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Sample records for beta-delayed proton activities

  1. $\\beta$-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, S W; Huang, W X; Li, Z K; Pan Qiang Yan; Shu, N C; Wang, K; Wang, X D; Xie, Y X; Xing, Y B; Xu, F R; Yu, Y; 10.1103/PhysRevC.71.054318

    2005-01-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on beta - delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of beta -delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N approximately=Z by utilizing the p- gamma coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half- lives for /sup 85/Mo, /sup 92/Rh, as well as the predicted "waiting point" nuclei /sup 89/Ru and /sup 93/Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moller et al. At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997). These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp p...

  2. Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, M V; Briz, J A; Cederkäll, J; Fynbo, H O U; Jensen, J H; Jonson, B; Laursen, K L; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Riisager, K; Tengblad, O

    2015-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with a detection setup including particle identification capabilities. $\\beta$-delayed protons with center of mass energies between 0.39$\\,$MeV and 7.2$\\,$MeV were measured and used to determine the half life of $^{21}$Mg as $118.6\\pm 0.5\\,$ms. From a line shape fit of the $\\beta p$ branches we extract spectroscopic information about the resonances of $^{21}$Na. Finally an improved interpretation of the decay scheme in accordance with the results obtained in reaction studies is presented.

  3. Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 21}Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, M.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Jensen, J.H.; Laursen, K.L.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus C (Denmark); Borge, M.J.G. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Briz, J.A.; Perea, A.; Pesudo, V.; Tengblad, O. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); Cederkaell, J. [Lund University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Lund (Sweden); Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Fundamental Physics, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 21}Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with a detection setup consisting of two charged-particle telescopes surrounding the decay point. Altogether 27 βp branches were measured with center-of-mass energies between 0.4-7.2 MeV. Seven new βp branches were observed. Beta-delayed protons were used to determine the half-life of {sup 21}Mg as 118.6 ± 0.5 ms. From a line shape fit of the βp branches we extract the widths, spins, and parities of the resonances of {sup 21}Na. An improved interpretation of the decay scheme in accordance with the results obtained in reaction studies is presented. (orig.)

  4. Search for $\\beta$-delayed protons from $^{11}$Be

    CERN Multimedia

    $\\beta$-delayed proton emission from $^{11}$Be will be a very rare process. It is believed to decay directly into continuum states. This would imply that it will be a sensitive probe of the halo structure of the one-neutron halo nucleus $^{11}$Be. We propose to improve existing (unpublished) limits on this decay mode by two orders of magnitude. Our earlier experience at ISOLDE indicates that the required intensity and purity of the source can be obtained. The branching ratio will be measured by counting the number of $^{10}$Be atoms produced via accelerator mass spectrometry.

  5. Search for beta-delayed protons from 11Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be can emit a proton in a beta decay of the halo neutron. However, due to the Q-value of this decay channel (280.7±0.3 keV) the expected branching ratio will be very low - most estimates are a few times 10-8 - and the detection of the outgoing proton with a kinetic energy of a few hundred keV is challenging. Therefore our attempt was to detect the remaining nucleus 10Be with the help of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS is a highly sensitive tool to detect radioisotopes at the ultra-trace level. A beam of 11Be ions was produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN and implanted in a collection sample. The sample was transferred to the VERA AMS facility at the University of Vienna where the 10Be content was determined. In my talk I present details of the experiment and results of the successful detection of this rare decay channel.

  6. The Mechanism of $\\beta$-Delayed Two-Proton Emission

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus $^{31}$Ar seems to be the most prolific ${\\beta}$-2p precursor known to date and is at the same time the one with the largest production yields at ISOLDE, where the most sensitive experiments can be done. Our purpose with this experiment is to study the ${\\beta}$-2p branches in detail, search for ${\\beta}$-3p events, place them in the decay scheme and obtain information on the decay mechanism for ${\\beta}$-2p via the energy distribution and the angular correlation between the two protons. As a by product we shall also resolve existing inconsistencies in the level scheme.\\\\ \\\\ The nucleus $^{31}$Ar, produced in a cold plasma ion source unit by the impact of a 1 GeV proton beam of 0.5 Hz frequency, had an average yield over one week of 1.5 $^{31}$Ar atoms/s. The beam passed through the central hole of an annular Si detector ($\\Omega$ = 4.3~\\%) and stopped in a thin carbon foil tilted 45$^o$ with respect to the beam direction. A 70~\\% coaxial HPGe-detector ($\\Omega$~=~7.4~\\%) was located opposite to ...

  7. Observation of Doppler broadening in $\\beta$-delayed proton-$\\gamma$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, S B; Bennett, M B; Liddick, S N; Perez-Loureiro, D; Bowe, A; Chen, A A; Chipps, K A; Cooper, N; Irvine, D; McNeice, E; Montes, F; Naqvi, F; Ortez, R; Pain, S D; Pereira, J; Prokop, C; Quaglia, J; Quinn, S J; Sakstrup, J; Santia, M; Shanab, S; Simon, A; Spyrou, A; Thiagalingam, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Doppler broadening of $\\gamma$-ray peaks due to nuclear recoil from $\\beta$-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using $\\beta$-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than $A=10$. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using $\\gamma$-ray peaks from the $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of $^{26}$P was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a $^{26}$P $\\beta$-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect $\\gamma$ rays from the $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in $\\beta$-delayed proton-$\\gamma$ decay was observed for the first time. The Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613 keV $\\gamma$-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776 keV $\\gamma$ ray de-exciting the 2720 keV $^{25}$Al level was observed...

  8. First observation of $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-proton decay in the $T_z$ = -2, $^{56}$Zn nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Orrigo, S E A; Fujita, Y; Blank, B; Gelletly, W; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ascher, P; Bilgier, B; Cáceres, L; Cakirli, R B; Fujita, H; Ganioğlu, E; Gerbaux, M; Giovinazzo, J; Grévy, S; Kamalou, O; Kozer, H C; Kucuk, L; Kurtukian-Nieto, T; Molina, F; Popescu, L; Rogers, A M; Susoy, G; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Tamii, A; Thomas, J C

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of a very exotic decay mode at the proton drip-line, the $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-proton decay, clearly seen in the $\\beta$ decay of the $T_z$ = -2, $^{56}$Zn nucleus. The $^{56}$Zn half-life and decay scheme have been determined. The decay proceeds by $\\beta$-delayed proton emission and $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$ de-excitation. The exotic $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-proton emission was also detected in three cases. It affects the usual determination of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength. Absolute Fermi and GT strengths have been deduced. Evidence for fragmentation of the Fermi strength due to isospin mixing is found.

  9. Beta-delayed proton emission in neutron-deficient lanthanide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmarth, P.A.

    1988-09-30

    Forty-two ..beta..-delayed proton precursors with 56less than or equal toZless than or equal to71 and 63less than or equal toNless than or equal to83 were produced in heavy-ion reactions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decay properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Twenty-five isotopes and eight delayed proton branches were identified for the first time. Delayed proton energy spectra and proton coincident ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectra were measured for all precursors. In a few cases, proton branching ratios were also determined. The precursor mass numbers were determined by the separator, while the proton coincident x-ray energies provided unambiguous Z identifications. The proton coincident ..gamma..-ray intensities were used to extract final state branching ratios. Proton emission from ground and isomeric states was observed in many cases. The majority of the delayed proton spectra exhibited the smooth bell-shaped distribution expected for heavy mass precursors. The experimental results were compared to statistical model calculations using standard parameter sets. Calculations using Nilsson model/RPA ..beta..-strength functions were found to reproduce the spectral shapes and branching ratios better than calculations using either constant or gross theory ..beta..-strength functions. Precursor half-life predictions from the Nilsson model/RPA ..beta..-strength functions were also in better agreement with the measured half-lives than were gross theory predictions. The ratios of positron coincident proton intensities to total proton intensities were used to determine Q/sub EC/-B/sub p/ values for several precursors near N=82. The statistical model calculations were not able to reproduce the experimental results for N=81 precursors. 154 refs., 82 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Competition between $\\beta$-delayed proton and $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$ decay of the exotic $T_z$ = -2 nucleus $^{56}$Zn and fragmentation of the IAS

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, B; Fujita, Y; Blank, B; Gelletly, W; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ascher, P; Bilgier, B; Cáceres, L; Cakirli, R B; Fujita, H; Ganioglu, E; Gerbaux, M; Giovinazzo, J; Grévy, S; Kamalou, O; Kozer, H C; Kucuk, L; Kurtukian-Nieto, T; Molina, F; Popescu, L; Rogers, A M; Susoy, G; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Tamii, A; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    A very exotic decay mode at the proton drip-line, $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-proton decay, has been observed in the $\\beta$ decay of the $T_z$ = -2 nucleus $^{56}$Zn. Three $\\gamma$-proton sequences have been observed following the $\\beta$ decay. The fragmentation of the IAS in $^{56}$Cu has also been observed for the first time. The results were reported in a recent publication. At the time of publication the authors were puzzled by the competition between proton and $\\gamma$ decays from the main component of the IAS. Here we outline a possible explanation based on the nuclear structure properties of the three nuclei involved, namely $^{56}$Zn, $^{56}$Cu and $^{55}$Ni, close to the doubly magic nucleus $^{56}$Ni. From the fragmentation of the Fermi strength and the excitation energy of the two populated 0$^{+}$ states we could deduce the off-diagonal matrix element of the charge-dependent part of the Hamiltonian responsible for the mixing. These results are compared with the decay of $^{55}$Cu with one proton ...

  11. Studies of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission : The cases of $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Riisager, K; Jokinen, A; Canchel, G; Heinz, A M; Jonson, B N G; Dominguez reyes, R R; Koldste, G T; Fraile prieto, L M; Nilsson, T; Audirac, L L

    2008-01-01

    We propose to perform detailed studies of the decays of the two dripline nuclei $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca. This will allow an in-depth study in the process of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission ($\\beta$2p); as well as provide important information on resonances in $^{30}$S and $^{34}$Ar relevant for the astrophysical rp-process.

  12. Beta-delayed gamma decay of 26P: Possible evidence of a proton halo

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Loureiro, D; Bennett, M B; Liddick, S N; Bowe, A; Brown, B A; Chen, A A; Chipps, K A; Cooper, N; Irvine, D; McNeice, E; Montes, F; Naqvi, F; Ortez, R; Pain, S D; Pereira, J; Prokop, C J; Quaglia, J; Quinn, S J; Sakstrup, J; Santia, M; Schwartz, S B; Shanab, S; Simon, A; Spyrou, A; Thiagalingam, E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measurements of $\\beta$ decay provide important nuclear structure information that can be used to probe isospin asymmetries and inform nuclear astrophysics studies. Purpose: To measure the $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$ decay of $^{26}$P and compare the results with previous experimental results and shell-model calculations. Method: A $^{26}$P fast beam produced using nuclear fragmentation was implanted into a planar germanium detector. Its $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-ray emission was measured with an array of 16 high-purity germanium detectors. Positrons emitted in the decay were detected in coincidence to reduce the background. Results: The absolute intensities of $^{26}$P $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-rays were determined. A total of six new $\\beta$-decay branches and 15 new $\\gamma$-ray lines have been observed for the first time in $^{26}$P $\\beta$-decay. A complete $\\beta$-decay scheme was built for the allowed transitions to bound excited states of $^{26}$Si. $ft$ values and Gamow-Teller strengths were a...

  13. $\\beta$-delayed fission in proton-rich nuclei in the lead region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085005; Huyse, Mark; Popescu, Lucia

    Nuclear fission is the breakup of an atomic nucleus into two (sometimes three) fragments, thereby releasing a large amount of energy. Soon after its discovery in the late 1930’s, the gross properties of the fission phenomenon were explained by macroscopic nuclear models. Certain features however, such as asymmetric fission-fragment mass distributions in the actinide region, require the inclusion of microscopic effects. This interplay of the microscopic motion of individual nucleons on this macroscopic process is, until today, not yet fully understood. The phenomenon of fission has therefore been of recurring interest for both theoretical and experimental studies. This thesis work focuses on the $\\beta$-delayed fission ($\\beta$DF) process, an excellent tool to study low-energy fission of exotic nuclei, which was discovered in 1966 in the actinide region. In this two-step process, a precursor nucleus first undergoes $\\beta$-decay to an excited level in the daughter nucleus, which may subsequently fission. Rec...

  14. Beta-delayed proton emission in neutron-deficient lanthanide isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-two β-delayed proton precursors with 56≤Z≤71 and 63≤N≤83 were produced in heavy-ion reactions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decay properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Twenty-five isotopes and eight delayed proton branches were identified for the first time. Delayed proton energy spectra and proton coincident γ-ray and x-ray spectra were measured for all precursors. In a few cases, proton branching ratios were also determined. The precursor mass numbers were determined by the separator, while the proton coincident x-ray energies provided unambiguous Z identifications. The proton coincident γ-ray intensities were used to extract final state branching ratios. Proton emission from ground and isomeric states was observed in many cases. The majority of the delayed proton spectra exhibited the smooth bell-shaped distribution expected for heavy mass precursors. The experimental results were compared to statistical model calculations using standard parameter sets. Calculations using Nilsson model/RPA β-strength functions were found to reproduce the spectral shapes and branching ratios better than calculations using either constant or gross theory β-strength functions. Precursor half-life predictions from the Nilsson model/RPA β-strength functions were also in better agreement with the measured half-lives than were gross theory predictions. The ratios of positron coincident proton intensities to total proton intensities were used to determine Q/sub EC/-B/sub p/ values for several precursors near N=82. The statistical model calculations were not able to reproduce the experimental results for N=81 precursors. 154 refs., 82 figs., 19 tabs

  15. Beta delayed emission of a proton by a one-neutron halo nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Baye, D.; TURSUNOV, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Some one-neutron halo nuclei can emit a proton in a beta decay of the halo neutron. The branching ratio towards this rare decay mode is calculated within a two-body potential model of the initial core+neutron bound state and final core+proton scattering states. The decay probability per second is evaluated for the $^{11}$Be, $^{19}$C and $^{31}$Ne one-neutron halo nuclei. It is very sensitive to the neutron separation energy.

  16. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of 31Cl, 27P and 28P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas ΔE-gas ΔE-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in 31Cl and 27P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of 31Cl were shown to be from the decay of 25Si. In 27P, two proton groups at 459 ± 14 keV and 610 ± 11 keV, with intensities of 7 ± 3% and 92 ± 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the β-decay of 28P, at 1,444 ± 12 keV with a 1.7 ± 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, 17Ne and 33Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 ± 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of 17Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from 17Ne and 33Ar were resolved

  17. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ognibene, T.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

  18. Extension of the T{sub z} = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 1 series of beta-delayed proton emitters to {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, and low energy beta-delayed proton emission from the T{sub z} = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 3 nucleus {sup 23}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelder, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The series of known Tz = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 1 nuclei has been extended to include the previously undiscovered isotopes {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, through the observation of beta-delayed proton emission via the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the beta-daughter (emitter). Due to the relatively large proton energies involved, these experiments were conducted using standard Si-Si {Delta}E-E telescopes. Beta-delayed protons arising from {sup 65}Se have been observed at an energy (laboratory) of 3.55 {plus_minus} 0.03 MeV, corresponding to the decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 65}As to the ground state of {sup 64}Ge. Similarly, beta-delayed protons from {sup 73}Sr at an energy of 3.75 {plus_minus} 0.04 MeV have been observed, corresponding to decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 73}Rb to the ground state of {sup 72}Kr. From the energies of these proton transitions, an improved prediction of the mass excesses of the two parent nuclei ({sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr) is made through the use of a Coulomb displacement formula. These predictions are {minus}33.41 {plus_minus} 0.26 and {minus}31.87 {plus_minus} 0.24 MeV for {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, respectively. Studies of low energy (down to {approximately}200 keV) beta-delayed protons from {sup 23}Al necessitated that a particle identification telescope with a low energy threshold for observation and identification of protons be developed. {sup 23}Al is of interest because of its role in the breakout of the hot CNO cycle leading to the astrophysical rp process.

  19. Proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of astrophysically important states of $^{30}$S studied by the $\\beta$-delayed decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M J G; Briz, J A; Carmona-Gallardo, M; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Giovinazzo, J; Johansen, J G; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Kurturkian-Nieto, T; Kusk, J H; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Picado, E; Riisager, K; Saastamoinen, A; Tengblad, O; Thomas, J -C; Van de Walle, J

    2013-01-01

    Resonances just above the proton threshold in $^{30}$S affect the $^{29}$P(p,$\\gamma$)$^{30}$S reaction under astrophysical conditions. The (p,$\\gamma$)-reaction rate is currently determined indirectly and depends on the properties of the relevant resonances. We present here a method for finding the ratio between the proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of resonances in $^{30}$S. The widths are determined from the $\\beta$-2p and $\\beta$-p-$\\gamma$- decay of $^{31}$Ar, which is produced at ISOLDE, CERN. Experimental limits on the ratio between the proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths for astrophysical relevant levels in $^{30}$S have been found for the first time. A level at 4689.2(24)keV is identified in the $\\gamma$-spectrum, and an upper limit on the $\\Gamma_{p}/\\Gamma_{\\gamma}$ ratio of 0.26 (95% C.L.) is found. In the two-proton spectrum two levels at 5227(3)keV and 5847(4)keV are identified. These levels were previously seen to $\\gamma$-decay and upper limits on the $\\Gamma_{\\gamma}/\\Gamma_{p}$ ratio of 0....

  20. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Ryan Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique for beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been developed using trapped radioactive ions. The neutron energy spectrum was reconstructed by measuring the time of flight (TOF) of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and gamma rays and complicated detector-response functions. A proof-of-principle measurement was conducted on 137I+ by delivering ions from a ...

  1. MONSTER: a TOF Spectrometer for beta-delayed Neutron Spetroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, T; Castilla, J; Garcia, A R; Marin, J; Martinez, G; Mendoza, E; Santos, C; Tera, F; Jordan, M D; Rubio, B; Tain, J L; Bhattacharya, C; Banerjee, K; Bhattacharya, S; Roy, P; Meena, J K; Kundu, S; Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K; Rana, T K; Pandey, R; Saxena, A; Behera, B; Penttila, H; Jokinen, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Guerrero, C; Ovejero, M C; Villamarin, D; Agramunt, J; Algora, A

    2014-01-01

    Beta-delayed neutron (DN) data, including emission probabilities, P-n, and energy spectrum, play an important role in our understanding of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technologies. A MOdular Neutron time-of-flight SpectromeTER (MONSTER) is being built for the measurement of the neutron energy spectra and branching ratios. The TOF spectrometer will consist of one hundred liquid scintillator cells covering a significant solid angle. The MONSTER design has been optimized by using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. The response function of the MONSTER cell has been characterized with mono-energetic neutron beams and compared to dedicated MC simulations.

  2. Systematic trends in beta-delayed particle emitting nuclei: The case of βpα emission from 21Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Lund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have observed β+-delayed α and pα emission from the proton-rich nucleus 21Mg produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The assignments were cross-checked with a time distribution analysis. This is the third identified case of βpα emission. We discuss the systematic of beta-delayed particle emission decays, show that our observed decays fit naturally into the existing pattern, and argue that the patterns are to a large extent caused by odd–even effects.

  3. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  4. Evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidins, C S; De Saint-Simon, M; Détraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Langevin, M; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

    1981-01-01

    Investigates the time spectrum of beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 30-34/Na and their descendants using beta -neutron coincidence detection. The authors have been able to assign an upper limit of 0,4% to the probability of beta -delayed neutron emission, p/sub n/, from the /sup 30/Na daugher isotope /sup 30/Mg. In fitting the time spectra of beta -delayed neutrons from /sup 31/Na and /sup 32/Na, we find a definitive component from subsequent daughter decay as well. This provides evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg with P/sub n/ values of the order of 2% for each. (7 refs).

  5. Beta-delayed fission probabilities of transfermium nuclei, involved in the r-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, I.; Lutostansky, Yu; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2016-01-01

    For the nucleosynthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei fission becomes very important when the r-process runs in a very high neutron density environment. In part, fission is responsible for the formation of heavy nuclei due to the inclusion of fission products as new seed nuclei (fission cycling). More than that, beta-delayed fission, along with spontaneous fission, is responsible in the late stages of the r-process for the suppression of superheavy element yields. For beta-delayed fission probability calculations a model description of the beta-strength- functions is required. Extended theoretical predictions for astro-physical applications were provided long ago, and new predictions also for superheavy nuclei with uptodate nuclear input are needed. For the further extension of data to heavier transactinides the models of strength- functions should be modified, taking into account more complicated level schemes. In our present calculations the strength-function model is based on the quasi-particle approximation of Finite Fermi Systems Theory. The probabilities of beta-delayed fission and beta-delayed neutron emission are calculated for some transfermium neutron-rich nuclei, and the influence of beta-delayed fission upon superheavy element formation is discussed.

  6. Characterization of a neutron–beta counting system with beta-delayed neutron emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Agramunt, J.; Tain, J.L.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; GARCIA A. R.; Albiol, F; Algora, A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; CALVIÑO F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cortés, G.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Eronen, Tommi; Gelletly, W.; Gorelov, Dmitry; Gorlychev, V.

    2016-01-01

    A new detection system for the measurement of beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities has been characterized using fission products with well known β-delayed neutron emission properties. The setup consists of BELEN-20, a 4π neutron counter with twenty 3He proportional tubes arranged inside a large polyethylene neutron moderator, a thin Si detector for β counting and a selftriggering digital data acquisition system. The use of delayed-neutron precursors with different neutron emis...

  7. Characterization of a neutron-beta counting system with beta-delayed neutron emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Agramunt Ros, Jorge; Taín, J. L.; Gómez Hornillos, María Belén; Calviño Tavares, Francisco; Cortés Rossell, Guillem Pere; Pretel Sánchez, Carme; Riego Pérez, Albert; Tarifeño Saldivia, Ariel Esteban

    2016-01-01

    A new detection system for the measurement of beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities has been characterized using fission products with well known ß-delayed neutron emission properties. The setup consists of BELEN-20, a 4p neutron counter with twenty 3He proportional tubes arranged inside a large polyethylene neutron moderator, a thin Si detector for ß counting and a self-triggering digital data acquisition system. The use of delayed-neutron precursors with different neutron emission win...

  8. New Beta-delayed Neutron Measurements in the Light-mass Fission Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new accurate determination of beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities from nuclei in the low mass region of the light fission group has been performed. The measurements were carried out using the BELEN 4π neutron counter at the IGISOL-JYFL mass separator in combination with a Penning trap. The new results significantly improve the uncertainties of neutron emission probabilities for 91Br, 86As, 85As, and 85Ge nuclei

  9. Study of Beta-delayed Proton Emission of 36,37Ca

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Li-jie; LIN; Cheng-jian; XU; Xin-xing; JIA; Hui-ming; YANG; Lei; BAO; Peng-fei; MA; Nan-ru; ZHANG; Huan-qiao; LIU; Zu-hua; WU; Zhen-dong; ZHENG; Lei; WANG; Jian-song; YANG; Yan-yun; HU; Zheng-guo; XU; Hu-shan; WANG; Meng; JIN; Shi-lun; HAN; Jian-long; ZHANG; Ning-tao; MA; Jun-bing; MA; Peng; ZHANG; Yu-hu; ZHOU; Xiao-hong; MA; Xin-wen; XIAO; Guo-qing

    2013-01-01

    Our experiment on the decays of 37Ca(QEC=11 639(22)keV)and 36Ca(QEC=10 990(40)keV)was performed at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou(HIRFL).The radioactive ion beam(RIB)37,36Ca was produced by projectile fragmentation,then separated and purified by the Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou(RIBLL)spectrometer.By employing the silicon detector array and segmented

  10. High-resolution studies of beta-delayed proton emitters at IGISOL facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokinen, A; Aysto, J; Dendooven, P; Hankonen, S; Honkanen, A; Huikari, J; Lhersonneau, G; Lipas, PO; Penttila, H; Perajarvi, K; Oinonen, M; Nieminen, A; Siiskonen, T; Wang, JC

    1998-01-01

    Beta-decays of Al-23 and Ti-41 have been studied by applying ion guide techniques, gamma detection and a gas-Si telescope for charged-particle detection. The experimental beta-decay strength of Ti-41 was found to be quenched by a factor of q(2) = 0.64 compared to our shell model calculations below 8

  11. Beta-delayed gamma and proton spectroscopy near the Z=N line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankainen, A.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Huang, W.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kopecky, S.; Moore, I.; Nieminen, A.; Penttilae, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Wang, Y.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Eliseev, S.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Fox, S.P.; Jenkins, D. [University of York, Department of Physics, Heslington (United Kingdom); Novikov, Yu.N.; Vorobjev, G.K. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg Univ. (Russian Federation); Popov, A.V.; Seliverstov, D.M. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schatz, H. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2005-09-01

    A series of beta decay experiments on nuclei near the Z=N line has been performed using the ISOL technique at the IGISOL facility in Jyvaeskylae and at ISOLDE, CERN. The decay properties of these neutron-deficient nuclei are important in astrophysics as well as in the studies of isospin symmetry. (orig.)

  12. On evaluated nuclear data for beta-delayed gamma rays following of special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencarini, Leonardo de H.; Caldeira, Alexandre D., E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a new type of information available in ENDF is discussed. During a consistency check of the evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 performed at the Nuclear Data Subdivision of the Institute for Advanced Studies, the size of the files for some materials drew the attention of one of the authors. Almost 94 % of all available information for these special nuclear materials is used to represent the beta-delayed gamma rays following fission. This is the first time this information is included in an ENDF version. (author)

  13. On evaluated nuclear data for beta-delayed gamma rays following of special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a new type of information available in ENDF is discussed. During a consistency check of the evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 performed at the Nuclear Data Subdivision of the Institute for Advanced Studies, the size of the files for some materials drew the attention of one of the authors. Almost 94 % of all available information for these special nuclear materials is used to represent the beta-delayed gamma rays following fission. This is the first time this information is included in an ENDF version. (author)

  14. First measurement of several $\\beta$-delayed neutron emitting isotopes beyond N=126

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Folch, R; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ameil, F; Arcones, A; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Borzov, I N; Bowry, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Cortés, G; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Estrade, A; Evdokimov, A; Faestermann, T; Farinon, F; Galaviz, D; García, A R; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gernhäuser, R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Guerrero, C; Heil, M; Hinke, C; Knöbel, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Y; Maier, L; Marganiec, J; Marketin, T; Marta, M; Martínez, T; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Montes, F; Mukha, I; Napoli, D R; Nociforo, C; Paradela, C; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Prochazka, A; Rice, S; Riego, A; Rubio, B; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, Ch; Smith, K; Sokol, E; Steiger, K; Sun, B; Taín, J L; Takechi, M; Testov, D; Weick, H; Wilson, E; Winfield, J S; Wood, R; Woods, P; Yeremin, A

    2015-01-01

    The $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission probabilities of neutron rich Hg and Tl nuclei have been measured together with $\\beta$-decay half-lives for 20 isotopes of Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi in the mass region N$\\gtrsim$126. These are the heaviest species where neutron emission has been observed so far. These measurements provide key information to evaluate the performance of nuclear microscopic and phenomenological models in reproducing the high-energy part of the $\\beta$-decay strength distribution. In doing so, it provides important constraints to global theoretical models currently used in $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  15. Summary Report of Consultants' Meeting on Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of a Consultants' Meeting assembled to assess the viability of a new IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Beta-delayed neutron emission evaluation. The current status of the field was reviewed, cases in which new measurements are needed were identified and the current theoretical models were examined. The best known cases were selected as standards and were assessed and preliminary best values of the emission probabilities were obtained. The need of such a CRP was strongly agreed. Both the technical discussions and the expected outcome of such a project are described, along with detailed recommendations for its implementation. (author)

  16. beta-delayed fission from sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ac

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Wei Fan; Xu Yan Bing; Xong Bing; Pan Qiang Yan; He Jian Jun; Xiao Yong Hou; Li Yi

    2002-01-01

    ThO sub 2 is irradiated with 60 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O beams. sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ra is produced via the multi-nucleon transfer and dissipative fragmentation reactions of the target. sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ra is radio-chemical separated from ThO sub 2 and the other reaction products. The thin Ra sources are prepared. The mica fission track detectors are exposed to the Ra sources. gamma-rays of Ra decay in the sources are measured by a HPGe detector. The mica foil is etched in HF solution. The etched mica foil is scanned with an optical microscope. The fission tracks that should come from beta-delayed fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ac are observed. The beta-delayed fission probability of sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ac is determined to be (1.19 +- 0.85) x 10 sup - sup 8

  17. Determination of uranium in urine samples of fuel element fabrication workers by beta-delayed neutron counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelmann, H.; Lerch, M.; Kratz, K.-L.; Rudolph, W.

    1984-06-01

    Within the health physics examination of fuel element fabrication workers, the control of uranium incorporation is of importance. This is commonly performed by the determination of the alpha activity concentration of uranium excreted in the urine. However, since the chemical separation procedure and the preparation of alpha-counting samples are complicated and time-consuming, this method may imply restrictions on the routine control of large numbers of persons. Therefore, we have investigated the applicability of measuring the beta-delayed neutrons from thermal neutron induced fission of the 235U in the urine samples. The uranium was separated by coprecipitation with Fe(OH) 3 from the urine samples and irradiated in a rabbit system of the Mainz TRIGA reactor. The neutrons were counted with a 3He long counter. The detection limit of 0.3 to 0.9 pCi 1 -1 is comparable to that of alpha spectrometry, but the time required for one sample, from preparation to data evaluation is less than 25 min.

  18. Proton pump activity of mitochondria-rich cells: The interpretation of external proton-concentration gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Sørensen, Jens N.; Larsen, Erik Hviid;

    1997-01-01

    Active Cl*O- transport, reheogenic H*O+ pump, unstirred layer, mathematics of diffusion, proton concentration-profiles outside epithelial cells......Active Cl*O- transport, reheogenic H*O+ pump, unstirred layer, mathematics of diffusion, proton concentration-profiles outside epithelial cells...

  19. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  20. Modeling the Production of Beta-Delayed Gamma Rays for the Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J M; Pruet, J A; Brown, D A; Descalle, M; Hedstrom, G W; Prussin, S G

    2005-02-14

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop one or more models for the production of {beta}-delayed {gamma} rays following neutron-induced fission of a special nuclear material (SNM) and to define a standardized formatting scheme which will allow them to be incorporated into some of the modern, general-purpose Monte Carlo transport codes currently being used to simulate inspection techniques proposed for detecting fissionable material hidden in sea-going cargo containers. In this report, we will describe a Monte Carlo model for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray emission following the fission of SNM that can accommodate arbitrary time-dependent fission rates and photon collection histories. The model involves direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and spectral distributions representing photon emission from each fission product and for each decay mode. While computationally intensive, it will be shown that this model can provide reasonably detailed estimates of the spectra that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer and may prove quite useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries and identifying gaps in the libraries. The accuracy of the model will be illustrated by comparing calculated and experimental spectra from the decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general-purpose transport calculations, where a detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may not be necessary, it will be shown that a simple parameterization of the {gamma}-ray source function can be defined which provides high-quality average spectral distributions that should suffice for calculations describing photons being transported through thick attenuating media. Finally, a proposal for ENDF-compatible formats that describe each of the models and

  1. Empirical description of beta-delayed fission partial half-lives

    CERN Document Server

    Ghys, L; Antalic, S; Huyse, M; Van Duppen, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The process of beta-delayed fission (bDF) provides a versatile tool to study low-energy fission in nuclei far away from the beta-stability line, especially for nuclei which do not fission spontaneously. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate systematic trends in bDF partial half-lives. Method: A semi-phenomenological framework was developed to systematically account for the behavior of bDF partial half-lives. Results: The bDF partial half-life appears to exponentially depend on the difference between the Q value for beta decay of the parent nucleus and the fission-barrier energy of the daughter (after beta decay) product. Such dependence was found to arise naturally from some simple theoretical considerations. Conclusions: This systematic trend was confirmed for experimental bDF partial half-lives spanning over 7 orders of magnitudes when using fission barriers calculated from either the Thomas-Fermi or the liquid-drop fission model. The same dependence was also observed, although less p...

  2. Beta-delayed particle emission from neutron-deficient tellurium, iodine, xenon, cesium and barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 58Ni, 63Cu(58Ni, xp yn) reactions and on-line mass separation the β-delayed proton and α-particle emission from neutron-deficient isotopes with 52113Xe, (protons), 114Cs (protons and α-particles) and 117Ba (protons). Coincidences between positons and β-delayed protons were recorded for 113Xe and 114Cs, yielding Qsub(EC)-Ssub(p) values of 7.92(15) and 8.73(15) MeV, respectively. The results are discussed within the statistical model. (orig.)

  3. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  4. Protein determination in seeds by proton activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J. R.; Dinator, M. I.; Cerda, P.

    1989-04-01

    A proton beam of 6.6 MeV has been used to produce 11C and 13N in Araucaria Araucana seeds. Their positron decay allows determination of the N/C ratio. In seeds the nitrogen content is associated to proteins while carbon is spread in the organic material. Samples were irradiated for about 10 min with a beam intensity of 5 nA on areas of 1 mm 2. Slices of the seed were radially explored, showing a larger concentration of protein in the center.

  5. Protein determination in seeds by proton activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, J.R.; Dinator, M.I. (Chile Univ., Santiago (Chile). Lab. de Fisica); Cerda, P. (Bio-Bio Univ., Chillan (Chile))

    1989-04-01

    A proton beam of 6.6 MeV has been used to produce /sup 11/C and /sup 13/N in Araucaria Araucana seeds. Their positron decay allows determination of the N/C ratio. In seeds the nitrogen content is associated to proteins while carbon is spread in the organic material. Samples were irradiated for about 10 min with a beam intensity of 5 nA on areas of 1 mm/sup 2/. Slices of the seed were radially explored, showing a larger concentration of protein in the center. (orig.).

  6. $\\beta$-delayed neutron spectroscopy of $^{130-132}$ Cd isotopes with the ISOLDE decay station and the VANDLE array

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use the new ISOLDE decay station and the neutron detector VANDLE to measure the $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission of N=82-84 $^{130-132}$Cd isotopes. The large delayed neutron emission probability observed in a previous ISOLDE measurement is indicative of the Gamow-Teller transitions due to the decay of deep core neutrons. Core Gamow-Teller decay has been experimentally proven in the $^{78}$Ni region for the N>50 nuclei using the VANDLE array. The spectroscopic measurement of delayed neutron emission along the cadmium isotopic chain will allow us to track the evolution of the single particle states and the shell gap.

  7. First-forbidden $\\mathbf{\\beta}$-decay rates, energy rates of $\\beta$-delayed neutrons and probability of $\\beta$-delayed neutron emissions for neutron-rich nickel isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Iftikhar, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    First-forbidden (FF) transitions can play an important role in decreasing the calculated half-lives specially in environments where allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are unfavored. Of special mention is the case of neutron-rich nuclei where, due to phase-space amplification, FF transitions are much favored. We calculate the allowed GT transitions in various pn-QRPA models for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel. Here we also study the effect of deformation on the calculated GT strengths. The FF transitions for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel are calculated assuming the nuclei to be spherical. Later we take into account deformation of nuclei and calculate GT + unique FF transitions, stellar $\\beta$-decay rates, energy rate of $\\beta$-delayed neutrons and probability of $\\beta$-delayed neutron emissions. The calculated half-lives are in excellent agreement with measured ones and might contribute in speeding-up of the $r$-matter flow.

  8. Proton catalysis with active carbons and partially pyrolyzed carbonaceous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. V. Strelko; S. S. Stavitskaya; Yu. I. Gorlov

    2014-01-01

    The development of environmentally friendly solid acid catalysts is a priority task. Highly oxidized activated carbon and their ion-substituted (saline) forms are effective proton transfer catalysts in esterification, hydrolysis, and dehydration, and thus are promising candidates as solid acid cata-lysts. Computations by the ab initio method indicated the cause for the enchanced acidity of the carboxylic groups attached to the surface of highly oxidized carbon. The synthesis of phosphorilated carbon was considered, and the proton transfer reactions catalyzed by them in recent studies were analyzed. The development of an amorphous carbon acid catalyst comprising polycyclic carbonaceous (graphene) sheets with-SO3H,-COOH and phenolic type OH-groups was carried out. These new catalysts were synthesized by partial pyrolysis and subsequent sulfonation of carbohydrates, polymers, and other organic compounds. Their high catalytic activities in proton transfere reactions including the processing of bio-based raw materials was demonsrated.

  9. A voltage-activated proton current in human cardiac fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A voltage-activated proton current in human cardiac fibroblasts, measured using the whole-cell recording configuration of the patch-clamp technique, is reported. Increasing the pH of the bathing solution shifted the current activation threshold to more negative potentials and increased both the current amplitude and its rate of activation. Changing the pH gradient by one unit caused a 51 mV shift in the reversal potential of the current, demonstrating a high selectivity for protons of the channel carrying the current. Extracellularly applied Zn2+ reversibly inhibited the current. Activation of the current contributes to the resting membrane conductance under conditions of intracellular acidosis. It is proposed that this current in cardiac fibroblasts is involved in the regulation of the intracellular pH and the membrane potential under physiological conditions as well as in response to pathological conditions such as ischemia

  10. Study of the $\\beta$-delayed Particle Emission of $^{17}$Ne

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We intend to investigate the charged particle decay modes from the excited states of $^{17}$F populated in the $\\beta^+$- decay of $^{17}$Ne. In particular, we propose to study the proton decay branches to $^{16}$O states which are unstable to $\\alpha$- decay. We plan to use the recently developed ISOLDE Si-ball detector array in order to efficiently detect the charged particles in a wide solid angle. We ask for a total of 12 shifts, including 9 shifts for $^{17}$Ne and 3 shifts for stable beam and calibrations. We request the use of a Mg oxide target coupled to a plasma ion source with cooled transfer line or, if possible, to the new MINIMONOECRIS. We would like to make use of the ISOLDE VME DAQ and CERN data storage system.

  11. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm‑3) and beef (~1.0 g cm‑3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10–50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1–5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20–40 min of scan time using various delay times (30–150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  12. Monte Carlo Models for the Production of beta-delayed Gamma Rays Following Fission of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Descalle, M; Hall, J

    2004-02-03

    A Monte Carlo method for the estimation of {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectra following fission is described that can accommodate an arbitrary time-dependent fission rate and photon collection history. The method invokes direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the fissioning system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and the spectral distributions for photon emission for each decay mode. Though computationally intensive, the method can provide a detailed estimate of the spectrum that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer, and can prove useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries, for identifying gaps in these libraries, etc. The method is illustrated by a first comparison of calculated and experimental spectra from decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general purpose transport calculations, where detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may be unnecessary, it is shown that an accurate and simple parameterization of a {gamma}-ray source function can be obtained. These parametrizations should provide high-quality average spectral distributions that should prove useful in calculations describing photons escaping from thick attenuating media.

  13. Total Absorption Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of 87Br, 88Br and 94Rb Beta-Delayed Neutron Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Valencia, E; Algora, A; Agramunt, J; Rubio, B; Rice, S; Gelletly, W; Regan, P; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A; Fallot, M; Porta, A; Rissanen, J; Eronen, T; Aysto, J; Batist, L; Bowry, M; Bui, V M; Caballero-Folch, R; Cano-Ott, D; Elomaa, V -V; Estevez, E; Farrelly, G F; Garcia, A R; Gomez-Hornillos, B; Gorlychev, V; Hakala, J; Jordan, M D; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Kondev, F G; Martinez, T; Mendoza, E; Moore, I; Penttila, H; Podolyak, Zs; Reponen, M; Sonnenschein, V; Sonzogni, A A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the decay of 87Br, 88Br and 94Rb using total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy. These important fission products are beta-delayed neutron emitters. Our data show considerable gamma-intensity, so far unobserved in high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, from states at high excitation energy. We also find significant differences with the beta intensity that can be deduced from existing measurements of the beta spectrum. We evaluate the impact of the present data on reactor decay heat using summation calculations. Although the effect is relatively small it helps to reduce the discrepancy between calculations and integral measurements of the photon component for 235U fission at cooling times in the range 1 to 100 s. We also use summation calculations to evaluate the impact of present data on reactor antineutrino spectra. We find a significant effect at antineutrino energies in the range of 5 to 9 MeV. In addition, we observe an unexpected strong probability for gamma emission from neutron unbound s...

  14. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  15. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  16. Measurement and simulation of proton induced activation of LaBr3 : Ce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, E. J.; Beijers, H.; Brandenburg, S.; Bos, A. J. J.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; Drozdowski, W.; Kraft, S.; Maddox, E.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the suitability of LaBr3:Ce scintillators for space mission applications, proton induced activation of LaBr3 has been investigated. The crystals were irradiated using proton beams at several different energies to mimic the spectrum of a solar flare. We have measured the activation both int

  17. Proton energy determination using activated yttrium foils and ionization chambers for activity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A. [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20520 Turku (Finland); Unidad PET/CT-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Edificio de Investigacion P.B, Cd. Universitaria, Circ. Interior, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: avilarod@uwalumni.com; Rajander, J.; Lill, J.-O. [Turku PET Centre, Abo Akademi University, Porthansg 3, 20500 Turku (Finland); Gagnon, K. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave., Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Schlesinger, J. [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20520 Turku (Finland); Wilson, J.S.; McQuarrie, S.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave., Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Solin, O. [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20520 Turku (Finland)

    2009-05-15

    Excitation functions of the {sup 89}Y(p, xn) nuclear reactions were measured up to 18 MeV by the conventional activation method using the stacked-foil technique, and the irradiation of single foils. Activity assays of the irradiated foils were performed via ionization chamber and gamma spectroscopy methods. Activity ratios of the activation products were measured in two different facilities and evaluated for use as a practical and simple method for proton energy determinations. Cross section values measured in this work were compared with published data and with theoretical values as determined by the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE II. In general, there was a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values of the cross section data. Activity ratios of the isomeric and ground state of {sup 89}Zr measured via ionization chamber were found to be useful for proton energy determinations in the energy range from 7 to 15 MeV. Proton energies above 13 MeV were accurately determined using the {sup 89g}Zr/{sup 88}Zr and {sup 89g}Zr/{sup 88}Y activity ratios measured via gamma spectroscopy.

  18. Ionic Polymer Microactuator Activated by Photoresponsive Organic Proton Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled M. Al-Aribe; George K. Knopf; Amarjeet S. Bassi

    2015-01-01

    An ionic polymer microactuator driven by an organic photoelectric proton pump transducer is described in this paper. The light responsive transducer is fabricated by using molecular self-assembly to immobilize oriented bacteriorhodopsin purple membrane (PM) patches on a bio-functionalized porous anodic alumina (PAA) substrate. When exposed to visible light, the PM proton pumps produce a unidirectional flow of ions through the structure’s nano-pores and alter the pH of the working solution in ...

  19. Screening Approach to the Activation of Soil and Contamination of Groundwater at Linear Proton Accelerator Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Otto, Thomas

    The activation of soil and the contamination of groundwater at proton accelerator sites with the radionuclides 3H and 22Na are estimated with a Monte-Carlo calculation and a conservative soil- and ground water model. The obtained radionuclide concentrations show that the underground environment of future accelerators must be adequately protected against a migration of activation products. This study is of particular importance for the proton driver accelerator in the planned EURISOL facility.

  20. Receptor kinase-mediated control of primary active proton pumping at the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, AT; Kristensen, A; Cuin, TA;

    2014-01-01

    Acidification of the cell wall space outside the plasma membrane is required for plant growth and is the result of proton extrusion by the plasma membrane-localized H+ -ATPases. Here we show that the major plasma membrane proton pumps in Arabidopsis, AHA1 and AHA2, interact directly in vitro...... heterologous expression system, the introduction of a negative charge at this position caused pump activation. Application of PSY1 to plant seedlings induced rapid in planta phosphorylation at Thr-881, concomitant with an instantaneous increase in proton efflux from roots. The direct interaction between AHA2...

  1. A Palladium-Binding Deltarhodopsin for Light-Activated Conversion of Protonic to Electronic Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Hemmatian, Zahra; Josberger, Erik E; Rolandi, Marco; Baneyx, François

    2016-08-01

    Fusion of a palladium-binding peptide to an archaeal rhodopsin promotes intimate integration of the lipid-embedded membrane protein with a palladium hydride protonic contact. Devices fabricated with the palladium-binding deltarhodopsin enable light-activated conversion of protonic currents to electronic currents with on/off responses complete in seconds and a nearly tenfold increase in electrical signal relative to those made with the wild-type protein. PMID:27185384

  2. $\\beta$-decay and $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Folch, R; Cortès, G; Taín, J L; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ameil, F; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Bowry, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Estrade, A; Evdokimov, A; Faestermann, T; Farinon, F; Galaviz, D; García-Ríos, A; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gernhäuser, R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Guerrero, C; Heil, M; Hinke, C; Knöbel, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Y; Maier, L; Marganiec, J; Marta, M; Martínez, T; Montes, F; Mukha, I; Napoli, D R; Nociforo, C; Paradela, C; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Prochazka, A; Rice, S; Riego, A; Rubio, B; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, C; Smith, K; Sokol, E; Steiger, K; Sun, B; Takechi, M; Testov, D; Weick, H; Wilson, E; Winfield, J S; Wood, R; Woods, P J; Yeremin, A

    2014-01-01

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Ti, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them (Hg208-211, Tl211-215, Pb214-218) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, P-n.

  3. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs

  4. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  5. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G., E-mail: s-sligar@illinois.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •The disruption of PREG/PROG hydroxylation activity by T306A showed the participation of Cpd I. •T306A supports the involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion during lyase activity. •The presence of cytochrome b{sub 5} augments C–C lyase activity. •Δ5-Steroids are preferred substrates for CYP17 catalysis. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 CYP17A1 catalyzes a series of reactions that lie at the intersection of corticoid and androgen biosynthesis and thus occupies an essential role in steroid hormone metabolism. This multifunctional enzyme catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of Δ4- and Δ5-steroids progesterone and pregnenolone to form the corresponding 17α-hydroxy products through its hydroxylase activity, and a subsequent 17,20-carbon–carbon scission of pregnene-side chain produce the androgens androstenedione (AD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). While the former hydroxylation reaction is believed to proceed through a conventional “Compound I” rebound mechanism, it has been suggested that the latter carbon cleavage is initiated by an iron-peroxy intermediate. We report on the role of Thr306 in CYP17 catalysis. Thr306 is a member of the conserved acid/alcohol pair thought to be essential for the efficient delivery of protons required for hydroperoxoanion heterolysis and formation of Compound I in the cytochromes P450. Wild type and T306A CYP17A1 self-assembled in Nanodiscs were used to quantitate turnover and coupling efficiencies of CYP17’s physiological Δ4- and Δ5-substrates. We observed that T306A co-incorporated in Nanodiscs with its redox partner cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, coupled NADPH only by 0.9% and 0.7% compared to the wild type (97% and 22%) during the conversion of pregnenolone and progesterone, respectively, to the corresponding 17-OH products. Despite increased oxidation of pyridine nucleotide, hydroxylase activity was drastically diminished in the T306A mutant, suggesting a high degree of uncoupling in which reducing

  6. Ionic Polymer Microactuator Activated by Photoresponsive Organic Proton Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Al-Aribe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An ionic polymer microactuator driven by an organic photoelectric proton pump transducer is described in this paper. The light responsive transducer is fabricated by using molecular self-assembly to immobilize oriented bacteriorhodopsin purple membrane (PM patches on a bio-functionalized porous anodic alumina (PAA substrate. When exposed to visible light, the PM proton pumps produce a unidirectional flow of ions through the structure’s nano-pores and alter the pH of the working solution in a microfluidic device. The change in pH is sufficient to generate an osmotic pressure difference across a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylic acid (HEMA-AA actuator shell and induce volume expansion or contraction. Experiments show that the transducer can generate an ionic gradient of 2.5 μM and ionic potential of 25 mV, producing a pH increase of 0.42 in the working solution. The ΔpH is sufficient to increase the volume of the HEMA-AA microactuator by 80%. The volumetric transformation of the hydrogel can be used as a valve to close a fluid transport micro-channel or apply minute force to a mechanically flexible microcantilever beam.

  7. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  8. Mechanism of pH-dependent activation of the sodium-proton antiporter NhaA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yandong; Chen, Wei; Dotson, David L.; Beckstein, Oliver; Shen, Jana

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli NhaA is a prototype sodium-proton antiporter, which has been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography, biochemical and biophysical experiments. However, the identities of proton carriers and details of pH-regulated mechanism remain controversial. Here we report constant pH molecular dynamics data, which reveal that NhaA activation involves a net charge switch of a pH sensor at the entrance of the cytoplasmic funnel and opening of a hydrophobic gate at the end of the funnel. The latter is triggered by charging of Asp164, the first proton carrier. The second proton carrier Lys300 forms a salt bridge with Asp163 in the inactive state, and releases a proton when a sodium ion binds Asp163. These data reconcile current models and illustrate the power of state-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations in providing atomic details of proton-coupled transport across membrane which is challenging to elucidate by experimental techniques.

  9. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of 78Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R.; Miller, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Fijałkowska, A.; Gross, C. J.; Howard, M. E.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Padgett, S. W.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, B. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.; Wang, E. H.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    The β -delayed neutron emission of Ga,8483 isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to 78Ni core-excited states in Ge,8483 favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton f p g9 /2 and neutron extended f p g9 /2+d5 /2 valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β -decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β -decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β -delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  10. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of ^{78}Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurga, M; Paulauskas, S V; Grzywacz, R; Miller, D; Bardayan, D W; Batchelder, J C; Brewer, N T; Cizewski, J A; Fijałkowska, A; Gross, C J; Howard, M E; Ilyushkin, S V; Manning, B; Matoš, M; Mendez, A J; Miernik, K; Padgett, S W; Peters, W A; Rasco, B C; Ratkiewicz, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Stracener, D W; Wang, E H; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2016-08-26

    The β-delayed neutron emission of ^{83,84}Ga isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to ^{78}Ni core-excited states in ^{83,84}Ge favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton fpg_{9/2} and neutron extended fpg_{9/2}+d_{5/2} valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β-decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β-decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β-delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. PMID:27610848

  11. Proton induced activation of LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of an assessment of lanthanum halide scintillators, such as LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce on their suitability for space based gamma-ray spectroscopy, proton induced activation of the materials has been studied. One inch scintillators were subjected to proton irradiations in the range of 60-184 MeV, where after the activation was measured. The activation was analyzed by identifying the decaying isotopes by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy and lifetime measurements using both a germanium detector and the activated scintillator itself. It was found that the dominant source of activation in the scintillators originates from the lighter elements in the materials: bromide and chloride, respectively. The activation of LaBr3:Ce manifest itself through gamma-decay, which partly leaves the volume. Activation of LaCl3:Ce originates mainly from beta decay, which is confined to the volume itself

  12. Cardiolipin is essential for higher proton translocation activity of reconstituted Fo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Fo membrane domain of FoF1-ATPase complex had been purifiedfrom porcine heart mitochondria. SDS-PAGE with silver staining indicated that the purity of Fo was about 85% and the sample contained no subunits of F1-ATPase. The purified Fo was reconstituted into liposomes with different phospholipid composition, and the effect of CL (cardiolipin), PA (phosphatidic acid), PI (phosphatidylinositol) and PS (phosphatidylserine) on the H+ translocation activity of Fo was investigated. The results demonstrated that CL, PA and PI could promote the proton translocation of Fo with the order of CL>PA>>PI, while PS inhibited it. Meanwhile ADM (adriamycin) severely impaired the proton translocation activity of Fo vesicles containing CL, which suggested that CL's stimulation of the activity of reconstituted Fo might correlate with its non-bilayer propensity. After Fo was incorporated into the liposomes containing PE (phosphatidylethanolamine), DOPE (dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) as well as DEPE (dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine), it was found that the proton translocation activity of Fo vesicles increased with the increasing content of PE or DOPE, which has high propensity of forming non-bilayer structure, but was independent of DEPE. The dynamic quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan by HB (hypocrellin B) as well as fluorescent spectrum of acrylodan labeling Fo at cysteine indicated that CL could induce Fo to a suitable conformation resulting in higher proton translocation activity.

  13. Measurement and simulation of proton induced activation of LaBr3:Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the suitability of LaBr3:Ce scintillators for space mission applications, proton induced activation of LaBr3 has been investigated. The crystals were irradiated using proton beams at several different energies to mimic the spectrum of a solar flare. We have measured the activation both internally and externally by measuring the count rate in the scintillator itself and with a germanium detector. The setup allowed to identify the dominant radioactive isotopes before and after irradiation. At lower energies, we have seen that the dominant source of activation originates from proton induced activation of bromine. At energies above 2MeV the activation is several orders of magnitude less and the spectrum shows no distinct features. In addition, we discuss results of a simulation of the activation using Monte Carlo methods in combination with state-of-the-art calculations of nuclear cross-sections. Results from the Monte Carlo simulations and the measurements agree within a factor of 2

  14. Proton pump activity is required for active uptake of chloride in isolated amphibian skin exposed to freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Willumsen, Niels J.; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2002-01-01

    Net proton secretion and unidirectional chloride fluxes were measured in isolated skin of toads (Bufo bufo) and frogs (Rana esculenta) mounted in an Ussing chamber and exposed to a Ringer's solution on the serosal side and a freshwater-like solution (1-3 mM Cl-) on the external side. Active proto...

  15. Leukocyte activity is altered in a ground based murine model of microgravity and proton radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenine K Sanzari

    Full Text Available Immune system adaptation during spaceflight is a concern in space medicine. Decreased circulating leukocytes observed during and after space flight infer suppressed immune responses and susceptibility to infection. The microgravity aspect of the space environment has been simulated on Earth to study adverse biological effects in astronauts. In this report, the hindlimb unloading (HU model was employed to investigate the combined effects of solar particle event-like proton radiation and simulated microgravity on immune cell parameters including lymphocyte subtype populations and activity. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell critical for adaptive immune responses and T lymphocytes are regulators of cell-mediated immunity, controlling the entire immune response. Mice were suspended prior to and after proton radiation exposure (2 Gy dose and total leukocyte numbers and splenic lymphocyte functionality were evaluated on days 4 or 21 after combined HU and radiation exposure. Total white blood cell (WBC, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts are reduced by approximately 65%, 70%, 55%, and 70%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control group at 4 days after combined exposure. Splenic lymphocyte subpopulations are altered at both time points investigated. At 21 days post-exposure to combined HU and proton radiation, T cell activation and proliferation were assessed in isolated lymphocytes. Cell surface expression of the Early Activation Marker, CD69, is decreased by 30% in the combined treatment group, compared to the non-treated control group and cell proliferation was suppressed by approximately 50%, compared to the non-treated control group. These findings reveal that the combined stressors (HU and proton radiation exposure result in decreased leukocyte numbers and function, which could contribute to immune system dysfunction in crew members. This investigation is one of the first to report on combined proton radiation and

  16. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of $^{197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192}$Hg, $^{196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum)}$Au, $^{191(cum)}$Pt and $^{192}$Ir were measured up to 65 MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code.

  17. Trace analysis measurements in high-purity aluminium by means of radiochemical neutron and proton activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study consisted in the development of efficient radiochemical composite processes and activation methods for the multi-element determination of traces within the lower ng range in high-purity aluminium. More than 50 elements were determined with the help of activation with reactor neutrons; the selective separation of matrix activity (adsorption with hydrated antimony pentoxide) led to a noticeable improvement of detectability, as compared with instrumental neutron activation analysis. Further improvements were achieved with the help of radiochemical group separations in ion exchangers or with the help of the selective separation of the pure beta-emitting elements. Over 20 elements up to high atomic numbers were determined by means of activating 13 MeV protons and 23 Me protons. In this connection, improvements of the detection limit by as a factor of 10 were achieved with radiochemical separation techniques, as compared with pure instrumental proton activation analysis. (RB)

  18. High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Active Site of Chymotrypsin. I. The Hydrogen Bonded Protons of the “Charge Relay” System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, G.; Shulman, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to observe protons at the active site of chymotrypsin Aδ and at the same region of chymotrypsinogen A. A single resonance with the intensity of one proton is located in the low field region of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. Th

  19. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  20. Activation of lactoperoxidase by heme-linked protonation and heme-independent iodide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Akira; Tominaga, Aya; Inoue, Tatsuo; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO), a mammalian secretory heme peroxidase, catalyzes the oxidation of thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide to produce hypothiocyanate, an antibacterial agent. Although LPO is known to be activated at acidic pH and in the presence of iodide, the structural basis of the activation is not well understood. We have examined the effects of pH and iodide concentration on the catalytic activity and the structure of LPO. Electrochemical and colorimetric assays have shown that the catalytic activity is maximized at pH 4.5. The heme Soret absorption band exhibits a small red-shift at pH 5.0 upon acidification, which is ascribable to a structural transition from a neutral to an acidic form. Resonance Raman spectra suggest that the heme porphyrin core is slightly contracted and the Fe-His bond is strengthened in the acidic form compared to the neutral form. The structural change of LPO upon activation at acidic pH is similar to that observed for myeloperoxidase, another mammalian heme peroxidase, upon activation at neutral pH. Binding of iodide enhances the catalytic activity of LPO without affecting either the optimum pH of activity or the heme structure, implying that the iodide binding occurs at a protein site away from the heme-linked protonation site.

  1. Dependence of regular background noise of VLF radiation and thunder-storm activity on solar wind proton density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlation of the intensity of slowly changing regular background noise within 9.7 kHz frequency in Yakutsk (L = 3) and of the solar wind density protons was determined. This result explains the reverse dependence of the intensity of the regular background noise on the solar activity, 27-day frequency, increase before and following geomagnetic storms, absence of relation with Kp index of geomagnetic activity. Conclusion is made that growth of density of the solar wind protons results in increase of the regular background noise and thunderstorm activity

  2. Electrocatalysts and their Supporting Materials for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Activity and Durability Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna

    This thesis describes investigations conducted exploring the activity, stability and durability of supported nano-particulate, bulk and thin film electrocatalysts used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The effects of different factors and conditions on the reactions involved...... instruments: TEM (FEI Tecnai T20 G2), EDS, AFM, XRD (PANalytical Multipurpose Diffractometer) and FTIR-IR. Chapter 3 describes the results of synthesis and testing of the Pt nanoparticulate catalyst supported by PBI wrapped Graphene for oxygen reduction reaction in PEMFCs. The physiochemical material’s...... presented. Electrochemical characterisation showed a gradual improvement of activity for carbon monoxide and methanol electro-oxidation when higher Si contents were employed in the Pt-Si alloy. Chapter 5 describes the preparation, material characterisation and initial electrochemical measurements...

  3. Production study of high specific activity NCA Re-186g by proton and deuteron cyclotron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very high specific activity (AS) 186gRe could be produced by either proton or deuteron cyclotron irradiation on highly enriched 186W target in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, leading to a AS very close to the theoretical carrier free (CF) value of 6.88 GBq μg-1. Thick Target Yields (TTYs), obtained irradiating both thick metal W targets of natural isotopic composition and highly enriched powdered 186W targets, were measured at different particles energies taking into account high accuracy and precision. The evaluation of radionuclidic purities of 186gRe obtained activating highly enriched 186W by both p and d were also carried out and accurately compared. The thin-target excitation functions for all Re (A = 181, 182, 183, 184, 186 and their metastable levels), and W and Ta coproduced radionuclides will be presented elsewhere in deep details. (author)

  4. Proton nuclear activation in stable tracer technique for ruthenium metabolism studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, M. C.; de Bartolo, D.; Gambarini, G.; Giussani, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Pirola, L.; Hansen, Ch.; Roth, P.; Werner, E.

    1994-12-01

    A methodology is presented, based on proton nuclear activation (PNA), for the contemporary determination of two stable isotopes of ruthenium in biological samples. This technique can be successfully applied in studying the biokinetics of oligoelements, avoiding radiation hazards. On the basis of the possible proton-induced nuclear reactions and the decay characteristics of radioactive products, (p, n) reactions on 99Ru and 101Ru resulted to be the most convenient. The minimum detectable quantities resulted to be 15 and 3 ng/ml of plasma respectively. Ru fractional intestinal absorption in an experimental animal was determined, as a feasibility test for applications to humans. Following double tracer technique, one male rabbit was orally given 1 mg of 99Ru and was injected 78 μg of 101Ru. Eleven blood samples were drawn within 300 min after administration. Concentrations in plasma samples of intravenously and orally given Ru tracers are reported, as a function of time after administration. Fractional intestinal absorption was determined from concentrations of both isotopes, using the convolution integral technique. A Ru intestinal absorption of (5.5 ± 0.8)% within 300 min from the oral administration was obtained. The results show the effectiveness of this methodology and its applicability for future investigations in humans.

  5. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Aly, Reham; Aly, Shereen; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Lotfy, Ahmad; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Ali, Ahmed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Bagaturia, Iuri; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sudhakar, Katta; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fantinel, Sergio; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Dellacasa, Giulio; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Myagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Wang, Wei Yang; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Du Pree, Tristan; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Ferro, Cristina; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Thomas, Laurent; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Yin, Hang; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mareskas-palcek, Darren; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Mcginn, Christopher; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Demortier, Luc; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Christian, Allison; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Gomber, Bhawna; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region ($ |{\\eta^{\\text{jet}}} |$ < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 $\\le p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\text{jet} \\lt$ 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\text{jet}$ in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta ($p_{\\mathrm{T}}$) of charged particles, with $|{\\eta}| \\lt 2$ and $p_{\\mathrm{T}} \\gt 0.5$ GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. The measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constrain...

  6. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 2.76 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|ηjet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pTjet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics

  7. Collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry induces intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    -specific information about the incorporation of deuterium into peptides and proteins in solution. Using a unique set of peptides with their carboxyl-terminal half labeled with deuterium we have shown unambiguously that hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling is such a dominating factor during low energy collisional activation......Considerable controversy exists in the literature as to the occurrence of intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens upon collisional activation of protonated peptides and proteins. This phenomenon has important implications for the application of CID as an experimental tool to obtain site...... of doubly protonated peptides that the original regioselective deuterium pattern of these peptides is completely erased (Jørgensen, T. J. D., Gårdsvoll, H., Ploug, M., and Roepstorff, P. (2005) Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation. J. Am. Chem. Soc...

  8. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, S; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80 MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of ${}^{104m,104g,105}$${}^{g,106m,110m}$Ag, ${}^{100,101}$Pd, ${}^{99m,99g,100,}$${}^{101m}$${}^{,101g,102m,102g,105}$Rh and ${}^{103,}$${}^{97}$Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed.

  9. Activation of BGO crystals with 1.5 GeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical bismuth germanate (BGO) detector (7.5 cm diameter x 7.5 cm long) and a cylindrical bare crystal of BGO (2.5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm long) were exposed to a fluence of 1.1x108 protons cm-2 at 1.5 GeV energy, roughly equivalent to that expected on an interplanetary journey to Mars. No degradation in the energy resolution or counting efficiency of the BGO detector was observed, although the background continuum increased significantly. Events emanating from the bare crystal were counted externally with a high-resolution germanium detector. The activation lines identified were compared to a spectrum from an externally counted BGO detector taken on a high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica. (orig.)

  10. Proton nuclear Overhauser effect study of the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugad, L B; Goff, H M

    1992-07-13

    Proton nuclear Overhauser effect and paramagnetic relaxation measurements have been used to define more extensively the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, CMP (previously known as Coprinus cinereus peroxidase), as the ferric low-spin cyanide ligated complex. The results are compared with other well-characterized peroxidase enzymes. The NMR spectrum of CMPCN shows changes in the paramagnetically shifted resonances as a function of time, suggesting a significant heme disorder for CMP. The presence of proximal and distal histidine amino acid residues are common to the heme environments of both CMPCN and HRPCN. However, the upfield distal arginine signals of HRPCN are not evident in the 1H-NMR spectra of CMPCN.

  11. Proton activation studies of changes in mineral composition of eucalyptus obliqua due to phytophthora cinnamomi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a study of disease caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi in native vegetation, the mineral composition of diseased plants was compared with those free from disease, but grown under the same conditions. Young plants of Eucalyptus obliqua, three years old and with well-formed lignotubers, were selected (a) diseased plant from soil containing a high concentration of P. cinnamomi, and (b) unaffected plant from an adjacent area where the soil was free from this pathogen. The plants were ashed and their mineral composition was compared by activation analysis using proton beams from the Melbourne University Cyclotron. Results showed a 70% reduction in iron and 41% in titanium from diseased plants compared with disease-free plants. The reduction in iron is associated with severe chlorosis which occurs as a primary symptom in most plants attacked by this pathogen

  12. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  13. The Proton-Activated Receptor GPR4 Modulates Glucose Homeostasis by Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giudici

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proton-activated G protein-coupled receptor GPR4 is expressed in many tissues including white adipose tissue. GPR4 is activated by extracellular protons in the physiological pH range (i.e. pH 7.7 - 6.8 and is coupled to the production of cAMP. Methods: We examined mice lacking GPR4 and examined glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in young and aged mice as well as in mice fed with a high fat diet. Expression profiles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in white adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle was assessed. Results: Here we show that mice lacking GPR4 have an improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and increased insulin sensitivity. Insulin levels were comparable but leptin levels were increased in GPR4 KO mice. Gpr4-/- showed altered expression of PPARα, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, and TGF-1β in skeletal muscle, white adipose tissue, and liver. High fat diet abolished the differences in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity between Gpr4+/+ and Gpr4-/- mice. In contrast, in aged mice (12 months old, the positive effect of GPR4 deficiency on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity was maintained. Liver and adipose tissue showed no major differences in the mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors between aged mice of both genotypes. Conclusion: Thus, GPR4 deficiency improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The effect may involve an altered balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in insulin target tissues.

  14. Simple thermodynamic model of unassisted proton shuttle uncoupling and prediction of activity from calculated speciation, lipophilicity, and molecular geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-06-21

    A mechanistic model of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by lipophilic weak acids (i.e. proton shuttles) was developed for the purposes of predicting the relative activity of xenobiotics of widely varying structure and of guiding the design of optimized derivatives. The model is based on thermodynamic premises not formulated elsewhere that allow for the calculation of steady-state conditions and of rate of energy dissipation on the basis of acid-dissociation and permeability behavior, the later estimated from partitioning behavior and geometric considerations. Moreover, permeability of either the neutral or of the ionized species is proposed to be effectively enhanced under conditions of asymmetrical molecular distribution. Finally, special considerations were developed to accommodate multi-protic compounds. The comparison of predicted to measured activity for a diverse testset of 48 compounds of natural origin spanning a wide range of activity yielded a Spearman's rho of 0.90. The model was used to tentatively identify several novel proton shuttles, as well as to elucidate core structures particularly conducive to proton shuttle activity from which optimized derivatives can be designed. Principles of design were formulated and examples of derivatives projected to be active at concentrations on the order of 10(-7)M are proposed. Among these are di-protic compounds predicted to shuttle two protons per cycle iteration and proposed to maximally exploit the proton shuttle mechanism. This work promotes the design of highly active, yet easily-metabolized uncouplers for therapeutic applications, namely the indirect activation of AMP-kinase, as well as for various industrial applications where low persistence is desirable.

  15. Pyrazinoic Acid Decreases the Proton Motive Force, Respiratory ATP Synthesis Activity, and Cellular ATP Levels▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, P.; Haagsma, A.C.; Pham, H.; Maaskant, J. J.; Mol, S; Lill, H.; Bald, D

    2011-01-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  16. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Proton Therapy Proton therapy delivers radiation to tumor tissue ... feel during and after the procedure? What is proton therapy and how is it used? Protons are ...

  17. Antisickling activity evaluation of 4 aromatic aldehydes using proton magnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of a Shiff base aduct hemoglobin-aromatic aldehyde, has been reported as inhibitor of the hemoglobin S polymerization. Using the Proton Magnetic Resonance methodology, the polymerization kinetics can be studied and the delay time can be determined. Our studies in vitro show the inhibitor effect of the isovanillin, o-vanillin, m-hydroxybenzaldehyde and the p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, using molar ratio (hemoglobin S/compound) 1:1, 1:4 and 1:8. The td increment (expressed in percents) obtained for each one of the molar ratio was the following: isovanillin: 34±6% (1:1), 68±16% (1:4), ovanillin: 26±10% (1:1), 63±20% (1:4), m-hydroxybelzaldehyde: 16±4% (1:1), 44±12% (1:4) and the phydroxybenzaldehyde: 10±3% (1:1), 32±8% (1:4). In the case of 1:8, the characteristic kinetics curve was not obtained. At the used concentrations, hemolytic activity was not found on the red blood cell. These results confirm the antisickling activity of these aromatic aldehydes, for a technique different to that reported in literature that also allows the quantification of concentration effect. The same ones will facilitate the study of the therapeutic usefulness of these compounds in the sickle cell anemia treatment. (author)

  18. Production study of high specific activity NCA Re-186g by proton and deuteron cyclotron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonardi, M.L., E-mail: mauro.bonardi@mi.infn.i [L.A.S.A., Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy); Groppi, F.; Manenti, S.; Persico, E.; Gini, L. [L.A.S.A., Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Very high specific activity (A{sub S}) {sup 186g}Re could be produced by either proton or deuteron cyclotron irradiation on highly enriched {sup 186}W target in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, leading to a A{sub S} very close to the theoretical carrier free (CF) value of 6.88 GBq {mu}g{sup -1}. Thick target yields (TTYs), obtained irradiating both thick metal W targets of natural isotopic composition and highly enriched pressed powdered {sup 186}W targets, were measured at different particles energies taking into account high accuracy and precision on both yield and beam energy. The measurement of radionuclidic purity of {sup 186g}Re obtained activating highly enriched {sup 186}W by both p and d beams were also carried out and accurately compared. The excitation function as thin-target yields (tty, i.e. proportional to the reaction cross-sections) and the integrated TTYs for all Re (A=181, 182, 183, 184, 186 and their metastable levels), W and Ta co-produced radionuclides will be presented elsewhere in deep details.

  19. Evidence for nickel/proton antiport activity at the tonoplast of the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, R A; Fricker, M D; Smith, J A C

    2008-11-01

    The mechanism of nickel uptake into vacuoles isolated from leaf tissue of Alyssum lesbiacum was investigated to help understand the ability of this species to hyperaccumulate Ni. An imaging system was designed to monitor Ni uptake by single vacuoles using the metal-sensitive fluorescent dye, Newport Green. Nickel uptake into isolated vacuoles from leaf tissue of A. lesbiacum was enhanced by the presence of Mg/ATP, presumably via energisation of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). This ATP-stimulated Ni uptake was abolished by bafilomycin (a diagnostic inhibitor of the V-ATPase) and by dissipation of the transmembrane pH difference with an uncoupler. These observations are consistent with Ni(2+)/nH(+) antiport activity at the tonoplast driven by a proton electrochemical gradient established by the V-ATPase, which would provide a mechanism for secondary active transport of Ni(2+) into the vacuole. This study provides insights into the molecular basis of Ni tolerance in Alyssum, and may aid in the identification of genes involved in Ni hyperaccumulation. PMID:18950432

  20. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  1. Cardiolipin is essential for higher proton translocation activity of reconstituted Fo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Hui

    2001-01-01

    [1]Daum, G., Lipids of mitochondria, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1985, 822: 1.[2]Cullis, P. R., De Kruijff, B., Lipid polymorphism and the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1979, 559: 399.[3]Li, L., Zheng, L. X., Yang, F. Y., Effect of propensity of hexagonal II phase formation on the activity of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase and H+-ATPase, Chem. Phys. Lipids, 1995, 76: 135.[4]Yang, F. Y., Huang, F., Effect of non-bilayer lipids on the activity of membrane enzymes, Chem. Phys. Lipids, 1996, 81: 197.[5]Yue Jiachang, Li Shengguang, Zhu Xiongwei, Conformational change of Fo moiety during uni-site ATP hydrolysis of H+-ATPase, Acta of Biophysica Sinica (in Chinese), 1996, 12: 585.[6]Lutter, R., Abrahams, J. P., Van Raaij, M. J. et al., Crystallization of F1-ATPase from bovine heart mitochondria, J. Mol. Biol., 1993, 229: 787.[7]Beechey, R. B., Hubbard, S. A., Linnett, P. E. et al., A simple and rapid method for the preparation of adenosine triphosphatase from submitochondrial particles, Biochem. J., 1975, 148: 533.[8]McEnery, M. W., Buhle, E. L. Jr., Aebi, U. et al., Proton ATPase of rat liver mitochondria, Preparation and visualization of a functional complex using the novel zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propane- sulfonate, J. Biol. Chem., 1984, 259: 4642.[9]McEnery, M. W., Hullihen, J., Pedersen, P. L., Fo "Proton channel" of rat liver mitochondria, J. Biol. Chem., 1989, 264: 12029.[10] Prendergast, F. G., Meyer, M., Carlson, G. L. et al., Synthesis, spectral properties, and use of 6-acryloyl-2- dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), A thiol-selective, polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe, J. Biol. Chem., 1983, 258: 7541.[11] Simpson, I. A., Sonne, O., A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for measuring protein concentration in subcellular membrane fractions prepared by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, Anal. Biochem., 1982, 119: 424

  2. Range degradation and distal edge behavior of proton radiotherapy beams using 11C activation and Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmekawy, Ahmed Farouk

    The distal edge of therapeutic proton radiation beams was investigated by different methods. Proton beams produced at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI) were used to irradiate a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom for three different ranges (13.5, 17.0 and 21.0 cm) to investigate the distal slope dependence of the Bragg peak. The activation of 11 C was studied by scanning the phantom less than 10 minutes post-irradiation with a Philips Big Bore Gemini(c) PET/CT. The DICOM images were imported into the Varian Eclipse(c) Treatment Planning System (TPS) for analysis and then analyzed by ImageJ(c) . The distal slope ranged from ?0.1671 +/- 0.0036 to -0.1986 +/- 0.0052 (pixel intensity/slice number) for ranges 13.5 to 21.0 cm respectively. A realistic description of the setup was modeled using the GATE 7.0 Monte Carlo simulation tool and compared to the experiment data. The results show the distal slope ranged from -0.1158+/-0.0133 to -0.0787+/-0.002 (Gy/mm). Additionally, low activity, 11C were simulated to study the 11C reconstructed half-life dependence versus the initial activity for six ranges chosen around the previous activation study. The results of the expected/nominal half-life vs. activity ranged from -5 x 10-4 +/- 2.8104 x 10-4 to 1.6 x 10-3 +/- 9.44 x 10-4 (%diff./Bq). The comparison between two experiments with proton beams on a PMMA phantom and multi-layer ion chamber, and two GATE simulations of a proton beam incident on a water phantom and 11C PET study show that: (i) the distal fall-off variation of the steepness of the slopes are found to be similar thus validating the sensitivity of the PET technique to the range degradation and (ii) the average of the super-ratios difference between all studies observed is primarily due to the difference in the dose deposited in the media.

  3. Simulation of a low-background proton detector for studying low-energy resonances relevant in thermonuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Loureiro, D

    2016-01-01

    A new detector is being developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) to measure low energy charged-particles from beta-delayed particle emission. These low energy particles are very important for nuclear astrophysics studies. The use of a gaseous system instead of a solid state detector decreases the sensitivity to betas while keeping high efficiency for higher mass charged particles like protons or alphas. This low sensitivity to betas minimizes their contribution to the background down to 150 keV. A detailed simulation tool based on \\textsc{Geant4} has been developed for this future detector.

  4. Affecting proton mobility in activated peptide and whole protein ions via lysine guanidination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Reid, Gavin E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of lysine guanidination in peptides and proteins on the dissociation of protonated ions in the gas phase. The dissociation of guanidinated model peptide ions compared to their unmodified forms showed behavior consistent with concepts of proton mobility as a major factor in determining favored fragmentation channels. Reduction of proton mobility associated with lysine guanidination was reflected by a relative increase in cleavages occurring C-terminal to aspartic acid residues as well as increases in small molecule losses. To evaluate the effect of guanidination on the dissociation behavior of whole protein ions, bovine ubiquitin was selected as a model. Essentially, all of the amide bond cleavages associated with the +10 charge state of fully guanidinated ubiquitin were observed to occur C-terminal to aspartic acid residues, unlike the dissociation behavior of the +10 ion of the unmodified protein, where competing cleavage N-terminal to proline and nonspecific amide bond cleavages were also observed. The +8 and lower charge states of the guanidinated protein showed prominent losses of small neutral molecules. This overall fragmentation behavior is consistent with current hypotheses regarding whole protein dissociation that consider proton mobility and intramolecular charge solvation as important factors in determining favored dissociation channels, and are also consistent with the fragmentation behaviors observed for the guanidinated model peptide ions. Further evaluation of the utility of condensed phase guanidination of whole proteins is necessary but the results described here confirm that guanidination can be an effective strategy for enhancing C-terminal aspartic acid cleavages. Gas phase dissociation exclusively at aspartic acid residues, especially for whole protein ions, could be useful in identifying and characterizing proteins via tandem mass spectrometry of whole protein ions.

  5. Electrocatalysts and their Supporting Materials for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Activity and Durability Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna; Bjerrum, Niels J.; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    Denne afhandling beskriver gennemførte undersøgelser, som omhandlende aktiviteten, stabiliteten og holdbarheden af ”supported” nano-partikler, ”bulk”- og tyndfilms - elektrokatalysatorer brugt i proton exchange membran brændselsceller (PEMFCs). Virkningen af forskellige faktorer og betingelser i reaktionerne, der involverede oxygen reduktion, carbonmonoxid og metanol elektro-oxidationsreaktioner er blevet undersøgt. De anvendte katalysatorer blev karakteriseret elektrokemisk og fysisk-kemisk ...

  6. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  7. Proton and Electron Threshold Energy Measurements for Extravehicular Activity Space Suits. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.

    2003-01-01

    Construction of ISS will require more than 1000 hours of EVA. Outside of ISS during EVA, astronauts and cosmonauts are likely to be exposed to a large fluence of electrons and protons. Development of radiation protection guidelines requires the determination of the minimum energy of electrons and protons that penetrate the suits at various locations. Measurements of the water-equivalent thickness of both US. and Russian EVA suits were obtained by performing CT scans. Specific regions of interest of the suits were further evaluated using a differential range shift technique. This technique involved measuring thickness ionization curves for 6-MeV electron and 155-MeV proton beams with ionization chambers using a constant source-to-detector distance. The thicknesses were obtained by stacking polystyrene slabs immediately upstream of the detector. The thicknesses of the 50% ionizations relative to the maximum ionizations were determined. The detectors were then placed within the suit and the stack thickness adjusted until the 50% ionization was reestablished. The difference in thickness between the 50% thicknesses was then used with standard range-energy tables to determine the threshold energy for penetration. This report provides a detailed description of the experimental arrangement and results.

  8. Study of the unbound proton-rich nucleus $^{21}$Al with resonance elastic and inelastic scattering using an active target

    CERN Multimedia

    We intend to measure the structure of the unbound nucleus $^{21}$Al via resonance elastic and inelastic scattering with an active target. There are many goals: \\\\ a) to locate the 1/2$^{+}$ level in $^{21}$Al that brings information on the Thomas-Ehrman shift, \\\\ b) to measure the energy spectrum of $^{21}$Al which is a N=8 isotone with the resonance elastic scattering reaction, \\\\ c) to investigate via inelastic scattering the strength of core excitations in the existence of narrow unbound resonances beyond the proton drip-line.

  9. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on natSm up to 65 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Proton induced reactions on natural samarium up to 65 MeV. •Stacked foil irradiation technique. •Comparison of experimental results with the ALICE, EMPIRE and TALYS theoretical model codes. •Calculation and comparison of thick target integral yields. -- Abstract: Activation cross sections for proton induced reactions on Sm are presented for the first time for natSm(p,xn)154,152m2,152m1,152g,150m,150g,149,148,147,146,145Eu, natSm(p,x)153,145Sm, natSm(p,x)151,150,149,148g,148m,146,144,143Pm and natSm(p,x)141Nd up to 65 MeV. The cross sections were measured via activation method by using a stacked-foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. The results were compared with results of the nuclear reaction codes ALICE, EMPIRE and TALYS (results taken from TENDL libraries). Integral yields of the activation products were calculated from the excitation functions

  10. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on natural Ni up to 65 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production cross-sections of the natNi(p,x)60,61Cu, 56,57Ni, 55,56,57,58Co nuclear reactions were measured in five experiments up to 65 MeV by using a stacked foil activation technique. The results were compared with the available literature values, predictions of the nuclear reaction model codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS-1.4, and extracted data from the TENDL-2012 library. Spline fits were made on the basis of selected data, from which physical yields were calculated and compared with the literature values. The applicability of the natNi(p,x)57Ni, 57Co reactions for thin layer activation (TLA) was investigated. The production rate for 55Co was compared for proton and deuteron induced reactions on Ni. - Highlights: • Production cross-sections of natNi(p,x)60,61Cu, 56,57Ni, 55,56,57,58Co reactions up to 65 MeV. • Comparison of results with theoretical codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.4 and TENDL-2012 library. • Calculation and comparison of physical yields with literature experiments. • Thin layer activation (TLA) curves for57Ni and 57Co for industrial applications. • The production rate for 55Co was compared for proton and deuteron induced reactions on Ni

  11. Experimental observation of $\\beta$-delayed neutrons from $^{9}$Li as a way to study short-pulse laser-driven deuteron production

    CERN Document Server

    Favalli, Andrea; Henzlova, Daniela; Falk, Katerina; Croft, Stephen; Gautier, Donald C; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Iliev, Metodi; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Roth, Markus; Fernandez, Juan C; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2016-01-01

    A short-pulse laser-driven deuteron beam is generated in the relativistic transparency regime and aimed at a beryllium converter to generate neutrons at the TRIDENT laser facility. These prompt neutrons have been used for active interrogation to detect nuclear materials, the first such demonstration of a laser-driven neutron source. During the experiments, delayed neutrons from $^9$Li decay was observed. It was identified by its characteristic half-life of 178.3 ms. Production is attributed to the nuclear reactions $^9$Be(d,2p)$^9$Li and $^9$Be(n,p)$^9$Li inside the beryllium converter itself. These reactions have energy thresholds of 18.42 and 14.26 MeV respectively, and we estimate the (d,2p) reaction to be the dominant source of $^9$Li production. Therefore, only the higher-energy portion of the deuteron spectrum contributes to the production of the delayed neutrons. It was observed that the delayed-neutron yield decreases with increasing distance between the converter and the deuteron source. This behavio...

  12. A functional EXXEK motif is essential for proton coupling and active glucosinolate transport by NPF2.11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Geiger, Dietmar;

    2015-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT/PTR) family shares a highly conserved E1X1X2E2RFXYY (E1X1X2E2R) motif across all kingdoms of life. This motif is suggested to have a role in proton coupling and active transport in bacterial homologs. For the plant POT/PTR family, also known as t...

  13. [Effects of palmitic acid on activity of uncoupling proteins and proton leak in in vitro cerebral mitochondria from the rats exposed to simulated high altitude hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Jun-Ze; Xia, Chen

    2008-02-25

    To reveal the roles of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation induced by free fatty acid during hypoxic exposure, the effects of palmitic acid on activity of UCPs, proton leak and mitochondrial membrane potential in hypoxia-exposed rat brain mitochondria were observed in vitro. Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were set randomly into control, acute hypoxia and chronic hypoxia groups (n=8 in each group). The acute and chronic hypoxic rats were exposed to simulated 5000 m high altitude in a hypobaric chamber 23 h/d for 3 d and 30 d, respectively. The brain mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation. UCP content and activity were detected by [(3)H]-GTP binding method. The proton leak was measured by TPMP(+) electrode and oxygen electrode. The membrane potential of mitochondria was calculated by detecting the fluorescence from Rodamine 123. Hypoxic exposure resulted in an increase in UCP activity and content as well as proton leak, but a decrease in the membrane potential of rat brain mitochondria. Palmitic acid resulted in further increases in UCP activity and content as well as proton leak, and further decrease in membrane potential of brain mitochondria in vitro from hypoxia-exposed rats, but hypoxic exposure decreased the reactivity of cerebral mitochondria to palmitic acid, especially in the acute hypoxia group. There was a negative correlation between mitochondrial proton leak and K(d) value (representing derivative of UCP activity, PB(max) (representing the maximal content of UCPs in mitochondrial inner membrane, P<0.01, r = 0.856). Cerebral mitochondrial membrane potential was negatively correlated with proton leak (P<0.01, r = -0.880). It is suggested that hypoxia-induced proton leak enhancement and membrane potential decrease are correlated with the increased activity of UCPs. Hypoxia can also decrease the sensitivity of cerebral mitochondria to palmitic acid, which may be a self-protective mechanism in high altitude

  14. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Raby, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  15. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  16. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of $^{51,48}$Cr, $^{48}$V, $^{48,47,46,44m,44g,43}$Sc and $^{43,42}$K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  17. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  18. BiOBr/protonated graphitic C3N4 heterojunctions: Intimate interfaces by electrostatic interaction and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • BiOBr/pg-C3N4 was prepared by an electrostatically-driven in-situ growth method. • BiOBr/pg-C3N4 exhibited a superior visible-light activity and stability. • The efficient separation of charges due to the intimate interface of BiOBr/pg-C3N4. - Abstract: In this work, enhanced photocatalytic activity of BiOBr/graphitic C3N4 heterojunctions for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) were obtained by the protonation pretreatment of graphitic C3N4 with hydrochloric acid. A possibly electrostatic interaction between protonated graphitic C3N4 (pg-C3N4) and BiOBr provided a closely intimate interface in the heterojunction, which was demonstrated by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This tight coupling was favorable for the charge transfer between pg-C3N4 and BiOBr, and therefore promoted the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole pairs. The effect of composition in heterojunctions on photocatalytic activity was investigated, and the optimal photocatalyst with a BiOBr/pg-C3N4 mass ratio of 7:3 showed a superior activity, which was 35.03 and 33.72 times higher than that over pg-C3N4 and BiOBr, respectively. Radical trap experiments confirmed that the holes and superoxide radical species were the main reactive species in the RhB photodegradation process. Moreover, the stability of BiOBr/pg-C3N4 heterojunction was also tested and the RhB degradation efficiency declined by only 9.6% after seven successive cycles

  19. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium up to 70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkanyi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Takacs, S.; Ditroi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Kiraly, B. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)], E-mail: kiralyb@atomki.hu; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-01

    Cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium were measured up to 70 MeV by using the standard stacked foil irradiation technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Experimental cross sections and derived integral yields are reported for the first time for the {sup nat}Yb(p,xn){sup 173,172mg,171mg,170,167}Lu, {sup nat}Yb(p,x){sup 175cum,166cum}Yb and {sup nat}Yb(p,x){sup 173ind,172ind,168,167cum,165cum}Tm reactions. No earlier experimental cross section data were found in the literature. The experimental data were compared to and analyzed with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE. Production routes of medical radioisotope {sup 167}Tm are discussed.

  20. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  1. New activation cross section data on longer lived radio-nuclei produced in proton induced nuclear reaction on zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation functions of 96Nb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 92mNb, 91mNb, 90Nb, 95Zr, 89Zr, 88Zr, 86Zr, 88Y, 87mY, 87gY, 86Y were measured up to 70 MeV proton energy by using the stacked foil technique and the activation method. The new data were compared with the critically analyzed experimental data in the literature and with the TALYS based model results in TENDL-2013 library. The possible role of the investigated reactions in the production of medically relevant 90Nb, 95mNb, 89Zr, and 88Y radionuclides is discussed. - Highlights: • Proton induced reactions on natural zirconium up to 65 MeV. • Stacked foil irradiation technique coupled with gamma-spectrometry. • Comparison of experimental data with the nuclear reaction model results in the TENDL-2013 library. • Calculation and comparison of thick target integral yields. • Comparison of the production routes of 90Nb, 95mNb, 89Zr and 88Y medically relevant radioisotopes

  2. Investigations on the role of proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen activation by [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, David W; Ratzloff, Michael W; Bruschi, Maurizio; Greco, Claudio; Koonce, Evangeline; Peters, John W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-29

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a fundamental process at the core of oxidation-reduction reactions for energy conversion. The [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the reversible activation of molecular H2 through a unique metallocofactor, the H-cluster, which is finely tuned by the surrounding protein environment to undergo fast PCET transitions. The correlation of electronic and structural transitions at the H-cluster with proton-transfer (PT) steps has not been well-resolved experimentally. Here, we explore how modification of the conserved PT network via a Cys → Ser substitution at position 169 proximal to the H-cluster of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CrHydA1) affects the H-cluster using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Despite a substantial decrease in catalytic activity, the EPR and FTIR spectra reveal different H-cluster catalytic states under reducing and oxidizing conditions. Under H2 or sodium dithionite reductive treatments, the EPR spectra show signals that are consistent with a reduced [4Fe-4S]H(+) subcluster. The FTIR spectra showed upshifts of νCO modes to energies that are consistent with an increase in oxidation state of the [2Fe]H subcluster, which was corroborated by DFT analysis. In contrast to the case for wild-type CrHydA1, spectra associated with Hred and Hsred states are less populated in the Cys → Ser variant, demonstrating that the exchange of -SH with -OH alters how the H-cluster equilibrates among different reduced states of the catalytic cycle under steady-state conditions. PMID:25286239

  3. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  4. Formation of activation products in interactions of medium energy protons with Na, Si, P, S, Cl, Ca and Fe

    CERN Document Server

    Fassbender, M; Qaim, S M

    1999-01-01

    Excitation functions of (p, X)-processes on the elements Na, Si, P, S, Cl, Ca and Fe, leading to the formation of /sup 22,24/Na and the medium mass activation products /sup 42,43/K, /sup 47/Ca, /sup 44m,47 /Sc, /sup 48/V, /sup 48,51/Cr, /sup 52,54/Mn, /sup 52/Fe and /sup 55 /Co, were measured over the proton energy range of 70 to 355 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. The product activity could be measured non-destructively via gamma -ray spectrometry. Experimental results were compared with theoretical data obtained using the modified hybrid nuclear model code ALICE-IPPE (1998) for intermediate energies. The agreement was found to be generally satisfactory below 70 MeV. The processes /sup nat/Cl(p, x)/sup 22/Na, /sup nat/Si(p, x) /sup 22,24/Na, /sup 31/P(p, x)/sup 22/Na and /sup nat/Fe(p, x)/sup 48 /V, /sup 55/Co, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 51/Cr are described reasonably well by the theory even at higher energies. An activity estimate showed that the contribution of medium mass activation products to the total tiss...

  5. Acidosis activation of the proton-sensing GPR4 receptor stimulates vascular endothelial cell inflammatory responses revealed by transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixue Dong

    Full Text Available Acidic tissue microenvironment commonly exists in inflammatory diseases, tumors, ischemic organs, sickle cell disease, and many other pathological conditions due to hypoxia, glycolytic cell metabolism and deficient blood perfusion. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to the acidic microenvironment are not well understood. GPR4 is a proton-sensing receptor expressed in endothelial cells and other cell types. The receptor is fully activated by acidic extracellular pH but exhibits lesser activity at the physiological pH 7.4 and minimal activity at more alkaline pH. To delineate the function and signaling pathways of GPR4 activation by acidosis in endothelial cells, we compared the global gene expression of the acidosis response in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC with varying level of GPR4. The results demonstrated that acidosis activation of GPR4 in HUVEC substantially increased the expression of a number of inflammatory genes such as chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, NF-κB pathway genes, and prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX-2 and stress response genes such as ATF3 and DDIT3 (CHOP. Similar GPR4-mediated acidosis induction of the inflammatory genes was also noted in other types of endothelial cells including human lung microvascular endothelial cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Further analyses indicated that the NF-κB pathway was important for the acidosis/GPR4-induced inflammatory gene expression. Moreover, acidosis activation of GPR4 increased the adhesion of HUVEC to U937 monocytic cells under a flow condition. Importantly, treatment with a recently identified GPR4 antagonist significantly reduced the acidosis/GPR4-mediated endothelial cell inflammatory response. Taken together, these results show that activation of GPR4 by acidosis stimulates the expression of a wide range of inflammatory genes in endothelial cells. Such inflammatory response can be

  6. Proton Beam Energy Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Marus, Lauren A.; Engle, J.W.; John, K. D.; Birnbaum, E. R.; Nortier, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) is actively engaged in the development of isotope production technologies that can utilize its 100 MeV proton beam. Characterization of the proton beam energy and current is vital for optimizing isotope production and accurately conducting research at the IPF. Motivation In order to monitor beam intensity during research irradiations, aluminum foils are interspersed in experimental stacks. A theoretical yield of 22Na from...

  7. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI 5232 (Switzerland); Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  8. Protonated nitrosamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Øgaard Madsen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The protonated nitrosamide, NH3NO+, has been generated by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Although a direct search for this species in ammonia flames has proved negative, fast proton transfer to major flame constituents is supported experimentally as well as by MO calculations....

  9. Intracellular shunting of O2− contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn2+, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O2− and H2O2, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H2O2 production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn2+ results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H2O2. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O2− generated within gp91phox in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. Highlights: • Neutrophils’ respiratory burst is not inhibited by the H+ channel inhibitor Zn2+. • Intracellular production of O2− and H2O2 is increased in the presence of Zn2+. • Intracellular H2O2 production is increased in H+ channels knock-down cells. • Zn2+ increases the rate but not the extent of depolarization and pHi decrease. • Intracellular shunting of O2− contributes to charge compensation in neutrophils

  10. Proton Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  11. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions...

  12. Highly Stable and Active Pt/Nb-TiO2 Carbon-Free Electrocatalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are not sufficiently durable for commercial deployment. One of the major challenges lies in the development of an inexpensive, efficient, and highly durable and active electrocatalyst. Here a new type of carbon-free Pt/Nb-TiO2 electrocatalyst has been reported. Mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres were synthesized by the sol-gel method using polystyrene (PS sphere templates. Pt nanoparticles (NPs were then deposited onto mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres via a simple wet-chemical route in aqueous solution, without the need for surfactants or potentiostats. The growth densities of Pt NPs on Nb-TiO2 supports could be easily modulated by simply adjusting the experimental parameters. Electrochemical studies of Pt/Nb-TiO2 show much enhanced activity and stability than commercial E-TEK Pt/C catalyst. PtNP/Nb-TiO2 is a promising new cathode catalyst for PEMFC applications.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  14. Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy to Understand Brain "Activation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslow, Morris H.; Guilfoyle, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Upon stimulation, areas of the brain associated with specific cognitive processing tasks may undergo observable physiological changes, and measures of such changes have been used to create brain maps for visualization of stimulated areas in task-related brain "activation" studies. These perturbations usually continue throughout the period of the…

  15. Dipeptide transport: an active process with energy- and proton-dependence in the human intestinal cell line, Caco-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bing-wei; SHI Lei; CHEN Xi; CHEN Zhao-yong; TAI Ning-zheng; ZHAO Xiao-chen; LI Ning

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the active process on dipeptide transport with proton- and energydependence in Caco-2 cells. Methods: A human intestinal cell monolayer (Caco-2) was used as the in vitro model of human small intestine and cephalexin as the model substrate for dipeptide transporter (PepT1). Caco-2 cells grown on multiwell dishes (24 wells) and Transwell membrane filters were incubated in the culture medium. The transport and uptake experiments of cephalexin across apical membranes were then conducted with different temperature and different pH values. Uptake of cephalexin in Caco-2 cells grown on multiple well dishes with addition of energy inhibitors( sodium azide, SA and 2,4-dinitrophenol, DNP) were then measured. Results: The accumulation of cephalexin into Caco-2 monolayers increased with the duration of culture. The uptake from the apical surface was markedly influenced by the pH of the apical medium, and the maximal uptake was achieved at pH 5.5; further acidification of the incubation medium may decrease transport of cephalexin despite an increase inward H + gradient.Cephalexin uptake was linear over the concentration range when the cells were incubated at 4 ℃ while the uptake rate was enhanced and tended to be saturated as the cephalexin concentration increased when the cells were incubated at 37 ℃. The kinetic parameters for the cephalexin transport carrier were determined to be: Vmax of (22. 173 ±1.9) nmol/min per mg protein, Km of (2.069 ±0.9) mol/L, the Kd was estimated to be (0.07 ± 0.02) nmol/min per mg protein per mmol/L. Uptake of cephalexin was markedly inhibited by sodium azide (SA) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). Conclusion: Cephalexin was transported actively across Caco-2 cells, and the transport process was proton- and energy-dependent. In addition, Caco-2 cells taked up cephalexin by dipeptide transporters that closely resembled the transporters present in the intestine. Caco-2 cells represented an ideal cellular model for future

  16. Nanosized IrOx–Ir Catalyst with Relevant Activity for Anodes of Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Produced by a Cost-Effective Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Lettenmeier, Philipp; Wang, Li; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Gazdzicki, Pawel; Cañas, Natalia A.; Handl, Michael; Hiesgen, Renate; Hosseiny, S.S.; Gago, Aldo; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a highly active nanostructured iridium catalyst for anodes of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis. Clusters of nanosized crystallites are obtained by reducing surfactant-stabilized IrCl3 in water-free conditions. The catalyst shows a five-fold higher activity towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) than commercial Ir-black. The improved kinetics of the catalyst are reflected in the high performance of the PEM electrolyzer (1 mgIr cm−2), showing an unparalleled low ov...

  17. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J., E-mail: jad.farah@irsn.fr; Trompier, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Pôle Radioprotection de l’Homme, BP17, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92260 (France); Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C. [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Trinkl, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching 85748 (Germany); Dufek, V. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoškova 28, Prague 140 00 (Czech Republic); Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Kubancak, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  18. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J; Trompier, F [IRSN - Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M [Trento Proton Therapy Center, Trento (Italy); Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Dufek, V [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Frojdh, E; George, S [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Harrison, R [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Kubancak, J; Ploc, O [Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez (Czech Republic); Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  19. The role of proton mobility in determining the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation channels of N-glycopeptide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Venkata; Roth, Heidi A; De La Cruz, Gabriela; Fernando, Ganga S; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-10-01

    Site-specific glycoproteomic analysis largely hinges on the use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to identify glycopeptides. Experiments of this type are usually aimed at drawing connections between individual oligosaccharide structures and their specific sites of attachment to the polypeptide chain. These determinations inherently require ion dissociation methods capable of interrogating both the monosaccharide and amino acid connectivity of the glycopeptide. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) shows potential to satisfy this requirement, as the vibrational activation/dissociation of protonated N-glycopeptides has been observed to access cleavage of either glycosidic bonds of the glycan or amide bonds of the peptide in an energy-resolved manner. Nevertheless, the relative energy requirement for these fragmentation pathways varies considerably among analytes. This research addresses the influence of proton mobility on the vibrational energy necessary to achieve either glycan or peptide cleavage in a collection of protonated N-glycopeptide ions. While greater proton mobility of the precursor ion was found to correlate with lower energy requirements for precursor ion depletion and appearance of glycosidic fragments, the vibrational energy deposition necessary for appearance of peptide backbone fragments showed no relation to the precursor ion proton mobility. These results are consistent with observations suggesting that peptide fragments arise from an intermediate fragment which is generally of lower proton mobility than the precursor ion. Such findings have potential to facilitate the rational selection of CID conditions which are best suited to provide either glycan or peptide cleavage products in MS/MS based N-glycoproteomic analysis.

  20. Proton Radiobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Tommasino; Marco Durante

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming...

  1. Measurement of activation reaction rate distributions in a lead assembly bombarded with 500-MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, H; Sasa, T; Tsujimoto, K; Yasuda, H

    2000-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co, /sup 197/Au(n,2n)/sup 196/Au, and /sup 197/Au(n,4n)/sup 194/Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code. (32 refs).

  2. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  3. The influence of osmotic stress on the content of calcium ions in the red beet vacuoles and on the transport activity of tonoplast proton pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozolina N.V.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The contents of calcium ions in the isolated vacuoles and in intact red beets under the conditions of dormancy and osmotic stress was determined. It is demonstrated that the content of calcium ions in the red beet vacuoles not exposed to osmotic stress makes 13.3% of the total content these ions in intact red beets. Under the conditions of osmotic stress, this indicator increases substantially. Furthermore, under the conditions of hyperosmotic stress, the content of calcium ions in the vacuoles was 30%, while under hypoosmotic stress it was 49% of the total content of these ions in the intact red beet. The transition of calcium ions from the cytoplasm and other compartments into the vacuole under the conditions of osmotic stress is, probably, one of forms of participation of the vacuole in adaptation processes of the plant cell under this kind of abiotic stress. It has been demonstrated for the first time that tonoplast proton pumps, which actively participate in provision of calcium homeostasis in cytoplasm, substantially activate their transport activity under osmotic stress, what allows one to speak about their important role in the cell’s protective programs. Under normal (no stress conditions, artificial elevation of the content of calcium ions led to inhibition of activity of the tonoplast proton pumps, while under gipoosmotic stress the activity of tonoplast proton pumps increased, what might aid to restoring homeoctasis with respect to calcium ions in cytoplasm.

  4. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  5. Decay studies of nuclei near the proton drip line: 35Ca, 31Ar, 69Br, 65As

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of new beta-delayed two-proton emitters and a search for ground state proton radioactivity in medium mass nuclei were performed using various experimental techniques in conjunction with several detection systems. A helium-jet transport system and three-element silicon telescopes were used to discover the existence and detect the decay of the first TZ = -5/2 nuclide, 35Ca. Two-proton emission from the T = 5/2 isobaric analog state in 35K at an excitation energy of 9.053 ± 0.045 MeV, fed by the superallowed beta decay of 35Ca, resulted in transitions to both the ground state and first excited state of 33Cl. The corresponding two-proton sum energies were 4.089 ± 0.030 MeV and 3.287 ± 0.030 MeV. Measurements of the individual proton energies indicated the prevalence of a sequential decay mechanism. Using the isobaric multiplet mass equation, the mass excess of 35Ca was calculated to be 4.453 ± 0.060 MeV. In order to study whose half-lives were too short for the helium-jet system, an in-beam recoil catcher wheel was constructed. The wheel speed can be varied to study nuclides whose half-lives range from 100 μs to ∼250 ms. The first new decay observed with the wheel system and traditional ΔE-E telescopes was the beta-delayed two-proton emission from 31Ar. The two-proton sum energy of ∼7.5 MeV corresponds to a transition from the isobaric analog state in 31Cl to the ground state of 29P. The search for proton radioactivity required the development of low energy, particle identification detector telescopes. These telescopes, comprised of a gas ΔE and silicon E, were used in conjunction with the in-beam recoil catcher wheel to search for ground state proton emission from 69Br and 65As. 90 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs

  6. Metabolic targeting of oncogene MYC by selective activation of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate family of transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, L; Xiu, R; Ren, P; Yue, M; Su, H; Guo, G; Xiao, D; Yu, J; Jiang, H; Liu, H; Hu, G; Qing, G

    2016-06-01

    Deregulation of the MYC oncogene produces Myc protein that regulates multiple aspects of cancer cell metabolism, contributing to the acquisition of building blocks essential for cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, disabling Myc function represents an attractive therapeutic option for cancer treatment. However, pharmacological strategies capable of directly targeting Myc remain elusive. Here, we identified that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that primarily inhibits glycolysis, preferentially induced massive cell death in human cancer cells overexpressing the MYC oncogene, in vitro and in vivo, without appreciable effects on those exhibiting low MYC levels. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of glutamine metabolism synergistically potentiated the synthetic lethal targeting of MYC by 3-BrPA due in part to the metabolic disturbance caused by this combination. Mechanistically, we identified that the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and MCT2, which enable efficient 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells, were selectively activated by Myc. Two regulatory mechanisms were involved: first, Myc directly activated MCT1 and MCT2 transcription by binding to specific recognition sites of both genes; second, Myc transcriptionally repressed miR29a and miR29c, resulting in enhanced expression of their target protein MCT1. Of note, expressions of MCT1 and MCT2 were each significantly elevated in MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas and C-MYC-overexpressing lymphomas than in tumors without MYC overexpression, correlating with poor prognosis and unfavorable patient survival. These results identify a novel mechanism by which Myc sensitizes cells to metabolic inhibitors and validate 3-BrPA as potential Myc-selective cancer therapeutics. PMID:26434591

  7. Proton scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scanner is based on the nuclear scattering of high energy protons by the nucleons (protons and neutrons) included in the atomic nuclei. Because of the wide scattering angle, three coordinates in space of the interaction point can be computed, giving directly three dimensional radiographs. Volumic resolution is of about a few cubic-millimeters. Because the base interaction is the strong nuclear force, the atomic dependence of the information obtained is different from that of the X-ray scanner, for which the base interaction is electro-magnetic force. (orig./VJ)

  8. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression.

  9. Nonidentical protons

    CERN Document Server

    Mart, T

    2013-01-01

    We have calculated the proton charge radius by assuming that the real proton radius is not unique and the radii are randomly distributed in a certain range. This is performed by averaging the elastic electron-proton differential cross section over the form factor cut-off. By using a dipole form factor and fitting the middle value of the cut-off to the low $Q^2$ Mainz data, we found the lowest $\\chi^2/N$ for a cut-off $\\Lambda=0.8203\\pm 0.0003$ GeV, which corresponds to a proton charge radius $r_E=0.8333\\pm 0.0004$ fm. The result is compatible with the recent precision measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen as well as recent calculations using more sophisticated techniques. Our result indicates that the relative variation of the form factor cut-off should be around 21.5%. Based on this result we have investigated effects of the nucleon radius variation on the symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and the neutron star matter (NSM) by considering the excluded volume effect in our calculation. The mass-radius ...

  10. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  11. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natTl up to 42 MeV: review, new data and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Adam-Rebeles, R; Walravens, N; Cichelli, O; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural thallium have been studied for investigation of the production of the medical important 201Tl diagnostic radioisotope. The excitation functions of 204mPb, 203Pb, 202mPb, 201Pb, 200Pb, 199Pb, 202Tl (direct, cumulative), 201Tl (direct, cumulative), 200Tl(direct), and 203Hg were measured up to 42 MeV proton energy by stacked foil technique and activation method. The experimental data were compared with the critically analyzed experimental data in the literature, with the IAEA recommended data and with the results of model calculations by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  12. A new set of regulatory molecules in plants: A plant phospholipid similar to platelet-activating factor stimulates protein kinase and proton-translocating ATPase in membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, G F; Martiny-Baron, G; Stoffel, B

    1988-08-01

    1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, an ether phospholipid from mammals known as platelet-activating factor (PAF), specifically stimulates proton transport in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) microsomes (G.F.E. Scherer, 1985, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commm. 133, 1160-1167). When plant lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography a lipid was found with chromatographic properties very similar to the PAF (G.F.E. Scherer and B. Stoffel, 1987, Planta, 172, 127-130). This lipid was isolated from zucchini hypocotyls, red beet root, lupin root, maize seedlings and crude soybean phospholipids. It had biological activity similar to that of the PAF, based on phosphorus content, and stimulated the steady-state ΔpH in zucchini hypocotyl microsomes about twofold. Other phospholipids, monoglyceride, diglyceride, triglyceride, oleic acid, phorbol ester, and 1-O-alkylglycerol did not stimulate proton transport. When microsomes were washed the PAF was ineffective but when soluble protein was added the PAF stimulation of H(+) transport was reconstituted. The soluble protein responsible for the PAF-dependent stimulation of transport activity could be partially purified by diethylaminoethyl Sephacel column chromatography. In the same fractions where the PAF-dependent transport-stimulatory protien was found, a protein kinase was active. This protein kinase was stimulated twofold either by the PAF or by Ca(2+). When Ca(2+) was present the PAF did not stimulate protein-kinase activity. When either the PAF, protein kinase, or both were added to membranes isolated on a linear sucrose gradient, ATPase activity was stimulated up to 30%. Comparison with marker enzymes indicated the possibility that tonoplast and plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase might be stimulated by the PAF and protein kinase. We speculate that a PAF-dependent protein kinase is involved in the regulation of proton transport in plants in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Dose-rate effects of protons on in vivo activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and cytokine expression in bone marrow (BM) cells of exposed mice as a function of the dose rate of protons. The cytokines included in this study are pro-inflammatory (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-10). We gave male BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0 (sham-controls) or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV protons, delivered at 5 or 10 mGy min-1, the dose and dose rates found during solar particle events in space. As a reference radiation, groups of mice were exposed to 0 (sham-controls) or 1 Gy of 137Cs γ rays (10 mGy min-1). After irradiation, BM cells were collected at 1.5, 3, 24 h, and 1 month for analyses (five mice per treatment group per harvest time). The results indicated that the in vivo time course of effects induced by a single dose of 1 Gy of 100 MeV protons or 137Cs γ rays, delivered at 10 mGy min-1, was similar. Although statistically significant levels of NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in BM cells of exposed mice when compared to those in the corresponding sham controls (Student's t-test, p -1 induced significant levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The results indicate dose-rate effects of protons.

  14. Synthesis, Coordination Chemistry, and Cooperative Activation of H2 with Ruthenium Complexes of ProtonResponsive METAMORPhos Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Terrade; M. Lutz; J.I. van der Vlugt; J.N.H. Reek

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic scope of proton-responsive sulfonamidophosphorus (METAMORPhos) ligands is expanded and design principles for the selective formation of particular tautomers, ion pairs, or double condensation products are elucidated. These systems have been introduced in the coordination sphere of Ru f

  15. Synthesis, coordination chemistry, and cooperative activation of H 2 with ruthenium complexes of proton-responsive METAMORPhos ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terrade, Frédéric G.; Lutz, Martin; Van Der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic scope of proton-responsive sulfonamidophosphorus (METAMORPhos) ligands is expanded and design principles for the selective formation of particular tautomers, ion pairs, or double condensation products are elucidated. These systems have been introduced in the coordination sphere of Ru f

  16. Tuning the activity of glutathione peroxidase mimics through intramolecular Se···N,O interactions: a DFT study incorporating solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayse, Craig A; Pavlou, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Diaryl diselenide mimics of the antioxidant selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase (GPx) often incorporate intramolecular Se···N,O interactions to enhance their GPx-like activity. Although the strength of the interaction is defined by the Lewis basicity of the donating group and the strength of the Se-X bond, there is not a clear relationship between the interaction and the GPx-like activity. Density-functional theory and natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations are used to show the range of Se···N,O interactions for various functional groups. The strongest interactions are found for groups which stabilize the donor-acceptor interaction through aromatic stabilization. The activation barriers for the GPx-like mechanism of activity of several substituted areneselenols are calculated using DFT and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a technique that incorporates networks of solvent molecules into the theoretical model to facilitate proton transfer between sites in the reactant and product. DFT-SAPE models show that, in addition to decreasing the barrier to oxidation of the selenol, Se···N,O interactions generally increase the barriers for selenenic acid reduction and selenol regeneration because the Se···N,O interaction must be broken for the reaction to proceed. Calculated activation barriers for the rate-determining step are consistent with the relative experimental GPx-like activities of a series of diaryl diselenides.

  17. Comparing the biological washout of β+-activity induced in mice brain after 12C-ion and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In clinical ion beam therapy, protons as well as heavier ions such as carbon are used for treatment. For protons, β+-emitters are only induced by fragmentation reactions in the target (target fragmentation), whereas for heavy ions, they are additionally induced by fragmentations of the projectile (further referred to as autoactivation). An approach utilizing these processes for treatment verfication, by comparing measured Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations, has already been clinically implemented. For an accurate simulation, it is important to consider the biological washout of β+-emitters due to vital functions. To date, mathematical expressions for washout have mainly been determined by using radioactive beams of 10C- and 11C-ions, both β+-emitters, to enhance the counting statistics in the irradiated area. Still, the question of how the choice of projectile (autoactivating or non-autoactivating) influences the washout coefficients, has not been addressed. In this context, an experiment was carried out at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center with the purpose of directly comparing irradiation-induced biological washout coefficients in mice for protons and 12C-ions. To this aim, mice were irradiated in the brain region with protons and 12C-ions and measured after irradiation with a PET/CT scanner (Siemens Biograph mCT). After an appropriate waiting time, the mice were sacrificed, then irradiated and measured again under similar conditions. The resulting data were processed and fitted numerically to deduce the main washout parameters. Despite the very low PET counting statistics, a consistent difference could be identified between 12C-ion and proton irradiated mice, with the 12C data being described best by a two component fit with a combined medium and slow washout fraction of 0.50 ± 0.05 and the proton mice data being described best by a one component fit with only one (slow) washout fraction of 0.73 ± 0

  18. Influence of Protonation State on the Excited State Dynamics of a Photobiologically Active Ru(II) Dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Christian; Sainuddin, Tariq; Wächtler, Maria; Monro, Susan; Kupfer, Stephan; Guthmuller, Julien; Gräfe, Stefanie; McFarland, Sherri; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2016-08-18

    The influence of ligand protonation on the photophysics of a ruthenium (Ru) dyad bearing the 2-(1-pyrenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]-phenanthroline (ippy) ligand was investigated by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. It was found that changes in the protonation state of the imidazole group led to changes in the electronic configuration of the lowest lying excited state. Formation of the fully deprotonated imidazole anion resulted in excited state signatures that were consistent with a low-lying intraligand (IL) triplet state. This assignment was supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. IL triplet states have been suggested to be potent mediators of photodynamic effects. Thus, these results are of interest in the design of Ru metal complexes as photosensitizers (PSs) for photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:27459188

  19. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M. -J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  20. Activation cross-sections of longer lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on manganese up to 70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: •Experimental excitation function of proton induced reactions on manganese up to 70 MeV. •Model code calculations with EMPIRE-3 and TALYS (TENDL-2012). •Integral production yield calculation. •Thin Layer Activation (TLA) curves for {sup 54}Mn and {sup 51}Cr. •Tabulated experimental results. -- Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of the proton induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the {sup 55}Mn(p,x){sup 54,52g}Mn, {sup 51}Cr and {sup 48}V were measured up to 70 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using the stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental data are analyzed and compared to the earlier results and to the prediction of the EMPIRE-3 as well as the TALYS theoretical model code in the TENDL-2012 library. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated. Practical applications of the cross-sections e.g. for thin layer activation are discussed.

  1. Decay studies of nuclei near the proton drip line: /sup 35/Ca, /sup 31/Ar, /sup 69/Br, /sup 65/As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiff, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    Studies of new beta-delayed two-proton emitters and a search for ground state proton radioactivity in medium mass nuclei were performed using various experimental techniques in conjunction with several detection systems. A helium-jet transport system and three-element silicon telescopes were used to discover the existence and detect the decay of the first T/sub Z/ = /minus/5/2 nuclide, /sup 35/Ca. Two-proton emission from the T = 5/2 isobaric analog state in /sup 35/K at an excitation energy of 9.053 /plus minus/ 0.045 MeV, fed by the superallowed beta decay of /sup 35/Ca, resulted in transitions to both the ground state and first excited state of /sup 33/Cl. The corresponding two-proton sum energies were 4.089 /plus minus/ 0.030 MeV and 3.287 /plus minus/ 0.030 MeV. Measurements of the individual proton energies indicated the prevalence of a sequential decay mechanism. Using the isobaric multiplet mass equation, the mass excess of /sup 35/Ca was calculated to be 4.453 /plus minus/ 0.060 MeV. In order to study whose half-lives were too short for the helium-jet system, an in-beam recoil catcher wheel was constructed. The wheel speed can be varied to study nuclides whose half-lives range from 100 /mu/s to /approximately/250 ms. The first new decay observed with the wheel system and traditional /Delta/E-E telescopes was the beta-delayed two-proton emission from /sup 31/Ar. The two-proton sum energy of /approximately/7.5 MeV corresponds to a transition from the isobaric analog state in /sup 31/Cl to the ground state of /sup 29/P. The search for proton radioactivity required the development of low energy, particle identification detector telescopes. These telescopes, comprised of a gas /Delta/E and silicon E, were used in conjunction with the in-beam recoil catcher wheel to search for ground state proton emission from /sup 69/Br and /sup 65/As. 90 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Particle production in proton-proton collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoneim, M. T.; Hussein, M. T.; Sawy, F. H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of particle production in proton-proton collisions using data that are collected from many experiments of relative wide range of reaction energies. These data include production of pions and heavier particles; like keons and lambda hyperons. Proton-proton collision is a simple system to investigate and to be considered a starting point that guides to more complicated processes of production in the proton-nucleus and the nucleus-nucleus collisions. In this pape...

  3. Changes of plasma membrane ATPase activity,membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in Kandelia candel and Avicennia marina seedlings with various salinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhong-qiu; ZHENG Hai-lei; ZHU Yong-guan

    2004-01-01

    The salt-secreting mangrove, Avicennia marina, and non-salt-secreting mangrove, Kandelia candel were cultivated in sand with various salinities(0 ‰, 10 ‰, 20 ‰, 30 ‰, 40 ‰) for 60 d. Plasma membrane vesicles of high-purity in leaves and roots of A.marina and K. candel seedlings were obtained by two-phase partitioning. The function of the plasma membranes, the activity of ATPase, membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient, at various salinities were investigated. The results showed that within a certain range of salinity(A. marina and roots of K. candel: 0-30‰;leaves of K.candel: 0-20‰), the activity of ATPase increased with increasing salinity, while high salinity(above 30‰ or 20‰) inhibited ATPase activity. In comparison with A. marina, K. candel appeared to be more sensitive to salinity. The dynamics of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in leaves and roots of A. marina and K. candel seedlings were similar to that of ATPase. When treated directly by NaCl all the indexes were inhibited markedly: there was a little increase within 0-10‰(K. candel) or 0-20‰(A. marina) followed by sharp declining. It indicated that the structure and function of plasma membrane was damaged severely.

  4. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  5. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  6. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  7. Organic ammonium ion-occluded flexible coordination polymers:Thermal activation,structure transformation and proton transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Solvothermal reactions of 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3btc) with cadmium acetate or zinc acetate yielded two compounds formulated as (Me2NH2)[Cd(btc)]·DMA (1) (btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide) and (Me2NH2)[Zn(btc)]·DMF (2) (DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide). Both are 3-D frameworks with the rutile topology, which are constructed from six-connected dimeric metal cores and three-connected btc linkers. The solvent molecules and counter cations are located in the 1-D channels of the frameworks. A slight difference between the two compounds is the different connectivity modes of the metal atoms with the carboxylate groups of the ligands. However, this slight difference results in distinct flexibilities of the two frameworks. Variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the framework of 1 collapses when heated at 180 °C with loss of the guest species, but compound 2 undergoes two structural transformations below 380 °C. Thermogravimetry-infrared spectroscopy analysis for 2 showed that the two structural transformations are induced by separate losses of solvent molecules and counter cations, and that the dimethylammonium cations are eliminated as neutral dimethylamine molecules. IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the protons are transferred from the counter cations onto the uncoordinated carboxylate oxygen atoms on the channel walls. Sorption and proton conduction studies have also been performed for the compounds.

  8. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  9. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules.

  10. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules. PMID:25856001

  11. Nanosized IrO(x)-Ir Catalyst with Relevant Activity for Anodes of Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Produced by a Cost-Effective Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettenmeier, Philipp; Wang, Li; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Gazdzicki, Pawel; Cañas, Natalia A; Handl, Michael; Hiesgen, Renate; Hosseiny, Seyed S; Gago, Aldo S; Friedrich, Kaspar A

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a highly active nanostructured iridium catalyst for anodes of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis. Clusters of nanosized crystallites are obtained by reducing surfactant-stabilized IrCl3 in water-free conditions. The catalyst shows a five-fold higher activity towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) than commercial Ir-black. The improved kinetics of the catalyst are reflected in the high performance of the PEM electrolyzer (1 mg(Ir) cm(-2)), showing an unparalleled low overpotential and negligible degradation. Our results demonstrate that this enhancement cannot be only attributed to increased surface area, but rather to the ligand effect and low coordinate sites resulting in a high turnover frequency (TOF). The catalyst developed herein sets a benchmark and a strategy for the development of ultra-low loading catalyst layers for PEM electrolysis. PMID:26616747

  12. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  13. BiOBr/protonated graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunctions: Intimate interfaces by electrostatic interaction and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhichong; Li, Jun; Cheng, Fuxing [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, 928 Second Avenue, Xiasha Higher Education Zone, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Zhi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, 258 Xueyuan Street, Xiasha Higher Education Zone, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Dong, Xiaoping, E-mail: xpdong@zstu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, 928 Second Avenue, Xiasha Higher Education Zone, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by an electrostatically-driven in-situ growth method. • BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} exhibited a superior visible-light activity and stability. • The efficient separation of charges due to the intimate interface of BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this work, enhanced photocatalytic activity of BiOBr/graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunctions for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) were obtained by the protonation pretreatment of graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with hydrochloric acid. A possibly electrostatic interaction between protonated graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and BiOBr provided a closely intimate interface in the heterojunction, which was demonstrated by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This tight coupling was favorable for the charge transfer between pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BiOBr, and therefore promoted the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole pairs. The effect of composition in heterojunctions on photocatalytic activity was investigated, and the optimal photocatalyst with a BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} mass ratio of 7:3 showed a superior activity, which was 35.03 and 33.72 times higher than that over pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BiOBr, respectively. Radical trap experiments confirmed that the holes and superoxide radical species were the main reactive species in the RhB photodegradation process. Moreover, the stability of BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunction was also tested and the RhB degradation efficiency declined by only 9.6% after seven successive cycles.

  14. Acidic digestion in a teleost: postprandial and circadian pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and pepsinogen and proton pump mRNAs expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Yúfera

    Full Text Available Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices.

  15. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  16. Modeling the cathode in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using density functional theory How the carbon support can affect durability and activity of a platinum catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Michael Nelson

    The current global energy and environmental challenges need to be addressed by developing a new portfolio of clean power producing devices. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell has the potential to be included and can fit into a variety of niches ranging from portable electronics to stationary residential applications. One of the many barriers to commercial viability is the cost of the cathode layer which requires too much platinum metal to achieve a comparable power output as well as would need to be replaced more frequently when compared to conventional sources for most applications. Using density functional theory, an ab initio modeling technique, these durability and activity issues are examined for platinum catalysts on graphene and carbon nanotube supports. The carbon supports were also doped by replacing individual carbon atoms with other second row elements (beryllium, boron, nitrogen, and oxygen) and the effect on the platinum-surface interaction along with the interaction between the platinum and the oxygen reduction reaction intermediates are discussed. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cell, density functional theory, platinum catalyst, oxygen reduction reaction, doped carbon surfaces

  17. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  18. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  19. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  20. Study of activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on barium: Production of {sup 131}Ba{yields}{sup 131}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkanyi, F.; Ditroi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Kiraly, B., E-mail: kiralyb@atomki.h [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of the therapeutic radioisotope {sup 131}Cs, excitation functions of the {sup nat}Ba(p,x){sup 135,132mg}La, {sup ind135m,cum133m,cum133mg,cum131mg}Ba and {sup 136mg,134mg,132,cum129}Cs reactions were measured in the 30-70 MeV energy range using stacked foil irradiation technique, activation method and gamma spectroscopy. Comparisons with new results of the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II codes and with existing data obtained with TALYS code are shown. From the measured cross section data integral yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. Potential use of proton induced reactions on Ba for production of {sup 131}Cs is discussed.

  1. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  2. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015. PMID:27451109

  3. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of $^{161}$Er and $^{160}$Er medical isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65 MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of $^{161}$Er, $^{160}$Er and $^{159,157}$Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related $^{161}$Er and $^{160}$Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the $^{162}$Er(p,x)$^{161,160}$Er and $^{162}$Er(d,x)$^{161,160}$Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  4. LHCb results from proton ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Massacrier, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Proton-lead and lead-proton data taking during 2013 has allowed LHCb to expand its physics program to heavy ion physics. Results include the first forward measurement of Z production in proton-lead collisions as well as a measurement of the nuclear modification factor and forward-backward production of prompt and displaced J/$\\psi$, $\\psi$(2S) and $\\Upsilon$. Angular particle correlations have also been measured for events of varying charged particle activity.

  5. LHCb results from proton ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Massacrier Laure

    2016-01-01

    Proton-lead and lead-proton data taking during 2013 has allowed LHCb to expand its physics program to heavy ion physics. Results include the first forward measurement of Z production in proton-lead collisions as well as a measurement of the nuclear modification factor and forward-backward production of prompt and displaced J/ψ, ψ(2S) and ϒ. Angular particle correlations have also been measured for events of varying charged particle activity.

  6. Voltage-gated proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoursey, Thomas E

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely, the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance approximately 10(3) times smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn(2+) (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B-lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H(+) for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens.

  7. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  8. Induction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. PMID:25931521

  9. Induction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godaux, Damien; Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. PMID:25931521

  10. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm

    2008-01-29

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e{sup {+-}}, {nu}{sub e}, {bar {nu}}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the {Delta}(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c{sup 2}. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a pencil beam of

  11. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  12. Charm production from proton-proton collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the cross sections for charmed hadron production from proton-proton reactions $pp\\to\\bar D^0p\\Lambda_c^+$ and $pp\\to\\bar D^{*0}p\\Lambda_c^+$ using a hadronic Lagrangian. With empirical coupling constants and cutoff parameters in the form factors, sum of their cross sections at center-of-mass energy of 11.5 GeV is about 1 $\\mu$b and is comparable to measured inclusive cross section for charmed hadron production from proton-proton reactions. The cross section decreases to about 1 nb...

  13. Strangeness Suppression in Proton-Proton Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Aichelin, Joerg; Werner, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    We analyse strangeness production in proton-proton (pp) collisions at SPS and RHIC energies, using the recently advanced NeXus approach. After having verified that the model reproduces well the existing data, we interpret the results: strangeness is suppressed in proton-proton collisions at SPS energy as compared to electron-positron (e+e-) annihilation due to the limited masses of the strings produced in the reaction, whereas high energy pp and e+e- collisions agree quantitatively . Thus str...

  14. Parity Violation in Proton-Proton Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    van Oers, W. T. H.; collaboration, for E497

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of parity-violating longitudinal analyzing powers (normalized asymmetries) in polarized proton-proton scattering provide a unique window on the interplay between the weak and strong interactions between and within hadrons. Several new proton-proton parity violation experiments are presently either being performed or are being prepared for execution in the near future: at TRIUMF at 221 MeV and 450 MeV and at COSY (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich) at 230 MeV and near 1.3 GeV. These ex...

  15. Effect of catalyst distribution in the active layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells; Effet de la distribution du catalyseur dans les couches actives de piles a combustible de type PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultel, Y.; Durand, R.; Ozil, P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Electrochimie et d' Electrometallurgie, Lab. d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, UMR 5631, 38 - Grenoble (France); Antoine, O. [Geneva Univ., Dept. de Chimie Minerale, Analytique et Appliquee, Sciences 2 (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the distribution of the platinum catalyst in the active layers on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) electrodes. In the one hand, the results predicted by the classical models and those in which the active layers is modified have been compared; these results have allowed to demonstrate theoretically the effect of the discrete distribution of the platinum catalyst in the form of nano-particles. On the other hand, the influence of a distribution gradient of the platinum catalyst for porous and non-porous active layers of PEMFC cathode has been experimentally demonstrated and predicted by numerical simulations. (O.M.)

  16. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  17. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  18. SYNTHESIS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER CATALYZED BY ACIDIC ION-EXCHANGE RESINS - INFLUENCE OF THE PROTON ACTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1995-01-01

    The catalytic activity of various strong acid ion-exchange resins on the synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) from methanol and isobutene has been investigated. Relative to Amberlyst 15, Kastel CS 381 and Amberlyst CSP have similar rate constants, whereas Duolite ES 276 and Amberlyst XE 307 h

  19. Two-proton radioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Blank, Bertram; Ploszajczak, Marek

    2007-01-01

    In the first part of the present review paper, experimental results which lead to the discovery of two-proton radioactivity are reviewed. Beyond two-proton emission from nuclear ground states, we also discuss experimental studies of two-proton emission from excited states populated either by nuclear beta decay or by inelastic reactions. In the second part, we review the modern theory of two-proton radioactivity. An outlook to future experimental studies and theoretical developments will concl...

  20. Structure of Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2003-01-01

    Electron--proton scattering in elastic and highly inelastic region is reviewed in a unified approach. The importance of parity--violating scattering due to electro--weak interference in probing the structure of proton is emphasized. The importance of longitudnal spin--spin asymmetry as well as parity violating longitudnal asymmetry to extract the structure functions of proton in both regions are discussed. The recoil polarization of proton in the elastic scattering is also discussed.

  1. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  2. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-...

  3. Fighting cancer with protons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, R.

    To help in the fight against cancer, researchers at TU Delft are lobbying for a proton clinic in Delft. Proton therapy is potentially far more effective than current treatment methods. Protons attack tumours with much greater precision, thus leaving the healthy tissue intact.

  4. Spatial correlation of proton irradiation-induced activity and dose in polymer gel phantoms for PET/CT delivery verification studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work demonstrates a novel application of BANG3-Pro2 polymer gel dosimeter as a dosimetric phantom able to accurately capture both dose and induced activity. Methods: BANG3-Pro2 dosimeters were irradiated with a clinical proton beam using an unmodulated beam and a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) modulation, the latter with a Lucite compensator to introduce a range offset in one quadrant of the circular field. The dosimeters were imaged in a nearby positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) unit starting within 5 min of beam-off. Induced positron emission (PE) activity along the central axis of the beam was compared to analytical calculations. Dose distributions were read out using an optical CT scanner and were validated against ion chamber measurements and the treatment plan. The offset between the distal fall-off of dose and activity (50% level) was determined over the entire irradiated field. Lateral profiles of PE were correlated to measured dose for the unmodulated beam delivery. Results: Measured profiles of PE activity along the central beam axis were found to be within 10% of the predictions of analytical calculations. The depth-dose profiles agreed with the reference values (ion chamber or treatment plan) within 3%. The offset between the depth profiles of dose and activity for the unmodulated beam was 8.4 ± 1.4 mm. For the compensator-based SOBP delivery, the distribution of offsets throughout the field was found to be bimodal, with the mean of 8.9 ± 2.8 mm for the thinner region of the compensator and 4.3 ± 2.5 mm for the thicker region. For the pristine beam delivery, lateral profiles of dose and activity were found to exhibit fair spatial correlation throughout the beam range, with the mean 2D gamma index of 0.42 and 91% of the evaluated pixels passing the test. Conclusions: This work presents the first demonstration of simultaneous and accurate experimental measurement of three-dimensional distributions of dose and induced

  5. Effect of heat treatment on the activity and stability of carbon supported PtMo alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen oxidation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Carreras, Alejo; Trincavelli, Jorge; Ticianelli, Edson Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the activity, stability and CO tolerance of PtMo/C catalysts was studied, due to their applicability in the anode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To this purpose, a carbon supported PtMo (60:40) alloy electrocatalyst was synthesized by the formic acid reduction method, and samples of this catalyst were heat-treated at various temperatures ranging between 400 and 700 °C. The samples were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS). Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the stability, and polarization curves were used to investigate the performance of all materials as CO tolerant anode on a PEM single cell text fixture. The catalyst treated at 600 °C, for which the average crystallite size was 16.7 nm, showed the highest hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO, giving an overpotential induced by CO contamination of 100 mV at 1 Acm-2. This catalyst also showed a better stability up to 5000 potential cycles of cyclic voltammetry, as compared to the untreated catalyst. CV, SEM and WDS results indicated that a partial dissolution of Mo and its migration/diffusion from the anode to the cathode occurs during the single cell cycling. Polarization results showed that the catalytic activity and the stability can be improved by a heat treatment, in spite of a growth of the catalyst particles.

  6. Neutron-gamma competition for $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Mumpower, Matthew; Moller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present a coupled Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation and Hauser-Feshbach (QRPA+HF) model for calculating delayed particle emission. This approach uses microscopic nuclear structure information which starts with Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the daughter nucleus, and then follows the statistical decay until the initial available excitation energy is exhausted. Explicitly included at each particle emission stage is $\\gamma$-ray competition. We explore this model in the context of neutron emission of neutron-rich nuclei and find that neutron-gamma competition can lead to both increases and decreases in neutron emission probabilities, depending on the system considered. A second consequence of this formalism is a prediction of more neutrons on average being emitted after $\\beta$-decay for nuclei near the neutron dripline compared to models that do not consider the statistical decay.

  7. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  8. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Proton-Proton Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Sawy, F. H.; Ghoneim, M. T.; Hussein, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    The fact that quark-quark, quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions are different sources of particle production in proton-proton collision at high energy is investigated in this work. The variation of the multiplicity and pseudo-rapidity distributions of the created particles with the interaction energy is studied. The limits at which Feynman and KNO scaling are violated and their relations with the mechanism of the production sources are considered in view of some theoretical aspects.

  10. Dreidimensionale Wasserstoffmikroskopie mittels Proton-Proton-Streuung

    OpenAIRE

    Reichart, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Mit der Methode der Proton-Proton-Streuung zum Wasserstoffnachweis wurde ein Verfahren entwickelt, um unter Einsatz eines fokussierten 17 MeV Protonenstrahls Wasserstoffverteilungen auf mikroskopischer Skala quantitativ mit einer sub-ppm Nachweisgrenze dreidimensional abzubilden. Die Realisierung am Rasterionenmikroskop SNAKE am Münchener 14 MV Tandembeschleuniger mit einem großen ringförmigen, segmentierten Detektor und einem komplexen Analysesystem ermöglicht eine Nachweisgrenze von 0.08 at...

  11. Proton-proton physics in ALICE

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Tapan K.

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has several unique features which makes it an important contributor to proton-proton physics at the LHC, in addition to its specific design goal of studying the physics of strongly interacting matter in heavy-ion collisions. The unique capabilities include its low transverse momentum (\\pT) acceptance, excellent vertexing, particle identification over a broad \\pT range and jet reconstruction. In this report, a brief review of ALICE capabilities is given for studying bulk p...

  12. Parity Violation in Proton-Proton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Van Oers, W T H

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of parity-violating longitudinal analyzing powers (normalized asymmetries) in polarized proton-proton scattering provide a unique window on the interplay between the weak and strong interactions between and within hadrons. Several new proton-proton parity violation experiments are presently either being performed or are being prepared for execution in the near future: at TRIUMF at 221 MeV and 450 MeV and at COSY (Kernforschungsanlage Jülich) at 230 MeV and near 1.3 GeV. These experiments are intended to provide stringent constraints on the set of six effective weak meson-nucleon coupling constants, which characterize the weak interaction between hadrons in the energy domain where meson exchange models provide an appropriate description. The 221 MeV is unique in that it selects a single transition amplitude (3P2-1D2) and consequently constrains the weak meson-nucleon coupling constant h_rho{pp}. The TRIUMF 221 MeV proton-proton parity violation experiment is described in some detail. A preliminar...

  13. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  14. Pulsed SC Proton Linac

    OpenAIRE

    Ouchi, N.; Chishiro, E.; Tsukishima, C.; Mukugi, K.

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) proton linac is proposed in the JAERI/KEK Joint Project for a high-intensity proton accelerator in the energy region from 400 to 600 MeV. Highly stable fields in the SC cavities are required under the dynamic Lorentz force detuning. A new model describing the dynamic Lorentz detuning has been developed and the validity has been confirmed experimentally. The model has been applied successfully to the rf control simulation of the SC proton linac.

  15. The proton microquasar

    OpenAIRE

    Vila, Gabriela S.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for high-energy emission in microquasars where the energy content of the jets is dominated by relativistic protons. We also include a primary leptonic component. Particles are accelerated up to relativistic energies in a compact region located near the base of the jet, where most of the emission is produced. We calculate the production spectrum due to proton and electron synchrotron radiation and photohadronic interactions. The target field for proton-photon collisions is p...

  16. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kooy, H. M.; Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radio...

  17. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle...

  18. Electromagetic proton form factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, M Y

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  19. Proton Radioactivity Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Hassan A A

    2002-01-01

    A search for new examples of proton emission from ground and low lying states was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. Of particular interest were examples of proton emission from nuclei which were deformed or had an odd number of neutrons, the majority of known proton emitters being odd-even and near-spherical. Candidate nuclei were created via fusion evaporation, these recoils then being separated according to their mass to charge ratio by the Fragment Mass Analyser, before being impla...

  20. Systematics of proton emission

    OpenAIRE

    Delion, D. S.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.

    2006-01-01

    A very simple formula is presented that relates the logarithm of the half-life, corrected by the centrifugal barrier, with the Coulomb parameter in proton decay processes. The corresponding experimental data lie on two straight lines which appear as a result of a sudden change in the nuclear shape marking two regions of deformation independently of the angular momentum of the outgoing proton. This feature provides a powerful tool to assign experimentally quantum numbers in proton emitters.

  1. Proton beam writing

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Watt; Breese, Mark B H; Bettiol, Andrew A; Jeroen A. van Kan

    2007-01-01

    Proton beam (p-beam) writing is a new direct-writing process that uses a focused beam of MeV protons to pattern resist material at nanodimensions. The process, although similar in many ways to direct writing using electrons, nevertheless offers some interesting and unique advantages. Protons, being more massive, have deeper penetration in materials while maintaining a straight path, enabling p-beam writing to fabricate three-dimensional, high aspect ratio structures with vertical, smooth side...

  2. Shapes of the Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    A model proton wave function, constructed using Poincare invariance, and constrained by recent electromagnetic form factor data, is used to study the shape of the proton. Spin-dependent quark densities are defined as matrix elements of density operators in proton states of definite spin-polarization, and shown to have an infinite variety of non-spherical shapes. For high momentum quarks with spin parallel to that of the proton, the shape resembles that of a peanut, but for quarks with anti-pa...

  3. Acceleration of Flare Protons by Langmuir Plasmons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓卿; 张航

    2002-01-01

    We analytically study the turbulent acceleration of solar protons by strong Langmuir plasmons in Cerenkov processes. It is shown that among the wave spectra with self-retained source only the Pelletier spectrum (Wk ∝ k-7/2) can result in the energy spectrum of non-relativistic protons, which gives a good fit to that observed from solarflare events. It is quite possible that strong Langmuir turbulence presents in coronal active region, with three-dimensional, isotropic and stationary spectrum proportional to k-7/2, and is responsible for the acceleration offlare protons.

  4. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul;

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  5. The Rate of the Proton-Proton Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Bahcall, John N.

    1993-01-01

    We re-evaluate the matrix element for the proton-proton reaction which is important for stellar-evolution calculations and for the solar-neutrino problem. We self-consistently determine the effect of vacuum polarization on the matrix element by first correcting the low-energy scattering data to account for vacuum polarization. We then calculate the proton-proton wave function by integrating the Schrodinger equation with vacuum polarization included. We use improved data for proton-proton scat...

  6. Proton-Proton Physics with ALICE

    OpenAIRE

    Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the ALICE experiment at LHC is to study strongly interacting matter at high energy densities as well as the signatures and properties of the quark-gluon plasma. This goal manifests itself in a rich physics program. Although ALICE will mainly study heavy-ion collisions, a dedicated program will concentrate on proton-proton physics. The first part will introduce the ALICE experiment from a pp measurement's point of view. Two unique properties are its low pT cut-off and the excellent...

  7. Proton-proton collisions at production thresholds

    OpenAIRE

    Moskal, P.; Adam, H. -H.; Budzanowski, A.; Grzonka, D.; Jarczyk, L.; Khoukaz, A.; Kilian, K.; Koehler, M; Kowina, P.; Lang, N.; Lister, T.; Oelert, W.; Quentmeier, C.; Santo, R.; Schepers, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results obtained by the COSY-11 collaboration concerning the production of eta and eta' mesons in the pp --> pp Meson reaction are presented. A comparison of the production amplitude for the pi(0), eta and eta' mesons at the same phase space volume allows to conclude that the proton-eta' interaction is in the order of, or smaller than, the proton-pi(0) one. A total cross section determined in a preliminary analysis of the data of elementary kaon and antikaon production via the pp-->ppK...

  8. Baryogenesis and proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constraints are analyzed that proton decay experiments and cosmologically sound unification models impose on each other. An intermediate scale of around 1010 GeV arises from considerations on baryogenesis, inflation and supersymmetry breaking. An upper bound to the gravitino mass of about 50 TeV follows from current proton lifetime limits

  9. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  10. Platinum Activated IrO2/SnO2 Nanocatalysts and Their Electrode Structures for High Performance Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Li, Qingfeng; Christensen, Erik;

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve proton exchange membrane water electrolysis performance, anode catalyst and catalyst layer were examined in this work. SnO2 supported IrO2 nanocatalyst and its analogue with platinum enhancement were firstly synthesized for the oxygen evolution reaction. The effect...

  11. Proton beams in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoroshkov, V.S.; Minakova, E.I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-01

    A branch of radiology, proton therapy employs fast protons as a tool for the treatment of various, mainly oncological, diseases. The features of tissue ionization by protons (Bragg peak) facilitate a further step towards solving the principal challenge in radiology: to deliver a sufficiently high and homogeneous dose to virtually any tumour, while sparing healthy neighbouring tissues, organs and structures. The state of the art of proton therapy is described, as well as the main technical, physics and clinical results gained since the 1950s at high-energy physics centres worldwide. The future of proton therapy is connected with the construction of hospital-based facilities with dedicated medical accelerators and modern technical instrumentation. (author)

  12. Insight into proton transfer in phosphotungstic acid functionalized mesoporous silica-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhua; Yang, Jing; Su, Haibin; Zeng, Jie; Jiang, San Ping; Goddard, William A

    2014-04-01

    We have developed for fuel cells a novel proton exchange membrane (PEM) using inorganic phosphotungstic acid (HPW) as proton carrier and mesoporous silica as matrix (HPW-meso-silica) . The proton conductivity measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is 0.11 S cm(-1) at 90 °C and 100% relative humidity (RH) with a low activation energy of ∼14 kJ mol(-1). In order to determine the energetics associated with proton migration within the HPW-meso-silica PEM and to determine the mechanism of proton hopping, we report density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). These DFT calculations revealed that the proton transfer process involves both intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfer pathways. When the adjacent HPWs are close (less than 17.0 Å apart), the calculated activation energy for intramolecular proton transfer within a HPW molecule is higher (29.1-18.8 kJ/mol) than the barrier for intermolecular proton transfer along the hydrogen bond. We find that the overall barrier for proton movement within the HPW-meso-silica membranes is determined by the intramolecular proton transfer pathway, which explains why the proton conductivity remains unchanged when the weight percentage of HPW on meso-silica is above 67 wt %. In contrast, the activation energy of proton transfer on a clean SiO2 (111) surface is computed to be as high as ∼40 kJ mol(-1), confirming the very low proton conductivity on clean silica surfaces observed experimentally. PMID:24628538

  13. Proton radiography in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, L., E-mail: luca.volpe@mib.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della scienza 3, Milano 20126 (Italy); Batani, D.; Morace, A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della scienza 3, Milano 20126 (Italy); Nicolai, Ph.; Regan, C. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, F33405 (France); Ravasio, A. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS, CEA, Universite Paris VI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2011-10-11

    Generation of high intensity and well collimated multi-energetic proton beams from laser-matter interaction extends the possibility to use protons as a diagnostic tool to image imploding target in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. Due to the very large mass densities reached during implosion, protons traveling through the target undergo a very large number of collisions. Therefore the analysis of experimentally obtained proton images requires care and accurate numerical simulations using both hydrodynamic and Monte Carlo codes. The impact of multiple scattering needs to be carefully considered by taking into account the exact stopping power for dense matter and for the underdense plasma corona. In our paper, density, temperature and ionization degree profiles of the imploding target are obtained by 2D hydrodynamic simulations performed using CHIC code. Proton radiography images are simulated using the Monte Carlo code (MCNPX; adapted to correctly describe multiple scattering and plasma stopping power) in order to reconstruct the complete hydrodynamic history of the imploding target. Finally we develop a simple analytical model to study the performance of proton radiography as a function of initial experimental parameters, and identify two different regimes for proton radiography in ICF.

  14. The proton complex of a diaza-macropentacycle: structure, slow formation, and chirality induction by ion pairing with the optically active 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diyl phosphate anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Clément; Chambron, Jean-Claude; Espinosa, Enrique; Bernauer, Klaus; Scholten, Ulrich; Graff, Roland

    2008-10-17

    The protonation of a sterically crowded [N2S6] macropentacycle (1) with 1 equiv of CF3SO3H in CDCl3 is slow and gives the singly (oo(+) [1 x H](+)) and doubly (o(+)o(+) [1 x 2H](2+)) protonated forms as kinetic products, the i(+)o form of [1 x H](+) being the thermodynamic product. i(+)o [1 x H](+) is C3 helically chiral in the solid state and in solution. The barrier to racemization (DeltaG(double dagger)) of the [1 x H](+) propeller is >71 kJ mol(-1). The ammonium proton is encapsulated in the tetrahedral coordination sphere provided by the endo (i) nitrogen bridgehead atom and the three proximal thioether sulfurs, which makes [1 x H](+) a proton complex. Use of the optically active acid (R)-(-)- or (S)-(+)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diyl hydrogen phosphate (BNPH) in chloroform allowed us to induce a significant diastereomeric excess (24% de), which produced a detectable ICD. The de was decreased in acetone-d6 (10%), suggesting that the sense of chirality of [1 x H](+) is controlled by ion-pair interactions. Detailed NMR studies allowed us to locate the chiral anion on the endo side of [1 x H](+), in the cavity lined by endo t-Bu groups, and to establish that the rate of anion exchange in [1 x H][(S,R)-(+/-)-BNP] was higher than the rate of propeller inversion of [1 x H](+). PMID:18811199

  15. Strangeness in the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberg, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Both perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms contribute to strangeness in the proton sea. We have developed a hybrid model in which non-perturbative contributions are calculated in a meson cloud model which expands the proton in terms of meson-baryon states, and perturbative contributions are calculated in a statistical model which expands the proton in terms of quark-gluon states. The perturbative contributions are represented in the parton distributions of the ``bare'' hadrons in the meson cloud. We compare our results to the recent experimental data of ATLAS and HERMES. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  16. Spin structure and dip development in elastic proton proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current-current interaction picture is used to obtain excellent fit for all proton proton elastic scattering above 12 GeV/c. Special attention is paid to the development of first, second, and third dips as energy increases. Spin structure of proton proton elastic scattering is displayed

  17. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  18. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  19. The Effect of Recombinant Ghrelin Plasmid on Pepsin and Proton Pump Activity in Rats%重组生长素对大鼠胃蛋白酶和质子泵活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜改梅; 晏文梅; 胡志华; 蒋加进; 罗碧平

    2012-01-01

    10 weaned rats are randomly divided into treatment and control groups to explore the impact of recombinant ghrelin plasmid on pepsin and proton pump activity. After 5 days, rats in the treatment group are injected with recombinant human growth hormone in the leg muscle. The research is lasted for 29 days. Rats are killed after the test is complete. The stomach is separated and weighed. The gastric mucosa is taken for pepsin and proton activity. The results show that the pepsin and proton pump activity are significantly increased in the treatment group. Therefore, ghrelin can promote gastric exocrine function.%研究生长素对大鼠胃蛋白酶和质子泵活性的影响。取10只刚断乳大鼠,随机分为试验组和对照组。预饲5d后,给试验组大鼠腿部肌肉注射重组生长紊,试验29d。试验结束后处死大鼠,分离胃,称重,取胃粘膜组织测定质子泵活性和胃蛋白酶活性。结果发现试验组大鼠质子泵和胃蛋白酶活性显著高于对照组,提示Ghrelin可以促进对胃外分泌功能具有重要的调节作用。

  20. Proton reduction by a nickel complex with an internal quinoline moiety for proton relay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majee, Karunamay; Patel, Jully; Rai, Surabhi; Das, Babulal; Panda, Binata; Padhi, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-08-21

    The complex Ni(DQPD) (where DQPD = deprotonated N(2),N(6)-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide (DQPDH2)) behaves as a visible light driven active catalyst to reduce protons from water when employed with the photosensitizer fluorescein (Fl) and triethylamine (TEA) as the sacrificial electron donor. The photocatalytic system shows very high activity, attaining 2160 turnovers and an initial turnover rate of 0.032 s(-1) with respect to the catalyst. The proposed electrocatalytic mechanism is of the CECE type (C is a chemical step protonation and E is the electrochemical step reduction), where the Ni(DQPD) catalyst undergoes rapid protonation at the non-coordinating nitrogen atom of the quinoline before undergoing reduction. The location of the pendant base is a key factor such that the N-H resulting from the protonation of the non-coordinating nitrogen atom of the quinoline is properly located to interact with the Ni-H hydride leading to heterocoupling between protons and hydrides. Theoretical calculations for the catalytic system were carried out using the density functional level of theory (DFT) and are consistent with a mechanism for catalysis in a polypyridine nickel system. This is the first report of a polypyridine based nickel catalyst where the pendant base is responsible for the internal proton relay towards the metal center through the heterocoupling between protons and hydrides to generate hydrogen. PMID:27432223

  1. Proton transport in proton exchange membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmeisser, Jennifer Mary

    2007-01-01

    This work investigated several proton exchange membranes (PEMs): perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymers (Nafion®), sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (S-PEEK), radiation-grafted ethylenetetrafluoroethylene-grafted-poly(styrene sulfonic) acid (ETFE-g-PSSA), sulfonated trifluorostyrene-co-substituted trifluorostyrene (BAM®), sulfonated polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene-r-butylene)-b-polystyrene triblock copolymer (S-SEBS), and a series of novel photocurable polyelectrolytes. These polymer systems dif...

  2. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  3. Lorentz Contracted Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Bedoya Fierro, D.; Kelkar, N.(Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1E No. 18A-10, Santafe de Bogota, Colombia); Nowakowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The proton charge and magnetization density distributions can be related to the well known Sachs electromagnetic form factors $G_{E,M}({\\bm q}^{2})$ through Fourier transforms, only in the Breit frame. The Breit frame however moves with relativistic velocities in the Lab and a Lorentz boost must be applied to the form factors before extracting the static properties of the proton from the corresponding densities. Apart from this, the Fourier transform relating the densities and form factors is...

  4. New Proton radioactivity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Richard J

    1998-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out at Argonne National Laboratory to search for examples of proton emission from ground and low­lying states in odd­Z nuclei at the proton drip­line. Recoils from fusion evaporation reactions were separated from other reaction products and dispersed according to their mass to charge ratio by the Fragment Mass Analyser, before being implanted into a double­sided silicon strip detector system, where their subsequent particle decays (prot...

  5. Neutron-Proton Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Di Grezia, E.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical model describing neutron-proton scattering developed by Majorana as early as in 1932, is discussed in detail with the experiments that motivated it. Majorana using collisions' theory, obtained the explicit expression of solutions of wave equation of the neutron-proton system. In this work two different models, the unpublished one of Majorana and the contemporary work of Massey, are studied and compared.

  6. Proton irradiation of EMCCDs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, DR; Ingley, R.; Holland, AD

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the irradiation of 95 electron multiplication charge coupled devices (EMCCDs) at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland, to investigate the effects of proton irradiation on the operational characteristics of CCDs featuring electron multiplication technology for space use. This work was carried out in support of the CCD development for the radial velocity spectrometer (RVS) instrument of the European Space Agency's cornerstone Gaia mission. Previous proton irradia...

  7. Proton femtoscopy in STAR

    OpenAIRE

    Zbroszczyk Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Two-particle femtoscopy allows one to study the properties of matter created in heavy ion collisions. It makes the study of space-time evolution of the source possible and may be applied to many different combinations of hadron pairs. Two-proton femtoscopy enables to extract the radii of produced sources which, compared to those obtained from pion studies, provide additional information about source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for protons and a...

  8. Muon-proton Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Borie, E.

    2012-01-01

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  9. Polarized Proton Nucleus Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Trueman, T. L.

    2000-01-01

    We show that, to a very good approximation, the ratio of the spin-flip to the non-flip parts of the elastic proton-nucleus amplitude is the same as for proton-nucleon scattering at very high energy. The result is used to do a realistic calculation of the analyzing power A_N for pC scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference (CNI) region of momentum transfer.

  10. Journal of Proton Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT) is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each publi...

  11. Limits of proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  12. The physics of proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes a...

  13. Effect of Proton Beam on Cancer Progressive and Metastatic Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Y. H.; Nam, K. S.; Oh, Y. H.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, M. Y.; Jang, J. S. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of proton beam on enzymes for promotion/progression of carcinogenesis and metastasis of malignant tumor cells to clarify proton beam-specific biological effects. The changes of cancer chemopreventive enzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells irradiated with proton beams were tested by measuring the activities of quinine reductase (QR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), glutathione (GSH) levels, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We also examined the effect of proton beam on the ODC activity and expression of COX-2 in human breast cancer cell. We then assessed the metastatic capabilities of HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cells irradiated with proton beam by measuring the invasiveness of cells through Matrigel-coated membrane and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. QR activity of irradiated HT-29 cells was slightly increased. Proton irradiation at dose of 32 Gy in HT-29 cells increased GST activity by 1.23-fold. In addition GSH levels in HT-29 cells was significantly increased 1.23- (p<0.05), 1.32- (p<0.01) and 1.34-fold (p<0.01) with the proton irradiation at doses of 8, 16 and 32 Gy, respectively. These results suggest that colon cancer chemopreventive activity was increased with the proton irradiation by increasing QR and GST activities and GSH levels and inhibiting ODC activity. Proton ion irradiation decreased the invasiveness of TPA-treated HT-29 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells through Matrigel-coated membrane. Proton ion irradiation pretreatment decreased TPA-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. Further studies are necessary to investigate if these findings could be translated to in vivo situations

  14. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patie

  15. Protonic transistors from thin reflecting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic transistors from organic and biological materials hold great promise for bioelectronics applications. Thus, much research effort has focused on optimizing the performance of these devices. Herein, we experimentally validate a straightforward strategy for enhancing the high to low current ratios of protein-based protonic transistors. Upon reducing the thickness of the transistors’ active layers, we increase their high to low current ratios 2-fold while leaving the other figures of merit unchanged. The measured ratio of 3.3 is comparable to the best values found for analogous devices. These findings underscore the importance of the active layer geometry for optimum protonic transistor functionality

  16. Polarized protons and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RHIC, the heavy ion collider being built at Brookhaven, offers an exciting opportunity to collide highly polarized protons at high energy and luminosity. This new facility would combine the existing AGS polarized proton capability with the new Booster/Accumulator and spin rotators to achieve collisions between intense beams of polarized protons at a collision energy of 500 GeV. At this energy and the expected luminosity of 2 x 1032 cm2/second physics probes will include high PT jets, direct photons, Drell-Yan, W±, and heavy quarks. The accessible physics includes study of the spin content of the proton, particularly gluon and antiquark polarization, study of large PQCD-predicted asymmetries for parton-parton subprocesses, and parity violation studies and searches. The proton spin direction at a RHIC crossing can be longitudinal or transverse and can alternate bunch-to-bunch giving exquisite control of systematic errors. At RHIC double spin experiments can be done with pure beams and the energy and luminosity open a new domain for probing the physics of spin. An international collaboration is forming which proposes to exploit the unique physics available from a polarized RHIC. Important steps, leading to a polarized RHIC, have been taken. The AGS has already accelerated polarized protons. A new Booster/Accumulator has been commissioned. A beautiful series of machine experiments at Indian University have verified that spin rotators indeed remove spin resonance behavior, which is the key to achieving polarized proton acceleration to high energy. E880, an accelerator experiment which will build, install, and test a Siberian Snake in the AGS, was approved by the Brookhaven PAC in August 1991. The snake will be installed in the AGS in the summer of 1993. RHIC construction has started, with heavy ion experiments to begin in 1997

  17. Proton beam therapy control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  18. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  19. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  20. Proton-proton reaction theory with proton polarizability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of proton polarizability in pp-scattering and in pp-reaction is considered with including a polarization potential into pp-interaction. Convenient low-energy representations of the pp-scattering function are derived within the variable phase approach and are used for a detailed analytical and numerical analysis of the pp-reaction matrix element considered in the standard impulse approximation. It is proved that for low astrophysical energies this squared matrix element and the contribution from the polarization potential to the astrophysical factor S11 may be approximated by linear functions of energy E, while the part of this contribution associated, with the region of distances quasiclassically avoided for the pp-scattering has the E8/3 threshold (E→O) behaviour. 45 refs

  1. Optimal Proton Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, K J

    2006-01-01

    In a neutron lifetime experiment conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, protons produced by neutron decay events are confined in a Penning trap. In each run of the experiment, there is a trapping stage of duration $\\tau$. After the trapping stage, protons are purged from the trap. A proton detector provides incomplete information because it goes dead after detecting the first of any purged protons. Further, there is a dead time $\\delta$ between the end of the trapping stage in one run and the beginning of the next trapping stage in the next run. Based on the fraction of runs where a proton is detected, I estimate the trapping rate $\\lambda$ by the method of maximum likelihood. I show that the expected value of the maximum likelihood estimate is infinite. To obtain a maximum likelihood estimate with a finite expected value and a well-defined and finite variance, I restrict attention to a subsample of all realizations of the data. This subsample excludes an exceedingly rare realization...

  2. Protonated salicylaldehyde: Electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alata, Ivan [CLUPS (Centre Laser de l' Universite Paris Sud)/LUMAT - FR 2764, Bat. 106, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Omidyan, Reza [CLUPS (Centre Laser de l' Universite Paris Sud)/LUMAT - FR 2764, Bat. 106, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, 81746-73441 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Broquier, Michel [CLUPS (Centre Laser de l' Universite Paris Sud)/LUMAT - FR 2764, Bat. 106, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d' Orsay, CNRS (UMR 8214), Bat. 210, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dedonder, Claude, E-mail: claude.dedonder-lardeux@u-psud.fr [CLUPS (Centre Laser de l' Universite Paris Sud)/LUMAT - FR 2764, Bat. 106, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d' Orsay, CNRS (UMR 8214), Bat. 210, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); and others

    2012-05-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the vibrationally resolved electronic spectrum of protonated salicylaldehyde. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ground and excited states of the 15 possible isomers have been calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Among these 15 isomers, only three may contribute to the observed spectrum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Franck-Condon simulations discriminate the isomer responsible for the observed spectrum. - Abstract: The excitation spectrum of protonated salicylaldehyde has been recorded in the 20,800-22,400 cm{sup -1} region (480-450 nm). The first excited state of protonated salicylaldehyde is a {pi}{pi}{sup Asterisk-Operator} state, largely red shifted as compared to the {pi}{pi}{sup Asterisk-Operator} transition of its neutral analogue. Like protonated benzaldehyde and in contrast to some other protonated aromatic molecules such as benzene or tryptophan in which the excited state dynamics is so fast that no vibrational structure can be observed, the vibrational bands are well resolved and assigned. This molecule has many low energy isomers and the simulations of the electronic spectrum via ab initio excited state optimizations and Franck-Condon calculations are precise enough to assign the observed electronic spectrum to one of the isomers.

  3. Proton Conductivity and Operational Features Of PBI-Based Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Precht Noyé, Pernille;

    2005-01-01

    As an approach to high temperature operation of PEMFCs, acid-doped PBI membranes are under active development. The membrane exhibits high proton conductivity under low water contents at temperatures up to 200°C. Mechanisms of proton conduction for the membranes have been proposed. Based...

  4. Electrical Mobility of Protons and Proton-Holes in Pure Water Characterized by Physics-Based Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    Pure water has been characterized empirically for nearly a century, as dissociation into hydronium (H3O)1+ and hydroxide (HO)1- ions. Last March, we reported that the ~40 year experimental industrial standard of chemical equilibrium reaction constant, the ion product, can be accounted for by a statistical-physics-based concentration product of two electrical charge carriers, the positively charged protons, p+, and the negatively charged proton holes or prohols, p-, with a thermal activation energy or proton trapping well depth of Ep + / p - = 576 meV, in the 0-100OC pure liquid water. We now report that the empirically fitted industrial standard experimental data (1985, 1987, 2005) of the two dc ion mobilities in liquid water, can also be accounted for by trapping-limited drift of protons and prohols through proton channels of lower proton electrical potential valleys, Ep+/0 water rule.

  5. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  6. Fast Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2009-01-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5) X U(1)_X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p \\to e^+ \\pi^0 from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the mos...

  7. Proton femtoscopy in STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbroszczyk Hanna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-particle femtoscopy allows one to study the properties of matter created in heavy ion collisions. It makes the study of space-time evolution of the source possible and may be applied to many different combinations of hadron pairs. Two-proton femtoscopy enables to extract the radii of produced sources which, compared to those obtained from pion studies, provide additional information about source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for protons and antiprotons for Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV.

  8. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors delivered with active raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT: early treatment results and study concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieken Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particle irradiation was established at the University of Heidelberg 2 years ago. To date, more than 400 patients have been treated including patients with primary brain tumors. In malignant glioma (WHO IV patients, two clinical trials have been set up-one investigating the benefit of a carbon ion (18 GyE vs. a proton boost (10 GyE in addition to photon radiotherapy (50 Gy, the other one investigating reirradiation with escalating total dose schedules starting at 30 GyE. In atypical meningioma patients (WHO °II, a carbon ion boost of 18 GyE is applied to macroscopic tumor residues following previous photon irradiation with 50 Gy. This study was set up in order to investigate toxicity and response after proton and carbon ion therapy for gliomas and meningiomas. Methods 33 patients with gliomas (n = 26 and meningiomas (n = 7 were treated with carbon ion (n = 26 and proton (n = 7 radiotherapy. In 22 patients, particle irradiation was combined with photon therapy. Temozolomide-based chemotherapy was combined with particle therapy in 17 patients with gliomas. Particle therapy as reirradiation was conducted in 7 patients. Target volume definition was based upon CT, MRI and PET imaging. Response was assessed by MRI examinations, and progression was diagnosed according to the Macdonald criteria. Toxicity was classified according to CTCAE v4.0. Results Treatment was completed and tolerated well in all patients. Toxicity was moderate and included fatigue (24.2%, intermittent cranial nerve symptoms (6% and single episodes of seizures (6%. At first and second follow-up examinations, mean maximum tumor diameters had slightly decreased from 29.7 mm to 27.1 mm and 24.9 mm respectively. Nine glioma patients suffered from tumor relapse, among these 5 with infield relapses, causing death in 8 patients. There was no progression in any meningioma patient. Conclusions Particle radiotherapy is safe and feasible in patients with primary brain

  9. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity.

  10. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. PMID:27423927

  11. A highly active anode functional layer for solid oxide fuel cells based on proton-conducting electrolyte BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuling; Qiu, Yu'e.; Jin, Feng; Guo, Feng; Song, Yulan; Zhu, Baoyong

    2013-11-01

    Extensive works have been performed to diminish cathode polarization for proton-conducting electrolyte based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) while not much attention is paid to functional anode for improving electrochemical reaction at three-phase-boundaries (TPB). In this work, a highly active anode functional layer (FL) synthesized by a modified combustion method was employed to significantly elevate the cell performance at intermediate operation temperatures (550-650 °C). The effects of anode structure configuration, FL powder size and thickness on power outputs and electrode polarization were investigated. A maximum power density of 489 mW cm-2 and a low electrode polarization resistance of 0.37 Ω cm2 were achieved at 650 °C, indicating fuel gas transport and hydrogen oxidation reaction at TPB sites largely contribute to total cell resistance which could be effectively diminished by optimization of anodic interface environment with the adoption of highly active anode powders.

  12. SU-E-T-231: Measurements of Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated Proton Dose Enhancement Due to Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission and Activation Products Using Radiochromic Films and CdTe Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J; Cho, S [Dept. of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Manohar, N [Dept. of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Medical Physics Program, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Krishnan, S [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There have been several reports of enhanced cell-killing and tumor regression when tumor cells and mouse tumors were loaded with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) prior to proton irradiation. While particle-induced xray emission (PIXE), Auger electrons, secondary electrons, free radicals, and biological effects have been suggested as potential mechanisms responsible for the observed GNP-mediated dose enhancement/radiosensitization, there is a lack of quantitative analysis regarding the contribution from each mechanism. Here, we report our experimental effort to quantify some of these effects. Methods: 5-cm-long cylindrical plastic vials were filled with 1.8 mL of either water or water mixed with cylindrical GNPs at the same gold concentration (0.3 mg Au/g) as used in previous animal studies. A piece of EBT2 radiochromic film (30-µm active-layer sandwiched between 80/175-µm outer-layers) was inserted along the long axis of each vial and used to measure dose enhancement due to PIXE from GNPs. Vials were placed at center-of-modulation (COM) and 3-cm up-/down-stream from COM and irradiated with 5 different doses (2–10 Gy) using 10-cm-SOBP 160-MeV protons. After irradiation, films were cleaned and read to determine the delivered dose. A vial containing spherical GNPs (20 mg Au/g) was also irradiated, and gamma-rays from activation products were measured using a cadmium-telluride (CdTe) detector. Results: Film measurements showed no significant dose enhancement beyond the experimental uncertainty (∼2%). There was a detectable activation product from GNPs, but it appeared to contribute to dose enhancement minimally (<0.01%). Conclusion: Considering the composition of EBT2 film, it can be inferred that gold characteristic x-rays from PIXE and their secondary electrons make insignificant contribution to dose enhancement. The current investigation also suggests negligible dose enhancement due to activation products. Thus, previously-reported GNP-mediated proton dose

  13. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  14. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  15. The Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scanning proton microprobe is described which operates in ultra-high vacuum with a resolution of ten microns. The operating principles and main features of the design are discussed and the ability of such an instrument to detect trace elements down to a few ppm by mass is illustrated

  16. Changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity evaluated by the [(13)C]-pantoprazole breath test after co-administration of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors following percutaneous coronary intervention and correlation to platelet reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Adrien; Modak, Anil; Déry, Ugo; Roy, Mélanie; Rinfret, Stéphane; Bertrand, Olivier F; Larose, Éric; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Barbeau, Gérald; Gleeton, Onil; Nguyen, Can Manh; Proulx, Guy; Noël, Bernard; Roy, Louis; Paradis, Jean-Michel; De Larochellière, Robert; Déry, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular events following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). These agents increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. To prevent these events, proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are routinely prescribed. It has been reported that with the exception of pantoprazole and dexlanzoprazole, PPIs can impede conversion of clopidogrel by cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) to its active metabolite, a critical step required for clopidogrel efficacy. Changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity (phenotype) and its correlation with platelet reactivity following PPI therapy has not yet been fully described. In this study we attempted to determine if the [ (13)C]-pantoprazole breath test (Ptz-BT) can evaluate changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity (phenoconversion) following the administration of PPI in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients treated with DAPT after PCI. Thirty (30) days after successful PCI with stent placement, 59 patients enrolled in the Evaluation of the Influence of Statins and Proton Pump Inhibitors on Clopidogrel Antiplatelet Effects (SPICE) trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00930670) were recruited to participate in this sub study. Patients were randomized to one of 4 antacid therapies (omeprazole, esomeprazole. pantoprazole or ranitidine). Subjects were administered the Ptz-BT and platelet function was evaluated by vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and light transmittance aggregometry before and 30 d after treatment with antacid therapy. Patients randomized to esomeprazole and omeprazole had greater high on-treatment platelet reactivity and lowering of CYP2C19 enzyme activity at Day 60 after 30 d of PPI therapy. Patients randomized to ranitidine and pantoprazole did not show any changes in platelet activity or CYP 2C19 enzyme activity. In patients treated with esomeprazole and omeprazole, changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity

  17. Proton transfer pathways in Photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and the 1.9-Å crystal structure of Photosystem II (Umena, Y., Kawakami, K., Shen, J.-R., and Kamiya, N. (2011) Nature 473, 55-60), we investigated the H-bonding environment of the redox active tyrosine, TyrD and obtained insights that help explain its slow redox kinetics and the stability of TyrD radical. The water molecule distal to TyrD, 4 Å away from the phenolic O of TyrD (OTyrD) , corresponds to the presence of the tyrosyl radical state. The water molecule proximal to TyrD, in H-bonding distance to OTyrD, corresponds to the presence of the unoxidised tyrosine. The H+ released upon oxidation of TyrD is transferred to the proximal water, which shifts to the distal position, triggering a concerted proton transfer pathway involving D2-Arg180 and a series of waters, through which the proton reaches the aqueous phase at D2-His61. The water movement linked to the ejection of the proton from the hydrophobic environment near TyrD makes oxidation slow and quasi-irreversible, explaining the great stability of the TyrD radical. A symmetry-related proton pathway associated with TyrZ is pointed out and this is associated with one of the Cl- sites. This may represent a proton pathway functional in the water oxidation cycle.

  18. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  19. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  20. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C., E-mail: cinzia.talamonti@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Reggioli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Civinini, C. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Pallotta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  1. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Radici, Marco; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-01-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions and it allows...

  2. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  3. Stereochemistry-Dependent Proton Conduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Tiwari, Omshanker; Gaikwad, Pramod; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2016-01-12

    Graphene oxide (GO) is impermeable to H2 and O2 fuels while permitting H(+) shuttling, making it a potential candidate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), albeit with a large anisotropy in their proton transport having a dominant in plane (σIP) contribution over the through plane (σTP). If GO-based membranes are ever to succeed in PEMFC, it inevitably should have a dominant through-plane proton shuttling capability (σTP), as it is the direction in which proton gets transported in a real fuel-cell configuration. Here we show that anisotropy in proton conduction in GO-based fuel cell membranes can be brought down by selectively tuning the geometric arrangement of functional groups around the dopant molecules. The results show that cis isomer causes a selective amplification of through-plane proton transport, σTP, pointing to a very strong geometry angle in ionic conduction. Intercalation of cis isomer causes significant expansion of GO (001) planes involved in σTP transport due to their mutual H-bonding interaction and efficient bridging of individual GO planes, bringing down the activation energy required for σTP, suggesting the dominance of a Grotthuss-type mechanism. This isomer-governed amplification of through-plane proton shuttling resulted in the overall boosting of fuel-cell performance, and it underlines that geometrical factors should be given prime consideration while selecting dopant molecules for bringing down the anisotropy in proton conduction and enhancing the fuel-cell performance in GO-based PEMFC.

  4. Proton Gradients and Proton-Dependent Transport Processes in the Chloroplast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhner, Ricarda; Aboukila, Ali; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Venema, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced -proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7) and the stroma (pH 8) is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrude protons. More than 30 years ago it was already established that these proton fluxes are electrically counterbalanced by Mg2+, K+, or Cl- fluxes, but only recently the first transport systems that regulate the pH gradient were identified. Notably several (Na+,K+)/H+ antiporter systems where identified, that play a role in pH gradient regulation, ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, or coupling of secondary active transport. The established pH gradients are important to drive uptake of essential ions and solutes, but not many transporters involved have been identified to date. In this mini review we summarize the current status in the field and the open questions that need to be addressed in order to understand how pH gradients are maintained, how this is interconnected with other transport processes and what this means for chloroplast function. PMID:26973667

  5. Antideuteron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Duperray, R. P.; Protasov, K. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental data of the antideuteron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions are analyzed within a simple model based on the diagrammatic approach to the coalescence model. This model is shown to be able to reproduce most of existing data without any additional parameter.

  6. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65 MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides $^{159}$Dy, $^{157}$Dy, $^{155}$Dy, $^{161}$Tb, $^{160}$Tb, $^{156}$Tb, $^{155}$Tb, $^{154m2}$Tb, $^{154m1}$Tb, $^{154g}$Tb, $^{153}$Tb, $^{152}$Tb and $^{151}$Tb are reported in the 36-65 MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  7. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  8. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    CERN Document Server

    Magro, G; Mairani, A; Mirandola, A; Panizza, D; Russo, S; Ferrari, A; Valvo, F; Fossati, P; Ciocca, M

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5–30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size r...

  9. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, G.; Molinelli, S.; Mairani, A.; Mirandola, A.; Panizza, D.; Russo, S.; Ferrari, A.; Valvo, F.; Fossati, P.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5-30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size ratio. The accuracy of the TPS was proved to be clinically acceptable in all cases but very small and shallow volumes. In this contest, the use of MC to validate TPS results proved to be a reliable procedure for pre-treatment plan verification.

  10. Proton pump inhibitors decrease melanogenesis in melanocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Seung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used as inhibitors of gastric juice secretion for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are no previous studies of the effects on melanogenesis resulting from PPI treatments. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of PPIs on melanogenesis in melan-a cells derived from immortalized mouse melanocytes. Tyrosinase activity and copper-chelating activity were measured spectrophotometrically. In addition,...

  11. The Proton Blazar

    OpenAIRE

    Mannheim, Karl

    1993-01-01

    Considering shock-accelerated protons in addition to electrons in a synchrotron radio jet naturally produces the observed X- through gamma ray continuum emission of flat-spectrum radio-loud AGN, whereas the corresponding shock-accelerated electrons produce the infrared through optical continuum. All of these emission components are rapidly variable on short time scales which can be accounted for by a common origin of the blazar emission in a relativistic sub-parsec scale jet. Moreover, neutri...

  12. Proton size anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Barger, Vernon; Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Keung, Wai-Yee; Marfatia, Danny

    2010-01-01

    A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that among leptons, couple preferentially to muons, and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low en...

  13. Heteronuclear proton assisted recoupling

    OpenAIRE

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Eddy, Matt; Megy, Simon; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a theoretical framework for understanding the heteronuclear version of the third spin assisted recoupling polarization transfer mechanism and demonstrate its potential for detecting long-distance intramolecular and intermolecular 15N–13C contacts in biomolecular systems. The pulse sequence, proton assisted insensitive nuclei cross polarization (PAIN-CP) relies on a cross term between 1H–15N and 1H–13C dipolar couplings to mediate zero- and/or double-quantum 15N–13C recoupling. In ...

  14. Proton channel models

    OpenAIRE

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the f...

  15. Regarding proton form factors

    OpenAIRE

    Bloch, J. C. R.; Krassnigg, A.; Roberts, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    The proton's elastic electromagnetic form factors are calculated using an Ansatz for the nucleon's Poincare' covariant Faddeev amplitude that only retains scalar diquark correlations. A spectator approximation is employed for the current. On the domain of q^2 accessible in modern precision experiments these form factors are a sensitive probe of nonperturbative strong interaction dynamics. The ratio of Pauli and Dirac form factors can provide realistic constraints on models of the nucleon and ...

  16. Ion-proton pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been publi...

  17. Proton beam therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, W P; Kooy, H; Loeffler, J S; T. F. DeLaney

    2005-01-01

    Conventional radiation therapy directs photons (X-rays) and electrons at tumours with the intent of eradicating the neoplastic tissue while preserving adjacent normal tissue. Radiation-induced damage to healthy tissue and second malignancies are always a concern, however, when administering radiation. Proton beam radiotherapy, one form of charged particle therapy, allows for excellent dose distributions, with the added benefit of no exit dose. These characteristics make this form of radiother...

  18. The Amsterdam proton microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis is to develop a microbeam setup such that small beam spot sizes can be produced routinely, and to investigate the capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE analysis. The development and performance of the Amsterdam proton microbeam setup are described. The capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE are shown with an investigation into the presence of trace elements in human hair. (Auth.)

  19. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 x 1032/cm2/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined

  20. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  1. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    collider and neutrino factory - summary of working group 2 / J. Galambos, R. Garoby and S. Geer -- Prospects for a very high power CW SRF linac / R. A. Rimmer -- Indian accelerator program for ADS applications / V. C. Sahni and P. Singh -- Ion accelerator activities at VECC (particularly, operating at low temperature) / R. K. Bhandari -- Chinese efforts in high intensity proton accelerators / S. Fu, J. Wang and S. Fang -- ADSR activity in the UK / R. J. Barlow -- ADS development in Japan / K. Kikuchi -- Project-X, SRF, and very large power stations / C. M. Ankenbrandt, R. P. Johnson and M. Popovic -- Power production and ADS / R. Raja -- Experimental neutron source facility based on accelerator driven system / Y. Gohar -- Transmutation mission / W. S. Yang -- Safety performance and issues / J. E. Cahalan -- Spallation target design for accelerator-driven systems / Y. Gohar -- Design considerations for accelerator transmutation of waste system / W. S. Yang -- Japan ADS program / T. Sasa -- Overview of members states' and IAEA activities in the field of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) / A. Stanculescu -- Linac for ADS applications - accelerator technologies / R. W. Garnett and R. L. Sheffield -- SRF linacs and accelerator driven sub-critical systems - summary working groups 3 & 4 / J. Delayen -- Production of Actinium-225 via high energy proton induced spallation of Thorium-232 / J. Harvey ... [et al.] -- Search for the electric dipole moment of Radium-225 / R. J. Holt, Z.-T. Lu and R. Mueller -- SRF linac and material science and medicine - summary of working group 5 / J. Nolen, E. Pitcher and H. Kirk.

  2. Preparations of an inorganic-framework proton exchange nanochannel membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. H.; Jiang, H. R.; Zhao, G.; Zeng, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a proton exchange membrane composed of straight and aligned proton conducting nanochannels is developed. Preparation of the membrane involves the surface sol-gel method assisted with a through-hole anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template to form the framework of the PEM nanochannels. A monomolecular layer (SO3Hsbnd (CH2)3sbnd Sisbnd (OCH3)3) is subsequently added onto the inner surfaces of the nanochannels to shape a proton-conducting pathway. Straight nanochannels exhibit long range order morphology, contributing to a substantial improvement in the proton mobility and subsequently proton conductivity. In addition, the nanochannel size can be altered by changing the surface sol-gel condition, allowing control of the active species/charge carrier selectivity via pore size exclusion. The proton conductivity of the nanochannel membrane is reported as high as 11.3 mS cm-1 at 70 °C with a low activation energy of 0.21 eV (20.4 kJ mol-1). First-principle calculations reveal that the activation energy for proton transfer is impressively low (0.06 eV and 0.07 eV) with the assistance of water molecules.

  3. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates.

  4. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  5. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Jan Christopher [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  6. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  7. Enhanced tolerance to NaC1 and LiC1 stresses by over-expressing Caragana korshinskii sodium/proton exchange 1 (CkNHX1) and the hydrophilic C terminus is required for the activity of CkNHX1 in Atsos3-1 mutant and yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium/proton exchangers (NHX antiporters) play important roles in plant responses to salt stress. Previous research showed that hydrophilic C-terminal region of Arabidopsis AtNHX1 negatively regulates the Na+/H+ transporting activity. In this study, CkNHX1 were isolated from Caragana korshinskii,...

  8. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  9. Proton Fraction in Neutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰收; 陈列文

    2001-01-01

    The proton fraction in β-stable neutron stars is investigated within the framework of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction for the first time. The calculated results show that the proton fraction disappears at high density, which implies that the pure neutron matter may exist in the interior of neutron stars. The incompressibility of the nuclear equation-of-state is shown to be more important to determine the proton fraction. Meanwhile, it is indicated that the addition of muons in neutron stars will change the proton fraction. It is also found that the higher-order terms of the nuclear symmetry energy have obvious effects on the proton fraction and the parabolic law of the nuclear symmetry energy is not enough to determine the proton fraction.

  10. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  11. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dime...

  12. PROTONIC PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY OF ICE

    OpenAIRE

    Petrenko, V.; Ebinuma, T.; Maeno, N.

    1987-01-01

    A number of attempts have been made to find the protonic photoconductivity of ice (abbreviated as PPC hereafter), but most of them were not successful. Camp and Spears (1) tried to excite PPC of pure ice single crystals by a xenon lamp and concluded that the probability of photodissociation of ice, if any, is very small. De Haas et al. (2) and Itagaki et al. (3) used gamma-rays, X-rays, or electron beams, and found a change in the electrical conductivity. Very high-energy beams were used in t...

  13. Kaon Electroproduction off Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.

    2006-01-01

    The elementary reaction of kaon exclusive electroproduction on protons has been studied in a broad kinematical range. Data for the calculation of the form factor of the kaon have been taken at different values of the invariant center of mass energy W in the range W=1.8, 1.85, 1.98, 2.08 (GeV), for one value of the transferred 4-momentum Q2=2.35 (GeV/c)2. In this analysis, we calculated sigma-L and sigma-T by using the Rosenbluth separation. Then the electromagnetic kaon form factor was calcul...

  14. The HERA Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Habib Shiraz

    2012-01-01

    The almost 1 $fb^{-1}$ of $\\it ep$ data collected by the H1 and ZEUS collider experiments at HERA allows for a precise determination of the proton’s parton distribution functions (PDFs). Measurements used to constrain the PDFs — inclusive and jet cross sections, charm contribution to the $\\it F_{2}$ proton structure function,$\\it F^{c̄}{c\\bar}}_{2}$ — are presented herein. The measurement process itself includes cataloguing the sensitivity of the cross sections to the various sources of corre...

  15. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  16. Resonant scattering of central plasma sheet protons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant proton loss timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Liang, Jun; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Shi, Run; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Fu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    energies (~ keV) on the nightside. The pitch angle coverage for H+ band EMIC wave resonant scattering strongly depends on proton energy, L shell, and field model. He+ and O+ band EMIC waves tend to cause efficient scattering loss of protons at higher energies, thereby importantly contributing to the isotropic distribution of higher energy (> ~ 10 keV) protons at higher L shells on the nightside where the geomagnetic field line is highly stretched. Our results also suggest that scattering by H+ band EMIC waves may significantly contribute to the formation of the reversed-type CPS proton precipitation on the dawnside where both the wave activity and occurrence probability is statistically high.

  17. Proposed layout features of an Australian proton treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From a theoretical point of view protons offer the best possible physical dose distribution for many radiotherapy treatment scenarios. However, proton generation of sufficient energy for treatment (about 250MeV) requires a large accelerator and is more expensive than conventional radiotherapy. Therefore the present project aimed at determining the desired configuration for a proton radiotherapy treatment facility in Australia. This is part of a proposal to introduce proton radiotherapy to Australia by the Australian Proton Project Group. It is assumed that a proton centre is build as a dedicated national radiotherapy facility. In this context and to be economically viable it must be large enough to treat well in excess of 1000 patients per year on several treatment stations. When building a proton treatment facility, it is essential to make use of all state-of-the-art features such as spot scanning techniques in order to offer patients a significant improvement in dose distribution compared to advanced conventional treatment techniques such as conformal and/or intensity modulated X-ray radiotherapy. As the potential useful life of a proton treatment unit is of the order of 20 years, it must be designed in a flexible way to allow upgrading as technology advances. The proposed facility includes at least one rotating gantry for isocentric beam delivery and stationary beam lines delivering protons between 70 and 250MeV energy. Features such as proton radiography and in situ PET treatment verification should be considered as a potential upgrade for future expansion. Other commercial activities (eg. radiation hardness testing) which could contribute to the running costs of the facility and scientific research out of the normal treatment hours is to be considered in the final design. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  18. Density functional theory study of proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lidong; XIE Daiqian

    2005-01-01

    Proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase II has been studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(D) level. The active site model consists of the zinc ion, four histidine residues, two threonine residues, and three water molecules. Our calculations showed that the proton of the zinc-bound water molecule could be transferred to the nearest water molecule and an intermediate containing H3O+ is then formed. The intermediate is only 1.3 kJ·mol-1 above the reactant complex, whereas the barrier height for the proton transfer is about 8.1 kJ·mol-1.

  19. Two ligands for a GPCR, proton vs lysolipid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-soon IM

    2005-01-01

    Recently, two different chemicals have been matched as ligands with the same Gprotein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Double-pairing of OGR1 family GPCRs with proton and lysolipid raises several questions. First, whether both are the real ligands for the GPCRs. Second, whether modulation of a GPCR by two chemicals could be possible. Third, one of the chemicals is proton. Proton-sensing not only is a new action mode of GPCR activation, but also it could be generalized in other GPCRs.In this review, I'd like to summarize the issue and discuss questions with pharmacological criteria.

  20. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  1. Non-chemical proton-dependent steps prior to O2-activation limit Azotobacter vinelandii 3-mercaptopropionic acid dioxygenase (MDO) catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Joshua K; Sardar, Sinjinee; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Pierce, Brad S

    2016-08-15

    3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av MDO) is a non-heme mononuclear iron enzyme that catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of 3-mercaptopropionate (3mpa) to produce 3-sulfinopropionic acid (3spa). With one exception, the active site residues of MDO are identical to bacterial cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). Specifically, the CDO Arg-residue (R50) is replaced by Gln (Q67) in MDO. Despite this minor active site perturbation, substrate-specificity of Av MDO is more relaxed as compared to CDO. In order to investigate the relative timing of chemical and non-chemical events in Av MDO catalysis, the pH/D-dependence of steady-state kinetic parameters (kcat and kcat/KM) and viscosity effects are measured using two different substrates [3mpa and l-cysteine (cys)]. The pL-dependent activity of Av MDO in these reactions can be rationalized assuming a diprotic enzyme model in which three ionic forms of the enzyme are present [cationic, E((z+1)); neutral, E(z); and anionic, E((z-1))]. The activities observed for each substrate appear to be dominated by electrostatic interactions within the enzymatic active site. Given the similarity between MDO and the more extensively characterized mammalian CDO, a tentative model for the role of the conserved 'catalytic triad' is proposed. PMID:27311613

  2. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  3. Scalar meson production in proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Bystritskiy, Yu. M.; Kuraev, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Taking into account the exchange forces between protons of scalar, pseudoscalar, vector and axial vector type the cross sections of neutral and charged scalar mesons $a_0(980)$, $a_+(980)$, $f_0(980)$, $\\sigma(600)$ production are calculated. The estimation for the facilities of moderately high energies such as PANDA and NICA are presented. Similar analysis is given for processes of charged and neutral Higgs boson production at high energy proton-proton colliders such as Tevatron, RHIC and LH...

  4. Diffraction slopes for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at low momentum transfer values. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slopes is approximated by various analytic functions. The expanded "standard" logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range reasonably. Various approximations differ from each other both in the low energy and very high...

  5. Strangeness production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Shyam, Radhey

    2005-01-01

    In these lectures we discuss the investigation of the strange meson production in proton-proton ($pp$) and in proton-nucleus ($pA$) reactions within an effective Lagrangian model. The kaon production proceeds mainly via the excitations of $N^*$(1650), $N^*$(1710), and $N^*$(1720) resonant intermediate nucleonic states, in the collision of two initial state nucleons. Therefore, the strangeness production is expected to provide information about the resonances lying at higher excitation energie...

  6. Synthesis and proton conductibility of ternary germanic heteropoly acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG Xiaoguang; WU Qingyin

    2004-01-01

    The ternary germanic heteropoly acids H5GeW11VO40·22H2O and H5GeMo11VOd0.24H2O were synthesized for the first time by the stepwise acidification and the stepwise addition of solution of the component elements. The products were characterized by ICP, IR, UV, XRD and TG-DTA. The proton conductibility and the activation energy of proton conduction of the heteropoly acids were investigated.

  7. Bioenergetics: Proton fronts on membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Noam; Gutman, Menachem

    2011-11-01

    Proton migration on membranes is a crucial step in the bioenergetics of the cell. It has typically been regarded as slow successive proton transfers between ionizable moieties within the membrane, but recent measurements suggest fast lateral diffusion in the membrane's hydration layer.

  8. Tomographic image of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Dupre, Raphael; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We determine, based on the latest experimental Deep Virtual Compton Scattering experimental data, the dependence of the spatial size of the proton on the quark's longitudinal momentum. This results in a three-dimensional momentum-space image and tomography of the proton.

  9. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romaine; C; Nichols; Soon; Huh; Zuofeng; Li; Michael; Rutenberg

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy.

  10. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  11. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  12. Regiospecific protonation of organic chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Lin, Tingting; Wang, FuKe; He, Chaobin

    2016-07-28

    Highly conductive, acid doped polymers such as PEDOT/PSS and polyaniline (PANI) have attracted much attention due to their potential applications in flexible electronics. However, the understanding of the mechanism behind the doping process is still lacking. In this paper, we conduct a systematic and detailed investigation on the acid doping behaviors of four model compounds which were synthesized by combining different protonatable units such as pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT), benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazole (BT), cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT), and azulene. DFT simulation and UV-vis-NIR spectral studies show that while the site of first protonation was mainly determined by proton affinity, the subsequent site of protonation and doping density were determined by the nature of the first protonation and influenced by the following two factors: (1) electrostatic charge repulsion and (2) the possible delocalization of protonated charge in the conjugated structure. If the first protonation occurs at heteroatoms and results in a coplanar structure, the subsequent sites of protonation are mainly determined by the distance from the positive charge center to lower the effect of static repulsion and charge delocalization. On the other hand, if the first protonation occurs on the main chain carbon atoms which induce a large torsional angle (non-coplanar) as the carbon hybridization changes from sp(2) to sp(3), the conformation and the possible charge delocalization in the protonated molecules will play an important role in determining the subsequent protonation. Our study provides new insight into the acid-doping mechanism of conductive polymers, which could be used as a guide to design new acid doped highly conductive polymers. PMID:27346384

  13. Ion-proton pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  14. Ion-proton pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  15. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J; Zeil, K; Kraft, S D; Karsch, L; Sobiella, M; Rehwald, M; Obst, L; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Schramm, U

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source. PMID:27587116

  16. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  17. Neutron activation as an independent indicator of expected total yield in the production of 82Sr and 68Ge with 66 MeV protons

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, C.; Steyn, G. F; van der Meulen, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A method based on neutron activation is being developed to assist in resolving discrepancies between the expected yield and actual yield of radionuclides produced with the vertical-beam target station (VBTS) at iThemba LABS. The VBTS is routinely employed for multi-Ci batch productions of the radionuclide pairs 22Na/68Ga and 82Sr/68Ga using standardized natMg/natGa and natRb/natGa tandem targets, respectively [1]. The metal-clad target discs are bombarded with a primary be...

  18. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grün, Rebecca [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

  19. Dayside isotropic precipitation of energetic protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeev

    Full Text Available Recently it has been shown that isotropic precipitation of energetic protons on the nightside is caused by a non-adiabatic effect, namely pitch-angle scattering of protons in curved magnetic field lines of the tail current sheet. Here we address the origin of isotropic proton precipitation on the dayside. Computations of proton scattering regions in the magnetopheric models T87, T89 and T95 reveal two regions which contribute to the isotropic precipitation. The first is the region of weak magnetic field in the outer cusp which provides the 1–2° wide isotropic precipitation on closed field lines in a ~2–3 hour wide MLT sector centered on noon. A second zone is formed by the scattering on the closed field lines which cross the nightside equatorial region near the magnetopause which provides isotropic precipitation starting ≈ 1.5–2 h MLT from noon and which joins smoothly the precipitation coming from the tail current sheet. We also analyzed the isotropic proton precipitation using observations of NOAA low altitude polar spacecraft. We find that isotropic precipitation of >30 to >80 keV protons continues around noon forming the continuous oval-shaped region of isotropic precipitation. Part of this region lies on open field lines in the region of cusp-like or mantle precipitation, its equatorward part is observed on closed field lines. Near noon it extends ~1–2° below the sharp boundary of solar electron fluxes (proxy of the open/closed field line boundary and equatorward of the cusp-like auroral precipitation. The observed energy dispersion of its equatorward boundary (isotropic boundary agrees with model predictions of expected particle scattering in the regions of weak and highly curved magnetic field. We also found some disagreement with model computations. We did not observe the predicted split of the isotropic precipitation region into separate nightside and dayside isotropic zones. Also, the oval-like shape of the isotropic

  20. Evaluation of proton inelastic reaction models in Geant4 for prompt gamma production during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasugiththan, Jeyasingam; Peterson, Stephen W.

    2015-10-01

    During proton beam radiotherapy, discrete secondary prompt gamma rays are induced by inelastic nuclear reactions between protons and nuclei in the human body. In recent years, the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit has played an important role in the development of a device for real time dose range verification purposes using prompt gamma radiation. Unfortunately the default physics models in Geant4 do not reliably replicate the measured prompt gamma emission. Determining a suitable physics model for low energy proton inelastic interactions will boost the accuracy of prompt gamma simulations. Among the built-in physics models, we found that the precompound model with a modified initial exciton state of 2 (1 particle, 1 hole) produced more accurate discrete gamma lines from the most important elements found within the body such as 16O, 12C and 14N when comparing them with the available gamma production cross section data. Using the modified physics model, we investigated the prompt gamma spectra produced in a water phantom by a 200 MeV pencil beam of protons. The spectra were attained using a LaBr3 detector with a time-of-flight (TOF) window and BGO active shield to reduce the secondary neutron and gamma background. The simulations show that a 2 ns TOF window could reduce 99% of the secondary neutron flux hitting the detector. The results show that using both timing and active shielding can remove up to 85% of the background radiation which includes a 33% reduction by BGO subtraction.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of a novel proton salt of 2-amino-6-nitrobenzothiazole with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and its metal complexes and their antimicrobial and antifungal activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlkimen, Halil; Yenikaya, Cengiz; Gülbandılar, Aysel; Sarı, Musa

    2016-09-01

    A novel proton transfer compound, (O2NHABT)+(HDPC)-.0.4EtOH (1), obtained from 2-amino-6-nitrobenzothiazole (O2NABT) and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (H2DPC), and its Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes (2-5) have been prepared and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. Additionally, single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques were applied to complexes 3-5. While complexes 3 and 4 have distorted octahedral conformations, complex 5 exhibits a distorted square pyramidal structure. The structure of 2 might be proposed as octahedral according to spectral and analytical results. Furthermore, parent compounds, O2NABT and H2DPC, simple metal complexes of H2DPC, and the synthesised compounds (1-5) were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213) (Gram positive), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) (Gram negative) and Candida krusei (ATCC 6258), Candida parapisilosis(ATCC 22019) (yeast). The results were compared with the control compounds, Vancomycin, Cefepime, Levofloxasin as antibacterial, and Flucanozole as antifungal agents.

  2. Proton-Proton Near-Forward Hard Elastic Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiropoulos, Michael G.; Sterman, George

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the leading twist contribution to near-forward proton-proton (and proton-antiproton) elastic scattering with large momentum transfer, in the multiple scattering (Landshoff) mechanism. The amplitude in the near-forward region is dominated by singlet exchange for all three valence quark-quark scatterings. We assume the existence of a hard singlet quark-quark amplitude, which we estimate to be ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s^2/t)$. For a three-quark state whose transverse size is less than $1/\\L...

  3. Proton-proton scattering above 3 GeV/c

    OpenAIRE

    Sibirtsev, A.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hammer, H. W.; Krewald, S.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A(NN) is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the p, omega, f(2), and a(2) trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specificall...

  4. Activity inhibition and its mitigation in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells: The role of phosphoric acid, ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, and polyvinylidene difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Olesen, Kaspar; Nesselberger, Markus; Perchthaler, Markus; Hacker, Viktor; Arenz, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In the presented work we systematically study the influence of phosphoric acid, ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate (ATFMS), and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of carbon supported, Pt based catalysts. The influence of phosphoric acid is investigated in a mixed solution of perchloric acid with small amounts of phosphoric acid added. Thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) measurements show that such a mixed electrolyte is advantageous as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is inhibited without influencing the oxygen solubility in the electrolyte. In contrast to previous reports it is seen when investigating additives that ATFMS acts as a catalyst poison; whereas the results provide evidence of a better performance in case of the PVDF incorporated catalysts as compared to reference samples without PVDF. The technological relevance of the PVDF improvements and its stability over prolonged time was validated by membrane electrode assembly (MEA) tests.

  5. FNAL Proton Source High Intensity Operations and Beam Loss Control

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, F G

    2014-01-01

    The 40-year-old Fermilab Proton Source machines, constituted by the Pre-Injector, Linac and the synchrotron Booster, have been the workhorse of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). During this time, the High Energy Physics Program has demanded an increase in proton throughput, especially during the past decade with the beginning of the neutrino program at Fermilab. In order to achieve a successful program, major upgrades and changes were made in Booster. Once again, the Proton Source has been charged to double their beam throughput, while maintain the present residual activation levels, to meet the laboratory Intensity Frontier program goals until new machines are built and operational to replace the Proton Source machines. This paper discusses the present performance of Booster and the plans involved in reaching even higher intensities.

  6. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  7. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  8. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP4. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above injection

  9. Constraints on proton-proton fusion from helioseismology

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, K. I. T.; Butler, M. N.; Guenther, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    The proton-proton ($pp$) fusion cross-section found at the heart of solar models is unconstrained experimentally and relies solely on theoretical calculations. Effective field theory provides an opportunity to constrain the $pp$ cross-section experimentally, however, this method is complicated by the appearance of two-nucleon effects in the form of an unknown parameter $L_{1,A}$. We present a method to constrain $L_{1,A}$ using the Standard Solar Model and helioseismology. Using this method, ...

  10. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, John; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future c...

  11. Heavy quark photoproduction in proton-proton collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the photoproduction of heavy quarks in proton-proton collisions at RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies. The integrated cross section and the rapidity distributions for open charm and bottom production are computed employing sound high energy QCD formalisms. For the linear pQCD approaches we consider both the usual collinear factorization and the k_T-factorization formalisms, whereas for the nonlinear QCD (saturation) calculations one considers the Golec-Biernat-Wuesthoff and the Ianc...

  12. $\\phi$-meson production in proton-proton collisions

    OpenAIRE

    K Nakayama; Durso, J.W.; J. Haidenbauer(IKP - Julich); Hanhart, C.; Speth, J.(Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, D-52425, Germany)

    1999-01-01

    The production of $\\phi$-mesons in proton-proton collisions is investigated within a relativistic meson-exchange model of hadronic interactions. The experimental prerequisites for extracting the $NN\\phi$ coupling strength from this reaction are discussed. In the absence of a sufficient set of data, which would enable an accurate determination of the $NN\\phi$ coupling strength, we perform a combined analysis, based on some reasonable assumptions, of the existing data for both $\\omega$- and $\\p...

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    -microscopy experiment was performed on the protonic conductor Ba-3(Ca1-chiNb2-chi)O9-delta, x = 0.18. The H/D concentration profile of a cross-section of the sample after partial isotopic exchange can be visualised; proton containing La0.9Ca0.1ErO3 was studied up to 200degreesC by Raman spectroscopy. At 200degrees...

  14. Relationship of proton motive force and the F(0)F (1)-ATPase with bio-hydrogen production activity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: effects of diphenylene iodonium, hydrogenase inhibitor, and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Gabrielyan, Lilit; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-08-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC 6521 was able to produce bio-hydrogen (H(2)) in anaerobic conditions under illumination. In this study the effects of the hydrogenase inhibitor-diphenylene iodonium (Ph(2)I) and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) on growth characteristics and H(2) production by R. sphaeroides were investigated. The results point out the concentration dependent DMSO effect: in the presence of 10 mM DMSO H(2) yield was ~6 fold lower than that of the control. The bacterium was unable to produce H(2) in the presence of Ph(2)I. In order to examine the mediatory role of proton motive force (∆p) or the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides, the effects of Ph(2)I and DMSO on ∆p and its components (membrane potential (∆ψ) and transmembrane pH gradient), and ATPase activity were determined. In these conditions ∆ψ was of -98 mV and the reversed ∆pH was +30 mV, resulting in ∆p of -68 mV. Ph(2)I decreased ∆ψ in concentrations of 20 μM and higher; lower concentrations of Ph(2)I as DMSO had no valuable effect on ∆ψ. The R. sphaeroides membrane vesicles demonstrated significant ATPase activity sensitive to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The 10-20 μM Ph(2)I did not affect the ATPase activity, whereas 40 μM Ph(2)I caused a marked inhibition (~2 fold) in ATPase activity. The obtained results provide novel evidence on the involvement of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides. Moreover, these data indicate the role of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in ∆p generation. In addition, DMSO might increase an interaction of nitrogenase with CO(2), decreasing nitrogenase activity and affecting H(2) production.

  15. Proton radiography to improve proton radiotherapy: Simulation study at different proton beam energies

    CERN Document Server

    Biegun, A K; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E R; van Beuzekom, M; Visser, J; Brandenburg, S

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4\\% and even up to 10\\% in region containing bone~\\cite{USchneider1995,USchneider1996,WSchneider2000,GCirrone2007,HPaganetti2012,TPlautz2014,GLandry2013,JSchuemann2014}. As a consequence, part of a tumor may receive no dose, or a very high dose can be delivered in healthy ti\\-ssues and organs at risks~(e.g. brain stem)~\\cite{ACKnopf2013}. A transmission radiograph of high-energy protons measuring proton stopping powers directly will allow to reduce these uncertainties, and thus improve the quality of treatment. The best way to obtain a sufficiently accurate radiograph is by tracking individual protons traversing the phantom (patient)~\\cite{GCirrone2007,TPlautz2014,VSipala2013}. In our simulations ...

  16. First tests for an online treatment monitoring system with in-beam PET for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kraan, Aafke C; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Cappucci, F; Ciocca, M; Ferrari, A; Ferretti, S; Mairani, A; Molinelli, S; Pullia, M; Retico, A; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Del Guerra, A; Rosso, V

    2014-01-01

    PET imaging is a non-invasive technique for particle range verification in proton therapy. It is based on measuring the beta+ annihilations caused by nuclear interactions of the protons in the patient. In this work we present measurements for proton range verification in phantoms, performed at the CNAO particle therapy treatment center in Pavia, Italy, with our 10 x 10 cm^2 planar PET prototype DoPET. PMMA phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams and clinical treatment plans, and PET data were acquired during and shortly after proton irradiation. We created 1-D profiles of the beta+ activity along the proton beam-axis, and evaluated the difference between the proximal rise and the distal fall-off position of the activity distribution. A good agreement with FLUKA Monte Carlo predictions was obtained. We also assessed the system response when the PMMA phantom contained an air cavity. The system was able to detect these cavities quickly after irradiation.

  17. Theoretical Studies of Proton Radioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ldia S Ferreira; Enrico Maglione

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, we will discuss the most recent theoretical approaches developed by our group, to understand the mechanisms of decay by one proton emission, and the structure and shape of exotic nuclei at the limits of stability.

  18. A New Proton CT Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Coutrakon, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rykalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Naimuddin, M

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction, and preliminary testing of a second generation proton CT scanner is presented. All current treatment planning systems at proton therapy centers use X-ray CT as the primary imaging modality for treatment planning to calculate doses to tumor and healthy tissues. One of the limitations of X-ray CT is in the conversion of X-ray attenuation coefficients to relative (proton) stopping powers, or RSP. This results in more proton range uncertainty, larger target volumes and therefore, more dose to healthy tissues. To help improve this, we present a novel scanner capable of high dose rates, up to 2~MHz, and large area coverage, 20~x~24~cm$^2$, for imaging an adult head phantom and reconstructing more accurate RSP values.

  19. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  20. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  1. Proton Football European Championship 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Check out the European championship of proton football 2016 at CERN. Produced by: CERN Audiovisual Productions Service Director: Jacques Fichet Editor: Jacques Fichet Music : Burnt of Jingle Punks You can follow us on:

  2. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  3. Protons and Hydroxide Ions in Aqueous Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Noam; Bakker, Huib J; Campen, R Kramer; Henchman, Richard H; Pohl, Peter; Roke, Sylvie; Thämer, Martin; Hassanali, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of water's constituent ions, proton and hydroxide, has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies over the last century. Besides their obvious importance in acid-base chemistry, these ions play an important role in numerous applications ranging from enzyme catalysis to environmental chemistry. Despite a long history of research, many fundamental issues regarding their properties continue to be an active area of research. Here, we provide a review of the experimental and theoretical advances made in the last several decades in understanding the structure, dynamics, and transport of the proton and hydroxide ions in different aqueous environments, ranging from water clusters to the bulk liquid and its interfaces with hydrophobic surfaces. The propensity of these ions to accumulate at hydrophobic surfaces has been a subject of intense debate, and we highlight the open issues and challenges in this area. Biological applications reviewed include proton transport along the hydration layer of various membranes and through channel proteins, problems that are at the core of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:27314430

  4. On the proton radius problem

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent values of the proton charge radius obtained by means of muonic-hydrogen laser spectroscopy are about $4\\%$ different from the electron scattering data. It has been suggested that the proton radius is actually measured in different frames and that, starting from a non relativistic quark model calculation, the Lorentz transformation of the form factors accounts properly for the discepancy. We shall show that the relation between the charge radii measured in different frames can be de...

  5. High intensity protons in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  6. Proton interactions with high multiplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, A G; Ardashev, E N; Avdeichikov, V V; Balandin, V P; Basiladze, S G; Batouritski, M A; Berezhnev, S F; Bogdanova, G A; Borzunov, Yu T; Budilov, V A; Chentsov, Yu A; Golovkin, V F; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Grishin, N I; Grishkevich, Ya V; Ermakov, G G; Ermolov, P F; Furmanets, N F; Karmanov, D E; Karpov, A V; Kekelidze, G D; Kireev, V I; Kiryakov, A A; Kholodenko, A G; Kokoulina, E S; Konstantinov, V V; Kramarenko, V N; Kubarovsky, A V; Kulikov, A K; Kuraev, E A; Kurchaninov, L L; Kutov, A Ya; Kuzmin, N A; Leflat, G I Lanschikov A K; Lobanov, I S; Lobanova, E V; Lutov, S I; Lysan, V N; Merkin, M M; Mitrofanov, G A; Myalkovskiy, V V; Nikitin, V A; Peshehonov, V D; Petrov, V S; Petukhov, Y P; Pleskach, A V; Polkovnikov, M K; Popov, V V; Riadovikov, V N; Ronzhin, V N; Rufanov, I A; Senko, V A; Shalanda, N A; Soldatov, M M; Spiryakin, V I; Terletskiy, A V; Tikhonova, L A; Tsyupa, Yu P; Vishnevskaya, A M; Volkov, V Yu; Vorobiev, A P; Voronin, A G; Yakimchuk, V I; Yukaev, A I; Zapolskii, V N; Zhidkov, N K; Zotkin, S A; Zverev, E G

    2011-01-01

    Project Thermalization (Experiment SERP-E-190 at IHEP) is aimed to study the proton - proton interactions at 50 GeV with large number of secondary particles. In this report the experimentally measured topological cross sections are presented taking into account the detector response and procession efficiency. These data are in good agreement with gluon dominance model. The comparison with other models is also made and shows no essential discrepancies.

  7. Mapping the Proton's Fluctuating Waistline

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Müller, Berndt

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for the apparently universal scaling in the high-multiplicity tail of charged particle distributions for high energy nuclear collisions. We argue that this scaling behavior originates from rare fluctuations of the nucleon density. We discuss a pair of simple models of proton shape fluctuations. A "fat" proton with a size of 3 fm occurs with observable frequency. In light of this result, collective flow behavior in the ensuing nuclear interaction seems feasible. We discu...

  8. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  9. A spectrophotometric study of the protonation processes of some N-[1-(benzimidazol-1-yl]methylbenzamide derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADA U. PERISIC-JANJIC

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The protonation of N-[1-(benzimidazol-1-yl]methylbenzamide derivatives in aqueous acids (H2SO4 media was investigated, using a spectrophotometric method. The investigated compounds have two protonation processes. The first protonation process occurs in weakly acidic aqueous solutions (pH range and refers to the protonation of the benzimidazole part of the molecule. The second protonation process occurs in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions and refers to protonation of the amide group. The protonation constants of the second process were calculated by the Hammett and Cox-Yates method. The effect of chemical structure on the ionisation constants is discussed. A correlation between the protonation constants and antimicrobial activity was established.

  10. Research on quality testing for active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator%主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器质量检测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程金生; 袁继龙; 李明生

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the quality testing of dose delivery system of the active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator,in order to provide the reference for the quality control of related equipment.Methods In the four therapy rooms,both 0.6 cc chambers and Gafchromic EBT3 films were used,respectively,to test the accelerator for dose reproducibility,dose linearity,dose stability,depth dose distribution,beam scanning position deviation and radiation field uniformity in each therapy room.Results Dose reproducibility variation coefficients are all less than 1.5%,dose linearity's maximum deviations less than 2%,dose stability's deviations less than 2%,depth dose distribution stability within 2%,beam scanning position deviation less than 1 mm,consistency of irradiation field's deviation less than 2 mm,and flatness within ± 5%.Conclusions The indicators about quality testing for the active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator are all in line with the requirements of IEC standards draft.%目的 对主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器剂量传输系统进行质量检测,为相关设备质量检测研究提供参考.方法 在4个治疗室中,分别采用0.6 CC指型电离室和辐射胶片测量质子重离子加速器在每间治疗室的输出剂量重复性、剂量线性、剂量日稳定性、深度剂量分布、束流扫描位置偏差和射野的一致性.结果 4个治疗室分别对应的4个终端的剂量重复性变异系数均<1.5%,剂量线性最大偏差均<2%,剂量日稳定性偏差均<2%,深度剂量分布稳定性均在2%之内,束流扫描位置偏差均<1 mm,射野一致性中射野大小偏差均<2 mm,射野平坦度均<±5%.结论 本研究涉及的主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器质量检测的各项指标均符合国际电工委员会(IEC)相关标准草案的要求.

  11. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn P; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Morth, J Preben; Palmgren, Michael G; Nissen, Poul

    2007-12-13

    A prerequisite for life is the ability to maintain electrochemical imbalances across biomembranes. In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by the activity of P-type ATPase membrane proteins: H+-ATPase (the proton pump) in plants and fungi, and Na+,K+-ATPase (the sodium-potassium pump) in animals. The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis. The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na+,K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase are type II. Electron microscopy has revealed the overall shape of proton pumps, however, an atomic structure has been lacking. Here we present the first structure of a P-type proton pump determined by X-ray crystallography. Ten transmembrane helices and three cytoplasmic domains define the functional unit of ATP-coupled proton transport across the plasma membrane, and the structure is locked in a functional state not previously observed in P-type ATPases. The transmembrane domain reveals a large cavity, which is likely to be filled with water, located near the middle of the membrane plane where it is lined by conserved hydrophilic and charged residues. Proton transport against a high membrane potential is readily explained by this structural arrangement. PMID:18075595

  12. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1α induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1α whereas it increased HIF-1α stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  13. An experimental investigation of proton-induced phenomena in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis proton-induced phenomena in krypton gas are described. The considered reactions of protons on krypton are both nuclear and atomic. The nuclear conversion processes mainly result in the production of several Rb radioisotopes, such as 81Rb that is used in 81Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator systems for medical diagnostics. The irradiation of krypton gas (natural composition) with protons of about 26 MeV can be used for the routine production of 81Rb from the direct production reaction 82Kr(p,2n)81Rb and from the indirect reaction 82Kr(p,2n)sup(81m)Rb → 81Rb. To determine the scattering of protons in krypton gas targets a quantitative autoradiographic technique was developed. Proton profiles have been determined from the proton-induced activity distribution on a copper foil. For the on-line detection of produced Rb radioisotopes several optical detection techniques were investigated. (Auth.)

  14. A Multiple Scattering Theory for Proton Penetration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dai-Lun; WU Zhang-Wen; JIANG Steve-Bin; LUO Zheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ We extend the electron small-angle multiple scattering theory to proton penetration. After introducing the concept of narrow energy spectra, the proton energy loss process is included in the proton deep penetration theory. It precisely describes the whole process of proton penetration. Compared to the Monte Carlo method,this method maintains the comparable precision and possesses much higher computational efficiency. Thus, it shows the real feasibility of applying this algorithm to proton clinical radiation therapy.

  15. The proton spin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents first the theoretical frame of the nucleon spin structure study carried out through the deep inelastic scattering of polarised leptons on a polarised target. The interest of the lepton scattering reaction to study the hadronic structure is discussed and the formalism of the inclusive inelastic scattering presented. If the target and the beam are both polarised, the formalism enables to connect the experimentally measured asymmetries to the contribution of quarks to the spin of nucleon. The recent knowledge about the nucleon spin structure is also presented. The Bjorken sum rule is then discussed: it correlates the difference of spin structure between proton and neutron to the neutron lifetime. Then, the author mentions the experimental results of SMC (CERN) and E142, E143 (SLAC). The transition from rough asymmetry to the g sub 1 structure function integral is discussed as well as the main causes of uncertainty. Compared to theoretical data, the measurements confirm the reliability of the Bjorken sum rule. They also confirm the deficit of the quark contribution with respect to the naive unpolarized strange sea model. The possible origins of this discrepancy and the contributions of the current and planned experiments are also discussed. Finally, the author brings up the next major step for nucleon spin studies: the estimation of the gluon contribution. He discusses the experimental knowledge about the polarised gluon distribution function with regard to the multiple existing parameter set. Concerning the experimental determination of this distribution function, outlooks are proposed with respect to feasibility on current experimental facilities. (N.T.)

  16. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  17. Characterization of uniform scanning proton beams with analytical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demez, Nebi

    Tissue equivalent phantoms have an important place in radiation therapy planning and delivery. They have been manufactured for use in conventional radiotherapy. Their tissue equivalency for proton beams is currently in active investigation. The Bragg-Kleeman rule was used to calculate water equivalent thickness (WET) for available tissue equivalent phantoms from CIRS (Norfolk, VA, USA). WET's of those phantoms were also measured using proton beams at Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI). WET measurements and calculations are in good agreement within ˜1% accuracy except for high Z phantoms. Proton beams were also characterized with an analytical proton dose calculation model, Proton Loss Model (PLM) [26], to investigate protons interactions in water and those phantoms. Depth-dose and lateral dose profiles of protons in water and in those phantoms were calculated, measured, and compared. Water Equivalent Spreadness (WES) was also investigated for those phantoms using the formula for scattering power ratio. Because WES is independent of incident energy of protons, it is possible to estimate spreadness of protons in different media by just knowing WES. Measurements are usually taken for configuration of the treatment planning system (TPS). This study attempted to achieve commissioning data for uniform scanning proton planning with analytical methods, PLM, which have been verified with published measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Depth doses and lateral profiles calculated by PLM were compared with measurements via the gamma analysis method. While gamma analysis shows that depth doses are in >90% agreement with measured depth doses, the agreement falls to PLM data were imported into the TPS (PLM-TPS). PLM-TPS was tested with different patient cases. The PLM-TPS treatment plans for 5 prostate cases show acceptable agreement. The Planning Treatment Volume (PTV) coverage was 100 % with PLM-TPS except for one case in which the coverage is 99%. The

  18. Manifestation of proton structure in ridge-like correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiczek, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the CMS collaboration reported a long range in rapidity, near-side ('ridge-like') angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions, so called ridge effect. This surprising observation suggests the presence of a collective flow that resembles the one believed to produce a similar correlation hydrodynamically in heavy-ion collisions. If the hydrodynamic description is valid then the effect is triggered by the initial spatial anisotropy of the colliding matter. Estimating this anisotropy within different models of the proton internal structure in comparison with measured angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collision data could in principle discriminate between different proton models. Inspired by recent theoretical developments, we propose several phenomenological models of the proton structure. Subsequently, we calculate the anisotropy coefficients of the dense matter formed in proton-proton collisions within the formalism of the Monte Carlo Glauber model. We find that some p...

  19. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  20. Triple-jet structures in proton-proton interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experiment, which uses a superconducting solenoid at the CERN ISR, a large sample of two-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at 62 GeV centre-of-mass energy has been examined for evidence of three-jet structures; that is, for the presence of events in which three particle jets can be separately identified at large transverse momenta relative to the initial proton directions, there also being spectator jets following these directions, making five jets in all. Such three-jet events are expected to be produced by gluon bremsstrahlung, as has been observed in the e+e- case, but several additional mechanisms are expected in the case of hadronic collisions. The three-jet events are identified by cluster analysis, the particles of each event being sorted into the best three-cluster and two-cluster combinations. Results are briefly described

  1. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  2. Proton-proton scattering above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibirtsev, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) und Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Newport News, VA (United States); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Haidenbauer, J.; Krewald, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Hammer, H.W. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) und Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Meissner, U.G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) und Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3GeV/c to 50GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model. (orig.)

  3. The general base in the thymidylate synthase catalyzed proton abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ananda K; Islam, Zahidul; Krueger, Jonathan; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-12-14

    The enzyme thymidylate synthase (TSase), an important chemotherapeutic drug target, catalyzes the formation of 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP), a precursor of one of the DNA building blocks. TSase catalyzes a multi-step mechanism that includes the abstraction of a proton from the C5 of the substrate 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (dUMP). Previous studies on ecTSase proposed that an active-site residue, Y94 serves the role of the general base abstracting this proton. However, since Y94 is neither very basic, nor connected to basic residues, nor located close enough to the pyrimidine proton to be abstracted, the actual identity of this base remains enigmatic. Based on crystal structures, an alternative hypothesis is that the nearest potential proton-acceptor of C5 of dUMP is a water molecule that is part of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) network comprised of several water molecules and several protein residues including H147, E58, N177, and Y94. Here, we examine the role of the residue Y94 in the proton abstraction step by removing its hydroxyl group (Y94F mutant). We investigated the effect of the mutation on the temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and found that these KIEs are more temperature dependent than those of the wild-type enzyme (WT). These results suggest that the phenolic -OH of Y94 is a component of the transition state for the proton abstraction step. The findings further support the hypothesis that no single functional group is the general base, but a network of bases and hydroxyls (from water molecules and tyrosine) sharing H-bonds across the active site can serve the role of the general base to remove the pyrimidine proton.

  4. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  5. Mechanoassisted Synthesis of Sulfonated Covalent Organic Frameworks with High Intrinsic Proton Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongwu; Xu, Guodong; Hu, Zhigang; Cheng, Youdong; Chi, Chenglong; Yuan, Daqiang; Cheng, Hansong; Zhao, Dan

    2016-07-20

    It is challenging to introduce pendent sulfonic acid groups into modularly built crystalline porous frameworks for intrinsic proton conduction. Herein, we report the mechanoassisted synthesis of two sulfonated covalent organic frameworks (COFs) possessing one-dimensional nanoporous channels decorated with pendent sulfonic acid groups. These COFs exhibit high intrinsic proton conductivity as high as 3.96 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) with long-term stability at ambient temperature and 97% relative humidity (RH). In addition, they were blended with nonconductive polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) affording a series of mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) with proton conductivity up to 1.58 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) and low activation energy of 0.21 eV suggesting the Grotthuss mechanism for proton conduction. Our study has demonstrated the high intrinsic proton conductivity of COFs shedding lights on their wide applications in proton exchange membranes.

  6. Towards a proton imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron therapy for tumor treatment is nowadays used in several medical centres. The main advantage in using protons or light ions beams is the possibility of tightly shaping the radiation dose to the target volume. Presently the spatial accuracy of the therapy is limited by the uncertainty in stopping power distribution, which is derived, for each treatment, from the photon attenuation coefficients measured by X-ray tomography. A direct measurement of the stopping powers will help in reducing this uncertainty. This can be achieved by using a proton beam and a detection system able to reconstruct a tomography image of the patient. As a first step towards such a system an apparatus able to perform a proton transmission radiography (pCR) has been designed. It consists of a silicon microstrip tracker, measuring proton trajectories, and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to determine the particle residual energy. Proton beam and laboratory tests have been performed on the system components prototypes: the main results will be shown and discussed.

  7. Towards a proton imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C., E-mail: Carlo.Civinini@fi.infn.i [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Capineri, L. [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Mazzaglia, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Menichelli, D.; Pieri, S. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Hadron therapy for tumor treatment is nowadays used in several medical centres. The main advantage in using protons or light ions beams is the possibility of tightly shaping the radiation dose to the target volume. Presently the spatial accuracy of the therapy is limited by the uncertainty in stopping power distribution, which is derived, for each treatment, from the photon attenuation coefficients measured by X-ray tomography. A direct measurement of the stopping powers will help in reducing this uncertainty. This can be achieved by using a proton beam and a detection system able to reconstruct a tomography image of the patient. As a first step towards such a system an apparatus able to perform a proton transmission radiography (pCR) has been designed. It consists of a silicon microstrip tracker, measuring proton trajectories, and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to determine the particle residual energy. Proton beam and laboratory tests have been performed on the system components prototypes: the main results will be shown and discussed.

  8. The Structure of the Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  9. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  10. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  11. Higher Twist Effects in Proton-Proton Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Boztosun, I.; Muradov, R. Kh.; Soylu, A.; Dadashov, E. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the contribution of the high twist Feynman diagrams to the large-$p_T$ pion production cross section in proton-proton collisions and we present the general formulae for the high and leading twist differential cross sections. The pion wave function where two non-trivial Gegenbauer coefficients $a_2$ and $a_4$ have been extracted from the CLEO data, two other pion model wave functions, $P_2$, $P_3$, the asymptotic and the Chernyak-Zhitnitsky wave functions are us...

  12. Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Gaunt, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Double hard parton-parton interactions are expected to occur frequently in proton-proton (p-p) collisions at the LHC. They can give rise to significant backgrounds to certain rare single scattering (SPS) signals, and are an interesting signal process in their own right. In this thesis, we discuss the theoretical description of the double parton scattering (DPS) cross section in the context of Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD). After an overview of QCD and an introduction to DPS in Chapter 1, w...

  13. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  14. Towards structural and functional analysis of the plant plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Bo Højen

    of plasma membrane H+-ATPases. Studies on the plasma membrane H+-ATPases have involved both in vivo and in vitro approaches, with the latter employing either solubilisation by detergent micelles, or reconstitution into lipid vesicles. Despite resulting in a large body of information on structure, function...... into soluble nanoscale lipid bilayers, also termed nanodiscs. Extensive analysis confirms the correct assembly and reconstitution of active proton pump into nanodiscs. The pump inserts as a monomer, which through activity analysis confirms this as the minimal functional unit of the plasma membrane H......The plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a proton pump essential for several physiological important processes in plants. Through the extrusion of protons from the cell, the PM H+-ATPase establishes and maintains a proton gradient used by proton coupled transporters and secondary active transport...

  15. Multistate empirical valence bond study of temperature and confinement effects on proton transfer in water inside hydrophobic nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahat, Amani; Martí, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Microscopic characteristics of an aqueous excess proton in a wide range of thermodynamic states, from low density amorphous ices (down to 100 K) to high temperature liquids under the critical point (up to 600 K), placed inside hydrophobic graphene slabs at the nanometric scale (with interplate distances between 3.1 and 0.7 nm wide) have been analyzed by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Water-proton and carbon-proton forces were modeled with a multistate empirical valence bond method. Densities between 0.07 and 0.02 Å(-3) have been considered. As a general trend, we observed a competition between effects of confinement and temperature on structure and dynamical properties of the lone proton. Confinement has strong influence on the local structure of the proton, whereas the main effect of temperature on proton properties is observed on its dynamics, with significant variation of proton transfer rates, proton diffusion coefficients, and characteristic frequencies of vibrational motions. Proton transfer is an activated process with energy barriers between 1 and 10 kJ/mol for both proton transfer and diffusion, depending of the temperature range considered and also on the interplate distance. Arrhenius-like behavior of the transfer rates and of proton diffusion are clearly observed for states above 100 K. Spectral densities of proton species indicated that in all states Zundel-like and Eigen-like complexes survive at some extent. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27189810

  16. Non-perturbative proton stability

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Adam(PH-TH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland); Stavenga, Gerben C.

    2011-01-01

    Proton decay is a generic prediction of GUT models and is therefore an important channel to detect the existence of unification or to set limits on GUT models. Current bounds on the proton lifetime are around 10^33 years, which sets stringent limits on the GUT scale. These limits are obtained under `reasonable' assumptions about the size of the hadronic matrix elements. In this paper we present a non-perturbative calculation of the hadronic matrix elements within the chiral bag model of the p...

  17. Neutron-Proton pairing revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, W. A.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2007-01-01

    We reexamine neutron-proton pairing as a phenomenon that should be explanable in a microscopic theory of nuclear binding energies. Empirically, there is an increased separation energy when both neutron and proton numbers are even or if they are both odd. The enhancement is present at some level in nearly all nuclei: the separation energy difference has the opposite sign in less than 1% of the cases in which sufficient data exist. We discuss the possible origin of the effect in the context of ...

  18. Magnetic moment of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, Gustavo R; Gonzalez, Javier G

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton is calculated using a geometric unified theory. The geometry determines a generalized Pauli equation showing anomalous terms due to the triplet proton structure. The theoretical result gives a bare anomalous Lande gyromagnetic g-factor close to the experimental value. The necessary radiative corrections should be included in the actual theoretical dressed value. The first order correction raises the value to 2(2.7796). Similarly we obtain for the neutron gyromagnetic g-factor the value 2(1.9267).

  19. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  20. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search...

  1. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  2. The chemistry of protonated species in the martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jane L.

    2015-05-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft entered orbit around Mars on 22 September 2014. The Neutral Gas Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) instrument on this spacecraft will measure the ion densities with unprecedented sensitivity of ∼1 cm-3 above the nominal periapsis altitude ∼150 km. The upper region of the martian ionosphere consists of a suite of ions that have been modeled many times, and several protonated species, for which there are fewer models. We model here the density profiles for 14 major ions that have been modeled previously and 10 additional protonated species, which include the most important 4 species, HCO+, OCOH+, OH+, and N2H+, with smaller densities of several minor species, including H2+, H3+, HOx2+, HNO+, ArH+, and CH+. To the ∼220 reactions that were already in our ionospheric models, we add ∼75 reactions that are of relevance to protonated species, including ion-molecule reactions and dissociative recombination reactions. These reactions also largely complete the chemistry of thermospheric H and H2, which we also show. We first discuss the chemistry of protonated species in general, and then we justify our choices for the rate coefficients of the reactions that we add here. We then describe the major production and loss mechanisms for the four major protonated species. Finally we present density profiles for all 10 protonated species that we consider here for low and high solar activity models, and show that most of their peak densities are anticorrelated with solar activity. This will confer an advantage to the MAVEN mission, which will enter the ionosphere during a period of declining solar activity. We compare our model to two previous models, and show that there are significant differences between them. The results presented here will provide a guide for the mass settings on the NGIMS instrument.

  3. β-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Shuwei; LI; Zhankui; XIE; Yuanxiang; HUANG; Wenxue; SH

    2005-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the experimental study on β-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line published by our group during the period of 1996―2004, namely the first observation of the β-delayed proton decays of 9 new nuclides in the rare-earth region and the new measurements of β-delayed proton decays of 5 nuclides in the mass (90 region near the N = Z line with the aid of the "p-γ" coincidence in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In the meantime some important experimental technique details were supplemented. The experimental results, including the half-lives, spins, parities, deformations and production reaction cross sections for the 14 nuclei were summarized and compared with the current nuclear-model predictions, and then the following points were represented. (1) The experimental half-lives for 85Mo and 92Rh as well as the predicted "waiting point" nuclei 89Ru and 93Pd are 5―10 times longer than the theoretical predictions given by M(o)ller et al. using a macroscopic-microscopic model. It considerably influences the predictions of the abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp-process. (2) The current-model predictions are not consistent with the experimental assignments of the spins and parities for the proton drip-line nuclei 142Ho and 128Pm. However, the nuclear potential energy surface (PES) calculated by using a Woods- Saxon-Strutinsky method reproduced the experimental results. (3) The Alice code overestimated the production reaction cross sections of the studied 9 rare-earth nuclei by one order of magnitude or two, while HIVAP code overestimated them by one order of magnitude approximately.

  4. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Conesa del Valle, Z; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B Z; Lansberg, J P; Lourenço, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Thereafter, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in a broader perspective, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  5. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa del Valle, Z. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Corcella, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E.Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy); Fleuret, F. [LLR, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Ferreiro, E.G. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and IGFAE, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Kartvelishvili, V. [Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB,United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Kopeliovich, B. [Departamento de Fisica Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Instituto de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias e Ingenieria and Centro, Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Lansberg, J.P. [IPNO, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France); Lourenco, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Martinez, G. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, Nantes (France); Papadimitriou, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois, 60510, U.S.A (United States); Satz, H. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld (Germany); Scomparin, E. [INFN Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino, I-10125 (Italy); Ullrich, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Teryaev, O. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Vogt, R. [Physics Divsion, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Physics Department, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang, J.X. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2011-05-15

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  6. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We pe

  7. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  8. Two different zinc(II)-aqua complexes held up by a metal-oxide based support: Synthesis, crystal structure and catalytic activity of [HMTAH]2[{Zn(H2O)5}{Zn(H2O)4}{Mo7O24}].2H2O (HMTAH = protonated hexamethylenetetramine)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Arumuganathan; A Srinivasarao; T Vijay Kumar; Samar K Das

    2008-01-01

    An inorganic−organic hybrid material, [HMTAH]2[{Zn(H2O)5}{Zn(H2O)4}{Mo7O24}].2H2O (1) (where HMTAH = protonated hxamethylenetetramine) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The compound 1 crystallizes in a monoclinic space group 2/. The crystal data of 1: = 43.12(3), = 12.399(10), = 16.285(13), = 111.131(11), = 8. Its crystal structure shows that two different Zn(II)-aqua complexes, [Zn(H2O)5]2+ and [Zn(H2O)4]2+ are covalently coordinated to a heptamolybdateanion [Mo7O24]6- resulting in an anionic species of polyoxometalate supported zinc-aqua complexes, [{Zn(H2O)}{Zn(H2O)4}{Mo7O24}]2-, that is stabilized with two protonated hexamethylenetetramine cations in the title compound 1. In the crystal structure, both lattice water molecules are found to interact with the heptamolybdate cluster anion and the protonated hexamethylenetetramine cation resulting in an intricate three-dimensional hydrogen bonding network. Interestingly, compound 1 exhibits catalytic activity towards oxidation of some primary alcohols.

  9. Squalamine is not a proton ionophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinsky, B S; Smith, R; Frangiosi, A; Vonbaur, B; Pedersen, L

    2000-03-15

    Squalamine, an aminosterol antibiotic isolated from the dogfish shark, creates relatively large defects in phospholipid bilayers, allowing the unrestricted translocation of small molecules across these compromised membranes (B.S. Selinsky, Z. Zhou, K.G. Fotjik, S. R. Jones, N.R. Dollahon, A.E. Shinnar, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1370 (1998) 218-234). However, an aminosterol structurally similar to squalamine was found to act as a proton ionophore in anionic phospholipid vesicles. In contrast with squalamine, gross membrane disruption was not observed with this synthetic analog (G. Deng, T. Dewa, S.L. Regen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118 (1996) 8975-8976). In this report, the ionophoric activity of squalamine was tested in anionic and zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles. No ionophoric activity was observed for squalamine in vesicles comprised of phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), or a mixture of the two lipids. Experiments using radiolabeled squalamine indicated that all of the squalamine added to PG vesicles remained with the vesicles, while approximately one-half of the squalamine added to PC vesicles was incorporated. We have synthesized the aminosterol analog of squalamine possessing ionophoric activity, and its ionophoric activity in PG vesicles was confirmed. The synthetic compound possessed no measurable lytic activity when added to preformed phospholipid vesicles. As both compounds possess significant antimicrobial activity, these results suggest that either multiple mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of aminosterols exist, depending upon the aminosterol structure, or possibly an unrelated common mechanism for antimicrobial activity remains to be discovered. PMID:10704927

  10. Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shochet, Melvyn J.

    1995-01-01

    Comment: Summary of the 10th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics, Fermilab, May 9-13, 1995. Postscript file (34 pages with 82 embedded figures; 5.7 MB) available at http://www-cdf.fnal.gov/physics/conf95/cdf3225_pbarp_wkshp_summary.ps

  11. A photon-proton marriage

    OpenAIRE

    Bylinkin, A. A.; Rostovtsev, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shapes of invariant differential cross section for charged hadron production as function of hadron's transverse momentum and rapidity in ep collisions at HERA machine are considered. The particle spectra shapes observed in pp and gamma-gamma collisions before have shown very different properties. This difference could be directly measured in the "mixed" type collisions of photon and proton at HERA experiments.

  12. Emerging technologies in proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Jacobus M.; Lomax, Antony J.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of proton therapy facilities are being planned and built at hospital based centers. Most facilities are employing traditional dose delivery methods. A second generation of dose application techniques, based on pencil beam scanning, is slowly being introduced into the commerciall

  13. Parton distributions of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J. (Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Roberts, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    To obtain improved parton densities of the proton, we present a new global analysis of deep-inelastic and related data including, in particular, the recent measurements of F[sub 2] at HERA, of the asymmetry of the rapidity distributions of W[sup [+-

  14. Parton distributions of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J. (Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham DH13LE (United Kingdom)); Roberts, R.G. (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX110QX (United Kingdom))

    1994-12-01

    To obtain improved parton densities of the proton, we present a new global analysis of deep-inelastic and related data including, in particular, the recent measurements of [ital F][sub 2] at DESY HERA, of the asymmetry of the rapidity distributions of [ital W][sup [plus minus

  15. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study

  16. Solid-state proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remick, R.J.; Jewulski, J.; Osif, T.

    1989-01-01

    Work on this project is divided into three tasks. In the first, a comprehensive literature review was performed for the purpose of collecting data on solid proton conductors. The data was then analyzed with the goal of correlating physical and chemical characteristics with protonic conductivity in order to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. In the second task, the results of the correlation study were used to choose an electrolyte system in which to work and to aid in the formulation of new candidate proton conductors. Under the third task, a universal test stand was constructed which can measure both electronic and protonic conductivity and which can be converted to use as a solid state fuel cell test stand. Samples of doped SrCe{sub 0.95}Yb{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} have been coated with palladium electrodes and the mechanism responsible for ionic conductivity through this material is currently under study. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  17. The size of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebel, T., E-mail: tbn@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Antognini, A. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Amaro, F. D. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Biraben, F. [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Cardoso, J. M. R. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Covita, D. S. [Universidade de Aveiro, I3N, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Dax, A.; Dhawan, S. [Yale University, Physics Department (United States); Fernandes, L. M. P. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Giesen, A. [Dausinger and Giesen GmbH (Germany); Graf, T. [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Strahlwerkzeuge (Germany); Haensch, T. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Indelicato, P.; Julien, L. [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Kao, C.-Y. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg, Departement de Physique (Switzerland); Kottmann, F. [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik (Switzerland); Bigot, E. Le [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Liu, Y.-W. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Lopes, J. A. M. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); and others

    2012-12-15

    The root-mean-square (rms) charge radius r{sub p} of the proton has so far been known only with a surprisingly low precision of about 1% from both electron scattering and precision spectroscopy of hydrogen. We have recently determined r{sub p} by means of laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift in the exotic 'muonic hydrogen' atom. Here, the muon, which is the 200 times heavier cousin of the electron, orbits the proton with a 200 times smaller Bohr radius. This enhances the sensitivity to the proton's finite size tremendously. Our new value r{sub p} = 0.84184 (67) fm is ten times more precise than the generally accepted CODATA-value, but it differs by 5 standard deviations from it. A lively discussion about possible solutions to the 'proton size puzzle' has started. Our measurement, together with precise measurements of the 1S-2S transition in regular hydrogen and deuterium, also yields improved values of the Rydberg constant, R{sub {infinity} } = 10,973,731.568160 (16) m{sup - 1}.

  18. $\\beta$3$p$-spectroscopy and proton-$\\gamma$ width determination in the decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to perform a detailed study of the $\\beta$-decay of the dripline nucleus $^{31}$Ar. This will allow a detailed study of the $\\beta$-delayed 3$p$-decay as well as provide important information on the resonances of $^{30}$S and $^{29}$P, in particular the ratio between the $p$- and $\\gamma$- partial widths relevant for astrophysics.

  19. Wide-dynamic-range kinetic investigations of deep proton tunnelling in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Sage, J Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Champion, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Directional proton transport along 'wires' that feed biochemical reactions in proteins is poorly understood. Amino-acid residues with high pKa are seldom considered as active transport elements in such wires because of their large classical barrier for proton dissociation. Here, we use the light-triggered proton wire of the green fluorescent protein to study its ground-electronic-state proton-transport kinetics, revealing a large temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect. We show that 'deep' proton tunnelling between hydrogen-bonded oxygen atoms with a typical donor-acceptor distance of 2.7-2.8 Å fully accounts for the rates at all temperatures, including the unexpectedly large value (2.5 × 10(9) s(-1)) found at room temperature. The rate-limiting step in green fluorescent protein is assigned to tunnelling of the ionization-resistant serine hydroxyl proton. This suggests how high-pKa residues within a proton wire can act as a 'tunnel diode' to kinetically trap protons and control the direction of proton flow. PMID:27554414

  20. Wide-dynamic-range kinetic investigations of deep proton tunnelling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Sage, J. Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Champion, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Directional proton transport along ‘wires’ that feed biochemical reactions in proteins is poorly understood. Amino-acid residues with high pKa are seldom considered as active transport elements in such wires because of their large classical barrier for proton dissociation. Here, we use the light-triggered proton wire of the green fluorescent protein to study its ground-electronic-state proton-transport kinetics, revealing a large temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect. We show that ‘deep’ proton tunnelling between hydrogen-bonded oxygen atoms with a typical donor-acceptor distance of 2.7-2.8 Å fully accounts for the rates at all temperatures, including the unexpectedly large value (2.5 × 109 s-1) found at room temperature. The rate-limiting step in green fluorescent protein is assigned to tunnelling of the ionization-resistant serine hydroxyl proton. This suggests how high-pKa residues within a proton wire can act as a ‘tunnel diode’ to kinetically trap protons and control the direction of proton flow.

  1. Trapped Proton Environment in Medium-Earth Orbit (2000-2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Friedel, Reinhard Hans [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kippen, Richard Marc [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This report describes the method used to derive fluxes of the trapped proton belt along the GPS orbit (i.e., a Medium-Earth Orbit) during 2000 – 2010, a period almost covering a solar cycle. This method utilizes a newly developed empirical proton radiation-belt model, with the model output scaled by GPS in-situ measurements, to generate proton fluxes that cover a wide range of energies (50keV- 6MeV) and keep temporal features as well. The new proton radiation-belt model is developed based upon CEPPAD proton measurements from the Polar mission (1996 – 2007). Comparing to the de-facto standard empirical model of AP8, this model is not only based upon a new data set representative of the proton belt during the same period covered by GPS, but can also provide statistical information of flux values such as worst cases and occurrence percentiles instead of solely the mean values. The comparison shows quite different results from the two models and suggests that the commonly accepted error factor of 2 on the AP8 flux output over-simplifies and thus underestimates variations of the proton belt. Output fluxes from this new model along the GPS orbit are further scaled by the ns41 in-situ data so as to reflect the dynamic nature of protons in the outer radiation belt at geomagnetically active times. Derived daily proton fluxes along the GPS ns41 orbit, whose data files are delivered along with this report, are depicted to illustrate the trapped proton environment in the Medium-Earth Orbit. Uncertainties on those daily proton fluxes from two sources are evaluated: One is from the new proton-belt model that has error factors < ~3; the other is from the in-situ measurements and the error factors could be ~ 5.

  2. Trapped Proton Environment in Medium-Earth Orbit (2000-2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the method used to derive fluxes of the trapped proton belt along the GPS orbit (i.e., a Medium-Earth Orbit) during 2000 - 2010, a period almost covering a solar cycle. This method utilizes a newly developed empirical proton radiation-belt model, with the model output scaled by GPS in-situ measurements, to generate proton fluxes that cover a wide range of energies (50keV- 6MeV) and keep temporal features as well. The new proton radiation-belt model is developed based upon CEPPAD proton measurements from the Polar mission (1996 - 2007). Comparing to the de-facto standard empirical model of AP8, this model is not only based upon a new data set representative of the proton belt during the same period covered by GPS, but can also provide statistical information of flux values such as worst cases and occurrence percentiles instead of solely the mean values. The comparison shows quite different results from the two models and suggests that the commonly accepted error factor of 2 on the AP8 flux output over-simplifies and thus underestimates variations of the proton belt. Output fluxes from this new model along the GPS orbit are further scaled by the ns41 in-situ data so as to reflect the dynamic nature of protons in the outer radiation belt at geomagnetically active times. Derived daily proton fluxes along the GPS ns41 orbit, whose data files are delivered along with this report, are depicted to illustrate the trapped proton environment in the Medium-Earth Orbit. Uncertainties on those daily proton fluxes from two sources are evaluated: One is from the new proton-belt model that has error factors < ~3; the other is from the in-situ measurements and the error factors could be ~ 5.

  3. Electrochemical reactivity and proton transport mechanisms in nanostructured ceria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J; Strelcov, E; Kalinin, S V; Bassiri-Gharb, N

    2016-08-26

    Electrochemical reactivity and ionic transport at the nanoscale are essential in many energy applications. In this study, time-resolved Kelvin probe force microscopy (tr-KPFM) is utilized for surface potential mapping of nanostructured ceria, in both space and time domains. The fundamental mechanisms of proton injection and transport are studied as a function of environmental conditions and the presence or absence of triple phase boundaries. Finite element modeling is used to extract physical parameters from the experimental data, allowing not only quantification of the observed processes, but also decoupling of their contributions to the measured signal. The constructed phase diagrams of the parameters demonstrate a thermally activated proton injection reaction at the triple phase boundary, and two transport processes that are responsible for the low-temperature proton conductivity of nanostructured ceria. PMID:27407076

  4. Electrochemical reactivity and proton transport mechanisms in nanostructured ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J.; Strelcov, E.; Kalinin, S. V.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical reactivity and ionic transport at the nanoscale are essential in many energy applications. In this study, time-resolved Kelvin probe force microscopy (tr-KPFM) is utilized for surface potential mapping of nanostructured ceria, in both space and time domains. The fundamental mechanisms of proton injection and transport are studied as a function of environmental conditions and the presence or absence of triple phase boundaries. Finite element modeling is used to extract physical parameters from the experimental data, allowing not only quantification of the observed processes, but also decoupling of their contributions to the measured signal. The constructed phase diagrams of the parameters demonstrate a thermally activated proton injection reaction at the triple phase boundary, and two transport processes that are responsible for the low-temperature proton conductivity of nanostructured ceria.

  5. Development of Interpretive Simulation Tool for the Proton Radiography Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, M C; Wilks, S C; Ross, J S; Huntington, C M; Fiuza, F; Baring, M G; Park, H- S

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography is a useful diagnostic of high energy density (HED) plasmas under active theoretical and experimental development. In this paper we describe a new simulation tool that interacts realistic laser-driven point-like proton sources with three dimensional electromagnetic fields of arbitrary strength and structure and synthesizes the associated high resolution proton radiograph. The present tool's numerical approach captures all relevant physics effects, including effects related to the formation of caustics. Electromagnetic fields can be imported from PIC or hydrodynamic codes in a streamlined fashion, and a library of electromagnetic field `primitives' is also provided. This latter capability allows users to add a primitive, modify the field strength, rotate a primitive, and so on, while quickly generating a high resolution radiograph at each step. In this way, our tool enables the user to deconstruct features in a radiograph and interpret them in connection to specific underlying electromagneti...

  6. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Dolney, D; Kondrla, M; Fager, M; Carabe, A

    2016-02-21

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm(-1)) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  7. Dilepton and double-photon production in proton-proton scattering at 190 MeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caplar, R.; Bacelar, J.C.S; Castelijns, R.J.J.; Ermisch, K.; Gasparic, I.; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Löhner, H.; Mahjour Shafiei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The first high-statistics measurement of dilepton and double-photon yields in proton-proton scattering below the pion threshold has been performed. The data obtained allow a detailed study of off-shell effects in the proton-proton interaction.

  8. Proton structure functions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  9. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'. PMID:7823046

  10. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  11. Possible method to measure the ratio of proton form factors in processes with proton spin transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Galynsky, M V; Bystritskiy, Yu M

    2008-01-01

    The ratio of squared of electric and magnetic form-factor of proton is shown to be proportional to the ratio of flip and non-flip cross section of elastic electron polarized proton scattering. Spin-flip (non-spin-flip) cross section correspond to the case when polarization of recoil proton antiparallel (parallel) to the polarization of initial proton when polarization of initial proton is parallel to tree momentum scattered proton. A similar arguments are valid for radiative ep-scattering as well as for the crossed process pair photo-production on the polarized proton in Bethe-Heitler kinematics.

  12. Spin asymmetries in lepton-proton and proton-proton diffractive reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Goloskokov, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the longitudinal double spin asymmetry $A_{ll}$ in polarized diffractive $Q \\bar Q$ production depends strongly on the spin structure of the quark-pomeron vertex. Relevant experiments will be possible at HERA with a polarized proton beam.

  13. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Markus K

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision.\\\\ Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium.\\\\ To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-...

  14. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; Status of the proton therapy center at Samsung Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kwang Zoo; Han, Young Yih; Kim, Jin Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  15. Proton-proton weak capture in chiral effective field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, L E; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2013-05-10

    The astrophysical S factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0-100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and magnetic moments and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium β decay. Contributions from S and P partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The S factor at zero energy is found to be S(0)=(4.030±0.006)×10(-23) MeV fm(2), with a P-wave contribution of 0.020×10(-23) MeV fm(2). The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the low-energy constants and to the cutoff dependence. PMID:23705703

  16. Proton-Proton Weak Capture in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcucci, Laura Elisa [Pisa U., INFN-Pisa; Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion U., JLAB; Viviani, MIchele [INFN-Pisa

    2013-05-01

    The astrophysical $S$-factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0--100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the $A=3$ binding energies and magnetic moments, and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium $\\beta$ decay. Contributions from $S$ and $P$ partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The $S$-factor at zero energy is found to be $S(0)=(4.030 \\pm 0.006)\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$, with a $P$-wave contribution of $0.020\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$. The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the LEC's and to the cutoff dependence. It is shown that polynomial fits to parametrize the energy dependence of the $S$-factor are inherently unstable.

  17. Golden Jubilee photos: ISR - The first proton-proton interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) on 16 October 1971, the man in charge of their construction, Kjell Johnsen, presented the "key" to the machine to Edoardo Amaldi, President of Council. Seated on the stage with them for this symbolic event were Victor Weisskopf, Marcel Antonioz, Willy Jentschke (seen on the left of the photo) and Werner Heisenberg (on the far right). On 27 January that year, in a world premier, signals produced by proton-proton collisions had been observed at the ISR. The protons, supplied by the PS, were injected into two identical rings, each measuring 300 metres in diameter, and collided head on at the 8 points where the rings intersected. The installation, which remained in operation until 1984, gave physicists access to a wide range of energies for hadron physics, hitherto restricted to the data from cosmic ray studies. The many technological challenges that were met at the ISR, in the fields of vacuum technology and stochastic cooling for instance,...

  18. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe, E-mail: Christophe.jouvet@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, UMR-7345, Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires (PIIM), Marseille (France)

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  19. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  20. SU-E-T-388: Estimating the Radioactivity Inventory of a Cyclotron Based Pencil Beam Proton Therapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Parts of the cyclotron and energy degrader are incidentally activated by protons lost during the acceleration and transport of protons for radiation therapy. An understanding of the radioactive material inventory is needed when regulatory requirements are assessed. Methods: First, the tumor dose and volume is used to determine the required energy deposition. For spot scanning, the tumor length along the beam path determines the number of required energy layers. For each energy layer the energy deposition per proton can be calculated from the residual proton range within the tumor. Assuming a typical layer weighting, an effective energy deposition per proton can then be calculated. The total number of required protons and the number of protons per energy layer can then be calculated. For each energy layer, proton losses in the energy degrader are calculated separately since its transmission efficiency, and hence the amount of protons lost, is energy dependent. The degrader efficiency also determines the number of protons requested from the cyclotron. The cyclotron extraction efficiency allows a calculation of the proton losses within the cyclotron. The saturation activity induced in the cyclotron and the degrader is equal to the production rate R for isotopes whose half-life is shorter that the projected cyclotron life time. R can be calculated from the proton loss rate and published production cross sections. Results: About 1/3 of the saturation activity is produced in the cyclotron and 2/3 in the energy degrader. For a projected case mix and a patient load of 1100 fractions per week at 1.8 Gy per fraction a combined activity of 180 mCi was estimated at saturation. Conclusion: Calculations were used to support to application of a radioactive materials license for the possession of 200 mCi of activity for isotopes with atomic numbers ranging from 1-83

  1. Dose energy dependence in proton imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denyak, V.V., E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Paschuk, S.A.; Schelin, H.R.; Rocha, R.L.; Setti, J.A.P.; Klock, M.C.L.; Evseev, I.G. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Yevseyeva, O.I. [Polytechnic Institute of the Rio de Janeiro State University, Nova Friburgo 28610-970 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the earliest works dedicated to proton radiography and proton computed tomography it was shown that the advantage of image creation using proton beams appears when the energy is chosen as small as possible, but enough to pass the object. This phenomenon is based on the great sensitivity of the energy flux of the proton beam in relation to the length and density of the object at the end of the proton range. However, this fact was proved experimentally only with thin detectors, such as photographic films, which detect only part of the exit energy of protons. Another method which is based on the measurement of total exit energy of protons contains two effects that act in opposite ways: the necessary irradiation dose increases when the energy of the proton is reduced. In this work, the dependence of the irradiation dose on proton initial energy was studied using analytical formulas and computer simulations. The investigation shows that the irradiation dose depends slightly on the proton energy beyond the region at the end of the proton range and increases sharply in it.

  2. Gluons and the spin of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubelskyi, Oleksandr

    2010-12-23

    The structure of the proton and the origin of the proton spin has been a puzzle for many years. The EMC collaboration at CERN provided the first experimental data on the spin structure of the proton. The result was almost zero net contribution from quarks. Over the past 20 years new measurements of polarized parton distributions became available. The present value of the quark contribution to the proton spin is one third. The remaining 60 percent of the proton spin come from the gluons and orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons. We investigate how the spin of the proton originates from the spin of its constituents. We study the proton using the phenomenologically accessible parameters such as distribution functions for quarks and gluons. The basic understanding of the proton structure (and in particular its spin structure) is important for interpreting the results of the LHC, which in turn can be used to refine the present knowledge. The proton spin structure gives a detailed information about the dynamical structure of the proton. Based on the present experimental data we suggest that the gluons and quarks play equally important role in the structure of the proton. (orig.)

  3. The application of Dow Chemical's perfluorinated membranes in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, G. A.

    1990-02-01

    Dow Chemical's research activities in fuel cells revolve around the development of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, useful as the proton transport medium and separator. The following work will outline some of the performance characteristics which are typical for such membranes.

  4. Buried planar and channel waveguides in sapphire and Ti:sapphire by proton implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laversenne, Laetitia; Hoffmann, Patrik; Pollnau, Markus; Moretti, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Buried, stacked planar, and channel waveguides fabricated by proton implantation into sapphire are demonstrated for the first time. The good control of implantation parameters is promising to achieve active integrated optics devices Ti3+:sapphire.

  5. Proton emission - new results and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    Proton emission is the radioactive decay mode that is expected to determine the limit of observable proton-rich nuclei for most elements. Considerable progress has been made in the study of proton-emitting nuclei since the first observation of direct proton emission nearly 50 years ago. This has led to improvements in our understanding of this decay process and provided invaluable nuclear structure data far from the valley of beta stability. The rapid fall in half-lives with increasing neutron deficiency when proton emission dominates makes it likely that for some elements, the lightest isotopes whose ground states can be observed in conventional experiments have already been reached. The enhanced stability against proton emission of the recently discovered high-lying isomer in 158Ta raises the possibility that proton emission from multiparticle isomers could be observed in nuclei beyond the expected boundaries of the nuclear landscape.

  6. Stable transport in proton driven Fast Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A

    2009-01-01

    Proton beam transport in the context of proton driven Fast Ignition is usually assumed to be stable due to protons high inertia, but an analytical analysis of the process is still lacking. The stability of a charge and current neutralized proton beam passing through a plasma is therefore conducted here, for typical proton driven Fast Ignition parameters. In the cold regime, two fast growing Buneman-like modes are found, with an inverse growth-rate much smaller than the beam time-of-flight to the target core. The stability issue is thus not so obvious, and Kinetic effects are investigated. One unstable mode is found stabilized by the background plasma protons and electrons temperatures. The second mode is also damped, providing the proton beam thermal spread is larger than $\\sim$ 10 keV. In Fusion conditions, the beam propagation should therefore be stable.

  7. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  8. The proton engineering frontier project: accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since launched in 2002 to establish an advanced research facility to promote and support core R and D programs by utilizing highly-characterized proton beams, the Proton Engineering Frontier Project has been devoted to developing a high-current 100-MeV, 20 mA proton linac. The upstream part of the proton linac, up to 20 MeV, has been successfully developed, integrated, and commissioned and has delivered proton beams to users under a limited operation license. The high-energy part of the accelerator and beamlines are under development. The architectural and radiation shielding design of the accelerator building and beam experimental hall has been completed. The site preparation and construction works are in progress in cooperation with the municipal government of Gyeongju city. When the project is completed in 2012, as scheduled, the proton accelerator facility will be capable of delivering highly-characterized proton beams to multiple users by satisfying their dedicated requirements.

  9. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  10. Characterization and partial purification of a proton translocating ATPase from corn coleoptile tonoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandala, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    ATP-dependent proton translocating activity in microsomal membranes from corn coleoptiles was characterized. Proton pumping activity, detected by either /sup 14/C-methylamine uptake or quinacrine fluorescence quenching, had a broad optimum at pH 7.5, and was substrate specific for MgATP. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, and protonophores were found to inhibit proton transport, while vanadate and oligomycin had little effect. Proton pumping activity was stimulated 10 fold with Cl/sup -/ but was almost completely inhibited by 50 mM, KNO/sub 3/. Uptake studies with /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ indicated the Cl/sup -/ was transported into the microsomal vesicles in response to the pH gradient. ATP-stimulated proton pumping activity was localized on linear density gradients. On sucrose gradients, the activity cosedimented with the marker for endoplasmic reticulum at 1.11 g/cc. Sucrose gradients prepared in the presence of MgCl/sub 2/ were used to shift the ER marker to a heavier density, away from proton pumping activity. Linear dextran gradients also resulted in a clear separation of ATP-stimulated methylamine, thiocyanate, and /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake, from markers for ER, Golgi, mitochondria, and plasma membranes. The tonoplast ATPase was solubilized with octylglucoside and partially purified on linear sucrose gradients. The specific activity of the KNO/sub 3/-sensitive ATPase increased 30-fold during purification.

  11. Monitoring proton therapy with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganetti, H; El Fakhri, G

    2015-07-01

    Protons are being used in radiation therapy because of typically better dose conformity and reduced total energy deposited in the patient as compared with photon techniques. Both aspects are related to the finite range of a proton beam. The finite range also allows advanced dose shaping. These benefits can only be fully utilized if the end of range can be predicted accurately in the patient. The prediction of the range in tissue is associated with considerable uncertainties owing to imaging, patient set-up, beam delivery, interfractional changes in patient anatomy and dose calculation. Consequently, a significant range (of the order of several millimetres) is added to the prescribed range in order to ensure tumour coverage. Thus, reducing range uncertainties would allow a reduction of the treatment volume and reduce dose to potential organs at risk. PMID:25989699

  12. Protonated water clusters in TPC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yunus; Kalkan, Yalçın; Veenhof, Rob

    2016-07-01

    Water vapour is added to the ALICE TPC gas to enhance its stability. These polar molecules create large protonated water clusters around a H+ core. In this context, the reactions H3O+(H2 O) n - 1 +H2 O →H3O+(H2O)n (n=1-9) were studied in the gas phase. Structures for these clusters are suggested and the most stable structures for each cluster size are shown. The thermodynamic parameters Δ Hn-1,n0, Δ Gn-1,n0, Δ Sn-1,n0 and equilibrium constants K n - 1 , n for the reaction were calculated to determine the size of the water clusters. The results are close to experimental data found in the literature. Protonated water clusters at stp have a size of 6-9 which corresponds to a mass of 127.1 - 181.2 g / mole.

  13. Characteristics of solar proton events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Tsuyoshi (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    Intensities of high energy particles originated from solar flares vary by many orders of magnitude depending on each flare. Elemental abundance and the energy spectrum are also variable for each event. A model for solar protons (SOLPRO) made by NASA and based on the data of solar cycle 20 predicts an occurrence probability for an anomalously large 'AL' event. But solar proton data of cycle 21, obtained by the Japanese meteorological satellite 'HIMAWARI' show that there was no 'AL' event in cycle 21, although several major events occurred whose intensities lie in the same order. Therefore the importance of 'AL' event prediction depends on the solar cycle. (author).

  14. Total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy of beta delayed neutron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Rice, S.; Agramunt, J.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Porta, A.; Fallot, M.; Jordan, M. D.; Molina, F.; Estevez, E.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Eloma, V.; Eronen, T.; Garcia, A.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Moore, I.; Rissanen, J.; Ńystö, J.; Penttilä, H.; Kankainen, A.; Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Farrelly, G. F.; Weber, C.; Mendoza, E.; Igisol People

    2013-06-01

    Preliminary results of the data analysis of the beta decay of 94Rb using a novel - segmented- total absorption spectrometer are shown in this contribution. This result is part of a systematic study of important contributors to the decay heat problem in nuclear reactors. In this particular case the goal is to determine the beta intensity distribution below the neutron separation energy and the gamma/beta competition above.

  15. $\\beta$-delayed neutrons from oriented $^{137,139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose a world-first measurement of the angular distribution of $\\beta$‐delayed n and $\\gamma$-radiation from oriented $^{137, 139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei, polarised at low temperature at the NICOLE facility. $\\beta$­-delayed neutron emission is an increasingly important decay mechanism as the drip line is approached and its detailed understanding is essential to phenomena as fundamental as the r‐process and practical as the safe operation of nuclear power reactors. The experiments offer sensitive tests of theoretical input concerning the allowed and first­‐forbidden $\\beta$‐decay strength, the spin-density of neutron emitting states and the partial wave barrier penetration as a function of nuclear deformation. In $^{137}$I and $^{87}$Br the decay feeds predominantly the ground state of the daughters $^{136}$Xe and $^{86}$Kr whereas in $^{139}$I and $^{89}$Br we will explore the use of n-$\\gamma$- coincidence to study neutron transitions to the first and second excited states in the daughters...

  16. $\\beta$-delayed neutrons from oriented $^{137,139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Grzywacz, Robert; Stone, Nicholas; Köster, Ulli; Singh, Barlaj; Bingham, Carrol; Gaulard, S; Kolos, Karolina; Madurga, Miguel; Nikolov, J; Otsubo, T; Roccia, S; Veskovic, Miroslav; Walker, Phil; Walters, William

    2013-01-01

    We propose a world-­‐first measurement of the angular distribution of $\\beta$-­‐delayed n and $\\gamma$- radiation from oriented $^{137, 139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei, polarised at low temperature at the NICOLE facility. $\\beta$-­‐delayed neutron emission is an increasingly important decay mechanism as the drip line is approached and its detailed understanding is essential to phenomena as fundamental as the r‐process and practical as the safe operation of nuclear power reactors. The experiments offer sensitive tests of theoretical input concerning the allowed and first-­‐forbidden $\\beta$‐decay strength, the spin-­‐density of neutron emitting states and the partial wave barrier penetration as a function of nuclear deformation. In $^{137}$I and $^{87}$Br the decay feeds predominantly the ground state of the daughters $^{136}$Xe and $^{86}$Kr whereas in $^{139}$I and $^{89}$Br we will explore the use of n-$\\gamma$- coincidence to study neutron transitions to the first and second excited state...

  17. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  18. Proton-tetraneutron elastic scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Sherrill, B. M.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the elastic scattering of protons on a 4n system. This was used as part of the detection technique of a recent experiment [1] to search for the 4n (tetraneutron) as a bound particle. We show that it is unlikely that this process alone could yield the events reported in ref. [1], unless the 4n has an anomalously large backward elastic scattering amplitude.

  19. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Blumenfeld; E Khan; F Maréchal; T Suomijärvi

    2001-08-01

    Recent improvements in the intensities and optical qualities of radioactive beams have made possible the study of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on unstable nuclei. The design and performances of an innovative silicon strip detector array devoted to such experiments are described. The quality of the data obtained are illustrated with recent results obtained at the GANIL facility for unstable oxygen, sulfur and argon isotopes. Methods to analyse the data using phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials are discussed.

  20. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, Jr, J F

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  1. Solid-state proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  3. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks (HOFs): A New Class of Porous Crystalline Proton-Conducting Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Avishek; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Sen, Arunabha; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-08-26

    Two porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) based on arene sulfonates and guanidinium ions are reported. As a result of the presence of ionic backbones appended with protonic source, the compounds exhibit ultra-high proton conduction values (σ) 0.75× 10(-2)  S cm(-1) and 1.8×10(-2)  S cm(-1) under humidified conditions. Also, they have very low activation energy values and the highest proton conductivity at ambient conditions (low humidity and at moderate temperature) among porous crystalline materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs). These values are not only comparable to the conventionally used proton exchange membranes, such as Nafion used in fuel cell technologies, but is also the highest value reported in organic-based porous architectures. Notably, this report inaugurates the usage of crystalline hydrogen-bonded porous organic frameworks as solid-state proton conducting materials. PMID:27464784

  4. Hydrogen-bonded proton transfer in the protonated guanine-cytosine (GC+H)+ base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuexia; Wang, Hongyan; Gao, Simin; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-10-13

    The single proton transfer at the different sites of the Watson-Crick (WC) guanine-cytosine (GC) DNA base pair are studied here using density functional methods. The conventional protonated structures, transition state (TS) and proton-transferred product (PT) structures of every relevant species are optimized. Each transition state and proton-transferred product structure has been compared with the corresponding conventional protonated structure to demonstrate the process of proton transfer and the change of geometrical structures. The relative energies of the protonated tautomers and the proton-transfer energy profiles in gas and solvent are analyzed. The proton-transferred product structure G(+H(+))-H(+)C(N3)(-H(+))(PT) has the lowest relative energy for which only two hydrogen bonds exist. Almost all 14 isomers of the protonated GC base pair involve hydrogen-bonded proton transfer following the three pathways, with the exception of structure G-H(+)C(O2). When the positive charge is primarily "located" on the guanine moiety (H(+)G-C, G-H(+)C(C4), and G-H(+)C(C6)), the H(1) proton transfers from the N(1) site of guanine to the N(3) site of cytosine. The structures G-H(+)C(C5) and G-H(+)C(C4) involve H(4a) proton transfer from the N(4) of cytosine to the O(6) site of guanine. H(2a) proton transfer from the N(2) site of guanine to the O(2) site of cytosine is found only for the structure G-H(+)C(C4). The structures to which a proton is added on the six-centered sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds are more prone to proton transfer in the gas phase, whereas a proton added on the minor groove and the sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds is favorable to the proton transfer in energy in the aqueous phase.

  5. Fluoroquinolones: A micro-species equilibrium in the protonation of amphoteric compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurchi, Valeria M; Crisponi, Guido; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Veclani, Daniele; Tolazzi, Marilena; Melchior, Andrea

    2016-10-10

    The knowledge of the speciation of fluoroquinolones is of great actuality for the implications on the activity, bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. Literature reports a number of contrasting evaluations on the existence of tautomeric forms of mono-protonated species, described by a set of protonation micro-constants. Here the protonation sequence and the related protonation constants of four representative molecules are evaluated by a combined potentiometric-spectrophotometric method. The experimental observations necessary to differentiate between a protonation scheme represented by macro-constants alone, and the one that requires the introduction of a micro-protonation scheme, are clearly delineated based on a careful analysis of experimental data and of simulated models. The role of the medium was investigated and UV-vis spectra in water- methanol solution were analyzed. The existence of the zwitterionic species alone at physiological pH in water, and an increase of the relative amount of the neutral species with the lipophilicity of the medium were remarked. This surely affects the bioavailability of FQs, with the increase of the neutral species when the molecules approach the local lipophilic environment close to the cellular membranes. NMR studies allowed the attribution of the protonation sites of the different forms. Quantum chemical evaluation of all the possible existent forms with different protonation degrees and in different sites strongly substantiates the experimental results. The study of the relevant frontier molecular orbitals completed the detailed theoretical characterization of the species. PMID:27586021

  6. Contribution of mitochondrial proton leak to skeletal muscle respiration and to standard metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, D F; Brand, M D

    1996-10-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that the leak of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (proton leak) is a significant contributor to standard metabolic rate (SMR). We found that proton leak accounts for around one-half of the resting respiration rate of perfused rat skeletal muscle. Proton leak is known to make a significant (26%) contribution to the resting respiration rate of isolated rat hepatocytes (M. D. Brand, L.-F. Chien, E. K. Ainscow, D. F. S. Rolfe, and R. K. Porter. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1187: 132-139, 1994). If the importance of proton leak in these isolated and perfused systems is similar to its importance in vivo, then using literature values for the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to SMR, we can calculate that proton leak in liver and skeletal muscle alone accounts for 11-26% (mean 20%) of the SMR of the rat. If proton leak activity in the other tissues of the rat is similar to that in liver cells, then the contribution of proton leak to rat SMR would be 16-31% (mean 25%).

  7. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in electron scattering induced by meson-exchange currents

    CERN Document Server

    Simo, I Ruiz; Barbaro, M B; De Pace, A; Caballero, J A; Megias, G D; Donnelly, T W

    2016-01-01

    We use a relativistic model of meson-exchange currents to compute the proton-neutron and proton-proton yields in $(e,e')$ scattering from $^{12}$C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross section with the relativistic Fermi gas model for a range of kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the $\\Delta$ isobar current. We also analyze the effect of the exchange contribution and show that the direct/exchange interference strongly affects the determination of the np/pp ratio.

  8. The Response of Debris-Flow Events to Solar Proton Flares (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Mingtao; WEI Fangqiang; ZHANG Jinghong; WANG Hongjuan

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the observation data from Dongchuan Debris Flow Observation and Research Station and historical data from year 1965 to 1990 gotten from National Astronomical Observatories/ Yunnan Observatory, the responding of debris flow in Jiangjia Ravine to Solar Proton Flare is studied. The following conclusion can be drawn. Solar Proton Flare, as one of most important astronomical factors, affects the activity of debris flow in Yunnan. Generally, from 1965 to 1990, the more active Solar Proton Flare is, the greater the probability of high frequency and large runoff of debris flow is. On the contrary, the less active Solar Proton Flare is, the greater the probability of low frequency, small runoff, and low sediment transport of debris flow is.

  9. Diffractive Higgs boson photoproduction in proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ducati, M B Gay

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new approach for the Higgs boson production by Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) in the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, where a color dipole interacts diffractively with the proton by DPE. Applying it to Peripheral Collisions, we predict a cross section around 0.1 fb, which is similar to that obtained from the $\\gamma\\gamma$ subprocess. Although this result is lower than the prediction from the KMR approach, our results are competitive with the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and Pomeron-Pomeron subprocesses with a more precise proposal for the Gap Survival Probability.

  10. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  11. Plant proton pumps as markers of biostimulant action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Basílio Zandonadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A standard protocol to evaluate the effects of biostimulants on plant physiology is still lacking. The proton pumps present in the vacuolar and plasma membranes are the primary agents responsible for the regulation of the electrochemical gradient that energizes the nutrient uptake system and acid growth mechanism of plant cells. In this study, two of these enzymes were characterized as biochemical markers of biostimulant activity. A simple and fast protocol based on the degree of root acidification using a pH sensitive dye and the Micro-Tom tomato as a plant model is proposed as an efficient methodology to prove the efficacy of biostimulants that are claimed to improve nutrient acquisition and root growth. The results agree with the data from more conventional, expensive and time-consuming proton pump assays. A direct correlation was found between plasmalemma proton-adenosine triphosphatase (H+-ATPase activation and the amount of rhizosphere acidification observed in the bromocresol gel. Moreover, roots of the diageotropica (dgt Micro-Tom plants, defective in auxin responses, barely acidify bromocresol purple gel even in the presence of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, 1 μM. The biostimulant TEA (vermicompost water extract, 25 % enhances proton extrusion by 40 % in wild type (WT plants, but no effect was induced in dgt plants. These results reinforce the notion that the class of biostimulant known as humic substances stimulates plant proton pumps and promotes root growth by exerting an auxin-like bioactivity and establish the usefulness of an economically and technically feasible assay to certify this kind of biostimulant.

  12. Reliability of proton-nuclear interaction cross section data to predict proton-induced PET images in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, S; Zhu, X; Daartz, J; El Fakhri, G; Bortfeld, T

    2011-01-01

    In-vivo PET range verification relies on the comparison of measured and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the simulated distribution depends on the accuracy of the Monte Carlo code, which is in turn dependent on the accuracy of the available cross sections data for β+ isotope production. We have explored different cross section data available in the literature for the main reaction channels (16O(p,pn)15O, 12C(p,pn)11C and 16O(p,3p3n)11C) contributing to the production of β+ isotopes by proton beams in patients. Available experimental and theoretical values were implemented in the simulation and compared with measured PET images obtained with a high-resolution PET scanner. Each reaction channel was studied independently. A phantom with three different materials was built, two of them with high carbon or oxygen concentration and a third one with average soft tissue composition. Monoenergetic and SOBP field irradiations of the phantom were accomplished and measured PET images were compared with simulation results. Different cross section values for the tissue-equivalent material lead to range differences below 1 mm when a 5 min scan time was employed and close to 5 mm differences for a 30 min scan time with 15 min delay between irradiation and scan (a typical off-line protocol). The results presented here emphasize the need of more accurate measurement of the cross section values of the reaction channels contributing to the production of PET isotopes by proton beams before this in-vivo range verification method can achieve mm accuracy. PMID:21464534

  13. Structures in proton-proton scattering at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bystricky, J.; Deregel, J.; Lehar, F. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires)

    1984-08-21

    Different structures observed in the proton-proton spin correlation parameters at theta = 90deg c.m. and in the spin-dependent cross-section differences ..delta..sigmasub(L) and ..delta..sigmasub(T) at intermediate energies are discussed. Elastic and inelastic contributions to the total cross-section indicate ..delta..sigmasub(L) to be mainly elastic and ..delta..sigmasub(T) inelastic. Based on the Saclay-Geneva phase shift analysis studied is the energy dependence of the singlet-triplet scattering amplitudes at 0deg and at 90deg c.m. up to 1GeV and the singlet and triplet cross-sections up to 2200 MeV from experimental data are calculated. Only the spin-singlet partial amplitude shows a possible resonant-like structure at approx. 560 MeV (total mass of 2.14 GeV); the spin-singlet total cross-section indicates another possible structure at approx. 1.3 GeV (total mass of 2.44 GeV). Phase shift analysis results show an anticlock-wise structure in the Argan diagram for the spin singlet partial wave.

  14. Polarized photon or proton Primakoff effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, J.; Vidal, J. (Deparatment de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, e IFIC Centre Mixt Univ. Valencia-CSIC, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)); Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A.; Gonzalez Sprinberg, G.A. (Departmento de Fisica, Universidad Nacionalde La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata, Argentina and CONICET (Argentina))

    1992-02-01

    A proposal to determine the axial coupling of the proton for the neutral strangeness current is discussed. By means of the [gamma][minus][ital Z][minus][pi][degree] triangle anomaly, the parity violating asymmetries for polarized photon or polarized proton Primakoff effect filter the couplings so as to leave the proton axial coupling only. We calculate the relevant observables induced by the electroweak interference and study the regions of energy and [ital Q][sup 2] of possible experimental interest.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  16. Polarized photon or proton Primakoff effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposal to determine the axial coupling of the proton for the neutral strangeness current is discussed. By means of the γ-Z-π degree triangle anomaly, the parity violating asymmetries for polarized photon or polarized proton Primakoff effect filter the couplings so as to leave the proton axial coupling only. We calculate the relevant observables induced by the electroweak interference and study the regions of energy and Q2 of possible experimental interest

  17. Calcium uptake and proton transport by acidocalcisomes of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rohloff

    Full Text Available Acidocalcisomes are acidic calcium stores found in diverse organisms, being conserved from bacteria to humans. They possess an acidic matrix that contains several cations bound to phosphates, which are mainly present in the form of short and long polyphosphate chains. Their matrix is acidified through the action of proton pumps such as a vacuolar proton ATPase and a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase. Calcium uptake occurs through a Ca(2+/H(+ countertransporting ATPase located in the membrane of the organelle. Acidocalcisomes have been identified in a variety of microorganisms, including Apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Eimeria species, and in Toxoplasma gondii. We report the purification and characterization of an acidocalcisome fraction from T. gondii tachyzoites after subcellular fractionation and further discontinuous iodixanol gradient purification. Proton and calcium transport activities in the fraction were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and spectrophotometric methods using acridine orange and arsenazo III, respectively. This work will facilitate the understanding of the function of acidocalcisomes in Apicomplexan parasites, as we can now isolate highly purified fractions that could be used for proteomic analysis to find proteins that may clarify the biogenesis of these organelles.

  18. Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS), 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J; Benedikt, Michael; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Maier, A T; Pullia, M; Reimoser, S; Rossi, S; Borri, G; Knaus, P; Gramatica, F; Pavlovic, M; Weisser, L

    2000-01-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) group was formed following an agreement between the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and the TERA Foundation (Italy) to combine their efforts in the design of a cancer therapy synchrotron capable of accelerating either light ions or protons. CERN agreed to support and host this study in its PS Division. A close collaboration was also set up with GSI (Germany). The study group was later joined by Onkologie-2000 (Czech Republic). Effort was first focused on the theoretical understanding of slow extraction and the techniques required to produce a smooth beam spill for the conformal treatment of complex-shaped tumours with a sub-millimetre accuracy by active scanning with proton and carbon ion beams. Considerations for passive beam spreading were also included for protons. The study has been written in two parts. The more general and theoretical aspects are recorded in Part I and the specific technical design considerations are presented in the present volume, Part II. An accompa...

  19. Recent results on the development of a proton computed tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C., E-mail: Carlo.Civinini@fi.infn.it [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Florence (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Università di Firenze, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN sez. di Cagliari, S.P. Sestu, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, Via Vienna 2, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via. S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [INFN sez. Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università of Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Università di Firenze, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); Pugliatti, C. [INFN sez. Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università of Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN sez. Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-12-21

    Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a medical imaging technique based on the use of proton beams with energies above 200 MeV to directly measure stopping power distributions inside the tissue volume. PRIMA (PRoton IMAging) is an Italian collaboration working on the development of a pCT scanner based on a tracker and a calorimeter to measure single protons trajectory and residual energy. The tracker is composed of four planes of silicon microstrip detectors to measure proton entry and exit positions and angles. Residual energy is measured by a calorimeter composed of YAG:Ce scintillating crystals. A first prototype of pCT scanner, with an active area of about 5×5 cm{sup 2}, has been constructed and characterized with 60 MeV protons at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy) and with 180 MeV protons at Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden). A new pre-clinical prototype with an extended active area up to 20×5 cm{sup 2}, real time data acquisition and a data rate up to 1 MHz is under development. A description of the two prototypes will be presented together with first results concerning tomographic image reconstruction.

  20. Glue Spin of the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Glatzmaier, Michael J; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2016-01-01

    We report the progress on the lattice QCD calculation of the glue spin contribution to proton spin. This calculation is carried out with valence overlap fermion on 2+1 flavor DWF gauge configurations at two lattice spacings with the momentum of the frame in the kinematic range $0\\leq p^2 \\leq 2$ GeV$^2$. A mild frame dependence is observed. The matching and mixing with large-momentum effective field theory are in progress. The unrenormalized result at $p^2=4$ GeV$^2$ with $O(a^2)$ correction gives $S_G$ = 0.13(3).

  1. Storage ring proton EDM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    sensitivity of 10^-29 e-cm.  The strength of the method originates from the fact that there are high intensity polarized proton beams available and the fact that the so-called geometric phase systematic error background cancels with clock-wise and counter-clock-wise storage possible in electric rings. The ultimate sensitivity of the method is 10^-30 e-cm. At this level it will either detect a non-zero EDM or it will eliminate electro-weak baryogenesis.

  2. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. PMID:26958828

  3. Proton spin in the valon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The valon model description of the proton is used to calculate contributions of the constituents of the proton to its spin. It is shown that the results of the model calculation agree rather well with the EMC results. It is conjectured that in probing the nucleon with high Q2 one actually probes its valon structure. It is further conjectured that the valence quark contribution to the proton spin cancels out the sea contribution, and gluons almost exclusively carry the spin of the proton. Our results satisfy various theoretical constraints on the sea polarization

  4. Proton spin in the valon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz

    1994-08-01

    The valon model description of the proton is used to calculate contributions of the constituents of the proton to its spin. It is shown that the results of the model calculation agree rather well with the EMC results. It is conjectured that in probing the nucleon with high Q2 one actually probes its valon structure. It is further conjectured that the valence quark contribution to the proton spin cancels out the sea contribution, and gluons almost exclusively carry the spin of the proton. Our results satisfy various theoretical constraints on the sea polarization.

  5. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, M B; Arendse, G J; Cowley, A A; Richter, W A; Lawrie, J J; Newman, R T; Pilcher, J V; Smit, F D; Steyn, G F; Koen, J W; Stander, J A

    1999-01-01

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  6. Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Prescribing Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababa, Mohammad; Al-Ghassani, Amal Ali; Kovach, Christine R; Dyer, Elaine M

    2016-04-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE Instructions 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Prescribing Cascade" found on pages 23-31, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until March 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Describe the prescribing cascade of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in nursing home residents. 2. Identify the statistically

  7. Beta decay of the exotic $T_z$ = -2 nuclei $^{48}$Fe, $^{52}$Ni and $^{56}$Zn

    OpenAIRE

    Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P; Bilgier, B.; Blank, B.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Ganioğlu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of the beta decays of three proton-rich nuclei with $T_z=\\text{-}2$, namely $^{48}$Fe, $^{52}$Ni and $^{56}$Zn, produced in an experiment carried out at GANIL, are reported. In all three cases we have extracted the half-lives and the total $\\beta$-delayed proton emission branching ratios. We have measured the individual $\\beta$-delayed protons and $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$ rays and the branching ratios of the corresponding levels. Decay schemes have been determined for t...

  8. Method study of parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Su; Jie, Gao; Ming, Xiao; Dou, Wang; Yi-Wei, Wang; Sha, Bai; Tian-Jian, Bian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show a systematic method of appropriate parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider by using an analytical expression for the beam-beam tune shift limit, starting from a given design goal and technical limitations. A suitable parameter space has been explored. Based on the parameter scan, sets of appropriate parameters designed for a 50 km and 100 km circular proton-proton collider are proposed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175192)

  9. Inter- and intra-annular proton exchange in gaseous benzylbenzenium ions (protonated diphenylmethane)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuck, Dietmar; Bäther, Wolfgang

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct proton exchange reactions occur in metastable gaseous benzylbenzenium ions, generated by isobutane chemical ionization of diphenylmethane and four deuterium-labelled analogues. Whereas the proton ring-walk at the benzenium moiety is fast giving rise to a completely random intraannular proton exchange, the interannular proton exchange is surprisingly slow and competes with the elimination of benzene. A kinetic isotope effect of kH/kD= 5 has been determined for the interannular pro...

  10. High Energy Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering in Reggeon-Pomeron Exchange Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; HU Zhao-Hui; MA Wei-Xing

    2006-01-01

    We initially propose a Reggeon-Pomeron exchange model to describe proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies in this short paper. A calculation for total cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies is performed without any free parameters. Our new finding from this work is that the Reggeon-Pomeron model gives a perfect fit to experimental data of the total cross section at the whole energy region where experimental data exist.

  11. Effects of fotemustine or dacarbasine on a melanoma cell line pretreated with therapeutic proton irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privitera Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that HTB140 melanoma cells have shown a poor response to either protons or alkylating agents, the effects of a combined use of these agents have been analysed. Methods Cells were irradiated in the middle of the therapeutic 62 MeV proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP. Irradiation doses were 12 or 16 Gy and are those frequently used in proton therapy. Four days after irradiation cells were treated with fotemustine (FM or dacarbazine (DTIC. Drug concentrations were 100 and 250 μM, values close to those that produce 50% of growth inhibition. Cell viability, proliferation, survival and cell cycle distribution were assessed 7 days after irradiation that corresponds to more than six doubling times of HTB140 cells. In this way incubation periods providing the best single effects of drugs (3 days and protons (7 days coincided at the same time. Results Single proton irradiations have reduced the number of cells to ~50%. FM caused stronger cell inactivation due to its high toxicity, while the effectiveness of DTIC, that was important at short term, almost vanished with the incubation of 7 days. Cellular mechanisms triggered by proton irradiation differently influenced the final effects of combined treatments. Combination of protons and FM did not improve cell inactivation level achieved by single treatments. A low efficiency of the single DTIC treatment was overcome when DTIC was introduced following proton irradiation, giving better inhibitory effects with respect to the single treatments. Most of the analysed cells were in G1/S phase, viable, active and able to replicate DNA. Conclusion The obtained results are the consequence of a high resistance of HTB140 melanoma cells to protons and/or drugs. The inactivation level of the HTB140 human melanoma cells after protons, FM or DTIC treatments was not enhanced by their combined application.

  12. Protonic conduction of hydrogen impurities in K2OsCl6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric measurements as a function of temperature and frequency in single crystal K2OsCl6 with defects containing protons are reported. The results are consistent with a model which assumes the defect state to be a simple interstitial proton which is hydrogen bonded to the nearest neighbor chlorine ions. Temperatures greater than 180 K shows that proton diffusion is thermally activated with a mobility of 10-2cm2/V-sec whereas below this temperature it is determined by quantum tunneling between localized states

  13. An S-N2-model for proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism of proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds is suggested. The transition is regarded as totally adiabatic. Two closest water molecules that move synchronously by hindered translation to and from the reaction complex are crucial. The water molecules induce...... a shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor and acceptor. Expressions for the activation barrier and kinetic hydrogen isotope effect are derived. The general scheme is illustrated with the use...

  14. Localized proton MR spectroscopic detection of nonketotic hyperglycinemia in an infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Yoon, Jong Hyun [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    Nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH) is a rare metabolic brain disease caused by deficient activity of the glycine cleveage system. Localized proton MR spectroscopy (echo-time 166 msec), performed in an infant with the typical clinical and biochemical features of neonatal NKH, showed a markedly increased peak intensity at 3.55 ppm, which was assigned to glycine. Serial proton MR spectrosocpic studies indicated that glycine/choline and glycine/total creatine ratios correlated closely with the patient's clinical course. Proton MR spectroscopy was useful for the non-invasive detection and monitoring of cerebral glycine levels in this infant with NKH.

  15. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  16. Saturating Cronin effect in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Fái, G; Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Fai, George

    2000-01-01

    Pion and photon production cross sections are analyzed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at energies 20 GeV < s^1/2 < 60 GeV. We separate the proton-proton and nuclear contributions to transverse-momentum broadening and suggest a new mechanism for the nuclear enhancement in the high transverse-momentum region.

  17. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  18. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photoproduction in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme. (orig.)

  19. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, A. [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Research Division, ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), Darmstadt (Germany); Arleo, F. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Palaiseau (France); Universite de Savoie, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Arnaldi, R.; Beraudo, A.; Bruna, E.; Scomparin, E. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Turin (Italy); Caffarri, D.; Lourenco, C.; Woehri, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Del Valle, Z.C.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J.P. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, IPNO, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Contreras, J.G.; Trzeciak, B.A. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Dahms, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Dainese, A. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Djordjevic, M. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics Belgrade (Serbia); Ferreiro, E.G. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, IGFAE, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fujii, H. [University of Tokyo, Institute of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Gossiaux, P.B.; Martinez-Garcia, G.; Peigne, S.; Stocco, D. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Cassagnac, R.G. de; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Palaiseau (France); He, M. [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing (China); Hees, H. van [FIAS, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt (Germany); Horowitz, W.A. [University of Cape Town, Department of Physics, Cape Town (South Africa); Kolevatov, R. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of High Energy Physics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Potashnikova, I.K.; Schmidt, I. [Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Lombardo, M.P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Massacrier, L. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, IPNO, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, LAL, Orsay (France); Mischke, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Institute for Subatomic Physics, Utrecht (Netherlands); National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nahrgang, M. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham (United States); Nystrand, J. [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen (Norway); Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Rosnet, P. [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire (LPC), Clermont-Ferrand (France); Rakotozafindrabe, A. [IRFU/SPhN, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rapp, R. [Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cyclotron Institute, College Station (United States); Robbe, P. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, LAL, Orsay (France); Rosati, M. [Iowa State University, Ames (United States); Satz, H. [Universitaet Bielefeld, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Bielefeld (Germany); Schicker, R.; Stachel, J. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Schienbein, I. [Universite Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Sharma, R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mumbai (India); Strickland, M. [Kent State University, Department of Physics, Kent (United States); Tieulent, R. [IPN-Lyon, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Uphoff, J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vitev, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physics Division, Livermore (United States); University of California, Physics Department, Davis (United States); Watanabe, K. [University of Tokyo, Institute of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Zhuang, P. [Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Tsinghua University, Physics Department, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photoproduction in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme. (orig.)

  20. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A; Arnaldi, R.; Beraudo, A.; Bruna, E.; Caffarri, D.; del Valle, Z.Conesa; Contreras, J.G.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Djordjevic, M.; Ferreiro, E.G.; Fujii, H.; Gossiaux, P.B.; de Cassagnac, R.Granier; Hadjidakis, C.; He, M.; van Hees, H.; Horowitz, W.A.; Kolevatov, R.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Lansberg, J.P.; Lombardo, M.P.; Lourenço, C.; Martinez-Garcia, G.; Massacrier, L.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Nahrgang, M.; Nguyen, M.; Nystrand, J.; Peigné, S.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Potashnikova, I.K.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Rapp, R.; Robbe, P.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Satz, H.; Schicker, R.; Schienbein, I.; Schmidt, I.; Scomparin, E.; Sharma, R.; Stachel, J.; Stocco, D.; Strickland, M.; Tieulent, R.; Trzeciak, B.A.; Uphoff, J.; Vitev, I.; Vogt, R.; Watanabe, K.; Woehri, H.; Zhuang, P.

    2016-01-01

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Unio...