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Sample records for beta-globin mutation induced

  1. Targeted correction of a thalassemia-associated beta-globin mutation induced by pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kuan, Jean Y;

    2009-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures...... that provoke DNA repair. However, the use of these molecules for gene targeting requires homopurine tracts to facilitate triple helix formation. Alternatively, to achieve binding to mixed-sequence target sites for the induced gene correction, we have used pseudo-complementary PNAs (pcPNAs). Due to steric...... hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA-pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences via double duplex-invasion complexes. We demonstrate here that pcPNAs, when co-transfected with donor DNA fragments, can promote single base pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta...

  2. Nonsense mutations in the human beta-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Baserga, S J; Benz, E J

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human alpha- and beta-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with beta zero-thalassemia have shown that for both the beta-17 and the beta-39 mutations less than normal levels of beta-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human beta-globin mRNA.) In vitro studies usi...

  3. Detection of Rare Beta Globin Gene Mutations in Northwestern Iran

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    M Haghi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent molecular studies on Iranian β-thalassemia genes revealed the presence of eight common mutations associated with thalassemia. Although these mutations are frequent, there are other rare and unknown mutations that can create large problems in designing preventive programs. We detected and explained the common mutations in north-western Iran previously and detection of the rare and unknown mutations could be useful in diagnosis and design of future preventive programs. Methods: In this study, 5ml peripheral blood from 20 Azari- β-thalassemia patients whose mutation was not revealed in the previous study was collected and DNA extraction was done by isopropanol and proteinase k method. Initially, samples were examined for the rare mutations: Codon6, Codon16, Codon41/42, Codon36/37, -88 and Codon22 by ARMS – PCR techniques and then the unknown cases were directly sequenced. Results: According to our results, Codon15(TGG-TGA, Codon16(-C, Codon36/37(-T, IVSII-848(C-A, IVSII-745(C-G, -28(A-C( and Codon25/26(+T were recognized and added to the spectrom of beta globin gene mutations in Azerbaijan and Iran. Also, we detected four SNP sites: 5’UTR+20(C-T, Codon2 (CAC-CAT , IVSII-16(C-G and IVSII-666(T-C in β-thalassemia genes. Conclusion: Our results could be useful for developing molecular screening plans and help prenatal diagnosis of beta thalassemia in Azerbaijan , Iran and other neighboring countries.

  4. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  5. Unexpected pattern of beta-globin mutations in beta-thalassaemia patients from northern Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Cabeda, J.; Correia, C.; Estevinho, A.; Simões, C.; Amorim, M; L. Pinho; Justiça, B

    1999-01-01

    We characterized the genetic nature of beta-thalassaemia in northern Portugal. Of the 164 patients studied three were beta-thalassaemia major cases (one IVS-1-6/beta degrees 39 and two homozygous IVS-1-110). The analysis of the frequency of each mutation in the families revealed that the codon 6(-A) mutation was unexpectedly frequent (40%) and associated with the beta-globin haplotype E, and not with the usual European and North African CD6(-A) haplotypes. In contrast, the frequency of IVS-1-...

  6. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S;

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian...... DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent...... cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor...

  7. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y.; Lonkar, Pallavi S.; Krause, Diane S.; Seidman, Michael M.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Nielsen, Peter E.; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the hu...

  8. Familial Polycythemia Caused by a Novel Mutation in the Beta Globin Gene: Essential Role of P50 in Evaluation of Familial Polycythemia

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    Neeraj Agarwal, Mariluz P. Mojica-Henshaw, Elizabeth. D. Simmons, Dottie Hussey, Ching N. Ou, Josef T. Prchal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two polycythemic subjects from a family with multiple polycythemic subjects were evaluated. Estimation of oxygen affinity of Hb from venous blood gas parameters (P50 revealed low P50 suggesting a high affinity Hb variant. Further work up, which included beta globin gene sequencing, revealed a novel mutation changing a codon to the previously reported high affinity Hb - Hb Johnstown (beta109 Val->Leu. Polycythemic subjects with high affinity Hb variant are asymptomatic with normal life expectancy. Their differentiation from polycythemia vera (PV is crucial to avoid therapy which is otherwise reserved for PV patients. We provide an electronic version (in Microsoft excel program of a previously reported mathematical formula for rapid calculation of P50 from venous blood gases. Estimation of P50 is an essential initial step in the evaluation of a subject with personal and family history of polycythemia.

  9. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease’s high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics’ assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions’ setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  10. GENETIC HETEROGENEITY OF BETA GLOBIN MUTATIONS AMONG ASIAN-INDIANS AND IMPORTANCE IN GENETIC COUNSELLING AND DIAGNOSIS

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    Ravindra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are an estimated 45 million carriers of β-thalassemia trait and about 12,000-15,000 infants with β-thalassemia major are born every year in India. The consanguinity rates are higher in India, and thalassemia major constitutes a significant burden on the health care system. In present study, β-thalassemia mutations were characterized in 300 thalassemia cases from 2007 to 2010 using ARMS-PCR and DNA sequencing. The five most common mutations accounted 79.3% of the studied chromosomes that includes IVS1-5(G>C, Cod 41-42(-TCTT, Cod8-9(+G, Cod16(-C and 619bp del. Though IVS1-5(G>C is most common mutation when all the communities were included, the percentage prevalence were calculated on sub caste basis and found that IVS1-5(G>C percentage prevalence varied from 25 to 60 in Aroras & Khatris and Thakur respectively. Interestingly Cod41-42(-TCTT mutation which is the second commonest among the mutations reported was totally absent in Kayasthas and Muslim community. These findings have implications for providing molecular diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to high risk couples of β-thalassemia.

  11. Structural analysis of the 5 prime flanking region of the. beta. -globin gene in African sickle cell anemia patients: Further evidence for three origins of the sickle cell mutation in Africa

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    Chebloune, Y.; Pagnier, J.; Trabuchet, G.; Faure, C.; Verdier, G.; Labie, D.; Nigon, V. (Universite Claude Bernard-Lyon, Villeurbane (France))

    1988-06-01

    Haplotype analysis of the {beta}-globin gene cluster shows two regions of DNA characterized by nonrandom association of restriction site polymorphisms. These regions are separated by a variable segment containing the repeated sequences (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y}, which might be involved in recombinational events. Studies of haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene in Africa provide strong argument for three origins of the mutation: Benin, Senegal, and the Central African Republic. The structure of the variable segment in the three African populations was studied by S1 nuclease mapping of genomic DNA, which allows a comparison of several samples. A 1080-base-pair DNA segment was sequenced for one sample from each population. S1 nuclease mapping confirmed the homogeneity of each population with regard to both (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y} repeats. The authors found three additional structures for (AT){sub x}T{sub y} correlating with the geographic origin of the patients. Ten other nucleotide positions, 5{prime} and 3{prime} to the (AT){sub x}T{sub y} copies, were found to be variable when compared to homologous sequences from human and monkey DNAs. These results allow us to propose an evolutionary scheme for the polymorphisms in the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-globin gene. The results strongly support the hypothesis of three origins for the sickle mutation in Africa.

  12. Beta-globin gene haplotypes among cameroonians and review of the global distribution: is there a case for a single sickle mutation origin in Africa?

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    Bitoungui, Valentina J Ngo; Pule, Gift D; Hanchard, Neil; Ngogang, Jeanne; Wonkam, Ambroise

    2015-03-01

    Studies of hemoglobin S haplotypes in African subpopulations have potential implications for patient care and our understanding of genetic factors that have shaped the prevalence of sickle cell disease (SCD). We evaluated HBB gene cluster haplotypes in SCD patients from Cameroon, and reviewed the literature for a global distribution. We reviewed medical records to obtain pertinent socio-demographic and clinical features for 610 Cameroonian SCD patients, including hemoglobin electrophoresis and full blood counts. RFLP-PCR was used to determine the HBB gene haplotype on 1082 chromosomes. A systematic review of the current literature was undertaken to catalogue HBB haplotype frequencies in SCD populations around the world. Benin (74%; n = 799) and Cameroon (19%; n = 207) were the most prevalent haplotypes observed among Cameroonian patients. There was no significant association between HBB haplotypes and clinical life events, anthropometric measures, hematological parameters, or fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. The literature review of the global haplotype distributions was consistent with known historical migrations of the people of Africa. Previously reported data from Sudan showed a distinctly unusual pattern; all four classical haplotypes were reported, with an exceptionally high proportion of the Senegal, Cameroon, and atypical haplotypes. We did not observe any significant associations between HBB haplotype and SCD disease course in this cohort. Taken together, the data from Cameroon and from the wider literature suggest that a careful reassessment of African HBB haplotypes may shed further light on the evolutionary dynamics of the sickle allele, which could suggest a single origin of the sickle mutation. PMID:25748438

  13. A review on the origin and spread of deleterious mutants of the beta-globin gene in Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S K; Talukder, G

    2001-01-01

    Deleterious mutations of the human beta-globin gene are responsible for beta-thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies, which are the most common genetic diseases in Indian populations. A highly heterogeneous distribution of those mutations is observed in India and certain mutations are restricted to some extent to particular groups only. The reasons behind the geographical clustering and origin of the mutations in India is a highly debated issue and the evidence is conflicting. Our present article aims at tracing the origin of the deleterious beta-globin mutation and evaluates the role of different evolutionary forces responsible for the spread and present distribution of those mutations in Indian populations, using data from molecular biology and statistical methods. Mutations are generated essentially randomly, but "hot-spot" sites for mutation are reported for the beta-globin gene cluster, indicating sequence dependency of mutation. A single origin of a deleterious beta-globin mutation, followed by recombination (in a hot spot region) and/or interallelic gene conversion (within beta-globin gene) through time is the most plausible hypothesis to explain the association of those mutations with multiple haplotype backgrounds and frameworks. It is suggested that India is the place of origin of HbE and HbD mutations and that they dispersed to other parts of the would by migration. HbS mutants present in Indian populations are not of Middle East origin but rather a fresh mutation is the probable explanation for the prevalence among tribal groups. beta-thalassaemia represents a heterogeneous group of mutant alleles in India. Five common and twelve rare mutations have been reported in variable frequencies among different Indian populations. Gene flow of those mutant alleles from different populations of the world by political, military and commercial interactions possibly accounts for the heterogenous nature of beta-thalassaemia among Indians. A multiple allelic

  14. Polymorphism and divergence in the beta-globin replication origin initiation region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, S M; Bond, J; Schneider, J A; Hamilton, B; Harding, R M; Boyce, A J; Clegg, J B

    2000-01-01

    DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence was examined in the vicinity of the human beta-globin gene cluster origin of replication initiation region (IR), a 1.3-kb genomic region located immediately 5' of the adult-expressed beta-globin gene. DNA sequence variation in the replication origin IR and 5 kb of flanking DNA was surveyed in samples drawn from two populations, one African (from the Gambia, West Africa) and the other European (from Oxford, England). In these samples, levels of nucleotide and length polymorphism in the IR were found to be more than two times as high as adjacent non-IR-associated regions (estimates of per-nucleotide heterozygosity were 0.30% and 0.12%, respectively). Most polymorphic positions identified in the origin IR fall within or just adjacent to a 52-bp alternating purine-pyrimidine ((RY)n) sequence repeat. Within- and between-populations divergence is highest in this portion of the IR, and interspecific divergence in the same region, determined by comparison with an orthologous sequence from the chimpanzee, is also pronounced. Higher levels of diversity in this subregion are not, however, primarily attributable to slippage-mediated repeat unit changes, as nucleotide substitution contributes disproportionately to allelic heterogeneity. An estimate of helical stability in the sequenced region suggests that the hypervariable (RY)n constitutes the major DNA unwinding element (DUE) of the replication origin IR, the location at which the DNA duplex first unwinds and new strand synthesis begins. These findings suggest that the beta-globin IR experiences a higher underlying rate of neutral mutation than do adjacent genomic regions and that enzyme fidelity associated with the initiation of DNA replication at this origin may be compromised. The significance of these findings for our understanding of eukaryotic replication origin biology is discussed. PMID:10666717

  15. First Spanish case of thalassemia major due to a compound heterozygosity for the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) and codon 39 (C --> T) mutations of the beta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropero, Paloma; Villegas, Ana; Muñoz, Juan; Briceño, Olga; Mora, Asunción; Salvador, María; Polo, Marta; González, Fernando A

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the first case in Spain of a severe form of beta-thalassemia (thal) due to a compound heterozygosity for the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) and the nonsense codon 39 (C --> T) mutations. Five members of a family from Cadiz (southern Spain) were studied. The proband was an 8-year-old girl diagnosed as anemic at the age of 13 months. Her father had the codon 39 (C --> T) mutation and her mother the C --> A change at nucleotide (nt) 848 of IVS-II. Haplotype analysis showed that the proband was a compound heterozygote for haplotypes I [+ --> + +] and VII [+ --> +]. This is the first description in Spain of the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) mutation. It appears, from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, that this mutation has a different origin in the various populations, where it was found. This observation shows that in this case the association of a beta(0)- and a beta(+)-thal mutation does not lead to a thalassemia intermedia but to a severe thalassemia with very low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. From a therapeutic point of view, early introduction of a transfusion regimen may improve the clinical picture of these children, allowing for better development and growth. PMID:16540410

  16. Sequential changes in chromatin structure during transcriptional activation in the beta globin LCR and its target gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihoon; Kim, AeRi

    2010-09-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during transcriptional activation. The changes include the association of transcriptional activators, formation of hypersensitive sites and covalent modifications of histones. To understand the order of the various changes accompanying transcriptional activation, we analyzed the mouse beta globin gene, which is transcriptionally inducible in erythroid MEL cells over a time course of HMBA treatment. Transcription of the globin genes requires the locus control region (LCR) consisting of several hypersensitive sites (HSs). Erythroid specific transcriptional activators such as NF-E2, GATA-1, TAL1 and EKLF were associated with the LCR in the uninduced state before transcriptional activation. The HSs of the LCR were formed in this state as revealed by high sensitivity to DNase I and MNase attack. However the binding of transcriptional activators and the depletion of histones were observed in the promoter of the beta globin gene only after transcriptional activation. In addition, various covalent histone modifications were sequentially detected in lysine residues of histone H3 during the activation. Acetylation of K9, K36 and K27 was notable in both LCR HSs and gene after induction but before transcriptional initiation. Inactive histone marks such as K9me2, K36me2 and K27me2 were removed coincident with transcriptional initiation in the gene region. Taken together, these results indicate that LCR has a substantially active structure in the uninduced state while transcriptional activation serially adds active marks, including histone modifications, and removes inactive marks in the target gene of the LCR.

  17. Modification of human beta-globin locus PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Patrinos (George); M. de Krom (Mariken); S. Bottardi; R.J. Janssens; E. Katsantoni (Eleni); A.W. Wai; D.J. Sherratt; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.M.A. Imam (Ali)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe report here modifications of human beta-globin PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli DH10B, utilising a plasmid temperature sensitive for replication, the recA gene and a wild-type copy of the rpsL gene which allows for an efficient selection for

  18. Evolution of the primate beta-globin gene region: nucleotide sequence of the delta-beta-globin intergenic region of gorilla and phylogenetic relationships between African apes and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin-Pecontal, P; Gouy, M; Nigon, V M; Trabuchet, G

    1992-01-01

    A 6.0-kb DNA fragment from Gorilla gorilla including the 5' part of the beta-globin gene and about 4.5 kb of its upstream flanking region was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was compared to the human, chimpanzee, and macaque delta-beta intergenic region. This analysis reveals four tandemly repeated sequences (RS), at the same location in the four species, showing a variable number of repeats generating both intraspecific (polymorphism) and interspecific variability. These tandem arrays delimit five regions of unique sequence called IG for intergenic. The divergence for these IG sequences is 1.85 +/- 0.22% between human and gorilla, which is not significantly different from the value estimated in the same region between chimpanzee and human (1.62 +/- 0.21%). The CpG and TpA dinucleotides are avoided. CpGs evolve faster than other sequence sites but do not confuse phylogenetic inferences by producing parallel mutations in different lineages. About 75% of CpG doublets have become TpG or CpA since the common ancestor, in agreement with the methylation/deamination pattern. Comparison of this intergenic region gives information on branching order within Hominoidea. Parsimony and distance-based methods when applied to the delta-beta intergenic region provide evidence (although not statistically significant) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than to gorilla. CpG sites are indeed rich in information by carrying substitutions along the short internal branch. Combining these results with those on the psi eta-delta intergenic region, shows in a statistically significant way that chimpanzee is the closest relative of human. PMID:1556740

  19. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua

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    Moreno Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were analyzed on a sample of 96 chromosomes of Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 0.479, followed by the Bantu haplotype (0.406; a minority of cases with other haplotypes was also identified: atypical Bantu A2 (0.042, Senegal (0.031, atypical Bantu A7 (0.021 and Saudi Arabia/Indian (0.021 haplotypes; however, the Cameroon haplotype was not identified in this study. Our results are in agreement with the historical records that establish Sudanese and Bantu origins for the African slaves brought into Venezuela.

  20. Expression of human beta-globin genes in transgenic mice: effects of a flanking metallothionein-human growth hormone fusion gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Townes, T M; Chen, H. Y.; Lingrel, J B; Palmiter, R. D.; Brinster, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to place a human beta-globin gene in an open chromatin domain regardless of its site of integration in the mouse genome, we microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs a construct in which the human beta-globin gene and a mouse metallothionein-human growth hormone fusion gene were juxtaposed and oriented in opposite directions. Mice that developed from injected eggs and that grew larger than normal were analyzed for human beta-globin mRNA. The globin genes were not expressed in ery...

  1. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, D Y; Ugozzoli, L; B..K. Pal; Wallace, R B

    1989-01-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell beta-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer co...

  2. Beta-globin gene evolution in the ruminants: evidence for an ancient origin of sheep haplotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Wang, X; Kijas, J W; Dalrymple, B P

    2015-10-01

    Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) can be divided into two groups with significantly different responses to hypoxic environments, determined by two allelic beta-globin haplotypes. Haplotype A is very similar to the goat beta-globin locus, whereas haplotype B has a deletion spanning four globin genes, including beta-C globin, which encodes a globin with high oxygen affinity. We surveyed the beta-globin locus using resequencing data from 70 domestic sheep from 42 worldwide breeds and three Ovis canadensis and two Ovis dalli individuals. Haplotype B has an allele frequency of 71.4% in O. aries and was homozygous (BB) in all five wild sheep. This shared ancestry indicates haplotype B is at least 2-3 million years old. Approximately 40 kb of the sequence flanking the ~37-kb haplotype B deletion had unexpectedly low identity between haplotypes A and B. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the divergent region of sheep haplotype B is remarkably distinct from the beta-globin loci in goat and cattle but still groups with the Ruminantia. We hypothesize that this divergent ~40-kb region in haplotype B may be from an unknown ancestral ruminant and was maintained in the lineage to O. aries, but not other Bovidae, evolving independently of haplotype A. Alternatively, the ~40-kb sequence in haplotype B was more recently acquired by an ancestor of sheep from an unknown non-Bovidae ruminant, replacing part of haplotype A. Haplotype B has a lower nucleotide diversity than does haplotype A, suggesting a recent bottleneck, whereas the higher frequency of haplotype B suggests a subsequent spread through the global population of O. aries. PMID:26096044

  3. In silico mutation analysis of human beta globin gene in sickle cell disease patients

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    Hira Mubeen

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Studies suggested that there is need to maintain a primary prevention program to detect sickle cell disease at earlier stages despite having a large high risk. Preventive diagnosis and follow-up would reduce infant mortality by preventing the development of severe anemia as well as dangerous complications. In short, sickle cell disease surveillance would avert loss of life, measured as the number of years lost due to ill-health, disability or early death. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1673-1677

  4. Intergenic transcription, cell-cycle and the developmentally regulated epigenetic profile of the human beta-globin locus.

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    Joanne Miles

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have established strong links between transcriptional activity and specific post-translation modifications of histones. Here we show using RNA FISH that in erythroid cells, intergenic transcription in the human beta-globin locus occurs over a region of greater than 250 kb including several genes in the nearby olfactory receptor gene cluster. This entire region is transcribed during S phase of the cell cycle. However, within this region there are approximately 20 kb sub-domains of high intergenic transcription that occurs outside of S phase. These sub-domains are developmentally regulated and enriched with high levels of active modifications primarily to histone H3. The sub-domains correspond to the beta-globin locus control region, which is active at all developmental stages in erythroid cells, and the region flanking the developmentally regulated, active globin genes. These results correlate high levels of non-S phase intergenic transcription with domain-wide active histone modifications to histone H3.

  5. (AC)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in 5' beta-globin gene in native and Mestizo Mexican populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, R; Delgado, P; Arenas, D; Barrientos, C; Buentello, L; Loeza, F; Salamanca, F

    2001-12-01

    Repeated sequences are dispersed along the human genome. These sequences are useful as markers in diagnosis of inherited diseases, in forensic medicine, and in tracking the origin and evolution of human populations. The (AC)n repeated element is the most frequent in the human genome. In this paper, the (AC)n repeated element located in the 5' flanking region of the beta-globin gene was studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Four ethnic Mexican groups (Mixteca, Nahua, Otomí, Purépecha) and a Mestizo population were analyzed. We observed three alleles, A [(AC)16, B [(AC)14], and C [(AC)18], with a frequency of between 68.2% and 86.9%, 13.1% and 18.2%, and 6.7% and 13.7%, respectively. Allele C was present only in Purépecha and Mestizo groups. The absence of this allele in the other ethnic groups studied suggests that there is low genetic admixture of Purépecha and that this is a relatively isolated population. However, it could be that the C allele occurs in low frequencies in the other groups as a result of small sample sizes. The (AC)n repeat polymorphism in the beta-globin gene has not been previously studied in Amerindian populations.

  6. Classical sickle beta-globin haplotypes exhibit a high degree of long-range haplotype similarity in African and Afro-Caribbean populations

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    Jallow Muminatou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sickle (βs mutation in the beta-globin gene (HBB occurs on five "classical" βs haplotype backgrounds in ethnic groups of African ancestry. Strong selection in favour of the βs allele – a consequence of protection from severe malarial infection afforded by heterozygotes – has been associated with a high degree of extended haplotype similarity. The relationship between classical βs haplotypes and long-range haplotype similarity may have both anthropological and clinical implications, but to date has not been explored. Here we evaluate the haplotype similarity of classical βs haplotypes over 400 kb in population samples from Jamaica, The Gambia, and among the Yoruba of Nigeria (Hapmap YRI. Results The most common βs sub-haplotype among Jamaicans and the Yoruba was the Benin haplotype, while in The Gambia the Senegal haplotype was observed most commonly. Both subtypes exhibited a high degree of long-range haplotype similarity extending across approximately 400 kb in all three populations. This long-range similarity was significantly greater than that seen for other haplotypes sampled in these populations (P s mutation. Conclusion Two different classical βs haplotypes, sampled from different populations, exhibit comparable and extensive long-range haplotype similarity and strong LD. This LD extends across the adjacent recombination hotspot, and is discernable at distances in excess of 400 kb. Although the multi-centric geographic distribution of βs haplotypes indicates strong subdivision among early Holocene sub-Saharan populations, we find no evidence that selective pressures imposed by falciparum malaria varied in intensity or timing between these subpopulations. Our observations also suggest that cis-acting loci, which may influence outcomes in sickle cell disease, could lie considerable distances away from β-globin.

  7. Beta-globin gene haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia analysis in Babinga pygmies from Congo-Brazzaville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouélé, R; Bodo, J M; Mpelé, D M; Feingold, J; Galactéros, F

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and deletional alpha+-thalassemia (-alpha3.7kb) in 54 Babinga pygmy subjects from Congo-Brazzaville. The beta(S)-globin gene frequency was 0.065 and that of the deletional alpha-globin gene (-alpha3.7kb) was 0.29. Eighty-five percent of the beta(S) chromosomes and 13% of the beta(A) chromosomes were associated with the Bantu haplotype, 10% of beta(A) chromosomes with the Senegal haplotype, and the remaining beta chromosomes with atypical haplotypes. None of the chromosomes were of the Benin haplotype. These results are clearly of anthropological and evolutionary interest. They also support earlier observations that alpha+-thalassemia is prevalent at a high frequency in African populations.

  8. Frequency and origin of haplotypes associated with the beta-globin gene cluster in individuals with trait and sickle cell anemia in the Atlantic and Pacific coastal regions of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Fong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease with high prevalence in people of African descent. There are five typical haplotypes associated with this disease and the haplotypes associated with the beta-globin gene cluster have been used to establish the origin of African-descendant people in America. In this work, we determined the frequency and the origin of haplotypes associated with hemoglobin S in a sample of individuals with sickle cell anemia (HbSS and sickle cell hemoglobin trait (HbAS in coastal regions of Colombia. Blood samples from 71 HbAS and 79 HbSS individuals were obtained. Haplotypes were determined based on the presence of variable restriction sites within the β-globin gene cluster. On the Pacific coast of Colombia the most frequent haplotype was Benin, while on the Atlantic coast Bantu was marginally higher than Benin. Eight atypical haplotypes were observed on both coasts, being more diverse in the Atlantic than in the Pacific region. These results suggest a differential settlement of the coasts, dependent on where slaves were brought from, either from the Gulf of Guinea or from Angola, where the haplotype distributions are similar. Atypical haplotypes probably originated from point mutations that lost or gained a restriction site and/or by recombination events.

  9. Frequency and origin of haplotypes associated with the beta-globin gene cluster in individuals with trait and sickle cell anemia in the Atlantic and Pacific coastal regions of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Cristian; Lizarralde-Iragorri, María Alejandra; Rojas-Gallardo, Diana; Barreto, Guillermo

    2013-12-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease with high prevalence in people of African descent. There are five typical haplotypes associated with this disease and the haplotypes associated with the beta-globin gene cluster have been used to establish the origin of African-descendant people in America. In this work, we determined the frequency and the origin of haplotypes associated with hemoglobin S in a sample of individuals with sickle cell anemia (HbSS) and sickle cell hemoglobin trait (HbAS) in coastal regions of Colombia. Blood samples from 71 HbAS and 79 HbSS individuals were obtained. Haplotypes were determined based on the presence of variable restriction sites within the β-globin gene cluster. On the Pacific coast of Colombia the most frequent haplotype was Benin, while on the Atlantic coast Bantu was marginally higher than Benin. Eight atypical haplotypes were observed on both coasts, being more diverse in the Atlantic than in the Pacific region. These results suggest a differential settlement of the coasts, dependent on where slaves were brought from, either from the Gulf of Guinea or from Angola, where the haplotype distributions are similar. Atypical haplotypes probably originated from point mutations that lost or gained a restriction site and/or by recombination events. PMID:24385850

  10. Search for antisense copies of beta-globin mRNA in anemic mouse spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor John M

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by Volloch and coworkers have reported that during the expression of high levels of β-globin mRNA in the spleen of anemic mice, they could also detect small but significant levels of an antisense (AS globin RNA species, which they postulated might have somehow arisen by RNA-directed RNA synthesis. For two reasons we undertook to confirm and possibly extend these studies. First, previous studies in our lab have focussed on what is an unequivocal example of host RNA-directed RNA polymerase activity on the RNA genome of human hepatitis delta virus. Second, if AS globin species do exist they could in turn form double-stranded RNA species which might induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, a phenomenon somehow provoked in eukaryotic cells by AS RNA sequences. Results We reexamined critical aspects of the previous globin studies. We used intraperitoneal injections of phenylhydrazine to induce anemia in mice, as demonstrated by the appearance and ultimate disappearance of splenomegaly. While a 30-fold increase in globin mRNA was detected in the spleen, the relative amount of putative AS RNA could be no more than 0.004%. Conclusions Contrary to earlier reports, induction of a major increase in globin transcripts in the mouse spleen was not associated with a detectable level of antisense RNA to globin mRNA.

  11. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  12. Splice-site mutations cause Rrp6-mediated nuclear retention of the unspliced RNAs and transcriptional down-regulation of the splicing-defective genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B Eberle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cells have developed surveillance mechanisms to prevent the expression of aberrant transcripts. An early surveillance checkpoint acts at the transcription site and prevents the release of mRNAs that carry processing defects. The exosome subunit Rrp6 is required for this checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but it is not known whether Rrp6 also plays a role in mRNA surveillance in higher eukaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an in vivo system to study nuclear mRNA surveillance in Drosophila melanogaster. We have produced S2 cells that express a human beta-globin gene with mutated splice sites in intron 2 (mut beta-globin. The transcripts encoded by the mut beta-globin gene are normally spliced at intron 1 but retain intron 2. The levels of the mut beta-globin transcripts are much lower than those of wild type (wt ss-globin mRNAs transcribed from the same promoter. We have compared the expression of the mut and wt beta-globin genes to investigate the mechanisms that down-regulate the production of defective mRNAs. Both wt and mut beta-globin transcripts are processed at the 3', but the mut beta-globin transcripts are less efficiently cleaved than the wt transcripts. Moreover, the mut beta-globin transcripts are less efficiently released from the transcription site, as shown by FISH, and this defect is restored by depletion of Rrp6 by RNAi. Furthermore, transcription of the mut beta-globin gene is significantly impaired as revealed by ChIP experiments that measure the association of the RNA polymerase II with the transcribed genes. We have also shown that the mut beta-globin gene shows reduced levels of H3K4me3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that there are at least two surveillance responses that operate cotranscriptionally in insect cells and probably in all metazoans. One response requires Rrp6 and results in the inefficient release of defective mRNAs from the transcription site. The

  13. Increased expression of alpha- and beta-globin mRNAs at the pituitary following exposure to estrogen during the critical period of neonatal sex differentiation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffers, H; Navarro, V M; Nielsen, John E; Mayen, A; Pinilla, L; Dalgaard, M; Malagon, M M; Castaño, J P; Skakkebaek, N E; Aguilar, E; Tena-Sempere, M

    2006-04-01

    Deterioration of reproductive health in human and wildlife species during the past decades has drawn considerable attention to the potential adverse effects of exposure to xenosteroids during sensitive periods of sex development. The hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) unit is a key element in the neuroendocrine system controlling development and function of the reproductive axis; the HP unit being highly sensitive to the organizing effects of endogenous and exogenous sex steroids. To gain knowledge on the molecular mode of action and potential biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic compounds at the HP unit, we screened for differentially expressed genes at the pituitary and hypothalamus of rats after neonatal exposure to estradiol benzoate. Our analyses identified persistent up-regulation of alpha- and beta-globin mRNAs at the pituitary following neonatal estrogenization. This finding was confirmed by combination of RT-PCR analyses and in situ hybridization. Induction of alpha- and beta-globin mRNA expression at the pituitary by neonatal exposure to estrogen was demonstrated as dose-dependent and it was persistently detected up to puberty. In contrast, durable up-regulation of alpha- and beta-globin genes was not detected at the hypothalamus, cortex, cerebellum, liver and testis. Finally, enhanced levels of alpha- and beta-globin mRNAs at the pituitary were also demonstrated after neonatal administration of the anti-androgen flutamide. In summary, alpha- and beta-globin genes may prove as sensitive, pituitary-specific biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic (and/or anti-androgenic) compounds at critical periods of sex development, whose potential in the assessment of endocrine disrupting events at the HP unit merits further investigation. PMID:16520034

  14. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org; You, Young-Hyun [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms

  15. Induced mutations in sorghum improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of different aspects of mutagen sensitivity, considering the importance of such factors as genotypic constitution of the material, pre- and post-treatment modifications, type of mutagen and dose, techniques of handling the material and treatment procedures to maximize the induction of mutations together with the scope of induced mutations in sorghum improvement is presented. Hydrazine was found to be a more effective and efficient mutagen for inducing chlorophyll and viable mutations in sorghum than ethyl methanesulphonate, methyl methanesulphonate or γ-rays. Ethyl methane-sulphonate among the alkylating agents and nitroso methyl urea among nitroso compounds were the most potent mutagens. The efficient radiation dose was within the 20-35 kr range whereas 0.015M was the effective dosage for hydrazine and ethylmethane sulphonate. The combination treatments of various physical and chemical mutagens failed to yield significant increase in the recovery of mutations, while cysteine post-treatments of γ-irradiated and hydrazine-treated material reduced seedling injury, seed sterility and increased the recovery of viable mutations compared to single treatments. There is scope for induced mutations in solving some of the current problems of sorghum improvement such as, increasing the recombination potential of tropical X temperate crosses, improving the nutritional quality of grain and forage sorghums, diversification of male sterile cytoplasmic sources, better understanding of mechanism of apomixis and augmenting the levels of resistance to sorghum insects, pests and diseases. (author)

  16. Plant improvement by induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic variability is required for the plant breeder to select better traits. Mutation induction by radiation and other mutagens is a means of altering genes and creating genetic variability for the breeder. A list is given of the number of mutant varieties of vegetables, fruits and ornamental flowers. Data given in the tables show that using induced mutations, 227 improved varieties of agricultural crops have been developed and released to farmers in 35 different countries. The IAEA has been involved in fostering mutation breeding since its foundation through training and direct research support. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division has published the Mutation Breeding Newsletter for plant breeders all over the world to keep abreast with developments in this field

  17. Induced mutations in sesame breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of induced mutations in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) breeding is reviewed. So far in Egypt, India, Iraq, Rep. of Korea, and Sri Lanka, 14 officially released varieties have been developed through induced mutations: 12 directly and 2 through cross breeding (one using the 'dt45' induced mutant from Israel). For another variety released in China there are no details. The induced mutations approach was adopted primarily in order to obtain genetic variability that was not available in the germplasm collection. The mutagens commonly applied have been gamma rays, EMS and sodium azide. Sesame seeds can withstand high mutagen doses, and there are genotypic differences in sensitivity between varieties. The mutants induced in the above named countries and others include better yield, improved seed retention, determinate habit, modified plant architecture and size, more uniform and shorter maturation period, earliness, resistance to diseases, genic male sterility, seed coat color, higher oil content and modified fatty acids composition. Some of the induced mutants have already given rise to improved varieties, the breeding value of other mutants is now being assessed and still others can serve as useful markers in genetic studies and breeding programmes. (author)

  18. Induced mutation of Dendrobium orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendrobiiim orchids serve as the main orchid cut flower export of Malaysia. The wide range of colour and forms presently available in the market are obtained through hybridisation. Induced mutation breeding program was initiated on a commercial variety Dendrobium 'Sonia Kai' to explore the possibilities of obtaining new colour and forms. Matured seeds from self pollination were cultured and irradiated at 35 Gy at the protocorm-like bodies (PLBS) stage. Selection of induced mutations was done after the first flowering of the plants regenerated from the irradiated protocorms. Results showed changes in flower colour, shape and size. Most of these chances are expressed in different combinations in the petals, sepals and lip of the flowers. Thus, resulting. in a very wide spectrum of mutations. Some of these chances are not stable. To date, mutants that showed stable characteristics changes are grouped into 11 categories based on flower colour and form. These results show that the combination of its vitro technique and induced mutation can be applied in orchid breeding to produce new interesting and attractive variety for the market

  19. Confirmation of the potential usefulness of two human beta globin pseudogene markers to estimate gene flows to and from sub-Saharan Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Pompei, Fiorenza; Relucenti, Michela; Lum, J Koji; Simporé, Jacques; Spedini, Gabriella; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Pardo, Miguel G

    2002-04-01

    Two polymorphic sites, -107 and -100 with respect to the "cap" site of the human beta globin pseudogene, recently discovered in our laboratory, turned out to have an ethnically complementary distribution. The first site is polymorphic in Europeans, North Africans, Indians (Hindu), and Oriental Asians, and monomorphic in sub-Saharan Africans. Conversely, the second site is polymorphic in sub-Saharan African populations and monomorphic in the aforementioned populations. Here we report the gene frequencies of these two polymorphic sites in nine additional populations (Egyptians, Spaniards, Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Africans from Togo and from Benin, and Pygmies), confirming their ethnospecificity and, through the analysis of these two markers in Oromo and Amhara of Ethiopia (two mixed populations), their usefulness in genetic admixture studies. Moreover, we studied another marker polymorphic in sub-Saharan African populations only, a TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism located in the same region as the present markers, demonstrating the absence of linkage disequilibrium between it and the -100 site, so that we can exclude that the information they provide is redundant.

  20. On the origin and spread of beta-thalassemia: recurrent observation of four mutations in different ethnic groups.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, C.; Antonarakis, S E; Goff, S C; Orkin, S H; Boehm, C. D.; Kazazian, H H

    1986-01-01

    Seven beta-thalassemia genes were characterized after they were identified as candidates for previously undescribed mutations based upon the close association of DNA polymorphism haplotypes in the beta-globin gene cluster with specific ethnic mutations. The molecular defect in four of these genes was identical, a frameshift deletion of four nucleotides (-CTTT) within codons 41 and 42. This gene represents a common Southeast Asian mutation shared by a Laotian beta-thalassemia gene, [framework ...

  1. Rice breeding with induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture decided in 1964 to organize a co-ordinated research programme on the use of induced mutations in rice breeding. The programme was organized within the framework of activities of the International Rice Commission. This is a report of the Third Co-ordination Meeting of the participants, which was held in Taipei, 5-9 June 1967. As the projects, which together make up the co-ordinated programme, are at different stages of progress, the report contains a variety of papers including completed studies, field and progress reports, and highlights of the discussions with some additional recommendations prepared by the participants. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Induced mutations - a tool in plant research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings include 34 papers and 18 brief descriptions of poster presentations in the following areas as they are affected by induced mutations: advancement of genetics, plant evolution, plant physiology, plant parasites, plant symbioses, in vitro culture, gene ecology and plant breeding. Only a relatively small number of papers are of direct nuclear interest essentially in view of the mutations being induced by ionizing radiations. The papers of nuclear interest have been entered as separate and individual items of input

  3. Induced mutations for crop improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutation induction has become an established tool in plant breeding to supplement existing germ plasma and to improve cultivars in certain specific traits. Hundreds of improved varieties have been released to farmers for many different crop species, demonstrating the economic value of the technology. Limitations arise mainly from the large mutagenized populations to be screened and from the unsatisfactory selection methods. Both limitations may be eased to some extent by advances in techniques of plant in-vitro culture. (author). Refs, 1 fig., 7 tabs

  4. Economic Aspects of Using Induced Mutations in Plant Breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic aspects of mutation plant breeding are considered in relation to basic principles of mutation induction and selection, when to use mutations in plant breeding programmes and mutation breeding strategies. The following basic principles of mutation plant breeding are outlined: - A imitation is induced in a single cell and expressed in the progeny from that cell. - Expression of a mutation is influenced by its genetic nature and the breeding system of the organism. - The mutation frequency determines the number of cell progenies that have to be examined to detect a particular mutant. - Random mutations in quantitatively inherited characters generally result in an increase in variance and a shift in the mean. Mutation rates for various types of mutations have been estimated and population sizes for mutation plant breeding experiments calculated. Based upon these principles the potential for using induced mutations in plant breeding and some breeding strategies are outlined. (author)

  5. Induced mutation in tropical fruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is based on an FAO/IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) and provides insight into the application of induced mutation and in vitro techniques for the improvement of well known fruit trees such as citrus, mango, avocado and papaya, as well as more exotic fruit trees such as litchi, annona, jujube, carambola, pitanga and jaboticaba. The latter are of particular importance due to their adaptation to harsh environments and their high potential as basic food and micronutrient providers for populations in poorer and more remote regions. The findings of the CRP show that application of radiation induced mutation techniques in tropical and subtropical fruit trees can contribute to improving nutritional balance food security, and to enhancing the economic status of growers

  6. Use of induced mutations for potato improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigations aim at the utilization of induced mutations for potato improvement. The effect of γ-rays was tested on selfed seeds and hybrid seeds as well as on tubers of several potato varieties. Chemical mutagens have been successfully employed to produce daylength neutral clones. An attempt to induce resistance against Pseudomonas solanacearum did not give conclusive results. Potato improvement in relation of yield and other characters of economic significance like maturity and attributes of tubers has been handicapped by several technical considerations world over. The crux of the problem lies in the narrow genetic base (variability) for potato breeders to work with. The use of mutation breeding, therefore, offers a good tool for this. Improvement by mutation breeding for the quantitative characters besides the resistance to disease and pest has been demonstrated in other crops like white mustard variety Primex (Anderson and Olsson, 1954), barley (Gustafsson, 1965) and peanut (Gregory, 1956). Keeping these in view and the success we had in isolating photoperiod insensitive types (Upadhaya et al, 1973, 1974) study was enlarged to use mutagens to increase as wide a spectrum as possible of the variability for quantative and qualitative characters. (author)

  7. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  8. Genetic improvement of soybean through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narrow genetic base of cultivated varieties in soybean is of global concern. Mutations, spontaneous or induced, are an important source for inducing genetic variability. Soybean cultivar VLS -2 was irradiated with 250 Gy gamma rays to induce mutations for morphological characters, high yield, high oil and low trypsin inhibitor content. A large number of mutants with altered morphological characters like plant height, flower colour, sterility, leaf shape, number of pods per plant, seed colour, early or late maturity were identified and characterized. Twenty six selections with high oil content ranging from 20 to 22 percent as compared to the parent VLS-2 (19.7 percent) were identified. Highest oil content was observed in the mutants M-387 (22.7%) and M-126 (20.7%). A modified rapid and reliable micro titration plate technique was developed and used for screening trypsin inhibitor (TI) content in the seeds of 7480 M2 plants. Three mutants namely M-213 (13.7 TIU/mg seed meal), M-104 (15.4 TIU/mg seed meal) and M-291 (15.9 TIU/mg seed meal) showed lower levels of TI content as compared to the parent VLS-2 (21.8 TIU/mg seed meal). Breeding behaviour and salient features of the mutants were studied through the M3 - M5 generations. In the M5 generation, twenty four mutants with good agronomic traits were evaluated for various quantitative characters. Analysis of variance showed highly significant variation among the mutants for yield per plant. Mutant M-17 showed high yield per plant 13.1gm in comparison to the parent VLS-2 (8.3 gm). This mutant also exhibited more number of branches, more number of pods and high harvest index. Genetic diversity study of the mutants indicated that mutant M-17 had maximum dissimilarity value of 24% from the parent and was most diverse. These identified mutants can be utilised in the breeding programme for developing elite varieties of soybean. (author)

  9. Dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations in mice induced by radiation or ethylnitrosourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehling, U.H.; Favor, J.; Kratochvilova, J.; Neuhaeuser-Klaus, A. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik)

    1982-01-01

    In a combined experiment, dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations were scored in the same offspring. In radiation experiments, a total of 15 dominant cataract and 38 specific-locus mutations was scored in 29396 offspring. In experiments with ethylnitrosourea (ENU), a total of 12 dominant cataracts and 54 specific-locus mutations was observed in 12712 offspring. The control frequency for dominant cataracts was 0 in 9954 offspring and for specific-locus mutations 11 in 169955 offspring. The two characteristic features of radiation-induced specific-locus mutations - the augmenting effect of dose fractionation and the quantitative differences in the mutation rates between spermatogonial and post-spermatogonial stages - can also be demonstrated for the induction of dominant cataracts. The dominant cataract mutations recovered can be categorized into 7 phenotypic classes. The only noteworthy difference observed between the radiation- and ENU-induced mutations recovered was that, of the 2 radiation-induced total lens opacities, both were associated with an iris anomaly and microphthalmia whereas the ENU-induced total opacities were not.

  10. A novel β-globin gene mutation HBB.c.22 G>C produces a hemoglobin variant (Hb Vellore) mimicking HbS in HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, E S; Sathya, M; Rajkumar, S V; Nair, S C; Srivastava, A; Shaji, R V

    2012-10-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are highly prevalent in Indian population. DNA analysis to detect causative mutations is required for identifying rare hemoglobin variants or when hematological results are discordant with the clinical phenotype. In this report, we describe a novel hemoglobin variant caused by a mutation in beta-globin gene, Codon 7 GAG→CAG (Glu→Gln) that elutes in the position of sickle haemoglobin (HbS) in cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. This report highlights possible diagnostic pitfalls in interpreting data solely based on haemoglobin analysis and usefulness of mutation screening in definitive diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:22471768

  11. Acute chest syndrome is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism-defined beta globin cluster haplotype in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Christopher J; Boulet, Sheree L; Yang, Genyan; Payne, Amanda B; Ghaji, Nafisa; Pyle, Meredith E; Hooper, W Craig; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Keefer, Jeffrey; Barron-Casella, Emily A; Casella, James F; Debaun, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Genetic diversity at the human β-globin locus has been implicated as a modifier of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) severity. However, haplotypes defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism sites across the β-globin locus have not been consistently associated with clinical phenotypes. To define the genetic structure at the β-globin locus more thoroughly, we performed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in 820 children who were homozygous for the sickle cell mutation (HbSS). Genotyping results revealed very high linkage disequilibrium across a large region spanning the locus control region and the HBB (β-globin gene) cluster. We identified three predominant haplotypes accounting for 96% of the β(S) -carrying chromosomes in this population that could be distinguished using a minimal set of common SNPs. Consistent with previous studies, fetal haemoglobin level was significantly associated with β(S) -haplotypes. After controlling for covariates, an association was detected between haplotype and rate of hospitalization for acute chest syndrome (ACS) (incidence rate ratio 0·51, 95% confidence interval 0·29-0·89) but not incidence rate of vaso-occlusive pain or presence of silent cerebral infarct (SCI). Our results suggest that these SNP-defined β(S) -haplotypes may be associated with ACS, but not pain or SCI in a study population of children with SCA. PMID:23952145

  12. Radiation-induced mutations in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray-induced mutations in teleostean fish were studied from the point of social behavior. A significant reduction in male aggression was found in the postirradiated F1 generation after the irradiation of parental oogonia and spermatogonia, with 2 x 500 R (24 hr apart) of x-rays, but did not alter the aggression of F1 females. A study on backcross generation of irradiated line fitted with a two-factor model of dominant genetic factors, high- and low-aggressive, which co-acted additively in repressing the male aggression. Social cohesiveness was compared between F1 convict cichlides (C. nigrofasciatum) exposed by 0, 250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 R of x-rays. The best response was observed in males with 500 R and in females with 750 R. While an increase in cohesiveness was observed in F1 males with 500 R, the cohesiveness of F1 females decreased with 750 and 200 R, suggesting that the increase in male was associated with a reduction of inter-male aggression. A new ''guppy male courtship activity test'' was carried out in the offsprings of irradiated guppy, maintained in seawater and in freshwater. The mean values of both the frequency and the duration of four behavioral traits of the male guppy increased in postirradiated F1 generation of the seawater substrain but were unchanged in that of freshwater's. In F2 generation the mean values of the same behavioral characters decreased in both seawater and freshwater substrains. (Nakanishi, T.)

  13. Induced mutation in garlic (Allium sativum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two strains of garlic, Ilocos White and Laguna Strain, were exposed to 500, 600, 800 and 1000 rad of gamma rays. A control was included for comparison. The garlic strains irradiated with 1000 rad did not survive. Only three treatments and the control were evaluated for yield performance in terms of bulb size in the Mu1, Mu2 and Mu3 populations. In Mu1, the bulb size of the control was greater and significantly different from those of the treated strains. In Mu2, more large bulbs of Ilocos White were obtained from 600 and 800 rad than from 500 rad and the control. In contrast, Laguna Strain had the lowest percentage large bulbs at 600 rad. The percentage selection of large and medium bulbs increased from Mu2 to Mu3 in both strains. The two garlic strains showed genetic differences in their response to gamma irradiation. In general, Laguna Strain was more responsive to induced mutation than Ilocos White; large bulbs in increased quantity were obtained from this strain. (author). 2 figs, 1 tab

  14. Induced mutation breeding by fast neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-yield and long-grain new variety 'Zhongtie 31' was developed through five generations after irradiation of the rice variety 'Tieqiu 15' dried seeds by 14 MeV fast neutrons with a fluence of (1.33 ∼ 3.33) x 1011 neutrons cm-2. It matured earlier 3 to 5 days, the plant is higher 10 cm, bigger ear, more grain than its original variety 'tieqiu 15', and the yield increased by 19.2% to 30.7%. The source of new variety 'Zhongtie 31' was proved by the isoenzyme genetics. In field test, it increased by 7% to 10% as compared with high-yield variety 'Guichao No.2' and the hybrid rive 'Shanyou No.2', and is more palatable. The new variety was initiated by irradiation mutagensis routine rice, its well-grown and bumper-yield performances may be compared favourably with hybrid rice variety. In July 1986, the new variety 'Zhongtie 31' was obtained by inducing mutation with fast neutron. The same year, the planted area of 'Zhongtie 31' has achieved upto 250 thousand mu (1.67 x 108 cm2)

  15. Increasing upland rice variability through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upland rice cultivars in Sao Paulo State, Brazil are generally tall (120-135 cm) even under low fertility soils (''cerrado''). In areas of continuous rice cultivation soil fertility is usually restored and the plants grow leafy, lodge, and seldom yield more than 2 t/ha. A mutation breeding programme involving Instituto Agronomico (IAC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA) was started with the following objectives: (1) to induce a semidwarf mutant gene in the upland cultivar IAC 165; (2) once obtained, to incorporate the semidwarf gene in the standard hybridization program; and (3) to hybridize the new semidwarf source with the sd1 gene in order to identify useful nonallelic semidwarf genes primarily for upland conditions. Fifty-five thousand seeds were treated with 40 and 45 krad (400 and 450 Gy). Conventional methods of handling and selecting mutant plants were carried out at the Campinas Experimental Center. Sixty-three mutant lines were selected and classified. In 1989 eight and in 1990 ten promising mutant lines were included in preliminary yield trials under upland conditions. In both years IAC 165 yielded more than the selected mutants. Under sprinkler irrigation several mutants yielded as high as IAC 165. Some mutants were later than IAC 165. Preliminary results of crosses involving the eight selected mutants with BR-IRGA 409 indicate that the mutant genes are not allelic to sd1. Crosses of the mutants with IAC 165 indicate that the tall types are dominant. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Studies on induced mutations in garlic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is the second most widely cultivated Allium - after onion. It has been recognised world-wide as a valuable spice for foods and a popular remedy for various ailments and physiological disorders. The available types of garlic exhibit low variability due to repeated vegetative propagation. As garlic flowers are mostly sterile, restoration of fertility is a difficult process and hence there exists little scope for genetic improvement through hybridization. Induced mutagenesis with gamma rays has helped to overcome these genetic barriers. Ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and their combination treatments attempted to improve bulb yield in garlic varieties 'Mettupalayam' and 'Ooty-1' at the Horticultural Research Station, Ooty in Nilgiris. Based on radiosensitivity studies, two doses of gamma rays (2.5 and 5.0 Gy), four concentrations of EMS (15, 20, 25 and 30 mM for 8 h at temperature 25±2 deg. C) and four combined treatments (2.5 Gy + 20 mM, 2.5 Gy + 25 mM, 5.0 Gy + 20 mM and 5.0 Gy + 25 mM) were employed. Garlic bulb and clove characteristics and the varietal response were significantly influenced by the physical, chemical mutagens and their combination treatments. The spectrum of chlorophyll mutants identified in the present study are comprised of, albina, chlorina, straita, viridis and xantha. The proportion of the various mutants varied with the varieties and mutagen treatments. Increasing doses of gamma rays, EMS or combination treatments increased the rate of lethality, injury and clove sterility of treated populations. Mutations for plant, leaf and shoot morphology were more frequent than bulb characters in both varieties. Non-viable mutants were dose dependant and this increased with higher doses. Gamma treatments caused more non-viable mutants (mottled and crinkled leaves) followed by combined and EMS treatments

  17. Induced mutations for improvement of grain legume production II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of 18 papers presented, 15 fall within the INIS subject scope. Other topics covered were: mutagenic efficiency of ethylmethane sulphonate in soybean; induced mutations for rust resistance in soybean; and nitrogen fixation-potentials for improvement in legumes

  18. Use of induced mutations in soybean breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial induction of mutation in plants is carried out using #betta#-irradiation and ethyl metanesulphonate (EMS) to expand the genetic variability of locally-grown soybean. This aspect of mutation breeding complements of conventional breeding approach undertaken by the Joint Malaysia Soybean Breeding Project group. Recovery of agronomically-important mutants such as earliness, lateness, bigger seed size and improved plant architecture were recorded. The significance of these findings is discussed. (author)

  19. Mathematical Modeling of the Induced Mutation Process in Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V.; Krasavin, Evgeny A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander Yu.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model of the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced mutation process in bacterial cells Escherichia coli is developed. Using mathematical approaches, the whole chain of events is tracked from a cell exposure to the damaging factor to mutation formation in the DNA chain. An account of the key special features of the regulation of this genetic network allows predicting the effects induced by the cell exposure to certain UV energy fluence.

  20. Rice breeding with induced mutations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutation experiments with rice at Montpellier yielded strains with improved lodging resistance, grain size, maturing time, milling quality and other characters. The general performance of these mutant strains was tested in field trials. Further mutagenic treatments were made to improve the high-yielding short grain varieties with regard to grain quality and seed dormancy. (author)

  1. SIMILARITY ANALYSIS OF DNA SEQUENCES BASED ON THE CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEOTIDE BASES, FREQUENCY AND POSITION OF GROUP MUTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima KABLI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA sequences similarity analysis approaches have been based on the representation and the frequency of sequences components; however, the position inside sequence is important information for the sequence data. Whereas, insufficient information in sequences representations is important reason that causes poor similarity results. Based on three classifications of the DNA bases according to their chemical properties, the frequencies and average positions of group mutations have been grouped into two twelve-components vectors, the Euclidean distances among introduced vectors applied to compare the coding sequences of the first exon of beta globin gene of 11 species.

  2. Improvement of grain legume production using induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This FAO/IAEA Workshop was the final Research Co-ordination Meeting for four FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programmes, namely: The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Use of Induced Mutations for Improvement of Grain Legume Production in South East Asia, supported since 1976; The FAO/IAEA/Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) Co-ordinated Research Programme on Induced Mutations for Disease Resistance in Grain Legumes, supported since 1977; The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Improvement of Leguminous Food Crops in Africa and the Near East Through Induced Mutations, supported since 1981; The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Improvement of Leguminous and Oil Seed Crops in Latin America Through Induced Mutations, supported since 1981. Of the 40 current and former holders of research contracts or research agreements under the above mentioned programmes, 29 were able to attend the Workshop and present their final reports. Participants have attempted to draw general conclusions from their work for a number of topics that may be relevant for other investigators who are considering using induced mutations in legume breeding programmes. The conclusions and recommendations are presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Carrie N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a compendium of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mouse mutations, identified in our laboratory over a period of 10 years either on the basis of phenotype or whole genome and/or whole exome sequencing, and archived in the Mutagenetix database. Our purpose is threefold: 1 to formally describe many point mutations, including those that were not previously disclosed in peer-reviewed publications; 2 to assess the characteristics of these mutations; and 3 to estimate the likelihood that a missense mutation induced by ENU will create a detectable phenotype. Findings In the context of an ENU mutagenesis program for C57BL/6J mice, a total of 185 phenotypes were tracked to mutations in 129 genes. In addition, 402 incidental mutations were identified and predicted to affect 390 genes. As previously reported, ENU shows strand asymmetry in its induction of mutations, particularly favoring T to A rather than A to T in the sense strand of coding regions and splice junctions. Some amino acid substitutions are far more likely to be damaging than others, and some are far more likely to be observed. Indeed, from among a total of 494 non-synonymous coding mutations, ENU was observed to create only 114 of the 182 possible amino acid substitutions that single base changes can achieve. Based on differences in overt null allele frequencies observed in phenotypic vs. non-phenotypic mutation sets, we infer that ENU-induced missense mutations create detectable phenotype only about 1 in 4.7 times. While the remaining mutations may not be functionally neutral, they are, on average, beneath the limits of detection of the phenotypic assays we applied. Conclusions Collectively, these mutations add to our understanding of the chemical specificity of ENU, the types of amino acid substitutions it creates, and its efficiency in causing phenovariance. Our data support the validity of computational algorithms for the prediction of damage caused by

  4. A Fast Determination of DNA Mutation Induced by Ultraviolet Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuFeng; LiuLili; ZhangXiaofang; WuYutian

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis, chromatography, immunoassay, sequencing and other time consuming ap-proaches have been developed to determine DNA base mismatching, oxidative lesion or strand breaks. Sometimes,however, only qualitative information is enough to decide whether mutation has happened to DNA and its extent.Convolution spectrometry (CS), a new technique to discover ultrafme difference on ultraviolet (UV) absorption ofdifferent substances, is originally employed to find out any subtle mutation of DNA induced by UV radiation. Muta-tive DNA is compared with ego criteria based on the spectra of the former DNA, any difference is quantitatively ex-pressed by dispersion (5). Visible changes cannot be observed on second -derivative spectra until the mutation gets 5up to 11.48%. Dimethyl sulfoxide is an intensifier of UV 254 nm induced DNA mutation and protector at 365 nm,which is simply confirmed by increasing and decreasing 5. Every convolution procedure takes less than 1 min. Convolution spectrometry provides a fast, simple, sensitive and inexpensive alternative to determine DNA mutation, andto screen anti-mutational medicines.

  5. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation. [uv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-07-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation.

  6. Hepatitis C virus induces a mutator phenotype: enhanced mutations of immunoglobulin and protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Keigo; Cheng, Kevin T-N; Sung, Vicky M-H; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Lindsay, Karen L; Levine, Alexandra M; Lai, Ming-Yang; Lai, Michael M C

    2004-03-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a nonretroviral oncogenic RNA virus, which is frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and B cell lymphoma. We demonstrated here that acute and chronic HCV infection caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in mutation frequency in Ig heavy chain, BCL-6, p53, and beta-catenin genes of in vitro HCV-infected B cell lines and HCV-associated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymphomas, and HCCs. The nucleotide-substitution pattern of p53 and beta-catenin was different from that of Ig heavy chain in HCV-infected cells, suggesting two different mechanisms of mutation. In addition, the mutated protooncogenes were amplified in HCV-associated lymphomas and HCCs, but not in lymphomas of nonviral origin or HBV-associated HCC. HCV induced error-prone DNA polymerase zeta, polymerase iota, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, which together, contributed to the enhancement of mutation frequency, as demonstrated by the RNA interference experiments. These results indicate that HCV induces a mutator phenotype and may transform cells by a hit-and-run mechanism. This finding provides a mechanism of oncogenesis for an RNA virus.

  7. Sucrose and IQ induced mutations in rat colon by independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Hald, M. T.; Autrup, H.;

    2004-01-01

    Sucrose-rich diets have repeatedly been observed to have co-carcinogenic actions in colon and liver of rats and to increase the number of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon. To investigate a possible interaction between sucrose and IQ...... on the genotoxicity in rat liver and colon, we gave Big Blue rats(TM) a diet containing sucrose (0%, 3.45% or 13.4% w/w) and/or IQ (70 ppm) for a period of 3 weeks. Sucrose and IQ increased the mutation frequency in the colon. The effect of combined treatments with IQ and sucrose on the mutation frequencies...... was additive indicating that sucrose and IQ act independently. This was supported by the mutation spectra where sucrose expands the background mutations in the colon, whereas IQ, in other studies, more specifically has induced G:C --> T:A transversions. In the liver IQ increased the mutation frequency, whereas...

  8. Specific gene mutations induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes our heavy-ion research rationale, progress, and plans for the near future. The major project involves selecting a group of maize Adh1 mutants induced by heavy ions and correlating their altered behavior with altered DNA nucleotide sequences and sequence arrangements. This research requires merging the techniques of classical genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Our secondary projects involve (1) the use of the Adh gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a second system with which to quantify the sort of specific gene mutants induced by heavy ions as compared to x rays, and (2) the development of a maize Adh1 pollen in situ monitor for environmental mutagens

  9. X-ray induced mutations, DNA and target theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that X-ray induced, specific locus, germ-line mutation rates vary significantly in eukaryotes. A consideration of the radiobiology of the individual gene by the author leads to three major conclusions. (1) Mutation rates tend to be much lower than radiation theory predicts. (2) Selection and/or repair are major factors that determine the rates. (3) The mouse 7-locus test, which provides a principal data base for the standards of human radiation hygiene, may not provide adequate overall representation of the mutability of the mammalian genome, so more research is needed. (U.K.)

  10. The Role of Induced Mutations in World Food Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical availability and economic accessibility of food are the most important criteria of food security. Induced mutations have played a great role in increasing world food security, since new food crop varieties embedded with various induced mutations have contributed to the significant increase of crop production at locations people could directly access. In this paper, the worldwide use of new varieties, derived directly or indirectly from induced mutants, was reviewed. Some highlights are: rice in China, Thailand, Vietnam, and the USA; barley in European countries and Peru, durum wheat in Bulgaria and Italy, wheat in China, soybean in China and Vietnam, as well as other food legumes in India and Pakistan. An exact estimate of the area covered by commercially released mutant cultivars in a large number of countries is not readily available, but the limited information gathered clearly indicates that they have played a very significant role in solving food and nutritional security problems in many countries. (author)

  11. Radiation induced mutations for breeding of sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several sorghum cultivars of Mali were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays and compared with the Caudatum types. Radio-sensitivity studies suggested that the local types were less sensitive to radiation than the introduced types. Whereas the local varieties survived dose of 300 Gy, in Caudatum types, seed germination and growth were significantly reduced at 200 Gy. Several agronomically important mutants were obtained among the progeny of the local types. Some of the mutants were shorter and had improved panicle characteristics. Radiation-induced variation was observed in several characters such as plant height, resistance to lodging, plant architecture, drought tolerance, panicle length and compactness, seed size and color, seed quality (viterous or floury) and protein content, glume color and structure, flowering data (early and late maturity), and tillering capacity. One mutant was drought tolerant. Promising mutants were selected and are presently under evaluation in the National List Trials to confirm their potential and future release. Selected variants have been also crossed with local types to obtain promising material. (author). 8 refs, 2 tabs

  12. Base substitution mutations induced by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P L; Eisenstadt, E; Miller, J H

    1983-05-01

    We have determined the base substitutions generated by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1 in the lacI gene of a uvrB- strain of Escherichia coli. By monitoring over 70 different nonsense mutation sites, we show that activated aflatoxin B1 specifically induced GxC leads to TxA transversions. One possible pathway leading to this base change involves depurination at guanine residues. We consider this mechanism of mutagenesis in the light of our other findings that the carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and N-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene also specifically induce GxC leads to TxA transversions. PMID:6405385

  13. Induced mutations in citrus shoot tip culture in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of using induced mutation of the callus of citrus clones as a method in citrus breeding. It was observed that the nuclear clones had a higher ratio of callus cell differentiation than the old clones. The callus cells were exposed to gamma irradiation of 7,000 roentgen at 127 R/min. Callus cells derived from the shoot tip proved to be more appropriate for cytological examination by the smearing technique than the root tip cells. Gamma irradiation of callus cells is quite effective for inducing chromosome aberration and micronucleus inspection

  14. Induced mutations for a determinate habit in rice bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induced mutation techniques were used to create polygenic variability in rice bean (Vigna umbellata). Dry seeds of the genotype (sel. I) were irradiated with 40-80 kR of gamma rays at 10 kR intervals. A wide variation in quantitative characters was induced in both the M2 and M3 generations. Some mutants were isolated that showed a determinate growth habit, earliness, a high yield and photoinsensitivity. These mutants were found to be breeding true. (author). 5 refs, 1 tab

  15. Induced mutations and marker assisted breeding approaches to crop improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crop improvement programme at the Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology involves use of mutation breeding techniques, particularly for improving plant architecture, maturity, period and induction/incorporation of genes for biotic and abiotic tolerance in important food and fibre crops. Recent advances in molecular genetics offered us new techniques to elucidate differences at the molecular level in the mutated genes with the help of marker assisted breeding techniques, i.e. restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Efforts are therefore being made to incorporate salt tolerance in cultivated wheat and rice from their wild relatives through wide hybridization. Thirteen improved varieties of rice, cotton, mungbeam and chickpea have been developed using the mutation breeding technique and then released for commercial cultivation. These improved varieties have played a significant role in increasing agricultural production in the country. In addition, a wealth of genetic variability has been developed for use in the cross-breeding programmes, and a few varieties of cotton have been developed in Pakistan with an induced mutation as one of their parents. Marker assisted wide hybridization in rice has helped to monitor the flow of genetic material carrying salt tolerance from wild to cultivated species. In wheat, DNA fingerprinting has been attempted to differentiate salt tolerant line (hybrids) from their parents

  16. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  17. Vacuum-induced Mutations In Bacillus Subtilis Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, N.; Maeda, M.; Hieda, K.

    During irradiation experiments with vacuum-UV radiation using synchrotron sources, we made unexpected observation that Bacillus subtilis spores of several recombination-deficient strains lost colony-forming ability by the exposure to high vacuum alone. Since this suggested the possible injury in spore DNA, we looked for mutation induction using the spores of strains HA101 (wild-type repair capability) and TKJ6312 (excision and spore repair deficient) that did not lose survivability. It was found that the frequency of nalidixic-acid resistant mutation increased several times in both of these strains by the exposure to high vacuum (10e-4 Pa after 24 hours). The analysis of sequence changes in gyrA gene showed that the majority of mutations carried a unique allele (gyrA12) of tandem double-base substitutions from CA to TT. The observation has been extended to rifampicin resistant mutations, the majority of that carried substitutions from CA to TT or AT in rpoB gene. On the other hand, when the spores of strains PS578 and PS2319 (obtained from P. Setlow) that are defective in a group of small acidic proteins (alpha/beta-type SASP) were similarly treated, none of the mutants analyzed carried such changes. This suggests that the unique mutations might be induced by the interaction of small acidic proteins with spore DNA under forced dehydration. The results indicate that extreme vacuum causes severe damage in spore DNA, and provide additional constraint to the long-term survival of bacterial spores in the space environment.

  18. Solar-UV-signature mutation prefers TCG to CCG: extrapolative consideration from UVA1-induced mutation spectra in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Kumagai, Jun; Ono, Tetsuya; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-08-01

    UVA1 exerts its genotoxicity on mammalian skin by producing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DNA and preferentially inducing solar-UV-signature mutations, C → T base substitution mutations at methylated CpG-associated dipyrimidine (Py-mCpG) sites, as demonstrated previously using a 364 nm laser as a UVA1 source and lacZ-transgenic mice that utilize the transgene as a mutational reporter. In the present study, we confirmed that a broadband UVA1 source induced the same mutation profiles in mouse epidermis as the UVA1 laser, generalizing the previous result from a single 364 nm to a wider wavelength range of UVA1 (340-400 nm). Combined with our previous data on the mutation spectra induced in mouse epidermis by UVB, UVA2 and solar UVR, we proved that the solar-UV-signature mutation is commonly observed in the wavelength range from UVB to UVA, and found that UVA1 induces this mutation more preferentially than the other shorter wavelength ranges. This finding indicates that the solar-UV-signature mutation-causing CPDs, which are known to prefer Py-mCpG sites, could be produced with the energy provided by the longer wavelength region of UVR, suggesting a photochemical reaction through the excitation of pyrimidine bases to energy states that can be accomplished by absorption of even low-energy UVR. On the other hand, the lower proportions of solar-UV-signature mutations observed in the mutation spectra for UVB and solar UVR indicate that the direct photochemical reaction through excited singlet state of pyrimidine bases, which can be accomplished only by high-energy UVR, is also involved in the mutation induction at those shorter wavelengths of UVR. We also found that the solar-UV signature prefers 5'-TCG-3' to 5'-CCG-3' as mutational target sites, consistent with the fact that UVA induces CPDs selectively at thymine-containing dipyrimidine sites and that solar UVR induces them preferably at Py-mCpG sites. However, the mutation spectrum in human p53 gene from non

  19. Base substitution mutations induced by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, P. L.; Eisenstadt, E; Miller, J H

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the base substitutions generated by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1 in the lacI gene of a uvrB- strain of Escherichia coli. By monitoring over 70 different nonsense mutation sites, we show that activated aflatoxin B1 specifically induced GxC leads to TxA transversions. One possible pathway leading to this base change involves depurination at guanine residues. We consider this mechanism of mutagenesis in the light of our other findings that the carcinogens benzo[a]pyren...

  20. Induced mutations for improvement of grain legume production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introduction on plant science research in Malaysia concerning crop breeding, 22 research reports are presented, 17 of which are analyzed individually and constitute separate INIS references. The remaining 5 were essentially concerned with only future applications of nuclear technology: a paper by V.L. Chopra (India) on mutation breeding for partial disease resistance of wheat; by H.H. Hoppe (Federal Republic of Germany) on mechanisms of resistance against Uromyces in Phaseolus vulgaris; by I.S. Santos (Philippines) on induction evaluation and utilization of beneficial mutations in the winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus), where gamma rays and fast neutrons will be used as well as other mutagens; by F. Saccardo (Italy) on breeding for disease resistance in peas and other vegetables (short communication only); and by E. Balazs and I. Sziraki (Hungary) on in vitro studies on virus resistance of legumes, including virus-host interaction studies involving gamma irradiation (short communication only). The conclusions and recommendations of the Regional Seminar on Induced Mutations for the Improvement of Grain Legumes in S.E. Asia 1975 (IAEA-203, 1977) were considered and generally endorsed, with some clarification. Conclusions and recommendations are given on p.121-126

  1. Radiation induced mutations in Phaseolus vulgaris L. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rubeai, M.A.F. (Garyounis Univ., Benghazi (Libya). Dept. of Botany)

    1982-09-01

    A selection of various macro- and micro-mutations was undertaken in the M2 generation of Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars after seed exposure to acute gamma radiation doses of 2.5, 5, 7, 10 and 15 Kr. The chlorophyll mutation was positively correlated with dose. Nevertheless, the highest frequency was at 7 Kr. Several interesting morphological mutants were observed. There were dwarf, stiff stem, shiny small leaf, narrow leaf and green giant mutants. Two selected micromutants were superior in seed yield capacity to their parents. The high yields were related to the high number of pods per plant. In 'The Prince' (seed color: red with beige marbling) several mutants with seeds of black color marbled with beige were selected. These seeds gave M3 segregants exhibiting a range of seed colors including white. Many of these M3 plants were short, early flowering and highly sterile. The work demonstrated that the pigmentation character can readily be changed, and confirmed that the variability induced by radiation can be exploited to obtain desirable mutations.

  2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Contributes to Pancreatic Tumorigenesis by Inducing Tumor-Related Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Yugo; Kodama, Yuzo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Ota, Yuji; Maruno, Takahisa; Eso, Yuji; Kurita, Akira; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Uza, Norimitsu; Matsumoto, Yuko; Masui, Toshihiko; Uemoto, Shinji; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develops via an accumulation of various gene mutations. The mechanism underlying the mutations in PDAC development, however, is not fully understood. Recent insight into the close association between the mutation pattern of various cancers and specific mutagens led us to investigate the possible involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA editing enzyme, in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Our immunohistochemical findings revealed AID protein expression in human acinar ductal metaplasia, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and PDAC. Both the amount and intensity of the AID protein expression increased with the progression from precancerous to cancerous lesions in human PDAC tissues. To further assess the significance of ectopic epithelial AID expression in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we analyzed the phenotype of AID transgenic (AID Tg) mice. Consistent with our hypothesis that AID is involved in the mechanism of the mutations underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, we found precancerous lesions developing in the pancreas of AID Tg mice. Using deep sequencing, we also detected Kras and c-Myc mutations in our analysis of the whole pancreas of AID Tg mice. In addition, Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of Kras, c-Myc, and Smad4 mutations, with the typical mutational footprint of AID in precancerous lesions in AID Tg mice separated by laser capture microdissection. Taken together, our findings suggest that AID contributes to the development of pancreatic precancerous lesions by inducing tumor-related gene mutations. Our new mouse model without intentional manipulation of specific tumor-related genes provides a powerful system for analyzing the mutations involved in PDAC.

  3. Improvement of sugar-cane through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results obtained on the use of induced mutations in sugar-cane breeding are summarized. Six commercial varieties under cultivation in India were subjected to mutagenic treatment for inducing mutations for specific characters. More than 50 mutants for various morphological characters, disease resistance and higher sugar content were obtained in these varieties. They were multiplied and studied for their stability for four to five years. Mutants of economic value include glabrous leaf sheath, non-flowering, vigorous and high-yielding mutants in Co 527, high-sugared and early maturing mutants in Co 419 and mutants for smut and disease resistance in Co 1287 and Co 740. Two mutants, one in Co 527 and the other in Co 419, have entered the All India Co-ordinated trials because of their superiority in yield and quality over the parent variety. Smut-resistant mutants of Co 1287 and Co 740 are being evaluated in large-scale trials. Tissue culture techniques have been used for propagating the mutants. Genetic variability has also been created by obtaining plants from callus culture with different chromosome numbers. (author)

  4. [UV-induced DNA mutation of peach aphid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Erxia; Guo, Jianwen; Zhao, Huiyan

    2006-07-01

    By using PCR technique and microsatellite marks, this paper studied the DNA polymorphism of peach aphid (Myzus persicae) under UV-radiation. The fragments of three primers were amplified, and the gene diversity and the rate of loci polymorphisms of their genomic DNA, which could reflect the damage degree of DNA after UV-radiation, were measured. The results revealed that after treated with different radiation intensity (15, 30, 45 W) and duration (2, 4, 6 h) , the UV-induced DNA mutations were genetic and could be delivered to F2 generation. The mutations depended on the interaction of radiation intensity and duration. Variance analysis on the gene diversity and the rate of loci polymorphisms showed that there existed a significant difference between UV-treated and control groups, except the rate of loci polymorphisms under 2 h radiation. The average value of the control was higher than that of 2 h radiation treatment. According to the cluster analysis of the genetic distance, the aphids were divided into three groups, i. e., control group, 2 h (15, 30 W) treatment group, and the other, which was consistent with the result of variance analysis.

  5. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted.

  6. Concordance of a point mutation 5' to the A gamma-globin gene with A gamma beta + hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waber, P G; Bender, M A; Gelinas, R E; Kattamis, C; Karaklis, A; Sofroniadou, K; Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Collins, F S; Forget, B G; Kazazian, H H

    1986-02-01

    In the Greek A gamma beta + type of hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), adult heterozygotes produce about 20% fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which is predominantly of the A gamma chain variety. The affected beta-globin gene cluster produces near normal amounts of beta-like globin, but in a A gamma to beta ratio of 20:80 instead of 0.5:99.5. Gelinas et al and Collins et al have shown a G to A change 117 nucleotides 5' to the A gamma gene in two Greeks with A gamma beta + HPFH. To demonstrate that this change is not a neutral polymorphism, we carried out hybridization with oligonucleotide probes (19mers) specific for the normal and the mutant sequences. While normal probe identified the A gamma fragment in genomic DNA of all subjects studied, mutant probe was positive only in Greeks with A gamma beta + HPFH. In sum, 108 beta-globin gene clusters of individuals without HPFH were negative when tested with mutant probe, but all 11 affected individuals of six families with Greek A gamma beta + HPFH (two previously sequenced and four new families) were positive with mutant probe. These data support the conclusion that the -117 mutation is causative of A gamma beta + HPFH in Greeks.

  7. Induced mutations in the improvement of mentha species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive study on the induced mutagenesis of the three commercially important species of Mentha; M. arvensis, var. piperascens; M. citrata and M. piperita, was initiated in 1970. Dormant suckers/stolons were exposed to X- and gamma rays (3 to 10 kR). Treated suckers/stolons were planted singly and surviving seedlings carefully examined for mutations using visual, analytical techniques and olfactory assessment of the oils to detect biochemical and qualitative mutants. The mutants selected were propagated through two vegetative cycles to ascertain their genetic stability and field performance. Eventually, a few economically useful and some novel biochemical mutants were isolated. Desirable mutants were subjected to agronomic and chemical evaluation over a period of three years. Consequently one clone of M. arvensis (RRL-118/3) was released for commercial cultivation early this year. This mutant has a potentiality of giving upto 40% more menthol per unit area over the currently available commercial strain. (author)

  8. Identification of pathways controlling DNA damage induced mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Ewa T; O'Neill, Bryan M; Gil-Lamaignere, Cristina; Chin, Jodie K; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2008-05-01

    Mutation in response to most types of DNA damage is thought to be mediated by the error-prone sub-branch of post-replication repair and the associated translesion synthesis polymerases. To further understand the mutagenic response to DNA damage, we screened a collection of 4848 haploid gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for decreased damage-induced mutation of the CAN1 gene. Through extensive quantitative validation of the strains identified by the screen, we identified ten genes, which included error-prone post-replication repair genes known to be involved in induced mutation, as well as two additional genes, FYV6 and RNR4. We demonstrate that FYV6 and RNR4 are epistatic with respect to induced mutation, and that they function, at least partially, independently of post-replication repair. This pathway of induced mutation appears to be mediated by an increase in dNTP levels that facilitates lesion bypass by the replicative polymerase Pol delta, and it is as important as error-prone post-replication repair in the case of UV- and MMS-induced mutation, but solely responsible for EMS-induced mutation. We show that Rnr4/Pol delta-induced mutation is efficiently inhibited by hydroxyurea, a small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, suggesting that if similar pathways exist in human cells, intervention in some forms of mutation may be possible.

  9. Oilseed cultivars developed from induced mutations and mutations altering fatty acid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and sixty-three cultivars of annual oilseed crops, developed using induced mutations, have been officially approved and released for cultivation in 26 countries. The maximum number of cultivars have been released in soybean (58), followed by groundnut (44), sesame (16), linseed (15), rapeseed (14), Indian mustard (8), castorbean (4), white mustard (3) and sunflower (1). The majority (118 of 163) of the cultivars have been developed as direct mutants and 45 of 163 by using the induced mutants in a crossing programme. While in soybean 53 out of 58 cultivars were selected as direct mutants, in groundnut 22 from 44 were developed after hybridization. Eighty-three cultivars were developed directly by exposing seeds to gamma or X-rays. Attempts have been made to infer the successful dose range, defined as the range which led to the development, registration and release of the maximum number of mutant cultivars for gamma and X-rays. The successful dose ranges in Gy for the main oilseed crops are: soybean 100-200, groundnut 150-250, rapeseed 600-800, Indian mustard 700 and sesame 100-200. The main characteristics of the new cultivars, besides higher yield, are altered plant type, early flowering and maturity and oil content. Mutants altering fatty acid composition have been isolated in soybean, rapeseed, sunflower, linseed and minor oil crops. New cultivars having altered fatty acid composition have been released in rapeseed, sunflower and linseed. The latter, previously grown for non-edible oil, has been converted to a new edible oil crop. (author)

  10. Grain legume cultivars derived from induced mutations, and mutations affecting nodulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred and sixty-five grain legume cultivars developed using induced mutations have been released in 32 countries. A maximum number of cultivars have been released in soybean (58), followed by common bean (50), groundnut (44), pea (32) and mungbean (14). Gamma or x-ray exposures of seeds led to the direct development of 111 cultivars, while neutron and chemical mutagen treatments resulted in 8 and 36 cultivars respectively. One hundred and three cultivars have been developed using mutants in cross breeding. Attempts have been made to estimate the successful dose range for gamma and x-rays, defined as the dose range, which led to the development, registration and release of a maximum number of mutant cultivars. Exposures to seeds ranging between 100-200 Gy in all grain legumes, except faba bean, resulted in 49 out of 111 cultivars being developed as direct mutants. Successful doses reported for faba bean are lower than 100 Gy. Modified crop plant characters are listed. Besides the development of new cultivars, a large number of induced mutants that show altered nodulation pattern have been isolated in grain legumes. Such mutants have made a significant contribution in basic studies on host-symbiont interactions and towards cloning of plant genes related to symbiosis and nitrogen fixation. Their exploitation in breeding programs for enhancing nitrogen fixation is just beginning. Available information on nodulation mutants in grain legume crops is summarised. Mainly, four types of nodulation mutants have been isolated. They show either: no nodulation (nod -), few nodules (nod +/-), ineffective nodulation (Fix-), hypernodulation (nod ++) or hypernodulation even in the presence of otherwise inhibitory nitrate levels (nts). Hypernodulating and nts mutants are of great interest. A soybean cultivar incorporating nts trait has been released in Australia. (author)

  11. Induced mutation breeding for the improvement of rice in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first application of nuclear technology in mutation breeding for the improvement of rice was undertaken by the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) in December, 1984 for a Coordinated Research Programme under RCA/IAEA/FAO entitled Semi Dwarf Mutants for Rice Improvement in Asia and Pacific. The main objective was to generate semi dwarf mutants in both native and improved cultivars for possible use as new released cultivars or as parents in cross breeding programmes. Within five years, 101 semi dwarf mutants which have the potential to be used as new cultivars or as parents in cross breeding were identified. Twenty nine of the semi dwarf mutants have grain yield between 6000-7300 kg/ha which were classified as potentially good yielding mutants. The parent, Manik yielded about 5700 kg/ha. Forty seven mutants have grain yield between 5000 6000 kg/ha and 25 mutants yielded in the range of 4300-5000 kg/ha. Twelve mutants are resistant to BPH (brown planthopper) but only one, mutant ML15 has grain yield (6300 kg / ha) better than the parent. One of the most striking effects of radiation (gamma ray) was the formation of glutinous rice (Manik 817) with both good yield and head recovery. It is also interesting to note that one of the mutants (MA 03) shows a drastic change in its characteristics and performs better than the parent and other mutant lines. This mutant was late popularly known as mutant Tongkat Ali because of its: outstanding agronomic features such as very erect panicle even after grain filling, very strong culm and resistance to lodging. Even though this mutant was not officially released, due to its unique characteristics and high yield, it has been planted commercially by several farmers especially in the northern parts of Malaysia. More collaborative research programmes using induced mutation breeding have been carried out between MINT, MADA and also MARDI with the aim of producing new potential varieties with high yield, disease

  12. Exercise-induced mitochondrial p53 repairs mtDNA mutations in mutator mice

    OpenAIRE

    Safdar, Adeel; Khrapko, Konstantin; Flynn, James M.; Saleem, Ayesha; De Lisio, Michael; Johnston, Adam P. W.; Kratysberg, Yevgenya; Samjoo, Imtiaz A.; Kitaoka, Yu; Ogborn, Daniel I.; Little, Jonathan P.; Raha, Sandeep; Parise, Gianni; Akhtar, Mahmood; Bart P Hettinga

    2016-01-01

    Background Human genetic disorders and transgenic mouse models have shown that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and telomere dysfunction instigate the aging process. Epidemiologically, exercise is associated with greater life expectancy and reduced risk of chronic diseases. While the beneficial effects of exercise are well established, the molecular mechanisms instigating these observations remain unclear. Results Endurance exercise reduces mtDNA mutation burden, alleviates multisystem pat...

  13. An RNA Aptamer Inhibits a Mutation-Induced Inactivating Misfolding of a Serpin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Dupont, Daniel M;

    2016-01-01

    ) or extracellularly (type-II serpinopathies). We have isolated a 2'-fluoropyrimidine-modified RNA aptamer, which inhibits a mutation-induced inactivating misfolding of the serpin α1-antichymotrypsin. It is the first agent able to stabilize a type-II mutation of a serpin without interfering with the...

  14. Use of induced mutations for crop improvement programmes in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radiation induced mutations is an effective additional tool for plant breeding work in Sri Lanka. Mutation Breeding could be effectively utilized to create favourable specific changes such as short culms, 90o resistance to pests and diseases, improvement in grain quality etc

  15. Genetic Improvement of Soybean Variety VLS-2 through Induced Mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The narrow genetic base of cultivated varieties in soybean is of global concern. Mutations, spontaneous or induced, are an important source of genetic variability. Seeds of soybean cultivar VLS -2 were irradiated with 250Gy Gamma-rays. A large number of mutants with altered morphological characters like plant height, flower color, sterility, leaf shape, number of pods per plant, seed color, early or late maturity were identified and characterized. Significantly higher oil content was observed in the mutant M-387 (22.7%) and dwarf mutant M-126 (20.7%) as compared to the parent VLS-2 (19.7%). A modified rapid and reliable micro titration plate technique was developed and used for screening trypsin inhibitor (TI) content in the seeds of 7480 M2 plants. The TI content in the M5 generation ranged from 13.5 TIU/mg seed meal to 22.9 TIU/mg seed meal. Significantly lower level of TI was observed in the mutants M-104 (13.5 TIU/mg seed meal), M-213 (14.0 TIU/mg seed meal) and M-291 (15.7 TIU/mg seed meal) as compared to the parent VLS-2 (22.4 TIU/mg seed meal). In the M5 generation, 24 mutant lines were evaluated for various quantitative characters. Analysis of variance showed highly significant variations among mutant lines for yield per plant. Mutant M-17 had the yield per plant of 13.1gm, significantly higher than the parent VLS-2 (8.3 gm). This mutant also exhibited more branches, more pods and higher harvest index. Genetic diversity study indicated that mutant M-17 had maximum dissimilarity value of 24% from the parent. These identified mutants can be utilised in the breeding programme for developing elite varieties of soybean. (author)

  16. Particle-induced chromosome aberrations and mutations: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    This overview will focus on progress in chromosome and mutation studies achieved by the application of new techniques. Furthermore, recent relevant data on longterm genetic effects of densely ionizing radiation will be summarized. (orig./MG)

  17. Sample preparation method for induced mutation on orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the induction of mutation in Dendrobium orchid at MINT has produced a number of new orchid mutant cultivars. Tissue culture techniques on orchid seeds and meristem cloning are employed in preparing the samples for the mutation induction. Solid medium based on the Murashige and Skoog (1962) and liquid medium based on Vacin and Went (1949) were found to be suitable in producing protocorm like bodies (PLBs) that are required for the irradiation treatment. (Author)

  18. Global impact of induced mutation in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden, heritable changes in the genetic material, DNA, are known as mutations. Selection of naturally occurring mutations in wild, ancestral species helped humans in the domestication and further improvement of today's crop plants. Although Charles Darwin was unaware in 1859 of variation and mutations in living organisms, his theory of evolution by natural selection assumed variability. Much later, it was established that mutations are the source of biodiversity, and the driving force for evolution. Gregor Mendel in 1865 also used several mutants in his experiments with garden pea to formulate the laws of inheritance. The term mutation itself was used for the first time by Hugo de Vries in 1901 in his mutation theory. Plant breeding based on the science of genetics, as practiced over the past 100 years, exploited the available genetic variability in the primary gene pool of crop plants, and sometimes in related species. This approach enlarged the yield potential of crops several fold. It also a) improved the stability of yield by incorporating resistance to various biotic and abiotic stresses; b) improved quality of the produce; and c) altered the adaptability of crop species, providing opportunities to grow new crops for food security outside their traditional range. Genetically improved seed (or other planting material) is the most significant input for developing sustainable cropping systems for food security and economic growth. Half of the increased productivity of today's crop plants comes from genetic improvements. The other half is contributed by inputs and management practices

  19. Performance of computational tools in evaluating the functional impact of laboratory-induced amino acid mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Vanessa E; Kukurba, Kimberly R; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-08-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis is frequently used by scientists to investigate the functional impact of amino acid mutations in the laboratory. Over 10,000 such laboratory-induced mutations have been reported in the UniProt database along with the outcomes of functional assays. Here, we explore the performance of state-of-the-art computational tools (Condel, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT) in correctly annotating the function-altering potential of 10,913 laboratory-induced mutations from 2372 proteins. We find that computational tools are very successful in diagnosing laboratory-induced mutations that elicit significant functional change in the laboratory (up to 92% accuracy). But, these tools consistently fail in correctly annotating laboratory-induced mutations that show no functional impact in the laboratory assays. Therefore, the overall accuracy of computational tools for laboratory-induced mutations is much lower than that observed for the naturally occurring human variants. We tested and rejected the possibilities that the preponderance of changes to alanine and the presence of multiple base-pair mutations in the laboratory were the reasons for the observed discordance between the performance of computational tools for natural and laboratory mutations. Instead, we discover that the laboratory-induced mutations occur predominately at the highly conserved positions in proteins, where the computational tools have the lowest accuracy of correct prediction for variants that do not impact function (neutral). Therefore, the comparisons of experimental-profiling results with those from computational predictions need to be sensitive to the evolutionary conservation of the positions harboring the amino acid change. PMID:22685075

  20. Radiation-induced forward and reverse specific locus mutations and dominant cataract mutations in treated strain BALB/c and DBA/2 male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favor, J; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Ehling, U H

    1987-03-01

    Strain BALB/c and DBA/2 mice were chosen to investigate the effects of genetic background on the radiation-induced mutation rate since they exhibit differences in their radiation sensitivity. Males were exposed to 3 + 3-Gy X-irradiation and mated to untreated specific locus Test-stock females. Offspring resulting from treated spermatogonia were screened for induced specific locus forward and reverse mutations and dominant cataract mutations. Since BALB/c mice are homozygous brown and albino, specific locus forward mutations could be screened at 5 of the 7 specific loci (a, d, se, p, s), while reverse mutations could be screened at the b and c loci. Strain DBA/2 is homozygous non-agouti, brown and dilute. Therefore, specific locus forward mutations could be screened at 4 loci (c, se, p, s) and reverse mutations were screened at the a, b and d loci. Results indicate no effect of genetic background on the sensitivity to mutation induction of specific locus forward mutations, while for the dominant cataract alleles strain DBA/2 exhibited a higher mutation rate than either strain BALB/c or similarly treated (101/El X C3H/El)F1 mice. If, by confirmation, these differences should be demonstrated to be real, it is interesting that strain DBA/2 should exhibit a greater sensitivity to radiation-induced dominant mutations. First, strain DBA/2 was chosen as radiation resistant or repair competent. The observation that DBA/2 exhibited a higher sensitivity to radiation-induced mutation may indicate a role for repair, albeit misrepair, in the mutation process. Second, that the effect of genotype was only observed for the mutation rate to dominant cataract alleles may reflect a difference in the spectrum of DNA alterations which result in dominant or recessive alleles. A dominant allele is more likely misinformation, such that as heterozygote it interferes with the wild-type allele. By comparison, a recessive allele may result from any DNA alteration leading to the loss of a

  1. Plant cultivars derived from mutation induction or the use of induced mutants in cross breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1969 we have collected information on cultivated varieties of plants, developed by using induced mutations. Whenever we learn about a cultivar presumably derived from an induced mutant or from use of mutants in crosses. we mail a questionnaire to the breeder. The information gathered in this way is stored in our file on ''Mutant Varieties''. Excerpts are published regularly in the form of a list in the FAO/IAEA Mutation Breeding Newsletter. Our mutant variety list has repeatedly provided a basis for analyses on the value and prospects of mutation breeding

  2. Performance of computational tools in evaluating the functional impact of laboratory-induced amino acid mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Vanessa E.; Kimberly R Kukurba; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Site-directed mutagenesis is frequently used by scientists to investigate the functional impact of amino acid mutations in the laboratory. Over 10 000 such laboratory-induced mutations have been reported in the UniProt database along with the outcomes of functional assays. Here, we explore the performance of state-of-the-art computational tools (Condel, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT) in correctly annotating the function-altering potential of 10 913 laboratory-induced mutations from 2372 protei...

  3. Target cell APOBEC3C can induce limited G-to-A mutation in HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Bourara

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary success of primate lentiviruses reflects their high capacity to mutate and adapt to new host species, immune responses within individual hosts, and, in recent years, antiviral drugs. APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F are host cell DNA-editing enzymes that induce extensive HIV-1 mutation that severely attenuates viral replication. The HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif, expressed in vivo, counteracts the antiviral activity of A3G and A3F by inducing their degradation. Other APOBECs may contribute more to viral diversity by inducing less extensive mutations allowing viral replication to persist. Here we show that in APOBEC3C (A3C-expressing cells infected with the patient-derived HIV-1 molecular clones 210WW, 210WM, 210MW, and 210MM, and the lab-adapted molecular clone LAI, viral G-to-A mutations were detected in the presence of Vif expression. Mutations occurred primarily in the GA context and were relatively infrequent, thereby allowing for spreading infection. The mutations were absent in cells lacking A3C but were induced after transient expression of A3C in the infected target cell. Inhibiting endogenous A3C by RNA interference in Magi cells prevented the viral mutations. Thus, A3C is necessary and sufficient for G-to-A mutations in some HIV-1 strains. A3C-induced mutations occur at levels that allow replication to persist and may therefore contribute to viral diversity. Developing drugs that inhibit A3C may be a novel strategy for delaying viral escape from immune or antiretroviral inhibition.

  4. Target Cell APOBEC3C Can Induce Limited G-to-A Mutation in HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourara, Khaoula; Liegler, Teri J; Grant, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary success of primate lentiviruses reflects their high capacity to mutate and adapt to new host species, immune responses within individual hosts, and, in recent years, antiviral drugs. APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) are host cell DNA-editing enzymes that induce extensive HIV-1 mutation that severely attenuates viral replication. The HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), expressed in vivo, counteracts the antiviral activity of A3G and A3F by inducing their degradation. Other APOBECs may contribute more to viral diversity by inducing less extensive mutations allowing viral replication to persist. Here we show that in APOBEC3C (A3C)-expressing cells infected with the patient-derived HIV-1 molecular clones 210WW, 210WM, 210MW, and 210MM, and the lab-adapted molecular clone LAI, viral G-to-A mutations were detected in the presence of Vif expression. Mutations occurred primarily in the GA context and were relatively infrequent, thereby allowing for spreading infection. The mutations were absent in cells lacking A3C but were induced after transient expression of A3C in the infected target cell. Inhibiting endogenous A3C by RNA interference in Magi cells prevented the viral mutations. Thus, A3C is necessary and sufficient for G-to-A mutations in some HIV-1 strains. A3C-induced mutations occur at levels that allow replication to persist and may therefore contribute to viral diversity. Developing drugs that inhibit A3C may be a novel strategy for delaying viral escape from immune or antiretroviral inhibition. PMID:17967058

  5. Heavy ion induced mutations in mammalian cells: Cross sections and molecular analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, U.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Our investigations of heavy ion-induced mutations in mammalian cells, which had been begun a few years ago, were systematically continued. For the first time, it was possible to cover a large LET range with a few kinds of ions. To do this, both UNILAC and SIS were used to yield comparable data for a large energy range. This is a necessary condition for a comprehensive description of the influence of such ion parameters as energy and LET. In these experiments, the induced resistance against the poison 6-thioguanin (6-TG), which is linked to the HPRT locus on the genome, is being used as mutation system. In addition to the mutation-induction cross-section measurements, the molecular changes of the DNA are being investigated by means of Multiplex PCR ('Polymerase Chain Reaction') gene amplification. From these experiments we expect further elucidation of the mutation-inducing mechanisms composing the biological action of heavy-ion radiation.

  6. Development of improved rice varieties through the use of induced mutations in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning in 1972, the use of induced mutations for rice improvement was initiated in Malaysia. The initiative became more significant when, in 1979, UKM and MARDI undertook a major and concerted effort to screen for blast resistance in Mahsuri, a popular variety at the time, which had succumbed to the disease. Mutation breeding has used both EMS and gamma irradiation, which comes from a 60Co source at UKM and MINT facilities, and this approach, has now become part and parcel of the overall national rice breeding and selection programmes. Mutation breeding was aimed at developing inter alia disease resistance, insect resistance, photoperiod insensitivity, short stature, reduced maturity, improved plant type and good grain and eating qualities, and involved many rice genetic resources, ranging from traditional varieties to advanced breeding lines as well as commercial improved varieties. Amongst released varieties e.g. Mahsuri, Muda, Manik, MR 211 and MR 219, mutation breeding had been attempted directly on them for single trait improvements. Generally, induced mutations have yielded mutants which are either used directly or have some interesting and desirable traits for use in further cross breeding. Such mutants include Mahsuri Mutant, Muda 2, PS 1297 and Manik 817, MA03, SPM 29 and SPM 39, Q 34, MRQ 50, SPM 129, SPM 130 and SPM 142. The objectives of this paper are to describe some of these rice mutants which have been developed through mutation breeding until the present time, and also to highlight some of the current activities involving induced mutations. (author)

  7. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF RADIATION-INDUCED MUTATION IN EXON 7/8 OF RAT HPRT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓庆; 黄定九; 黄钢; 王利民

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the radiation dose and the HPRT gene locus mutation in rat smooth muscle cells, and provide the molecular basis for prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA).MethodsThe smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re in different doses. HPRT gene mutation colonies were selected and isolated by 6 thioguanine. Analysis of mutation in exon 7/8 of HPRT gene were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism.ResultsThe HPRT gene mutation frequency of rat smooth muscle cells that were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re ranged from 5.5×10-6 to 13×10-6. Of 91 HPRT gene mutation colonies, 13(14.3%) contained exon 7/8 deletion and 15(16.5%) had point mutation. The exon 7/8 mutation frequency was 30.8%. There were significant relationships between radiation dose and mutation frequency of HPRT gene and exon 7/8.ConclusionThe DNA damage and gene mutation induced by radiation has positive relationship with radiation dose, and is a basis of proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of smooth muscle cells.

  8. Mutator suppression and escape from replication error-induced extinction in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Herr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells rely on a network of conserved pathways to govern DNA replication fidelity. Loss of polymerase proofreading or mismatch repair elevates spontaneous mutation and facilitates cellular adaptation. However, double mutants are inviable, suggesting that extreme mutation rates exceed an error threshold. Here we combine alleles that affect DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ proofreading and mismatch repair to define the maximal error rate in haploid yeast and to characterize genetic suppressors of mutator phenotypes. We show that populations tolerate mutation rates 1,000-fold above wild-type levels but collapse when the rate exceeds 10⁻³ inactivating mutations per gene per cell division. Variants that escape this error-induced extinction (eex rapidly emerge from mutator clones. One-third of the escape mutants result from second-site changes in Pol δ that suppress the proofreading-deficient phenotype, while two-thirds are extragenic. The structural locations of the Pol δ changes suggest multiple antimutator mechanisms. Our studies reveal the transient nature of eukaryotic mutators and show that mutator phenotypes are readily suppressed by genetic adaptation. This has implications for the role of mutator phenotypes in cancer.

  9. Characterization of ultraviolet light-induced ouabain-resistant mutations in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouabain-resistant mutations in Chinese hamster cells have been quantitatively characterized. The mutation frequencies were found to be induced curvilinearly with treatments of increasing doses of ultraviolet light (UV). For the range of UV doses tested (5-20 J/m2), the observed mutation frequency, Y, as a function of UV dose X, follows a curvilinear function, Y=(-28+13.37X - 1.52X2+0.08 X3).10-6. The frequencies of UV-induced mutations were directly correlated with cell survival, indicating a similar causal relationship between cell killing and mutation induction. Under the same experimental conditions, X-rays induced 6-thioguanine-, but not ouabain-, resistant mutations, UV-induced ouabain-resistant (ouasup(r)) mutants exhibit a selection disadvantage. Their phenotypic expressions are modifiable by various agents. Wild type and 16 ouasup(r) mutants were compared with respect to their sensitivity to ouabain inhibition of 86Rb uptake by whole cells. All the ouasup(r) mutants assayed are less sensitive to the drug than are wild-type cells. In the absence of ouabain, the Na+-K+-ATPase activities can be significantly higher or lower than that of the wild-type cells. (Auth.)

  10. Somatic mutations in leafs of tobacco seedlings induced by ionizing radiation and pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatic mutations induced by the combined treatment of pesticide and ionizing radiation were analyzed in the leaves of tobacco seedlings. The pesticide (1,5 and 10 ppm of parathion) was sprayed directly onto the seedlings. The seedlings, with or without pretreatment of pesticide, were irradiated with 0.1 ∼10 Gy of gamma ray. The difference in the somatic mutation frequencies were not significant among groups treated with different concentration of pesticide. The somatic mutations in tobacco seedlings irradiated with gamma-ray showed a clear dose-response relationship in a range of 0.1 to 10 Gy. However, the combined treatment of pesticide and radiation did not cause any synergistic enhancement in the mutation frequencies. The highest efficiency in the induction of somatic mutations could be obtained by irradiating the seedlings with 5 Gy, 12 hours after 1 ppm of pesticide treatment, or 24 hours after 5 ppm of pesticide treatment

  11. Characterization of beta-thalassemia mutations in patients from the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zama Messala Luna da Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 35 unrelated individuals were studied for characterization as either heterozygous or homozygous for beta-thalassemia. Molecular analysis was done by PCR/RFLP to detect the mutations most commonly associated with beta-thalassemia (β0IVS-I-1, β+IVS-I-6, and β039. In the patients who showed none of these mutations, the beta-globin genes were sequenced. Of the 31 heterozygous patients, 13 (41.9% had the β+IVS-I-6 mutation, 15 (48.4% the β0IVS-I-1 mutation, 2 (6.5% the β+IVS-I-110 mutation and 1 (3.2% the β+IVS-I-5 mutation. IVS-I-6 was detected in the four homozygotes. The mutation in codon 39, often found in previous studies in Brazil, was not detected in the present case. This is the first study aiming at identifying mutations that determine beta-thalassemia in the state of Rio Grande do Norte.

  12. Beta-Globin Gene Regulation and Nuclear Organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Kooren (Jurgen)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAll genetic information required for the development and functioning of an organism is stored in billions of base pairs of deoxyribonucleic acid (or DNA). In eukaryotes, DNA is organised in large units called chromosomes that are located inside the cells nucleus. On these chromosomes res

  13. Induced mutations for resistance to powdery mildew in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most serious diseases of wheat in the Yangtze River Valley in China are powdery mildew and scab. Breeding for disease resistance either using conventional methods or through mutation breeding is the best way of controlling these diseases. Mutation breeding may be valuable in obtaining genotypes with resistance or tolerance, or for breaking undesirable linkages involving existing genes for disease resistance. The following commercial varieties were used: Yangmai 3, Ningmai 3 and Ningmai 6. They are high-yielding varieties, but susceptible to powdery mildew. Seeds of these cultivars were treated with gamma-rays. The material was screened in the seedling stage in M2 in the greenhouse and under field conditions in M3-M4 and later generations. The seedlings were inoculated with a spore suspension of the powdery mildew fungus. The most resistant mutant selected from variety Ningmai 3 was the line 34080 with resistance to races 4, 16 and 20. According to the number of progenies in M2, the mutation frequency was 1.2x10-4. The other two mutants (34157, 34158) were screened from variety Yangmai 3. Mutant 34157 showed a stable resistance to races 4, 16 and 20; mutant 34158 was resistant to races 4 and 20 but susceptible to race 16. Tracing them back to M2 progeny, the mutation frequency was 1.0x10-4. From electrophoretic analysis of mildew resistant mutant lines of wheat we found that the zymogram of peroxidase in resistant lines 34080 and 34157 was different from their parents and that these lines do not have band 3A

  14. Space environment induced mutations prefer to occur at polymorphic sites of rice genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Liu, M.; Cheng, Z.; Sun, Y.

    To explore the genomic characteristics of rice mutants induced by space environment, space-induced mutants 971-5, 972-4, and R955, which acquired new traits after space flight such as increased yield, reduced resistance to rice blast, and semi-dwarfism compared with their on-ground controls, 971ck, 972ck, and Bing95-503, respectively, together with other 8 japonica and 3 indica rice varieties, 17 in total, were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. We chose 16 AFLP primer-pairs which generated a total of 1251 sites, of which 745 (59.6%) were polymorphic over all the genotypes. With the 16 pairs of primer combinations, 54 space-induced mutation sites were observed in 971-5, 86 in 972-4, and 5 in R955 compared to their controls, and the mutation rates were 4.3%, 6.9% and 0.4%, respectively. Interestingly, 75.9%, 84.9% and 100% of the mutation sites identified in 971-5, 972-4, and R955 occurred in polymorphic sites. This result suggests that the space environment preferentially induced mutations at polymorphic sites in rice genomes and might share a common mechanism with other types of mutagens. It also implies that polymorphic sites in genomes are potential "hotspots" for mutations induced by the space environment.

  15. Modification of radiation-induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation frequency by tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study evaluates the effect of supplementing culture medium with α-tocopherol acetate on the yield of sex-linked recessive lethal mutants induced by X-irradiation in mature sperm of Drosophila. Although tocopherol treatment of males had no impact on the yield of mutations, a drastic reduction in mutation frequency was observed when irradiated males were mated to females raised and subsequently maintained on tocopherol-enriched diet. (orig./MG)

  16. Recovery of induced mutations for X chromosome-linked muscular dystrophy in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, V M; Miller, D R; Armstrong, D; Caskey, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    We have used elevated levels of plasma creatine phosphokinase activity to identify muscular dystrophy phenotypes in mice and to screen the progeny of chemical mutagen-treated male mice for X chromosome-linked muscular dystrophy mutations. We were not successful in identifying heterozygous carriers of these induced muscular dystrophy mutations in greater than 8000 progeny. However, we were highly successful in identifying three additional alleles of the characterized mdx locus. These alleles o...

  17. Factors affecting mutational specificity induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to analyze the factors affecting the specificity of mutational change as induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. We want to understand not only the rules that affect base substitution, but also the mechanism(s) by which additions and deletions are produced, since detections are a common consequence of radiation. We wish to carry out this analysis in an in vitro mutation system that permits us to analyze the role of base sequence, of polymerase and of mutagenic agent. Our system is designed to screen out most direct breaks as a cause of mutation and should indicate the changes resulting from base damage to the DNA

  18. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami; Kaneda, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Saiki, Yuriko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Gondo, Yoichi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Noda, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1-4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14-17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. PMID:27131742

  19. Study on toxicity mutation of crownvetch induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suckers of Germany crownvetch were irradiated by 60Co gamma-ray and fast neutron. The toxicity mutation frequency and genetic stability of crownvetch were studied. The various toxicity mutants were found in M1. Most of the toxicity mutants was unstable in M2. Stable mutant was very few (about 2.0-12.9%). Beta-nitropropionic acid in the low toxicity mutants selected was 31.7-39.8 mg/g, genetic characteristics of low toxicity mutants were stable in M3-M5

  20. Inducing mutations in the mouse genome with the chemical mutagen ethylnitrosourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.G. Massironi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available When compared to other model organisms whose genome is sequenced, the number of mutations identified in the mouse appears extremely reduced and this situation seriously hampers our understanding of mammalian gene function(s. Another important consequence of this shortage is that a majority of human genetic diseases still await an animal model. To improve the situation, two strategies are currently used: the first makes use of embryonic stem cells, in which one can induce knockout mutations almost at will; the second consists of a genome-wide random chemical mutagenesis, followed by screening for mutant phenotypes and subsequent identification of the genetic alteration(s. Several projects are now in progress making use of one or the other of these strategies. Here, we report an original effort where we mutagenized BALB/c males, with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea. Offspring of these males were screened for dominant mutations and a three-generation breeding protocol was set to recover recessive mutations. Eleven mutations were identified (one dominant and ten recessives. Three of these mutations are new alleles (Otop1mlh, Foxn1sepe and probably rodador at loci where mutations have already been reported, while 4 are new and original alleles (carc, eqlb, frqz, and Sacc. This result indicates that the mouse genome, as expected, is far from being saturated with mutations. More mutations would certainly be discovered using more sophisticated phenotyping protocols. Seven of the 11 new mutant alleles induced in our experiment have been localized on the genetic map as a first step towards positional cloning.

  1. Characteristics and inheritance of space flight induced mutations in rice genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenlong; Feng, Jie; Kong, Fanding; Wang, Chunli; Zhang, Meng; Jinming Shi, Mrs; Guan, Shuanghong; Sun, Yeqing

    In order to determine the mutagenic effects of space flight and the properties of space induced mutations, the seeds of 5 japonica rice varieties, Zhenzhuhong, Lianjing-2, Yuguang, Beijinghong and Lianjing-1, were carried on-board by Shenzhou-6 spaceship for 5-day-flight. In M1 generation, 20-30 individuals were selected at random from each variety for determination of genomic changes with AFLP method. Sixteen pairs of selective amplification primers were used and 1061, 933, 1054, 749, and 673 loci were detected in each variety. Mutation rates were 3.4% 10.1%, 3.3% 8.5%, 4.0% 10.1%, 0.93% 6.54% and 1.19% 4.46%. Three individuals with significant phenotypic changes which in significant differences in height, tillering, length of spike, seeds per spike and per individual, the mutation rates were 13.7%, 12.1% and 13.1% respectively,. These results suggested that space flight induced mutations in rice genomes and the phenotypic mutants showed higher genomic mutation rates. Nineteen mutant loci were amplified for sequence analysis. BlastN program performance showed that 10 (52.6%) were matched with sequences in GenBank, 5 single copies and 5 multi-copies in rice genome. Among 5 single copy sequences, 2 were located at exons, 2 at introns. One was combined with exon and intron sequences. Three multi-copy sequences were related to transposons or retroposon, one of which was combination of two fragments in different chromosomes, indicating that chromosome recombination may be involved in spaceflight induced mutation. Inheritance of one mutation at transposon related region and another mutation at non-coding region was checked in M1, 2 and 3 generations. Results showed that mutation loci can be inherited to some but all progenies. Interestingly, mutations were detected in M3 individuals, whose M2 parents were with no mutation at corresponding loci, suggesting that space flight may induce genomic instability on rice seeds (Supported by National Natural Science Foundation No

  2. Most ultraviolet irradiation induced mutations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are chromosomal rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, H.I.; Rosenbluth, R.E.; Baillie, D.L. (Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada). Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology)

    1991-07-01

    In this study the utility of 254-nm ultraviolet light (UV) as a magnetic tool in C.elegans is determined. It is demonstrated that irradiation of adult hermaphrodites provides a simple method for the induction of heritable chromosomal rearrangements. A screening protocol was employed that identifies either recessive lethal mutations in the 40 map unit region balanced by the translocation eT1(III;V), or unc-36(III) duplications. Mutations were recovered in 3% of the chromosomes screened after a dose of 120 J/m{sup 2}. This rate resembles that for 1500 R {gamma}-ray-induced mutations selected in a similar manner. The mutations were classified either as lethals (mapping to Linkage Group (LG)III or LGV) or as putative unc-36 duplications. In contrast to the majority of UV-induced mutations analysed in micro-organisms, a large fraction of the C.elegans UV-induced mutations were found to be not simple intragenic lesions, but deficiencies for more than one adjacent gene or more complex events. Preliminary evidence for this conclusion came from the high frequency of mutations that had a dominant effect causing reduced numbers of adult progeny. Subsequently 6 out of 9 analysed LGV mutations were found to be deficiencies. Other specific rearrangements also identified were: one translocation, sT5(II;III), and two unc-36 duplications, sDp8 and sDp9. It was concluded that UV irradiation can easily be used as an additional tool for the analysis of C.elegans chromosomes, and that C.elegans should prove to be a useful organism in which to study the mechanisms whereby UV acts as a mutagen in cells of complex eukaryotes. (author). 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs.

  3. Spectrum of Glycidyl Methacrylate—induced Mutation in Plasmid—Escherichia coli System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOHui-Lan; ZuoJin; 等

    1994-01-01

    In order to characterize the spectrum of mutation induced by glycidyl methacrylate(GMA),the plasmid pBR322 was modified with this mutagen in vitro.transfected into appropriate Escherichia coli host HB101.The mutants were then screned and defined by DNA sequencing.Sequence analysis reveals that GMA induces two classes of mutations:deletion of the mono-,di-or tetra-base or the insertion of mono-or di-base.Both types of muations,with about 10% frequency,occur predominantly at C.G runs and at 5'-CNCCN-3' sequence,which are hotspots for GMA damage and may cause frameshift muation.

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of regions of the murine genome associated with radiation-induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are exploiting the large array of radiation-induced mutations to develop both detailed molecular and functional maps of selected small model regions (as opposed to specific genes) within the mouse genome. Through the integrated use of recombinant DNA technology and classical genetic and cytogenetic analysis, they hope to relate the structure and function of these regions to the study of both normal and abnormal mammalian development. Over the years, the germ-line mutagenesis program has generated a valuable array of induced mutations at several specific loci scattered throughout the murine genome. Many of these mutations are multilocus deletions of chromosomal DNA. Genetic analysis of these types of lesions has detected passenger mutations of wide-ranging effect and severity, and has generated gross functional maps of entire chromosomal regions. They have initiated a program to expand the molecular analysis of these types of deletion mutations. This program exploits the deletion mutations and other chromosomal rearrangements to obtain molecular clones of wild-type DNA that map to regions absent in mutants carrying the deletions. These clones will then be used to correlate the resultant molecular/physical map of the chromosomal region with the genetic/functional map in both mutant and wild-type individuals. Such correlations are essential to a strategy for identifying as many of the genes as possible in a particular region of the genome and for ascertaining their role(s) in the normal development of the mouse

  5. Break-Induced Replication Is a Source of Mutation Clusters Underlying Kataegis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J. Sakofsky

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of simultaneous multiple mutations can be a source of rapid change during carcinogenesis and evolution. Such mutation clusters have been recently shown to originate from DNA damage within long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA formed at resected double-strand breaks and dysfunctional replication forks. Here, we identify double-strand break (DSB-induced replication (BIR as another powerful source of mutation clusters that formed in nearly half of wild-type yeast cells undergoing BIR in the presence of alkylating damage. Clustered mutations were primarily formed along the track of DNA synthesis and were frequently associated with additional breakage and rearrangements. Moreover, the base specificity, strand coordination, and strand bias of the mutation spectrum were consistent with mutations arising from damage in persistent ssDNA stretches within unconventional replication intermediates. Altogether, these features closely resemble kataegic events in cancers, suggesting that replication intermediates during BIR may be the most prominent source of mutation clusters across species.

  6. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  7. Obtaining induced mutations of drought tolerance in sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since sorghum plant (Sorghum bicolor L.) has a big potential to be cultivated in Indonesia especially in drought-prone areas, improvement of sorghum had been carried out through mutation breeding methods. The seeds of the sorghum plant was irradiated by gamma rays emitted from cobalt-60 source. The total dose was 0.4 kGy. Through selection process in the M2 generation, a number of promising mutant lines of sorghum have been obtained and registered in the M3 generation. In the M4, a number of 100 mutant lines were tested against drought in Gunung Kidul District during the dry season in 2000. Results of the test showed that mutant line DU/20/Psj/1, DU/20/Psj/4, DU/20/Psj/24, JA/30/Cty/21, ET/40/Psj/4 and DU/20/Psj/10 had relatively high grain yield compared to the control variety. (author)

  8. Improvement of quinoa and barley through induced mutations and biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main cropping problems in the Bolivian highlands are the long growing period of barley, high degree of environmental influence on the performance of quinoa, and low soil moisture at sowing time, leading to low germination rate and poor stands, and frost or chilling damages. The program aimed to establish protocols for induction of mutations with X rays and chemical mutagens (NaN3, MNH, EMS) in quinoa, barley, native forage species and forest plants and to obtain mutant lines, especially in barley and quinoa; and to establish callus regeneration in quinoa and micropropagation of kenua (Polilepis). The project is still in its study stages, hence further evaluations are needed before firm conclusions are drawn. (author)

  9. Induced mutations in Iraqi bread wheat cv. Saber Beg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Saber Beg'', is a local wheat cultivar important in the semi-arid zone of Iraq where the rainfall is less than 450 mm per year. This cultivar has a good baking quality, but is of low productivity, high susceptibility to common bunt (Tilletia spp.) and to leaf rust (Puccinia recondita Rob. ex Desm.), but only in the rainy season. A mutation breeding programme using gamma irradiation has been started in 1978 to improve this cultivar. Seeds of all main tillers from M1 plants were harvested and artificially inoculated with teliospores of Tilletia spp. All the seeds from healthy M2 plants were inoculated again and sown in the same area. Out of 22920 M3 plants, 244 resistant ones were selected. During subsequent screening for 4 generations, however, only 3 mutants were confirmed

  10. Induced mutation-facilitated genetic studies of seed phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the chemical composition and total amount of seed phosphorus (P) are important to the end-use quality of cereal and legume seed crops, whether for use in human foods or animal feeds. They are also important to the management of P in agricultural production, and to the long-term sustainability of that production. About 75% (±10%) of seed total P is found as phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate). Mutations that block the synthesis or accumulation of phytic acid during seed development, often referred to as low phytic acid (lpa) mutations, have been isolated in maize (Zea mays L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. (Merr.). Chromosomal mapping has identified as many as six non-allelic lpa loci in a single species (barley). Studies of lpa mutants has enhanced knowledge of the genes and proteins important to phytic acid P metabolism. While there has been substantial research into the biology of P uptake by plants, there has been little progress in the genetics of seed total P. Genetics that either decreases or increases seed total P might be of value for both enhancing the end-use quality of seed crops and for optimizing the utilization of P during agricultural production. As proof-of-principle, homozygosity for recessive alleles of barley lpa1 both blocks seed phytic acid accumulation by 50% and reduces seed total P by 15%, while having little impact on yield. The current status of lpa genetics and current efforts at isolating 'seed-total P' mutants, using both forward and reverse genetics approaches, will be described. (author)

  11. Induced Mutation-Facilitated Genetic Studies of Seed Phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the chemical composition and total amount of seed phosphorus (P) are important to the end-use quality of cereal and legume seed crops, whether for use in human foods or animal feeds. They are also important to the management of P in agricultural production, and to the long-term sustainability of that production. About 75% (±10%) of seed total P is found as phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate). Mutations that block the synthesis or accumulation of phytic acid during seed development, often referred to as low phytic acid (lpa) mutations, have been isolated in maize (Zea mays L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. (Merr.). Chromosomal mapping has identified as many as six non-allelic lpa loci in a single species (barley). Studies of lpa mutants has enhanced knowledge of the genes and proteins important to phytic acid P metabolism. While there has been substantial research into the biology of P uptake by plants, there has been little progress in the genetics of seed total P. Genetic factors that either decrease or increase seed total P might be of value for both enhancing the end-use quality of seed crops and for optimizing the utilization of P during agricultural production. As proof-of-principle, homozygosity for recessive alleles of barley lpa 1 both blocks seed phytic acid accumulation by 50% and reduces seed total P by 15%, while having little impact on yield. The current status of lpa genetics and current efforts at isolating 'seed-total P' mutants, using both forward and reverse genetics approaches, will be described. (author)

  12. Use of gamma radiation in floriculture industry for development of new varieties through induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear radiation (gamma rays) can create changes in genetic make up of plant material through mutation. Gamma ray induced mutation is now an established method for crop improvement. It is well known that the crops which are propagated vegetatively are very suitable for the application of mutation breeding methods. In floriculture industry there is always demand and necessity of new and novel ornamental varieties. Flower colour and shape are the most important components of novelties. Gamma rays have been most successfully use to produce quite a large number of new promising,varieties in different ornamental (Bougainvillea - 4, Perennial portulaca-6, Chrysanthemum-43, Hibiscus-1, Rose-16, Tuberose-2, Lantana depressa-3 etc.) plants by bringing about genetic changes at Floriculture Section, National Botanical Research. Institute, Lucknow, India. Research carried out covers radiosensitivity, selection of materials, methods of exposure to gamma rays, suitable dose of gamma rays, detection of mutants, isolation of mutants and commercial exploitation of mutants. A good number of mutant varieties have been well accepted in the floriculture industry. The mutant varieties are with new flower colour and shape. More than three decades of applied mutation breeding work has now established beyond doubt that mutation breeding will constitute an excellent supplement to the conventional methods for development of new varieties . Detection of somatic, mutations in flower colour/shape in different vegetative generations (M1V1, M1V2, M1V3 and even in later vegetative generations), mutation frequency and spectrum relationship with dose of gamma radiation have been precisely determined. Studies have clearly proved that mutation breeding technique can be exploited for the creation of new and novel ornamental cultivars of commercial importance by inducing genetic variation in already adapted, modern genotypes and can also enrich the germplasm of ornamental horticulture. (Author)

  13. A Novel SCN5A Mutation Associated with Drug Induced Brugada Type ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Isik; Makiyama, Takeru; Vatta, Matteo; Itoh, Hideki; Ueyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Class IC antiarrhythmic agents may induce acquired forms of Brugada Syndrome. We have identified a novel mutation in SCN5A, the gene that encodes the α-subunit of the human cardiac sodium channel (hNav1.5), in a patient who exhibited Brugada- type ECG changes during pharmacotherapy of atrial arrhythmias. Objective To assess whether the novel mutation p.V1328M can cause drug induced Brugada Syndrome. Methods Administration of pilsicainide, a class IC antiarrhythmic agent, caused Brugada- type ST elevation in a 66-year-old Japanese male who presented with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), type I atrial flutter and inducible ventricular fibrillation (VF) during electrophysiological study. Genetic screening using direct sequencing identified a novel SCN5A variant, p.V1328M. Electrophysiological parameters of WT and p.V1328M and their effects on drug pharmacokinetics were studied using the patch-clamp method. Results Whole-cell sodium current densities were similar for WT and p.V1328M channels. While p.V1328M mutation did not affect the voltage-dependence of the activation kinetics, it caused a positive shift of voltage-dependent steady-state inactivation by 7 mV. The tonic block in the presence of pilsicainide was similar in WT and p.V1328M, when sodium currents were induced by a low frequency pulse protocol (q15s). On the contrary, p.V1328M mutation enhanced pilsicainide induced use-dependent block at 2 Hz. (Ki: WT, 35.8 μM; V1328M, 19.3 μM). Conclusion Our study suggests that a subclinical SCN5A mutation, p.V1328M, might predispose individuals harboring it to drug-induced Brugada Syndrome. PMID:27560382

  14. International symposium on induced mutations in plants (ISIM). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year 2008 will mark the 80th anniversary of mutation induction in crop plants. The application of mutation techniques, i.e. gamma rays and other physical and chemical mutagens, has generated a vast amount of genetic variability and has played a significant role in plant breeding and genetic studies. The widespread use of induced mutants in plant breeding programmes throughout the world has led to the official release of more than 2600 mutant crop varieties. A large number of these varieties (including cereals, pulses, oil, root and tuber crops, and ornamentals) have been released in developing countries, resulting in enormous positive economic impacts. The International Symposium on Induced Mutations in Plants (ISIM) will be the eighth in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme's Symposium series dedicated exclusively to harnessing and disseminating information on current trends in induced mutagenesis in plants, the first of which was held in 1969 and the last in 1995. These previous symposia dealt with themes relating to the development of efficient protocols for induced mutagenesis and their role in the enhancement of quality traits, as well as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses in crops and the integration of in vitro and molecular genetic techniques in mutation induction. Since 1995, there has been an increased interest within the scientific community, not only in the use of induced mutations for developing improved crop varieties and for the discovery of genes controlling important traits and in the understanding the functions and mechanisms of actions of these genes, but also in deciphering the biological nature of DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis. A symposium that brings together the key players in basic research, as well as in the development and application of technologies relating to the efficient use of induced mutations for crop improvement and empirical genetic studies, is therefore justified and necessary. Topics addressed at the symposium

  15. Ionizing radiation-induced mutation of human cells with different DNA repair capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundson, S.A.; Chen, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    We have observed significant differences in the response to ionizing radiation of two closely related human cell lines, and now compare the effects on these lines of both low and intermediate LET radiation. Compared to TK6, WTK1 has an enhanced X-ray survival, and is also more resistant to cell killing by {alpha}-particles. The hprt locus is more mutable in WTK1 than in TK6 by both X-rays and {alpha}-particles. WTK1 is also more mutable by {alpha}-particles than by X-rays at the hprt locus. X-ray-induced mutation at the heterozygous tk locus in WTK1 is about 25 fold higher than in TK6, while {alpha}-particle-induced mutation is nearly 50 fold higher at this locus. Also, the slowly growing tk- mutants, which comprise the majority of spontaneous and X-ray-induced tk- mutants of TK6, were not induced significantly by {alpha}-particles. Previously, we showed that TK6 has a reduced capacity for recombination compared with WTK1, and therefore, these results indicate that recombinational repair may contribute to both cell survival and mutation-induction following exposure to ionizing radiation. Such a mechanism may aid cell survival, but could also result in increased deleterious effects such as the unmasking of recessive mutations in cancer suppresser genes.

  16. Mutator activity induced by microRNA-155 (miR-155) links inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tili, Esmerina; Michaille, Jean-Jacques; Wernicke, Dorothee; Alder, Hansjuerg; Costinean, Stefan; Volinia, Stefano; Croce, Carlo M

    2011-03-22

    Infection-driven inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ~15-20% of human tumors. Expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155) is elevated during innate immune response and autoimmune disorders as well as in various malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms providing miR-155 with its oncogenic properties remain unclear. We examined the effects of miR-155 overexpression and proinflammatory environment on the frequency of spontaneous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) mutations that can be detected based on the resistance to 6-thioguanine. Both miR-155 overexpression and inflammatory environment increased the frequency of HPRT mutations and down-regulated WEE1 (WEE1 homolog-S. pombe), a kinase that blocks cell-cycle progression. The increased frequency of HPRT mutation was only modestly attributable to defects in mismatch repair machinery. This result suggests that miR-155 enhances the mutation rate by simultaneously targeting different genes that suppress mutations and decreasing the efficiency of DNA safeguard mechanisms by targeting of cell-cycle regulators such as WEE1. By simultaneously targeting tumor suppressor genes and inducing a mutator phenotype, miR-155 may allow the selection of gene alterations required for tumor development and progression. Hence, we anticipate that the development of drugs reducing endogenous miR-155 levels might be key in the treatment of inflammation-related cancers. PMID:21383199

  17. Dominant cataract mutations induced by γ-irradiation of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the knowledge of the phenotypic damage caused by mutational events occurring in the first generation the authors initiated an experiment to study the induction of radiation-induced hereditary cataracts. To determine the frequency of dominant mutations affecting the lens, the authors examine the offspring of irradiated and control (101xC3H)F1 hybrid male mice which had been mated to untreated females. The observation of the induction of specific-locus mutations served as a positive control of the effectiveness of the exposure. The males of the irradiated group were exposed at the age of 11 weeks to 455 R+455 R 137Cs γ-rays (55 R/min) with a 24-h fractionation interval. The eyes of the F1 offspring, as well as of the animals of the parental generation, were examined biomicroscopically. The F1 offspring were 3 weeks old at the time of examination. The frequency of specific-locus mutations (9 mutations in 5231 offspring) derived from irradiated spermatogonia was 2.7x10-7 mutations/locus/R in this experiment, which is in accord with data discussed elsewhere. (Auth.)

  18. Compensatory variances of drug-induced hepatitis B virus YMDD mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Wang, Ning; Wu, Xiaomei; Zheng, Kai; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Although the drug-induced mutations of HBV have been ever documented, the evolutionary mechanism is still obscure. To deeply reveal molecular characters of HBV evolution under the special condition, here we made a comprehensive investigation of the molecular variation of the 3432 wild-type sequences and 439 YMDD variants from HBV genotype A, B, C and D, and evaluated the co-variant patterns and the frequency distribution in the different YMDD mutation types and genotypes, by using the naïve Bayes classification algorithm and the complete induction method based on the comparative sequence analysis. The data showed different compensatory changes followed by the rtM204I/V. Although occurrence of the YMDD mutation itself was not related to the HBV genotypes, the subsequence co-variant patterns were related to the YMDD variant types and HBV genotypes. From the hierarchy view, we clarified that historical mutations, drug-induced mutation and compensatory variances, and displayed an inter-conditioned relationship of amino acid variances during multiple evolutionary processes. This study extends the understanding of the polymorphism and fitness of viral protein. PMID:27588233

  19. PROTS-RF: a robust model for predicting mutation-induced protein stability changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Li

    Full Text Available The ability to improve protein thermostability via protein engineering is of great scientific interest and also has significant practical value. In this report we present PROTS-RF, a robust model based on the Random Forest algorithm capable of predicting thermostability changes induced by not only single-, but also double- or multiple-point mutations. The model is built using 41 features including evolutionary information, secondary structure, solvent accessibility and a set of fragment-based features. It achieves accuracies of 0.799,0.782, 0.787, and areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of 0.873, 0.868 and 0.862 for single-, double- and multiple- point mutation datasets, respectively. Contrary to previous suggestions, our results clearly demonstrate that a robust predictive model trained for predicting single point mutation induced thermostability changes can be capable of predicting double and multiple point mutations. It also shows high levels of robustness in the tests using hypothetical reverse mutations. We demonstrate that testing datasets created based on physical principles can be highly useful for testing the robustness of predictive models.

  20. The improvement of cisantana rice variety through induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous improvement for rice through breeding is necessary to obtain new varieties with good quality and quantity. Cisantana variety hairy tips could be improved by mutation breeding. Seeds of Cisantana variety was irradiated by gamma rays (60Co) at doses of 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 kGy respectively at the Center for Application of Isotope and Radiation (CAIR) - Batan, Pasar Jumat, Jakarta. There after the irradiated seeds were planted as M1 plants at the CAIR’S experiment field in the dry season of 2000. Selection was carried out at the M2 generation and stressed on early maturity and bald spike. This was done at the experiment field at Pusakanegara - Subang in the Wet season of 2001/2002. From this population 19 mutants having early maturity and bald spike lets were selected. Purification in the next generation obtained 10 mutants which were homogeneous and without segregation. From these 10 mutants two mutant lines Obs-1688/PsJ and Obs-1692/PsJ were further tested. These two mutant lines showed good productivity and adaptability when tested at several locations. The resistance test for brown plant hopper and bacterial leaf blight disease showed that these two mutant lines are resistant to biotype 1 and 2, and medium resistant to biotype 3 of brown plant hopper, and also resistant to strain 3 and medium resistant to strain IV of bacterial leaf blight disease. These two mutant lines have good rice quality and were gelatinous. The Obs-1688/PsJ and Obs-1692/PsJ mutant lines were released as new rice varieties by the Minister of Agriculture and officially address as Mira-1 at 2006 and Bestari at 2008, respectively. (author)

  1. Induced mutations for disease resistance in wheat and field beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat disease in Egypt is reviewed and results of mutation breeding by γ irradiation for disease resistance in wheat and field beans are described. Wheat mutants of the variety Giza 155 resistant to leaf rust, Giza 156 resistant to both leaf and yellow rusts, and Tosson with a reasonable level of combined resistance to the three rusts in addition to mutants of the tetraploid variety Dakar 52 with a good level of stem and yellow rust resistance are required. Their seeds were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 krad. Of 3000-3700 M2 plants from each variety and dosage, 22 plants from both Giza 155 and Giza 156, although susceptible, showed a lower level of disease development. In 1975, M3 families of these selected plants and 6000 plants from bulked material were grown from each variety and dosage at two locations. Simultaneously, an additional population consisting of 3000 mutagen-treated seeds was grown to have a reasonable chance of detecting mutants; 2 heads from each plant were harvested. These will be grown next season (1976) to make a population of 25,000-30,000 M2 plants and screened to composite cultures of specific rusts. Vicia faba seeds of field bean varieties Giza 1, Giza 2 and Rebaya 40, equally susceptible to rust and chocolate spot, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 krad of 60Co gamma radiation and 800 M1 plants were grown in 1972 per variety and dose. Up to this later growing season (M3) no resistance was detected in M3 plank

  2. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  3. Cytosine arabinoside enhancement of gamma irradiation induced mutations in human T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of 6-thioguanine resistant (TGr) mutants induced in human G0 phase T-lymphocytes by 200 cGy of gamma irradiation is greatly enhanced by incubation with cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) after irradiation. The mutant frequency increased with increasing incubation time in ara-C for up to 2 hr. This mutation induction required a phenotypic expression time of 5-8 days mass culture growth, similar to that found with mutants induced by 300 cGy of irradiation alone. Southern blot analysis of 40 isolated mutant clones revealed 8 independent mutations by T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Four of these eight showed hprt gene structural alterations (0.50). An alternative method to allow phenotypic expression was developed to minimize the isolation of hprt/TCR sibling mutants. The use of in situ expression in the microtiter dish wells resulted in the isolation of 17 independent mutations in 19 mutant clones. Ten of these 17 mutations showed hprt structural alterations (0.59). The high fraction of mutations involving structural alterations detected by Southern blot analysis is consistent with the known induction of chromosome aberrations by irradiation plus ara-C treatment. We propose that both the increase in Mf and the increase in the incidence of hprt gene structural alterations are due to the accumulation of strand breaks in repairing regions of DNA under these conditions of ara-C induced inhibition of repair. We further propose that upon release of the ara-C inhibition, these repairing regions can interact to yield both gene mutations and chromosome aberrations

  4. Chromosomal mutations induced by triplex-forming oligonucleotides in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Vasquez, K M; Wang, G; Havre, P A; Glazer, P M

    1999-01-01

    Specific recognition of a region of duplex DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provides an attractive strategy for genetic manipulation. Based on this, we have investigated the ability of the triplex-directed approach to induce mutations at a chromosomal locus in living cells. A mouse fibroblast cell line was constructed containing multiple chromosomal copies of the lambdasupFG1 vector carrying the supFG1 mutation-reporter gene. Cells were treated with specific (psoAG30) or control...

  5. Studies on physically and chemically induced soybean mutations of high protein and oil content and their genetic pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983, two different varieties were treated with five doses of fast neutrons and two concentrations of ethyl methane-sulphonate (EMS) in order to study the effects of different mutagens on the production of mutations with high protein and oil content. The experiment seems to show that EMS had a better effect in inducing such mutations. It showed not only a large variation in extent, but also a higher frequency of mutations. Fast neutrons could also induce mutations with high protein and oil content, but the rate was lower than for EMS. For high protein and oil content mutations induced by fast neutrons, the correlation between the M2 and M3 generations was unstable; it is difficult to forecast the protein and oil content of subsequent generations from seeds of the M2 generation. The high protein and oil content mutations induced by EMS showed a high hereditary value in the M2 and M3 lines. The values of such parameters as hereditary variation, the hereditary variance coefficient, the hereditary capacity and the genetic advance of high protein content mutations were higher than those for high oil content mutations. Thus, it seems easier to induce mutations with high protein rather than high oil content. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt B Kaufer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and telomerase RNA (TR represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5 by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1 that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2 that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates

  7. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, Gary M. [Dermatology Research Laboratories, Division of Medicine, Melanoma and Skin Cancer Research Institute, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital at the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: garyh@med.usyd.edu.au

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  8. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Gary M

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  9. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans

  10. Evolution of improved varieties of sesame through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the seed as compared to black seeded ones. Combined analysis of variances for seed yield over locations revealed significant differences in the performance of the mutants over their source material. Mutants SM5 and SM7 proved superior in respect to seed and oil yield and other agronomic characters. The mutants were given on farm trials at various locations with two management practices, viz., research management with higher inputs and farmers' management practices with low or no inputs. In both management practices the mutants produced significantly higher yield compared to the source. Significant differences were found in seed yield in mutants/check (G), locations (L), management practices (M) and interaction between (GxL) while the interaction between management and location (MxL) was insignificant. Mutants SM5 and SM7 would be submitted to National Seed Board for registration as commercial high yielding mutant varieties. Some of the promising mutants will be utilized in cross-breeding programmes. The present report discusses the effect of mutagen on sesame genotypes, results obtained in different mutant generation and overall mutation breeding studies carried out throughout the project period starting from 1993 to 1997. (author)

  11. New Codanin-1 Gene Mutations in a Italian Patient with Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type I and Heterozygous Beta-Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alcamo, Elena; Agrigento, V; Pitrolo, L; Sclafani, S; Barone, R; Calvaruso, G; Buffa, V; Maggio, A

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with macrocytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, iron overloading and characterized by abnormal chromatin ultrastructure in erythroblasts such as internuclear chromatin bridges, spongy heterochromatin and invagination of the nuclear membrane. A 58-year-old Causasian man with chronic hemolytic anemia, heterozygous for β (+) -globin IVS1, nt110 G>A mutation (causing abnormal alpha:beta globin chain ratio) showed clinical, laboratory and hematological features suggesting diagnosis of CDA1. Sequence analysis of CDA-related genes revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel mutations in the CDAN1 gene: a frameshift mutation 3367 del 4 (TTAG) in exon 25 and a missense mutation c.1811 G>T in exon 11 causing an aminoacid change from glycine to valine at codon 565 (G565V). One of the propositus' brothers showed the same gene mutations. As the CDA1 can mimic thalassemia, a frequent misdiagnosis is possible especially in countries where the prevalence of thalassemia is high. A strong clinical suspicion in patients who do not reveal a clear genetic basis for presumed thalassemia may help clinch the correct diagnosis. PMID:27408412

  12. Gene Mutation as Biomarker of Radiation Induced Cell Injury and Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Syaifudin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling and its mutation has become one of the most widely used approaches to identify genes and their functions in the context of identify and categorize genes to be used as radiation effect markers including cell and tissue sensitivities. Ionizing radiation produces genetic damage and changes in gene expression that may lead to cancer due to specific protein that controlling cell proliferation altered the function, its expression or both. P53 protein encoded by p53 gene plays an important role in protecting cell by inducing growth arrest and or cell suicide (apoptosis after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA damage induced by mutagen such as ionizing radiation. The mutant and thereby dysfunctional of this gene was found in more than 50% of various human cancers, but it is as yet unclear how p53 mutations lead to neoplastic development. Wild-type p53 has been postulated to play a role in DNA repair, suggesting that expression of mutant forms of p53 might alter cellular resistance to the DNA damage caused by radiation. Moreover, p53 is thought to function as a cell cycle checkpoint after irradiation, also suggesting that mutant p53 might change the cellular proliferative response to radiation. p53 mutations affect the cellular response to DNA damage, either by increasing DNA repair processes or, possibly, by increasing cellular tolerance to DNA damage. The association of p53 mutations with increased radioresistance suggests that alterations in the p53 gene might lead to oncogenic transformation. Current attractive model of carcinogenesis also showed that p53 gene is the major target of radiation. The majority of p53 mutations found so far is single base pairchanges (point mutations, which result in amino acid substitutionsor truncated forms of the P53 protein, and are widely distributedthroughout the evolutionarily conserved regions of the gene. Examination of p53 mutations in human cancer also shows an association between particular

  13. Gamma-ray-induced dominant mutations that cause skeletal abnormalities in mice. II. Description of proved mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, P.B.; Selby, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    In a mutation-rate experiment described earlier, 31 dominant skeletal mutations were confirmed by breeding tests. Skeletel abnormalities were detected in the skeletons of some of the sons of irradiated males, and for 31 of these sons the study of skeletons in subsequent generations showed that they transmitted abnormalities. The detailed descriptions of these mutations, together with descriptions of 6 presumed mutations found in a later paper, provide the basis for determining which mutations cause effects that would, if they occurred in humans, cause a serious handicap. Such a determination is necessary before these data can be used to estimate genetic hazard to humans. Furthermore, these descriptions of syndromes caused by individual dominant mutations should be useful to clinicians interested in skeletal defects. The statistical analysis of the frequency of each abnormality in the mutant line versus an approximation of the frequency of the malformation in the absence of new mutations is essential to be sure that a mutation is indeed the cause of each abnormality. These analyses, together with analyses of the correlation of abnormalities caused by individual mutations, clearly demonstrate that dominant mutations exhibit low penetrance for many of their effects. A few of the mutations also cause the death of some heterozygotes. No externally visible effects have been detected in heterozygotes for most of these mutations. Externally visible effects found in some of the heterozygotes for a few of the mutations include hydrocephalus, circling behavior, increased nervous activity, ray coat color, webbing of digits, and small size. Two coat-color mutations were found that caused no detected skeletal abnormalities. The data suggest that a few of the mutations may be reciprocal translocations. In most of the mutant lines tested cytologically, however, there was no indication of chromosomal aberrations.

  14. Plant type improvement of indigenous rice cultivars through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high yielding, locally adapted cultivar 'Afaa Mwanza 1/159' of rice (Oryza sativa L.) which is tall and late in maturity, was irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 170, 210 and 250 Gy to shorten plant height and time of maturity. Twelve mutants were selected, and evaluated for yield performance in field trials from M6 to M9 generations. All the mutants were shorter in plant height, and gave higher mean yield than the parent. Correlation coefficient analysis showed that the number of productive tillers, number of panicles per square meter and grain filling in the panicle were important characters which influenced yield. On the other hand, panicle length had negative influence on yield. Cv. 'Supa India' and 'Salama' were also irradiated with doses of 170, 210, 240 Gy gamma rays. Analysis of M2 populations of these cultivars indicated that mutagenesis created a lot of variation in plant height, maturity, spikelet fertility and panicle length. The induced variation shall be useful in selecting desired plant types. (author). 16 refs, 12 tabs

  15. The Clinical Value of Oxymatrine in Preventing Lamivudine Induced YMDD Mutation: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Wu, Yu; Wang, Mengmeng; Chen, Wenwen; Yuan, Weian; Jiang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMTR) is widely used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in China. Several reports revealed that combination of OMTR and lamivudine reduced the incidence of tyrosine- (Y-) methionine- (M-) aspartic acid- (D-) aspartic acid (D) (YMDD) mutations in CHB patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of oxymatrine in preventing lamivudine induced YMDD mutation using meta-analysis of data from published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to provide some useful information for clinical treatment and future research of YMDD mutation. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Science Citation Index, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database, and China Biomedical Database were searched to identify RCTs that evaluated the incidence of YMDD-motif mutation to lamivudine therapy and lamivudine plus OMTR therapies in CHB patients. Data analysis was carried out with the use of RevMan 5.3.2. The literature search yielded 324 studies, and 16 RCTs matched the selection criteria. Overall, the incidence of YMDD mutation was significantly lower in patients treated with lamivudine plus OMTR than in patients treated with lamivudine alone (11.14% versus 28.18%; RR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.33-0.52; p < 0.05). The exact outcome needs to perform rigorously designed, multicenter, and large randomized controlled trials. PMID:26508988

  16. Differential effects of radical scavengers on X-ray-induced mutation and cytotoxicity in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of X irradiation on a human lymphoblast cell line were examined in the presence of two radioprotective agents which modulate damage to DNA. The cells were treated with X rays alone or in the presence of either dimethyl sulfoxide or cysteamine. Surviving fraction and mutation to trifluorothymidine resistance (tk locus) and to 6-thioguanine resistance (hgprt locus) were measured. Survival was enhanced when the cells were irradiated in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide; the D0 rose from 58 to 107 rad. However, at both genetic loci the induced mutant fractions were identical in the presence or absence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Survival was enhanced to a greater degree when the cells were irradiated in the presence of cysteamine; the D0 rose from 58 to 200 rad. Cysteamine also protected the cells from X-ray-induced mutation; the frequencies of X-ray-induced mutation at both the tk and hgprt loci were reduced by 50-75%. No protective effects were observed unless dimethyl sulfoxide or cysteamine was present during irradiation. These findings are discussed in terms of the hypothesis that, unlike for cell killing, radiation-induced mutagenesis in human lymphoblast cells is not mediated by the actions of aqueous free radicals, but rather by the direct effects of ionizing radiation

  17. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Kuppu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type.

  18. Mutational spectra of Salmonella typhimurium revertants induced by chlorohydroxyfuranones, byproducts of chlorine disinfection of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knasmüller, S; Zöhrer, E; Kronberg, L; Kundi, M; Franzén, R; Schulte-Hermann, R

    1996-03-01

    The base substitution specificities of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), 3-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (CMCF), 3,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MCA), and chloromalonaldehyde (CMA), a putative breakdown product of MCA, were examined in the hisG46 gene and in the hisG428 gene of Salmonella typhimurium using allele specific oligonucleotide hybridization. Although the compounds are structurally closely related, they induced substantially different mutation spectra: MCA and CMA caused primarily GC-->AT transitions in the hisG46 allele (target sequence CCC), in particular, at the second position of the codon in strain TA100. In TA100 the mutation spectrum of MCA was similar to that of CMA. The mutational specificity of MCA can be explained as a consequence of misincorporation opposite to cyclic etheno adducts identical to those formed by the carcinogen vinyl chloride. The spectra induced by MX and CMCF in TA100 were almost identical but distinctively different from the spectra of MCA and CMA. Both compounds induced primarily GC-->TA transversions, in particular, at the second position of the codon, and to a lesser extent in the first position of the codon. An identical site bias is induced by carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines as a consequence of formation of (noncyclic) guanosine adducts. In hisG428 (target sequence TAA) MX induced again primarily GC-->TA transversions in Tyr tRNA genes (supC/M) and, to a lesser extent, intragenic AT-->TA transversions (TAA-->AAA). The possible involvement of guanosine and adenosine adducts in the mutational specificity of MX is addressed.

  19. Development of radiation-induced mutation techniques and functional genomics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project has been performed to develop plant genetic resources using radiation (gamma-rays, ion-beam, space environments), to conduct functional genomics studies with mutant resources, and to develop new radiation plant breeding techniques using various radiation sources during 3 years. In the first section, we developed flower genetic resources, functional crop resources, and bio-industrial plant resources. In the second section, we cloned several mutated genes and studied mechanisms of gene expression and genetic diversity of mutations induced by gamma-rays. In the third section, we developed new plant breeding techniques using gamma-phytotron, heavy ion-beam, and space environments. Based on these results, a total of 8 cultivars containing Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, kenaf, rice, and soybean were applied for plant variety protection (PVP) and a total of 4 cultivars were registered for PVP. Also, license agreement for the dwarf type Hibiscus mutant 'Ggoma' was conducted with Supro co. and the manufacturing technology for natural antioxidant pear-grape vinegar was transferred into Enzenic co. Also, 8 gene sequences, such as F3'H and LDOX genes associated with flower color in Chrysanthemum and EPSPS gene from Korean lawn grass, were registered in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). In the future study, we will develop new radiation mutation breeding techniques through the mutation spectrum induced by various radiation sources, the studies for mechanism of the cellular response to radiation, and the comparative·structural·functional genomics studies for useful traits

  20. Male-fertility-restorer mutation induced by x-rays in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some male-fertility restoring mutants were obtained by X-irradiation (20 or 25 kR, 105.3 R/min) of the air-dried seed of cytoplasmic male-sterile (cms) wheat, (timopheevi)-Bison. These X-ray induced male-fertility restoring mutant (Rfx) lines restored the male fertility of F1 hybrids with cms (timopheevi)-Bison as female, but their fertility-restoring ability was not superior to that of known restorers such as Gironde, Primepi, and (t)-H30. The Rfx lines were also different from the original (timopheevi)-Bison, in many characters. The study on these multicharacter mutations with 18 morphological and physiological characters of the 7 M6 line groups derived from the 7M2 plants, revealed that each M2 progenitor plant of each M6 line-group had the mutant genes for almost all these characters, and that the mutation for at least half of all these mutant genes was induced in the original cell of the gamates of each X-irradiated M1 plant. Considering the multicharacter mutations of the Rfx lines, a backcross method for the mutation breeding of male-fertility restorers in wheat was proposed. (Kaihara, S.)

  1. Nucleic acid template and the risk of a PCR-Induced HIV-1 drug resistance mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vici Varghese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HIV-1 nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI-resistance mutation, K65R confers intermediate to high-level resistance to the NRTIs abacavir, didanosine, emtricitabine, lamivudine, and tenofovir; and low-level resistance to stavudine. Several lines of evidence suggest that K65R is more common in HIV-1 subtype C than subtype B viruses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS and clonal dideoxynucleotide sequencing of plasma virus samples to assess the prevalence of minority K65R variants in subtype B and C viruses from untreated individuals. Although UDPS of plasma samples from 18 subtype C and 27 subtype B viruses showed that a higher proportion of subtype C viruses contain K65R (1.04% vs. 0.25%; p1.5% of UDPS reads. We therefore performed UDPS on clones and site-directed mutants containing subtype B- and C-specific patterns of silent mutations in the conserved KKK motif encompassing RT codons 64 to 66 and found that subtype-specific nucleotide differences were responsible for increased PCR-induced K65R mutation in subtype C viruses. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the RT KKK nucleotide template in subtype C viruses can lead to the spurious detection of K65R by highly sensitive PCR-dependent sequencing techniques. However, the study is also consistent with the subtype C nucleotide template being inherently responsible for increased polymerization-induced K65R mutations in vivo.

  2. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  3. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin

  4. Somatic mutation and recombination induced with reactor thermal neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SMART test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to quantify the effect over the somatic mutation and recombination induced by thermal and fast neutrons at the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the ININ at the power of 300 k W for times of 30, 60 and 120 minutes with total equivalent doses respectively of 20.8, 41.6 and 83.2 Sv. A linear relation between the radiation equivalent dose and the frequency of the genetic effects such as mutation and recombination was observed. The obtained results allow to conclude that SMART is a sensitive system to the induced damage by neutrons, so this can be used for studying its biological effects. (Author)

  5. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  6. Cap +1 mutation; an unsuspected cause of beta thalassaemia transmission in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Usman Babar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Thalassemia is one of the most common genetic disorders worldwide. Cap +1 mutation which causes ‘silent beta thalassemia’ is present around all ethnic groups of Pakistan. This study was designed to detect the frequency of Cap+1 mutation in Pakistani Population.Materials and Methods: Molecular genetic for Cap+1 beta thalassemic mutation was done by extracting DNA from whole blood by using Genomic DNA Purification Kit (Gentra system USA. Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS primers were designed for detection of normal and mutant DNA.Basic hematological parameters were performed by using automated analyzer (Sysmex KX-21. Cellulose acetate hemoglobin electrophoresis was done by using semi-automated technique (INTERLAB Roma Microtech Series Electrophoresis system 4.23. Results: The frequency of Cap+1 mutation was observed 5% (10/200 in targeted thalassemic families (having patients with beta-thalassemia intermedia while its frequency was observed 2% (12/600 in total thalassemic genes in Pakistani population. Conclusion: Cap+1 (A-C is a silent mutation and it has very minimum effect on beta globin synthesis because of which it produces very less clinical severity and certain important laboratory diagnostic tests like basic hematological parameters and Hb A2 levels are also remain in normal range. Therefore individuals with Cap+1 mutation may produce children with beta-thalassemia intermedia if they marry an individual with beta-thalassemia minor. Cap+1 (A-C mutation is an unsuspected cause of beta thalassemia transmission in Pakistani population. This mutation can identify at molecular level. As this molecular defect is difficult to diagnose in Laboratory with routine laboratory tests because of that it has become a serious hindrance for thalassemia prevention program in Pakistan.

  7. Studies on induced mutation and genetics of a yellow seedling mutant in rapeseed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A yellow seedling mutant Tt was derived from the progeny of the inbred 3529(B. napus L.) which seeds were jointly treated with fast neutro exposure and chemical inducer of DES. Genetics investigation showed that the yellow seedling character is controlled by one pair of recessive nuclear genes. The mutation character is easily to be introduced into the other rapeseed lines and could be used as a marker character to identify the authenticity of hybrid seeds

  8. Intersex (ix) mutations of Drosophila melanogaster cause nonrandom cell death in genital disc and can induce tumours in genitals in response to decapentaplegic (dppdisk) mutations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. N. chatterjee; P. Chatterjee; S. Kuthe; M. Acharyya-Ari; R. Chatterjee

    2015-06-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the intersex (ix) is a terminally positioned gene in somatic sex determination hierarchy and function with the female specific product of double sex (DSXF) to implement female sexual differentiation. The null phenotype of ix is to transform diplo-X individuals into intersexes while leaving haplo-X animals unaffected. This study on the effect of different intersex mutations on genital disc development provides the following major results: (i) similar range of a characteristic array of morphological structures (from almost double sex terminalia to extreme reduction of terminal appendages) was displayed by the terminalia of XX ix1/ix1, XX ix2/ix2 and XX ix5/ix5 individuals; (ii) an increased number of apoptotic cells were found to occur in a localized manner in mature third instar larval genital discs of ix individuals; (iii) ix mutations can induce high frequency of neoplastic tumours in genitals in the presence of decapentaplegic (dppdisk) mutations; and (iv) heteroallelic combinations of dppdisk mutations can also induce tumours in intersex genitals with variable expressivity. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that: (i) loss of function of ix causes massive cell death in both male and female genital primordia of genital discs, resulting phenotype mimicking in male and female characteristics in genitals; and (ii) at the discs, the apoptotic cells persist as ‘undead’ cells that can induce oncogenic transformation in the neighbouring disc cells when dpp signalling is blocked or reduced by dppdisk mutations.

  9. The use of induced mutation in the development of new cultivars in Morocco: achievement and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the AFRA project RAF5050, induced mutation programme was initiated on wheat, barley and lentils. Results showed that from mutation induced on three ancient varieties (BD 1658, BD 2777 and Karim) we select seven varieties, characterized by reduced growing cycle and short height. These genotypes are under multiplication for quality test. On barley however, results are less promising, since the obtained mutant materiel are less productive due to their lateness, susceptibility to diseases and lodging. On lentils, we obtained three high productive mutants by irradiating the local variety Bakria. We also select one mutant with 20 days later than the mother variety and two mutants resistant to Fusarium. Furthermore, nitrogen fixation studies showed a high ability of two mutants to fix the atmospheric nitrogen, which was evaluated at 10 to 20%. The selected mutants are growing to improve their genetic stability to start multilocation yield trials. Currently and under the extended phase of AFRA project RAF5056, induced mutation concern the safflower, capper and sugar beet. The objective is more oriented on the increasing of the genetic variability of these species. (author)

  10. Efficient genome-wide detection and cataloging of EMS-induced mutations using exome capture and next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical mutagenesis efficiently generates phenotypic variation in otherwise homogeneous genetic backgrounds, enabling functional analysis of genes. Advances in mutation detection have brought the utility of induced mutant populations on par with those produced by insertional mutagenesis, but system...

  11. Application of Induced Mutation by Using Gamma Ray Treatment in Study Breeding for Orchid (Phalaenopsis) Varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim to breed new orchid varieties adapted to climate of Vietnam for domestic use and export, national orchid breeding program has been established for some years. In our study, application of induced mutation by using 60Co. gamma ray treatment was set up to breed new varieties of Phalaenopsis orchid. Different dosages of 60Co. gamma rays were 0, 20, 40, 60, 100 Gy doses with dose rate of 90 Gy/h. Three years after radiation treatment, result showed that the use of 60Co. gamma rays for treatment had conspicuously influenced to growth, mutation frequencies in morphological and physiological traits of Phalaenopsis varieties. Survival rate and growth vigor of treated plants reduced while total variation ratio increased by higher doses. The useful variations were the highest in 20 Gy and next to 40 Gy radiation treatments. In this study, LD50 dose in radiation treatment for Phalaenopsis orchid variety was at dose 40 Gy. Suitable doses in radiation treatment which made wide diversity for Phalaenopsis orchid was at doses 20-40 Gy. At present, selected Phalaenopsis lines are being conducted to research segregating mutated traits, mutation frequencies in inbred Phalaenopsis lines and multiplication of promising mutant lines. (author)

  12. Stability Test For Sorghum Mutant Lines Derived From Induced Mutations with Gamma-Ray Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorghum breeding program had been conducted at the Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, BATAN. Plant genetic variability was increased through induced mutations using gamma-ray irradiation. Through selection process in successive generations, some promising mutant lines had been identified to have good agronomic characteristics with high grain yield. These breeding lines were tested in multi location trials and information of the genotypic stability was obtained to meet the requirements for officially varietal release by the Ministry of Agriculture. A total of 11 sorghum lines and varieties consisting of 8 mutant lines derived from induced mutations (B-100, B-95, B-92, B-83, B-76, B-75, B-69 and Zh-30) and 3 control varieties (Durra, UPCA-S1 and Mandau) were included in the experiment. All materials were grown in 10 agro-ecologically different locations namely Gunungkidul, Bantul, Citayam, Garut, Lampung, Bogor, Anyer, Karawaci, Cianjur and Subang. In each location, the local adaptability test was conducted by randomized block design with 3 replications. Data of grain yield was used for evaluating genotypic stability using AMMI approach. Results revealed that sorghum mutation breeding had generated 3 mutant lines (B-100, B-76 and Zh-30) exhibiting grain yield significantly higher than the control varieties. These mutant lines were genetically stable in all locations so that they would be recommended for official release as new sorghum varieties to the Ministry of Agriculture. (author)

  13. Stability Test For Sorghum Mutant Lines Derived From Induced Mutations with Gamma-Ray Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Human

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum breeding program had been conducted at the Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, BATAN. Plant genetic variability was increased through induced mutations using gamma-ray irradiation. Through selection process in successive generations, some promising mutant lines had been identified to have good agronomic characteristics with high grain yield. These breeding lines were tested in multi location trials and information of the genotypic stability was obtained to meet the requirements for officially varietal release by the Ministry of Agriculture. A total of 11 sorghum lines and varieties consisting of 8 mutant lines derived from induced mutations (B-100, B-95, B-92, B-83, B-76, B-75, B-69 and Zh-30 and 3 control varieties (Durra, UPCA-S1 and Mandau were included in the experiment. All materials were grown in 10 agro-ecologically different locations namely Gunungkidul, Bantul, Citayam, Garut, Lampung, Bogor, Anyer, Karawaci, Cianjur and Subang. In each location, the local adaptability test was conducted by randomized block design with 3 replications. Data of grain yield was used for evaluating genotypic stability using AMMI approach. Results revealed that sorghum mutation breeding had generated 3 mutant lines (B-100, B-76 and Zh-30 exhibiting grain yield significantly higher than the control varieties. These mutant lines were genetically stable in all locations so that they would be recommended for official release as new sorghum varieties to the Ministry of Agriculture

  14. A PCR based protocol for detecting indel mutations induced by TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan; Zhang, Yaguang; Yao, Shaohua; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing techniques such as the zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effecter nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system Cas9 can induce efficient DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) at the target genomic sequence and result in indel mutations by the error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair system. Several methods including sequence specific endonuclease assay, T7E1 assay and high resolution melting curve assay (HRM) etc have been developed to detect the efficiency of the induced mutations. However, these assays have some limitations in that they either require specific sequences in the target sites or are unable to generate sequencing-ready mutant DNA fragments or unable to distinguish induced mutations from natural nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we developed a simple PCR-based protocol for detecting indel mutations induced by TALEN and Cas9 in zebrafish. We designed 2 pairs of primers for each target locus, with one putative amplicon extending beyond the putative indel site and the other overlapping it. With these primers, we performed a qPCR assay to efficiently detect the frequencies of newly induced mutations, which was accompanied with a T-vector-based colony analysis to generate single-copy mutant fragment clones for subsequent DNA sequencing. Thus, our work has provided a very simple, efficient and fast assay for detecting induced mutations, which we anticipate will be widely used in the area of genome editing. PMID:24901507

  15. A PCR based protocol for detecting indel mutations induced by TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Yu

    Full Text Available Genome editing techniques such as the zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effecter nucleases (TALENs and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas system Cas9 can induce efficient DNA double strand breaks (DSBs at the target genomic sequence and result in indel mutations by the error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair system. Several methods including sequence specific endonuclease assay, T7E1 assay and high resolution melting curve assay (HRM etc have been developed to detect the efficiency of the induced mutations. However, these assays have some limitations in that they either require specific sequences in the target sites or are unable to generate sequencing-ready mutant DNA fragments or unable to distinguish induced mutations from natural nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we developed a simple PCR-based protocol for detecting indel mutations induced by TALEN and Cas9 in zebrafish. We designed 2 pairs of primers for each target locus, with one putative amplicon extending beyond the putative indel site and the other overlapping it. With these primers, we performed a qPCR assay to efficiently detect the frequencies of newly induced mutations, which was accompanied with a T-vector-based colony analysis to generate single-copy mutant fragment clones for subsequent DNA sequencing. Thus, our work has provided a very simple, efficient and fast assay for detecting induced mutations, which we anticipate will be widely used in the area of genome editing.

  16. Braf Mutations Initiate the Development of Rat Gliomas Induced by Postnatal Exposure to N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Satomi, Kaishi; Oh, Ji Eun; Hutter, Barbara; Brors, Benedikt; Diessl, Nicolle; Liu, Hai-Kun; Wolf, Stephan; Wiestler, Otmar; Kleihues, Paul; Koelsch, Bernd; Kindler-Röhrborn, Andrea; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-10-01

    A single dose of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) during late prenatal or early postnatal development induces a high incidence of malignant schwannomas and gliomas in rats. Although T->A mutations in the transmembrane domain of the Neu (c-ErbB-2) gene are the driver mutations in ENU-induced malignant schwannomas, the molecular basis of ENU-induced gliomas remains enigmatic. We performed whole-genome sequencing of gliomas that developed in three BDIV and two BDIX rats exposed to a single dose of 80 mg ENU/kg body weight on postnatal day one. T:A->A:T and T:A->C:G mutations, which are typical for ENU-induced mutagenesis, were predominant (41% to 55% of all somatic single nucleotide mutations). T->A mutations were identified in all five rat gliomas at Braf codon 545 (V545E), which corresponds to the human BRAF V600E. Additional screening revealed that 33 gliomas in BDIV rats and 12 gliomas in BDIX rats all carried a Braf V545E mutation, whereas peritumoral brain tissue of either strain had the wild-type sequence. The gliomas were immunoreactive to BRAF V600E antibody. These results indicate that Braf mutation is a frequent early event in the development of rat gliomas caused by a single dose of ENU. PMID:27658714

  17. Utilization of induced mutation techniques in rice improvement in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asencion, A.B.; Santos, I.S.; Barrida, A.C.; Medina, F.I.S. III [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Atomic Research Center (Philippines)

    2001-03-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the Philippines, as such, efforts have been made consistently to improve the varieties released to the farmers for planting. Both conventional and induced mutation techniques were utilized to solve some of the problems. Varieties with improved qualities, resistance to pests and diseases, reduced height, early maturity and non-photoperiod sensitive were developed using either physical or chemical mutagen. Other methods were also tried to enhance variability like combination of gamma irradiation and biotechnology. Irradiation of F1 seeds was also initiated including the use of mutants in crosses to transfer their improved mutated characters. Promising selections were already tested and six lines from the F1 irradiation out-yielded both C4-63G and IR 1561-288-3, their parents. (author)

  18. Induced mutation and in vitro culture techniques for the genetic improvement of ornamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutation breeding using cobalt-60 (60Co) gamma radiation coupled with tissue culture techniques is undertaken for genetic improvement of foliage ornamentals (Dracaena sp. and Murraya exotica L.) and cutflowers (Chrysanthemum morifolium and orchids; Vanda sanderiana, Dendrobium Pattaya Beauty and Phalenopsis schilleriana). Gamma radiation (10-30 Gy) induced chlorophyll mutations and several morphological changes in D. sanderiana. For D. godseffiana, irradiated cuttings resulted in reduction of leaf size and chlorophyll mutations. Reduction in height was observed in the M2 generation of Murraya exotica L. irradiated at doses ranging from 10 to 30 Gy. The dwarf Murraya mutant was multiplied through the use of seeds and presently 116 plants are commercially available and are ''test marketed'' to the public. Tissue culture technique was used to induce mutation and as a means of micropropagation in two ornamental crops (orchids and chrysanthemum). Effects of different doses of gamma radiation on callus induction from nodal sections of chrysanthemum grown in Murashige and Skoog's (MS) with naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and benzyl adenine (BA) were studied. Micropropagation of irradiated and unirradiated chrysanthemum using MS basal medium is presently being studied. Whorling and changes in leaf color were observed at 10 Gy and doubling of leaf growth at the node at 20 Gy for vegetatively generated V3 plant. In orchids, irradiation of immature embryo with gamma rays ranging from 5 to 10 Gy increased the percentage of germination in Dendrobium Pattaya Beauty and P. schilleriana. Protocorms of Vanda sanderiana irradiated at 10 Gy and grown in Knudson C medium developed into plantlets that are bigger and more vigorous than those irradiated at 20 GY and from the control plant. A decrease in seedling height was observed with increasing dose of gamma radiation. (Author)

  19. Development of radiation-induced mutation techniques and functional genomics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Jin Baek [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    This project has been performed to develop plant genetic resources using radiation (gamma-rays, ion-beam, space environments), to conduct functional genomics studies with mutant resources, and to develop new radiation plant breeding techniques using various radiation sources during 3 years. In the first section, we developed flower genetic resources, functional crop resources, and bio-industrial plant resources. In the second section, we cloned several mutated genes and studied mechanisms of gene expression and genetic diversity of mutations induced by gamma-rays. In the third section, we developed new plant breeding techniques using gamma-phytotron, heavy ion-beam, and space environments. Based on these results, a total of 8 cultivars containing Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, kenaf, rice, and soybean were applied for plant variety protection (PVP) and a total of 4 cultivars were registered for PVP. Also, license agreement for the dwarf type Hibiscus mutant 'Ggoma' was conducted with Supro co. and the manufacturing technology for natural antioxidant pear-grape vinegar was transferred into Enzenic co. Also, 8 gene sequences, such as F3'H and LDOX genes associated with flower color in Chrysanthemum and EPSPS gene from Korean lawn grass, were registered in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). In the future study, we will develop new radiation mutation breeding techniques through the mutation spectrum induced by various radiation sources, the studies for mechanism of the cellular response to radiation, and the comparative{center_dot}structural{center_dot}functional genomics studies for useful traits.

  20. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald John H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will

  1. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, J.G. [Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Brinson, E.C.; Milner, P.M. [Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  2. Oxidative stress at low levels can induce clustered DNA lesions leading to NHEJ mediated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard B; Chen, Ting-Huei; Herr, Natalie; Takeda, Shunichi; Sun, Wei; Swenberg, James A; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-05-01

    DNA damage and mutations induced by oxidative stress are associated with various different human pathologies including cancer. The facts that most human tumors are characterized by large genome rearrangements and glutathione depletion in mice results in deletions in DNA suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause gene and chromosome mutations through DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the generation of DSBs at low levels of ROS is still controversial. In the present study, we show that H2O2 at biologically-relevant levels causes a marked increase in oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) with a significant elevation of replication-independent DSBs. Although it is frequently reported that OCDLs are fingerprint of high-energy IR, our results indicate for the first time that H2O2, even at low levels, can also cause OCDLs leading to DSBs specifically in G1 cells. Furthermore, a reverse genetic approach revealed a significant contribution of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway in H2O2-induced DNA repair & mutagenesis. This genomic instability induced by low levels of ROS may be involved in spontaneous mutagenesis and the etiology of a wide variety of human diseases like chronic inflammation-related disorders, carcinogenesis, neuro-degeneration and aging. PMID:27015367

  3. P63 null mutation protects mouse oocytes from radio-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livera, G.; Petre-Lazar, B.; Guerquin, M.J.; Trautmann, E.; Coffigny, H.; Habert, R. [CEA, DSV/DRR/SEGG/LDRG, Unit Gametogenesis et Genotoxic, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Univ Paris 07 Denis Diderot, UFR Biol, UMR S 566, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); INSERM, U566, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France)

    2008-07-01

    Female fertility in mammals is determined by the pool of primordial follicles and low doses of radiation induce a major loss of primordial follicles in the ovary. We investigated the expression of p53 and its homologues, p63 and p73, in the normal and irradiated neonatal ovary. p63 was the only member of the p53 family detected in oocyte nucleus. No p63 transcripts or protein were detected in the early foetal ovary. p63 production began in late pachytene-stage oocytes and peaked in diplotene oocytes in mice and humans. The production of p63 was correlated with meiotic DNA double-strand break repair. Only trans-activation (TA) isoforms were present in the ovary, with TAp63 alpha by far the most abundant in terms of mRNA and protein levels. Complete p63 null mutation did not affect normal ovary development. Irradiation rapidly triggered p63 phosphorylation. p63 null mutation prevented the cleavage of caspases-9 and -3 and the follicle loss induced by ionizing radiation. Thus, our results evidence that irradiation-induced depletion of the primordial follicle pool results from the activation of p63 in quiescent oocytes. (authors)

  4. Genetic and molecular analyses of UV radiation-induced mutations in the fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.S.; De Wilde, D.; Dwarakanath, V.N. [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-06-01

    The utility of a new target gene (fem-3) is described for investigating the molecular nature of mutagenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. As a principal attribute, this system allows for the selection, maintenance and molecular analysis of any type of mutation that disrupts the gene, including deletions. In this study, 86 mutant strains were isolated, of which 79 proved to have mutations in fem-3. Twenty of these originally tested as homozygous inviable. Homozygous inviability was expected, as Stewart and coworkers had previously observed that, unlike in other organisms, most UV radiation-induced mutations in C. elegans are chromosomal rearrangements of deficiencies (Mutat. Res 249, 37-54, 1991). However, additional data, including Southern blot analyses on 49 of the strains, indicated that most of the UV radiation-induced fem-3 mutations were not deficiencies, as originally inferred from their homozygous inviability. Instead, the lethals were most likely ``coincident mutations`` in linked, essential genes that were concomitantly induced. As such, they were lost owing to genetic recombination during stock maintenance. As in mammalian cells, yeast and bacteria, the frequency of coincident mutations was much higher than would be predicted by chance. (Author).

  5. Analysis of mutation induced by radiation in HPRT gene exon 7/8 of rat smooth muscles cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between radiation dose and HPRT gene locus mutation in rat smooth muscle cells, and provide a molecular basis for prevention of blood vessel restenosis after PTCA. Methods: The smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re with different doses. HPRT gene mutation colonies were selected and isolated by 6-thioguanine. Analysis of mutation in exon 7/8 of HPRT gene were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results: The HPRT gene mutation frequency of rat smooth muscle cells that were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re ranged from 5.5 x 10-6 to 13 x 10-6. Of 91 HPRT gene mutation colonies, 13 contained exon 7/8 deletion and 15 had point mutation. The exon 7/8 mutation frequency was 30.8%. There was significant relationship between radiation dose and mutation frequency of HPRT gene and exon 7/8. Conclusions: The DNA damage and gene mutation induced by radiation was the basis of proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of smooth muscle cells

  6. Somaclonal variation is induced de novo via the tissue culture process: a study quantifying mutated cells in Saintpaulia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The origin of somaclonal variation has not been questioned previously, i.e., "pre-existing mutations" in explants and "newly induced mutations" arising from the tissue culture process have not been distinguished. This is primarily because there has been no reliable molecular method for estimating or quantifying variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adopted a petal-variegated cultivar of Saintpaulia 'Thamires' (Saintpaulia sp. as the model plant. Based on the difference between the pre- and post-transposon excision sequence of the promoter region of flavonoid 3', 5'-hydoroxylase (F3'5'H, we estimated mutated (transposon-excised cell percentages using a quantitative real-time PCR. Mutated cell percentages in leaf laminae used as explants was 4.6 and 2.4% in highly or low variegation flower plants, respectively, although the occurrences of blue color mutants in their regenerants were more than 40%. Preexisting mutated cell percentages in cultured explants were considerably lower than the mutated plant percentage among total regenerants via tissue culture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The estimation of mutated cell percentages became possible using the quantitative real-time PCR. The origins of mutations were successfully distinguished; it was confirmed that somaclonal variations are mainly caused by newly generated mutations arising from tissue culture process.

  7. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  8. Improvement of Barley and Chenopodium species in the Andean region by induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the genetic improvement of barley (H. vulgare), quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), and canahua (C. pallidicaule) were conducted in the field and greenhouse at the Centro de Investigaciones Nucleares at Viacha, using different concentrations and treatment durations of sodium azide (NaN3) to induce beneficial mutations. Greenhouse tests were conducted to establish the concentration and treatment duration for sodium azide. The treatments were applied and field evaluations were carried out in different generations to improve the germplasm available in the country, particularly in respect to environmental stresses such as frost, hail, and drought, which severely restrict yields. (author). 3 tabs

  9. Mutagenic efficiency of radiations and chemical mutagens in inducing viable mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of radiations (gamma rays and fast neutrons) and chemical mutagens (EMS and NMU) in inducing viable mutations in rice. Radiations were more effective than chemical mutagens, the most effective being fast neutrons. Mutagenic efficiency when estimated on the basis of lethality was higher for radiations but when based on sterility was higher for chemical mutagens. Fast neutrons, more effective than gamma rays, were less efficient. NMU was more effective but less efficient than EMS. (author)

  10. Targeted mutations induced by a single acetylaminofluorene DNA adduct in mammalian cells and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic specificity of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) has been established in mammalian cells and several strains of bacteria by using a shuttle plasmid vector containing a single N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)acetylaminofluorene (C8-dG-AAF) adduct. The nucleotide sequence of the gene conferring tetracycline resistance was modified by conservative codon replacement so as to accommodate the sequence d(CCTTCGCTAC) flanked by two restriction sites, Bsm I and Xho I. The corresponding synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide underwent reaction with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)-fluorene (AAAF), forming a single dG-AAF adduct. This modified oligodeoxynucleotide was hybridized to its complementary strand and ligated between the Bsm I and Xho I sites of the vector. Plasmids containing the C8-dG-AAF adduct were used to transfect simian virus 40-transformed simian kidney (COS-1) cells and to transform several AB strains of Escherichia coli. Colonies containing mutant plasmides were detected by hybridization to 32P-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides. Presence of the single DNA adduct increased the mutation frequency by 8-fold in both COS cells and E. coli. Over 80% of mutations detected in both systems were targeted and represented G x C → C x G or G x C → T x A transversions or single nucleotide deletions. The authors conclude that modification of a deoxyguanosine residue with AAF preferentially induces mutations targeted at this site when a plasmid containing a single C8-dG-AAF adduct is introduced into mammalian cells or bacteria

  11. Target DNA sequence directly regulates the frequency of activation-induced deaminase-dependent mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangguo; Viboolsittiseri, Sawanee S; O'Connor, Brian P; Wang, Jing H

    2012-10-15

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyses class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B lymphocytes to enhance Ab diversity. CSR involves breaking and rejoining highly repetitive switch (S) regions in the IgH (Igh) locus. S regions appear to be preferential targets of AID. To determine whether S region sequence per se, independent of Igh cis regulatory elements, can influence AID targeting efficiency and mutation frequency, we established a knock-in mouse model by inserting a core Sγ1 region into the first intron of proto-oncogene Bcl6, which is a non-Ig target of SHM. We found that the mutation frequency of the inserted Sγ1 region was dramatically higher than that of the adjacent Bcl6 endogenous sequence. Mechanistically, S region-enhanced SHM was associated with increased recruitment of AID and RNA polymerase II, together with Spt5, albeit to a lesser extent. Our studies demonstrate that target DNA sequences influence mutation frequency via regulating AID recruitment. We propose that the nucleotide sequence preference may serve as an additional layer of AID regulation by restricting its mutagenic activity to specific sequences despite the observation that AID has the potential to access the genome widely.

  12. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  13. Genotoxicity of neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster. Somatic mutation and recombination induced by reactor neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Rincón, J; Delfín-Loya, A; Ureña-Núñez, F; Paredes, L C; Zambrano-Achirica, F; Graf, U

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the observation of a direct relationship between the absorbed doses of neutrons and the frequencies of somatic mutation and recombination using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. This test was used for evaluating the biological effects induced by neutrons from the Triga Mark III reactor of Mexico. Two different reactor power levels were used, 300 and 1000 kW, and two absorbed doses were tested for each power level: 1.6 and 3.2 Gy for 300 kW and 0.84 and 1.7 Gy for 1000 kW. A linear relationship was observed between the absorbed dose and the somatic mutation and recombination frequencies. Furthermore, these frequencies were dependent on larval age: In 96-h-old larvae, the frequencies were increased considerably but the sizes of the spots were smaller than in 72-h-old larvae. The analysis of the balancer-heterozygous progeny showed a linear absorbed dose- response relationship, although the responses were clearly lower than found in the marker-trans-heterozygous flies. Approximately 65% of the genotoxicity observed is due to recombinational events. The results of the study indicate that thermal and fast neutrons are both mutagenic and recombinagenic in the D. melanogaster wing SMART, and that the frequencies are dependent on neutron dose, reactor power, and the age of the treated larvae. PMID:16038586

  14. The potential role of biotechnology and induced mutations in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although conventional techniques including mutation induction have increased the productivity of crops, the application of biotechnological tools such as tissue culture and molecular markers can speed up crop improvement. Through the application of in vitro culture techniques in Mammilaria san-angelensis, an ornamental cactus severely endangered, we proved through flow cytometry, genetic uniformity in massive in vitro derived plantlets and after irradiation we were able to regenerate it up to M1V4 generation. Solid mutants are expected if somatic embryos are treated with mutagenic agents due to its unicellular origin. Somatic embryogenesis was successfully achieved in Agave tequilana and after irradiation of embryogenic callus cultures, survivors were challenged with pathogenic crude bacterial extracts allowing the selection of resistant or tolerant individuals. Specially important are studies on neglected crops due to the interruption of its domestication and they are locally important for indigenous people as marginal crops. The trend now is to combine biotechnology and induced mutations to overcome problems with this highly promising crops. Chenopodium quinoa exhibits a strong constraint as food due to the undesirable production of saponins. The mutation induction strategy has enabled the reduction of this compounds in M5 generation, but further research is needed to overcome productivity and adaptability problems. Here the use of molecular markers (RAPDS) and flow cytometry techniques acquire relevance in the study of related species such as Chenopodium berlandieri in order to design an inter-specific breeding programme among selected mutants and outstanding local races to combine productivity, adaptability and grain quality

  15. Selective Breeding under Saline Stressed Conditions of Canola Mutations Induced by Gamma Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutation breeding program has been initiated for inducing canola mutations tolerance to saline stressed conditions for growing at harsh land in Egypt. Therefore, seed lots of three cultivars and exotic variety (Bactol, Serow 4, Serow 6 and Evita) were subjected to 100,400 and 600 Gy of gamma rays. Mass selection with 20 % intensity for high number of pods per plant has been done in each treatment in M2 generation. However, individually plants with high number of pods / plant were selected from each variety in M3 generation for test under saline stressed conditions at Ras Sudr region in M4 (8600 and 8300 ppm salinity for soil and irrigation, respectively). The obtained results revealed that eight mutated families from 12- test families in M4 generation surpassed their parents in seed yield / plant and related characters ( plant height ,fruiting zone length , No. of branches , No. of pods / plant ). In addition, the mutant F93 characterized by fast growing and non shuttering pods reflecting 50.4% over Evita control in seed yield/ plant. Twelve mutant lines in M5 represented the mutant families were grown in sandy-loam soil at Inshas region. The three mutant lines (L 22, L 38 and L 45) continuously surpassed their parents in seed yield and related characters, but the increases were less than the previous generation. The increase was 22.3 %, 38.7 % and 36.7 % over seed yield of respective parents. Moreover, mutant L66 exhibited an increase in its yield components in M5 at Inshas only, suggesting that gene expression and genomic structure extremely influenced by environmental factors. Genetic stability for the obtained mutations could be done at different environmental conditions in further studies

  16. Hybridization-Induced Aggregation Technology for Practical Clinical Testing: KRAS Mutation Detection in Lung and Colorectal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Hillary S; Landers, James P; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2016-07-01

    KRAS mutations have emerged as powerful predictors of response to targeted therapies in the treatment of lung and colorectal cancers; thus, prospective KRAS genotyping is essential for appropriate treatment stratification. Conventional mutation testing technologies are not ideal for routine clinical screening, as they often involve complex, time-consuming processes and/or costly instrumentation. In response, we recently introduced a unique analytical strategy for revealing KRAS mutations, based on the allele-specific hybridization-induced aggregation (HIA) of oligonucleotide probe-conjugated microbeads. Using simple, inexpensive instrumentation, this approach allows for the detection of any common KRAS mutation in platform may involve the detection of mutations in other key oncogenic pathways. PMID:27289420

  17. Tn5-induced pBS286 plasmid mutations blocking early stages of napthalene oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present data on the further analysis of the structural and functional organization of the nah region of plasmid pBS286 controlling the constitutive oxidation of naphthalene by Pseudomonas putida cells. They have studied Tn5-induced mutations blocking early stages of naphthalene oxidation. They present and discuss data providing evidence that, in contrast to plasmid NAH7, the mechanism of regulation of the nahl operon of plasmid NPL-1, the parent plasmid of plasmid pBS286, with inducible synthesis of naphthalene dioxygenase can include elements of a negative control with participation of the regulatory locus R, located proximal to the structural nah genes and closely linked to or overlapped by the inverted control DNA segment (4.2 kb). They also present data on the possibility of regulation of the activity of the catechol-splitting meta-pathway genes with the participation of products of early stages of naphthalene oxidation

  18. Induced mutagenesis as a source of new mutations in maize (Zea mays L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Seed samples of 9 inbreds were treated with MNU. Mutant individuals were visually selected in M2 and M3. Mutability was determined in 100 loci by crossing induced mutants with some well-known natural mutants obtained from the U.S. Association of Corn Geneticists. Only viable mutants characterised with distinct stable traits connected with kernel texture and mature plant were taken for tests. Mapping of the expected new mutants was realised through A-B translocations and marker lines. Evaluation of the mutant alleles' effect on yield and quality of biomass in inbreds and heterotic hybrids was done by the standard methods. The results show the ability of artificial mutagens to induce mutations in previously known loci. The genotype of the inbreds greatly affects the probability of mutation occurrence in a new locus. Due to the mutagen effect, independently inherited complexes of traits or naturally polygenic traits may become monogenic. This results in simplified inheritance, in an increase in heritability and thus in high effectiveness of selection. (author)

  19. Mutation breeding in sweet potato with fast neutrons by inducing hypocotyl adventitious buds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid sweet potato seeds were irradiated by fast neutrons. After the irradiation, adventitious buds were induced from the epidermal cells of the hypocotyls of the seedlings. The adventitious buds appeared from the hypocotyls 2 - 3 cm below the cotyledonary node. Detailed observations of cell division and tissue dissection showed that some adventitious buds emerged in 20 - 45 days after seedling emergence. Most of them originated from a single cell. These adventitious bud clones showed a wide mutation spectrum at high frequency, mostly non-chimeric. The mutant characters included the color of leaf, vine, vein, root-tuber skin and the leaf shape, yield, root-tuber dry matter rates, root-tuber numbers, sprouting, early tuber formation, resistance to black rot, root rot, nematodes etc. The results were confirmed in the field; the observed mutant characters were stable and non-chimeric. Such a method of inducing mutations is advantageous for the improvement of economic characters. Actually, there were examples of increasing the dry matter content of the tubers by 1.0 - 5.5%, the yield of tubers increased by 3.6 - 53.8%, and tubers per plant increased by 0.6 - 4.2%. The resistances to black rot, root rot, nematodes etc. were also improved. Three multiple resistance varieties Yanshu 568, Yanshu 571-1, 84-C-2 and two good quality varieties Yanshu 759 and 781 have been selected. (author). 9 refs, 3 tabs

  20. Somaclonal Variation Is Induced De Novo via the Tissue Culture Process: A Study Quantifying Mutated Cells in Saintpaulia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuru Sato; Munetaka Hosokawa; Motoaki Doi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The origin of somaclonal variation has not been questioned previously, i.e., "pre-existing mutations" in explants and "newly induced mutations" arising from the tissue culture process have not been distinguished. This is primarily because there has been no reliable molecular method for estimating or quantifying variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adopted a petal-variegated cultivar of Saintpaulia 'Thamires' (Saintpaulia sp.) as the model plant. Based on the difference be...

  1. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, P. S.; Hlavacek, A.; Wilde, H.; Lewicki, D.; Schubert, W.; Kern, R. G.; Kazarians, G. A.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  2. The dioxin TCDD protects against aflatoxin-induced mutation in female rats, but not in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, A S; Oda, Y; Stuart, G R; Holcroft, J; de Boer, J G

    2004-07-11

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant and a potent carcinogen in laboratory rodents. When combined with other environmental toxins, it has been shown to increase the (geno)toxicity of some compounds. In this study, the effect of TCDD on the mutagenicity of aflatoxin-B1 (AFB1) was examined in the rat liver using a lacI transgenic rodent mutation assay. AFB1 induces GC-->TA transversions. Since TCDD is known to have a differential effect in male and female rodents, both sexes were studied. The data showed that a 6-week pre-exposure to TCDD had no significant effect on the frequency of aflatoxin-induced mutation in the liver of male rats. However, the TCDD treatment completely prevented the aflatoxin-induced transversion mutations in female animals.

  3. Induced mutations to develop sources of resistance to rice blast, Pyricularia grisea Sacc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice blast caused by Pyricularia grisea is the most important disease limiting yields worldwide. The pathogen has many virulent forms or pathotypes, hence durable blast resistance is lacking. Studies on strategy to develop durable blast resistance based on defining the genetic structure of the population, using DNA-fingerprinting, and virulence diversity are described. This strategy is leading to the identification of resistance genes/sources against all isolates within a genetic family of the pathogen. Combinations of genes showing complementary resistance to different genetic families of the fungus exclude any compatible interaction with a blast isolate. Identification of complementary resistance genes is based on detecting those virulence factors whose combinations in individual isolates within the pathogen population have a frequency near zero. Identifying and combining resistance genes to which combinations of corresponding virulence genes are absent in the pathogen population should confer more durable resistance than that previously obtained. The use of induced mutations in the development of resistance was limited, since in most cases single gene changes were responsible for the induced resistance against all the pathogen population. The main objective here is to develop many mutants, each with a gene resistant to just one or a few families of the blast pathogen; and crossing them can accumulate the different resistance genes. A total of 201 Latin American commercial cultivars, including Cuban, Brazilian and Venezuelan were analyzed with different genetic families of the blast pathogen to identify potential sources of resistance to blast and identify complementary resistance sources. Characterization of the resistance of 37 mutants of the Colombian rice cultivar Oryzica 1 was conducted in collaboration with the INEA in Colombia. Results suggested that mutations for resistance to genetic families to which Oryzica 1 is susceptible were induced, although one

  4. Research work and demonstration of crop space-induced mutation breeding in Guangdong academy of agricultural science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    138 entries of crop seeds, seedlings and sources of microbe, including conventional rice varieties, hybrid rice, vegetable, flower, mulberry, tea, and silkworm, were sent for space mutation. Muti-suject combining research had been conducted on the innovation of new gemplasm, breeding for new varieties and elucidating the physiological and molecular mechanism of space induced mutation. Based on the displaying platform fro crop breeding in national Agri- Tech displaying land in Guangzhou, Guangdong. Space Agri-Tech Displaying Land was being constructed large scale displaying land for space induced breeding in Guangdong will be developed in collaboration with the Provincial production management agencies. (authors)

  5. Rice improvement through radiation-induced mutation for cultivation in South Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For past years, rice varieties cultivated in South Vietnam originated from domestic hybridisation or from IRRI. Rice mutation breeding has been initiated for recent years. To meet the requirement of rice production diversification in different agro-ecological areas and rice genetic resources, from 1993 Institute of Agricultural Science of South Vietnam has carried out rice improvement by induced mutation of radiation. The mutagen was gamma rays of 60Co. The goal is to create inherited variations, which cannot be obtained from other breeding methods, specially important characters of rice varieties (high tolerance to acid sulfate soil, lodging resistance combined with early maturity), which were difficult to gain by hybridisation. With 60Co gamma rays, doses of 10-20 krad, dose rate of 280 krad/h, dry and germinated seeds of introduced and local rice varieties (IR 64, IR 9729, IR 50404, IR 59606, Jasmine 85, Nang Huong, Tam Xoan) were irradiated. The irradiated seeds were immediately sown within 24 and 94 hrs for wet seeds and dry seeds after treatment, respectively. Population of 10,000-15,000 plants were established and evaluated by IRRI evaluation standard from M2-M7 generations. 365 lines, varieties were selected with better behaviours than original varieties as lodging resistance, earliness, potential yield, leaf characters, tolerant ability to adverse conditions etc. Some good varieties (VND95-19, VND95-20) have been approved as leading national varieties and released for large-scale production in South Vietnam. (author)

  6. Improvement of rice through somaculture and induced mutations in Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important crops in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, from both the production and mainly the consumption standpoint. It is cultivated predominantly under upland conditions in areas that have high temperature and humidity, excellent environment for rapid spreading of the blast disease (Pyricularia grisea). The objective of this research was to induce mutations in connection with somaculture, for resistance to blast and a high yield potential, retaining the other qualities of IAC 201, a commercial upland variety. Seeds were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays at 300, 350 and 400 Gy, and boots and seeds from M1 plants in the 300 Gy treatments were harvested for mutation in vitro and in vivo techniques. Selection was not done in M2 generation; panicles were harvested and the offsprings were evaluated in the M3 generation for blast reaction. From 10340 panicles screened, 267 lines were selected with a possible blast tolerance. In the M4 generation these populations were again evaluated for blast reaction and for agronomic traits. Fifty-three possible mutant lines with tolerance to blast were selected, with more than 15% increments in yield potential. From these lines it is expected that at least one will be released in the near future as a new, resistant upland rice cultivar for Sao Paulo State, Brazil. (author)

  7. Improvement of penicillin G acylase expression in Escherichia coli through UV induced mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Arshad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We used ultraviolet (UV radiation to induce mutation in three locally isolated strains of Escherichia coli. Different dilutions of bacterial cultures were exposed to UV lamp of 254 nm wavelength for different time intervals at varied distances ranging from 5 to 210 sec and 5 to 100 cm. Viable colonies were screened for mutants with an increased production of penicillin G acylase (PGA and a reduced production of β-lactamase, which are the desired properties of PGA producing industrial strains. A survival curve was made to get optimum exposure time and distance. The survival percentage for each exposure period was calculated and 1-5% survival was found useful for obtaining mutants with desired change. Screening for PGA and β-lactamase constitutive and/or deficient mutants was made by Serratia marcescens overlay test. A total of 100 survivors were selected of which 49% expressed PGA activity higher than the parent strain. Frequency of β-lactamase constitutive and deficient mutants was 48 and 52%, respectively. The best hyper-producing mutant (BDCS-N-M74, with almost negligible expression of β-lactamase, exhibited three-fold (22.5 mg 6-APA h-1 mg-1 wet cells increase in PGA activity compared with that in the parent strain (6.7 mg 6-APA h-1 mg-1 wet cells. The results indicated the successful induction of UV mediated mutation in E. coli for PGA hyper-producing mutants lacking β-lactamase activity.

  8. A triple-helix forming oligonucleotide targeting genomic DNA fails to induce mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshat, Reshat; Priestley, Catherine C; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2012-11-01

    Purine tracts in duplex DNA can bind oligonucleotide strands in a sequence specific manner to form triple-helix structures. Triple-helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting supFG1 constructs have previously been shown to be mutagenic raising safety concerns for oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals. We have engineered a TFO, TFO27, to target the genomic Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus to define the mutagenic potential of such structures at genomic DNA. We report that TFO27 was resistant to nuclease degradation and readily binds to its target motif in a cell free system. Contrary to previous studies using the supFG1 reporter construct, TFO27 failed to induce mutation within the genomic HPRT locus. We suggest that it is possible that previous reports of triplex-mediated mutation using the supFG1 reporter construct could be confounded by DNA quadruplex formation. Although the present study indicates that a TFO targeting a genomic locus lacks mutagenic activity, it is unclear if this finding can be generalised to all TFOs and their targets. For the present, we suggest that it is prudent to avoid large purine stretches in oligonucleotide pharmaceutical design to minimise concern regarding off-target genotoxicity. PMID:22914677

  9. Study on mutation induced effect of gamma ray and DES on black bean phaseolus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Thi Dinh; Pham Le Ha; Nguyen Van Toan; Le Xuan Tham [Nuclear Research Institute, Radiobiology Department, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    The study on mutation induced effect of gamma ray and DES on black bean Phaseolus vulgaris was carried out at Radiobiology Department, Nuclear Research Institute of Dalat. Dry seeds of variety No.1847 - Bonita - Cuba in set of 13 black bean varieties were irradiated with gamma ray from {sup 60}Co source at dose range from 150 Gy to 350 Gy and treated with DES at concentration from 0.1% to 0.3% in 2 hours for experiments in laboratory. The doses of 200, 250, 300 Gy and concentration of 0.2% DES in 2 hours were selected to treat dry seeds for experiments on the field. In populations of M{sub 1} generation, the height, number of branches and fruits per plant, number of seeds per fruit were decreased with increasing of irradiation doses. In populations of M{sub 2} generation, individual variants in leaf shape, chlorophyll, short stem, dwarf, early maturity, flowering in very short time were obtained and selected in all treatment cases. Mutation frequency at dose of 300 Gy was higher than that in other treatment cases, but ratio of sterility is also largest. The mutant lines of early maturity and short stem with flowering in very short time are promised materials for further studies. (author)

  10. Attempts to induce mutations in Haemophilus influenzae with the base analogues 5-bromodeoxyuridine and 2-aminopurine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, R.F.; Perdue, S.W.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts were made to induce mutations in Haemophilus influenzae with the base analogues 5-bromodeoxyuridine and 2-aminopurine. These attempts were unsuccessful. Incorporation studies with BrdUrd showed, in agreement with earlier studies on Escherichia coli, that BrdUrd was discriminated against when dThd was also present but was incorporated to essentially the same extent as dThd when only BrdUrd was present. In this latter case, strands fully substituted with BrdUrd were produced, but survival data suggest that bacteria deriving their DNA by replication on such fully substituted templates were inviable. However, bacteria with about 20% of the thymine substituted with bromouracil were usually viable. No mutations could be detected in the descendants of such bacteria. The reasons for this are discussed and it is concluded that in all probability the replication system in species rarely if ever treats incorporated bromouracil as anything except a thymine analogue. The alternative possibility, that the negative results are a consequence of the absence of the reclex (SOS) error-prone repair system in this species, is considered much less likely.

  11. Physiological, biochemical and molecular characterization of an induced mutation conferring imidazolinone resistance in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Francisco; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M; Fernández, Pablo Tomas; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Atienza, Sergio G; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    The Clearfield(®) wheat cultivars possessing imidazolinone (IMI)-resistant traits provide an efficient option for controlling weeds. The imazamox-resistant cultivar Pantera (Clearfield(®) ) was compared with a susceptible cultivar (Gazul). Target and non-target mechanisms of resistance were studied to characterize the resistance of Pantera and to identify the importance of each mechanism involved in this resistance. Pantera is resistant to imazamox as was determined in previous experiments. The molecular study confirmed that it carries a mutation Ser-Asn627 conferring resistance to imazamox in two out of three acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (imi1 and imi2), located in wheat on chromosomes 6B and 6D, respectively. However, the last gene (imi3) located on chromosome 6A does not carry any mutation conferring resistance. As a result, photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll content were reduced after imazamox treatment. Detoxification was higher in the resistant biotype as shown by metabolomic study while imazamox translocation was higher in the susceptible cultivar. Interestingly, imazamox metabolism was higher at higher doses of herbicide, which suggests that the detoxification process is an inducible mechanism in which the upregulation of key gene coding for detoxification enzymes could play an important role. Thus, the identification of cultivars with a higher detoxification potential would allow the development of more resistant varieties. PMID:26991509

  12. A novel radiation-induced p53 mutation is not implicated in radiation resistance via a dominant-negative effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Sun

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance.

  13. The use of induced mutation combined with crossing in high quality rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high quality rice varieties: Tam thom mutant rice Var., DT17 rice Var, DT21 glutinous rice Var were formed by induced mutation combined with crossing. Tam thom mutant rice Var. lost photosensitivity, could be planted 2 crops/year. DT17 rice Var with high yielding capacity, suitable for growth on lowland in summer crop, is replacing step-by-step Moctuyen rice Var. in North Vietnam. DT21 glutinous rice Var. could be planted 2 crops/year and had short growth duration, average yield was 4.0-4.5 tons/ha. These three ones had good quality, soft and scent cooked rice, suitable for customers and export requirements. Tam thom mutant rice Var. DT17 rice Var., DT21 and glutinous rice Var. were adopted for regional production by Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and allowed to be in trial production. (author)

  14. Solar and UVC-induced mutation in human cells and inhibition by deoxynucleosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimum conditions were established for quantitating the induction of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase-deficient (HGPRT-mutants in HeLa cells and a human amelanotic melanoma cell line (MM96L). Compared at a fluence of equal toxicity, noon sunlight in summer was slightly more mutagenic in MM96L than in HeLa cells. UVC exhibited similar mutagenicity as equitoxic sunlight in HeLa but was 8-fold more effective in MM96L than equitoxic sunlight. Addition of a mixture of deoxyguanosine, deoxyadenosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine to the culture medium during the 7-day expression period following irradiation gave a 3-fold reduction in the UVC-induced mutation frequency of MM96L but not HeLa cells. The results suggest that these melanocytic cells are highly susceptible to mutagenesis by short wavelength UV, in a mechanism sensitive to deoxynucleosides. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Mutated recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1 induces differentiation of PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Wu; Lan Zhang; Zhongwei Sun; Gang Huang; Jing Huang; Bing Mei

    2011-01-01

    "Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its long-acting analogues have neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties and are emerging as potential treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Its short half-life has limited the application of GLP-1 in the clinic. We generated a mutated form of human GLP-1 (mGLP-1) using site-directed mutagenesis and gene recombination techniques, and found that these modifications significantly prolonged the biological half-life of GLP-1 compared with native GLP-1 (nGLP-1). This study investigated the role of mGLP-1 on inducing PC12 cell differentiation. mGLP-1 induced PC12 cell differentiation with neurite outgrowth and increased the expression of growth-associated protein-43 and neuronal class III ?-tubulin, and significantly increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate level. No significant difference was found between mGLP-1 and nGLP-1. The results indicate that mGLP-1 activates the GLP-1 receptor, induces PC12 cell differentiation, and has neurotrophic effects.

  16. Evidence that in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, which lack DNA polymerase eta, DNA polymerase iota causes the very high frequency and unique spectrum of UV-induced mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Woodgate, Roger; McManus, Terrence P; Mead, Samantha; McCormick, J Justin; Maher, Veronica M

    2007-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients have normal DNA excision repair, yet are predisposed to develop sunlight-induced cancer. They exhibit a 25-fold higher than normal frequency of UV-induced mutations and very unusual kinds (spectrum), mainly transversions. The primary defect in XPV cells is the lack of functional DNA polymerase (Pol) eta, the translesion synthesis DNA polymerase that readily inserts adenine nucleotides opposite photoproducts involving thymine. The high frequency and striking difference in kinds of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells strongly suggest that, in the absence of Pol eta, an abnormally error-prone polymerase substitutes. In vitro replication studies of Pol iota show that it replicates past 5'T-T3' and 5'T-U3' cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, incorporating G or T nucleotides opposite the 3' nucleotide. To test the hypothesis that Pol iota causes the high frequency and abnormal spectrum of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells, we identified an unlimited lifespan XPV cell line expressing two forms of Pol iota, whose frequency of UV-induced mutations is twice that of XPV cells expressing one form. We eliminated expression of one form and compared the parental cells and derivatives for the frequency and kinds of UV-induced mutations. All exhibited similar sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of UV((254 nm)), and the kinds of mutations induced were identical, but the frequency of mutations induced in the derivatives was reduced to UV-induced mutations, and ultimately their malignant transformation.

  17. Improvement of new and traditional industrial crops by induced mutations and related biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial crops are an important source of income for many small landholders in developing countries and contribute directly or indirectly to food security in rural areas. Crop diversification, finding alternative crops, development of new uses for existing crops and introduction of new crops are important components in the efforts to meet the demand for food, pharmaceuticals, chemical raw materials, fibres and fuel in developing and developed countries. Plant breeding efforts combining genetic resources and induced mutations using classical, in vitro and innovative molecular approaches have been responsible for much of the development of industrial crops. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) was initiated in 1994. It focused on developing mutagenesis approaches for previously unstudied species, screening procedures for agricultural and industrial requirements and suitable genotypes of traditional industrial crops adapted to new areas and for new needs. The industrial crops selected for improvement under this CRP were oilseeds and fibre plants. The potential of induced mutations to affect critical steps in various biosynthetic pathways leading to oil quality and other metabolic modifications was investigated. The success of this CRP is evidenced by the application of mutation techniques, in combination with in vitro and molecular techniques in genetic improvement of oilseed crops such as soybean, rapeseed, sunflower, linseed, cuphea, meadowfoam and fibre plants such as cotton and jute. As a result, improved breeding lines are available in all the industrial crops that the CRP focused on. Novel oil types were developed in cuphea with potential use as a renewable, economical and safe energy source and in linseed with increased levels of saturated fatty acids. Genes of fatty acid synthesis were isolated from one species and used for modification of quality of other oilseeds. Disease and pest resistance was improved in oilseeds and fibre crops through transgenesis

  18. Absence of p53 gene mutations in mice colon pre-cancerous stage induced by o-nitrotoluene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahed A Hussien

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results from the present study indicate that point mutations in the p53 gene, in the coding region (exons 5-8 and outside it (exons 10, 11, are not involved in the development of the colon precancerous stage induced by o-nt in mice.

  19. Comparative analysis of charged particle-induced autosomal mutations in murine cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Turker, Mitchell; Dan, Cristian; Kwoh, Ely

    exposed to 2 Gy of Fe ions. Mutant spectra were analyzed via PCR using a series of heterozygous markers along mouse chromosome 8. Cytotoxicity assays were performed immediately after Fe ion exposure of cells from two primary clones. Cells irradiated in vitro demonstrated a dose-dependent decrement in cloning efficiency with no evidence of a shoulder. The results demonstrate the two clones behave similarly (unpaired t-test, p>0.3) with a D0 of 84.3 cGy for the combined data set. Mutation data were obtained using cells from one of the primary clones. In three experiments, we observed a linear dose-response for Aprt mutation with an induced mutant frzction of 1.06 x 10-3 /Gy. Kidney epithelial cells irradiated in vivo and incubated for 2-4 months in situ prior to harvest also showed an exponential reduction of cloning efficiency. Cells harvested 8-10 months postirradiation showed evidence of recovery for doses up to 1.5 Gy, but there was no improvement in cloning efficiency for kidney cells exposed to 2 Gy Fe ions in vivo evaluated at the late time point. Results for Aprt mutation induction in vivo indicated considerable inter-animal variation within each dose group (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 Gy). Fe ion exposures were mutagenic to the kidney, even at the lowest dose (p<0.01). A comparison of the mutant frequency results at the two harvest times indicates that the dose response did not vary with incubation time in vivo. Analysis of the pooled data from the 2-4 months harvests and the 8-10 month harvests indicated an increase in mutant frequency of 1.49 fold per Gy (p=0.01, CI 1.11-2.01). Molecular analysis of Aprtdeficient cells collected after a 2 Gy exposure to Fe ions in vitro showed an increased proportion of mutants arising via interstitial deletion or mitotic recombination, with an indication of an increase in chromosome loss. Similar results have been obtained for Aprt mutants isolated from mice exposed to 2 Gy of Fe ions, as compared with mutants collected from sham

  20. UV-induced mutations in epidermal cells of mice defective in DNA polymerase η and/or ι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Rie; Yokoi, Masayuki; Ohkumo, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Yasutaka; Dotsu, Kantaro; Kura, Shinobu; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) is a human rare inherited recessive disease, predisposed to sunlight-induced skin cancer, which is caused by deficiency in DNA polymerase η (Polη). Polη catalyzes accurate translesion synthesis (TLS) past pyrimidine dimers, the most prominent UV-induced lesions. DNA polymerase ι (Polι) is a paralog of Polη that has been suggested to participate in TLS past UV-induced lesions, but its function in vivo remains uncertain. We have previously reported that Polη-deficient and Polη/Polι double-deficient mice showed increased susceptibility to UV-induced carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated UV-induced mutation frequencies and spectra in the epidermal cells of Polη- and/or Polι-deficient mice. While Polη-deficient mice showed significantly higher UV-induced mutation frequencies than wild-type mice, Polι deficiency did not influence the frequencies in the presence of Polη. Interestingly, the frequencies in Polη/Polι double-deficient mice were statistically lower than those in Polη-deficient mice, although they were still higher than those of wild-type mice. Sequence analysis revealed that most of the UV-induced mutations in Polη-deficient and Polη/Polι double-deficient mice were base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites. An increase in UV-induced mutations at both G:C and A:T pairs associated with Polη deficiency suggests that Polη contributes to accurate TLS past both thymine- and cytosine-containing dimers in vivo. A significant decrease in G:C to A:T transition in Polη/Polι double-deficient mice when compared with Polη-deficient mice suggests that Polι is involved in error-prone TLS past cytosine-containing dimers when Polη is inactivated.

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including “safe harboring” techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including "safe harboring" techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  3. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Mutation-Related Paragangliomas Classify as Discrete Pseudohypoxic Subcluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, Stephanie M J; Shankavaram, Uma; Marzouca, Geena; Elkahloun, Abdel; Jochmanova, Ivana; Daerr, Roland; Linehan, W Marston; Timmers, Henri; Tischler, Arthur S; Papaspyrou, Konstantinos; Brieger, Jürgen; de Krijger, Ronald; Breza, Jan; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2016-09-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the hypoxia-inducible factor 2α gene (HIF2A/EPAS1) have been recognized to predispose to multiple paragangliomas (PGLs) and duodenal somatostatinomas associated with polycythemia, and ocular abnormalities. Previously, mutations in the SDHA/B/C/D, SDHAF2, VHL, FH, PHD1, and PHD2 genes have been associated with HIF activation and the development of pseudohypoxic (cluster-1) PGLs. These tumors overlap in terms of tumor location, syndromic presentation, and noradrenergic phenotype to a certain extent. However, they also differ especially by clinical outcome and by presence of other tumors or abnormalities. In the present study, we aimed to establish additional molecular differences between HIF2A and non-HIF2A pseudohypoxic PGLs. RNA expression patterns of HIF2A PGLs (n=6) from 2 patients were compared with normal adrenal medullas (n=8) and other hereditary pseudohypoxic PGLs (VHL: n=13, SDHB: n=15, and SDHD: n=14). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed that HIF2A PGLs made up a separate cluster from other pseudohypoxic PGLs. Significance analysis of microarray yielded 875 differentially expressed genes between HIF2A and other pseudohypoxic PGLs after normalization to adrenal medulla (false discovery rate 0.01). Prediction analysis of microarray allowed correct classification of all HIF2A samples based on as little as three genes (TRHDE, LRRC63, IGSF10; error rate: 0.02). Genes with the highest expression difference between normal medulla and HIF2A PGLs were selected for confirmatory quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, HIF2A PGLs show a characteristic expression signature that separates them from non-HIF2A pseudohypoxic PGLs. Unexpectedly, the most significantly differentially expressed genes have not been previously described as HIF target genes. PMID:27659016

  4. An induced mutation in tomato eIF4E leads to immunity to two potyviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Piron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The characterization of natural recessive resistance genes and Arabidopsis virus-resistant mutants have implicated translation initiation factors of the eIF4E and eIF4G families as susceptibility factors required for virus infection and resistance function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate further the role of translation initiation factors in virus resistance we set up a TILLING platform in tomato, cloned genes encoding for translation initiation factors eIF4E and eIF4G and screened for induced mutations that lead to virus resistance. A splicing mutant of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor, S.l_eIF4E1 G1485A, was identified and characterized with respect to cap binding activity and resistance spectrum. Molecular analysis of the transcript of the mutant form showed that both the second and the third exons were miss-spliced, leading to a truncated mRNA. The resulting truncated eIF4E1 protein is also impaired in cap-binding activity. The mutant line had no growth defect, likely because of functional redundancy with others eIF4E isoforms. When infected with different potyviruses, the mutant line was immune to two strains of Potato virus Y and Pepper mottle virus and susceptible to Tobacco each virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutation analysis of translation initiation factors shows that translation initiation factors of the eIF4E family are determinants of plant susceptibility to RNA viruses and viruses have adopted strategies to use different isoforms. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of TILLING as a reverse genetics tool to improve crop species. We have also developed a complete tool that can be used for both forward and reverse genetics in tomato, for both basic science and crop improvement. By opening it to the community, we hope to fulfill the expectations of both crop breeders and scientists who are using tomato as their model of study.

  5. Efficient Generation of Gene-Modified Pigs Harboring Precise Orthologous Human Mutation via CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Homology-Directed Repair in Zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lulu; Du, Yinan; Xie, Fei; Li, Liang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Chuanhong; Wang, Shiqiang; Zhang, Shibing; Huang, Xingxu; Wang, Yong; Wei, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Precise genetic mutation of model animals is highly valuable for functional investigation of human mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9)-induced homology-directed repair (HDR) is usually used for precise genetic mutation, being limited by the relatively low efficiency compared with that of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although inhibition of NHEJ was shown to enhance HDR-derived mutation, in this work, without inhibition of NHEJ, we first generated gene-modified pigs harboring precise orthologous human mutation (Sox10 c.A325>T) via CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes using single-strand oligo DNA (ssODN) as template with an efficiency as high as 80%, indicating that pig zygotes exhibited high activities of HDR relative to NHEJ and were highly amendable to genetic mutation via CIRSPR/Cas9-induced HDR. Besides, we found a higher concentration of ssODN remarkably reduced HDR-derived mutation in pig zygotes, suggesting a possible balance for optimal HDR-derived mutation in zygotes between the excessive accessibility to HDR templates and the activities of HDR relative to NHEJ which appeared to be negatively correlated to ssODN concentration. In addition, the HDR-derived mutation, as well as those from NHEJ, extensively integrated into various tissues including gonad of founder pig without detected off-targeting, suggesting CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes is a reliable approach for precise genetic mutation in pigs.

  6. Comparative analysis of charged particle-induced autosomal mutations in murine cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Turker, Mitchell; Dan, Cristian; Kwoh, Ely

    exposed to 2 Gy of Fe ions. Mutant spectra were analyzed via PCR using a series of heterozygous markers along mouse chromosome 8. Cytotoxicity assays were performed immediately after Fe ion exposure of cells from two primary clones. Cells irradiated in vitro demonstrated a dose-dependent decrement in cloning efficiency with no evidence of a shoulder. The results demonstrate the two clones behave similarly (unpaired t-test, p>0.3) with a D0 of 84.3 cGy for the combined data set. Mutation data were obtained using cells from one of the primary clones. In three experiments, we observed a linear dose-response for Aprt mutation with an induced mutant frzction of 1.06 x 10-3 /Gy. Kidney epithelial cells irradiated in vivo and incubated for 2-4 months in situ prior to harvest also showed an exponential reduction of cloning efficiency. Cells harvested 8-10 months postirradiation showed evidence of recovery for doses up to 1.5 Gy, but there was no improvement in cloning efficiency for kidney cells exposed to 2 Gy Fe ions in vivo evaluated at the late time point. Results for Aprt mutation induction in vivo indicated considerable inter-animal variation within each dose group (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 Gy). Fe ion exposures were mutagenic to the kidney, even at the lowest dose (pvivo. Analysis of the pooled data from the 2-4 months harvests and the 8-10 month harvests indicated an increase in mutant frequency of 1.49 fold per Gy (p=0.01, CI 1.11-2.01). Molecular analysis of Aprtdeficient cells collected after a 2 Gy exposure to Fe ions in vitro showed an increased proportion of mutants arising via interstitial deletion or mitotic recombination, with an indication of an increase in chromosome loss. Similar results have been obtained for Aprt mutants isolated from mice exposed to 2 Gy of Fe ions, as compared with mutants collected from sham-irradiated mice. Taken together, the results to date demonstrate that Fe ions are mutagenic to

  7. Genomics meets induced mutations in citrus: identification of deleted genes through comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the use of genomic approaches to identify pivotal genes in induced citrus mutants. Citrus is the most economically important fruit crop in the world while Spain is the first fresh citrus producer. The survival of the Citrus industry is critically dependent on genetically superior cultivars but improvements in fruit quality traits through traditional techniques are extremely difficult due to the unusual combination of biological characteristics of citrus. Genomic science, however, holds promise of improvements in breeding. In this work, we reported the successful identification of genes included in hemizygous deletions induced by fast neutron irradiation on Citrus clementina. Microarray-based CGH was used to identify underrepresented genes in a citrus mutant that shows color break delay. Subsequent confirmation of gene doses through quantitative PCR and comparison of best hits of putative deleted citrus genes against annotated genomes from other eudicots, specially poplar, enabled the prediction that these genes were clustered into a 700 kb fragment. The availability of Citrus BAC end sequences helped to draw a partial physical map of the deletion. Furthermore, gene content and order in the deleted segment was established by PCR location of gene hits on the physical map. Finally, a lower chlorophyll a/b ratio was found in green tissues from the mutant, an observation that can be related to the hemizygous deletion of a ClpC-like gene, coding a putative subunit of a multifunctional protease complex located into the chloroplast. Analysis of gene content and order inside this Citrus deletion led to the conclusion that microsynteny and local gene colinearity with Populus trichocarpa were higher than with the phylogenetically closer Arabidopsis thaliana genome. In conclusion, a combined strategy including genomics tools and induced citrus mutations has been proved to be a successful approach to identify genes with major roles in citrus fruit development

  8. Genomics Meets Induced Mutations in Citrus: Identification of Deleted Genes Through Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the use of genomic approaches to identify pivotal genes in induced citrus mutants. Citrus is the most economically important fruit crop in the world and Spain is the first fresh citrus producer. The survival of the citrus industry is critically dependent on genetically superior cultivars but improvements in fruit quality traits through traditional techniques are extremely difficult due to the unusual combination of biological characteristics of citrus. Genomic science, however, holds promise of improvements in breeding. In this work, we reported the successful identification of genes included in hemizygous deletions induced by fast neutron irradiation on Citrus clementina. Microarray-based CGH was used to identify underrepresented genes in a citrus mutant that shows color break delay. Subsequent confirmation of gene doses through quantitative PCR and comparison of best hits of putative deleted citrus genes against annotated genomes from other eudicots, specially poplar, enabled the prediction that these genes were clustered into a 700 kb fragment. The availability of Citrus BAC end sequences helped to draw a partial physical map of the deletion. Furthermore, gene content and order in the deleted segment was established by PCR location of gene hits on the physical map. Finally, a lower chlorophyll a/b ratio was found in green tissues from the mutant, an observation that can be related to the hemizygous deletion of a ClpC-like gene, coding a putative subunit of a multifunctional protease complex located into the chloroplast. Analysis of gene content and order inside this Citrus deletion led to the conclusion that microsynteny and local gene colinearity with Populus trichocarpa were higher than with the phylogenetically closer Arabidopsis thaliana genome. In conclusion, a combined strategy including genomics tools and induced citrus mutations has been proved to be a successful approach to identify genes with major roles in citrus fruit development

  9. A mutation in the insulin 2 gene induces diabetes with severe pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in the Mody mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Jie WANG; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Kubo, Suely-Kunimi; Kayo, Tsuyoshi; Lu, Danhong; Takata, Kuniaki; Koizumi, Akio; Izumi, Tetsuro

    1999-01-01

    The mouse autosomal dominant mutation Mody develops hyperglycemia with notable pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. This study demonstrates that one of the alleles of the gene for insulin 2 in Mody mice encodes a protein product that substitutes tyrosine for cysteine at the seventh amino acid of the A chain in its mature form. This mutation disrupts a disulfide bond between the A and B chains and can induce a drastic conformational change of this molecule. Although there was no gross defect in the ...

  10. NanoTIO2 (UV-Titan) does not induce ESTR mutations in the germline of prenatally exposed female mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Hougaard, Karin Sørig;

    2012-01-01

    Particulate air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates induces mutations in the male germline. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects...... on male germ cells resulting from environmental exposures; however, female germ cells have received little attention. Oocytes may be vulnerable during stages of active cell division (e.g., during fetal development). Accordingly, an increase in germline ESTR mutations in female mice prenatally exposed...... exposed by whole-body inhalation to the nanoTiO2 UV-Titan L181 (~42.4 mg UV-Titan/m3) or filtered clean air on gestation days (GD) 8–18. Female C57BL/6 F1 offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates...

  11. Closing Statement [International Symposium on Induced Mutations in Plants, Vienna (Austria), 12-15 August 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Symposium was the eighth in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme's Symposium series, dedicated to harnessing and disseminating information on current trends in induced mutagenesis in plants. The first meeting was held in 1969, and the most recent in 1995. Thirteen years on, in a climate of increasing food shortages, it was high time that this Symposium was held. Although mutation breeding is 80 years old, as we just heard, new applications continue to be found and will continue to be developed. The application of mutation techniques, such as Gamma-rays and other physical and chemical mutagens, has generated a vast amount of genetic variability and has played a significant role in plant breeding and genetic studies in countries throughout the world. The importance of these techniques is reflected in the large number of participants gathered here: a total of 500 delegates from 81 countries that are IAEA and FAO Member States and nine organizations. I believe that the extensive scientific programme, which included 126 oral and 252 poster presentations, is an indicator of the range, depth and relevance of the topic. Being aware of the scientific nature of this Symposium, let me however, say a few words on behalf of the IAEA's TC Programme. The programme provided financial support to several participants to attend this Symposium, but more importantly, many of the participants have been trained through the Technical Cooperation Programme, supported by the FAO/IAEA Joint Division. Technical training of this sort is a core component in the implementation of the IAEA mandate 'Atoms for Peace, Health and Prosperity'. Over the past five years, food and agriculture has accounted for one of the largest areas of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme around the world, and projects in this area are on the increase in the 2009-2011 programme cycle. The Agency's combination of technical and managerial expertise offers Member States significant benefits in the formulation and

  12. Mutations in uvrD induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Ossanna, N; Mount, D W

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated three new mutations in uvrD that increase expression of the Escherichia coli SOS response in the absence of DNA damage. Like other uvrD (DNA helicase II) mutants, these strains are sensitive to UV irradiation and have high spontaneous mutation frequencies. Complementation studies with uvrD+ showed that UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutator activity were recessive in these new mutants. The SOS-induction phenotype, however, was not completely complemented, which indicated that...

  13. Induced mutations in tomato SlExp1 alter cell wall metabolism and delay fruit softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoia, Silvia; Boualem, Adnane; Marcel, Fabien; Troadec, Christelle; Quemener, Bernard; Cellini, Francesco; Petrozza, Angelo; Vigouroux, Jacqueline; Lahaye, Marc; Carriero, Filomena; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening and softening are key traits for many fleshy fruit. Since cell walls play a key role in the softening process, expansins have been investigated to control fruit over ripening and deterioration. In tomato, expression of Expansin 1 gene, SlExp1, during fruit ripening was associated with fruit softening. To engineer tomato plants with long shelf life, we screened for mutant plants impaired in SlExp1 function. Characterization of two induced mutations, Slexp1-6_W211S, and Slexp1-7_Q213Stop, showed that SlExp1 loss of function leads to enhanced fruit firmness and delayed fruit ripening. Analysis of cell wall polysaccharide composition of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant pointed out significant differences for uronic acid, neutral sugar and total sugar contents. Hemicelluloses chemistry analysis by endo-β-1,4-d-glucanase hydrolysis and MALDI-TOF spectrometry revealed that xyloglucan structures were affected in the fruit pericarp of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant. Altogether, these results demonstrated that SlExp1 loss of function mutants yield firmer and late ripening fruits through modification of hemicellulose structure. These SlExp1 mutants represent good tools for breeding long shelf life tomato lines with contrasted fruit texture as well as for the understanding of the cell wall polysaccharide assembly dynamics in fleshy fruits.

  14. Possible contribution of induced mutations on breaking the rice yield barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At The World Rice Research Conference in Tsukuba, Japan, on 4 — 7 November 2004, there was an active discussion on how to increase the world rice yield production. Breeders agreed that after IR8, the yield potential of rice varieties could not increase drastically. From the breeding point of view, there were two approaches that already started in three to one decade ago, but it is still unfinished yet. These two approaches were to do breeding for hybrid rice varieties or breeding for new plant idiotype varieties. The idea to produce hybrid rice was stimulated by the success of hybrid corn, onion, and sorghum on commercial basis. Among the countries that are working for producing hybrid rice varieties, China was the leading one. China produced hybrid rice varieties and which are planted already in very large area. This success influenced other countries to do the same, including Indonesia. Now Indonesia has already released 11 hybrid rice varieties. Knowing so many characters that are already present in the rice collection, the idea to produce new plant idiotype appears. It seems not difficult to unite selected characters to become a new plant idiotype. In fact, however, up to now there are still a lot of obstacles that make those two approaches could not reach the real goal. This paper will discuss the possible contribution of induced mutations toward the success of these two approaches. (author)

  15. Induced mutations in ornamental plants by 'in vitro' irradiation of Petunia hybrida meristems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent decades it has been observed that for the induction of mutation in ornamental plants we can obtain better results when the plants are irradiated in vegetative state and even better 'in vitro' that when its are irradiated 'in vivo'. In this work the possibilities are showed to avoid the best use of a new biotechnology: the gamma irradiations on the meristem 'in vitro'. A tissue culture method was described for the best vegetative propagation of Petunia hybrid hort through morphogenesis induction of meristem. These were planted in the Murashige and Skoog's basic medium added with BAP and ANA. The pH was adjusted to 6.5 prior autoclaving at 121 Centigrade degree and 1.1 Kg/ cm2 for 15 minutes. Latter the meristem of plantules in immature and mature physiology stated were irradiated with gamma ray doses ranging from 1.0 at 10.0 Gy. The meristem were then subcultived aseptically with the following results: 1) The immature stage was higher radio sensibilities. 2) The LD 50 for the matured plants was to ranged from 1.0 at 9.0 Gy. and immature 1.0 at 8.0 Gy. 3) The better doses was at 7.5 Gy. 4) The meristem gamma irradiation at 7.5 Gy. showed in the first culture: the adventitious bud induced and the multi meristem formation. 5) In the second cultured the results reveals the 'variegadas' plants formations and the new purples flowers. (Author)

  16. Antibody-induced down-regulation of a mutated insulin receptor lacking an intact cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin receptor down-regulation was studied in various Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing transfected human insulin receptor cDNAs. In addition to a cell line expressing the normal receptor (CHO.T line), three lines expressing mutated receptors were studied: the CHO.T-t line, which expresses a receptor with a degraded cytoplasmic domain due to the removal of the C-terminal 112 amino acids, and the CHO.YF1 and CHO.YF3 lines, in which important autophosphorylation sites of the receptor kinase (tyrosines-1162 and -1163) have been replaced by phenylalanine. A monoclonal anti-receptor antibody, but not insulin itself, was found to down-regulate cell surface receptor levels in all four cell lines by 60-80% after 18-h treatment at 370C. Down-regulation of the CHO.T and CHO.T-t receptors occurred at similar antibody concentrations and with a similar time course, although the maximum level of CHO.T-t down-regulation (60%) was generally lower than the level of CHO.T down-regulation (80%). Pulse-chase labeling of these two cell types with [35S]methionine revealed that antibody treatment of both CHO.T and CHO.T-t cells resulted in a similar increase in the rate of degradation of mature receptor subunits. These results indicate that antibody-induced down-regulation of the insulin receptor in these cells can occur in the absence of various autophosphorylation sites of the receptor and that the mechanism of antibody-induced down-regulation is different from that for insulin

  17. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Ina, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Anzai, Keizo; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Shuji; Kurisaki, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 background are highly sensitive to virus-induced diabetes. Tyk2 gene expression is strongly reduced in Tyk2-mutant mice, associated with low Tyk2 promoter activity, and leads to decreased expression of interferon-inducible genes, resulting in significantly compromised antiviral response. Tyk2-mutant pancreatic β-cells are unresponsive even to high dose of Type I interferon. Reversal of virus-induced diabetes could be achieved by β-cell-specific Tyk2 gene expression. Thus, reduced Tyk2 gene expression in pancreatic β-cells due to natural mutation is responsible for susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes. PMID:25849081

  18. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  19. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) I. comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of physical & chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic effectiveness usually means the rate of mutation as related to dose. Mutagenic efficiency refers to the mutation rate in relation to damage. Studies on comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of two physical (gamma rays and fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU and EMS) on two desi (G 130 & H 214), one kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345) chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) have been reported. The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 and 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 and 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU 0.01% 20h and 0.02% 8h) and EMS (0.1% 20h and 0.2% 8h). Results indicated that chemical mutagens, particularly NMU are not only more effective but also efficient than physical mutagens in inducing mutations in chickpea. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency showed differential behaviour depending upon mutagen and varietal type. Chemical mutagens were more efficient than physical in inducing cholorophyll as well as viable and total number of mutations. Among the mutagens NMU was the most potent, while in the physical, gamma rays were more effective. Out of four mutagens, NMU was the most effective and efficient in inducing a high frequency and wide spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in the M2 followed by fast neutrons. While gamma rays showed least effectiveness, EMS was least efficient mutagens. Major differences in the mutagenic response of the four cultivars were observed. The varieties of desi type were more resistant towards mutagenic treatment than kabuli and green seeded type

  20. Genetic analysis of wild-isolated Neurospora crassa strains identified as dominant suppressors of repeat-induced point mutation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, Ashwin; Noubissi, Felicite K.; Vyas, Meenal; Kasbekar, Durgadas P

    2003-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora results in inactivation of duplicated DNA sequences. RIP is thought to provide protection against foreign elements such as retrotransposons, only one of which has been found in N. crassa. To examine the role of RIP in nature, we have examined seven N. crassa strains, identified among 446 wild isolates scored for dominant suppression of RIP. The test system involved a small duplication that targets RIP to the easily scorable gene erg-3. We prev...

  1. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations induce hyperactive signaling by disrupting autoinhibition by the PKC-responsive inhibitory domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamason, Rebecca L; McCully, Ryan R; Lew, Stefanie M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2010-09-28

    The regulated activation of NF-κB by antigen receptor signaling is required for normal B and T lymphocyte activation during the adaptive immune response. Dysregulated NF-κB activation is associated with several types of lymphoma, including diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). During normal antigen receptor signaling, the multidomain scaffold protein CARD11 undergoes a transition from a closed, inactive state to an open, active conformation that recruits several signaling proteins into a complex, leading to IKK kinase activation. This transition is regulated by the CARD11 inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions that prevent cofactor binding to CARD11 prior to signaling, but which is neutralized after receptor engagement by phosphorylation. Several oncogenic CARD11 mutations have been identified in DLBCL that enhance activity and that are mostly found in the coiled-coil domain. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations cause CARD11 hyperactivity and spontaneous NF-κB activation are poorly understood. In this report, we provide several lines of evidence that oncogenic mutations F123I and L225LI induce CARD11 hyperactivity by disrupting autoinhibition by the CARD11 ID. These mutations disrupt ID-mediated intramolecular interactions and ID-dependent inhibition and bypass the requirement for ID phosphorylation during T cell receptor signaling. Intriguingly, these mutations selectively enhance the apparent affinity of CARD11 for Bcl10, but not for other signaling proteins that are recruited to CARD11 in an ID-dependent manner during normal antigen receptor signaling. Our results establish a mechanism that explains how DLBCL-associated mutations in CARD11 can initiate spontaneous, receptor-independent activation of NF-κB.

  2. Molecular structural analysis of HPRT mutations induced by thermal and epithermal neutrons in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinashi, Y; Sakurai, Y; Masunaga, S; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Akaboshi, M; Ono, K

    2000-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to thermal and epithermal neutrons, and the occurrence of mutations at the HPRT locus was investigated. The Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which has been improved for use in neutron capture therapy, was the neutron source. Neutron energy spectra ranging from nearly pure thermal to epithermal can be chosen using the spectrum shifters and thermal neutron filters. To determine mutant frequency and cell survival, cells were irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons under three conditions: thermal neutron mode, mixed mode with thermal and epithermal neutrons, and epithermal neutron mode. The mutagenicity was different among the three irradiation modes, with the epithermal neutrons showing a mutation frequency about 5-fold that of the thermal neutrons and about 1.5-fold that of the mixed mode. In the thermal neutron and mixed mode, boron did not significantly increase the frequency of the mutants at the same dose. Therefore, the effect of boron as used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is quantitatively minimal in terms of mutation induction. Over 300 independent neutron-induced mutant clones were isolated from 12 experiments. The molecular structure of HPRT mutations was determined by analysis of all nine exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. In the thermal neutron and mixed modes, total and partial deletions were dominant and the fraction of total deletions was increased in the presence of boron. In the epithermal neutron mode, more than half of the mutations observed were total deletions. Our results suggest that there are clear differences between thermal and epithermal neutron beams in their mutagenicity and in the structural pattern of the mutants that they induce. Mapping of deletion breakpoints of 173 partial-deletion mutants showed that regions of introns 3-4, 7/8-9 and 9-0 are sensitive to the induction of mutants by neutron irradiation.

  3. Complete Spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-induced Mutations on HBV cccDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Christoph; Sohn, Ji A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infections that cannot yet be cured. The virus persists in infected hepatocytes, because covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, is stable in nondividing cells. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in capsids in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes, but do not destroy nuclear cccDNA. Because over 200 million people are still infected, a cure for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has become one of the major challenges in antiviral therapy. As a first step toward the development of curative therapies, we previously demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to functionally inactivate cccDNA derived from infectious HBV. Moreover, some evidence suggests that certain cytokines might induce an APOBEC-mediated cascade leading to the destruction of cccDNA. In this report we investigated whether a combination of the two mechanisms could act synergistically to inactivate cccDNA. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), we determined the complete spectrum of mutations in cccDNA following Cas9 cleavage and repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We found that over 90% of HBV DNA was cleaved by Cas9. In addition our results showed that editing of HBV DNA after Cas9 cleavage is at least 15,000 times more efficient that APOBEC-mediated cytosine deamination following treatment of infected cells with interferon alpha (IFNα). We also found that a previously used method to detect cytosine deaminated DNA, termed 3D-PCR, overestimates the amount and frequency of edited HBV DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is so far the best method to functionally inactivate HBV cccDNA and provide a cure for CHB. PMID:27203444

  4. Evaluating and validating the protocol for gamma radiation induced mutations in floral distinct rosa spp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the highly fragrant Rosa species, Rosa gruss an teplitz and Rosa centifolia have high value in terms of commercial importance and economical trade. However, the absence of floral diversification and diversity in color patterns in these species acts as limiting factors in floriculture trade of these species. In the present study, we aimed to induce mutations using gamma radiations up to 120 Gy to observe the rate and the correlated effects on the several plant traits in micropropagated shoot tips of Rosa gruss an teplitz and Rosa centifolia. Irradiated shoot tips were micropropagated for one culture cycle and were acclimatized in a green house after in vitro rooting. Plants of irradiated population at 60 and 30 Gy showed 78.12 and 38.50 percentage less culture rooting percentage age as well as 23.82 and 7 percentage less flower size as compared to non irradiated population of Rosa gruss an teplitz and Rosa centifolia respectively. Moreover, flower color component a* (+ redness - green, 36.16 and 27.16) and chroma (37.77 and 27.5) depicted minimum while L* (Lightness, 45.12 and 76.64), b* (+ yellow - blue, 10.69 and -4.14) and hue angle (17.1 and -8.58) maximum value. Apart from these variations, mutants of Rosa gruss an teplitz also produced variegated, pink color and different shape flowers. Genetic variations observed among the putative mutants of Rosa gruss an teplitz and Rosa centifolia were evaluated using twelve decamer RAPD primers. Phylogenetic inferences showed large genetic diversity in putative mutants as compared to mother plant. (author)

  5. M 127- A Promising Tomato Variety Developed Through Induced Mutation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial wilt (BW) is the most serious constraints for tomato cultivation in Sri Lanka. At present, the producers and consumers are more interested in yield and quality of produce. The objective of this study was to develop genotypes having BW resistance, high yield potential (>20 t/ha) with desirable fruit qualities. Application of induced mutations was practiced on the Manik variety. It is a well-adapted variety with BW resistance, large fruit size with low fruit weight (76 g) due to large empty locular cavities. Several beneficial mutants better than the parent variety were identified in the M2 generation and confirmed in the M4 generation. The five most promising mutants were evaluated for BW resistance, fruit quality and yield. During dry and wet seasons, the yield evaluation studies were conducted in research and farmers' fields. The mutant M 127 gave significantly higher yields (32.2 t/ha) than the check variety T 245 (21.7 t/ha) during the both seasons. Bacterial wilt screening in the field and laboratory demonstrated that M 127 was moderately resistant. The National Coordinated Varietal Trials confirmed that it was a promising mutant under different agro-ecological zones in both dry and wet seasons. Farm trials indicated that farmer acceptability was higher for the mutant than the check variety. The mutant M 127 possesses high fruit weight (158.6 g), red, slightly flattened firm fruits. It is highly acceptable for table purposes. In the near future the mutant M 127 will be officially released to farmers and at present, it is utilized as a donor parent in the development of new HF3 hybrid under the heterosis breeding programme. (author)

  6. Complete Spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-induced Mutations on HBV cccDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Christoph; Sohn, Ji A

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infections that cannot yet be cured. The virus persists in infected hepatocytes, because covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, is stable in nondividing cells. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in capsids in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes, but do not destroy nuclear cccDNA. Because over 200 million people are still infected, a cure for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has become one of the major challenges in antiviral therapy. As a first step toward the development of curative therapies, we previously demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to functionally inactivate cccDNA derived from infectious HBV. Moreover, some evidence suggests that certain cytokines might induce an APOBEC-mediated cascade leading to the destruction of cccDNA. In this report we investigated whether a combination of the two mechanisms could act synergistically to inactivate cccDNA. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), we determined the complete spectrum of mutations in cccDNA following Cas9 cleavage and repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We found that over 90% of HBV DNA was cleaved by Cas9. In addition our results showed that editing of HBV DNA after Cas9 cleavage is at least 15,000 times more efficient that APOBEC-mediated cytosine deamination following treatment of infected cells with interferon alpha (IFNα). We also found that a previously used method to detect cytosine deaminated DNA, termed 3D-PCR, overestimates the amount and frequency of edited HBV DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is so far the best method to functionally inactivate HBV cccDNA and provide a cure for CHB. PMID:27203444

  7. Aminoglycoside-induced mutation suppression (stop codon readthrough) as a therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R.; Viollet, Laurence; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, lethal, X-linked genetic disease, affecting 1 in 3500 newborn males. It is caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Owing to the large size of the gene, the mutation rate in both germline and somatic cells is very high. Nearly 13–15% of DMD cases are caused by nonsense mutations leading to premature termination codons in the reading frame that results in truncated dystrophin protein. Currently there is no cure for DMD. The only available treat...

  8. Somatic-cell mutation induced by short exposures to cigarette smoke in urate-null, oxidative stress-sensitive Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Tomoyo; Koike, Ryota; Yuma, Yoko; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Suzuki, Toshinori; Negishi, Tomoe

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that a urate-null strain of Drosophila is hypersensitive to cigarette smoke (CS), and we suggested that CS induces oxidative stress in Drosophila because uric acid is a potent antioxidant. Although the carcinogenic risk of CS exposure is widely recognized; documentation of in vivo genotoxic activity of environmental CS, especially gaseous-phase CS, remains inconclusive. To date, somatic-cell mutations in Drosophila resulting from exposure to CS have not been detected via the somatic mutation and recombination test (wing spot test) with wild-type flies, a widely used Drosophila assay for the detection of somatic-cell mutation; moreover, genotoxicity has not been documented via a DNA repair test that involves DNA repair-deficient Drosophila. In this study, we used a new Drosophila strain (y v ma-l; mwh) to examine the mutagenicity induced by gaseous-phase CS; these flies are urate-null due to a mutation in ma-l, and they are heterozygous for multiple wing hair (mwh), a mutation that functions as a marker for somatic-cell mutation. In an assay with this newly developed strain, a superoxide anion-producing weed-killer, paraquat, exhibited significant mutagenicity; in contrast, paraquat was hardly mutagenic with a wild-type strain. Drosophila larvae were exposed to CS for 2, 4 or 6h, and then kept at 25°C on instant medium until adulthood. After eclosion, mutant spots, which consisted of mutant hairs on wings, were scored. The number of mutant spots increased significantly in an exposure time-dependent manner in the urate-null females (ma-l (-/-)), but not in the urate-positive females (ma-l (+/-)). In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to CS was mutagenic in this in vivo system. In addition, we obtained suggestive data regarding reactive oxygen species production in larva after CS exposure using the fluorescence probe H2DCFDA. These results suggest that oxidative damage, which might be countered by uric acid, was partly responsible

  9. Herpesvirus Telomerase RNA (vTR) with a Mutated Template Sequence Abrogates Herpesvirus-Induced Lymphomagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Sina Arndt; Sascha Trapp; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Jarosinski, Keith W.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA (TR) represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR)...

  10. Relationship of p53 Mutations to Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine G. Einspahr

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is continually subjected to UV-irradiation with the p53 gene playing a pivotal role in repair of UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Consequently, p53 alterations are early events in human UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. We studied 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, 16 actinic keratoses (AK, 13 samples adjacent to an AK (chronically sun-damaged, and 14 normal-appearing skin samples for p53 mutation, p53 immunostaining (IHC, apoptosis (in situ TUNEL and morphology, and proliferation (PCNA. The frequency of p53 mutation increased from 14% in normal skin, to 38.5% in sun-damaged skin, 63% in AK, and 54% in SCC. p53 IHC increased similarly. Apoptosis (TUNEL increased from 0.06 ± 0.02%, to 0.1 ± 0.2, 0.3 ± 0.3, and 0.4 ± 0.3 in normal skin, sun-damaged skin, AK, and SCC, respectively. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with proliferation (i.e., TUNEL and PCNA, r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and proliferation was significantly increased in the progression from normal skin to SCC. Bax was significantly increased in SCC compared to AK. These data imply that apoptosis in samples with a high frequency of p53 mutation may not necessarily be p53-dependent. We suggest that there is a mechanism for apoptosis in response to increased cellular proliferation that is p53-independent.

  11. Multipotent genetic suppression of retrotransposon-induced mutations by Nxf1 through fine-tuning of alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Concepcion

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular gene expression machinery has coevolved with molecular parasites, such as viruses and transposons, which rely on host cells for their expression and reproduction. We previously reported that a wild-derived allele of mouse Nxf1 (Tap, a key component of the host mRNA nuclear export machinery, suppresses two endogenous retrovirus-induced mutations and shows suggestive evidence of positive selection. Here we show that Nxf1(CAST suppresses a specific and frequent class of intracisternal A particle (IAP-induced mutations, including Ap3d1(mh2J, a model for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and Atcay(hes, an orthologous gene model for Cayman ataxia, among others. The molecular phenotype of suppression includes approximately two-fold increase in the level of correctly-spliced mRNA and a decrease in mutant-specific, alternatively-processed RNA accumulating from the inserted allele. Insertional mutations involving ETn and LINE elements are not suppressed, demonstrating a high degree of specificity to this suppression mechanism. These results implicate Nxf1 in some instances of pre-mRNA processing, demonstrate the useful range of Nxf1(CAST alleles for manipulating existing mouse models of disease, and specifically imply a low functional threshold for therapeutic benefit in Cayman ataxia.

  12. Molecular nature of mutations induced by high-LET irradiation with argon and carbon ions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Liu Yang; Kambara, Tadashi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoabe@riken.jp [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an important parameter to be considered in heavy-ion mutagenesis. However, in plants, no quantitative data are available on the molecular nature of the mutations induced with high-LET radiation above 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. In this study, we irradiated dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana with Ar and C ions with an LET of 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. We analyzed the DNA alterations caused by the higher-LET radiation. Mutants were identified from the M{sub 2} pools. In total, 14 and 13 mutated genes, including bin2, egy1, gl1, gl2, hy1, hy3-5, ttg1, and var2, were identified in the plants derived from Ar- and C-ions irradiation, respectively. In the mutants from both irradiations, deletion was the most frequent type of mutation; 13 of the 14 mutated genes from the Ar ion-irradiated plants and 11 of the 13 mutated genes from the C ion-irradiated plants harbored deletions. Analysis of junction regions generated by the 2 types of irradiation suggested that alternative non-homologous end-joining was the predominant pathway of repair of break points. Among the deletions, the proportion of large deletions (>100 bp) was about 54% for Ar-ion irradiation and about 64% for C-ion irradiation. Both current results and previously reported data revealed that the proportions of the large deletions induced by 290-keV {mu}m{sup -1} radiations were higher than those of the large deletions induced by lower-LET radiations (6% for 22.5-30.0 keV {mu}m{sup -1} and 27% for 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}). Therefore, the 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1} heavy-ion beams can effectively induce large deletions and will prove useful as novel mutagens for plant breeding and analysis of gene functions, particularly tandemly arrayed genes.

  13. Protective effect of curcumin and chlorophyllin against DNA mutation induced by cyclophosphamide or benzo[a]pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, M.A.; Elbehairy, A.M.; Ghoneim, M.A.; Amer, H.A. [Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt). Biochemistry Dept. and Biotechnology Center

    2007-03-15

    The current study was carried out to evaluate the potency of curcumin and chlorophyllin as natural antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress markers induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) and benzo[a]pyrene [B(a)P] which were used as free radical inducers. For this purpose, 126 male albino rats were used. The animals were assigned into 4 main groups: negative control group; oxidant-treated group (subdivided into two subgroups: cyclophosphamide- treated group and benzo[a]pyrene-treated group); curcumin-treated group; and chlorophyllin-treated group. Liver samples were collected after two days post the oxidant inoculation and at the end of the experimental period (10 weeks). These samples were examined for determination of liver microsomal malondialdehyde (MDA), DNA fragmentation, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentration. Both CP and B(a)P caused increments in DNA fragmentation percentages, liver microsomal MDA, concentration of 8-OHdG and induced point mutation. Treatment of rats with either curcumin or chlorophyllin revealed lower DNA fragmentation percentages, liver microsomal MDA concentration, concentration of 8-OHdG and prevented induction of mutations, i. e., reversed the oxidative stress induced by CP and B(a)P and proved that they were capable of protecting rats against the oxidative damage evoked by these oxidants. (orig.)

  14. Disruption of Transcriptional Coactivator Sub1 Leads to Genome-Wide Re-distribution of Clustered Mutations Induced by APOBEC in Active Yeast Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lada, Artem G; Kliver, Sergei F; Dhar, Alok; Polev, Dmitrii E; Masharsky, Alexey E; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in genomes of species are frequently distributed non-randomly, resulting in mutation clusters, including recently discovered kataegis in tumors. DNA editing deaminases play the prominent role in the etiology of these mutations. To gain insight into the enigmatic mechanisms of localized hypermutagenesis that lead to cluster formation, we analyzed the mutational single nucleotide variations (SNV) data obtained by whole-genome sequencing of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by AID/APOBEC deaminase and base analog 6-HAP. Deaminase from sea lamprey, PmCDA1, induced robust clusters, while 6-HAP induced a few weak ones. We found that PmCDA1, AID, and APOBEC1 deaminases preferentially mutate the beginning of the actively transcribed genes. Inactivation of transcription initiation factor Sub1 strongly reduced deaminase-induced can1 mutation frequency, but, surprisingly, did not decrease the total SNV load in genomes. However, the SNVs in the genomes of the sub1 clones were re-distributed, and the effect of mutation clustering in the regions of transcription initiation was even more pronounced. At the same time, the mutation density in the protein-coding regions was reduced, resulting in the decrease of phenotypically detected mutants. We propose that the induction of clustered mutations by deaminases involves: a) the exposure of ssDNA strands during transcription and loss of protection of ssDNA due to the depletion of ssDNA-binding proteins, such as Sub1, and b) attainment of conditions favorable for APOBEC action in subpopulation of cells, leading to enzymatic deamination within the currently expressed genes. This model is applicable to both the initial and the later stages of oncogenic transformation and explains variations in the distribution of mutations and kataegis events in different tumor cells.

  15. A sucrose-rich diet induces mutations in the rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L.O.; Daneshvar, B.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte;

    2002-01-01

    affecting the overall energy and carbohydrate intake. We observed a dose-dependent increase in the mutation frequency at the cII site in the colonic mucosa with increased sucrose levels, reaching a 129% increase at the highest dose level. This would indicate a direct or indirect genotoxic effect...... of a sucrose-rich diet. No significant increase in mutations was observed in the liver. To seek an explanation for this finding, a variety of parameters were examined representing different mechanisms, including increased oxidative stress, changes in oxidative defense, effects on DNA repair, or changes......, but the background level of DNA adducts (1-compounds) as determined by P-32 postlabeling was significantly decreased in colon. This decrease in colon 1-compounds correlated inversely with both mutation frequency and ERCC1 DNA repair gene expression. Dietary sucrose did not change liver apoptosis or cell turnover...

  16. Mutations in uvrD induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossanna, N.; Mount, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated three new mutations in uvrD that increase expression of the Escherichia coli SOS response in the absence of DNA damage. Like other uvrD (DNA helicase II) mutants, these strains are sensitive to UV irradiation and have high spontaneous mutation frequencies. Complementation studies with uvrD+ showed that UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutator activity were recessive in these new mutants. The SOS-induction phenotype, however, was not completely complemented, which indicated that the mutant proteins were functioning in some capacity. The viability of one of the mutants in combination with rep-5 suggests that the protein is functional in DNA replication. We suggest that these mutant proteins are deficient in DNA repair activities (since UV sensitivity is complemented) but are able to participate in DNA replication. We believe that defective DNA replication in these mutants increases SOS expression.

  17. Mutations in uvrD induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have isolated three new mutations in uvrD that increase expression of the Escherichia coli SOS response in the absence of DNA damage. Like other uvrD (DNA helicase II) mutants, these strains are sensitive to UV irradiation and have high spontaneous mutation frequencies. Complementation studies with uvrD+ showed that UV sensitivity and spontaneous mutator activity were recessive in these new mutants. The SOS-induction phenotype, however, was not completely complemented, which indicated that the mutant proteins were functioning in some capacity. The viability of one of the mutants in combination with rep-5 suggests that the protein is functional in DNA replication. We suggest that these mutant proteins are deficient in DNA repair activities (since UV sensitivity is complemented) but are able to participate in DNA replication. We believe that defective DNA replication in these mutants increases SOS expression

  18. Specific UV-induced mutation spectrum in the p53 gene of skin tumors from DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UV component of sunlight is the major carcinogen involved in the etiology of skin cancers. The authors have studied the rare, hereditary syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by a very high incidence of cutaneous tumors on exposed skin at an early age, probably due to a deficiency in excision repair of UV-induced lesions. It is interesting to determine the UV mutation spectrum in XP skin tumors in order to correlate the absence of repair of specific DNA lesions and the initiation of skin tumors. The p53 gene is frequently mutated in human cancers and represents a good target for studying mutation spectra since there are >100 potential sites for phenotypic mutations. Using reverse transcription-PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism to analyze >40 XP skin tumors (mainly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), the authors have found that 40% (17 out of 43) contained at least one point mutation on the p53 gene. All the mutations were located at dipyrimidine sites, essentially at CC sequences, which are hot spots for UV-induced DNA lesions. Sixty-one percent of these mutations were tandem CC → TT mutations considered to be unique to UV-induced lesions; these mutations are not observed in internal human tumors. All the mutations, except two, must be due to translesion synthesis of unrepaired dipyrimidine lesions left on the nontranscribed strand. These results show the existence of preferential repair of UV lesions [either pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts] on the transcribed strand in human tissues

  19. Role of combined use of classical induced mutation breeding and biotechnology in development of new flower colour/form in ornamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In floriculture trade there is always demand and necessity of new and novel ornamental varieties. Flower colour is one of the most important component of novelties. Induced somatic mutation techniques by using ionizing radiations and other mutagens have successfully produced quite a large number of new promising varieties (50 Nos.) in different ornamental (Bougainvillea, Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, Rose, Tuberose, Lantana depressa etc.) plants by bringing about genetic changes at Floriculture Section, National Botanical Research Institute, India. For inducing novelties in flower colour of different plants the technique of selection of proper type/state of plant material for experiment, suitable dose, detection of mutation at right stage of development, isolation and multiplication of chimeric tissue have been standardised. The capability of the technique is well understood from significant number of new varieties developed via direct mutation breeding in already adapted, modern genotypes and enriched the germplasm. The mutations in flower lour/shape were detected as chimera in M1v1, M1v2, M1v3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure of gamma rays. The main bottleneck of mutation breeding is that the mutation appears as chimera. When the entire branch is mutated, mutants can be isolated through conventional propagation techniques while small sectorial mutation in the floret cannot be isolated using existing conventional techniques. Therefore, many new flower colour/shape mutants are lost due to the lack of a suitable propagation technique. By applying biotechnological technique on the same mutagen treated gamma rays population a novel tissue culture technique hasbeen standardised to regenerate plants directly from such mutated sectors (ray florets) of Chrysanthemum. A number of somatic flower colour/shape mutants have been developed in Chrysanthemum by using this in vitro technique. Combination of classical mutation breeding and

  20. 27. Molecular spectra of acrylamide-induced mutation at hprt locus in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 and NB4. cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘胜学; 曹佳; 杨梦苏; 方志俊; 安辉

    2001-01-01

    The genotoxicity of acrylamide was investigated by methods of single cell clone culturing, two-way screening count, multiplex PCR amplification and electrophoresis technique. Acrylamide only showed clear mutagenesis until dose raised 700 mg*L-1 in HL-60 cells. The most frequent spontaneous mutation were point mutation (≥90.0%) and acrylamide-induced mutation mainly included partial deletion and point mutation (respectively 40.0%~66.7%/33.3%~60.0%). Total gene deletion wasn't discovered in both of cells. There were deletion mutation in all exons of hprt gene(except 7/8 exon), and toward the 3' end of the hprt gene. The most frequent acrylamide-induced mutation were point mutation and single exon deletion (93.3%/86.1%). There were not clear difference in both of cells. The results suggest that the spectra of spontaneous and acrylamide-induced mutants were different. and the smaller changes in genetic structure have something to do with mechanism.

  1. How does the 'ancient' asexual Philodina roseola (Rotifera : Bdelloidea) handle potential UVB-induced mutations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Claus; Ahlrichs, Wilko H.; Buma, Anita G. J.; van de Poll, Willem H.; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R. P.

    2013-01-01

    Like other obligate asexuals, bdelloid rotifers are expected to suffer from degradation of their genomes through processes including the accumulation of deleterious mutations. However, sequence-based analyses in this regard remain inconclusive. Instead of looking for historical footprints of mutatio

  2. Application of Two- and Four-Mutation Carcinogenesis Models to UV induced Skin Tumours in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema LB; Leenhouts HP; LSO

    1995-01-01

    Dit rapport bevat de resultaten van de analyse van de incidentie van huidtumoren bij muizen na blootstelling aan ultra-violette straling (UV). Twee soorten modellen, gebaseerd op het meerstadiumkarakter van het carcinogenese proces, werden gebruikt om de incidentie te beschrijven: een twee-mutat

  3. Studies on radiation induced mutation of pollen, ovary and plant of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pollen, ovary and whole plants of wheat in spike forming stage, ear sprouting stage and the end of flowering stage were irradiated by 60Co γ-rays. The seed setting rate in the treated generation were calculated. The survival rate of M1 plants, the mutation rate and the mutant types in M2 were investigated. The results show that the optimal dose for irradiation of wheat living plants is 0.206 to 0.516 C/kg(800∼2000 R) that is only one tenth for irradiation of dry wheat seeds, and the whole mutation rate, beneficial mutation frequency and percentage of beneficial mutation for irradiation of living plants are 50 ∼57%,, 22∼24% and 83∼127% higher than that for irradiation of dry seeds, respectively. The results also show that in the same exposure range the smaller exposure rate has more effects. The optimal exposure rate is 7.74∼12.9 mC/kg (30∼50 R) per minute

  4. Fever-Induced Life-Threatening Arrhythmias in Children Harboring an SCN5A Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Chockalingam; L.A. Rammeloo; P.G. Postema; J. Hruda; S.A.B. Clur; N.A. Blom; A.A. Wilde

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac channelopathies caused by SCN5A mutation are well tolerated by most patients. However, the dramatic presentation of a previously healthy 4-month-old girl with life-threatening arrhythmias and the subsequent findings in the child and her family provide evidence that loss-of-function sodium ch

  5. BRD4-targeted therapy induces Myc-independent cytotoxicity in Gnaq/11-mutatant uveal melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Grazia; Sawle, Ashley D; Musi, Elgilda; Schwartz, Gary K

    2015-10-20

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is an aggressive intraocular malignancy with limited therapeutic options. Both primary and metastatic UM are characterized by oncogenic mutations in the G-protein alpha subunit q and 11. Furthermore, nearly 40% of UM has amplification of the chromosomal arm 8q and monosomy of chromosome 3, with consequent anomalies of MYC copy number. Chromatin regulators have become attractive targets for cancer therapy. In particular, the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) inhibitor JQ1 has shown selective inhibition of c-Myc expression with antiproliferative activity in hematopoietic and solid tumors. Here we provide evidence that JQ1 had cytotoxic activity in UM cell lines carrying Gnaq/11 mutations, while in cells without the mutations had little effects. Using microarray analysis, we identified a large subset of genes modulated by JQ1 involved in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Further analysis of selected genes determined that the concomitant silencing of Bcl-xL and Rad51 represented the minimal requirement to mimic the apoptotic effects of JQ1 in the mutant cells, independently of c-Myc. In addition, administration of JQ1 to mouse xenograft models of Gnaq-mutant UM resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth.Collectively, our results define BRD4 targeting as a novel therapeutic intervention against UM with Gnaq/Gna11 mutations. PMID:26397223

  6. Evolution of metastasis revealed by mutational landscapes of chemically induced skin cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Melissa Q; Halliwill, Kyle D; Chin, Douglas; Delrosario, Reyno; Hirst, Gillian; Vuong, Peter; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Hewinson, James; Adams, David J; Balmain, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors show a high level of genetic heterogeneity, but the processes that influence the timing and route of metastatic dissemination of the subclones are unknown. Here we have used whole-exome sequencing of 103 matched benign, malignant and metastatic skin tumors from genetically heterogeneous mice to demonstrate that most metastases disseminate synchronously from the primary tumor, supporting parallel rather than linear evolution as the predominant model of metastasis. Shared mutations between primary carcinomas and their matched metastases have the distinct A-to-T signature of the initiating carcinogen dimethylbenzanthracene, but non-shared mutations are primarily G-to-T, a signature associated with oxidative stress. The existence of carcinomas that either did or did not metastasize in the same host animal suggests that there are tumor-intrinsic factors that influence metastatic seeding. We also demonstrate the importance of germline polymorphisms in determining allele-specific mutations, and we identify somatic genetic alterations that are specifically related to initiation of carcinogenesis by Hras or Kras mutations. Mouse tumors that mimic the genetic heterogeneity of human cancers can aid our understanding of the clonal evolution of metastasis and provide a realistic model for the testing of novel therapies. PMID:26523969

  7. Proteomic analysis of the low mutation rate of diploid male gametes induced by colchicine in Ginkgo biloba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yang

    Full Text Available Colchicine treatment of G. biloba microsporocytes results in a low mutation rate in the diploid (2n male gamete. The mutation rate is significantly lower as compared to other tree species and impedes the breeding of new economic varieties. Proteomic analysis was done to identify the proteins that influence the process of 2n gamete formation in G. biloba. The microsporangia of G. biloba were treated with colchicine solution for 48 h and the proteins were analyzed using 2-D gel electrophoresis and compared to protein profiles of untreated microsporangia. A total of 66 proteins showed difference in expression levels. Twenty-seven of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Among the 27 proteins, 14 were found to be up-regulated and the rest 13 were down-regulated. The identified proteins belonged to five different functional classes: ATP generation, transport and carbohydrate metabolism; protein metabolism; ROS scavenging and detoxifying enzymes; cell wall remodeling and metabolism; transcription, cell cycle and signal transduction. The identification of these differentially expressed proteins and their function could help in analysing the mechanism of lower mutation rate of diploid male gamete when the microsporangium of G. biloba was induced by colchicine.

  8. Opening Remarks by W Burkart [International Symposium on Induced Mutations in Plants, Vienna (Austria), 12-15 August 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This international Symposium, promoted by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, is the eighth of its kind - the first was held in 1969 - dedicated to harnessing and disseminating information on current trends in induced mutagenesis in plants. These symposia have dealt with themes relating to the development of efficient protocols for induced mutagenesis and their role in the enhancement of quality traits, as well as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses in crops and the integration of in vitro and molecular genetic techniques in mutation induction. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division has been promoting the efficient use of mutation techniques since the late 1960's, in line with the Agency's 'atoms for peace' agenda, very much related to agricultural policy and practices of some our main donor nations. In 1960, for example, in the United States, disease heavily damaged the bean crop in Michigan - except for a promising new variety that had been made by radiation breeding, which quickly replaced the old bean. The Manual on Mutation Breeding, edited by the Agency and first published in 1970, updated in 1979 and reprinted several times afterwards, was the first book of its kind in the world. It has been widely used both as textbook in universities (translated into a couple of local languages) and reference book for breeders in their profession. Together with the training provided to scientists in developing countries and the support and coordination of research activities in this area, this manual has greatly promoted the correct and efficient use of mutation techniques in crop improvement. At a time when the world is facing a food and energy crisis of unprecedented proportions, plant mutation breeding can be a catalyst in developing improved, higher-yield, saline-resistant sturdier crop varieties. More and more, the interest of the scientific community in this discipline has focused on the discovery of genes that control important traits, and on understanding the functions and

  9. Sesame improvement by induced mutations: Results of the co-ordinated research project and recommendation for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project has brought together sesame breeders from 11 countries. They, together with pathologists, agronomists and physiologists, have made considerable effort to advance the genetic improvement in sesame. The results and conclusions from this project cover the mutation techniques used for the genetic improvement of various aspects of sesame. These recommendations do not only deal with the application of mutation induction, but also with the wider plant breeding related objectives and methods to be considered for this semi-domesticated crop. It is clear that more advanced techniques can and should be incorporated in the process which would enhance the genetic improvement. Although five years is a relatively limited time in a plant breeding programme, the participants have been able to produce and make available a considerable pool of agronomically interesting mutant sesame germplasm. The participants in the CRP considered that, together with other specialists, plant breeders can gain fuller benefit from the mutations induced by radiation or chemicals. Work on these mutants must continue in co-operation/consultation with plant physiologists and pathologists, and with biotechnologists who may in the future be able to provide in the future methods for introducing beneficial traits from other crops into sesame. The sesame programme should include scientists from the Member States where sesame grows and scientists from developed countries who may have greater access to physiological and molecular research facilities. (author)

  10. Antimutagenic effect of Phellinus rimosus (Berk) Pilat against chemical induced mutations of histidine dependent Salmonella typhimurium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K

    2011-10-01

    Mutations are one of the important factors contributing to oncogenesis. Somatic mutations have been detected in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in various types of cancers. In vitro antimutagenic activity of ethyl acetate extract of macro fungus, Phellinus rimosus was evaluated by Ames' mutagenicity assay. The effect was evaluated against the direct acting mutagens (sodium azide, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, doxorubicin and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine) and mutagen needing activation (2-acetyl aminofluorine, and benzo[a]pyrene). The extract was significantly (p<0.05) and dose dependently effective against direct acting mutagens and mutagen needing activation. Among the antimutagenic activity against directly acting mutagens, effect was found to be highest against doxorubicin-induced mutation. The antimutagenic effect of the extract against indirect acting mutagen in the presence of mammalian metabolic activation system was also found to be significant (p<0.01). The background bacterial growth and number of revertant colonies in the extract alone treated plate with or with out metabolic activator was almost same as that of spontaneous revertants. This indicated the non-toxic nature of the extract. The effect was partially ascribed to the antioxidant activity. The results of the study suggest the possible antitumor mechanisms of P. rimosus. PMID:21784121

  11. Mutation induced extinction in finite populations: lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, C Scott; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate "semi-conservatively," e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathogens by increasing their mutation rate. Previous theoretical models of lethal mutagenesis assume infinite population size (N). However, in addition to high U, small N can accelerate extinction by strengthening genetic drift and relaxing selection. Here, we examine how the time until extinction depends jointly on N and U. We first analytically compute the mean time until extinction (τ) in a simplistic model where all mutations are either lethal or neutral. The solution motivates the definition of two distinct regimes: a survival phase and an extinction phase, which differ dramatically in both how τ scales with N and in the coefficient of variation in time until extinction. Next, we perform stochastic population-genetics simulations on a realistic fitness landscape that both (i) features an epistatic distribution of fitness effects that agrees with experimental data on viruses and (ii) is based on the biophysics of protein folding. More specifically, we assume that mutations inflict fitness penalties proportional to the extent that they unfold proteins. We find that decreasing N can cause phase transition-like behavior from survival to extinction, which motivates the concept of "lethal isolation." Furthermore, we find that lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation interact synergistically, which may have clinical implications for treating infections. Broadly, we conclude that stably folded proteins are only possible in ecological settings that support sufficiently large populations

  12. Mutation induced extinction in finite populations: lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scott Wylie

    Full Text Available Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate "semi-conservatively," e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U, and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathogens by increasing their mutation rate. Previous theoretical models of lethal mutagenesis assume infinite population size (N. However, in addition to high U, small N can accelerate extinction by strengthening genetic drift and relaxing selection. Here, we examine how the time until extinction depends jointly on N and U. We first analytically compute the mean time until extinction (τ in a simplistic model where all mutations are either lethal or neutral. The solution motivates the definition of two distinct regimes: a survival phase and an extinction phase, which differ dramatically in both how τ scales with N and in the coefficient of variation in time until extinction. Next, we perform stochastic population-genetics simulations on a realistic fitness landscape that both (i features an epistatic distribution of fitness effects that agrees with experimental data on viruses and (ii is based on the biophysics of protein folding. More specifically, we assume that mutations inflict fitness penalties proportional to the extent that they unfold proteins. We find that decreasing N can cause phase transition-like behavior from survival to extinction, which motivates the concept of "lethal isolation." Furthermore, we find that lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation interact synergistically, which may have clinical implications for treating infections. Broadly, we conclude that stably folded proteins are only possible in ecological settings that support sufficiently

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α polymorphisms and TSC1/2 mutations are complementary in head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitakis Nikolaos G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms or mutations in hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha that increases its activity and stability under normoxia have recently been identified. Likewise, disruption of the TSC1/TSC2 complex through loss of TSC1 or TSC2 has been shown to result in abnormal accumulation of HIF-1α. Here, we investigate the novel polymorphisms in exon 12, that approximate the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha in five cell lines and 28 patients with oral squamous carcinomas. Moreover, we assess for the presence of polymorphisms and mutations in TSC1 and TSC2, to ascertain if dysregulation of such might complement HIF-1alpha expression. Results Denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC analysis on PCR fragments in exon 12 of HIF-1alpha from 28 patients with OSCC revealed that 6 of 28 patients had mismatched heteroduplex patterns. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and direct sequencing showed that in 5 of the six cases these changes represented polymorphisms while, one case was a somatic mutation. Analyses of TSC1 and TSC2 revealed heteroduplexes in exons: TSC1 exon 17; TSC2 exons 36,40, and 41. The relative levels of HIF-1alpha were significantly greater for tumors possessing a HIF-1alpha polymorphism or mutation within exon 12, whereas tumors possessing a deletion or polymorphism in TSC1/TSC2 displayed a trend for higher levels of HIF-1alpha. Western blot analyses for HIF-1alpha, TSC1 and TSC2 in five SCC cell lines revealed high levels of HIF-1alpha in SCC cells possessing TSC1 and/or TSC2 mutations. Wild-type TSC2 cells targeted with siRNA to TSC2 exhibited increased levels of HIF-1alpha. Transfection of a HIF-1alpha mutant produced higher levels of HIF-1alpha in TSC1/TSC2 mutant cell lines than in wild type cells. TSC1/TSC2 mutant cell lines administered Rapamycin blocked S6 phorphorylation and diminished the levels of HIF-1alpha to those observed in cell lines with wild

  14. A modified TILLING approach to detect induced mutations in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Helen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat (Triticum ssp. is an important food source for humans in many regions around the world. However, the ability to understand and modify gene function for crop improvement is hindered by the lack of available genomic resources. TILLING is a powerful reverse genetics approach that combines chemical mutagenesis with a high-throughput screen for mutations. Wheat is specially well-suited for TILLING due to the high mutation densities tolerated by polyploids, which allow for very efficient screens. Despite this, few TILLING populations are currently available. In addition, current TILLING screening protocols require high-throughput genotyping platforms, limiting their use. Results We developed mutant populations of pasta and common wheat and organized them for TILLING. To simplify and decrease costs, we developed a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel set-up that uses ethidium bromide to detect fragments generated by crude celery juice extract digestion of heteroduplexes. This detection method had similar sensitivity as traditional LI-COR screens, suggesting that it represents a valid alternative. We developed genome-specific primers to circumvent the presence of multiple homoeologous copies of our target genes. Each mutant library was characterized by TILLING multiple genes, revealing high mutation densities in both the hexaploid (~1/38 kb and tetraploid (~1/51 kb populations for 50% GC targets. These mutation frequencies predict that screening 1,536 lines for an effective target region of 1.3 kb with 50% GC content will result in ~52 hexaploid and ~39 tetraploid mutant alleles. This implies a high probability of obtaining knock-out alleles (P = 0.91 for hexaploid, P = 0.84 for tetraploid, in addition to multiple missense mutations. In total, we identified over 275 novel alleles in eleven targeted gene/genome combinations in hexaploid and tetraploid wheat and have validated the presence of a subset of them in our seed stock

  15. Molecular nature of mutations induced in aging process and X-irradiation in spleen, liver and brain of LacZ-Transgenic mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Tetsuya; Ikehata, Hironobu; Nakamura, Shingo; Saito, Yusuke [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2000-07-01

    Mutation is believed to be one of the important factors in radiation-induced carcinogenesis as well as in aging. The study of mutation, however, has long been limited to cultured cells and blood cells. Thus little is known about various tissues in a body. The absence of information on molecular nature of mutations which appear in tissues makes it difficult to understand mechanisms responsible for long-term effects of radiation. The problem, however, has been overcome lately by a development of transgenic mice which are made suitable for mutation assay by introduction of E. coli gene into mouse genome. In the present study, we have used one of these transgenic mice named Muta{sup TM} and examined molecular nature of mutants accumulated in aging process and those induced by high dose of radiation. (author)

  16. Induced mutations for the improvement of grain legumes in South East Asia (1975)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is divided into seven sections containing papers on the following subjects: regional cooperation for improving grain legume production in South-East Asia and the role of FAO in this connection; national reports on the production and consumption of grain legumes (mainly beans, soybeans, peas, peanuts) in various Asian countries (separate reports for Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Burma, Philippines, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Taiwan, and Australia). Specific papers are presented on the following: modifications of field pea; chickpea breeding at ICRISAT; mutation breeding in winged bean; mutation breeding in improving groundnut cultivars; and the consumption of grain legumes in Singapore. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations adopted by the participants of the meeting are presented

  17. Assessing the potential of an induced-mutation strategy for avermectin overproducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Liu, Mei; Zhuo, Ying; Zhou, Xianlong; Liu, Jintao; Chen, Difei; Zhang, Wenquan; Gou, Zhongxuan; Shang, Peng; Zhang, Lixin

    2010-07-01

    Mutant libraries of avermectin-producing Streptomyces avermitilis strains were constructed by different mutagenesis strategies. A metric was applied to assess the mutation spectrum by calculating the distribution of average phenotypic distance of each population. The results showed for the first time that a microgravity environment could introduce larger phenotype distribution and diversity than UV and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) could. PMID:20453119

  18. MUTATION OF p53 GENE IN TRANSFORMED RAT TRACHEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS INDUCED BY RADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永良; 吴德昌; 刘国廉; 项晓琼

    1998-01-01

    The highly conserved domain (exon 5-8) of p53 gene in transformed rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells was analyzed by means of polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). The result showed that single strand of exon 8 gene had mobility shift in polyacrylamide nondenaturing gel. DNA sequencing proved the mutation was G→C transversion at condon 265.

  19. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113. Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and

  20. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113). Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i) the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii) the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii) the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and developing effective

  1. Rice breeding with induced mutations II. Report of an FAO/IAEA research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of the fourth meeting of participants in the FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Program of Research on the Use of Induced Mutations in Rice Breeding, a program which was initiated in 1964. The three previous meetings were reported as follows: First: proceedings published in the International Rice Commission Newsletter, Vol. XV, No. 1 (1966). Second: report presented to the IRC Working Party meeting at Lake Charles, Louisiana, 18-30 July 1966. Third: proceedings published by the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 86 under the title 'Rice breeding with induced mutations'. The fourth meeting was held at Oiso, Japan, on 12-14 August 1968. Co-operators from nine countries attended, together with scientists from five other countries, the International Rice Research Institute, the Rockefeller Foundation, the International Rice Commission, and the FAO and IAEA. In addition, a number of scientists from the host country were present. The purpose of the meeting was to present reports on research related to or carried out under the co-ordinated program in 1967/68, to review and co-ordinate research plans for 1968/69, and to draw up technical recommendations for future work

  2. Large-mutation spectra induced at hemizygous loci by low-LET radiation: evidence for intrachromosomal proximity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, S.; Sachs, R.; Hlatky, L.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C.; Fouladi, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model is used to analyze mutant spectra for large mutations induced by low-LET radiation. The model equations are based mainly on two-break misrejoining that leads to deletions or translocations. It is assumed, as a working hypothesis, that the initial damage induced by low-LET radiation is located randomly in the genome. Specifically, we analyzed data for two hemizygous loci: CD59- mutants, mainly very large-scale deletions (>3 Mbp), in human-hamster hybrid cells, and data from the literature on those HPRT- mutants which involve at least deletion of the whole gene, and often of additional flanking markers (approximately 50-kbp to approximately 4.4-Mbp deletions). For five data sets, we estimated f, the probability that two given breaks on the same chromosome will misrejoin to make a deletion, as a function of the separation between the breaks. We found that f is larger for nearby breaks than for breaks that are more widely separated; i.e., there is a "proximity effect". For acute irradiation, the values of f determined from the data are consistent with the corresponding break misrejoining parameters found previously in quantitative modeling of chromosome aberrations. The value of f was somewhat smaller for protracted irradiation than for acute irradiation at a given total dose; i.e., the mutation data show a decrease that was smaller than expected for dose protraction by fractionation or low dose rate.

  3. In Vivo Spectrum of UVC-induced Mutation in Mouse Skin Epidermis May Reflect the Cytosine Deamination Propensity of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Although ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has a genotoxicity for inducing skin cancers, the skin may tolerate UVC component because the epidermal layer prevents this short wavelength range from passing through. Here, UVC genotoxicity for mouse skin was evaluated in terms of DNA damage formation and mutagenicity. UVC induced UVR photolesions and mutations remarkably in the epidermis but poorly in the dermis, confirming the barrier ability of the epidermis against shorter UVR wavelengths. Moreover, the epidermis itself responded to UVC mutagenicity with mutation induction suppression, which suppressed the mutant frequencies to a remarkably low, constant level regardless of UVC dose. The mutation spectrum observed in UVC-exposed epidermis showed a predominance of UV-signature mutation, which occurred frequently in 5'-TCG-3', 5'-TCA-3' and 5'-CCA-3' contexts. Especially, for the former two contexts, the mutations recurred at several sites with more remarkable recurrences at the 5'-TCG-3' sites. Comparison of the UVC mutation spectrum with those observed in longer UVR wavelength ranges led us to a mechanism that explains why the sequence context preference of UV-signature mutation changes according to the wavelength, which is based on the difference in the mCpG preference of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation among UVR ranges and the sequence context-dependent cytosine deamination propensity of CPD.

  4. In Vivo Spectrum of UVC-induced Mutation in Mouse Skin Epidermis May Reflect the Cytosine Deamination Propensity of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Although ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has a genotoxicity for inducing skin cancers, the skin may tolerate UVC component because the epidermal layer prevents this short wavelength range from passing through. Here, UVC genotoxicity for mouse skin was evaluated in terms of DNA damage formation and mutagenicity. UVC induced UVR photolesions and mutations remarkably in the epidermis but poorly in the dermis, confirming the barrier ability of the epidermis against shorter UVR wavelengths. Moreover, the epidermis itself responded to UVC mutagenicity with mutation induction suppression, which suppressed the mutant frequencies to a remarkably low, constant level regardless of UVC dose. The mutation spectrum observed in UVC-exposed epidermis showed a predominance of UV-signature mutation, which occurred frequently in 5'-TCG-3', 5'-TCA-3' and 5'-CCA-3' contexts. Especially, for the former two contexts, the mutations recurred at several sites with more remarkable recurrences at the 5'-TCG-3' sites. Comparison of the UVC mutation spectrum with those observed in longer UVR wavelength ranges led us to a mechanism that explains why the sequence context preference of UV-signature mutation changes according to the wavelength, which is based on the difference in the mCpG preference of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation among UVR ranges and the sequence context-dependent cytosine deamination propensity of CPD. PMID:26335024

  5. Site-specific analysis of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in nucleotide excision repair-proficient and -deficient hamster cells: Lack of correlation with mutational spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Meijers, Caro M; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline; Vrieling, Harry; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F; Loenen, Wil A M

    2009-04-26

    Irradiation of cells with UVC light induces two types of mutagenic DNA photoproducts, i.e. cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4 PP). To investigate the relationship between the frequency of UV-induced photolesions at specific sites and their ability to induce mutations, we quantified CPD formation at the nucleotide level along exons 3 and 8 of the hprt gene using ligation-mediated PCR, and determined the mutational spectrum of 132 UV-induced hprt mutants in the AA8 hamster cell line and of 165 mutants in its nucleotide excision repair-defective derivative UV5. In AA8 cells, transversions predominated with a strong strand bias towards thymine-containing photolesions in the non-transcribed strand. As hamster AA8 cells are proficient in global genome repair of 6-4 PP but selectively repair CPD from the transcribed strand of active genes, most mutations probably resulted from erroneous bypass of CPD in the non-transcribed strand. However, the relative incidence of CPD and the positions where mutations most frequently arose do not correlate. In fact some major damage sites hardly gave rise to the formation of mutations. In the repair-defective UV5 cells, mutations were almost exclusively C>T transitions caused by photoproducts at PyC sites in the transcribed strand. Even though CPD were formed at high frequencies at some TT sites in UV5, these photoproducts did not contribute to mutation induction at all. We conclude that, even in the absence of repair, large variations in the level of induction of CPD at different sites throughout the two exons do not correspond to frequencies of mutation induction.

  6. Radiation-induced dominant skeletal mutations in mice: mutation rate, characteristics, and usefulness in estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, P. B.

    1979-05-01

    The work discussed in this paper represents a major advance in the difficult task of trying to estimate the effects that an increase in mutation frequency would have on human health. Male mice were bred to three females prior to being killed and skeleton studies made. Guidelines were instituted for checking progeny mutations. Surprising results showed a mutation frequency of 1.4% per gamete where none would have been expected. It is now clear that mice can be greatly deformed without showing external effects. (PCS)

  7. Radiation-induced dominant skeletal mutations in mice: mutation rate, characteristics, and usefulness in estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work discussed in this paper represents a major advance in the difficult task of trying to estimate the effects that an increase in mutation frequency would have on human health. Male mice were bred to three females prior to being killed and skeleton studies made. Guidelines were instituted for checking progeny mutations. Surprising results showed a mutation frequency of 1.4% per gamete where none would have been expected. It is now clear that mice can be greatly deformed without showing external effects

  8. Application Of Induced Mutation Combined With Hybridization Method In Rice Improvement In Southern Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice plays an important role of social-economic issues in Vietnam, especially in Mekong River Delta (MRD). Rice mutation breeding was not initiated until 1992 in Southern Vietnam. Therefore, no mutant rice varieties were cultivated in MRD before 1995. Dry and germinated seeds of varieties as IR64, Tam Xoan, Nang Huong were exposed to 60 Co gamma rays at doses of 200-300 Gy. Population of 10,000-15,000 M1 plants were established by direct seeded practice. Mutant elite lines were used in hybridization program, assessed according to the standard system for rice (IRRI 1996) from M2 - M7 generations. The promising selected lines were tested in multi-location trials. The mutated characters developed so far consist of better resistance to lodging, disease and insect damages, higher tolerance to soil stresses such as acid sulphate, drought etc, and also earliness and higher yield potential. Mutation techniques have shown very useful in rice improvement, especially for characters controlled by close linked genes that are difficult to break by recombination. Some best mutant varieties: VND95-19, VND95-20, VND99-3, TNDB-100 have been released for large-scale production in MRD. Among them, VND95-20 has become one of the top 5 varieties for export and grown annually about 300,000 ha in Southern Vietnam. In combination with hybridization method, some mutants gave promising recombinants in aroma, tolerance to BPH, Grassy Stunt Virus and Ragged Stunt Virus diseases. Selected varieties as VN121, VN24-4 are largely released into production in recent time. (author)

  9. Antimutagenic effect of essential oil of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and its fractions against UV-induced mutations in bacterial and yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Vukčević Jelena B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by essential oil (EO of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and its fractions F1-F5 containing different proportions of mono- and sesquiterpenes was studied with the Salmonella/microsome, E. coli K12, and S. cerevisiae D7 reversion assays. The EO, F1, and F2 exhibited antimutagenic potential against UV-induced mutations in all tests. Fractions F3 and F4 produced a toxic, mutagenic, or antimutagenic response, depend­ing on the test organism used. Reduction of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by F5 was detected only in permeable strains of E. coli. The obtained results demonstrate antimutagenic activity of volatile sage terpenes and recommend them for further antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis studies.

  10. Study on toxicity mutation of crown-vetch induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suckers of Germany crown-vetch were irradiated by 60Co gamma ray and fast neutron. The toxicity mutation frequency and genetic stability of crown-vetch were studied. The various toxicity mutants were found in M1. Most of the toxicity mutants was unstable in M2, Stable mutant was very few (about 2.0-12.9%). β-nitropropionic acid in the low toxicity mutants selected was 31.7-39.8 mg/g. Genetic characteristics of low toxicity mutants were stable in M3-M5

  11. Induced mutations and molecular techniques for crop improvement. Proceedings of an international symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium was aimed at reviewing current aspects of mutation and molecular biology techniques for use in crop improvement and to bridge the gap between practical plant breeding and molecular laboratory techniques. Over the past few years, many transgenic plants have been developed in important crops such as rice, wheat, maize, soybean, banana, cassava and cotton, as well as in many food, industrial and pharmaceutical plant species. More than 180 participants from 48 countries of which 31 were from developing countries, attended which provided a forum for the discussion of problems related to crop improvement world wide, and their possible solutions. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 induces glioma cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoliang; Sai, Ke; Gong, Fanghe; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Furong; Lin, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Recently, mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 gene, which specifically occur in the majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas, have drawn particular attention of neuro-oncologists. Mutations of the IDH1 gene have been proposed to have significant roles in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of gliomas. However, the molecular mechanism of the role of IDH1 mutants in gliomagenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study, showed that forced expression of an IDH1 mutant, of which the 132th amino acid residue arginine is substituted by histidine (IDH1R132H), promoted cell proliferation in cultured cells, while wild-type IDH1 overexpression had no effect on cell proliferation. Consistent with previous studies, it was also observed that expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) was upregulated in IDH1R132H expressing cells with the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. However, knockdown of VEGF via small RNA interference had no significant influence on the cell proliferation induced by overexpression of IDH1R132H, implying that another signaling pathway may be involved. Next, forced expression of IDH1R132H was found to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), since the inhibitory IκB protein (IκBα) was highly phosphorylated and the NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated into the nucleus. Notably, knockdown of HIF1-α significantly blocked NF-κB activation, which was induced by the overexpression of IDH1 mutants. In addition, expression of IDH1 mutants markedly induced the NF-κB target gene expression, including cyclin D1 and E and c-myc, which were involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the IDH1 mutant activated NF-κB in a HIF1-α‑dependent manner and was involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  13. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis of UV-A- and UV-B-induced delayed and early mutations in V79 Chinese hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Jostein; Noordhuis, Paul; Stokke, Trond; Svendsrud, Debbie Hege; Kvam, Egil

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that approximately 10% of V79 Chinese hamster fibroblast populations clonally derived from single cells immediately after irradiation with either ultraviolet B (UV-B, 290-320 nm, mainly 311 nm) or ultraviolet A (UV-A, 320-400 nm, mainly 350-390 nm) radiation exhibit genomic instability. The instability is revealed by relatively high mutation frequencies in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene up to 23 cell generations after irradiation. These delayed mutant clones exhibited higher levels of oxidative stress than normal cells. Therefore, persistently increased oxidative stress has been proposed as a mechanism for UV-induced genomic instability. This study investigates whether this mechanism is reflected in the deletion spectrum of delayed mutant clones. Eighty-eight percent of the delayed mutant clones derived from UV-A-irradiated populations were found to have total deletion of the hprt gene. Correspondingly, 81% of UV-A-induced early mutations (i.e. detected shortly after irradiation) also had total deletions. Among delayed UV-B-induced mutant clones, 23% had total deletions and 8% had deletion of one exon, whereas all early UV-B events were either point mutations or small deletions or insertions. In conclusion, the multiplex polymerase chain reaction deletion screen showed that there were explicit differences in the occurrence of large gene alterations between early and delayed mutations induced by UV-B radiation. For UV-A radiation the deletion spectra were similar for delayed and early mutations. UV-A radiation is, in contrast to UV-B radiation, only weakly absorbed by DNA and probably induces mutation almost solely via production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, the present results support the hypothesis that persistent increase in oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism of UV-induced genomic instability.

  14. SCN5A mutation in patients with Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞建华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between SCN5A,SCN1b,SCN3b and GPD1L genotypes and the risk of malignant arrhythmia in patients with Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever.Methods The clinical data and peripheral blood of patients with Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever were

  15. Induced mutation of Egypt cotton variety and selection of long fiber cotton mutant by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain long fiber cotton variety which would be adaptable to the ecological conditions of Yellow River Region, the mutation induction of Egypt cotton variety, Ashmouni, was carried out by γ-ray of 279 Gy in 1985. In M1 generation, serious radiation damage was shown in seed-lings, the death percentage of seedling was 63.3%. Two plants with early maturity were selected and their seeds were planted individually in 1986. The complex segregation appeared in M2 generation. The selection and domestication were carried out for several years and four stable mutant lines which included early maturity, dwarf plant, compact pattern, stranger bollbearing ability as well as upland cotton characters were obtained in 1991. The fiber length of these lines reached 33 ∼ 35 mm, and the mutants were adaptable to ecological condition in Shandong Province. The mutant line, 90197-1, whose growing period and plant height shorter than those of upland cotton cultivar, Zhong-mian No.12, has compact plant pattern, high bollbearing ability and ginning out turn of about 40%. Further yield test is required for these lines. The hereditary variability of the progeny in mutated Egypt cotton variety, preliminary cytological observation and the analysis of isoenzyme in mutants are also discussed

  16. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called "CENP-A") is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923-937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest. PMID:26294252

  17. Characterization of Cat-2t, a radiation-induced dominant cataract mutation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dominant cataract mutation was detected recently among the offspring of x-ray-irradiated male mice. The mutation, which causes total lens opacity, has provisionally been designated by the gene symbol Cat-2t. In the lenses of heterozygous and homozygous Cat-2t mutants, the epithelial and fiber cells were swollen and the lens capsule was ruptured. The histologic analysis demonstrated a complete destruction of the cellular organization of the lens, which might be caused by its altered developmental processes. The data derived from biochemical investigations indicate that biochemistry of the cataractous Cat-2t lenses is affected: the osmotic state as indicated by the increased water content and increased Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity; the energy state as indicated by the decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration; and the redox state as indicated by the enhanced content of oxidized glutathione. Additionally, the lenticular protein composition is altered because of the presence of vimentin in the water-soluble fraction. This cannot be explained by the enhanced crosslinking activity of transglutaminase. The changes of the osmotic, energy, and redox states are considered to be secondary in relation to the altered lenticular development. In contrast, the variations concerning vimentin and transglutaminase might be a biochemical indication of the changed development. Possible similarities to other dominantly expressed murine cataract mutants are discussed

  18. Radiation-induced mutations in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. ) cvs Napoleon and Bing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saamin, S.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were conducted using gamma radiation to determine radiosensitivities of main and accessory buds, to increase the proportion of mutant tissue, and to determine the type of damage and mode of recovery in irradiated shoot spices of sweet cherry cvs Napoleon and Bin. Survival, growth, and the types of mutations of V/sub 1/ (primary) shoots and V/sub 2/ plants were observed. LD/sub 50/ values, based on survival of forced buds were about 5kR for both acute and fractionated irradiation in air, 5.5kR for acute exposure in water, and 6kR for fractionated dose in water. 0.39-0.69 accessory buds/site on non-irradiated Napoleon had forced after 30 days in the glasshouse. In the Bing field experiment with main buds, the LD/sub 50/ for both acute and fractionated irradiation in air was 3.5kR. In water, the LD/sub 50/ was 5kR for acute treatment and 6.5kR for fractionated dose. The overall mutation frequency in Napoleon V/sub 2/ shoots derived from main buds was 7.6%: 0.04% growth-reduced mutants, 0.4% total leaf mutants, and7.1% partial leaf mutants.

  19. Identification of potential molecular markers of ionizing radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based exon deletion analysis, we have analyzed mutations at the hprt locus from independent CHO cell mutants isolated from untreated, 60Co x-ray-, and 212Bi-exposed CHO-K1 cello and its radiation-sensitive derivative, xrs-5. In the 71 spontaneous CHO-K1 mutants analyzed, 78% showed no change in exon number or size, 20% showed loss of 1-8 exons (partial deletion), and 3% showed loss of all nine hprt exons (total deletion). Exposure of CHO-K1 cells to 6 Gy of γ rays (10% survival) produced 45% of the 20 mutants analyzed showing partial deletion, and 30% showing total deletion. Exposure to an equitoxic dose of a radiation from 212Bi, a 220Rn daughter, resulted in a spectrum similar to the γ-ray spectrum in that more than 75% of the 49 mutants analyzed were deletions. The α-radiation, however, tended to produce larger intragenic deletions that γ radiation. Of the 87 spontaneous xrs-5 mutants analyzed for deletions 44% showed partial deletion, and 14% showed total deletion. Exposure to α radiation (10% survival) resulted in a deletion spectrum similar to that seen in CHO-K1 cells. Of the 49 mutants analyzed, 43% showed no change in exon number or size, 16% showed partial deletion, and 41% showed total deletion. While the defect in xrs-5 has a profound effect on spontaneous mutation spectra, it does not appear to affect α-induced mutation spectra

  20. Precise Correction of Disease Mutations in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived From Patients With Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Soeren; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Srifa, Waracharee; Day, John W; Calos, Michele P

    2016-04-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophies types 2B (LGMD2B) and 2D (LGMD2D) are degenerative muscle diseases caused by mutations in the dysferlin and alpha-sarcoglycan genes, respectively. Using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we corrected the dysferlin nonsense mutation c.5713C>T; p.R1905X and the most common alpha-sarcoglycan mutation, missense c.229C>T; p.R77C, by single-stranded oligonucleotide-mediated gene editing, using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system to enhance the frequency of homology-directed repair. We demonstrated seamless, allele-specific correction at efficiencies of 0.7-1.5%. As an alternative, we also carried out precise gene addition strategies for correction of the LGMD2B iPSC by integration of wild-type dysferlin cDNA into the H11 safe harbor locus on chromosome 22, using dual integrase cassette exchange (DICE) or TALEN-assisted homologous recombination for insertion precise (THRIP). These methods employed TALENs and homologous recombination, and DICE also utilized site-specific recombinases. With DICE and THRIP, we obtained targeting efficiencies after selection of ~20%. We purified iPSC corrected by all methods and verified rescue of appropriate levels of dysferlin and alpha-sarcoglycan protein expression and correct localization, as shown by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time precise correction of LGMD iPSC and validation of expression, opening the possibility of cell therapy utilizing these corrected iPSC. PMID:26916285

  1. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Esch, Celine E.F.; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Loos, Friedemann; Schelling-Kazaryan, Nune; Widagdo, W.; Munshi, Shashini T.; van der Wal, Erik; Douben, Hannie; Gunhanlar, Nilhan; Kushner, Steven A.; Pijnappel, W.W.M. Pim; de Vrij, Femke M.S.; Geijsen, Niels; Gribnau, Joost; Willemsen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM) individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene. PMID:25358783

  2. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine E.F. de Esch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene.

  3. CYP2U1 mutations in two Iranian patients with activity induced dystonia, motor regression and spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminejad, A.; Schöls, L.; Schüle, R.; Tonekaboni, S.H.; Abolhassani, A.; Fadaee, M.; Rosti, R.O.; Gleeson, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. It is divided into two major groups, complicated and uncomplicated, based on the presence of additional features such as intellectual disability, ataxia, seizures, peripheral neuropathy and visual problems. SPG56 is an autosomal recessive form of HSP with complicated and uncomplicated manifestations, complicated being more common. CYP2U1 gene mutations have been identified as responsible for SPG56. Intellectual disability, dystonia, subclinical sensory motor neuropathy, pigmentary degenerative maculopathy, thin corpus callosum and periventricular white-matter hyperintensities were additional features noted in previous cases of SPG56. Here we identified two novel mutations in CYP2U1 in two unrelated patients by whole exome sequencing. Both patients had complicated HSP with activity-induced dystonia, suggesting dystonia as an additional finding in SPG56. Two out of 14 previously reported patients had dystonia, and the addition of our patients suggests dystonia in a quarter of SPG56 patients. Developmental regression has not been reported in SPG56 patients so far but both of our patients developed motor regression in infancy. PMID:27292318

  4. Gain-of-function mutations of Ptpn11 (Shp2) cause aberrant mitosis and increase susceptibility to DNA damage-induced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Zheng, Hong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Siying; Meyerson, Howard J; Yang, Wentian; Neel, Benjamin G; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2016-01-26

    Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase implicated in multiple cell signaling pathways, are associated with childhood leukemias and solid tumors. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we report that Ptpn11 GOF mutations disturb mitosis and cytokinesis, causing chromosomal instability and greatly increased susceptibility to DNA damage-induced malignancies. We find that Shp2 is distributed to the kinetochore, centrosome, spindle midzone, and midbody, all of which are known to play critical roles in chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with Ptpn11 GOF mutations show a compromised mitotic checkpoint. Centrosome amplification and aberrant mitosis with misaligned or lagging chromosomes are significantly increased in Ptpn11-mutated mouse and patient cells. Abnormal cytokinesis is also markedly increased in these cells. Further mechanistic analyses reveal that GOF mutant Shp2 hyperactivates the Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) kinase by enhancing c-Src kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Plk1. This study provides novel insights into the tumorigenesis associated with Ptpn11 GOF mutations and cautions that DNA-damaging treatments in Noonan syndrome patients with germ-line Ptpn11 GOF mutations could increase the risk of therapy-induced malignancies.

  5. Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid target NPM1 mutant oncoprotein levels and induce apoptosis in NPM1-mutated AML cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Maria Paola; Gionfriddo, Ilaria; Mezzasoma, Federica; Milano, Francesca; Pierangeli, Sara; Mulas, Floriana; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Pettirossi, Valentina; Rossi, Roberta; Vetro, Calogero; Brunetti, Lorenzo; Sportoletti, Paolo; Tiacci, Enrico; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Falini, Brunangelo

    2015-05-28

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations represent an attractive therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) because they are common (∼30% AML), stable, and behave as a founder genetic lesion. Oncoprotein targeting can be a successful strategy to treat AML, as proved in acute promyelocytic leukemia by treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide (ATO), which degrade the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor fusion protein. Adjunct of ATRA to chemotherapy was reported to be beneficial for NPM1-mutated AML patients. Leukemic cells with NPM1 mutation also showed sensibility to ATO in vitro. Here, we explore the mechanisms underlying these observations and show that ATO/ATRA induce proteasome-dependent degradation of NPM1 leukemic protein and apoptosis in NPM1-mutated AML cell lines and primary patients' cells. We also show that PML intracellular distribution is altered in NPM1-mutated AML cells and reverted by arsenic through oxidative stress induction. Interestingly, similarly to what was described for PML, oxidative stress also mediates ATO-induced degradation of the NPM1 mutant oncoprotein. Strikingly, NPM1 mutant downregulation by ATO/ATRA was shown to potentiate response to the anthracyclin daunorubicin. These findings provide experimental evidence for further exploring ATO/ATRA in preclinical NPM1-mutated AML in vivo models and a rationale for exploiting these compounds in chemotherapeutic regimens in clinics. PMID:25795919

  6. [Malignant transformation of human fibroblasts by neutrons and by gamma radiation: Relationship to mutations induced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    A brief overview if provided of selected reports presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation- and Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Cell Transformation held at Mackinac Island, Michigan on September 19-23, 1993.

  7. A sucrose-rich diet induces mutations in the rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Lars O.; Daneshvar, Bahram; Vogel, Ulla;

    2002-01-01

    A sucrose-rich diet has repeatedly been observed to have cocarcinogenic actions in the colon and liver of rats and to increase the number of aberrant crypt foci in rat colon. To investigate whether sucrose-rich diets might directly increase the genotoxic response in the rat colon or liver, we have...... added sucrose to the diet of Big Blue rats, a strain of Fischer rats carrying 40 copies of the lambda-phage on chromosome 4. Dietary sucrose was provided to the rats for 3 weeks at four dose levels including the background level in the purified diet [3.4% (control), 6.9%, 13.8%, or 34.5%] without...... of a sucrose-rich diet. No significant increase in mutations was observed in the liver. To seek an explanation for this finding, a variety of parameters were examined representing different mechanisms, including increased oxidative stress, changes in oxidative defense, effects on DNA repair, or changes...

  8. Plant breeding for resistance to insect pests: Considerations about the use of induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Panel was intended to stimulate proposals on specific plant breeding objectives, for immediate and long term solution. Nine papers considered the host plant resistance to particular insect pests in a variety of cases. The desirability of achieving some measure of pest control via the development of disease-resistant mutants was discussed. In its conclusions, the Panel stressed the need to consider host plant resistance as one of the primary lines of defense in all pest management programmes. Consequently, resistance to insects was recommended to become an integral part of plant breeding programmes. Preference might need to be given to developing insect resistance in those crop plants for which practical control is lacking or where current methods of pest control present critical environmental hazards. The roles of the IAEA and FAO in such projects is outlined. Guidelines and recommendations on mutation breeding for resistance to insects are given in an appendix

  9. Effects of gamma-irradiation-induced mutation on upland cotton pollen grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the demonstrated value of gamma ray as a tool in plant mutation research, in the genetic plant species upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), such mutations have not been extensively studied. To investigate these questions, the upland cotton cultivar 'Sumian 22' pollen grains were irradiated by gamma rays (20Gy). The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested considering the ultrastructure changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, DNA polymorphism in the pollen grains, the actin filament in pollen tube, fertilization, and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which were irradiation with γ-rays. As compared with the control, although the cell structures inside the pollen grain were destroyed, its exine and interior walls of the pollen grain were not etched. The amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rate decreased by 37%. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined by 38%, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13-h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened. No evident change of the fecundation time of ovule was observed. The significant difference on DNA polymorphism was found between irradiation pollen grain and control after pollination by Simple sequence repeats (SSR) molecular marker. The actin filament of the apical domain in pollen tube was destabilized, and in the approximately apical domain, the actin cytoskeleton component disappeared. Various mutants were appeared in the M1 progenies. These results indicate that gamma rays can cause a series of biological changes in irradiated-pollen grains and their progenies of upland cotton. (author)

  10. Mutational analysis of VAMP domains implicated in Ca2+-induced insulin exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, R; Sadoul, K; Meda, P; Kelly, R B; Halban, P A; Wollheim, C B

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2) and cellubrevin are associated with the membrane of insulin-containing secretory granules and of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing synaptic-like vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells. We found that a point mutation in VAMP-2 preventing targeting to synaptic vesicles also impairs the localization on insulin-containing secretory granules, suggesting a similar requirement for vesicular targeting. Tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment of permeabilized HIT-T15 cells leads to the proteolytic cleavage of VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and causes the inhibition of Ca2+-triggered insulin exocytosis. Transient transfection of HIT-T15 cells with VAMP-1, VAMP-2 or cellubrevin made resistant to the proteolytic action of TeTx by amino acid replacements in the cleavage site restored Ca2+-stimulated secretion. Wild-type VAMP-2, wild-type cellubrevin or a mutant of VAMP-2 resistant to TeTx but not targeted to secretory granules were unable to rescue Ca2+-evoked insulin release. The transmembrane domain and the N-terminal region of VAMP-2 were not essential for the recovery of stimulated exocytosis, but deletions preventing the binding to SNAP-25 and/or to syntaxin I rendered the protein inactive in the reconstitution assay. Mutations of putative phosphorylation sites or of negatively charged amino acids in the SNARE motif recognized by clostridial toxins had no effect on the ability of VAMP-2 to mediate Ca2+-triggered secretion. We conclude that: (i) both VAMP-2 and cellubrevin can participate in the exocytosis of insulin; (ii) the interaction of VAMP-2 with syntaxin and SNAP-25 is required for docking and/or fusion of secretory granules with the plasma membrane; and (iii) the phosphorylation of VAMP-2 is not essential for Ca2+-stimulated insulin exocytosis. Images PMID:9003771

  11. Modulatory effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae on doxorubicin-induced somatic mutation and recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neila C. de Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART in D. melanogaster was used to study genotoxicity of the medicinal plant Tabebuia impetiginosa. Lapachol (naphthoquinone and β-lapachone (quinone are the two main chemical constituents of T. impetiginosa. These compounds have several biological properties. They induce apoptosis by generating oxygen-reactive species, thereby inhibiting topoisomerases (I and II or inducing other enzymes dependent on NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1, thus affecting cell cycle checkpoints. The SMART was used in the standard (ST version, which has normal levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes, to check the direct action of this compound, and in the high bioactivation (HB version, which has a high constitutive level of CYP enzymes, to check for indirect action in three different T. impetiginosa concentrations (10%, 20% or 40% w/w. It was observed that T. impetiginosa alone did not modify the spontaneous frequencies of mutant spots in either cross. The negative results observed prompted us to study this phytotherapeuticum in association with the reference mutagen doxorubicin (DXR. In co-treated series, T. impetiginosa was toxic in both crosses at higher concentration, whereas in the HB cross, it induced a considerable potentiating effect (from ~24.0 to ~95.0% on DXR genotoxity. Therefore, further research is needed to determine the possible risks associated with the exposure of living organisms to this complex mixture.

  12. Anti-GD(2) with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Linda S; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C; Ming Yu, Hui; Yu, Alice L

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD(2) ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human-mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody's ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  13. Induced Mutations for Crop Improvement in Africa. Proceedings of a Regional Seminar on the Utilization of Induced Mutations for Crop Improvement in Africa Held in Conjunction with an Advisory Group on the Role and Limitations of Induced Mutations in Plant Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar has been arranged with the intention to give plant breeders and plant geneticists from African countries an opportunity for refreshing and updating their knowledge in a technology that can be a useful supplement to plant breeding programmes. There are some who had been participating in training courses or study tours organized by FAO and IAEA, others who had been studying abroad under a fellowship programme. Others are holding a research contract or are counterparts in a technical assistance project. Again, there are others who know about the subject of mutation induction and the utilization of induced mutants in plant breeding only from textbooks or university courses. Besides updating knowledge and exchanging experiences, the seminar should be an occasion to discuss the need for and the efficiency of training programmes, and other forms of assistance

  14. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  15. The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Liane B [ORNL; Hunsicker, Patricia R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

  16. Chemical inducible promoter used to obtain transgenic plants with a silent marker and organisms and cells and methods of using same for screening for mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jianru; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2007-06-12

    Disclosed is a chemically inducible promoter for transforming plants or plant cells with genes which are regulatable by adding the plants or cells to a medium containing an inducer or by removing them from such medium. The promoter is inducible by a glucocorticoid, estrogen or inducer not endogenous to plants. Such promoters may be used with any plant genes that can promote shoot regeneration and development to induce shoot formation in the presence of a glucocorticoid, estrogen or inducer. The promoter may be used with antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes or other genes which are regulatable by the presence or absence of a given inducer. Also presented are organisms or cells comprising a gene wherein the natural promoter of the gene is disrupted and the gene is placed under the control of a transgenic inducible promoter. These organisms and cells and their progeny are useful for screening for conditional gain of function and loss of function mutations.

  17. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific heterozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels T.;

    2016-01-01

    have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into one of the alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3....

  18. Antimutagenic action of mammalian placental extracts on mutations induced in Escherichia coli by UV radiation, γ-rays and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian placental extracts prepared from human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse had strong antimutagenic activities for reverse mutations induced in Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp- by UV radiation, γ-rays and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). (orig.)

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich;

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained froma 57-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The diseaseis caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4, h...

  20. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a L150P mutation in PSEN-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubsuwan, Alisa; Pires, Carlota; Rasmussen, Mikkel A.;

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts isolated from a 58-year old male with a L150P mutation in the presenilin 1 (PSEN-1) gene, which is responsible for the majority of familial cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The iPSC swere established by co-electroporation...

  1. The mutation reversion of induced waxy gene of rice in Indica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some induced waxy gene lines such as Nanhui 175wxR, Xianghui 288wxR, Minghui 86wxR, Shuhui 527wxR, Minghui 63wxR, II-32wxB, Longtepu wxB and D62wxB, which developed through irradiation induction of the parents of hybrid rice in indica, were selected as the materials, and the properties of endosperm of their inbred descendant brown rice were identified by visual estimation and by the method of 1% KI-I2 determination. It was the first time to discover the reversion of induced waxy mutants (waxy endosperm reversed to non-waxy ones) in rice, and the reversion frequency was between 0 to 6.34 x 10-5, with a average of 3.74 x 10-5 Genetic analysis indicated that induced waxy mutants reversion gene was dominant. Except for 1000-grain weight, no significant difference in other traits was found among the induced waxy mutants, the waxy mutants reversion and the wilds. A new core seed production and seed purity control techniques of the parents of waxy hybrid rice was also put forward in this paper. (authors)

  2. Improvement of strain Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 for tannase production by induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakipour-Molkabadi, E; Hamidi-Esfahani, Z; Sahari, M A; Azizi, M H

    2013-11-01

    In the search for an efficient producer of tannase, Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 was subjected to mutagenesis using heat treatment and strain EZ-ZH290 was isolated. The maximum tannase in this mutant strain was 4.32 U/mL with an incubation period of 84 h as compared to wild strain EZ-ZH190 where the incubation period was 96 h with a maximum enzyme activity of 4.33 U/mL. Also, the Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH290 tannase had a maximum activity at 40 °C and pH 5.5. Then, the spores of strain EZ-ZH290 were subjected to γ irradiation mutagenesis and strain EZ-ZH390 was isolated. Strain EZ-ZH390 exhibited higher tannase activity (7.66 U/mL) than the parent strain EZ-ZH290. It was also found that Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 tannase had an optimum activity at 35 °C and a broad pH profile with an optimum at pH 5.5. The tannase pH stability of Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 and its maximum production of tannase followed the same trend for five generations confirming the occurrence of stable mutant. This paper is shown that γ irradiation can mutate the Penicillium sp. leading to increase the tannase production.

  3. A single amino acid mutation in SNAP-25 induces anxiety-related behavior in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kataoka

    Full Text Available Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25 is a presynaptic protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Previously, we demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylates Ser(187 of SNAP-25, and enhances neurotransmitter release by recruiting secretory vesicles near to the plasma membrane. As PKC is abundant in the brain and SNAP-25 is essential for synaptic transmission, SNAP-25 phosphorylation is likely to play a crucial role in the central nervous system. We therefore generated a mutant mouse, substituting Ser(187 of SNAP-25 with Ala using "knock-in" technology. The most striking effect of the mutation was observed in their behavior. The homozygous mutant mice froze readily in response to environmental change, and showed strong anxiety-related behavior in general activity and light and dark preference tests. In addition, the mutant mice sometimes exhibited spontaneously occurring convulsive seizures. Microdialysis measurements revealed that serotonin and dopamine release were markedly reduced in amygdala. These results clearly indicate that PKC-dependent SNAP-25 phosphorylation plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional behavior as well as the suppression of epileptic seizures, and the lack of enhancement of monoamine release is one of the possible mechanisms underlying these defects.

  4. Use of Induced Mutations to Adopt Aromatic Rice to Low Country Conditions of Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two aromatic rice accessions, Au 27789 and IR Basmati were used in mutation breeding by subjecting 12,000 seeds of each variety to γ-ray doses of 200 or 300Gy from a 60Co source. Based on agronomic characteristics, 635 M2 plants were selected and grown as M3 progenies. Sixty plants were selected from non-irradiated parental varieties using the same criteria, and tested along with mutant plant progenies. Both doses of γ-rays were effective in creating genetic variability for agronomic characteristics, with high heritability values when M2 parent to M3 progeny regression-based heritability was compared with selection in non-irradiated control varieties. Three mutant lines with compact plant type, erect and larger flag leaf, compact panicles and acceptable quality recording the highest yield were tested in five locations over four seasons using two recommended cultivars as controls. The mutant line 22/3 with a medium level of aroma recorded more than 2.5 t/ha, higher than the average yield of rice (1.5 -2 t/ha) in low-country wet zone. It has a compact panicle and narrow leaf angle allowing denser planting, which may help further increase the yield. The mutant lines maintained superior kernel length, linear elongation ratio and expansion index, all of which are important characteristics of aromatic long grain rice. (author)

  5. Development of drought tolerant tomato varieties through induced mutation in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having in mind the need to have tomato varieties growing under low water input conditions a tomato breeding program using nuclear techniques was started with the purpose of obtaining adequate yielding-potential cultivars under drought conditions. Seeds from INCA 9-1 variety were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays irradiated using of 300 Gy and 500 Gy. Starting from M2 generation, selection of high yield potential genotypes under low water supply conditions was made during 4 generations. Individual selection was done, taking into account the following criteria: healthy plants, determinate growth habit, yield per plant, fruit number per plant, average fruit weight, equatorial and polar fruit diameters were recorded in individually selected plants. The total soluble solids (Brix), acidity, dry matter and water content were evaluated in fruit of M5 generation. Different isoenzymatic systems, the protein concentration as well as the Random Amplified Polymorphism DNA (RAPD) were used in order to evaluate the genetic variability between the selected mutants and the donor variety. The most frequent variations observed in each generation were: plant cycle, fruit size, number, shape, colour and yield. It was possible to release two varieties of high yielding under low water input conditions. The tomato mutants Maybel and Mali are being used in tomato production for industrial purposes. These varieties are the firsts tomato varieties obtain from mutation induction in Cuba. (author)

  6. Enhancement of Phenol Biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through Ultraviolet-Induced Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Mao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane’s kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h−1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h−1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters.

  7. Enhancement of phenol biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through ultraviolet-induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhen; Yu, Chenyang; Xin, Lingling

    2015-04-01

    The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane's kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h-1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h-1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters.

  8. A missense mutation in CHS1, a TIR-NB protein, induces chilling sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuancong; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shuhua

    2013-08-01

    Low temperature is an environmental factor that affects plant growth and development and plant-pathogen interactions. How temperature regulates plant defense responses is not well understood. In this study, we characterized chilling-sensitive mutant 1 (chs1), and functionally analyzed the role of the CHS1 gene in plant responses to chilling stress. The chs1 mutant displayed a chilling-sensitive phenotype, and also displayed defense-associated phenotypes, including extensive cell death, the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid, and an increased expression of PR genes: these phenotypes indicated that the mutation in chs1 activates the defense responses under chilling stress. A map-based cloning analysis revealed that CHS1 encodes a TIR-NB-type protein. The chilling sensitivity of chs1 was fully rescued by pad4 and eds1, but not by ndr1. The overexpression of the TIR and NB domains can suppress the chs1-conferred phenotypes. Interestingly, the stability of the CHS1 protein was positively regulated by low temperatures independently of the 26S proteasome pathway. This study revealed the role of a TIR-NB-type gene in plant growth and cell death under chilling stress, and suggests that temperature modulates the stability of the TIR-NB protein in Arabidopsis.

  9. Mutations in SYNGAP1 Cause Intellectual Disability, Autism, and a Specific Form of Epilepsy by Inducing Haploinsufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berryer, Martin H; Hamdan, Fadi F; Klitten, Laura L;

    2013-01-01

    De novo mutations in SYNGAP1, which codes for a RAS/RAP GTP-activating protein, cause nonsyndromic intellectual disability (NSID). All disease-causing point mutations identified until now in SYNGAP1 are truncating, raising the possibility of an association between this type of mutations and NSID...

  10. Subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic

    CERN Document Server

    Warkentin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Quiver mutation plays a crucial role in the definition of cluster algebras by Fomin and Zelevinsky. It induces an equivalence relation on the set of all quivers without loops and two-cycles. A quiver is called mutation-acyclic if it is mutation-equivalent to an acyclic quiver. The aim of this note is to show that full subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic.

  11. Genetic signatures from amplification profiles characterize DNA mutation in somatic and radiation-induced sports of chrysanthemum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev.) cultivars 'Dark Charm', 'Salmon Charm', 'Coral Charm' and 'Dark Bronze Charm' are either radiation-induced mutants or spontaneous sports of 'Charm' and constitute a family or series of plants that primarily differ in flower color. These cultivars, which were difficult to differentiate genetically by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF), were easily identified by using arbitrary signatures from amplification profiles (ASAP). Genomic DNA was first amplified with three standard octamer arbitrary primers, all of which produced monomorphic profiles. Products from each of these DNA fingerprints were subsequently reamplified using four minihairpin decamer primers. The 12 primer combinations produced signatures containing approximately 37% polymorphic character loci, which were used to estimate genetic relationships between cultivars. Forty-six (32%) unique amplification products were associated with individual cultivars. The number of ASAP polymorphisms detected provided an estimate of the mutation rate in the mutant cultivars, ranging from 0.03% to 1.6% of nucleotide changes within an average of 18 kb of arbitrary amplified DAF sequence. The ASAP technique permits the clear genetic identification of somatic mutants and radiation-induced sports that are genetically highly homogeneous and should facilitate marker assisted breeding and protection of plant breeders rights of varieties or cultivars

  12. Development of seedless fruits mutants in citrus including tangerine (C. reticulata) and pummelo (C. grandis) through induced mutations and biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of seedless fruit mutants in citrus, including Tangerine (C. reticulata) and Pummelo (C. grandis), through induced mutation and biotechnology was studied at the Gamma Irradiation Service and Nuclear Technology Center, Pichit and Phare Horticultural Research Center for 4 years (August 2000 to September 2004). The results showed successful induction of mutants with gamma irradiation using both chronic and acute procedures for pot plants, scions and in vitro plantlets of tangerine (Citrus reticulata var. Shogun and Sai Nam Puaeng) and pummelo (Citrus grandis viz. Kao Thong Dee). MS medium with 2 mgL-1 of BA was found to be the most suitable medium for shoot proliferation. The seedlings were sub-cultured at least 4 times, and then they were treated with acute and chronic irradiation. Shoot induction from M1V0 to M1V4 generation was performed in basic MS medium with 2 mgL-1 added BA. Rooting was induced in the M1V4 in halfstrength MS enriched with BA 2 mgL-1. Later, the shoots were excised and grafted on mature plants or the plantlets directly transferred in the field and later the fruits from mature trees were evaluated for seedlessness in M1V4 at Pichit and Phare Horticultural Research Center. (author)

  13. Combining Single Strand Oligodeoxynucleotides and CRISPR/Cas9 to Correct Gene Mutations in β-Thalassemia-induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaohua; He, Wenyin; Song, Bing; Ou, Zhanhui; Fan, Di; Chen, Yuchang; Fan, Yong; Sun, Xiaofang

    2016-08-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-Thal) is one of the most common genetic diseases in the world. The generation of patient-specific β-Thal-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), correction of the disease-causing mutations in those cells, and then differentiation into hematopoietic stem cells offers a new therapeutic strategy for this disease. Here, we designed a CRISPR/Cas9 to specifically target the Homo sapiens hemoglobin β (HBB) gene CD41/42(-CTTT) mutation. We demonstrated that the combination of single strand oligodeoxynucleotides with CRISPR/Cas9 was capable of correcting the HBB gene CD41/42 mutation in β-Thal iPSCs. After applying a correction-specific PCR assay to purify the corrected clones followed by sequencing to confirm mutation correction, we verified that the purified clones retained full pluripotency and exhibited normal karyotyping. Additionally, whole-exome sequencing showed that the mutation load to the exomes was minimal after CRISPR/Cas9 targeting. Furthermore, the corrected iPSCs were selected for erythroblast differentiation and restored the expression of HBB protein compared with the parental iPSCs. This method provides an efficient and safe strategy to correct the HBB gene mutation in β-Thal iPSCs. PMID:27288406

  14. Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam Induced Mutations in Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2) of Anopheles stephensi

    OpenAIRE

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha; Barna, Bhupinder; Kaur, Satvinderjeet

    2012-01-01

    The present article deals with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotoxicity evaluation of neonicotinoid pesticides, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, by using the genome of a mosquito Anopheles stephensi taken as an experimental model. After treatment of the second instar larvae with LC20 of the pesticides for 24 h, the induced nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of freshly hatched unfed control and treated individuals was studied from the sequenc...

  15. Induced mutation studies with Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. and some indica rice varieties from Ceylon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-imbibed seeds of Brachiaria brizantha were irradiated with doses of 60Co gamma rays ranging from 7.5 to 75 kR and fresh stem cuttings containing three nodes were irradiated with doses ranging from 7.5 to 45 kR. Chromosome counts were made using the Carnoy method. There was no germination at 75 kR, and 18% germination at 60 kR with no survival of the seedlings. At the other doses germination and seedling survival decreased from 56% and 100% respectively for the control to 42% and 46% respectively at 45 kR. There were no chlorophyll mutants at 7.5 kR, while a few were observed among seedlings at the higher doses. In the stem cuttings establishment was poor and morphological variations were observed at all doses above 15 kR. A mutant of desirable plant type was obtained from the 45-kR seed treatment with an erect growth habit, reduced pubescence, short internodes, profuse tillering and rapid regrowth compared with the parent. Four indica rice varieties, H-4, H-8, H-7 and Pachchaiperumal 2462/11 (PP 2462/11), were subjected to gamma rays, neutrons and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) treatments. The LD50 level for gamma rays was 50 to 60 kR, for neutrons 1600 R and for EMS 0.4%. Germination and final plant stand in the M1 generation were affected only slightly by the neutron treatments, but were greatly reduced by EMS, and gamma irradiation above 35 kR. The final plant stand of the variety PP 2462/11 was most reduced by all the mutagens. In the M2 generation there was segregation for chlorophyll mutants, of the albina, chlorina, xantha, virescens and zebrina types. Other macro-mutations observed were for grain size and shape, plant height, flowering date and sterility. Grass clump types were found occasionally. (author)

  16. Use of induced mutations to adopt aromatic rice to low country conditions of Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two aromatic rice accessions, Au 27789 and IR Basmati were used in mutation breeding by subjecting 12000 seeds of each variety to γ-ray doses of 200 or 300 Gy from a 60Co source. Based on agronomic characteristics, 635 M2 plants were selected and grown as M3 progenies. Sixty plants were selected from non-irradiated parental varieties using the same criteria, and tested along with mutant plant progenies. Both doses of γ-rays were effective in creating genetic variability for agronomic characteristics, with high heritability values when M2 parent to M3 progeny regression based heritabilities were compared with selection in non-irradiated control varieties. Three mutant lines with compact plant type, erect and larger flag leaf, compact panicles and acceptable quality recording the highest yield were tested in five locations over four seasons using two recommended cultivars as controls. The mutant line 22/3 with a medium level of aroma recorded more than 2.5 t/ha, higher than the average yield of rice (1.5 -2 t/ha) in low-country wet zone. It has a compact panicle and narrow leaf angle allowing denser planting, which may help further increase the yield. The mutant lines maintained superior kernel length, linear elongation ratio and expansion index, all of which are important characteristics of aromatic long grain rice. High quality aromatic Basmati rice is almost triple the price of rice produced from standard varieties, making their cultivation more profitable. Such grades fetch approximately two times the price of average-grade rice in international markets. Investigation and implementation of agronomic practices that enable the optimisation of the yield and quality of new mutant lines will help to increase profitability of rice cultivation in the marginal areas. Their further improvement may be possible through hybridisation among mutants

  17. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  20. Expression of human AID in yeast induces mutations in context similar to the context of somatic hypermutation at G-C pairs in immunoglobulin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunkel Thomas A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody genes are diversified by somatic hypermutation (SHM, gene conversion and class-switch recombination. All three processes are initiated by the activation-induced deaminase (AID. According to a DNA deamination model of SHM, AID converts cytosine to uracil in DNA sequences. The initial deamination of cytosine leads to mutation and recombination in pathways involving replication, DNA mismatch repair and possibly base excision repair. The DNA sequence context of mutation hotspots at G-C pairs during SHM is DGYW/WRCH (G-C is a hotspot position, R = A/G, Y = T/C, W = A/T, D = A/G/T. Results To investigate the mechanisms of AID-induced mutagenesis in a model system, we studied the genetic consequences of AID expression in yeast. We constructed a yeast vector with an artificially synthesized human AID gene insert using codons common to highly expressed yeast genes. We found that expression of the artificial hAIDSc gene was moderately mutagenic in a wild-type strain and highly mutagenic in an ung1 uracil-DNA glycosylase-deficient strain. A majority of mutations were at G-C pairs. In the ung1 strain, C-G to T-A transitions were found almost exclusively, while a mixture of transitions with 12% transversions was characteristic in the wild-type strain. In the ung1 strain mutations that could have originated from deamination of the transcribed stand were found more frequently. In the wild-type strain, the strand bias was reversed. DGYW/WRCH motifs were preferential sites of mutations. Conclusion The results are consistent with the hypothesis that AID-mediated deamination of DNA is a major cause of mutations at G-C base pairs in immunoglobulin genes during SHM. The sequence contexts of mutations in yeast induced by AID and those of somatic mutations at G-C pairs in immunoglobulin genes are significantly similar. This indicates that the intrinsic substrate specificity of AID itself is a primary determinant of mutational hotspots at G

  1. Genetic redundancy between SPT23 and MGA2: regulators of Ty-induced mutations and Ty1 transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Zhang; Burkett, T J; Yamashita, I; Garfinkel, D J

    1997-01-01

    SPT23 was isolated as a dosage-dependent suppressor of Ty-induced mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SPT23 shows considerable sequence homology with MGA2, a gene identified as a dosage-dependent suppressor of a snf2-imposed block on STA1 transcription in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. Although single mutations in either of these genes have only modest effects on cell growth, spt23 mga2 double mutants are inviable. Unlike SPT23, multicopy expression of a truncated form of MGA2 suppresses ...

  2. Translesion DNA polymerases Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are not essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Tamuli; C Ravindran; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2006-12-01

    Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize DNA across a damaged template. DNA synthesis by such translesion polymerases can be mutagenic due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. In fact, many mutational and hypermutational processes in systems ranging from yeast to mammals have been traced to the activity of such polymerases. We show however, that the translesion polymerases are dispensable for repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora crassa. Additionally, we demonstrate that the upr-1 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of Pol , is a highly polymorphic locus in Neurospora.

  3. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B on chromosome 3 (FTD3, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III. We have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3.

  4. Prion protein with Y145STOP mutation induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and PrP-containing deposits in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pathogenic truncation of an amber mutation at codon 145 (Y145STOP) in Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) was investigated through the real-time imaging in living cells, by utilizing GFP-PrP constructs. GFP-PrP(1-144) exhibited an aberrant localization to mitochondria in mouse neuroblastoma neuro2a (N2a) and HpL3-4 cells, a hippocampal cell line established from prnp gene-ablated mice, whereas full-length GFP-PrP did not. The aberrant mitochondrial localization was also confirmed by Western blot analysis. Since GFP-PrP(1-121), as previously reported, and full-length GFP-PrP do not exhibit such mitochondrial localization, the mitochondrial localization of GFP-PrP(1-144) requires not only PrP residues 121-144 (in human sequence) but also COOH-terminal truncation in the current experimental condition. Subsequently, the GFP-PrP(1-144) induced a change in the mitochondrial innermembrane potential (ΔΨm), release of cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytosol, and DNA fragmentation in these cells. Non-fluorescent PrP(1-144) also induced the DNA fragmentation in N2a and HpL3-4 cells after the proteasomal inhibition. These data may provide clues as to the molecular mechanism of the neurotoxic property of Y145STOP mutation. Furthermore, immunoelectron microscopy revealed numerous electron-dense deposits in mitochondria clusters of GFP-PrP(1-144)-transfected N2a cells, whereas no deposit was detected in the cells transfected with full-length GFP-PrP. Co-localization of GFP/PrP-immunogold particles with porin-immunogold particles as a mitochondrial marker was observed in such electron-dense vesicular foci, resembling those found in autophagic vacuoles forming secondary lysosomes. Whether such electron-dense deposits may serve as a seed for the growth of amyloid plaques, a characteristic feature of GSS with Y145STOP, awaits further investigations

  5. Induced mutations in connection with biotechnology for crop improvement in Latin America. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication results from the second Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Plant Breeding and Genetics organized on a regional basis in Latin America. The present CRP and the previous one were initiated and implemented in response to the pressing need to enhance the productivity of economic plants, viz. food crops, fruits and ornamentals. Improvement of crop production has become the highest priority in most countries of Latin America, as in other regions. Breeding superior varieties is often the only feasible solution where inputs are limited; well adapted varieties are required to meet specific agro-environmental conditions. Such varieties provide yield stability on an economically required level. The most important and common factors limiting crop production are abiotic, e.g. cold, salinity, soil aluminium toxicity and drought; as well as biotic, e.g. diseases and pests. Modern biotechnology and induced mutations offer new means and significant potential to breed desired varieties in a relatively short time. Additionally, both approaches facilitate the breeding of some vegetatively propagated crops which until now were improved mainly through selection of rare spontaneous mutants in natural or cultivated populations. Using some of these techniques it recently became possible to produce, in some crops, true-to-type mutated lines or clones within a few months. Biotechnology can also facilitate selection, description and molecular characterization of promising mutants. Currently used DNA markers, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) as well as other polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques, were included in this CRP to benefit the important crops of this region. Also included in this CRP were doubled haploids (DH), which are obtained from anther or microspore cultures and are very suitable biotechnology methods. In connection with radiation-induced mutations, they can speed up conventional

  6. Mutations induced by 1,3-butadiene metabolites, butadiene diolepoxide, and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane at the Hprt locus in CHO-K1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Hyun-Jo; Rhee, Seung Keun; Yoon, ByoungSu; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Lee, Chong-Soon

    2002-12-31

    Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial chemical that is classified as a probable human carcinogen. Butadiene diolepoxide (BDE) and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB) are metabolites of carcinogenic BD and contain the DNA-reactive one and two epoxides, respectively. In this study, the mutation frequencies and mutation spectra that are induced by BDE and DEB have been investigated at the hprt locus in CHO-K1 cells. The BDE- and DEB-treated CHO-K1 cells were allowed to grow for several days, then seeded in a medium that contained 6-thioguanine in order to select the hprt mutants. BDE exhibited the mutagenic activity at concentrations that were approximately 100-times higher than DEB. The mutation spectra for BDE and DEB were determined by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of hprt mRNA, which was followed by automatic DNA sequencing of the PCR products. The mutational spectrum for BDE was exon deletions (16/41), G x C --> A x T transitions (11/41), and A x T --> G x C transitions (5/41). The mutational spectrum for DEB was exon deletions (15/39), G x C --> A x T transitions (11/39), and A x T --> T x A transversions (5/39). The most common base substitution that was induced by both BDE and DEB was G x C --> A x T transitions. The sites of the single base substitutions that were induced by BDE and DEB were guanine and adenine, which was consistent with the DNA adduct profiles. The high frequencies of the exon deletions by each metabolite occurred in the regions of exons 2, 3, or 4. These data indicate that BDE and DEB are mutagenic carcinogens by forming DNA adducts at the site of adenine and guanine, and inducing large exon deletions and single base substitutions. PMID:12521305

  7. The Effect of Kinetin, Gibberellic Acid and Indole Acetic Acid on EMS-Induced Somatic Mutation and Recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    YEŞİLADA, Elif

    2000-01-01

    The effect of plant growth hormones (kinetin, gibberellic acid (GA 3) and indole acetic acid (IAA)) on EMS-induced mutant wing spots was studied with the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster.GA 3 reduced all kinds of EMS-induced spot. While a 10 -3 M concentration of kinetin reduced only the number of EMS-induced twin spots, a 10 -4 M concentration was seen to increase the number of all types of spot. The same concentrations of IAA gave variable resu...

  8. Paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, writer's cramp, migraine with aura and absence epilepsy in twin brothers with a novel SLC2A1 missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbizu, Aintzane; Cuenca-León, Ester; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Gratacòs, Margarida; Conill, Joan; Redecillas, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Macaya, Alfons

    2010-08-15

    We report two monochorionic twins that progressively developed, between ages 5 and 10, a combination of episodic neurological disorders including paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, migraine without or with aura, absence seizures and writer's cramp. CSF/serum glucose ratio was moderately decreased in both patients. Mutational analysis of SLC2A1 gene identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in exon 4. This novel mutation has been previously showed to disrupt glucose transport in vitro. Both patients showed immediate and near-complete response to ketogenic diet. This clinical observation suggests that a high index of suspicion for GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is warranted in evaluating patients with multiple neurological paroxysmal events.

  9. Epistatic participation of REV1 and REV3 in the formation of UV-induced frameshift mutations in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Steinboeck, Ferdinand [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-29

    Mutations arising in times of cell cycle arrest may provide a selective advantage for unicellular organisms adapting to environmental changes. For multicellular organisms, however, they may pose a serious threat, in that such mutations in somatic cells contribute to carcinogenesis and ageing. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae presents a convenient model system for studying the incidence and the mechanisms of stationary-phase mutation in a eukaryotic organism. Having studied the emergence of frameshift mutants after several days of starvation-induced cell cycle arrest, we previously reported that all (potentially error-prone) translesion synthesis (TLS) enzymes identified in S. cerevisiae did not contribute to the basal level of spontaneous stationary-phase mutations. However, we observed that an increased frequency of stationary-phase frameshift mutations, brought about by a defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway or by UV irradiation, was dependent on Rev3p, the catalytic subunit of the TLS polymerase zeta (Pol {zeta}). Employing the same two conditions, we now examined the effect of deletions of the genes coding for polymerase eta (Pol {eta}) (RAD30) and Rev1p (REV1). In a NER-deficient strain background, the increased incidence of stationary-phase mutations was only moderately influenced by a lack of Pol {eta} but completely reduced to wild type level by a knockout of the REV1 gene. UV-induced stationary-phase mutations were abundant in wild type and rad30{delta} strains, but substantially reduced in a rev1{delta} as well as a rev3{delta} strain. The similarity of the rev1{delta} and the rev3{delta} phenotype and an epistatic relationship evident from experiments with a double-deficient strain suggests a participation of Rev1p and Rev3p in the same mutagenic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the response of cell cycle-arrested cells to an excess of exo- or endogenously induced DNA damage includes a novel replication

  10. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-01-01

    We use Brownian dynamics simulations to study the permeation properties of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as a function of the fixed charge Q_f at its selectivity filter. We reconcile the recently-discovered discrete calcium conduction bands M0 (Q_f=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e) with the set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5-0.7e), L1 (1.5-2e) thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands v Q_f for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q_f leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium selective, non-blocking channel) -> M0 (non-selective channel) -> L1 (sodium selective channel with divalent block) -> M1 (calcium selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L1 band is identified with the eukaryotic (DEKA) sodium channel, and L0 (speculatively) with the bacterial NaChBac channel. The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced ...

  11. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27217538

  12. Breeding of high biomass and lipid producing Desmodesmus sp. by Ethylmethane sulfonate-induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; He, Meilin; Zou, Shanmei; Fei, Cong; Yan, Yongquan; Zheng, Shiyan; Rajper, Aftab Ahmed; Wang, Changhai

    2016-05-01

    To improve the biomass yield and lipid productivity, two desert microalgae, Desmodesmus sp. S81 and G41 were induced mutagenesis by Ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS), and obtained two potential mutants, Desmodesmus sp. S5 and G3 from the mutagenic clones for their greatly promoted biomass and lipid production. The results showed that the biomass yield, lipid content and lipid productivity of the mutant strains S5 and G3 were 778.10mg·L(-1), 48.41% and 19.83mg·L(-1)·d(-1), 739.52mg·L(-1), 46.01%, and 17.92mg·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively, which presented the increment of 45.50%, 8.00% and 74.24%, 20.67%, 10.35% and 55.77% than those of S81 and G41. Comparing with the wild strains, the mutants showed reduced PUFAs and glycol lipids, elevated MUFAs and neutral lipids contents, which were appropriate for biodiesel production. PMID:26894567

  13. Detection of haplotype mutations of the MD-2 gene promoter associated with Der p2-induced allergy using a nanostructured biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin YT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ting Chin,1 En-Chih Liao,2 Chia-Che Wu,1 Gou-Jen Wang,1,3,4 Jaw-Ji Tsai2 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, 2Department of Medical Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 3Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, 4PhD Program in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan Abstract: Group 2 allergens (Der p2 have been reported to be a major cause of the human immune response to dust mite allergens. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time the effective differentiation between haplotype mutation and normal genes in the MD-2 gene promoter using a nanostructured biosensor. A 70-mer gene fragment containing the haplotype of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the MD-2 gene promoter region was used as a probe to detect haplotype mutations associated with Der p2-induced allergy. Discrimination was achieved using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The discrimination experiments employed 30 haplotype mutation samples and 30 normal target samples. The haplotype mutation samples and normal target samples could be clearly discriminated, even using samples produced by a five-cycle polymerase chain reaction process. The time and cost of sample preparation for the polymerase chain reaction process in the clinical setting can thus be reduced. Keywords: haplotype mutation detection, nanostructured biosensor, MD-2 gene promoter, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

  14. Involvement of p53 Mutation and Mismatch Repair Proteins Dysregulation in NNK-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome integrity is essential for normal cellular functions and cell survival. Its instability can cause genetic aberrations and is considered as a hallmark of most cancers. To investigate the carcinogenesis process induced by tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK, we studied the dynamic changes of two important protectors of genome integrity, p53 and MMR system, in malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells after NNK exposure. Our results showed that the expression of MLH1, one of the important MMR proteins, was decreased early and maintained the downregulation during the transformation in a histone modification involved and DNA methylation-independent manner. Another MMR protein PMS2 also displayed a declined expression while being in a later stage of transformation. Moreover, we conducted p53 mutation analysis and revealed a mutation at codon 273 which led to the replacement of arginine by histidine. With the mutation, DNA damage-induced activation of p53 was significantly impaired. We further reintroduced the wild-type p53 into the transformed cells, and the malignant proliferation can be abrogated by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These findings indicate that p53 and MMR system play an important role in the initiation and progression of NNK-induced transformation, and p53 could be a potential therapeutic target for tobacco-related cancers.

  15. Non-homologous end joining dependency of {gamma}-irradiation-induced adaptive frameshift mutation formation in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-11-22

    There is a strong selective pressure favoring adaptive mutations which relieve proliferation-limiting adverse living conditions. Due to their importance for evolution and pathogenesis, we are interested in the mechanisms responsible for the formation of such adaptive, gain-of-fitness mutations in stationary-phase cells. During previous studies on the occurrence of spontaneous reversions of an auxotrophy-causing frameshift allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we noticed that about 50% of the adaptive reversions depended on a functional non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we show that the occasional NHEJ component Pol4, which is the yeast ortholog of mammalian DNA polymerase lambda, is not required for adaptive mutagenesis. An artificially imposed excess of DSBs by {gamma}-irradiation resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of adaptive, cell cycle arrest-releasing frameshift reversions. By the use of DNA ligase IV-deficient strains we detected that the majority of the {gamma}-induced adaptive mutations were also dependent on a functional NHEJ pathway. This suggests that the same mutagenic NHEJ mechanism acts on spontaneously arising as well as on ionizing radiation-induced DSBs. Inaccuracy of the NHEJ repair pathway may extensively contribute to the incidence of frameshift mutations in resting (non-dividing) eukaryotic cells, and thus act as a driving force in tumor development.

  16. Novel Ras pathway inhibitor induces apoptosis and growth inhibition of K-ras-mutated cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Piotr; Zwolak, Pawel; Terai, Kaoru; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2008-11-01

    MT477 is a novel quinoline with potential activity in Ras-mutated cancers. In this study, MT477 preferentially inhibited the proliferation of K-ras-mutated human pulmonary (A549) and pancreatic (MiaPaCa-2) adenocarcinoma cell lines, compared with a non-Ras-mutated human lung squamous carcinoma cell line (H226) and normal human lung fibroblasts. MT477 treatment induced apoptosis in A549 cells and was associated with caspase-3 activation. MT477 also induced sub-G1 cell-cycle arrest in A549 cells. Although we found that MT477 partially inhibited protein kinase C (PKC), it inhibited Ras directly followed in time by inhibition of 2 Ras downstream molecules, Erk1/2 and Ral. MT477 also caused a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and formation of filopodias in A549 cells; this event may lead to decreased migration and invasion of tumor cells. In a xenograft mouse model, A549 tumor growth was inhibited significantly by MT477 at a dose of 1 mg/kg (P < 0.05 vs vehicle control). Taken together, these results support the conclusion that MT477 acts as a direct Ras inhibitor. This quinoline, therefore, could potentially be active in Ras-mutated cancers and could be developed extensively as an anticancer molecule with this in mind. PMID:19010291

  17. Somatic mutation and recombination induced with reactor thermal neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster; Mutacion y recombinacion somaticas inducidas con neutrones termicos de reactor en Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The SMART test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to quantify the effect over the somatic mutation and recombination induced by thermal and fast neutrons at the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the ININ at the power of 300 k W for times of 30, 60 and 120 minutes with total equivalent doses respectively of 20.8, 41.6 and 83.2 Sv. A linear relation between the radiation equivalent dose and the frequency of the genetic effects such as mutation and recombination was observed. The obtained results allow to conclude that SMART is a sensitive system to the induced damage by neutrons, so this can be used for studying its biological effects. (Author)

  18. Mutations induced at the promoter region of the c-myc gene due to dual exposure to ionizing radiation and methyl nitroso urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant tumors were arising from a sequence of events including mutation in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.The accretion of these mutations is apparently facilitated by acquired or inherited defects inguardianmechanisms that maintain the integrity of the cellular genome. The proto-oncogene c-myc, which is frequently over expressed in tumors at the center of a transcription factor network, requlates cellular proliferation replicate potential, growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Expression of c-myc is down reglated during differentiation and is rapidly induced by a diverse catalog of mutagens including ionizing radiation and many alkylating agents. In the present study, the dual exposure to methyl nitroso urea(MNU) and ionizing radiation were assessed. These induced effects were assessed histopathologically and biochemically and were correlated at the molecular level by assessing single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP)

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter includes articles dealing with radiation induced mutation based plant breeding research findings aimed at improving productivity, disease resistance and tolerance of stress conditions

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena E.; Hasholt, Lis F.;

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained froma 57-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The diseaseis caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4, h...... normal karyotype. The iPSC line may be useful for studying hereditary frontotemporal dementia and TAU pathology in vitro....

  1. Mutational interactions between near-UV radiation and DNA damaging agents in Escherichia coli: the role of near-UV-induced modifications in growth and macromolecular synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutational interactions between near-ultraviolet (334 nm, 365 nm) radiation and DNA damaging agents (far-UV (254 nm) and ethyl-methanesulphonate (EMS)) were studied in strains of Escherichia coli B/r trp thy with different susceptibilities to near-UV-induced growth delay (wild-type, rel and sr). Far-UV induced reversion to tryptophan independence is reduced while forward mutation to streptomycin is enhanced by prior exposure of the rel+ srd+ strains to near-UV radiation. The observed interactions are reduced (rel) or absent (srd) in the two mutant strains as are the corresponding growth and macromolecular synthesis delays normally observed after near-UV treatment. Quantitatively, the degree of interaction induced by near-UV pre-treatment correlates closely with the degree of protein synthesis inhibition. A mechanism is proposed for the contrasting interactions at the two genetic loci based on the different pathways by which pre-mutagenic lesions may be processed. The primary chromophore for the mutational interactions would appear to be 4-thiouracil-containing transfer RNA. (author)

  2. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma preferentially induces apoptosis in p53-mutated cancer cells by activating ROS stress-response pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghao Ma

    Full Text Available Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPP is an ionized gas at room temperature and has potential as a new apoptosis-promoting cancer therapy that acts by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, it is imperative to determine its selectivity and standardize the components and composition of NTAPP. Here, we designed an NTAPP-generating apparatus combined with a He gas feeding system and demonstrated its high selectivity toward p53-mutated cancer cells. We first determined the proper conditions for NTAPP exposure to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The apoptotic effect of NTAPP was greater for p53-mutated cancer cells; artificial p53 expression in p53-negative HT29 cells decreased the pro-apoptotic effect of NTAPP. We also examined extra- and intracellular ROS levels in NTAPP-treated cells to deduce the mechanism of NTAPP action. While NTAPP-mediated increases in extracellular nitric oxide (NO did not affect cell viability, intracellular ROS increased under NTAPP exposure and induced apoptotic cell death. This effect was dose-dependently reduced following treatment with ROS scavengers. NTAPP induced apoptosis even in doxorubicin-resistant cancer cell lines, demonstrating the feasibility of NTAPP as a potent cancer therapy. Collectively, these results strongly support the potential of NTAPP as a selective anticancer treatment, especially for p53-mutated cancer cells.

  3. DNA damage-processing in E. coli: on-going protein synthesis is required for fixation of UV-induced lethality and mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Amanda; Raymer, Jenny; Bockrath, R

    2002-10-01

    UV irradiation of E. coli produces photoproducts in the DNA genome. In consequence, some bacteria lose viability (colony-forming ability) or remain viable as mutant cells. However, the end-points of viability inactivation (lethality) or mutation are determined by cellular processes that act on the UV-damaged DNA. We have investigated the in vivo time course for processes that deal with cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which can be specifically removed by photoreactivation (PR). At different times during post-UV incubation, samples were challenged with PR and assayed for viability or mutation. We used excision-defective E. coli B/r cells and worked under yellow light to avoid background PR. During post-UV incubation (0-100min) in fully supplemented defined medium, inactivation and mutation were initially significantly reversed by PR but the extent of this reversal decreased during continued incubation defining "fixation" of lethality or mutation, respectively. In contrast, if protein synthesis was restricted during the post-UV incubation, no fixation developed. When chloramphenicol was added to inhibit protein synthesis after 30min of supplemented post-UV incubation, at a time sufficient for expression of UV-induced protein(s), fixation of lethality or mutation was still annulled (no change in the effectiveness of PR developed). Lethality fixation did progress when protein synthesis was restricted and the cells were incubated in the presence of puromycin or were either clpP or clpX defective. We discuss these and related results to suggest (1) on-going protein synthesis is required in the fixation process for lethality and mutation to sustain an effective level of a hypothetical protein sensitive to ClpXP proteolysis and (2) this protein plays a critical role in the process leading to exchange between Pol III activity and alternative polymerase activities required as each cell deals with damage in template DNA.

  4. Evaluation Of Some Induced Gamma Ray Mutations In Bread Wheat For Drought Tolerance In The Newly Cultivated Sandy Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two field experiments were out during two successive growing seasons (2001/2002 and 2002/2003) in the experimental farm of Plant Research Department, Nuclear Research Center, Abu Zaabal, to study the effect of two irrigation intervals on yield and its attributes of four induced mutations (Mutant 7, Mutant 8, Mutant 12 and Mutant 19) and two commercial varieties (Giza 164 and Sahel 1). The obtained results showed that : 1- Leaf temperature and protein content were significantly increased by increasing irrigation interval in the two seasons. 2- Longer irrigation interval significantly decreased plant height, spike length, No. of spikelets/spike, No. of spikes/m2, grain yield ton/hectare, straw yield ton/hectare and biological yield ton/hectare. While the mean values of all characters were increased in the two seasons when irrigation interval was shorter. 3- he mean value of grain yield ton/hectare for Mutant 7 and Mutant 19 was higher the other genotypes under long irrigation interval in the two seasons. 4- The interaction between irrigation intervals and wheat genotypes showed significant effect on spike length, No. of spikes/m2, 1000 grain weight, grain yield ton/hectare, straw yield ton/hectare, biological yield ton/hectare and harvest index. 5- Stress susceptibility index the different genotypes showed differences in their tolerance to drought. Mut. 7, Mut. 8 and Mut. 19 were more tolerant to drought than the other genotypes. 6- The highest water use efficiency (WUE) were obtained for Mut. 19 and Mut. 7 with long irrigation interval (20 days). 7- The Mutant 19 and Mutant 7 were more tolerant to drought than the other genotypes, due to higher yield and higher water use efficiency under drought and to their lowest values for stress susceptibility indices. (Authors)

  5. Analysis at the sequence level of mutations induced by the ultimate carcinogen N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Robert P. P.; Schwartz, Nicole; Daune, Michel P.

    1983-01-01

    The covalent binding of an ultimate carcinogen to the DNA bases or phosphate groups creates a premutational lesion that in vivo is processed by the repair, replication and recombination enzymes, and eventually may be converted into a mutation. Being interested in the way that an initial premutational event is converted into a stable heritable mutation, we have sequenced stable mutations in a gene that has formed covalent adducts in vitro with N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene (N-AcO-AAF, a mo...

  6. Improvement of local varieties of rice (Oryza glaberrima) for resistance to shattering and grain quality by induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Mali, a large area of rice is planted with the local rice, O. glaberrima which under conditions of low rainfall and flood water is more hardy to stress than the introduced O. sativa cultivars. A program to improve the local varieties of O. glaberrima by induced mutations was started in 1988. Ten local varieties were irradiated with 20 and 30 krad. In M4 of cv. 'Gorbal', irradiated with 20 krads, 13 variants were selected. Five of these were evaluated in M5 for their agronomic performance. The induced mutants in the remaining 9 varieties were highly sterile with 90% or more sterility in the M2 and M3. Irradiation with 20-30 krad gave high survival (70-95%), and several mutants with white kernel were obtained from the red seeded types. Nearly two-third of the identified mutants had white caryopsis. There is better consumer acceptance of the white seeded type of rice than the red seeded varieties in Mali and the white seeded mutants may have an added premium in the market. The field performance of the M5 mutants was investigated. Preliminary results showed that some of mutants derived from cv. 'Gorbal' were early in maturity and had more panicles per plant, but had a lower 1000-kernel weight, and did not differ from the parent in grain yield. Additional trials are planned to establish potential of the mutants for yield and quality. Three more cultivars of O. glaberrima - 'Haira', 'Tombo' and 'Yele' - were irradiated with 20 and 60 krads, and gave 75, 81 and 72% seed viability, respectively. M1 showed reduced plant height. Selection for non-shattering of grains shall be carried out in M2. Any plants which are non-shattering but sterile shall be crossed with the parent to recover the mutant types. The taxonomic status of cv. 'Gorbal' is not very clear. Isozyme patterns suggest that this cultivar may belong to O. sativa and not to O. glaberrima. To establish its taxonomic status, crosses shall be made with O. sativa and O. glaberrima. (author). 2 tabs

  7. 紫外线致DNA突变的快速测定研究%A Fast Determination of DNA Mutation Induced by Ultraviolet Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆峰; 刘荔荔; 张晓芳; 吴玉田

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis, chromatography, immunoassay, sequencing and other time consuming approaches have been developed to determine DNA base mismatching, oxidative lesion or strand breaks. Sometimes,however, only qualitative information is enough to decide whether mutation has happened to DNA and its extent.Convolution spectrometry (CS), a new technique to discover ultrafine difference on ultraviolet (UV) absorption of different substances, is originally employed to find out any subtle mutation of DNA induced by UV radiation. Mutative DNA is compared with ego criteria based on the spectra of the former DNA, any difference is quantitatively expressed by dispersion (δ). Visible changes cannot be observed on second -derivative spectra until the mutation gets δup to 11.48%. Dimethyl sulfoxide is an intensifier of UV 254 nm induced DNA mutation and protector at 365 nm,which is simply confirmed by increasing and decreasing δ. Every convolution procedure takes less than 1 min. Convolution spectrometry provides a fast, simple, sensitive and inexpensive alternative to determine DNA mutation, and to screen anti-mutational medicines.%毛细管电泳、变性色谱、免疫吸附、DNA测序方法等已广泛用于DNA碱基错配、氧化缺失、链断裂等变化的检测,但有时如进行药物筛选时,只需定性地检测DNA是否变化或变化程度.本文采用褶合光谱法定性地检测紫外线致DNA变化程度,将突变后DNA的褶合光谱与未变异前DNA自身标准比较,并以差谱值δ量化地表示突变程度.当褶合光谱δ高达11.48%时,才能从二阶导数光谱上发现差异,表明方法的灵敏度远远高于前者.加入DMSO后,溶液在254nm照射时,δ升高,表现为DNA变异诱导剂;溶液在365 nm照射时,δ降低,表现为DNA变异保护剂.褶合光谱法快速、简便、灵敏、经济,可以作为检测DNA突变、筛选抗突变药物的一种新型方法.

  8. Effect of strand-specific excision repair on the spectra of mutations induced by benzo[a]pyrene-diol epoxide and ultraviolet radiation in diploid human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of excision repair on the spectra of mutations induced in diploid human cells by UV and ±-7β, 8α-dihydroxy-9α,10α-epoxy- 7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE), the author synchronized repair-proficient cells, treated them at the beginning of S phase or in G1 phase several hours prior to the onset of S phase, selected for thioguanine resistant cells, and determined the spectra of mutations in the coding region of the hyproxanthine(guanine)phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in the mutants. As a control, the spectra of mutations similarly induced in repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells were compared. There was no difference in the kinds of mutations observed in mutants derived from either cell strain treated with a particular mutagen either in S or in G1. With BPDE, the majority were G.C→T.A transversions; with UV, they were mainly G.C.→A.T transitions. The strand distribution of premutagenic lesions in mutants from repair-proficient cells treated in S or G1 differed significantly. The results strongly support the hypothesis that human cells preferentially repair UV- and BPDE-induced lesions from the transcribed strand of the HPRT gene. To test this, the rate of repair of BPDE adducts from individual strands of the HPRT gene was measured, using the UvrABC exinuclease and Southern hybridizations with strand-specific probes to detect lesions remaining. BPDE lesions were removed from the transcribed strand at a significantly faster rate than from the nontranscribed strand, consistent with my hypothesis. It was found that BPDE adducts were removed faster from either strand of the HPRT gene than from a transcriptionally inactive locus, indicating preferential repair of active genes. The results of these studies provide biochemical and biological evidence of strand-specific DNA repair of BPDE adducts in human cells

  9. Transfection with extracellularly UV-damaged DNA induces human and rat cells to express a mutator phenotype towards parvovirus H-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinsart, C.; Cornelis, J.J.; Klein, B.; van der Eb, A.J.; Rommelaere, J.

    1984-02-01

    Human and rat cells transfected with UV-irradiated linear double-stranded DNA from calf thymus displayed a mutator activity. This phenotype was identified by growing a lytic thermosensitive single-stranded DNA virus (parvovirus H-1) in those cells and determining viral reversion frequencies. Likewise, exogenous UV-irradiated closed circular DNAs, either double-stranded (simian virus 40) or single-stranded (phi X174), enhanced the ability of recipient cells to mutate parvovirus H-1. The magnitude of mutator activity expression increased along with the number of UV lesions present in the inoculated DNA up to a saturation level. Unirradiated DNA displayed little inducing capacity, irrespective of whether it was single or double stranded. Deprivation of a functional replication origin did not impede UV-irradiated simian virus 40 DNA from providing rat and human cells with a mutator function. Our data suggest that in mammalian cells a trans-acting mutagenic signal might be generated from UV-irradiated DNA without the necessity for damaged DNA to replicate.

  10. Sequence analysis of lacZ~- mutations induced by ion beam irradiation in double-stranded M13mp18DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨剑波; 吴李君; 李莉; 吴家道; 余增亮; 许智宏

    1997-01-01

    While M13mpl8 double-stranded DNA was irradiated with ion beam, and transfected into E. coli JM103, a decrease of transfecting activity was discovered. The lacZ-mutation frequency at 20% survival could reach (3.6-16.8) × 104, about 2.3-10 times that of unirradiated M13DNA. Altogether, 27 lacZ~ mutants were select-ed, 10 of which were used for sequencing. 7 of the sequenced mutants show base changes in 250-bp region examined (the remaining 3 mutants probably have base changes outside the regions sequenced). 5 of the base-changed mutants contain more than one mutational base sites (some of them even have 5-6 mutational base sites in 250-bp region ex-amined) ; this dense distribution of base changes in polysites has seldom been seen in X-rays, γ-rays or UV induced DNA mutations. Our experiments also showed that the types of base changes include transitions( 50 % ), transversions (45% ) and deletion (5% ); no addition or duplication was observed. The transitions were mainly C→T and A→G; the transversion

  11. Efforts to accelerate domestication of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.) by means of induced mutations and tissue culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klu, G.Y.P.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes mutation breeding and tissue culture techniques developed for accelerated domestication of winged bean ( Psophocarpustetragonolobus (L.) DC.). The tissue culture techniques, which are the first steps towards genetic transformation of the crop, include: (1) direct adventitious s

  12. Features of a Chinese family with cerebral cavernous malformation induced by a novel CCM1 gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue; LIU Xue-wu; Nora Lee; LIU Qi-ji; LI Wen-na; HAN Tao; WEI Kun-kun

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs),characterized by hemorrhagic stroke,recurrent headache and epilepsy,are congenital vascular anomalies of the central nervous system.Familial CCMs is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder and three CCM genes have been identified.We report a Chinese family with CCMs and intend to explore clinical,pathological,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and pathogenic gene mutation of this family.Methods Totally 25 family members underwent brain MRI examination and clinical check.Two patients with surgical indications had surgical treatment and the specimens were subjected to histopathological and microstructural examination.In addition,polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were performed with genomic DNA extracted from 25 family members' blood samples for mutation detection.Results Brain MRI identified abnormal results in seven family members.All of them had multiple intracranial lesions and four cases had skin cavernous hemangioma.T2-weighted sequence showed that the lesions were typically characterized by an area of mixed signal intensity.Gradient-echo (GRE) sequence was more sensitive to find microcavernous hemangiomas.There was a wide range in the clinical manifestations as well as the age of onset in the family.The youngest patient was an 8-year-old boy with least intracranial lesions.Histopathological and microstructural examination showed that CCMs were typically discrete multi-sublobes of berry-like lesions,with hemorrhage in various stages of illness evolution.They were formed by abnormally enlarged sinusoids and the thin basement membranes.A novel T deletion mutation in exon 14 of CCM1 gene was identified by mutation detection in the seven patients.But unaffected members and healthy controls did not carry this mutation.Conclusions The clinical manifestations were heterogenic within this family.We identified a novel mutation (c.1396delT) was the disease-causing mutation for this

  13. Mutations in the fourth EGF-like domain affect thrombomodulin-induced changes in the active site of thrombin

    OpenAIRE

    Koeppe, Julia R.; Beach, Muneera A.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel; Jordan Kerns, S.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of alanine and more conservative mutants of residues in the fourth domain of thrombomodulin (TM) were prepared and assayed for protein C activation and for thrombin binding. Several of the alanine mutations appeared to cause misfolding or structural defects as assessed by poor expression and/or NMR HSQC experiments, while more conservative mutations at the same site appeared to fold correctly and retain activity. Several of the conservative mutants bound more weakly to thrombin despi...

  14. The Immunodominant Antigen of an Ultraviolet-induced Regressor Tumor Is Generated by a Somatic Point Mutation in the DEAD Box Helicase p68

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Purnima; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Skipper, Jonathan C.A.; Engelhard, Victor H.; Hunt, Donald F.; Schreiber, Hans

    1997-01-01

    The genetic origins of CD8+ T cell–recognized unique antigens to which mice respond when immunized with syngeneic tumor cells are unknown. The ultraviolet light-induced murine tumor 8101 expresses an H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant antigen, A, that induces cytolytic CD8+ T cells in vivo A+ 8101 cells are rejected by naive mice while A− 8101 tumor cells grow. To identify the antigen H-2Kb molecules were immunoprecipitated from A+ 8101 cells and peptides were eluted by acid. The sensitizing peptide was isolated by sequential reverse-phase HPLC and sequenced using microcapillary HPLC-triple quadruple mass spectrometry. The peptide, SNFVFAGI, matched the sequence of the DEAD box protein p68 RNA helicase except for a single amino acid substitution, caused by a single nucleotide change. This mutation was somatic since fibroblasts from the mouse of tumor origin expressed the wild-type sequence. The amino acid substitution created an anchor for binding of the mutant peptide to H-2Kb. Our results are consistent with mutant p68 being responsible for rejection of the tumor. Several functions of p68, which include nucleolar assembly and inhibition of DNA unwinding, may be mediated through its IQ domain, which was altered by the mutation. This is the first description of a somatic tumor–specific mutation in the coding region of a nucleic acid helicase. PMID:9034148

  15. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a M146I mutation in PSEN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 46-year-old symptomatic man carrying a M146I mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1, responsible for causing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28 and shTP53 genes. M146I-iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific mutation but no additional genomic aberrancies, expressed the expected pluripotency markers and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The reported M146I-iPSCs line may be a useful resource for in vitro modeling of familial AD.

  16. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying an A79V mutation in PSEN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 48-year-old presymptomatic woman carrying a A79V mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1, causing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28 and shTP53 genes. A79V-iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific mutation but no additional genomic aberrancies, expressed the expected pluripotency markers and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The reported A79V-iPSCs line may be a useful resource for in vitro modeling of familial AD.

  17. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a Bernard–Soulier syndrome patient carrying a W71R mutation in the GPIX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lopez-Onieva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from a Bernard–Soulier Syndrome (BSS patient carrying the mutation p.Trp71Arg in the GPIX locus (BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were reprogrammed using heat sensitive non-integrative Sendai viruses containing the reprogramming factors Oct3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Successful silencing of the exogenous reprogramming factors was checked by RT-PCR. Characterization of BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4 included mutation analysis of GPIX locus, Short Tandem Repeats (STR profiling, alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity, analysis of conventional pluripotency-associated factors at mRNA and protein level and in vivo differentiation studies. BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4 will provide a powerful tool to study BSS.

  18. Elevated incidence of polyp formation in APC(Min/⁺Msh2⁻/⁻ mice is independent of nitric oxide-induced DNA mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoaneta Belcheva

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota has been linked to a number of human diseases including colon cancer. However, the mechanism through which gut bacteria influence colon cancer development and progression remains unclear. Perturbation of the homeostasis between the host immune system and microbiota leads to inflammation and activation of macrophages which produce large amounts of nitric oxide that acts as a genotoxic effector molecule to suppress bacterial growth. However, nitric oxide also has genotoxic effects to host cells by producing mutations that can predispose to colon cancer development. The major DNA lesions caused by nitric oxide are 8oxoG and deamination of deoxycytosine bases. Cellular glycosylases that belong to the base excision repair pathway have been demonstrated to repair these mutations. Recent evidence suggests that the mismatch repair pathway (MMR might also repair nitric oxide-induced DNA damage. Since deficiency in MMR predisposes to colon cancer, we hypothesized that MMR-deficient colon epithelial cells are incapable of repairing nitric-oxide induced genetic lesions that can promote colon cancer. Indeed, we found that the MMR pathway repairs nitric oxide-induced DNA mutations in cell lines. To test whether nitric oxide promotes colon cancer, we genetically ablated the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or inhibited iNOS activity in the APC(Min/+Msh2(-/- mouse model of colon cancer. However, despite the fact that nitric oxide production was strongly reduced in the colon using both approaches, colon cancer incidence was not affected. These data show that nitric oxide and iNOS do not promote colon cancer in APC(Min/+Msh2(-/- mice.

  19. Acceleration of 5-methylcytosine deamination in cyclobutane dimers by G and its implications for UV-induced C-to-T mutation hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Sunlight-induced C-->T mutation hotspots occur most frequently at methylated CpG sites in tumor suppressor genes and are thought to arise from translesion synthesis past deaminated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). While it is known that methylation enhances CPD formation in sunlight, little is known about the effect of methylation and sequence context on the deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((m)C) and its contribution to mutagenesis at these hotspots. Using an enzymatic method, we have determined the yields and deamination rates of C and (m)C in CPDs and find that the frequency of UVB-induced CPDs correlates with the oxidation potential of the flanking bases. We also found that the deamination of T(m)C and (m)CT CPDs is about 25-fold faster when flanked by G's than by A's, C's or T's in duplex DNA and appears to involve catalysis by the O6 group of guanine. In contrast, the first deamination of either C or (m)C in AC(m)CG with a flanking G was much slower (t(1/2) >250 h) and rate limiting, while the second deamination was much faster. The observation that C(m)CG dimers deaminate very slowly but at the same time correlate with C-->T mutation hotspots suggests that their repair must be slow enough to allow sufficient time for deamination. There are, however, a greater number of single C-->T mutations than CC-->TT mutations at C(m)CG sites even though the second deamination is very fast, which could reflect faster repair of doubly deaminated dimers.

  20. Suppression of edr2-mediated powdery mildew resistance, cell death and ethylene-induced senescence by mutations in ALD1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haozhen Nie; Yingying Wu; Chunpeng Yao; Dingzhong Tang

    2011-01-01

    EDR2 is a negative regulator of the defense response and cell death in Arabidopsis. Loss-of-function of EDR2 leads to enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. To identify new components in the EDR2 signal transduction pathway, mutations that suppress edr2 resistant phenotypes were screened. Three mutants, edts5-1, edts5-2 and edts5-3 (edr (t)wo (s)uppressor 5), were identified. The EDTS5 gene was identified by map-based cloning and previously was shown to encode an aminotransferase (ALD1). Therefore we renamed these three alleles ald1-10, ald1-11 and ald1-12, respectively. Mutations in ALD1 suppressed all edr2-mediated phenotypes, including powdery mildew resistance, programmed cell death and ethylene-induced senescence. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in edr2 was also suppressed by ald1 mutation. The expression of defense-related genes was up-regulated in the edr2 mutant, and the up-regulation of those genes in edr2 was suppressed in the edr2/ald1 double mutant. The ald1 single mutant displayed delayed ethylene-induced senescence. In addition, ald1 mutation suppressed edr1-mediated powdery mildew resistance, but could not suppress the edr1/edr2 double-mutant phenotype. These data demonstrate that ALD1 plays important roles in edr2-mediated defense responses and senescence, and revealed a crosstalk between ethylene and salicylic acid signaling mediated by ALD1 and EDR2.

  1. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention

  2. Insights into the drug resistance induced by the BaDHPS mutations: molecular dynamic simulations and MM/GBSA studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chen, Lin; Xue, Qiao; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2013-10-01

    Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) is essential for the folic acid biosynthetic pathway in prokaryotes; the mutation forms for DHPS are found to be relative to the urgent drug resistance problems. In our study, the Bacillus anthracis DHPS (BaDHPS) was selected for molecular dynamics and binding free energy studies to investigate the biochemistry behaviors of the wild-type and mutation form BaDHPS proteins (D184N and K220Q). It is found that the conformational change of the ligand dihydropteroate sulfathiazole binding site in mutation D184N and K220Q systems is mainly attributed from the Loop 1, Loop 2, and Loop 7 regions, and the binding free energy of these mutation systems is lower than that of the wild-type system. Additionally, some important hydrogen bonds of the mutation systems are disrupted during the simulations. But the shortening of the distance between residue Thr67 and the ligand would cause significant change of the binding pose in the K220Q system. These studies of DHPS family will be helpful for further drug resistance investigations. An animated Interactive 3D Complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:24. PMID:23030549

  3. Achievements of Grain Legume Variety Improvement Using Induced Mutation of the IAEA/RAS/5/040 Project in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    generations. Accelerated Aging Test was also used to test the seed vigour of the mutant lines. In dry season trial, eight mutant lines had seed germination of 65-75% compared with the parent of 30%. In rainy season, 12 mutant lines had seed germination of 75-89% whereas the parent had only 41%. Mungbean mutant multi-location trials: The highest yield- ing variety across five trials during 2003-2005 was a Thai mutant, Chai Nat 72. It produced large seed of 70g/ 1,000 seeds which is a desirable trait for Thai and international markets. However, this mutant is susceptible to powdery mildew disease. An introduction from the Philippines, LM19-Native Variety, showed resistant to the disease. It can be utilized for mungbean breeding programme. Novel mungbean germplasm derived from induced mutation; variegated leaf: All F1 plants from the cross between variegated mutant and normal leaf parent showed normal green leaves without reciprocal while the F2 plants segregated well in a 3 : 1 ratio. The number of F3 lines showing all green plants, segregating, all variegated plants fitted well with the 1 : 2 : 1 ratio. The variegated leaf character is controlled by a single recessive gene. Multiple leaflet: A mutant with small pentafoliate was crossed with a large heptafoliate mutant to study the inheritance. It was found that their F2 plants segregated in the ratio of 9,3,4 with tri (N1-N2-), penta (N1-n2n2) and heptafoliate (n1n1N2- and n1n1n2n2). The n2 may be closely linked to the gene controlling leaf size as well. There are three AFLP markers linked to number of leaflets per leaf and all of them corresponded to the n1 locus. The mutants of soybean and mungbean will be utilized for further breeding programme and demonstrated in farmers' field. (author)

  4. In utero exposure to nanosized carbon black (Printex90) does not induce tandem repeat mutations in female murine germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Jackson, Petra;

    2013-01-01

    J mice were exposed four times during gestation by intratracheal instillation of 67μg/animal of nanosized carbon black Printex90 or vehicle (gestation days 7, 10, 15 and 18). Female offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) germline...... mutation rates in the resulting F2 generation were determined from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring) of F1 female mice (178 CB-exposed and 258 control F2 offspring). ESTR mutation rates in CB-exposed F2 female offspring were not statistically different from those of F2 female control offspring....

  5. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic stu...

  6. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  7. Evidence for dominant suppression of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in crosses with the wild-isolated Neurospora crassa strains Sugartown and Adiopodoume-7

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Felicite K. Noubissi; K. Aparna; Kevin McCluskey; Durgadas P. Kasbekar

    2001-08-01

    A convenient assay to score repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora employs the erg-3 locus as a mutagenesis target. Using this assay we screened 132 wild-isolated Neurospora crassa strains for ability to dominantly suppress RIP. RIP was exceptionally inefficient in crosses with the wild isolates Sugartown (P0854) and Adiopodoume-7 (P4305), thereby suggesting the presence of dominant RIP suppressors in these strains. In other experiments, we found no evidence for dominant RIP suppression by the Spore killer haplotypes Sk-2 and Sk-3.

  8. The JAK2V617 mutation induces constitutive activation and agonist hypersensitivity in basophils from patients with polycythemia vera

    OpenAIRE

    Pieri, Lisa; Bogani, Costanza; Guglielmelli, Paola; Zingariello, Maria; Rana, Rosa Alba; Bartalucci, Niccolò; Bosi, Alberto; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2009-01-01

    The JAK2 (V617F) mutation is found in almost all patients with polycythemia vera and an important fraction of patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. This study shows that basophil counts are increased in JAK2 (V617F)-positive patients, and that the basophils contain an increased number of granules. See related article on page 1484.

  9. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pathogenic mutations induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic death in transmitochondrial cells incubated with galactose medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelli, Anna; Zanna, Claudia; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Schapira, Anthony H V; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela

    2003-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited form of central vision loss, is associated with mitochondrial DNA pathogenic point mutations affecting different subunits of complex I. We here report that osteosarcoma-derived cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrid) cell lines harboring one of the three most frequent LHON pathogenic mutations, at positions 11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6, undergo cell death when galactose replaces glucose in the medium, contrary to control cybrids that maintain some growth capabilities. This is a well known way to produce a metabolic stress, forcing the cells to rely on the mitochondrial respiratory chain to produce ATP. We demonstrate that LHON cybrid cell death is apoptotic, showing chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA laddering. Moreover, we also document the mitochondrial involvement in the activation of the apoptotic cascade, as shown by the increased release of cytochrome c into the cytosol in LHON cybrid cells as compared with controls. Cybrids bearing the 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 mutations seemed more readily prone to undergo apoptosis as compared with the 11778/ND4 mutation. In conclusion, LHON cybrid cells forced by the reduced rate of glycolytic flux to utilize oxidative metabolism are sensitized to an apoptotic death through a mechanism involving mitochondria.

  10. [Effect of the female genotype on the yield of dominant lethal mutations induced by thiophosphamide in mature mouse spermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korogodina, Iu V

    1980-02-01

    On crossing of thiophosphamide treated CBA males to untreated A/He, C57BL/6, C57BL/Mib and fidget females the lowest output of dominant lethal mutations was found in progeny of C57BL/Mib females. It is suggested that the ceparation of premutational lesions is most effective in egg cells of this strain.

  11. Mutation in lamin A/C sensitizes the myocardium to exercise-induced mechanical stress but has no effect on skeletal muscles in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattin, Marie-Elodie; Ferry, Arnaud; Vignaud, Alban; Mougenot, Nathalie; Jacquet, Adeline; Wahbi, Karim; Bertrand, Anne T; Bonne, Gisèle

    2016-08-01

    LMNA gene encodes lamin A/C, ubiquitous proteins of the nuclear envelope. They play crucial role in maintaining nuclear shape and stiffness. When mutated, they essentially lead to dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction defects, associated or not with muscular diseases. Excessive mechanical stress sensitivity has been involved in the pathophysiology. We have previously reported the phenotype of Lmna(delK32) mice, reproducing a mutation found in LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy patients. Heterozygous Lmna(delK32/+) (Het) mice develop a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy leading to death between 35 and 70 weeks of age. To investigate the sensitivity of the skeletal muscles and myocardium to chronic exercise-induced stress, Het and wild-type (Wt) mice were subjected to strenuous running treadmill exercise for 5 weeks. Before exercise, the cardiac function of Het mice was similar to Wt-littermates. After the exercise-period, Het mice showed cardiac dysfunction and dilation without visible changes in cardiac morphology, molecular remodelling or nuclear structure compared to Wt exercised and Het sedentary mice. Contrary to myocardium, skeletal muscle ex vivo contractile function remained unaffected in Het exercised mice. In conclusion, the expression of the Lmna(delK32) mutation increased the susceptibility of the myocardium to cardiac stress and led to an earlier onset of the cardiac phenotype in Het mice. PMID:27287550

  12. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hane James K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. Results DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP. In this study, we apply deRIP to the genome of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum SN15 and predict the origin of several previously uncharacterised classes of repetitive DNA. Conclusions Five new classes of transposon repeats and four classes of endogenous gene repeats were identified after deRIP. The deRIP process is a new tool for fungal genomics that facilitates the identification and understanding of the role and origin of fungal repetitive DNA. DeRIP is open-source and is available as part of the RIPCAL suite at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/ripcal.

  13. Mutation-Induced Population Shift in the MexR Conformational Ensemble Disengages DNA Binding: A Novel Mechanism for MarR Family Derepression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Pilstål, Robert; Andresen, Cecilia; Trewhella, Jill; Moche, Martin; Wallner, Björn; Sunnerhagen, Maria

    2016-08-01

    MexR is a repressor of the MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where DNA-binding impairing mutations lead to multidrug resistance (MDR). Surprisingly, the crystal structure of an MDR-conferring MexR mutant R21W (2.19 Å) presented here is closely similar to wild-type MexR. However, our extended analysis, by molecular dynamics and small-angle X-ray scattering, reveals that the mutation stabilizes a ground state that is deficient of DNA binding and is shared by both mutant and wild-type MexR, whereas the DNA-binding state is only transiently reached by the more flexible wild-type MexR. This population shift in the conformational ensemble is effected by mutation-induced allosteric coupling of contact networks that are independent in the wild-type protein. We propose that the MexR-R21W mutant mimics derepression by small-molecule binding to MarR proteins, and that the described allosteric model based on population shifts may also apply to other MarR family members. PMID:27427478

  14. Fast homozygosity mapping and identification of a zebrafish ENU-induced mutation by whole-genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne L Voz

    Full Text Available Forward genetics using zebrafish is a powerful tool for studying vertebrate development through large-scale mutagenesis. Nonetheless, the identification of the molecular lesion is still laborious and involves time-consuming genetic mapping. Here, we show that high-throughput sequencing of the whole zebrafish genome can directly locate the interval carrying the causative mutation and at the same time pinpoint the molecular lesion. The feasibility of this approach was validated by sequencing the m1045 mutant line that displays a severe hypoplasia of the exocrine pancreas. We generated 13 Gb of sequence, equivalent to an eightfold genomic coverage, from a pool of 50 mutant embryos obtained from a map-cross between the AB mutant carrier and the WIK polymorphic strain. The chromosomal region carrying the causal mutation was localized based on its unique property to display high levels of homozygosity among sequence reads as it derives exclusively from the initial AB mutated allele. We developed an algorithm identifying such a region by calculating a homozygosity score along all chromosomes. This highlighted an 8-Mb window on chromosome 5 with a score close to 1 in the m1045 mutants. The sequence analysis of all genes within this interval revealed a nonsense mutation in the snapc4 gene. Knockdown experiments confirmed the assertion that snapc4 is the gene whose mutation leads to exocrine pancreas hypoplasia. In conclusion, this study constitutes a proof-of-concept that whole-genome sequencing is a fast and effective alternative to the classical positional cloning strategies in zebrafish.

  15. DNA synthesis time in germinating rice and pattern of diethylsulphate induced mutations in pre-soaked seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA synthesis pattern in germinating rice seeds, pre-soaked in water for varying periods upto 48 hr, was determined by following the pulse incorporation of 3H-thymidine into the TCA-insoluble nucleoprotein. Synthesis of DNA commenced at 24 hr, progressively increased to a first peak at about 38 hr, thereafter showed a 1/3rd drop and subsequently increased to a 2nd and still higher peak at 46 to 48 hr of pre-soaking. Treatments of diethylsulphate (dES) at a low concentration (0.2%-2hr) administered at various progressing stages of DNA synthesis resulted in decrease in seedling height and survival, and increase in mutation frequency at 45 hr. pre-soaking, maximum mutation frequencies of 20, 10 and 2% on M1 plants, M1 spikes and M2 seedling bases, respectively were observed. Higher dES concentration (0.3%-2hr) given at later periods of pre-soaking showed near lethal effects and consequently decreased mutation frequencies. Treatments of sodium fluoride given singly or in combination with dES did not show any substantially different results as compared to those of the respective controls. Mutation spectra observed after dES treatments to germinating seeds, at different pre-soaking periods, were quite dissimilar. Specific mutations of economic importance like semi-dwarf mutants were isolated from the treatment of germinating seeds pre-soaked for 37.5 hr or more when shoot apex cells were undergoing DNA synthesis. (author)

  16. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-/- mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS-/- mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS-/- mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4-9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS-/- and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS-/- mice, but not in wild type. Thus, homozygous

  17. Development of cassava germplasm resources for the improvement of high value root quality traits through induced mutation and marker aided breeding in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement of cassava for increased beta carotene and protein content, dry matter content and delayed post-harvest physiological deterioration.is important for increased income and improved livelihood for poor farmers. Irradiation was used in this study to induce mutation using in vitro culture plantlets and botanical seeds. Gamma irradiated in vitro culture plantlets of varieties SM 909-25 and Col 2215 identified 12 clones with dry matter content above 40% and five clones with high beta carotenoid content. Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) resistant varieties/land race are presently being used for mutation breeding to reduce the effect of this devastating disease in Africa and irradiated plants are being selfed to generate M2 populations. Crosses of Latin American varieties having cream or deep yellow coloured-roots and crude protein contents of 3-8%.were made to generate populations with combined enhanced beta carotene and high protein contents in cassava roots. A total of 1555 seeds were derived from 17 parents. They were genotyped in marker-assisted selection (MAS) for resistance to cassava mosaic disease (CMD) using one SSR marker, NS158 and a SCAR marker, RME 1. Fourteen percent (138 plants) were selected for CMD resistance and are being evaluated in the breeding scheme. Delayed post harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) have been introgressed from Manihot Walkerae and and backcross populations developed. About 150 SSR polymorphic markers were used for mapping in delayed PPD population resulting in the identification of three putative markers for this trait. A BC2 population for delayed PPD and CMD resistance have been developed. Initial results obtained with irradiated germplasm indicates that induced mutation can rapidly facilitate the development of value-added traits in cassava. The development of new populations for root quality traits using parental lines from Latin America in combination with MAS are also contributing immensely in the breeding for

  18. Analysis of Ki-ras Exon 2 Gene Mutations in 3-Methylcholanthrene and Butylated Hydroxytoluene-Induced Rat Lung Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    POLAT, Fikriye; ÖZDEMİR, Öztürk; ELAGÖZ, Şahende

    2008-01-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (MCA) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and potent carcinogenic agent that is often used in experimental cancer studies. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) has been widely used for many years as an antioxidant to preserve and stabilize the freshness, nutritional value, flavor, and color of foods. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the application of MCA and BHT in the development of lung cancer, and to detect any mutation in the Ki-ras gene exon 2....

  19. Fast Homozygosity Mapping and Identification of a Zebrafish ENU-Induced Mutation by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Voz, Marianne L; Wouter Coppieters; Isabelle Manfroid; Ariane Baudhuin; Virginie Von Berg; Carole Charlier; Dirk Meyer; Wolfgang Driever; Martial, Joseph A.; Bernard Peers

    2012-01-01

    Forward genetics using zebrafish is a powerful tool for studying vertebrate development through large-scale mutagenesis. Nonetheless, the identification of the molecular lesion is still laborious and involves time-consuming genetic mapping. Here, we show that high-throughput sequencing of the whole zebrafish genome can directly locate the interval carrying the causative mutation and at the same time pinpoint the molecular lesion. The feasibility of this approach was validated by sequencing th...

  20. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  1. Identification of the Modifier of Min 2 (Mom2) Locus, a New Mutation That Influences Apc-Induced Intestinal Neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Karen A.; Koratkar, Revati; Linda D. Siracusa; Buchberg, Arthur M.

    2002-01-01

    Min (Multiple intestinal neoplasia) mice carry a dominant mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and develop multiple adenomas throughout their intestinal tract (Moser et al. 1990; Su et al. 1992). Polyp multiplicity in Min mice is greatly influenced by genetic background. A modifier locus, Mom1 (Modifier of Min 1), was identified and localized to distal mouse chromosome 4 (Moser et al. 1992; Dietrich et al. 1993), and accounts for some of the genetic variance in polyp multipli...

  2. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an adjoining single-copy gene in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meenal Vyas; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2005-02-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is an unusual genome defense mechanism that was discovered in Neurospora crassa. RIP occurs during a sexual cross and induces numerous G : C to A : T mutations in duplicated DNA sequences and also methylates many of the remaining cytosine residues. We measured the susceptibility of the erg-3 gene, present in single copy, to the spread of RIP from duplications of adjoining sequences. Genomic segments of defined length (1, 1.5 or 2 kb) and located at defined distances (0, 0.5, 1 or 2 kb) upstream or downstream of the erg-3 open reading frame (ORF) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the duplications were created by transformation of the amplified DNA. Crosses were made with the duplication strains and the frequency of erg-3 mutant progeny provided a measure of the spread of RIP from the duplicated segments into the erg-3 gene. Our results suggest that ordinarily RIP-spread does not occur. However, occasionally the mechanism that confines RIP to the duplicated segment seems to fail (frequency 0.1–0.8%) and then RIP can spread across as much as 1 kb of unduplicated DNA. Additionally, the bacterial hph gene appeared to be very susceptible to the spread of RIP-associated cytosine methylation.

  3. An Inducible Lentiviral Guide RNA Platform Enables the Identification of Tumor-Essential Genes and Tumor-Promoting Mutations In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Aubrey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables the introduction of genomic alterations into almost any organism; however, systems for efficient and inducible gene modification have been lacking, especially for deletion of essential genes. Here, we describe a drug-inducible small guide RNA (sgRNA vector system allowing for ubiquitous and efficient gene deletion in murine and human cells. This system mediates the efficient, temporally controlled deletion of MCL-1, both in vitro and in vivo, in human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines that require this anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for sustained survival and growth. Unexpectedly, repeated induction of the same sgRNA generated similar inactivating mutations in the human Mcl-1 gene due to low mutation variability exerted by the accompanying non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ process. Finally, we were able to generate hematopoietic cell compartment-restricted Trp53-knockout mice, leading to the identification of cancer-promoting mutants of this critical tumor suppressor.

  4. Connexin 43 remodeling induced by LMNA gene mutation Glu82Lys in familial dilated cardiomyopathy with atrial ventricular block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-ping; WANG Lin; WANG Hui; ZHANG Yin-hui; PU Jie-lin

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) may cause familial dilated cardiomyopathy (dilated cardiomyopathy) characterized by early onset atrio-ventricular block (A-V block) before the manifestation of dilated cardiomyopathy and high risk of sudden death due to ventricular arrhythmia, which is very similar to the phenotype of gap junction related heart disease. This study aimed to determine the expression and localization of connexins in neonatal myocytes transfected with wild-type (WT) or mutant LMNA to elucidate how these mutations cause heart diseases. Methods We studied the connexin 43 (Cx43) and connexin 40 (Cx40) expression in cultured neonatal myocytes transfected with wild-type (WT) or mutant LMNA (Glu82Lys (E82K) and Arg644Cys (R644C) using confocal imaging and Western blotting analysis.Results Cx43 protein expression was reduced by 40% in cells transfected with LMNA E82K than that in cells transfected with WT LMNA cDNA. Confocal imaging showed that the Cx43 located inside the cells by LMNA E82K. By contrast, LMNA E82K mutation had no effect on expression and localization of Cx40. LMNA R644C transfection did not show any significant effects on gap junctions at all.Conclusions Our findings suggest that LMNA E82K significantly reduced the Cx43 expression and altered its localization which may be one of the pathological mechanisms underlying LMNA-related heart disease.

  5. Changing in lipid profile induced by the mutation of Foxn1 gene: A lipidomic analysis of Nude mice skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzini, Justine; Dargère, Delphine; Regazzetti, Anne; Tebani, Abdellah; Laprévote, Olivier; Auzeil, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Nude mice carry a spontaneous mutation affecting the gene Foxn1 mainly expressed in the epidermis. This gene is involved in several skin functions, especially in the proliferation and the differentiation of keratinocytes which are key cells of epithelial barrier. The skin, a protective barrier for the body, is essentially composed of lipids. Taking into account these factors, we conducted a lipidomic study to search for any changes in lipid composition of skin possibly related to Foxn1 mutation. Lipids were extracted from skin biopsies of Nude and BALB/c mice to be analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS). Multivariate and univariate data analyses were carried out to compare lipid extracts. Identification was performed using HRMS data, retention time and mass spectrometry fragmentation study. These results indicate that mutation of Foxn1 leads to significant modifications in the lipidome in Nude mice skin. An increase in cholesterol sulfate, phospholipids, sphingolipids and fatty acids associated with a decrease in glycerolipids suggest that the lipidome in mice skin is regulated by the Foxn1 gene.

  6. Hepatic gene mutations induced in Big Blue rats by both the potent rat liver azo-carcinogen 6BT and its reported noncarcinogenic analogue 5BT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, K; Soames, A R; Tinwell, H; Lefevre, P A; Ashby, J

    1999-01-01

    The potent rat liver carcinogen 6-p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzthiazole (6BT) and its reported noncarcinogenic analogue 5-p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzthiazole (5BT; evaluated for carcinogenicity under the similar limited bioassay conditions used for 6BT) have been studied in order to seek an explanation for their different carcinogenic activities. Both compounds act as DNA-damaging agents to the rat liver, and both have now been shown to induce lacI (-) gene mutations in the liver of Big Blue(trade mark) transgenic rats. Both compounds were mutagenic following ten daily gavage doses or following administration in diet for 10 days. Neither chemical induced cell proliferation in the liver following repeat gavage administrations. In contrast, dietary administration of 6BT, and to a lesser extent of 5BT, induced hepatic cell proliferation. The carcinogen 6BT, but not the noncarcinogen 5BT, caused proliferation of oval stem cells in the livers by both routes of administration. It is possible that mutations induced in oval cells by 6BT are responsible for its potent carcinogenicity, and that the comparative absence of these cells in 5BT-treated livers may account for the carcinogenic inactivity of 5BT. Equally, the proliferation of the oval cells may reflect changes in liver homeostasis associated with the liver toxicity observed at the dose level of 6BT used (which was, nonetheless, the dose level used in the positive cancer bioassays). It is concluded that the new data presented cannot explain the differing carcinogenic activities of 5BT and 6BT, and that the reported noncarcinogen 5BT may also be carcinogenic when adequately assessed for this activity.

  7. Mutation Breeding in Sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present position of sugar industry particularly cane sugar production in the world has been discussed. The role of African Countries which can contribute more than the present 11% to world cane sugar production is presented. The breeding methods employed in cane growing court-tries indicate the biparental crossing and selection in F1 has been the major method used to develop varieties. Due to cytogenetical peculiarities, thousands of seedlings are grown to select the desirable genotype. Mutations or sports has been a source of variation for selection in nature. Induced mutations have only enhanced the mutation rate and has enabled the plant breeders to get better variation for selection. Though many mutagens have been used gamma rays have been most effective. Induced mutations for nonflowering, spineless leaf-sheath, higher sugar content, yield md resistance to diseases like smut and downy mildew have been reported. The methods of making mutated tissues express itself have been indicated. Mutation breeding holds out promise in sugarcane in that the basic variety or genotype can be kept intact and a few characters changed as desired by the plant breeder provided proper selection methods are employed. (author)

  8. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This newsletter contains brief articles on the use of radiation to induce mutations in plants; radiation-induced mutants in Chrysanthemum; disrupting the association between oil and protein content in soybean seeds; mutation studies on bougainvillea; a new pepper cultivar; and the use of mutation induction to improve the quality of yam beans. A short review of the seminar on the use of mutation and related biotechnology for crop improvement in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and a description of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on the application of DNA-based marker mutations for the improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop species are also included. Two tables are given: these are based on the ''FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database'' and show the number of mutated varieties and the number of officially released mutant varieties in particular crops/species. Refs and tabs

  9. Characterization of a novel mutation in NS1 protein of influenza A virus induced by a chemical substance for the attenuation of pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Sasaki

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV has the potential for use as a vaccination against flu. In this study, we demonstrated the nature of an influenza A virus (IAV mutant induced by treating the IAV with a stable furan derivative, (1R,2R-1-(5'-methylfur-3'-ylpropane-1,2,3-triol (MFPT, which had been isolated from Streptomyces sp. strain FV60 with the objective of it being an LAIV candidate. The resulting MFPT-resistant (MFPTr IAVs possessed attenuated pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo when compared with that of the parent virus (H1N1 subtype, NWS strain. Sequencing analysis revealed that a novel mutation, C490U in ns gene (P164S in NS1, was detected in all MFPTr virus clones tested. Therefore, NS1 might be a main target of MFPT, and it was suggested that the P164S mutation contributed to the attenuated pathogenicity of the mutants. Although the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is one of the targets of NS1, the MFPTr virus suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt when compared with the wild-type (WT virus. It was suggested that this might lead to the subsequent inhibition of the cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3, which is important for the progression of apoptosis. At the same time, nucleoprotein (NP was found to be retained in the nuclei in MFPTr virus-infected cells while nuclear export of NP was detected in WT virus-infected cells. In addition, the expression levels of interferon-β transcripts were significantly decreased in MFPTr virus-infected cells. From these results it can be shown that the mutation, NS1P164S, might be one of the key residues to control NS1 function concerning the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, MFPT induced favorable mutation in the ns gene for the attenuation of IAV, and therefore might provide the novel methodology for preparing LAIVs.

  10. Determination of mRNA fate by different RNA polymerase II promoters.

    OpenAIRE

    Enssle, J; Kugler, W; Hentze, M.W.; Kulozik, A E

    1993-01-01

    Translational stop mutations of the human beta-globin gene cause a reduction of cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation in thalassemia patients and in transfection models. The exact mechanism underlying this phenomenon has remained enigmatic but is known to be post-transcriptional. We have used transfected HeLa cells to study the expression of beta-globin mRNAs with nonsense or frameshift mutations within the three exons of this gene. Mutations in exons 1 or 2 reduce cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation where...

  11. Novel ENU-Induced Mutation in Tbx6 Causes Dominant Spondylocostal Dysostosis-Like Vertebral Malformations in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Abe

    Full Text Available Congenital vertebral malformations caused by embryonic segmentation defects are relatively common in humans and domestic animals. Although reverse genetics approaches in mice have provided information on the molecular mechanisms of embryonic somite segmentation, hypothesis-driven approaches cannot adequately reflect human dysmorphology within the population. In a N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis project in Kyoto, the Oune mutant rat strain was isolated due to a short and kinked caudal vertebra phenotype. Skeletal staining of heterozygous rats showed partial loss of the cervical vertebrae as well as hemivertebrae and fused vertebral blocks in lumbar and sacral vertebrae. In homozygous embryos, severe displacement of the whole vertebrae was observed. The Oune locus was genetically mapped to rat chromosome 1 using 202 backcross animals and 50 genome-wide microsatellite markers. Subsequently, a miss-sense mutation in the Tbx6 gene was identified in the critical region. Although the mutation is located within the T-box domain near a predicted dimmer-interface, in vitro experiments revealed that the Tbx6 variant retains normal DNA binding ability and translational efficiency. However, the variant has decreased transcriptional activation potential in response to Notch-mediated signaling. Recently, it was reported that a dominant type of familial spondylocostal dysostosis is caused by a stoploss mutation in TBX6. Thus, we propose that partial dysfunction of Tbx6 leads to similar congenital vertebral malformations in both humans and rats. The Oune strain could be a unique animal model for dominant spondylocostal dysostosis and is useful for molecular dissection of the pathology of congenital vertebral malformations in humans.

  12. lon Incompatibility Associated with Mutations Causing SOS Induction: Null uvrD Alleles Induce an SOS Response in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    SaiSree, L.; Reddy, Manjula; Gowrishankar, J

    2000-01-01

    The uvrD gene in Escherichia coli encodes a 720-amino-acid 3′-5′ DNA helicase which, although nonessential for viability, is required for methyl-directed mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair and furthermore is believed to participate in recombination and DNA replication. We have shown in this study that null mutations in uvrD are incompatible with lon, the incompatibility being a consequence of the chronic induction of SOS in uvrD strains and the resultant accumulation of the cell s...

  13. Anti-GD2 with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Linda S.; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M.; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C.; Yu, Hui Ming; Yu, Alice L.

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD2 ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human–mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC ...

  14. Application of GAMMA ray for induction of mutation and combination with biotechnology for induce desirable genetic variation in Tangerine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined application of physical mutagen and tissue culture for induction of somatic mutation in some characters without affecting the whole genome proved to be an efficient tool for improvement of plant trees.Up to now substantial breeding research has not been done on fruit trees in Iran. We are intending to begin a new era in fruit trees improvement through mutation and biotechnology. On this basis we selected tangerine as a well-adapted and highly consumed citrus fruit which has a disadvantage of too many seeds in it's flesh. Through this technique the aim is to produce seedless/less seeded tangerine in order to motivate increase in cultivation area and potential for export. We used physical mutagen (γ-ray) with doses of (30,35 and 40 Gy) for lateral bud in vivo and doses of (10, 15 and 20 Gy) for bud in-vitro. To produce explant free of pathogen we used shoot tip grafting (stg) technique, and micropropagation of bud in modified MS medium for multiplication of buds

  15. Temperature-dependent changes in neuronal dynamics in a patient with an SCN1A mutation and hyperthermia induced seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C.; Rosch, R. E.; Hughes, E.; Ruben, P. C.

    2016-09-01

    Dravet syndrome is the prototype of SCN1A-mutation associated epilepsies. It is characterised by prolonged seizures, typically provoked by fever. We describe the evaluation of an SCN1A mutation in a child with early-onset temperature-sensitive seizures. The patient carries a heterozygous missense variant (c3818C > T pAla1273Val) in the NaV1.1 brain sodium channel. We compared the functional effects of the variant vs. wild type NaV1.1 using patch clamp recordings from channels expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells at different temperatures (32, 37, and 40 °C). The variant channels produced a temperature-dependent destabilization of activation and fast inactivation. Implementing these empirical abnormalities in a computational model predicts a higher threshold for depolarization block in the variant, particularly at 40 °C, suggesting a failure to autoregulate at high-input states. These results reveal direct effects of abnormalities in NaV1.1 biophysical properties on neuronal dynamics. They illustrate the value of combining cellular measurements with computational models to integrate different observational scales (gene/channel to patient).

  16. A desk evaluation review of project POL/5/006 plant breeding using induced mutations. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Projects POL/5/006 was initiated in 1985 to assist the Government of Poland in improving the mutation breeding efforts in the country to promote the development of new and higher yielding crop varieties. The difficult economic situation in the country at this time restricted the procurement of special equipment, spare parts and supplies from abroad and, therefore, impeded research and development work in this field. The project was implemented using a distinctive approach and design characterized by having six recipient institutions and the establishment of one central gamma-irradiation facility to be made available to all participating institutions for mutation induction. The project was formally closed in 1989. The review of project POL/5/006 was undertaken in accord with the expressed wishes of the Board of Governors for selected ex-post evaluations of completed projects. The main purpose of the review was to ascertain if the project objectives were achieved, and to determine what impact the technical assistance provided may have had on continued post-project and current plant breeding programmes in Poland

  17. Leapfrogging: primordial germ cell transplantation permits recovery of CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in essential genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ira L; Fish, Margaret B; Cho, Ken W Y

    2016-08-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is revolutionizing genetic loss-of-function analysis but technical limitations remain that slow progress when creating mutant lines. First, in conventional genetic breeding schemes, mosaic founder animals carrying mutant alleles are outcrossed to produce F1 heterozygotes. Phenotypic analysis occurs in the F2 generation following F1 intercrosses. Thus, mutant analyses will require multi-generational studies. Second, when targeting essential genes, efficient mutagenesis of founders is often lethal, preventing the acquisition of mature animals. Reducing mutagenesis levels may improve founder survival, but results in lower, more variable rates of germline transmission. Therefore, an efficient approach to study lethal mutations would be useful. To overcome these shortfalls, we introduce 'leapfrogging', a method combining efficient CRISPR mutagenesis with transplantation of mutated primordial germ cells into a wild-type host. Tested using Xenopus tropicalis, we show that founders containing transplants transmit mutant alleles with high efficiency. F1 offspring from intercrosses between F0 animals that carry embryonic lethal alleles recapitulate loss-of-function phenotypes, circumventing an entire generation of breeding. We anticipate that leapfrogging will be transferable to other species. PMID:27385011

  18. Glucose starvation induces mutation and lineage-dependent adaptive responses in a large collection of cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ningning; Kim, Nayoung; Jeong, Euna; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance of glucose deprivation is an important factor for cancer proliferation, survival, migration and progression. To systematically understand adaptive responses under glucose starvation in cancers, we analyzed reverse phase protein array (RPPA) data of 115 protein antibodies across a panel of approximately 170 heterogeneous cancer cell lines, cultured under normal and low glucose conditions. In general, glucose starvation broadly altered levels of many of the proteins and phosphoproteins assessed across the cell lines. Many mTOR pathway components were selectively sensitive to glucose stress, although the change in their levels still varied greatly across the cell line set. Furthermore, lineage- and genotype-based classification of cancer cell lines revealed mutation-specific variation of protein expression and phosphorylation in response to glucose starvation. Decreased AKT phosphorylation (S473) was significantly associated with PTEN mutation under glucose starvation conditions in lung cancer cell lines. The present study (see TCPAportal.org for data resource) provides insight into adaptive responses to glucose deprivation under diverse cellular contexts. PMID:26573869

  19. A comparative investigation of DNA strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges and K-ras gene mutations induced by cadmium salts in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal of continuing occupational and environmental concern with a wide variety of adverse effects. Several studies have shown that cadmium produces DNA strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, oxidative DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, dysregulation of gene expression resulting in enhanced proliferation, depressed apoptosis and/or altered DNA repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the ability of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and cadmium sulphate (CdSO4) to induce point mutations in codon 12 of the K-ras protooncogene assessed by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphisms (PCR-SSCP) and RFLP-enriched PCR methods. Also their genotoxic effects were analyzed by the comet assay and sister chromatid exchanges test. The human lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5 was used for the experiments. Sister chromatid exchanges assay (SCEs) frequencies were significantly increased in cells exposed to cadmium salts in relation to controls (p < 0.001). Despite the slow increment observed in the three comet parameters considered when cells were treated with cadmium chloride, significant differences between groups were only found in the variable comet moment (CM) (p < 0.005). On the other hand, when cells were exposed to cadmium sulphate, the Kruskal-Wallis test showed highly significant differences between groups for migration, tail moment and comet moment parameters (p < 0.001). Nevertheless, a null or weak point mutation induction in K-ras protooncogene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-low ionic strength-single strand conformation polymorphisms (PCR-LIS-SSCP) and RFLP-enriched PCR methods when cells were treated with cadmium salts. Thus, inorganic cadmium produces genotoxicity in human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells, in the absence of significant point mutation of the K-ras gene

  20. A factor in a wild isolated Neurospora crassa strain enables a chromosome segment duplication to suppress repeat-induced point mutation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukund Ramakrishnan; T Naga Sowjanya; Kranthi B Raj; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a sexual stage-specific mutational process of Neurospora crassa and other fungi that alters duplicated DNA sequences. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that chromosome segment duplications (Dps) longer than ∼300 kbp can dominantly suppress RIP, presumably by titration of the RIP machinery, and that although Dps < 200 kbp did not individually suppress RIP, they could do so in homozygous and multiply heterozygous crosses, provided the sum of the duplicated DNA exceeds ∼300 kbp. Here we demonstrate suppression of RIP in a subset of progeny carrying the normally sub-threshold 154 kbp Dp(R2394) from a cross of T(R2394) to the wild isolated Carrefour Mme. Gras strain (CMG). Thus, the CMG strain contains a factor that together with Dp(R2394) produces a synthetic RIP suppressor phenotype. It is possible that the factor is a cryptic Dp that together with Dp(R2394) can exceed the size threshold for titration of the RIP machinery and thereby causes RIP suppression.

  1. Sesame improvement by induced mutations. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project. 1993-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient oil crop considered to be still at an early stage in breeding. The fact that sesame is a crop of mainly developing countries with limited available research funds for long term breeding programmes, resulted in very few breeding efforts in research stations. Furthermore, sesame is not a mandate crop of any of the international agriculture research centers. Until recently most of the released sesame varieties in countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea were the product of selection and pedigree breeding. A major constraint in this approach was the lack of sufficient genetic variation within the existing germplasm collections, especially for traits such as resistance to various diseases and seed retention. This is where mutation techniques could offer a possible solution. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) organized some expert consultations on sesame breeding between 1981 and 1987, which all recommended the use of mutation induction for the enhancement of genetic variability with a focus on the following traits: modified plant architecture, seed retention, and resistance to diseases and pests. As a result, most of these recommendations have been included in this five year co-ordinated research project (CRP) that started in 1993, organized by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. This CRP focused on the induction of the above mentioned characters in different sesame improvement programmes, and on the enhancement of co-operation between sesame breeders in developed and developing countries. Each participant covered a number of traits important for their specific breeding needs. During regular meetings under this project the participants had the opportunity to jointly appraise and evaluate sesame mutants and varieties in demonstration fields, thus strengthening the mutual effort for the genetic improvement of sesame through mutation techniques. The success

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  15. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This newsletter contains a brief account of FAO/IAEA meetings held in 1990 on plant breeding involving the use of induced mutations. It also features a list of commercially available plant cultivars produced by such techniques. Refs and tabs

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Newsletter presents research reports on the role of radiation induced mutation and chemical mutagens in improving productivity, disease resistance; cold and salinity tolerance of various crops and ornamental plants

  14. The beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell anemia patients from Northeast Brazil: a clinical and molecular view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Elisângela Vitória; Zanette, Angela; Lyra, Isa; Souza, Cyntia Cajado; Santos, Leandro Ferraz; Menezes, Joelma Figueiredo; Dupuit, Marie France; Almeida, Mari Ney Tavares; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Gonçalves, Marilda Souza

    2004-08-01

    The beta(S)-globin haplotypes were studied in 78 sickle cell Brazilian patients from Bahia, Northeast Brazil, that has a large population of African origin. Hemoglobin (Hb) profiles were developed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and beta(S)-globin gene haplotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. We identified 44 (55.0%) patients with the CAR/Ben (Central African Republic/Benin) genotype, 16 (20.0%) Ben/Ben, 13 (16.2%) CAR/CAR and seven (8.8%) with other genotypes. Analyses of the phenotypes showed clinical differences related only to Hb F levels and blood transfusion therapy; the presence of -alpha(-3.7)-thalassemia (thal) demonstrated statistical significance when associated with hematocrit (p=0.044), MCV (p=0.0007), MCH (p=0.012) and spleen sequestration events. The haplotype diversity found in the present study can be justified by information about the origin of the slave traffic period in Bahia during the 19th century. The specific characteristics described among the Bahian sickle cell patients could be confirmed by increasing the number of patients with specific genotypes and further studies of genetic markers.

  15. Identification and characterization of adult alpha-and beta-globin genes and their genomic arrangement in Pseudosciaena crocea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Wuying; QIAN Ronghua; WANG Lianshen; YU Xiameng; YOU Zhenqiang; YU Lian

    2006-01-01

    The α- and β-globin genes from Pseudosciaena crocea were cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA 3'-end (3'-RACE). The cDNA of the α-globin is 595 bp with the ATG start codon located at Position 37, the TAA stop codon at Position 469 and the AATAAA polyadenylation signal at Position 560, which codifies 145 amino acids. The entire open reading frame of the β-globin gene is 447 bp long, which encodes 148 amino acids. Amino acid identity of the α- globin or β-globin gene compared with those reported in other fish species, ranged from 31.9% to 76.4%. When comparing with human α- and β-globins, three important alterations in the structural regions can be noted: α39 Thr→Gln, α113 His→Tyr and β117 His→Lys. The α-globin has a unique inserted amino acid residue in the 47th position. To understand the process of globin gene duplication and identify the regulatory elements present in the intergenic and intragenic regions of globin genes, the genomic arrangement of α- and β-globin genes was investigated. The results showed that the orientation of the two genes was head-to-head relative to each other. The intergenic region between the translation initiation codons of the linked α- and β-globin genes contains classical promoter elements and the length of it is much shorter than that reported in other fish.

  16. Enhancement of gamma-ray-induced mutation frequency in rice by post-treatment with chloral hydrate, methanol and their mixtures with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation has been made of the mutagenic activity of ethanol, chlorate hydrate (CH) and methanol on rice seed. In independent treatments with ethanol, methanol, CH and four aqueous mixtures of these chemicals, chlorophyll-deficient mutants were not recovered in the M2 generation. However, in sequential treatments with gamma rays + CH, gamma rays + methanol and gamma rays + aqueous mixtures of these chemicals, significant increases in the yields of chlorophyll mutations were observed as compared to that of a 30 kR gamma ray treatment. In contrast, post-irradiation treatment with ethanol failed to provoke any increase in the frequency of chlorophyll mutants in the M2 generation. The results indicate that CH and methanol alone and mixed with ethanol can potentiate gamma ray-induced genetic lesions in rice seed. (author)

  17. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Improvement of Basic Food Crops in Africa Through Plant Breeding, Including the Use of Induced Mutations, funded by the Italian Government, was initiated in 1989 in the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of stable food crops of Africa with the main emphasis on the indigenous species and their local cultivars. The fourth and final Research Co-ordination meeting under the CRP was held in Naples, Italy from 30 October - 3 November 1995. This publication includes the reports, conclusions and recommendations made by the participants. We hope that it will be of value to researchers, students and policy makers alike in their endeavour to promote plant breeding and increase food productions in Africa. Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Antimutagenic effect of Ge-132 on #betta#-ray-induced mutations in Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide (Ge-132) over a concentration range of 0-30μg/ml on #betta#-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp (dose range 0-10 kR) has been examined. The mutation frequency (Trp- → Trp+) in absence of Ge-132 was approximately 1.1 x 10-6, whereas it became about 5.4 x 10-8 with soft agar supplementing 30 μg/ml of the metal compound. When similar experiments were made with unirradiated bacteria, the Ge-132 had little effect on the survival as well as on the mutability, indicating that Ge-132 itself is not a mutagen. (U.K.)

  19. Intestinal tissues induce an SNP mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that enhances its virulence: possible role in anastomotic leak.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Olivas

    Full Text Available The most feared complication following intestinal resection is anastomotic leakage. In high risk areas (esophagus/rectum where neoadjuvant chemoradiation is used, the incidence of anastomotic leaks remains unacceptably high (≈ 10% even when performed by specialist surgeons in high volume centers. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that anastomotic leakage develops when pathogens colonizing anastomotic sites become in vivo transformed to express a tissue destroying phenotype. We developed a novel model of anastomotic leak in which rats were exposed to pre-operative radiation as in cancer surgery, underwent distal colon resection and then were intestinally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common colonizer of the radiated intestine. Results demonstrated that intestinal tissues exposed to preoperative radiation developed a significant incidence of anastomotic leak (>60%; p<0.01 when colonized by P. aeruginosa compared to radiated tissues alone (0%. Phenotype analysis comparing the original inoculating strain (MPAO1- termed P1 and the strain retrieved from leaking anastomotic tissues (termed P2 demonstrated that P2 was altered in pyocyanin production and displayed enhanced collagenase activity, high swarming motility, and a destructive phenotype against cultured intestinal epithelial cells (i.e. apoptosis, barrier function, cytolysis. Comparative genotype analysis between P1 and P2 revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP mutation in the mexT gene that led to a stop codon resulting in a non-functional truncated protein. Replacement of the mutated mexT gene in P2 with mexT from the original parental strain P1 led to reversion of P2 to the P1 phenotype. No spontaneous transformation was detected during 20 passages in TSB media. Use of a novel virulence suppressing compound PEG/Pi prevented P. aeruginosa transformation to the tissue destructive phenotype and prevented anastomotic leak in rats. This work demonstrates that

  20. Oral exposure to commercially available coal tar‐based pavement sealcoat induces murine genetic damage and mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Margaret; Arlt, Volker M.; White, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar (CT) is a thick black liquid produced as a by‐product of coal carbonization to produce coke or manufactured gas. It is comprised a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic compounds, including a wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which are genotoxic and carcinogenic. CT is used in some pavement sealants (also known as sealcoat), which are applied to pavement in order to seal and beautify the surface. Human exposure is known to occur not only during application, but also as a result of the weathering process, as elevated levels of PAHs have been found in settled house dust in residences adjacent to CT‐sealed surfaces. In this study we examined the genotoxicity of an extract of a commercially available CT‐based sealcoat in the transgenic Muta™Mouse model. Mice were orally exposed to 3 doses of sealcoat extract daily for 28 days. We evaluated genotoxicity by examining: (1) stable DNA adducts and (2) lacZ mutations in bone marrow, liver, lung, small intestine, and glandular stomach, as well as (3) micronucleated red blood cells. Significant increases were seen for each endpoint and in all tissues. The potency of the response differed across tissues, with the highest frequency of adducts occurring in liver and lung, and the highest frequency of mutations occurring in small intestine. The results of this study are the first demonstration of mammalian genotoxicity following exposure to CT‐containing pavement sealcoat. This work provides in vivo evidence to support the contention that there may be adverse health effects in mammals, and potentially in humans, from exposure to coal tar. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:535–545, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada PMID:27473530

  1. Oral exposure to commercially available coal tar-based pavement sealcoat induces murine genetic damage and mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Alexandra S; Watson, Margaret; Arlt, Volker M; White, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Coal tar (CT) is a thick black liquid produced as a by-product of coal carbonization to produce coke or manufactured gas. It is comprised a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic compounds, including a wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which are genotoxic and carcinogenic. CT is used in some pavement sealants (also known as sealcoat), which are applied to pavement in order to seal and beautify the surface. Human exposure is known to occur not only during application, but also as a result of the weathering process, as elevated levels of PAHs have been found in settled house dust in residences adjacent to CT-sealed surfaces. In this study we examined the genotoxicity of an extract of a commercially available CT-based sealcoat in the transgenic Muta™Mouse model. Mice were orally exposed to 3 doses of sealcoat extract daily for 28 days. We evaluated genotoxicity by examining: (1) stable DNA adducts and (2) lacZ mutations in bone marrow, liver, lung, small intestine, and glandular stomach, as well as (3) micronucleated red blood cells. Significant increases were seen for each endpoint and in all tissues. The potency of the response differed across tissues, with the highest frequency of adducts occurring in liver and lung, and the highest frequency of mutations occurring in small intestine. The results of this study are the first demonstration of mammalian genotoxicity following exposure to CT-containing pavement sealcoat. This work provides in vivo evidence to support the contention that there may be adverse health effects in mammals, and potentially in humans, from exposure to coal tar. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:535-545, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. PMID:27473530

  2. Improvement of garlic (Allium Sativum L.) resistance to white rot and storability using gamma irradiation induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutation program was conducted to improve garlic (Allium sativum) resistance to white rot (Sclerotium cepivorum) and to improve its storability under natural conditions. Cloves of two local garlic cultivars (Kisswany and Yabroudy) were irradiated with gamma ray doses 4, 5, 6, and 7 gray. The cloves were then planted in the field and plants were advanced for 4 generations in order to isolate mutations in stable form. The results indicated that the cultivar Yabroudy was more sensitive to gamma irradiation than Kisswany. Rate of morphological mutants increased with increasing gamma ray dosage. Selection pressure against white rot disease was applied starting in the second generation by adding infected garlic leaves to the soil. In the third and fourth generations, however, full selection pressure was applied by inoculating the cloves with the fungus sclerotia and planting them in a soil previously planted with infected garlic plants. healthy garlic bulbs were harvested and stored under natural conditions and then planted to obtain the next generation. By the end of the fourth generation, we have been able to improve garlic resistance to white rot disease and its storability. Twenty four mutant lines from each garlic cultivar have been selected. Out of the selected lines, twelve lines from cultivar Kisswany had only 3% infection percentage as compared to 29% in the control, and twelve lines from cultivar Yabroudy had less than 5% infection percentage as compared to 20% in the control. Also, we have been able to improve storability under natural conditions. Weight loss during storage decreased from 8.25% in the control to only 4% in some Kisswany lines and from 10% to 3% in some Yabroudy lines. However, we have not been able to increase the bulb weight over the control but the weights of the selected lines were comparable to those of the control. (author)

  3. Twenty year results on application of induced mutation in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) breeding at Agricultural Genetics Institute (AGI), Hanoi, Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on application of the induced mutation method combined with crossing in soybean breeding for 20 years (1980-2000) plays an important role in research work at AGI, (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development of Vietnam). 23 soybean varieties and hybrid lines (including 6 local cultivars, 14 selected and introduced varieties, 3 hybrid lines) were treated with Roentgen ray irradiation, Gamma Ray 60Co with doses 7, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20 krad, and with chemical mutagens: EI, NMU, DNMU, DES, EMS, DEU with various concentrations 0.008, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08%. As the results, we obtained the important conclusions about the rule of induced mutation process in soybean in the natural conditions of Vietnam. 8 mutant varieties [1 National varieties (DT84) and 6 regional production varieties (DT83, DT90, DT94, DT95, DT99, AK06 (DT-55). Several promising varieties were selected and released for farmers to produce in the large areas that occupied 50-90% percentage of soybean cultivated areas in Vietnam. These varieties have high-yield 1.5-3.5 tons/ha, short growth duration 75-100 days, tolerance to cold and hot temperature and can be planted in 3 crops per year (Winter, Spring and Summer season) over 35-40 thousands ha/year. At present, the mutagens are being used for defect- orientated repair of some promising hybrid lines, in order to contribute new good varieties to soybean production in Vietnam. (author)

  4. Twenty year results on application of induced mutation in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) breeding at Agricultural Genetics Institute (AGI), Hanoi, Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai Quang Vinh; Phan Phai; Ngo Phuong Thinh; Tran Dinh Dong; Tran Thuy Oanh [Agricultural Genetics Institute (AGI), Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    Research on application of the induced mutation method combined with crossing in soybean breeding for 20 years (1980-2000) plays an important role in research work at AGI, (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development of Vietnam). 23 soybean varieties and hybrid lines (including 6 local cultivars, 14 selected and introduced varieties, 3 hybrid lines) were treated with Roentgen ray irradiation, Gamma Ray {sup 60}Co with doses 7, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20 krad, and with chemical mutagens: EI, NMU, DNMU, DES, EMS, DEU with various concentrations 0.008, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08%. As the results, we obtained the important conclusions about the rule of induced mutation process in soybean in the natural conditions of Vietnam. 8 mutant varieties [1 National varieties (DT84) and 6 regional production varieties (DT83, DT90, DT94, DT95, DT99, AK06 (DT-55))]. Several promising varieties were selected and released for farmers to produce in the large areas that occupied 50-90% percentage of soybean cultivated areas in Vietnam. These varieties have high-yield 1.5-3.5 tons/ha, short growth duration 75-100 days, tolerance to cold and hot temperature and can be planted in 3 crops per year (Winter, Spring and Summer season) over 35-40 thousands ha/year. At present, the mutagens are being used for defect-orientated repair of some promising hybrid lines, in order to contribute new good varieties to soybean production in Vietnam. (author)

  5. Induced mutation breeding as a tool for the genetic improvement of cassava landraces for high starch and delayed post harvest deterioration (PPD) in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassava a major staple in Ghana that contributes 22% of Agricultural Gross Domestic Product provides high and reliable cheap source of carbohydrates for over 200 million people has assumed an industrial and cash crop status in Sub- Sahara Africa. However, cassava suffers from pest and diseases, with the starchy roots rapidly deteriorating within 24 to 72 hours after harvest resulting in close to 20% loss in the fresh roots. Cassava crosses for the introgression of useful genes for delayed Post harvest Deterioration where Molecular Markers Assisted selected (MAS) inter-specific hybrids with delayed PPD properties were crossed with preferred land races. Inter-specific hybrids of walkererea evaluated showed remarkable disease resistance in all ecological zones tested, PPD score Clone CR 52A-25 additionally showed no signs of post harvest physiological deterioration after the seventh day of harvest and AR 14-10 had unique starch properties for potential industrial use. Induced mutation of tissue culture plantlets of four preferred cassava landraces 'Cedi bankye', 'Sisipe 166', 'Debor' (ancient variety) and 'Dabodabo' (zigzag plant architecture with stay green properties) at two levels of doses 15Gy and 12 Gy were at V5 stage hardened and established in a replicated field trial in three locations. Initial results showed high root yields for doses of 12Gy and remarkable resistance for ACMD (1.5 score) for all mutants at 3MAP, Debor at both doses showed the best vigour for all locations. Induced mutation of botanical seeds from landraces and inter-specific hybrids of walkererea at 200 and 300Gy showed moderate disease reaction and plant vigor. The mutants would be tested alongside the control for starch and PPD at 9MAP and 12MAP. (author)

  6. Evaluation of AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress and DNA mutation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Farrokh; Dabbagh, Somayyeh; Alizadeh, Sina; Rostamnia, Sadegh

    2016-08-01

    The bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles have been demonstrated in the past years. Recently, the new antimicrobial compounds of silver nanoparticles with different formulations have been developed. In this work, AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL as a new compound of Ag nanoparticles, was synthesized and characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and EDX. The antibacterial activity and the molecular mechanism effects of AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles (SNPs) on Escherichia coli DH5α cells were investigated by analyzing the growth inhibitory, H2O2 level, catalase activity, DNA mutation, and plasmid copy number following treatment with AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles. In experimental results, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was observed in 75 μg/ml and the antibacterial efficacy (ABE) in CFU analysis was estimated 95.3 %. In bacterial cells treated with 75 and 100 μg/ml, H2O2 level significantly increased and catalase activity decreased compared with control. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to evaluate the effect of AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles in DNA damages and mutation in E. coli genome. RADP-PCR results indicated different banding patterns including appearance or disappearance of bands and differences in their intensity. Cluster analysis of the RAPD-PCR results based on genetic similarity showed genetic difference between E. coli cells treated with AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles, and control and phylogenetic tree were divided to two clusters. Plasmid copy number analysis indicated that after 8 h incubation of E. coli cells with 50, 75, and 100 μg/ml AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles, copy number of pET21a (+) significantly decreased compared with control which indicating DNA replication inhibition by Ag nanoparticles. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles can be used as an effective bactericidal agent against bacterial cells. PMID:27209037

  7. Induced point mutations in the phytoene synthase 1 gene cause differences in carotenoid content during tomato fruit ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gady, A.L.F.; Vriezen, W.; Wal, van de M.H.B.J.; Huang, P.; Bovy, A.G.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bachem, C.W.B.

    2012-01-01

    In tomato, carotenoids are important with regard to major breeding traits such as fruit colour and human health. The enzyme phytoene synthase (PSY1) directs metabolic flux towards carotenoid synthesis. Through TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes), we have identified two point mutatio

  8. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase η from Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA polymerase η belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Polη homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Polη activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates

  9. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase eta from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, María Jesús; Alejandre-Durán, Encarna; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2006-10-10

    DNA polymerase eta belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Pol eta homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Pol eta activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates.

  10. Manual on mutation breeding. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manual is a compilation of work done on the use of induced mutations in plant breeding, and presents general methods and techniques in this field. The use of chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations (X-rays, gamma rays, α- and β-particles, protons, neutrons) are described as well as the effects of these mutagens. The different types of mutations achieved can be divided into genome mutations, chromosome mutations and extra nuclear mutations. Separate chapters deal with mutation techniques in breeding seed-propagated species and asexually propagated plants (examples of development of cultivars given). Plant characters which can be improved by mutation breeding include yield, ripening time, growth habit, disease resistance and tolerance to environmental factors (temperature, salinity etc.). The use of mutagens for some specific plant breeding problems is discussed and attention is also paid to somatic cell genetics in connection with induced mutations. The manual contains a comprehensive bibliography (60 p. references) and a subject index

  11. Mutations in lettuce improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  12. A gain-of-function mutation in Msl10 triggers cell death and wound-induced hyperaccumulation of jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zou; Jian-Min Zhou; Satya Chintamanani; Ping He; Hirotada Fukushige; Liping Yu; Meiyu Shao; Lihuang Zhu; David F Hildebrand; Xiaoyan Tang

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are rapidly induced after wound-ing and act as key regulators for wound induced signaling pathway. However, what perceives the wound signal and how that triggers JA biosynthesis remains poorly understood. To identify components involved in Arabidopsis wound and JA signaling pathway, we screened for mutants with abnormal expression of a luciferase reporter, which is under the control of a wound-responsive promoter of an ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factor gene, RAP2.6 (Related to APetala 2.6). The rea1 (RAP2.6 expresser in shoot apex) mutant constitutively expressed the RAP2.6-LUC reporter gene in young leaves. Along with the typical JA phenotypes including shorter petioles, loss of apical dominance, accumulation of anthocyanin pig-ments and constitutive expression of JA response gene, rea1 plants also displayed cell death and accumulated high levels of JA in response to wounding. The phenotype of rea1 mutant is caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the C-terminus of a mechanosensitive ion channel MscS-like 10 (MSL10). MSL10 is localized in the plasma membrane and is expressed predom-inantly in root tip, shoot apex and vascular tissues. These results suggest that MSL10 is involved in the wound-triggered early signal transduction pathway and possibly in regulating the positive feedback synthesis of JA.

  13. A gain-of-function mutation in Msl10 triggers cell death and wound-induced hyperaccumulation of jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yan; Chintamanani, Satya; He, Ping; Fukushige, Hirotada; Yu, Liping; Shao, Meiyu; Zhu, Lihuang; Hildebrand, David F; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-06-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are rapidly induced after wounding and act as key regulators for wound induced signaling pathway. However, what perceives the wound signal and how that triggers JA biosynthesis remains poorly understood. To identify components involved in Arabidopsis wound and JA signaling pathway, we screened for mutants with abnormal expression of a luciferase reporter, which is under the control of a wound-responsive promoter of an ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factor gene, RAP2.6 (Related to APetala 2.6). The rea1 (RAP2.6 expresser in shoot apex) mutant constitutively expressed the RAP2.6-LUC reporter gene in young leaves. Along with the typical JA phenotypes including shorter petioles, loss of apical dominance, accumulation of anthocyanin pigments and constitutive expression of JA response gene, rea1 plants also displayed cell death and accumulated high levels of JA in response to wounding. The phenotype of rea1 mutant is caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the C-terminus of a mechanosensitive ion channel MscS-like 10 (MSL10). MSL10 is localized in the plasma membrane and is expressed predominantly in root tip, shoot apex and vascular tissues. These results suggest that MSL10 is involved in the wound-triggered early signal transduction pathway and possibly in regulating the positive feedback synthesis of JA. PMID:26356550

  14. A point mutation of PRL gene in pituitary prolactin-secreting adenoma induced by 17-b-estradiol in SD rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Animal model bearing pituitary prolactin-secreting adenomas (prolactinoma) induced by 17-b -estradiol (E2) in both eutopic pituitary and ectopic pituitary grafted under the renal capsule was generated.Northern blotting assay indicated that PRL mRNA level in eutopic prolactinomas was higher than that in normal pituitaries and ectopic prolactinomas (P<0.05-0.01).By polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing,a point mutation from C to A occurring at -36 nt in proximal promoter of rat PRL (rPRL) gene was found only in eutopic prolactinomas.No base change was detected in ectopic prolactinomas.Fusion gene transfection assay in vitro exhibited increased activity of the mutant promoter derived from eutopic prolactinoma (P<0.01).These data suggested that the base change in the proximal promoter of rPRL gene may be associated with hyperexpression of rPRL gene in eutopic prolactinomas.The pathogenesis of eutopic and ectopic prolactinomas induced by E2 in SD rats may be separate.

  15. Mutations in thep16 gene in DMBA-induced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic cancer in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhu; Tao Liu; Fei Han; Su-Dong Zhan; Chun-You Wang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 7, 12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic cancer in rats provide a classic model for uncovering the molec-ular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer. However, this model has not been characterized genetically, and in particular, the major genetic alterations in the p16 gene are unknown. METHODS: Lesions of PanIN and pancreatic cancer were in-duced with DMBA implantation in 40 rats, and control pancre-atic tissue was obtained from 10 age-matched rats without ex-posure to DMBA. Pancreatic tissue was harvested three months after DMBA implantation and DNA was extracted. Homozy-gous deletions and point mutations of the p16 (exons 1 and 2) gene were detected by PCR ampliifcation and direct sequencing. RESULTS: DMBA implantation in the 40 rats induced 26 Pan-INs and 9 carcinomas. The overall frequency of p16 alterations in the pancreatic tissue of these rats was 42.86% (15/35), and the changes were point mutations, not homozygous deletions. p16 mutations were present in 30.77% (8/26) of the rats with PanIN and 77.78% (7/9) of the rats with carcinoma (P CONCLUSION: Our ifndings indicated that p16 alteration is a common event in the carcinogenesis of this model and that the mutation pattern is analogous to that of human lesions.

  16. Magnetoresistive sensor for real-time single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a magnetoresistive sensor platform that allows for the real-time detection of point mutations in DNA targets. Specifically, we detect point mutations at two sites in the human beta globin gene. For DNA detection, the present sensor technology has a detection limit of about 160pM an...

  17. Par-3 partitioning defective 3 homolog (C. elegans and androgen-induced prostate proliferative shutoff associated protein genes are mutationally inactivated in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Igor

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene identification by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay inhibition (GINI has proven its usefulness in identifying mutant genes in cancer cell lines. An increase in transcription in response to NMD inhibition of a subset of genes is a major cause of false positives when genes are selected for sequencing analysis. To distinguish between mRNA accumulations caused by stress response-induced transcription and nonsense-containing mRNA stabilizations is a challenge in identifying mutant genes using GINI. Methods To identify potential tumor-suppressor genes mutated in prostate cancer cell lines, we applied a version of GINI that involves inhibition of NMD in two steps. In the first step, NMD is inhibited in duplicate tissue-culture plates. During this step, both the substrate for NMD and stress-response mRNA transcripts are accumulated in cells. In the second step, transcription is inhibited in both plates and NMD is inhibited in one plate and released in the second plate. Microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in both plates after the second step detects only the differences in mRNA degradation but not in mRNA accumulation. Results Analyzing gene expression profile alterations in 22RV1 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells following NMD inhibition we selected candidates for sequencing analysis in both cell lines. Sequencing identified inactivating mutations in both alleles of the PARD3 and AS3 genes in the LNCaP and 22RV1 cells, respectively. Introduction of a wild-type PARD3 cDNA into the LNCaP cells resulted in a higher proliferation rate in tissue culture, a higher adhesion of LNCaP cells to the components of extracellular matrix and impaired the growth of the LNCaP cells in soft agar and in a three-dimensional cell-culture. Conclusion The mutational inactivation in a prostate cancer cell line of the PARD3 gene involved in asymmetric cell division and maintenance of cell-polarity suggests that the loss of cell-polarity contributes

  18. Mutation direction by irradiation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutation directions of rice were studied. The results indicated that the mutation directions of rice induced by 14C were invert correlation to their genetic backgrounds of tested rice varieties, i.e. early mature and short stem varieties produced later mature and higher stem mutation; late mature and high stem varieties produced earlier mature and shorter stem mutation; the varieties of middle maturity and height produced both direction mutations of earlier and later maturity or shorter and higher stem. The mutation directions induced by 14C were also related to treated doses and stages. Frequency of earlier maturity mutation by protons treatment were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of later maturity by γ-rays were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of short stem mutation by synchronous irradiation (soft X-rays) were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of beneficial mutation induced by proton treatment were higher than those induced by γ-rays

  19. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiga, N.; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K.; Y. Yokota; Yokoyama, M.; Matsuo, M.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resu...

  20. A novel in vivo transcription assay demonstrates the presence of globin-inducing trans-acting factors in uninduced Murine Erythroleukemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Wrighton; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe report the development of a novel in vivo transcription assay for trans-acting factors regulating the human gamma- and beta-globin genes. A cDNA coding for the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was inserted into the globin genes. Simian virus 40 small T-antigen splice and

  1. Mutation breeding in pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F1 hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M1 effects, handling the treated material in M1, M2 and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  2. Effect of dose of gamma-rays and ethylmethane sulphonate on the germination and survival of induced mutations in pigeonpea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premsekar, S. (Central Inst. for Cotton Research, Coimbatore (India). Regional Station); Appadurai, R. (Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India))

    1981-06-01

    The LD/sub 50/ values for germination and survival of the induced mutants (M/sub 1/) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (Linn.) Millsp.) were attained with 20 and 15 krad when gamma-rays were used, and 30 and 40 mM concentration when EMS was used. In the combination treatments the half-kill dose for germination and survival was reached even at the low dose combination of 5 krad gamma-ray + 20 mM EMS. Higher doses resulted in lower pollen and seed fertility. The sterility was much enhanced in the combined treatments. The number of pods, seed yield and weight of seeds could be stimulated with 10 and 15 krad doses of gamma-rays and 20 mM of EMS. In combination treatments such a stimulatory effect was noticed in seed weight only.

  3. Simple quantitative PCR approach to reveal naturally occurring and mutation-induced repetitive sequence variation on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Aldrich

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence.

  4. Q344ter mutation causes mislocalization of rhodopsin molecules that are catalytically active: a mouse model of Q344ter-induced retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Concepcion

    Full Text Available Q344ter is a naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in humans that causes autosomal dominant retinal degeneration through mechanisms that are not fully understood, but are thought to involve an early termination that removed the trafficking signal, QVAPA, leading to its mislocalization in the rod photoreceptor cell. To better understand the disease mechanism(s, transgenic mice that express Q344ter were generated and crossed with rhodopsin knockout mice. Dark-reared Q344ter(rho+/- mice exhibited retinal degeneration, demonstrating that rhodopsin mislocalization caused photoreceptor cell death. This degeneration is exacerbated by light-exposure and is correlated with the activation of transducin as well as other G-protein signaling pathways. We observed numerous sub-micrometer sized vesicles in the inter-photoreceptor space of Q344ter(rho+/- and Q344ter(rho-/- retinas, similar to that seen in another rhodopsin mutant, P347S. Whereas light microscopy failed to reveal outer segment structures in Q344ter(rho-/- rods, shortened and disorganized rod outer segment structures were visible using electron microscopy. Thus, some Q344ter molecules trafficked to the outer segment and formed disc structures, albeit inefficiently, in the absence of full length wildtype rhodopsin. These findings helped to establish the in vivo role of the QVAPA domain as well as the pathways leading to Q344ter-induced retinal degeneration.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis, ecythyma gangrenosum and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia occurring in a man with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Apostolova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin necrosis and limb gangrene are occasional thrombotic manifestations of anticoagulation therapy. We report a man heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, and with a history of recurrent deep venous thrombosis, who initially presented with a necrotic skin lesion of the right flank while on warfarin therapy with a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin was discontinued and he received intravenous heparin. Thereafter he developed thrombocytopenia and pedal erythema and was diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Heparin was replaced with argatroban. He ultimately underwent bilateral below-knee amputations for the thrombotic complications of the HIT. The initial necrotic lesion healed with antibiotics and wound care. Pathologic examination of multiple biopsy specimens revealed two separate lesions. One was necrotic tissue infiltrated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus having features of ecthyma gangrenosum. The second showed thrombotic changes consistent with HIT. The case illustrates the differential diagnosis of skin necrosis and limb gangrene in patients on warfarin and heparin, and also the clinical complexities that can occur in a FVL heterozygote.

  6. Deep vein thrombosis, ecythyma gangrenosum and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia occurring in a man with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolova, Mariya; Weng, Baoying; Pote, Harry H.; Ashcraft, Harold; Goldblatt, Curtis; Woolley, Paul V.

    2012-01-01

    Skin necrosis and limb gangrene are occasional thrombotic manifestations of anticoagulation therapy. We report a man heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, and with a history of recurrent deep venous thrombosis, who initially presented with a necrotic skin lesion of the right flank while on warfarin therapy with a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin was discontinued and he received intravenous heparin. Thereafter he developed thrombocytopenia and pedal erythema and was diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Heparin was replaced with argatroban. He ultimately underwent bilateral below-knee amputations for the thrombotic complications of the HIT. The initial necrotic lesion healed with antibiotics and wound care. Pathologic examination of multiple biopsy specimens revealed two separate lesions. One was necrotic tissue infiltrated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus having features of ecthyma gangrenosum. The second showed thrombotic changes consistent with HIT. The case illustrates the differential diagnosis of skin necrosis and limb gangrene in patients on warfarin and heparin, and also the clinical complexities that can occur in a FVL heterozygote. PMID:23355938

  7. Role of 239Pu-induced chromosome alterations and mutated Ki-v-ras oncogene during liver-cancer induction in Chinese hamsters and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberrations and mutated oncogenes can cause important changes during carcinogenesis. Model systems are being studied in which defined cellular and molecular changes can be quantitated and altered, and tumor frequency, type, and time of appearance can be evaluated. Dose-response relationships for Pu Citrate-induced chromosome aberrations and liver cancer were measured in Chinese hamsters. Chromosome aberrations increased linearly according to dose, with a slope of 4.8 x 10-1 aberrations/cell/Gy; liver-tumor incidence was 1.1 x 10-1 tumors/animal/Gy. The dose was calculated at the 50% survival time. The interaction between Pu and Ki-v-ras, an altered, dominant-acting oncogene, on the induction of liver cancer was measured in B6C3F1 mice. The neo oncogene was used as a negative control in these studies. The Ki-v-ras oncogene was inserted into a viral vector and incorporated into the livers of mice either 30 days before or after the incorporation of 239Pu. Compared with both the controls and the mice injected with a single insult, mortality increased in groups of animals that received combined exposure to oncogenes, CCl4, and 239Pu. The relationships between molecular and cellular damage and the induction of cancer is being defined in both mice and Chinese hamsters

  8. Derivation, Characterization, and Neural Differentiation of Integration-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Parkinson's Disease Patients Carrying SNCA, LRRK2, PARK2, and GBA Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momcilovic, Olga; Sivapatham, Renuka; Oron, Tal Ronnen;

    2016-01-01

    We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from ten Parkinson's disease (PD) patients carrying SNCA, PARK2, LRRK2, and GBA mutations, and one age-matched control. After validation of pluripotency, long-term genome stability, and integration-free reprogramming, eight of the...... not be sufficient to determine the cause or mechanism of the disease, and highlights the need to use more focused strategies for large-scale data analysis....... of these lines (one of each SNCA, LRRK2 and GBA, four PARK2 lines, and the control) were differentiated into neural stem cells (NSC) and subsequently to dopaminergic cultures. We did not observe significant differences in the timeline of neural induction and NSC derivation between the patient and control line......, nor amongst the patient lines, although we report considerable variability in the efficiency of dopaminergic differentiation among patient lines. We performed whole genome expression analyses of the lines at each stage of differentiation (fibroblast, iPSC, NSC, and dopaminergic culture) in an attempt...

  9. Characteristics of commercially recommending sesame mutant cultivars through induced mutations by different sources of radiation and chemical in the Republic of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Churl Whan [National Crop Experiment Station, Sodundong Suwon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    The sesame acreage in Korea has grown 2.5 times in the last two decades as the result of recommending sesame mutant cultivars and polyethylene mulch technique newly developed since 1978. The mutation was induced by X-ray irradiation at 200 Gy yielding a variety named 'Ahnsankkae' known for early ripeness, white color of seed coat, tolerance for diseases. 'Suwon 128' is a dwarf mutant bred through sodium azide and known for strong lodging resistance, dense and lower first capsule set and dense planting adaptability toward mechanized culture against typhoon. Seven mutant recommending cultivars of sesame are compared with respect to their qualitative and quantitative characteristics based on passport data regarding different mutagen sources of radiations and chemicals published by Committee New Recommending Cultivars on the Crops. Breeding sources are summarized: 5 out of 7 sources are through radiation (X-rays, {gamma}-rays, and neutrons) and the rest 2 through chemicals. Their growth characteristics such as flowering date, maturing date, plant height, length-capsule bearing stem, disease and lodging resistance, oil content, and yield ability are also presented. (S. Ohno)

  10. I131 therapy induces persistent radiation-dose dependent increases in glycophorin a locus somatic mutations in bone marrow stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with thyroid diseases treated with I131 receive known sub-acute marrow exposures to ionizing radiation of ∼2 to >200 cGy. Time-series sampling of peripheral blood from these patients, assayed for the frequency of erythrocytes expressing glycophorin A (GPA) allele-loss variant phenotypes, demonstrates the induction, accumulation, and long-term persistence of radiation-induced in vivo somatic mutations at this locus in erythroid marrow progenitor cells. Initial dosimetry and assay data from 5 patients yielded a linear GPA dose response of ∼6.5 induced variants/106 cells/Gy which is 1/3 to 1/4 of that previously observed for Hiroshima A-bomb survivors and individuals exposed at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor and Goiania Cs137 source accidents who predominantly received external exposures to ionizing radiation. The lower slope of the dose response observed in the I131 treated patients may reflect a reduced biological effectiveness of this exposure due to differences in the energy spectra of the γ radiation, internal versus external exposure, and/or protracted versus acute dose rate effects. Ongoing studies of I131 treated patients are designed to define the shape of the low dose response and limit of sensitivity of the GPA assay; parameters that are required for the application of the assay as a quantitative cumulative radiation biodosimeter in medical, occupational, and accidental exposure settings. This biodosimetric analysis of patients receiving very similar marrow exposures will also permit an assessment of the inter-individual variability in biological response to ionizing radiation

  11. A Dominant Allele of Arabidopsis Pectin-Binding Wall-Associated Kinase Induces a Stress Response Suppressed by MPK6 but Not MPK3 Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruce D.Kohorn; Susan L.Kohorn; Tanya Todorova; Gillian Baptiste; Kevin Stansky; Meghan McCullough

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of a matrix of cellulose fibers,flexible pectin polymers,and an array of assorted carbohydrates and proteins.The receptor-like Wall-Associated Kinases(WAKs)of Arabidopsis bind pectin in the wall,and are necessary both for cell expansion during development and for a response to pathogens and wounding.Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases(MPKs)form a major signaling link between cell surface receptors and both transcriptional and enzyme regulation in eukaryotes,and Arabidopsis MPK6 and MPK3 indeed have important roles in development and the response to stress and pathogens.A dominant allele of WAK2 requires kinase activity and activates a stress response that includes an increased ROS accumulation and the up-regulation of numerous genes involved in pathogen resistance,wounding,and cell wall biogenesis.This dominant allele requires a functional pectin binding and kinase domain,indicating that it is engaged in a WAK signaling pathway.A null mutant of the major plasma membrane ROS-producing enzyme complex,rbohd/f does not suppress the WAK2cTAP-induced phenotype.A mpk6,but not a mpk3,null allele is able to suppress the effects of this dominant WAK2 mutation,thus distinguishing MPK3 and MPK6,whose activity previously was thought to be redundant.Pectin activation of gene expression is abated in a wak2-null,but is tempered by the WAK-dominant allele that induces elevated basal stress-related transcript levels.The results suggest a mechanism in which changes to the cell wall can lead to a large change in cellular responses and help to explain how pathogens and wounding can have general effects on growth.

  12. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  13. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  14. Mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. II. A spectrum of mutational events induced with 1500 r of gamma-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbluth, R.E.; Cuddeford, C.; Baillie, D.L.

    1985-03-01

    The authors previously established a gamma-ray dose-response curve for recessive lethal events (lethals) captured over the eT1 balancer. In this paper they analyze the nature of lethal events produced, with a frequency of 0.04 per eT1 region, at a dose of 1500 r. To do so, they developed a protocol that, in the absence of cytogenetics, allows balanced lethals to be analyzed for associated chromosomal rearrangements. A set of 35 lethal strains was chosen for the analysis. Although the dosage was relatively low, a large number of multiple-break events were observed. The fraction of lethals associated with rearrangements was found to be 0.76. Currently most X- and gamma-ray dosages used for mutagenesis in C. elegans are 6000-8000 r. From the data it was conservatively estimated that 43% of rearrangements induced with 8000 r would be accompanied by additional chromosome breaks in the genome. With 1500 r the value was 5%. The 35 lethals studied were derived from 875 screened F1's. Among these lethals there were (1) at least two unc-36 duplications, (2) at least four translocations, (3) at least six deficiencies of chromosome V (these delete about 90% of the unc-60 to unc-42 region) and (4) several unanalyzed rearrangements. Thus, it is possible to recover desired rearrangements at reasonable rates with a dose of only 1500 r. The authors suggest that the levels of ionizing radiation employed in most published C. elegans studies are excessive and efforts should be made to use reduced levels in the future.

  15. Lack of UV-induced respiration shutoff in a recF strain of Escherichia coli: temperature conditional suppression at 30 degrees C by the sfrA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, P A; Norton, I L

    1986-05-01

    A mutation in the recF gene of Escherichia coli results in a radiation-sensitive strain. The RecF pathway and the RecBC pathway account for nearly all of the conjugative recombination occurring in E. coli. recBC cells are radiation-sensitive and carry only out a small amount of recombination but these deficiencies are suppressed by an sbcB as recombination is shunted to the RecF pathway. A recBC sbcB recF strain is very radiation-sensitive and is devoid of recombination ability. These deficiencies are suppressed by the srfA mutation; srfA is a recA allele. UV-induced respiration shutoff is a recA+, lexA+ and recBC+ dependent. We report in this paper that respiration does not shutoff in a recF strain at 37 and 30 degrees C. an srfA mutation suppresses this lack of respiration shutoff effect in a recF srfA mutant at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C; no suppression by this mutation occurs at either temperature in a recF recBC sbcB strain. An srfA strain also does not shut off its respiration at 37 degrees C and shows a temperature conditional UV-induced respiration shutoff response at 30 degrees C. The srfA mutation is thought to cause an altered RecA protein to be produced and we suggest that at 37 degrees This altered protein is temperature sensitive. We conclude from the results in this paper that the recF gene product is required for UV-induced respiration shutoff and that the RecA protein plays a special role in the induction process.

  16. Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucire Y

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Yolande Lucire, Christopher CrottyEdgecliff Centre, Edgecliff, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: To examine the relation between variant alleles in 3 CYP450 genes (CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19, interacting drugs and akathisia in subjects referred to a forensic psychiatry practice in Sydney, Australia.Patients and methods: This paper concerns 10/129 subjects who had been referred to the first author’s practice for expert opinion or treatment. More than 120 subjects were diagnosed with akathisia/serotonin toxicity after taking psychiatric medication that had been prescribed for psychosocial distress. They were tested for variant alleles in CYP450 genes, which play a major role in Phase I metabolism of all antidepressant and many other medications. Eight had committed homicide and many more became extremely violent while on antidepressants. Ten representative case histories involving serious violence are presented in detail.Results: Variant CYP450 allele frequencies were higher in akathisia subjects compared with random primary care patients tested at the same facility. Ten subjects described in detail had variant alleles for one or more of their tested CYP450 genes. All but two were also on interacting drugs, herbals or illicit substances, impairing metabolism further. All those described were able to stop taking antidepressants and return to their previously normal personalities.Conclusion: The personal, medical, and legal problems arising from overuse of antidepressant medications and resulting toxicity raise the question: how can such toxicity events be understood and prevented? The authors suggest that the key lies in understanding the interplay between the subject’s CYP450 genotype, substrate drugs and doses, co-prescribed inhibitors and inducers and the age of the subject. The results presented here concerning a sample of persons given antidepressants for psychosocial distress demonstrate the extent to which the psychopharmacology industry has

  17. Point mutation of tyrosine 759 of the IL-6 family cytokine receptor, gp130, augments collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihara Katsuhiko

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knock-in mice (gp130F759 with a Y759F point mutation in gp130, a signal transducing receptor subunit shared by members of the IL-6 cytokine family, show sustained activation of STAT3, enhanced acute-phase or immune responses, and autoimmune arthritis. We conducted a detailed analysis of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in gp130F759 with a DBA/1J background (D/J.gp130F759. Methods We backcrossed gp130F759 to C57BL/6 and DBA/1J, and compared the pathologic changes, including occurrence of arthritis, in the two distinct genetic backgrounds. We analyzed CIA in D/J.gp130F759 and investigated the effects of methotrexate (MTX on CIA. Results C57BL/6 background gp130F759 mice, but not D/J.gp130F759, spontaneously developed polyarthritis and glomerulonephritis. On the other hand, keratitis of the eyes only developed in D/J.gp130F759, indicating the influence of genetic background on disease development in gp130F759 mice. Resistance of the DBA/1J background against spontaneous arthritis urged us to examine CIA in D/J.gp130F759. CIA in D/J.gp130F759 was more severe, with greater bone destruction, than the control mice. After collagen immunization, splenomegaly and serum levels of rheumatoid factor and anti-DNA antibody were augmented in D/J.gp130F759. Bio-Plex analysis of serum cytokines revealed increased IL-12p40 and PDGF-BB before immunization, and increased levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, TNF-α, IL-9, and MIP-1β 8 days after the booster dose. IL-6 and PDGF-BB in D/J.gp130F759 showed distinct kinetics from the other cytokines; higher levels were observed after arthritis development. MTX partially attenuated the development of arthritis and inhibited bone destruction in D/J.gp130F759, with reduction of anti-type II collagen antibody levels, suggesting that MTX mainly affects antigen-specific immune responses in CIA. Conclusion The Tyr-759 point mutation of the IL-6 family cytokine receptor subunit, gp130, caused autoimmune disease, and this

  18. Liver tumors induced in B6C3F{sub 1} mice by benz[a]anthracene and two of its halogenated derivatives contain K-RAS oncogene mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, O.; Yi, P.; Zhan, D. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated PAHs are genotoxic environmental contaminants. We previously examined the tumorigenicity of benz[a]anthracene (BA), 7-Cl-BA, and 7-Br-BA in the neonatal mouse tumorigenicity bioassay. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered i.p. injections at a total dose of 400 nmol per mouse on 1, 8, and 15 days after birth. BA, 7-Cl-BA, and 7-Br-BA induced hepatocellular adenoma in 67, 92, and 96% of the mice, respectively, and induced hepatocellular carcinoma in 15, 100 and 83% of the mice, respectively. In the present study, mRNA was isolated from each of the liver tumors induced by the three compounds, reversed-transcribed to cDNA, and portions of the K- and H-ras oncogene coding sequences were amplified and analyzed for DNA sequence alterations. 92% (11/12) of BA-induced, 79% (19/24) of 7-Cl-BA-induced and 86% (19/22) of 7-Br-BA-induced liver tumors had activated ras protooncogenes. In contrast to the general finding of H-ras mutations in B6C3F{sub 1} mouse liver tumors, all the mutations were at the first base of K-ras codon 13, resulting in a pattern of GGC{yields}CGC. No other ras oncogene mutations were detected. Our results clearly demonstrate that these chemicals induce a unique type of ras (K-ras) oncogene activation in the liver tumors of B6C3F{sub 1} mice.

  19. Habitat induced mutational effects and fatty acid profile changes in bottom dweller Cirrhinus mrigala inhabitant of river Chenab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain, B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fish from the river Chenab were analyzed for DNA damage by the Comet and Micronucleus assays. The fatty acid profile was determined by gas chromatography using a Flame Ionization Detector. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry showed significant (p p Cirrhinus mrigala of 37.29±2.51%, 34.96±2.53% and 38.80±2.42% in the comet tail, in the tail moment of 23.48±3.90, 19.78±4.26 and 14.30±1.82, in the olive moment of 16.22±2.04, 13.83±1.96 10.99±0.90, respectively, from three experimental sites. The micronucleus assay showed a high frequency of single micronucleus induction of 44.80±3.73, double induction of 06.20±0.97 and nuclear abnormalities of 09.60±1.72, as calculated in a thousand cells. C8:0, C12:0, C20:0, C16:1(n-7, C16:1(n-9, C20:1(n-9, C18:2(n-6, C18:4(n-3, C20:5(n-3, C22:4(n-6 fatty acids were found missing in the fish with a higher intensity of DNA damage but were found in optimal amounts both in farmed and wild fish from non polluted habitats. A highly significant (p Los daños en el ADN de los peces del río Chenab se analizaron mediante la técnica del “ensayo del cometa” y el ensayo de micronúcleos. El perfil de ácidos grasos se determinó mediante cromatografía de gases con detector de ionización de llama. La espectrofotometría de absorción atómica mostró diferencias significativas (p p p < 0,01 también en ácidos saturados, ácidos grasos insaturados, daño del ADN y hábitat. El presente estudio reveló que la intensidad de la contaminación del hábitat aún en la más baja no sólo induce daño en el ADN, sino también en la composición de los ácidos grasos de la serie omega y de los ácidos grasos insaturados, para los que se prefiere ingerir pescado a otros animales.

  20. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.