale to large datasets: a greedy approach to select the most important routers and one which uses a density-based clustering algorithm to detect router fingerprints. We validate our results using participants' GPS data as well as ground truth data collected during a two month period.

  19. Answers to Science Questions from the "Stop Faking It!" Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William C.

    2009-01-01

    This valuable and entertaining compendium of Bill Robertson's popular "Science 101" columns, from NSTA member journal "Science and Children," proves you don't have to be a science geek to understand basic scientific concepts. The author of the best-selling "Stop Faking It!" series explains everything from quarks to photosynthesis, telescopes to…

  20. Developing A One Stop Shop Model For Integrated Land Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional survey was conducted in six land sector agencies in Kumasi on data formats, standards and accessibility in provision of land delivery services to their clients. The results of the survey were then used to design a client server application based on a one stop shop concept to integrate the parcel attribute ...

  1. developing a one stop shop model for integrated land information

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    DEVELOPING A ONE STOP SHOP MODEL FOR INTEGRATED LAND. INFORMATION MANAGEMENT. E. K. Forkuo and S. B. Asiedu. Department of Geomatic Engineering. Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology. Kumasi, Ghana. ABSTRACT. In Ghana much attention has not been given to the development ...

  2. Dealing With Resistance to Thought-Stopping: A Transcript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpe, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    A woman who had from childhood suffered from neurotic anxieties of an interpersonal kind had for 10 years been plagued with insistent and fruitless negative thoughts about herself. This transcript deals mainly with her objections to the technique of thought stopping and the efforts that were made to overcome them. (Author)

  3. Improved atomic data for electron-transport predictions by the codes TIGER and TIGERP: II. Electron stopping and range data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J.M.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1983-04-01

    The electron stopping and range data now used in the TIGER and TIGERP electron-transport codes are extracted and compared with other data for these processes. At the smallest collision energies treated by these codes, E approx. 1 keV, the stopping-power is estimated to be accurate for small-Z targets, to be about 25 percent too small for Z near 36 and to be a factor of three too small for Z > 79. These errors decrease with increasing E and the largest error for any target is roughly 20 percent for E = 10 keV. The closely related continuous-slowing-down range is estimated, at 1 keV, to be about 25 percent too small for small-Z targets and a factor of 2 too large for large-Z targets. The electron-transport problem of reflection from planer surfaces is re-investigated with improved stopping-power data. The effects of this change for the examples considered were about the size of the statistical uncertainties in the calculation, 1 to 2 percent

  4. Stopping the error cascade: a report on ameliorators from the ASIPS collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnes, Bennett; Fernald, Douglas; Quintela, Javán; Araya‐Guerra, Rodrigo; Westfall, John; Harris, Daniel; Pace, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    Objective To present a novel examination of how error cascades are stopped (ameliorated) before they affect patients. Design Qualitative analysis of reported errors in primary care. Setting Over a three‐year period, clinicians and staff in two practice‐based research networks voluntarily reported medical errors to a primary care patient safety reporting system, Applied Strategies for Improving Patient Safety (ASIPS). The authors found a number of reports where the error was corrected before it had an adverse impact on the patient. Results Of 754 codeable reported events, 60 were classified as ameliorated events. In these events, a participant stopped the progression of the event before it reached or affected the patient. Ameliorators included doctors, nurses, pharmacists, diagnostic laboratories and office staff. Additionally, patients or family members may be ameliorators by recognising the error and taking action. Ameliorating an event after an initial error requires an opportunity to catch the error by systems, chance or attentiveness. Correcting the error before it affects the patient requires action either directed by protocols and systems or by vigilance, power to change course and perseverance on the part of the ameliorator. Conclusion Despite numerous individual and systematic methods to prevent errors, a system to prevent all potential errors is not feasible. However, a more pervasive culture of safety that builds on simple acts in addition to more costly and complex electronic systems may improve patient outcomes. Medical staff and patients who are encouraged to be vigilant, ask questions and seek solutions may correct otherwise inevitable wrongs. PMID:17301195

  5. Stopping electric field extension in a modified nanostructure based on SOI technology - A comprehensive numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvarifard, Mohammad K.; Orouji, Ali A.

    2017-11-01

    This article has related a particular knowledge in order to reduce short channel effects (SCEs) in nano-devices based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFETs. The device under study has been designed in 22 nm node technology with embedding Si3N4 extra oxide as a stopping layer of electric field and a useful heatsink for transferring generated heat. Two important subjects (DC characteristics and RF characteristics) have been investigated, simultaneously. Stopping electric field extension and enhancement of channel thermal conduction are introduced as an entrance gateway for this work so that improve the electrical characteristics, eventually. The inserted extra oxide made by the Si3N4 material has a vital impact on the modification of the electrical and thermal features in the proposed device. An immense comparison between the proposed SOI and conventional SOI showed that the proposed structure has higher electrical and thermal proficiency than the conventional structure in terms of main parameters such as short channel effects (SCEs), leakage current, floating body effect (FBE), self-heating effect (SHE), voltage gain, ratio of On-current to Off- current, transconductance, output conductance, minimum noise figure and power gain.

  6. Improved Reproduction of Stops in Noise Reduction Systems with Adaptive Windows and Nonstationarity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Mauler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new block-based noise reduction system is proposed which focuses on the preservation of transient sounds like stops or speech onsets. The power level of consonants has been shown to be important for speech intelligibility. In single-channel noise reduction systems, however, these sounds are frequently severely attenuated. The main reasons for this are an insufficient temporal resolution of transient sounds and a delayed tracking of important control parameters. The key idea of the proposed system is the detection of non-stationary input data. Depending on that decision, a pair of spectral analysis-synthesis windows is selected which either provides high temporal or high spectral resolution. Furthermore, the decision-directed approach for the estimation of the a priori SNR is modified so that speech onsets are tracked more quickly without sacrificing performance in stationary signal regions. The proposed solution shows significant improvements in the preservation of stops with an overall system delay (input-output, excluding group delay of noise reduction filter of only 10 milliseconds.

  7. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    The device of the present invention prevents unnecessary automatic reactor shutdown, without increasing operator's burden by automatic insertion of selected control rods in case if a recycling pump in a BWR reaction should stop. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for detecting that at least one recycling pump stops, (2) a means for judging region for inserting the selected control rods based on the reactor power and the recycling flowrate of driving water, and (3) a means for calculating a logic product of output signals sent from both of the means described above and outputting a selected control rod insertion signal. With such a constitution, if at least one recycling pump stops, the means (1) detects it. Further, the means (2) judges the regions for inserting the selected control rods. Then, the means (3) outputs a signal for inserting the selected control rods. As a result, since a group of control rods selected previously are inserted into the reactor rapidly, the reactor power is suppressed, to avoid the automatic reactor shutdown. (I.N.)

  8. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  9. Stopped-pipe wind instruments: Acoustics of the panpipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, N. H.

    2005-01-01

    Stopped-pipe jet-excited musical instruments are known in many cultures, those best-known today being the panpipes or syrinx of Eastern Europe and of the Peruvian Andes. Although the playing style differs, in each case the instrument consists of a set of graduated bamboo pipes excited by blowing across the open tops. Details of the excitation aerodynamics warrant examination, particularly as the higher notes contain amplitudes of the even harmonics approaching those of the odd harmonics expected from a stopped pipe. Analysis shows that the jet offset is controlled by the fluid dynamics of the jet, and is such that appreciable even-harmonic excitation is generated. The theory is largely confirmed by measurements on a player. .

  10. Identification of STOP1-Like Proteins Associated With Aluminum Tolerance in Sweet Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity in acidic soils affects crop production worldwide. C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factor STOP1/ART1-mediated expression of Al tolerance genes has been shown to be important for Al resistance in Arabidopsis, rice and other crop plants. Here, we identified and characterized four STOP1-like proteins (SbSTOP1a, SbSTOP1b, SbSTOP1c, and SbSTOP1d in sweet sorghum, a variant of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.. Al induced the transcription of the four SbSTOP1 genes in both time- and Al concentration-dependent manners. All SbSTOP1 proteins localized to the cell nucleus, and they showed transcriptional activity in a yeast expression system. In the HEK 293 coexpression system, SbSTOP1d showed transcriptional regulation of SbSTAR2 and SbMATE, indicating the possible existence of another SbSTOP1 and SbSTAR2-dependent Al tolerance mechanism in sorghum apart from the reported SbMATE-mediated Al exclusion mechanism. A transgenic complementation assay showed that SbSTOP1d significantly rescued the Al-sensitivity characteristic of the Atstop1 mutant. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC assays showed that SbSTOP1d interacted with SbSTOP1b and SbSTOP1d itself, suggesting that SbSTOP1 may function as a homodimer and/or heterodimer. These results indicate that STOP1 plays an important role in Al tolerance in sweet sorghum and extend our understanding of the complex regulatory mechanisms of STOP1-like proteins in response to Al toxicity.

  11. Stop the Evictions! The Diffusion of Networked Social Movements and the Emergence of a New Hybrid Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez de Andrés, Eva; Zapata, Patrik; Zapata Campos, Maria José

    1135 evictions throughout the country. We argue that the ability of networked social movements to quickly replicate has fuelled their power to resist, protest, and induce change. We contend that the fast growth of networked social movements in Global North and South cities, is fuelled by its ability......Over 350,000 families have been evicted from their homes since Spain's property market crashed in 2008. The response of Spanish civil society has been the emergence of a networked social movement, Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca (PAH; the Spanish Mortgage Victims Group), to stop...... the evictions and change applicable legislation. This paper uses social movement theory and the travel of ideas metaphor from organization theory to understand how the PAH movement and its practices and tactics, originally born in Barcelona in 2009, have successfully spread to over 160 cities and stopped over...

  12. Forced concentration oscillations for catalytic reactions with stop-effect

    OpenAIRE

    Thullie, Jan; Renken, Albert

    1991-01-01

    The effect of forced concn. oscillations on a catalytic reaction with stop-effect was studied based on 2 different adsorption-desorption models. Both models predict mean reaction rates which can be more than twice as high as the max. rate under optimum steady-state conditions. An anal. soln. is presented to describe the mean performance as a function of concn., length of period, and cycle split. [on SciFinder (R)

  13. We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-28

    As part of the We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages Hispanics/Latinos to talk openly about HIV and AIDS with their families, friends, partners, and communities.  Created: 8/28/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 8/28/2014.

  14. Assessing Stop-Loss Policy Options through Personnel Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    respond to iso - lated policy changes for stop-loss in a manner fundamentally similar to any alternative system change that, too, would have to reconcile...All Units - Scale: 5 Pct of Force FY07 Accession Pattern 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Year

  15. Why alite stops hydrating below 80% relative humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flatt, Robert J.; Scherer, George W.; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the hydration of cement paste stops when the relative humidity drops below about 80%. A thermodynamic analysis shows that the capillary pressure exerted at that RH shifts the solubility of tricalcium silicate, so that it is in equilibrium with water. This is a reflection of the chemical shrinkage in this system: according to Le Chatelier's principle, since the volume of the products is less than that of the reactants, a negative (capillary) pressure opposes the reaction.

  16. Analysing passenger arrivals rates and waiting time at bus stops

    OpenAIRE

    Kaparias, I.; Rossetti, C.; Trozzi, V.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the rather under-explored topic of passenger waiting times at public transport facilities. Using data collected from part of London’s bus network by means of physical counts, measurements and observations, and complemented by on-site passenger interviews, the waiting behaviour is analysed for a number of bus stops served by different numbers of lines. The analysis employs a wide range of statistical methods and tools, and concentrates on three aspects: passenger...

  17. An Improved DBSCAN Algorithm to Detect Stops in Individual Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Luo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing use of mobile GPS (global positioning system devices, a large volume of trajectory data on users can be produced. In most existing work, trajectories are usually divided into a set of stops and moves. In trajectories, stops represent the most important and meaningful part of the trajectory; there are many data mining methods to extract these locations. DBSCAN (density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise is a classical density-based algorithm used to find the high-density areas in space, and different derivative methods of this algorithm have been proposed to find the stops in trajectories. However, most of these methods required a manually-set threshold, such as the speed threshold, for each feature variable. In our research, we first defined our new concept of move ability. Second, by introducing the theory of data fields and by taking our new concept of move ability into consideration, we constructed a new, comprehensive, hybrid feature–based, density measurement method which considers temporal and spatial properties. Finally, an improved DBSCAN algorithm was proposed using our new density measurement method. In the Experimental Section, the effectiveness and efficiency of our method is validated against real datasets. When comparing our algorithm with the classical density-based clustering algorithms, our experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Maintenance management during long-term stop of JRR-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yutaka; Suwa, Masayuki; Wada, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    JRR-3 has been continuing its stop state for more than 5 years as of FY2015 after stopping the use operation of the reactor in November 2010. Different responses are required in the maintenance management for operation resumption, compared with those in normal operation. This paper introduces part of the maintenance managements that are performed during long-term stop. The water qualities of primary coolant and secondary coolant are controlled by measuring pH and conductivity, and the prevention of crevice corrosion of equipment is performed. In the management of pumps for coolant circulation, vibration measurement is performed to confirm that there are no signs of abnormality. As the management of the core structure, the bend measurement of beryllium reflector is performed to confirm that there is no hindrance to operation resumption, and the visual inspection of high burnup fuel elements is performed to confirm that abnormality has not occurred. As for the management of monitoring equipment, the equipment required in shutdown period is subjected to calibration work, and the equipment required in operation period is subjected to soundness check based on the results of cooling system operation. As the functional maintenance of the cooling system, cooling system operating test and 10-day continuous operation of the cooling system are monthly performed to confirm the soundness of equipment. In addition, the competence maintenance and capacity improvement of operators are performed through the cooling system operation and reactor simulator training. (A.O.)

  19. Adaptive weak approximation of reflected and stopped diffusions

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We study the weak approximation problem of diffusions, which are reflected at a subset of the boundary of a domain and stopped at the remaining boundary. First, we derive an error representation for the projected Euler method of Costantini, Pacchiarotti and Sartoretto [Costantini et al., SIAM J. Appl. Math., 58(1):73-102, 1998], based on which we introduce two new algorithms. The first one uses a correction term from the representation in order to obtain a higher order of convergence, but the computation of the correction term is, in general, not feasible in dimensions d > 1. The second algorithm is adaptive in the sense of Moon, Szepessy, Tempone and Zouraris [Moon et al., Stoch. Anal. Appl., 23:511-558, 2005], using stochastic refinement of the time grid based on a computable error expansion derived from the representation. Regarding the stopped diffusion, it is based in the adaptive algorithm for purely stopped diffusions presented in Dzougoutov, Moon, von Schwerin, Szepessy and Tempone [Dzougoutov et al., Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. Eng., 44, 59-88, 2005]. We give numerical examples underlining the theoretical results. © de Gruyter 2010.

  20. Portable semiconductor laser system to stop internal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediker, Robert H.; Durville, Frederic M.; Cho, George; Boll, James H.

    1995-03-01

    One significant cause of death during a sever trauma (gun wound or stab wound) is internal bleeding. A semiconductor diode laser system has been used in in vitro studies of cauterizing veins and arteries to stop bleeding. The conditions of laparoscopic surgery, including bleeding conditions (blood flow and pressure), are simulated. Results have been obtained both with and without using a hemostat (e.g., forceps) to temporarily stop the bleeding prior to the cautery. With the hemostat and a fiber-coupled 810-nm laser, blood vessels of up to 5 mm diameter were cauterized with an 8 W output from the fiber. Great cautions must be used in extrapolating from these in vitro results, since the exact conditions of bleeding in a living being are impossible to exactly reproduce in a laboratory in-vitro experiment. In a living being, when blood flow stops the cessation of nourishment to the vessels results in irreversible physiological changes. Also, the blood itself is different from blood in a living being because an anti-clotting agent (heparin) was added in order to inhibit the blood's natural tendency to coagulate.