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Sample records for beta-delayed proton activities

  1. $\\beta$-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, S W; Huang, W X; Li, Z K; Pan Qiang Yan; Shu, N C; Wang, K; Wang, X D; Xie, Y X; Xing, Y B; Xu, F R; Yu, Y; 10.1103/PhysRevC.71.054318

    2005-01-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on beta - delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of beta -delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N approximately=Z by utilizing the p- gamma coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half- lives for /sup 85/Mo, /sup 92/Rh, as well as the predicted "waiting point" nuclei /sup 89/Ru and /sup 93/Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moller et al. At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997). These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp p...

  2. Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, M V; Briz, J A; Cederkäll, J; Fynbo, H O U; Jensen, J H; Jonson, B; Laursen, K L; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Riisager, K; Tengblad, O

    2015-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with a detection setup including particle identification capabilities. $\\beta$-delayed protons with center of mass energies between 0.39$\\,$MeV and 7.2$\\,$MeV were measured and used to determine the half life of $^{21}$Mg as $118.6\\pm 0.5\\,$ms. From a line shape fit of the $\\beta p$ branches we extract spectroscopic information about the resonances of $^{21}$Na. Finally an improved interpretation of the decay scheme in accordance with the results obtained in reaction studies is presented.

  3. Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 20}Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, M.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Howard, A.M.; Kirsebom, O.S.; Munch, M.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus C (Denmark); Andreyev, A.; Wadsworth, R. [University of York, Department of Physics, York (United Kingdom); Borge, M.J.G. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cederkaell, J. [Lund University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Lund (Sweden); Witte, H. de; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. van [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU-Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Fraile, L.M.; Vedia, V. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Madrid (Spain); Greenlees, P.T.; Konki, J.; Rahkila, P. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Harkness-Brennan, L.J.; Judson, D.S.; Page, R.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Jonson, B.; Lindberg, S.; Nilsson, T. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Physics, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kurcewicz, J.; Madurga, M.; Rapisarda, E. [CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Lazarus, I.; Pucknell, V. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Lica, R. [CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Rotaru, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Turturica, A. [' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Marroquin, I.; Nacher, E.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); Sotty, C. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU-Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Warr, N. [Universitaet Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: IDS Collaboration

    2016-10-15

    Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 20} Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with the ISOLDE Decay Station (IDS) setup including both charged-particle and gamma-ray detection capabilities. A total of 27 delayed proton branches were measured including seven so far unobserved. An updated decay scheme, including three new resonances above the proton separation energy in {sup 20}Na and more precise resonance energies, is presented. Beta-decay feeding to two resonances above the Isobaric Analogue State (IAS) in {sup 20}Na is observed. This may allow studies of the 4032.9(2.4) keV resonance in {sup 19}Ne through the beta decay of {sup 20}Mg, which is important for the astrophysically relevant reaction {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne. Beta-delayed protons were used to obtain a more precise value for the half-life of {sup 20}Mg, 91.4(1.0) ms. (orig.)

  4. Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 21}Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, M.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Jensen, J.H.; Laursen, K.L.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus C (Denmark); Borge, M.J.G. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, PH Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Briz, J.A.; Perea, A.; Pesudo, V.; Tengblad, O. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain); Cederkaell, J. [Lund University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Lund (Sweden); Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Fundamental Physics, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Beta-delayed proton emission from {sup 21}Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with a detection setup consisting of two charged-particle telescopes surrounding the decay point. Altogether 27 βp branches were measured with center-of-mass energies between 0.4-7.2 MeV. Seven new βp branches were observed. Beta-delayed protons were used to determine the half-life of {sup 21}Mg as 118.6 ± 0.5 ms. From a line shape fit of the βp branches we extract the widths, spins, and parities of the resonances of {sup 21}Na. An improved interpretation of the decay scheme in accordance with the results obtained in reaction studies is presented. (orig.)

  5. Search for $\\beta$-delayed protons from $^{11}$Be

    CERN Multimedia

    $\\beta$-delayed proton emission from $^{11}$Be will be a very rare process. It is believed to decay directly into continuum states. This would imply that it will be a sensitive probe of the halo structure of the one-neutron halo nucleus $^{11}$Be. We propose to improve existing (unpublished) limits on this decay mode by two orders of magnitude. Our earlier experience at ISOLDE indicates that the required intensity and purity of the source can be obtained. The branching ratio will be measured by counting the number of $^{10}$Be atoms produced via accelerator mass spectrometry.

  6. Beta-delayed Proton Decay of Proton Drip-line Nucleus ~(142)Ho

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Unknown beta-delayed proton precursor~(142)Ho was synthesized in the reaction~(106)Cd(~(40)Ca,p3n)and identified for the first time by using a proton-gamma coincidence measurements in combination with a helium-jet fast tape transport system~([1~3]).Its beta-delayed proton spectrum was observed.The hal-life of~(142)Ho was

  7. Beta-delayed proton emission in the 100Sn region

    CERN Document Server

    Lorusso, G; Amthor, A; Baumann, T; Bazin, D; Berryman, J S; Brown, B A; Cyburt, R H; Crawford, H L; Estrade, A; Gade, A; Ginter, T; Guess, C J; Hausmann, M; Hitt, G W; Mantica, P F; Matos, M; Meharchand, R; Minamisono, K; Montes, F; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Schatz, H; Smith, K; Stoker, J; Stolz, A; Zegers, R G T

    2012-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton emission from nuclides in the neighborhood of 100Sn was studied at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The nuclei were produced by fragmentation of a 120 MeV/nucleon 112Sn primary beam on a Be target. Beam purification was provided by the A1900 Fragment Separator and the Radio Frequency Fragment Separator. The fragments of interest were identified and their decay was studied with the NSCL Beta Counting System (BCS) in conjunction with the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA). The nuclei 96Cd, 98Ing, 98Inm and 99In were identified as beta-delayed proton emitters, with branching ratios bp = 5.5(40)%, 5.5+3 -2%, 19(2)% and 0.9(4)%, respectively. The bp for 89Ru, 91,92Rh, 93Pd and 95Ag were deduced for the first time with bp = 3+1.9 -1.7%, 1.3(5)%, 1.9(1)%, 7.5(5)% and 2.5(3)%, respectively. The bp = 22(1)% for 101Sn was deduced with higher precision than previously reported. The impact of the newly measured bp values on the composition of the type-I X-ray burst ashes was studied.

  8. $\\beta$-particle energy-summing correction for $\\beta$-delayed proton emission measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Meisel, Z; Crawford, H L; Cyburt, R H; Grinyer, G F; Langer, C; Montes, F; Schatz, H; Smith, K

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to studying $\\beta$-delayed proton emission is to measure the energy of the emitted proton and corresponding nuclear recoil in a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) after implanting the $\\beta$-delayed proton emitting ($\\beta$p) nucleus. However, in order to extract the proton-decay energy, the measured energy must be corrected for the additional energy implanted in the DSSD by the $\\beta$-particle emitted from the $\\beta$p nucleus, an effect referred to here as $\\beta$-summing. We present an approach to determine an accurate correction for $\\beta$-summing. Our method relies on the determination of the mean implantation depth of the $\\beta$p nucleus within the DSSD by analyzing the shape of the total (proton + recoil + $\\beta$) decay energy distribution shape. We validate this approach with other mean implantation depth measurement techniques that take advantage of energy deposition within DSSDs upstream and downstream of the implantation DSSD.

  9. The Mechanism of $\\beta$-Delayed Two-Proton Emission

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus $^{31}$Ar seems to be the most prolific ${\\beta}$-2p precursor known to date and is at the same time the one with the largest production yields at ISOLDE, where the most sensitive experiments can be done. Our purpose with this experiment is to study the ${\\beta}$-2p branches in detail, search for ${\\beta}$-3p events, place them in the decay scheme and obtain information on the decay mechanism for ${\\beta}$-2p via the energy distribution and the angular correlation between the two protons. As a by product we shall also resolve existing inconsistencies in the level scheme.\\\\ \\\\ The nucleus $^{31}$Ar, produced in a cold plasma ion source unit by the impact of a 1 GeV proton beam of 0.5 Hz frequency, had an average yield over one week of 1.5 $^{31}$Ar atoms/s. The beam passed through the central hole of an annular Si detector ($\\Omega$ = 4.3~\\%) and stopped in a thin carbon foil tilted 45$^o$ with respect to the beam direction. A 70~\\% coaxial HPGe-detector ($\\Omega$~=~7.4~\\%) was located opposite to ...

  10. Observation of Doppler broadening in $\\beta$-delayed proton-$\\gamma$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, S B; Bennett, M B; Liddick, S N; Perez-Loureiro, D; Bowe, A; Chen, A A; Chipps, K A; Cooper, N; Irvine, D; McNeice, E; Montes, F; Naqvi, F; Ortez, R; Pain, S D; Pereira, J; Prokop, C; Quaglia, J; Quinn, S J; Sakstrup, J; Santia, M; Shanab, S; Simon, A; Spyrou, A; Thiagalingam, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Doppler broadening of $\\gamma$-ray peaks due to nuclear recoil from $\\beta$-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using $\\beta$-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than $A=10$. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using $\\gamma$-ray peaks from the $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of $^{26}$P was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a $^{26}$P $\\beta$-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect $\\gamma$ rays from the $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in $\\beta$-delayed proton-$\\gamma$ decay was observed for the first time. The Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613 keV $\\gamma$-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776 keV $\\gamma$ ray de-exciting the 2720 keV $^{25}$Al level was observed...

  11. Beta-delayed proton emission in neutron-deficient lanthanide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmarth, P.A.

    1988-09-30

    Forty-two ..beta..-delayed proton precursors with 56less than or equal toZless than or equal to71 and 63less than or equal toNless than or equal to83 were produced in heavy-ion reactions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decay properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Twenty-five isotopes and eight delayed proton branches were identified for the first time. Delayed proton energy spectra and proton coincident ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectra were measured for all precursors. In a few cases, proton branching ratios were also determined. The precursor mass numbers were determined by the separator, while the proton coincident x-ray energies provided unambiguous Z identifications. The proton coincident ..gamma..-ray intensities were used to extract final state branching ratios. Proton emission from ground and isomeric states was observed in many cases. The majority of the delayed proton spectra exhibited the smooth bell-shaped distribution expected for heavy mass precursors. The experimental results were compared to statistical model calculations using standard parameter sets. Calculations using Nilsson model/RPA ..beta..-strength functions were found to reproduce the spectral shapes and branching ratios better than calculations using either constant or gross theory ..beta..-strength functions. Precursor half-life predictions from the Nilsson model/RPA ..beta..-strength functions were also in better agreement with the measured half-lives than were gross theory predictions. The ratios of positron coincident proton intensities to total proton intensities were used to determine Q/sub EC/-B/sub p/ values for several precursors near N=82. The statistical model calculations were not able to reproduce the experimental results for N=81 precursors. 154 refs., 82 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. Studies of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission : The cases of $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Riisager, K; Jokinen, A; Canchel, G; Heinz, A M; Jonson, B N G; Dominguez reyes, R R; Koldste, G T; Fraile prieto, L M; Nilsson, T; Audirac, L L

    2008-01-01

    We propose to perform detailed studies of the decays of the two dripline nuclei $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca. This will allow an in-depth study in the process of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission ($\\beta$2p); as well as provide important information on resonances in $^{30}$S and $^{34}$Ar relevant for the astrophysical rp-process.

  13. Beta-delayed gamma decay of 26P: Possible evidence of a proton halo

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Loureiro, D; Bennett, M B; Liddick, S N; Bowe, A; Brown, B A; Chen, A A; Chipps, K A; Cooper, N; Irvine, D; McNeice, E; Montes, F; Naqvi, F; Ortez, R; Pain, S D; Pereira, J; Prokop, C J; Quaglia, J; Quinn, S J; Sakstrup, J; Santia, M; Schwartz, S B; Shanab, S; Simon, A; Spyrou, A; Thiagalingam, E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measurements of $\\beta$ decay provide important nuclear structure information that can be used to probe isospin asymmetries and inform nuclear astrophysics studies. Purpose: To measure the $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$ decay of $^{26}$P and compare the results with previous experimental results and shell-model calculations. Method: A $^{26}$P fast beam produced using nuclear fragmentation was implanted into a planar germanium detector. Its $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-ray emission was measured with an array of 16 high-purity germanium detectors. Positrons emitted in the decay were detected in coincidence to reduce the background. Results: The absolute intensities of $^{26}$P $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-rays were determined. A total of six new $\\beta$-decay branches and 15 new $\\gamma$-ray lines have been observed for the first time in $^{26}$P $\\beta$-decay. A complete $\\beta$-decay scheme was built for the allowed transitions to bound excited states of $^{26}$Si. $ft$ values and Gamow-Teller strengths were a...

  14. $\\beta$-delayed fission in proton-rich nuclei in the lead region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085005; Huyse, Mark; Popescu, Lucia

    Nuclear fission is the breakup of an atomic nucleus into two (sometimes three) fragments, thereby releasing a large amount of energy. Soon after its discovery in the late 1930’s, the gross properties of the fission phenomenon were explained by macroscopic nuclear models. Certain features however, such as asymmetric fission-fragment mass distributions in the actinide region, require the inclusion of microscopic effects. This interplay of the microscopic motion of individual nucleons on this macroscopic process is, until today, not yet fully understood. The phenomenon of fission has therefore been of recurring interest for both theoretical and experimental studies. This thesis work focuses on the $\\beta$-delayed fission ($\\beta$DF) process, an excellent tool to study low-energy fission of exotic nuclei, which was discovered in 1966 in the actinide region. In this two-step process, a precursor nucleus first undergoes $\\beta$-decay to an excited level in the daughter nucleus, which may subsequently fission. Rec...

  15. {beta} delayed emission of a proton by a one-neutron halo nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baye, D., E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.b [Physique Quantique, CP 165/82, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, CP229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Tursunov, E.M., E-mail: tursune@inp.u [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, 100214, Ulugbek, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2011-02-14

    Some one-neutron halo nuclei can emit a proton in a {beta} decay of the halo neutron. The branching ratio towards this rare decay mode is calculated within a two-body potential model of the initial core + neutron bound state and final core + proton scattering states. The decay probability per second is evaluated for the {sup 11}Be, {sup 19}C and {sup 31}Ne one-neutron halo nuclei. It is very sensitive to the neutron separation energy.

  16. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ognibene, Theodore Joseph [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of 31Cl, 27P and 28P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas ΔE-gas ΔE-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in 31Cl and 27P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of 31Cl were shown to be from the decay of 25Si. In 27P, two proton groups at 459 ± 14 keV and 610 ± 11 keV, with intensities of 7 ± 3% and 92 ± 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the β-decay of 28P, at 1,444 ± 12 keV with a 1.7 ± 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, 17Ne and 33Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 ± 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of 17Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from 17Ne and 33Ar were resolved.

  17. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ognibene, T.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

  18. Extension of the T{sub z} = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 1 series of beta-delayed proton emitters to {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, and low energy beta-delayed proton emission from the T{sub z} = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 3 nucleus {sup 23}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelder, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The series of known Tz = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 1 nuclei has been extended to include the previously undiscovered isotopes {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, through the observation of beta-delayed proton emission via the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the beta-daughter (emitter). Due to the relatively large proton energies involved, these experiments were conducted using standard Si-Si {Delta}E-E telescopes. Beta-delayed protons arising from {sup 65}Se have been observed at an energy (laboratory) of 3.55 {plus_minus} 0.03 MeV, corresponding to the decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 65}As to the ground state of {sup 64}Ge. Similarly, beta-delayed protons from {sup 73}Sr at an energy of 3.75 {plus_minus} 0.04 MeV have been observed, corresponding to decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 73}Rb to the ground state of {sup 72}Kr. From the energies of these proton transitions, an improved prediction of the mass excesses of the two parent nuclei ({sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr) is made through the use of a Coulomb displacement formula. These predictions are {minus}33.41 {plus_minus} 0.26 and {minus}31.87 {plus_minus} 0.24 MeV for {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, respectively. Studies of low energy (down to {approximately}200 keV) beta-delayed protons from {sup 23}Al necessitated that a particle identification telescope with a low energy threshold for observation and identification of protons be developed. {sup 23}Al is of interest because of its role in the breakout of the hot CNO cycle leading to the astrophysical rp process.

  19. Studies of {beta}-delayed proton decays of N{approx_equal}Z nuclei around {sup 100}Sn at the GSI-ISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Batist, L. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Universita ' Federico II' and INFN Napoli, Naples (Italy); Becker, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Blazhev, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); University of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria); Bruechle, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Doering, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Grawe, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Faestermann, T. [Technical University, Munich (Germany); Hoffman, C. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Janas, Z. [Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Jungclaus, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain); Karny, M. [Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Kavatsyuk, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); National T. Shevchenko University, Kiev (Ukraine); Kavatsyuk, O. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kirchner, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); La Commara, M. [Universita ' Federico II' and INFN Napoli, Naples (Italy); Mazzocchi, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Plochocki, A. [Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Romoli, M. [Universita ' Federico II' and INFN Napoli, Naples (Italy); Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Schwengner, R. [Inst. fuer Kern und Hadronenphysik, Forschungzentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)] [and others

    2004-12-27

    Beta decays of {sup 94,96}Ag and {sup 103}Sn nuclei into proton channels have been studied in the recent experiments at the GSI-ISOL facility. New efficient and chemically selective ion sources provided the highest yields of light silver and tin isotopes. Large arrays of germanium {gamma}-ray and silicon charged-particle detectors, as well as a total absorption spectrometer (TAS) were used to measure {beta}-proton, proton-{gamma}, {beta}-proton-{gamma} and proton-{gamma}-{gamma} spectra. For the decay of {sup 94}Ag, we observed high-spin states in {sup 93}Rh populated by proton emission following {beta} decay, whose largest spin value ({>=}39/2) yields an experimental proof for the existence of a second high-spin isomer in {sup 94}Ag with I{>=}17. Its {beta}-decay energy is at least 16.8 MeV, corresponding to an excitation energy {>=}5.5 MeV. For {sup 103}Sn, the {gamma} rays measured in coincidence with {beta}-delayed protons allowed us to establish the {beta}-decay properties of this isotope. In particular, a Q{sup EC} value of 7.5(6) MeV is derived from the intensity ratio of protons that are preceded either by EC or by {beta}{sup +} decays and populate the 2{sup +} state in {sup 102}Cd.

  20. Proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of astrophysically important states of $^{30}$S studied by the $\\beta$-delayed decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M J G; Briz, J A; Carmona-Gallardo, M; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Giovinazzo, J; Johansen, J G; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Kurturkian-Nieto, T; Kusk, J H; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Picado, E; Riisager, K; Saastamoinen, A; Tengblad, O; Thomas, J -C; Van de Walle, J

    2013-01-01

    Resonances just above the proton threshold in $^{30}$S affect the $^{29}$P$(p,\\gamma)^{30}$S reaction under astrophysical conditions. The ($p,\\gamma$)-reaction rate is currently determined indirectly and depends on the properties of the relevant resonances. We present here a method for finding the ratio between the proton- and $\\gamma$- partial widths of resonances in $^{30}$S. The widths are determined from the $\\beta -2p$ and $\\beta -p-\\gamma$-decay of $^{31}$Ar, which is produced at ISOLDE, CERN. Experimental limits on the ratio between the proton- and $\\gamma$- partial widths for astrophysical relevant levels in $^{30}$S have been found for the first time. A level at 4689.2(24)keV is identified in the $\\gamma$-spectrum, and an upper limit on the $\\Gamma_{p}/\\Gamma_{\\gamma}$ ratio of 0.26 (95% C.L.) is found. In the two-proton spectrum two levels at 5227(3)keV and 5847(4)keV are identified. These levels were previously seen to $\\gamma$-decay and upper limits on the $\\Gamma_{\\gamma}/\\Gamma_{p}$ ratio of 0.5...

  1. News on $\\beta$-delayed particle emission from $^{14}$Be

    CERN Document Server

    Jeppesen, H; Borge, M J G; Cederkäll, J; Fynbo, H O U; Fedoseyev, V N; Hansper, V Y; Jonson, B; Markenroth, K; Mishin, V I; Nilsson, T; Nyman, G; Riisager, K; Tengblad, O; Wilhelmsen Rolander, K

    2002-01-01

    $\\beta$-delayed charged particles from $^{14}$Be have been measured and give an upper limit on $\\beta$-delayed $\\alpha$-particles of B($\\beta\\alpha$) < $\\,6.7\\times\\!10^{-5}$ and a tentative branching ratio on $\\beta$-delayed tritons of $7.5\\times\\!10^{-5}$ < B($\\beta$t) < $\\,3.9\\times\\!10^{-4}$. We combine the knowledge on $\\beta$-delayed particles from $^{14}$Be to deduce information on the $\\beta$-strength distribution.

  2. Beta-delayed particle decay of sup 1 sup 7 Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, A C; King, J D; Boyd, R N; Bateman, N P T; Buchmann, L; D'Auria, J M; Davinson, T; Dombsky, M; Galster, W; Gete, E; Giesen, U; Iliadis, C; Jackson, K P; Powell, J; Roy, G; Shotter, A

    2002-01-01

    The beta-delayed particle decay of sup 1 sup 7 Ne has been studied via proton-gamma coincidences, time-of-flight measurements and the ''ratio-cut technique'', allowing cleanly-separated proton and alpha-particle spectra to be obtained. A complete set of proton and alpha branching ratios for the decay of 14 excited states in sup 1 sup 7 F to the ground and excited states of sup 1 sup 6 O and sup 1 sup 3 N has been determined and branching ratios for the beta decay of sup 1 sup 7 Ne to these states have been deduced. From the branching ratios, f sub A t values and reduced Gamow-Teller matrix elements were calculated; no indication of isospin mixing in the isobaric analog state in sup 1 sup 7 F was observed. From the measurement of proton-gamma angular correlations, combined with the selection rules for an allowed beta decay, we obtain J suppi=((1)/(2)) sup - for states at 8.436 and 9.450 MeV and ((3)/(2)) sup - for the state at 10.030 MeV in sup 1 sup 7 F. Probabilities for the beta-delayed p alpha decay to sup...

  3. The {beta}2p decay mechanism of {sup 31}Ar[23.40.Hc; 27.30.+t; Radioactivity 31Ar({beta}+p) [from Ca(p,3pxn) reaction]; Measured {beta}-delayed protons Ep, E2p; pp energy and angular correlations; 31Ar deduced {beta}1p and {beta}2p decay channels; 30S, 31Cl deduced levels, T, {pi}, branching ratios; CaO target; On-line mass separation; Double sided Si strip detector; Si p-i-n detectors; Surface barrier Si detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynbo, H.O.U.; Borge, M.J.G.; Axelsson, L.; Aeystoe, J.; Bergmann, U.C.; Fraile, L.M.; Honkanen, A.; Hornshoej, P.; Jading, Y.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Martel, I.; Mukha, I.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Oinonen, M.; Piqueras, I.; Riisager, K.; Siiskonen, T.; Smedberg, M.H.; Tengblad, O.; Thaysen, J.; Wenander, F

    2000-09-11

    We have measured the beta-decay of {sup 31}Ar with a high granularity setup sensitive to multiparticle decay branches. Two-proton emission is observed from the isobaric analog state in {sup 31}Cl to the four lowest states in {sup 29}P and furthermore from a large number of states fed in Gamow-Teller transitions. The mechanism of two-proton emission is studied via energy and angular correlations between the two protons. In all cases the mechanism is found to be sequential yielding information about states in {sup 30}S up to 8 MeV excitation energy. Improved data on the {beta}-delayed one-proton branches together with the two-proton data provide precise information about the beta-strength distribution up to 15 MeV excitation energy.

  4. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy using ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Barbara; Czeszumska, A.; Siegl, K.; Caldwell, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Burkey, M.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Marley, S.; Morgan, G.; Norman, E.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Scielzo, N.; Sharma, K.; Strauss, S.

    2017-01-01

    Trapped radioactive ions suspended in vacuum allow for a new way to perform beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy. Decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons are inferred from a measurement of the nuclear recoil, thereby circumventing the many limitations associated with direct neutron detection. Beta-delayed neutron measurements were carried out for 137-138,140I, 134-136Sb, and 144-145Cs at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The data collected are needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Results for the isotopes 135-136Sb and 140I will be presented. Supported by NSF under PHY-1419765, and U.S. DOE under NEUP 13-5485, DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  5. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy of spherical and deformed neutron emitters with VANDLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Thomas; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.,; Taylor, S. Z.; Vandle Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    For many neutron-rich isotopes, the main decay mode is through beta-delayed neutron and gamma emission. Neutron and gamma coincidences provide information necessary to extract the beta-strength distribution. These distributions are inputs to test nuclear models needed for r-process modeling. The detailed data on beta decay feeding to neutron-unbound states are used to calculate reactor decay heat and understand the antineutrino spectrum. A series of measurements with selective ion sources was performed at the On-Line Test Facility (OLTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). These experiments revisited decays of spherical and deformed isotopes produced in proton induced fission of 238U, which included beta delayed precursors of bromine, rubidium, cesium, and iodine. Unique data sets with neutron and gamma ray coincidences were collected. Achieving high coincidence efficiency required the addition of high-efficiency gamma-ray detectors consisting of 16 LaBr3 crystals (HAGRiD) and a large volume set of NaI detectors to VANDLE. Preliminary results will be presented. This research was sponsored by DOE under Contracts DE-FG52-08NA2855, DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FG02-96ER40983.

  6. MONSTER: a TOF Spectrometer for beta-delayed Neutron Spetroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, T; Castilla, J; Garcia, A R; Marin, J; Martinez, G; Mendoza, E; Santos, C; Tera, F; Jordan, M D; Rubio, B; Tain, J L; Bhattacharya, C; Banerjee, K; Bhattacharya, S; Roy, P; Meena, J K; Kundu, S; Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K; Rana, T K; Pandey, R; Saxena, A; Behera, B; Penttila, H; Jokinen, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Guerrero, C; Ovejero, M C; Villamarin, D; Agramunt, J; Algora, A

    2014-01-01

    Beta-delayed neutron (DN) data, including emission probabilities, P-n, and energy spectrum, play an important role in our understanding of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technologies. A MOdular Neutron time-of-flight SpectromeTER (MONSTER) is being built for the measurement of the neutron energy spectra and branching ratios. The TOF spectrometer will consist of one hundred liquid scintillator cells covering a significant solid angle. The MONSTER design has been optimized by using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. The response function of the MONSTER cell has been characterized with mono-energetic neutron beams and compared to dedicated MC simulations.

  7. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  8. A Further Measurement of the beta-Delayed alpha-Particle Emission of 16N

    CERN Document Server

    III, R H F; McDonald, J E; Wilds, E L

    2007-01-01

    We measured the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission spectrum of 16N with a sensitivity for beta-decay branching ratios of the order of 10-10. The 16N nuclei were produced using the d(15N,16N)p reaction with 70 MeV 15N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The 16N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 mu g/cm2 tilted at 7 Deg with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The beta-delayed alpha-particles were measured using a time of flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources (148Gd, 241Am, 208,209Po, and 227Ac) as well as alpha-particles and 7Li from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time of flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the beta-de...

  9. Study of $\\beta$-delayed neutron decay of $^{8}$He

    CERN Multimedia

    The goal of the present proposal is to study $\\beta$-delayed neutron decay branch of $^{8}$He. The energy spectra of the emitted neutrons will be measured in the energy range of 0.1 – 6 MeV using the VANDLE spectrometer. Using coincident $\\gamma$-ray measurement, components of the spectrum corresponding to transitions to the ground- and first- excited states of $^{7}$Li will be disentangled. The new data will allow us to get a more complete picture of the $\\beta$-decay of $^{8}$He and to clarify the discrepancy between the B(GT) distributions derived from the $\\beta$-decay and $^{8}$He(p, n)$^{8}$Li reaction studies.

  10. Beta-delayed neutron decay of {sup 33}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radivojevic, Z. E-mail: zoran.radivojevic@phys.jyu.fi; Baumann, P.; Caurier, E.; Cederkaell, J.; Courtin, S.; Dessagne, Ph.; Jokinen, A.; Knipper, A.; Scornet, G.L.G. Le; Lyapin, V.; Miehe, Ch.; Nowacki, F.; Nummela, S.; Oinonen, M.; Poirier, E.; Ramdhane, M.; Trzaska, W.H.; Walter, G.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-01

    Beta-delayed neutron decay of {sup 33}Na has been studied using the on-line mass separator ISOLDE. The delayed neutron spectra were measured by time-of-flight technique using fast scintillators. Two main neutron groups at 800(60) and 1020(80) keV were assigned to the {sup 33}Na decay, showing evidence for strong feeding of states at about 4 MeV in {sup 33}Mg. By simultaneous {beta}-{gamma}-n counting the delayed neutron emission probabilities P{sub 1n}=47(6)% and P{sub 2n}=13(3)% were determined. The half-life value for {sup 33}Na, T{sub 1/2}=8.0(3) ms, was measured by three different techniques, one employing identifying gamma transitions and two employing beta and neutron counting.

  11. Studies of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission using Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegl, Kevin; Aprahamian, A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kolos, K.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Norman, E. B.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Pérez Galván, A.; Sh, K. S.; Strauss, S. Y.; Wang, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap to confine radioactive ions allows indirect measurements of beta-delayed neutron (BDN) emission. By determining the recoil energy of the beta-decay daughter ions it is possible to study BDN emission, as the neutron emission can impart a significantly larger nuclear recoil than from beta-decay alone. This method avoids most of the systematic uncertainties associated with direct neutron detection but introduces dependencies on the specifics of the decay and interactions of the ion with the RF fields. The decays of seven BDN precursors were studied using the Beta-decay Paul Trap (BPT) to confine fission fragments from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The analysis of these measurements and results for the branching ratios and neutron energy spectra will be presented. Supported by the NSF under grant PHY-1419765, and the U.S. DOE under the NEUP project 13-5485, contracts DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and award DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  12. Evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidins, C S; De Saint-Simon, M; Détraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Langevin, M; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

    1981-01-01

    Investigates the time spectrum of beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 30-34/Na and their descendants using beta -neutron coincidence detection. The authors have been able to assign an upper limit of 0,4% to the probability of beta -delayed neutron emission, p/sub n/, from the /sup 30/Na daugher isotope /sup 30/Mg. In fitting the time spectra of beta -delayed neutrons from /sup 31/Na and /sup 32/Na, we find a definitive component from subsequent daughter decay as well. This provides evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg with P/sub n/ values of the order of 2% for each. (7 refs).

  13. beta -delayed charged particles from /sup 9/Li and /sup 11/Li

    CERN Document Server

    Langevin, M; Détraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Mark, S K T; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

    1981-01-01

    beta -delayed emission of alpha particles rom /sup 9/Li and of both alpha and /sup 6/He particles from /sup 11/Li is observed. New beta branches are reported which populate high-energy levels in the daughter nuclei. The branching ratios are measured and the beta delayed neutron emission probabilities P/sub n/ for /sup 9/Li and P /sub 3n/ for /sup 11/Li are deduced. (14 refs).

  14. Beta-delayed fission probabilities of transfermium nuclei, involved in the r-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, I.; Lutostansky, Yu; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2016-01-01

    For the nucleosynthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei fission becomes very important when the r-process runs in a very high neutron density environment. In part, fission is responsible for the formation of heavy nuclei due to the inclusion of fission products as new seed nuclei (fission cycling). More than that, beta-delayed fission, along with spontaneous fission, is responsible in the late stages of the r-process for the suppression of superheavy element yields. For beta-delayed fission probability calculations a model description of the beta-strength- functions is required. Extended theoretical predictions for astro-physical applications were provided long ago, and new predictions also for superheavy nuclei with uptodate nuclear input are needed. For the further extension of data to heavier transactinides the models of strength- functions should be modified, taking into account more complicated level schemes. In our present calculations the strength-function model is based on the quasi-particle approximation of Finite Fermi Systems Theory. The probabilities of beta-delayed fission and beta-delayed neutron emission are calculated for some transfermium neutron-rich nuclei, and the influence of beta-delayed fission upon superheavy element formation is discussed.

  15. The neutron long counter NERO for studies of beta-delayed neutron emission in the r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, J; Lorusso, G; Santi, P; Couture, A; Daly, J; Del Santo, M; Elliot, T; Goerres, J; Herlitzius, C; Kratz, K -L; Lamm, L O; Lee, H Y; Montes, F; Ouellette, M; Pellegrini, E; Reeder, P; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, K; Stech, E; Strandberg, E; Ugalde, C; Wiescher, M; Woehr, A; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.02.262

    2010-01-01

    The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a beta-decay implantation station, so that beta decays and beta-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring beta-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

  16. High-statistics measurement of the {beta} -delayed {alpha} spectrum of {sup 20}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, K.L.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus (Denmark); Kirsebom, O.S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus (Denmark); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jokinen, A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Madurga, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-15

    A measurement of the {sup 20}Na {beta} -delayed alpha spectrum with a high-granularity setup has allowed the decay scheme to be revised on several points. Three new transitions of low intensity are found at low {alpha} -particle energy. An R-matrix fit of the complete spectrum gives an improved description of the decay and indicates feeding to the broad 2{sup +} {alpha} -cluster state close to 9MeV. (orig.)

  17. Proton dripline studies at ISOLDE: {sup 31}Ar and {sup 9}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M.J.G.; Fraile, L.M.; Tengblad, O.; Bergmann, U.O.C.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Mukha, I.; Riisager, K.; Axelsson, L.; Jonson, B.; Nyman, G.; Markenroth, K.; Aeystoe, J.; Honkanen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Oinonen, M.; Jading, Y.; Martel, I.; Nilsson, T.; Wenander, F

    2002-04-22

    In this contribution examples of the application of new technologies to disentangle the mechanism of beta-delayed multiparticle emission are given. In particular the mechanism of {beta}-delayed two-proton emission from {sup 31}Ar has been resolved and proved to be sequential, a preview of {sup 9}C-decay data is discussed.

  18. High-resolution studies of beta-delayed proton emitters at IGISOL facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokinen, A; Aysto, J; Dendooven, P; Hankonen, S; Honkanen, A; Huikari, J; Lhersonneau, G; Lipas, PO; Penttila, H; Perajarvi, K; Oinonen, M; Nieminen, A; Siiskonen, T; Wang, JC

    1998-01-01

    Beta-decays of Al-23 and Ti-41 have been studied by applying ion guide techniques, gamma detection and a gas-Si telescope for charged-particle detection. The experimental beta-decay strength of Ti-41 was found to be quenched by a factor of q(2) = 0.64 compared to our shell model calculations below 8

  19. Beta-delayed gamma and proton spectroscopy near the Z=N line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankainen, A.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Huang, W.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kopecky, S.; Moore, I.; Nieminen, A.; Penttilae, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Wang, Y.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Eliseev, S.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Fox, S.P.; Jenkins, D. [University of York, Department of Physics, Heslington (United Kingdom); Novikov, Yu.N.; Vorobjev, G.K. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg Univ. (Russian Federation); Popov, A.V.; Seliverstov, D.M. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schatz, H. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2005-09-01

    A series of beta decay experiments on nuclei near the Z=N line has been performed using the ISOL technique at the IGISOL facility in Jyvaeskylae and at ISOLDE, CERN. The decay properties of these neutron-deficient nuclei are important in astrophysics as well as in the studies of isospin symmetry. (orig.)

  20. Study of Beta-delayed Proton Emission of 36,37Ca

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Li-jie; LIN; Cheng-jian; XU; Xin-xing; JIA; Hui-ming; YANG; Lei; BAO; Peng-fei; MA; Nan-ru; ZHANG; Huan-qiao; LIU; Zu-hua; WU; Zhen-dong; ZHENG; Lei; WANG; Jian-song; YANG; Yan-yun; HU; Zheng-guo; XU; Hu-shan; WANG; Meng; JIN; Shi-lun; HAN; Jian-long; ZHANG; Ning-tao; MA; Jun-bing; MA; Peng; ZHANG; Yu-hu; ZHOU; Xiao-hong; MA; Xin-wen; XIAO; Guo-qing

    2013-01-01

    Our experiment on the decays of 37Ca(QEC=11 639(22)keV)and 36Ca(QEC=10 990(40)keV)was performed at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou(HIRFL).The radioactive ion beam(RIB)37,36Ca was produced by projectile fragmentation,then separated and purified by the Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou(RIBLL)spectrometer.By employing the silicon detector array and segmented

  1. First measurement of several $\\beta$-delayed neutron emitting isotopes beyond N=126

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Folch, R; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ameil, F; Arcones, A; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Borzov, I N; Bowry, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Cortés, G; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Estrade, A; Evdokimov, A; Faestermann, T; Farinon, F; Galaviz, D; García, A R; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gernhäuser, R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Guerrero, C; Heil, M; Hinke, C; Knöbel, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Y; Maier, L; Marganiec, J; Marketin, T; Marta, M; Martínez, T; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Montes, F; Mukha, I; Napoli, D R; Nociforo, C; Paradela, C; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Prochazka, A; Rice, S; Riego, A; Rubio, B; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, Ch; Smith, K; Sokol, E; Steiger, K; Sun, B; Taín, J L; Takechi, M; Testov, D; Weick, H; Wilson, E; Winfield, J S; Wood, R; Woods, P; Yeremin, A

    2015-01-01

    The $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission probabilities of neutron rich Hg and Tl nuclei have been measured together with $\\beta$-decay half-lives for 20 isotopes of Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi in the mass region N$\\gtrsim$126. These are the heaviest species where neutron emission has been observed so far. These measurements provide key information to evaluate the performance of nuclear microscopic and phenomenological models in reproducing the high-energy part of the $\\beta$-decay strength distribution. In doing so, it provides important constraints to global theoretical models currently used in $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  2. On evaluated nuclear data for beta-delayed gamma rays following of special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencarini, Leonardo de H.; Caldeira, Alexandre D., E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a new type of information available in ENDF is discussed. During a consistency check of the evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 performed at the Nuclear Data Subdivision of the Institute for Advanced Studies, the size of the files for some materials drew the attention of one of the authors. Almost 94 % of all available information for these special nuclear materials is used to represent the beta-delayed gamma rays following fission. This is the first time this information is included in an ENDF version. (author)

  3. beta-delayed fission from sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ac

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Wei Fan; Xu Yan Bing; Xong Bing; Pan Qiang Yan; He Jian Jun; Xiao Yong Hou; Li Yi

    2002-01-01

    ThO sub 2 is irradiated with 60 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O beams. sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ra is produced via the multi-nucleon transfer and dissipative fragmentation reactions of the target. sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ra is radio-chemical separated from ThO sub 2 and the other reaction products. The thin Ra sources are prepared. The mica fission track detectors are exposed to the Ra sources. gamma-rays of Ra decay in the sources are measured by a HPGe detector. The mica foil is etched in HF solution. The etched mica foil is scanned with an optical microscope. The fission tracks that should come from beta-delayed fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ac are observed. The beta-delayed fission probability of sup 2 sup 3 sup 0 Ac is determined to be (1.19 +- 0.85) x 10 sup - sup 8

  4. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  5. {beta}-delayed neutron emission measurements around the third r-process abundance peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Cortes, G.; Calvino, F.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Riego, A. [INTE-DFEN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain) and Inst. Nucl. Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Ameil, F.; Farinon, F.; Heil, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2013-06-10

    This contribution summarizes an experiment performed at GSI (Germany) in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126. The aim of this measurement is to provide the nuclear physics input of relevance for r-process model calculations, aiming at a better understanding of the third r-process abundance peak. Many exotic nuclei were measured around {sup 211}Hg and {sup 215}Tl. Final ion identification diagrams are given in this contribution. For most of them, we expect to derive halflives and and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities. The detectors used in this experiment were the Silicon IMplantation and Beta Absorber (SIMBA) detector, based on an array of highly segmented silicon detectors, and the BEta deLayEd Neutron (BELEN) detector, which consisted of 30 3He counters embedded in a polyethylene matrix.

  6. Measurement of the branching ratio for beta-delayed alpha decay of 16N

    CERN Document Server

    Refsgaard, J; Dijck, E A; Fynbo, H O U; Lund, M V; Portela, M N; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Renzi, F; Sambi, S; Sytema, A; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2015-01-01

    While the 12C(a,g)16O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The beta-delayed alpha spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed beta-alpha branching ratio. We have remeasured the beta-alpha branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of beta-alpha decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49(5)e-5, represents a 25% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of 14% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  7. Modeling the Production of Beta-Delayed Gamma Rays for the Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J M; Pruet, J A; Brown, D A; Descalle, M; Hedstrom, G W; Prussin, S G

    2005-02-14

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop one or more models for the production of {beta}-delayed {gamma} rays following neutron-induced fission of a special nuclear material (SNM) and to define a standardized formatting scheme which will allow them to be incorporated into some of the modern, general-purpose Monte Carlo transport codes currently being used to simulate inspection techniques proposed for detecting fissionable material hidden in sea-going cargo containers. In this report, we will describe a Monte Carlo model for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray emission following the fission of SNM that can accommodate arbitrary time-dependent fission rates and photon collection histories. The model involves direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and spectral distributions representing photon emission from each fission product and for each decay mode. While computationally intensive, it will be shown that this model can provide reasonably detailed estimates of the spectra that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer and may prove quite useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries and identifying gaps in the libraries. The accuracy of the model will be illustrated by comparing calculated and experimental spectra from the decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general-purpose transport calculations, where a detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may not be necessary, it will be shown that a simple parameterization of the {gamma}-ray source function can be defined which provides high-quality average spectral distributions that should suffice for calculations describing photons being transported through thick attenuating media. Finally, a proposal for ENDF-compatible formats that describe each of the models and

  8. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trattnig, Sarah Maria; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z

    2016-01-01

    further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all...... characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities...

  9. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies with a C7LYC array at CARIBU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gemma; Chowdhury, Partha; Lister, Christopher; Brown, Tristan; Carpenter, Michael; Chillery, Thomas; Copp, Patrick; Doucet, Emery; Mitchell, Alan; Savard, Guy; Zhu, Shaofei

    2016-09-01

    This work is a study of β-delayed neutron and γ emission from 94Rb at CARIBU. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies are important in the astrophysical r-process, nuclear structure and for nuclear reactor safety and design. Approximately 150 γ rays are known in the daughter 94Sr, many of which are unplaced. An estimated 26% of γ rays are thought to be missing. The probability of β-delayed neutron emission in 94Sr is 10.2(2)%. Recently, substantial γ-decay from above the neutron separation energy in 94Rb has been reported. This research is aimed at understanding this high-lying γ-strength. The experiment employed the X-Array (a high efficiency HPGe clover array), SCANS (Small CLYC Array for Neutron Scattering) and the SATURN decay station (Scintillator And Tape Using Radioactive Nuclei) for γ, fast neutron and β-particle detection, respectively. Data were collected in a triggerless digital data acquisition system, with detected β , n , and γ events correlated offline. Techniques, analysis and first results will be discussed. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008, and by US DoE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  10. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2013-11-07

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% (18)O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and >97% (68)Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including (16)O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at four depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160 MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the four distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water

  11. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  12. A trapped-ion technique for beta-delayed neutron studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Shane

    The properties of beta-delayed neutron emission (betan) are important in basic and applied nuclear physics. The neutron spectra and branching ratios of betan emitters reflect the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei. Branching ratios affect the heavy-element abundances resulting from the astrophysical r process. Energy spectra and branching ratios are also important to nuclear stockpile stewardship and the safe design of nuclear reactors. Recently we demonstrated a novel technique for betan spectroscopy using I137+ ions confined to a ˜1 mm 3 volume within a linear RFQ ion trap [61, 77]. By measuring the time-of-flight spectrum of ions recoiling from both beta and betan decays, the betan branching ratio and spectrum can be determined. This recoil-ion technique has several advantages over techniques that rely on neutron detection: the recoil-ions are easily detectable; complications due to scattered neutrons and gamma-rays are avoided; and the betan branching ratio can be extracted in several ways. In this thesis we present new measurements of the delayed-neutron energy spectra and branching ratios of 137I, 135Sb, and 136Sb, which include the first observation of the 136Sb spectrum. These measurements were motivated by the impact that the branching ratios of 135Sb and136Sb can have on the r-process abundances and by the use of 137 I, a well-studied case, as a benchmark for the new technique. Our current understanding of the r process is severely limited by the lack of an exhaustive body of data on neutron-rich nuclei. Relative to the previous demonstration on 137I, the present iteration of the experiment incorporates a 10x improvement in both the detection efficiencies and the beam intensity, as well as a position-sensitive design for the recoil-ion detectors that enables an improvement in energy resolution. An important analytical tool is introduced, which models the evolution of each ion population in the trap and is used to provide a needed

  13. Proton catalysis with active carbons and partially pyrolyzed carbonaceous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. V. Strelko; S. S. Stavitskaya; Yu. I. Gorlov

    2014-01-01

    The development of environmentally friendly solid acid catalysts is a priority task. Highly oxidized activated carbon and their ion-substituted (saline) forms are effective proton transfer catalysts in esterification, hydrolysis, and dehydration, and thus are promising candidates as solid acid cata-lysts. Computations by the ab initio method indicated the cause for the enchanced acidity of the carboxylic groups attached to the surface of highly oxidized carbon. The synthesis of phosphorilated carbon was considered, and the proton transfer reactions catalyzed by them in recent studies were analyzed. The development of an amorphous carbon acid catalyst comprising polycyclic carbonaceous (graphene) sheets with-SO3H,-COOH and phenolic type OH-groups was carried out. These new catalysts were synthesized by partial pyrolysis and subsequent sulfonation of carbohydrates, polymers, and other organic compounds. Their high catalytic activities in proton transfere reactions including the processing of bio-based raw materials was demonsrated.

  14. $\\beta$-delayed neutron spectroscopy of $^{130-132}$ Cd isotopes with the ISOLDE decay station and the VANDLE array

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use the new ISOLDE decay station and the neutron detector VANDLE to measure the $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission of N=82-84 $^{130-132}$Cd isotopes. The large delayed neutron emission probability observed in a previous ISOLDE measurement is indicative of the Gamow-Teller transitions due to the decay of deep core neutrons. Core Gamow-Teller decay has been experimentally proven in the $^{78}$Ni region for the N>50 nuclei using the VANDLE array. The spectroscopic measurement of delayed neutron emission along the cadmium isotopic chain will allow us to track the evolution of the single particle states and the shell gap.

  15. First-forbidden $\\mathbf{\\beta}$-decay rates, energy rates of $\\beta$-delayed neutrons and probability of $\\beta$-delayed neutron emissions for neutron-rich nickel isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Iftikhar, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    First-forbidden (FF) transitions can play an important role in decreasing the calculated half-lives specially in environments where allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are unfavored. Of special mention is the case of neutron-rich nuclei where, due to phase-space amplification, FF transitions are much favored. We calculate the allowed GT transitions in various pn-QRPA models for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel. Here we also study the effect of deformation on the calculated GT strengths. The FF transitions for even-even neutron-rich isotopes of nickel are calculated assuming the nuclei to be spherical. Later we take into account deformation of nuclei and calculate GT + unique FF transitions, stellar $\\beta$-decay rates, energy rate of $\\beta$-delayed neutrons and probability of $\\beta$-delayed neutron emissions. The calculated half-lives are in excellent agreement with measured ones and might contribute in speeding-up of the $r$-matter flow.

  16. Proton activity of the Sun in current solar cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chuan; Fang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of 7 large solar proton events (SPEs) of current solar cycle 24 (from 2009 January up to date). They were recorded by GOES spacecraft with highest proton fluxes over 200 pfu for energies $>$10 MeV. In situ particle measurements show that: (1) The profiles of the proton fluxes are highly dependent of the locations of their solar sources, namely flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs); (2) The solar particle release (SPR) times fall in the decay phase of the flare emission, and are in accordance with the times when the CMEs travel to an average height of 7.9 solar radii; (3) The time differences between the SPR and the flare peak are also dependent of the locations of the solar active regions (ARs). The results tend to support the concept of proton acceleration by the CME-driven shock, even though there exists a possibility of particle acceleration at flare site with subsequent perpendicular diffusion of accelerated particles in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We derive the integral ...

  17. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm-3) and beef (~1.0 g cm-3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  18. Structure of {sup 11}Be studied in {beta}-delayed neutron- and {gamma}- decay from polarized {sup 11}Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, Y. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University (Japan); Izumi, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University (Japan); Yano, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University (Japan); Yagi, M. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Institute of Physics, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo (Japan); Levy, C.D.P. [TRIUMF (Canada); Jackson, K.P. [TRIUMF (Canada); Miyatake, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan)

    2004-12-27

    The detailed level scheme of {sup 11}Be, including spin-parity assignments, has been established from a {beta}-delayed decay spectroscopy of spin-polarized {sup 11}Li (Lig.s.11->{beta}Be*11->nBe*10->{gamma}Beg.s.10). From the decay scheme of {sup 11}Be, neutron spectroscopic factors of the levels in {sup 11}Be have been determined. The present results have been compared with the predictions by the Anti-symmetrized Molecular Dynamics (AMD) theory, where various types of {alpha}-cluster states have been predicted for the excited states both in {sup 11}Be and {sup 10}Be. Some of the levels in {sup 11}Be show good accord with the 2{alpha}-cluster states in the rotational bands and with a single {alpha}-cluster state.

  19. Study of the $\\beta$-delayed Particle Emission of $^{17}$Ne

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We intend to investigate the charged particle decay modes from the excited states of $^{17}$F populated in the $\\beta^+$- decay of $^{17}$Ne. In particular, we propose to study the proton decay branches to $^{16}$O states which are unstable to $\\alpha$- decay. We plan to use the recently developed ISOLDE Si-ball detector array in order to efficiently detect the charged particles in a wide solid angle. We ask for a total of 12 shifts, including 9 shifts for $^{17}$Ne and 3 shifts for stable beam and calibrations. We request the use of a Mg oxide target coupled to a plasma ion source with cooled transfer line or, if possible, to the new MINIMONOECRIS. We would like to make use of the ISOLDE VME DAQ and CERN data storage system.

  20. Acid activation mechanism of the influenza A M2 proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ruibin; Swanson, Jessica M J; Madsen, Jesper J; Hong, Mei; DeGrado, William F; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-10-24

    The homotetrameric influenza A M2 channel (AM2) is an acid-activated proton channel responsible for the acidification of the influenza virus interior, an important step in the viral lifecycle. Four histidine residues (His37) in the center of the channel act as a pH sensor and proton selectivity filter. Despite intense study, the pH-dependent activation mechanism of the AM2 channel has to date not been completely understood at a molecular level. Herein we have used multiscale computer simulations to characterize (with explicit proton transport free energy profiles and their associated calculated conductances) the activation mechanism of AM2. All proton transfer steps involved in proton diffusion through the channel, including the protonation/deprotonation of His37, are explicitly considered using classical, quantum, and reactive molecular dynamics methods. The asymmetry of the proton transport free energy profile under high-pH conditions qualitatively explains the rectification behavior of AM2 (i.e., why the inward proton flux is allowed when the pH is low in viral exterior and high in viral interior, but outward proton flux is prohibited when the pH gradient is reversed). Also, in agreement with electrophysiological results, our simulations indicate that the C-terminal amphipathic helix does not significantly change the proton conduction mechanism in the AM2 transmembrane domain; the four transmembrane helices flanking the channel lumen alone seem to determine the proton conduction mechanism.

  1. Monte Carlo Models for the Production of beta-delayed Gamma Rays Following Fission of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Descalle, M; Hall, J

    2004-02-03

    A Monte Carlo method for the estimation of {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectra following fission is described that can accommodate an arbitrary time-dependent fission rate and photon collection history. The method invokes direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the fissioning system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and the spectral distributions for photon emission for each decay mode. Though computationally intensive, the method can provide a detailed estimate of the spectrum that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer, and can prove useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries, for identifying gaps in these libraries, etc. The method is illustrated by a first comparison of calculated and experimental spectra from decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general purpose transport calculations, where detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may be unnecessary, it is shown that an accurate and simple parameterization of a {gamma}-ray source function can be obtained. These parametrizations should provide high-quality average spectral distributions that should prove useful in calculations describing photons escaping from thick attenuating media.

  2. Total Absorption Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of 87Br, 88Br and 94Rb Beta-Delayed Neutron Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Valencia, E; Algora, A; Agramunt, J; Rubio, B; Rice, S; Gelletly, W; Regan, P; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A; Fallot, M; Porta, A; Rissanen, J; Eronen, T; Aysto, J; Batist, L; Bowry, M; Bui, V M; Caballero-Folch, R; Cano-Ott, D; Elomaa, V -V; Estevez, E; Farrelly, G F; Garcia, A R; Gomez-Hornillos, B; Gorlychev, V; Hakala, J; Jordan, M D; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Kondev, F G; Martinez, T; Mendoza, E; Moore, I; Penttila, H; Podolyak, Zs; Reponen, M; Sonnenschein, V; Sonzogni, A A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the decay of 87Br, 88Br and 94Rb using total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy. These important fission products are beta-delayed neutron emitters. Our data show considerable gamma-intensity, so far unobserved in high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, from states at high excitation energy. We also find significant differences with the beta intensity that can be deduced from existing measurements of the beta spectrum. We evaluate the impact of the present data on reactor decay heat using summation calculations. Although the effect is relatively small it helps to reduce the discrepancy between calculations and integral measurements of the photon component for 235U fission at cooling times in the range 1 to 100 s. We also use summation calculations to evaluate the impact of present data on reactor antineutrino spectra. We find a significant effect at antineutrino energies in the range of 5 to 9 MeV. In addition, we observe an unexpected strong probability for gamma emission from neutron unbound s...

  3. First direct observation of two protons in the decay of 45Fe with a time-projection chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovinazzo, J; Blank, B; Borcea, C; Canchel, G; Dalouzy, J-C; Demonchy, C E; de Oliveira Santos, F; Dossat, C; Grévy, S; Hay, L; Huikari, J; Leblanc, S; Matea, I; Pedroza, J-L; Perrot, L; Pibernat, J; Serani, L; Stodel, C; Thomas, J-C

    2007-09-07

    The decay of the ground-state two-proton emitter 45Fe was studied with a time-projection chamber and the emission of two protons was unambiguously identified. The total decay energy and the half-life measured in this work agree with the results from previous experiments. The present result constitutes the first direct observation of the individual protons in the two-proton decay of a long-lived ground-state emitter. In parallel, we identified for the first time directly two-proton emission from 43Cr, a known beta-delayed two-proton emitter. The technique developed in the present work opens the way to a detailed study of the mechanism of ground state as well as beta-delayed two-proton radioactivity.

  4. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  5. Proton energy determination using activated yttrium foils and ionization chambers for activity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A. [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20520 Turku (Finland); Unidad PET/CT-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Edificio de Investigacion P.B, Cd. Universitaria, Circ. Interior, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: avilarod@uwalumni.com; Rajander, J.; Lill, J.-O. [Turku PET Centre, Abo Akademi University, Porthansg 3, 20500 Turku (Finland); Gagnon, K. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave., Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Schlesinger, J. [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20520 Turku (Finland); Wilson, J.S.; McQuarrie, S.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Ave., Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Solin, O. [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 4-8, 20520 Turku (Finland)

    2009-05-15

    Excitation functions of the {sup 89}Y(p, xn) nuclear reactions were measured up to 18 MeV by the conventional activation method using the stacked-foil technique, and the irradiation of single foils. Activity assays of the irradiated foils were performed via ionization chamber and gamma spectroscopy methods. Activity ratios of the activation products were measured in two different facilities and evaluated for use as a practical and simple method for proton energy determinations. Cross section values measured in this work were compared with published data and with theoretical values as determined by the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE II. In general, there was a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values of the cross section data. Activity ratios of the isomeric and ground state of {sup 89}Zr measured via ionization chamber were found to be useful for proton energy determinations in the energy range from 7 to 15 MeV. Proton energies above 13 MeV were accurately determined using the {sup 89g}Zr/{sup 88}Zr and {sup 89g}Zr/{sup 88}Y activity ratios measured via gamma spectroscopy.

  6. The cytochrome ba3 oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus uses a single input channel for proton delivery to the active site and for proton pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Hemp, James; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2009-09-22

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps that generate a proton motive force in both prokaryotes and mitochondria. These enzymes have been divided into 3 evolutionarily related groups: the A-, B- and C-families. Most experimental work on proton-pumping mechanisms has been performed with members of the A-family. These enzymes require 2 proton input pathways (D- and K-channels) to transfer protons used for oxygen reduction chemistry and for proton pumping, with the D-channel transporting all pumped protons. In this work we use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the ba(3) oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, a representative of the B-family, does not contain a D-channel. Rather, it utilizes only 1 proton input channel, analogous to that of the A-family K-channel, and it delivers protons to the active site for both O2 chemistry and proton pumping. Comparison of available subunit I sequences reveals that the only structural elements conserved within the oxygen reductase families that could perform these functions are active-site components, namely the covalently linked histidine-tyrosine, the Cu(B) and its ligands, and the active-site heme and its ligands. Therefore, our data suggest that all oxygen reductases perform the same chemical reactions for oxygen reduction and comprise the essential elements of the proton-pumping mechanism (e.g., the proton-loading and kinetic-gating sites). These sites, however, cannot be located within the D-channel. These results along with structural considerations point to the A-propionate region of the active-site heme and surrounding water molecules as the proton-loading site.

  7. Screening Approach to the Activation of Soil and Contamination of Groundwater at Linear Proton Accelerator Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Otto, Thomas

    The activation of soil and the contamination of groundwater at proton accelerator sites with the radionuclides 3H and 22Na are estimated with a Monte-Carlo calculation and a conservative soil- and ground water model. The obtained radionuclide concentrations show that the underground environment of future accelerators must be adequately protected against a migration of activation products. This study is of particular importance for the proton driver accelerator in the planned EURISOL facility.

  8. Beta-decay half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region below A=110, relevant for the r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, J; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Becerril, A; Elliot, T; Estrade, A; Galaviz, D; Kessler, R; Kratz, K -L; Lorusso, G; Mantica, P F; Matos, M; Møller, P; Montes, F; Pfeiffer, B; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Quinn, M; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the beta-decay properties of r-process nuclei below A=110 have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, at Michigan State University. Beta-decay half-lives for Y-105, Zr-106,107 and Mo-111, along with beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities of Y-104, Mo-109,110 and upper limits for Y-105, Zr-103,104,105,106,107 and Mo-108,111 have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  9. Revealing the Mechanistic Pathway of Acid Activation of Proton Pump Inhibitors To Inhibit the Gastric Proton Pump: A DFT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Kalyanashis; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2016-12-29

    Acid-related gastric diseases are associated with disorder of digestive tract acidification due to the acid secretion by gastric proton pump, H(+),K(+)-ATPase. Omeprazole is one of the persuasive irreversible inhibitor of the proton pump H(+),K(+)-ATPase. However, the reports on the mechanistic pathway of irreversible proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the acid activation and formation of disulfide complex are scarce in the literature. We have examined the acid activation PPIs, i.e., timoprazole, S-omeprazole and R-omeprazole using M062X/6-31++G(d,p) in aqueous phase with SMD solvation model. The proton pump inhibitor is a prodrug and activated in the acidic canaliculi of the gastric pump H(+),K(+)-ATPase to sulfenic acid which can either form another acid activate intermediate sulfenamide or a disulfide complex with cysteine amino acid of H(+),K(+)-ATPase. The quantum chemical calculations suggest that the transition state (TS5) for the disulfide complex formation is the rate-determining step of the multistep acid inhibition process by PPIs. The free energy barrier of TS5 is 5.5 kcal/mol higher for timoprazole compared to the S-omeprazole. The stability of the transition state for the formation of disulfide bond between S-omeprazole and cysteine amino acid of H(+),K(+)-ATPase is governed by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The disulfide complex for S-omeprazole is thermodynamically more stable by 4.5 kcal/mol in aqueous phase compared to disulfide complex of timoprazole, which corroborates the less efficacy of timoprazole as irreversible PPI for acid inhibition process. It has been speculated that sulfenic acid can either form sulfenamide or a stable disulfide complex with cysteine amino acid residue of H(+),K(+)-ATPase. The M062X/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory calculated results reveal that the formation of tetra cyclic sulfenamide is unfavored by ∼17 kcal/mol for S-omeprazole and 11.5 kcal/mol for timoprazole compared to the disulfide complex formation

  10. A Palladium-Binding Deltarhodopsin for Light-Activated Conversion of Protonic to Electronic Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Hemmatian, Zahra; Josberger, Erik E; Rolandi, Marco; Baneyx, François

    2016-08-01

    Fusion of a palladium-binding peptide to an archaeal rhodopsin promotes intimate integration of the lipid-embedded membrane protein with a palladium hydride protonic contact. Devices fabricated with the palladium-binding deltarhodopsin enable light-activated conversion of protonic currents to electronic currents with on/off responses complete in seconds and a nearly tenfold increase in electrical signal relative to those made with the wild-type protein.

  11. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail.

  12. Proton pump activity is required for active uptake of chloride in isolated amphibian skin exposed to freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Willumsen, Niels J.; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2002-01-01

    Net proton secretion and unidirectional chloride fluxes were measured in isolated skin of toads (Bufo bufo) and frogs (Rana esculenta) mounted in an Ussing chamber and exposed to a Ringer's solution on the serosal side and a freshwater-like solution (1-3 mM Cl-) on the external side. Active proto...... active Cl- uptake in fresh water by creating a favourable gradient for an apical HCO3- exit in exchange for external Cl-. The data also suggest that a carbonic anhydrase activity provides H+ and HCO3- for apically co-expressed proton pumps and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers....... of a rheogenic proton pump. Cl- influx was 37.4-7.5 pmol·cm-2·s-1 (n=14) in frog skin and 19.5-3.5 pmol·cm-2·s-1 (n=11) in toad skin. In toad skin, the mean Cl- flux ratio was larger than expected for simple electro-diffusion. In 8 of 11 sets of paired skins, influx was greater than the efflux indicating active......-type proton pump (V-ATPase) inhibitor, significantly reduced proton secretion in frog skin. In addition, concanamycin A (1 µM) significantly reduced Cl- influx in frog skin. We suggest that the active proton secretion and Cl- influx are coupled. We hypothesise that an apical V-ATPase is capable of energising...

  13. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  14. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Yun-Hee [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF-β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused the MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF-β and VEGF transcription.

  15. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  16. Mechanism of pH-dependent activation of the sodium-proton antiporter NhaA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yandong; Chen, Wei; Dotson, David L.; Beckstein, Oliver; Shen, Jana

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli NhaA is a prototype sodium-proton antiporter, which has been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography, biochemical and biophysical experiments. However, the identities of proton carriers and details of pH-regulated mechanism remain controversial. Here we report constant pH molecular dynamics data, which reveal that NhaA activation involves a net charge switch of a pH sensor at the entrance of the cytoplasmic funnel and opening of a hydrophobic gate at the end of the funnel. The latter is triggered by charging of Asp164, the first proton carrier. The second proton carrier Lys300 forms a salt bridge with Asp163 in the inactive state, and releases a proton when a sodium ion binds Asp163. These data reconcile current models and illustrate the power of state-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations in providing atomic details of proton-coupled transport across membrane which is challenging to elucidate by experimental techniques.

  17. Shape-coexistence and shape-evolution studies for bismuth isotopes by insource laser spectroscopy and $\\beta$-delayed fission in $^{188}$Bi

    CERN Multimedia

    The proposal aims at the two main goals: \\\\ \\\\1) the studies of shape-coexistence and shape-evolution phenomena in the long chain of bismuth isotopes (Z=83) by in-source laser spectroscopy measurements of isotopic shifts (IS) and hyperfine structures (hfs), and \\\\ 2) $\\beta$-delayed fission ($\\beta$DF) of two isomeric states in $^{188}$Bi. \\\\ \\\\Isomer-selective $\\beta$DF studies for $^{188m1, 188m2}$Bi isomers will enable us for the first time to investigate the spin-dependence of the $\\beta$DF process and to check theoretical predictions of asymmetrical fission fragment mass-distribution in this region of nuclei. The measurements will be performed with the well-proven Windmill and MR-TOF MS/Penning Trap techniques.

  18. $\\beta$-decay and $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Folch, R; Cortès, G; Taín, J L; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ameil, F; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Bowry, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Estrade, A; Evdokimov, A; Faestermann, T; Farinon, F; Galaviz, D; García-Ríos, A; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gernhäuser, R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Guerrero, C; Heil, M; Hinke, C; Knöbel, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Y; Maier, L; Marganiec, J; Marta, M; Martínez, T; Montes, F; Mukha, I; Napoli, D R; Nociforo, C; Paradela, C; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Prochazka, A; Rice, S; Riego, A; Rubio, B; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, C; Smith, K; Sokol, E; Steiger, K; Sun, B; Takechi, M; Testov, D; Weick, H; Wilson, E; Winfield, J S; Wood, R; Woods, P J; Yeremin, A

    2014-01-01

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Ti, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them (Hg208-211, Tl211-215, Pb214-218) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, P-n.

  19. Cardiolipin is essential for higher proton translocation activity of reconstituted Fo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Fo membrane domain of FoF1-ATPase complex had been purifiedfrom porcine heart mitochondria. SDS-PAGE with silver staining indicated that the purity of Fo was about 85% and the sample contained no subunits of F1-ATPase. The purified Fo was reconstituted into liposomes with different phospholipid composition, and the effect of CL (cardiolipin), PA (phosphatidic acid), PI (phosphatidylinositol) and PS (phosphatidylserine) on the H+ translocation activity of Fo was investigated. The results demonstrated that CL, PA and PI could promote the proton translocation of Fo with the order of CL>PA>>PI, while PS inhibited it. Meanwhile ADM (adriamycin) severely impaired the proton translocation activity of Fo vesicles containing CL, which suggested that CL's stimulation of the activity of reconstituted Fo might correlate with its non-bilayer propensity. After Fo was incorporated into the liposomes containing PE (phosphatidylethanolamine), DOPE (dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) as well as DEPE (dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine), it was found that the proton translocation activity of Fo vesicles increased with the increasing content of PE or DOPE, which has high propensity of forming non-bilayer structure, but was independent of DEPE. The dynamic quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan by HB (hypocrellin B) as well as fluorescent spectrum of acrylodan labeling Fo at cysteine indicated that CL could induce Fo to a suitable conformation resulting in higher proton translocation activity.

  20. Resonant proton scattering on 46Ar using the Active-Target Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J.; Ahn, T.; Ayyad Limonge, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Carpenter, L.; Kuchera, M. P.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; Rost, S.; Watwood, N.; Barney, J.; Datta, U.; Estee, J.; Gillibert, A.; Manfredi, J.; Morfouace, P.; Perez Loureiro, D.; Pollacco, E.; Sammut, J.; Sweany, S.

    2016-09-01

    A well-known technique for studying the single-particle properties of neutron-rich nuclei is to use resonant proton scattering on a parent nucleus to populate the isobaric analog states of the corresponding neutron-rich nucleus. The locations and amplitudes of these resonances are directly related to the structure of the nucleus of interest by isospin symmetry. We performed an experiment of this type at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to commission the recently completed Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). A 4.6-MeV/u radioactive beam of 46Ar was injected into the AT-TPC. The detector was filled with isobutane gas-which provided the protons for the reaction and served as the tracking medium-and placed inside a 2-T magnetic field. We will present preliminary results from this experiment and discuss the benefits of the active-target method for this type of measurement.

  1. Half-lives and branchings for {\\beta}-delayed neutron emission for neutron-rich Co-Cu isotopes in the r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmer, P; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Clement, R R C; Estrade, A; Farouqi, K; Kratz, K -L; Liddick, S N; Lisetskiy, A F; Mantica, P F; Möller, P; Mueller, W F; Montes, F; Morton, A C; Ouellette, M; Pellegrini, E; Pereira, J; Pfeiffer, B; Reeder, P; Santi, P; Steiner, M; Stolz, A; Tomlin, B E; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.82.025806

    2010-01-01

    The {\\beta} decays of very neutron-rich nuclides in the Co-Zn region were studied experimentally at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the NSCL {\\beta}-counting station in conjunction with the neutron detector NERO. We measured the branchings for {\\beta}-delayed neutron emission (Pn values) for 74Co (18 +/- 15%) and 75-77Ni (10 +/- 2.8%, 14 +/- 3.6%, and 30 +/- 24%, respectively) for the first time, and remeasured the Pn values of 77-79Cu, 79,81Zn, and 82Ga. For 77-79Cu and for 81Zn we obtain significantly larger Pn values compared to previous work. While the new half-lives for the Ni isotopes from this experiment had been reported before, we present here in addition the first half-life measurements of 75Co (30 +/- 11 ms) and 80Cu (170+110 -50 ms). Our results are compared with theoretical predictions, and their impact on various types of models for the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is explored. We find that with our new data, the classical r-process model is bet...

  2. protonation behavior of histidine during HSF1 activation by physiological acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Park, Jang-Su

    2015-06-01

    The expression of eukaryotic molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins, HSPs) is triggered in response to a wide range of environmental stresses, including: heat shock, hydrogen peroxide, heavy metal, low-pH, or virus infection. Biochemical and genetic studies have clearly shown the fundamental roles of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in stress-inducible HSP gene expression, resistance to stress-induced cell death, carcinogenesis, and other biological phenomena. Previous studies show that acidic pH changes within the physiological range directly activate the HSF1 function in vitro. However, the detailed mechanism is unclear. Though computational pKa-predications of the amino acid side-chain, acidic-pH induced protonation of a histidine residue was found to be most-likely involved in this process. The histidine 83 (His83) residue, which could be protonated by mild decrease in pH, causes mild acidic-induced HSF1 activation (including in-vitro trimerization, DNA binding, in-vivo nuclear accumulation, and HSPs expression). His83, which is located in the loop region of the HSF1 DNA binding domain, was suggested to enhance the intermolecular force with Arginine 79, which helps HSF1 form a DNA-binding competent. Therefore, low-pH-induced activation of HSF1 by the protonation of histidine can help us better to understand the HSF1 mechanism and develop more therapeutic applications (particularly in cancer therapy). J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 977-984, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Receptor kinase-mediated control of primary active proton pumping at the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, AT; Kristensen, A; Cuin, TA

    2014-01-01

    and in planta with PSY1R, a receptor kinase of the plasma membrane that serves as a receptor for the peptide growth hormone PSY1. The intracellular protein kinase domain of PSY1R phosphorylates AHA2/AHA1 at Thr-881, situated in the autoinhibitory Region I of the C-terminal domain. When expressed in a yeast...... heterologous expression system, the introduction of a negative charge at this position caused pump activation. Application of PSY1 to plant seedlings induced rapid in planta phosphorylation at Thr-881, concomitant with an instantaneous increase in proton efflux from roots. The direct interaction between AHA2...... and PSY1R observed might provide a general paradigm for regulation of plasma membrane proton transport by receptor kinases....

  4. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of $^{197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192}$Hg, $^{196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum)}$Au, $^{191(cum)}$Pt and $^{192}$Ir were measured up to 65 MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code.

  5. IRMPD spectroscopy of protonated S-nitrosocaptopril, a biologically active, synthetic amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Cecilia; Re, Nazzareno; Scuderi, Debora; Maître, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Fornarini, Simonetta; Lanucara, Francesco; Sinha, Rajeev K; Crestoni, Maria Elisa

    2010-11-07

    S-Nitrosocaptopril, a biologically active S-nitrosothiol, is generated as protonated species and isolated in the gas phase by electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) or ion-trap mass spectrometry. The structural and IR spectroscopic characterization of protonated S-nitrosocaptopril (SNOcapH(+)) is aided by the comparative study of the parent species lacking the NO feature, namely protonated captopril. The study is accomplished by methodologies based on tandem mass spectrometry, namely by energy resolved collision-induced dissociation and infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy, backed by density functional theory calculations. IRMPD spectra have been obtained both in the 1000-1900 cm(-1) fingerprint range, using a beamline of the infrared free electron laser (IR-FEL) at the Centre Laser Infrarouge d'Orsay (CLIO), and in the O-H and N-H stretching region (2900-3700 cm(-1)) using the tunable IR radiation of a tabletop parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser source. The structural features of the ion have been ascertained by comparison of the experimental IRMPD spectra with the IR transitions calculated for the lowest energy isomers. Evidence is obtained that protonation occurs at the amide carbonyl oxygen which is found to be the thermodynamically most basic site. However, SNOcapH(+) is present as a thermally equilibrated mixture of low-energy structures, with a major contribution of the most stable isomer characterized by a trans relationship of the positively charged OH group with respect to the carboxylic acid functionality on the adjacent proline ring and by an anti conformation at the S-N (partial) double bond, though the energy difference with the analogous trans-syn isomer is less than 1 kJ mol(-1). The highly diagnostic N-O stretching mode has been unambiguously identified, which may be regarded as an informative probe for S-nitrosation features in more complex, biologically active

  6. Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of CuB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-10-01

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CuB(II) and Fea3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased CuB(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between CuB(II) and Fea3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence.

  7. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L [HUPTI, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  8. Decay mechanisms of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics after electrospray ionization and ion activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Borislav; Schorr, Pascal; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed experimental investigation of charge isomers of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics molecules formed during electrospray ionization (ESI) with proposed dissociation mechanisms after collisional activation. Piperazinyl quinolones have been previously shown to exhibit erratic behavior during tandem MS analyses of biological samples, which originated from varying ratios of two isomeric variants formed during ESI. Here, a combination of ESI-collision-induced dissociation (CID), differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), high resolution MS, and density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of isomer formation and their individual dissociation behaviors. The study focused on ciprofloxacin; major findings were confirmed using structurally related 4-quinolones. DFT calculations showed a reversal of basicity for piperazinyl quinolones between liquid and gas phase. We provide an experimental comparison and theoretical treatment of factors influencing the formation ratio of the charge isomers during ESI, including solvent pH, protic/aprotic nature of solvent, and structural effects such as pK a and proton affinity. The actual dissociation mechanisms of the isomers of the protonated molecules were studied by separating the individual isomers via DMS-MS, which allowed type-specific CID spectra to be recorded. Both primary CID reactions of the two charge isomers originated from the same carboxyl group by charge-remote (CO(2) loss) and charge-mediated (H(2)O loss) fragmentation of the piperazinyl quinolones, depending on whether the proton resides on the more basic keto or the piperazinyl group, followed by a number of secondary dissociation reactions. The proposed mechanisms were supported by calculated energies of precursors, transition states, and products for competing pathways.

  9. Optimization of a general-purpose, actively scanned proton beamline for ocular treatments: Geant4 simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Rimoldi, Adele; Riccardi, Cristina; Pirola, Michele; Molinelli, Silvia; Ciocca, Mario

    2015-03-08

    The Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), a synchrotron-based hospital facility, started the treatment of patients within selected clinical trials in late 2011 and 2012 with actively scanned proton and carbon ion beams, respectively. The activation of a new clinical protocol for the irradiation of uveal melanoma using the existing general-purpose proton beamline is foreseen for late 2014. Beam characteristics and patient treatment setup need to be tuned to meet the specific requirements for such a type of treatment technique. The aim of this study is to optimize the CNAO transport beamline by adding passive components and minimizing air gap to achieve the optimal conditions for ocular tumor irradiation. The CNAO setup with the active and passive components along the transport beamline, as well as a human eye-modeled detector also including a realistic target volume, were simulated using the Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit. The strong reduction of the air gap between the nozzle and patient skin, as well as the insertion of a range shifter plus a patient-specific brass collimator at a short distance from the eye, were found to be effective tools to be implemented. In perspective, this simulation toolkit could also be used as a benchmark for future developments and testing purposes on commercial treatment planning systems.

  10. High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Active Site of Chymotrypsin. I. The Hydrogen Bonded Protons of the “Charge Relay” System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, G.; Shulman, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to observe protons at the active site of chymotrypsin Aδ and at the same region of chymotrypsinogen A. A single resonance with the intensity of one proton is located in the low field region of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. Th

  11. Search for supersymmetry in events with at least one photon, missing transverse momentum, and large transverse event activity in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with at least one photon, large transverse momentum imbalance, and large total transverse event activity is presented. This event selection provides good sensitivity for gauge mediated supersymmetry models in which pair-produced gluinos or squarks decay via short-living neutralinos to photons and gravitinos. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016. No excess of events above the standard model background is observed. The data is interpreted in simplified models of gluino- and squark pair production, in which gluinos and squarks decay via gauginos to photons. Gluino masses of up to $2~\\mathrm{TeV}$ masses up to $1.6~\\mathrm{TeV}$ are excluded.

  12. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  13. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  14. Activation of lactoperoxidase by heme-linked protonation and heme-independent iodide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Akira; Tominaga, Aya; Inoue, Tatsuo; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO), a mammalian secretory heme peroxidase, catalyzes the oxidation of thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide to produce hypothiocyanate, an antibacterial agent. Although LPO is known to be activated at acidic pH and in the presence of iodide, the structural basis of the activation is not well understood. We have examined the effects of pH and iodide concentration on the catalytic activity and the structure of LPO. Electrochemical and colorimetric assays have shown that the catalytic activity is maximized at pH 4.5. The heme Soret absorption band exhibits a small red-shift at pH 5.0 upon acidification, which is ascribable to a structural transition from a neutral to an acidic form. Resonance Raman spectra suggest that the heme porphyrin core is slightly contracted and the Fe-His bond is strengthened in the acidic form compared to the neutral form. The structural change of LPO upon activation at acidic pH is similar to that observed for myeloperoxidase, another mammalian heme peroxidase, upon activation at neutral pH. Binding of iodide enhances the catalytic activity of LPO without affecting either the optimum pH of activity or the heme structure, implying that the iodide binding occurs at a protein site away from the heme-linked protonation site.

  15. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Aly, Reham; Aly, Shereen; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Lotfy, Ahmad; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Ali, Ahmed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Bagaturia, Iuri; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sudhakar, Katta; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fantinel, Sergio; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Dellacasa, Giulio; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Myagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Wang, Wei Yang; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Du Pree, Tristan; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Ferro, Cristina; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Thomas, Laurent; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Yin, Hang; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mareskas-palcek, Darren; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Mcginn, Christopher; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Demortier, Luc; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Christian, Allison; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Gomber, Bhawna; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region ($ |{\\eta^{\\text{jet}}} |$ < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 $\\le p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\text{jet} \\lt$ 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\text{jet}$ in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta ($p_{\\mathrm{T}}$) of charged particles, with $|{\\eta}| \\lt 2$ and $p_{\\mathrm{T}} \\gt 0.5$ GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. The measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constrain...

  16. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, S; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80 MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of ${}^{104m,104g,105}$${}^{g,106m,110m}$Ag, ${}^{100,101}$Pd, ${}^{99m,99g,100,}$${}^{101m}$${}^{,101g,102m,102g,105}$Rh and ${}^{103,}$${}^{97}$Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed.

  17. Proton nuclear Overhauser effect study of the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugad, L B; Goff, H M

    1992-07-13

    Proton nuclear Overhauser effect and paramagnetic relaxation measurements have been used to define more extensively the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, CMP (previously known as Coprinus cinereus peroxidase), as the ferric low-spin cyanide ligated complex. The results are compared with other well-characterized peroxidase enzymes. The NMR spectrum of CMPCN shows changes in the paramagnetically shifted resonances as a function of time, suggesting a significant heme disorder for CMP. The presence of proximal and distal histidine amino acid residues are common to the heme environments of both CMPCN and HRPCN. However, the upfield distal arginine signals of HRPCN are not evident in the 1H-NMR spectra of CMPCN.

  18. Energetic proton irradiation history of the HED parent body regolith and implications for ancient solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Palma, R. L.; Bogard, D. D.

    1997-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Kapoeta howardite, as well as several other meteorites, contain excess concentrations of cosmogenic neon in the darkened, solar-irradiated phase compared to the light, non-irradiated phase. The two explanations offered for the nuclear production of these Ne excesses in the parent body regolith are either from galactic particle (GCR) irradiation or from a greatly enhanced flux of energetic solar protons (SCR), as compared to the recent solar flux. Combining new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from Kapoeta light and dark phases with literature data, we show that the cosmogenic 21Ne /22Ne ratio of light phase feldspar (0.80) is consistent with only GCR irradiation in space for ~3 Myr. However, the 21Ne/22Ne ratio (0.68) derived for irradiation of dark phase feldspar in the Kapoeta regolith indicates that cosmogenic Ne was produced in roughly equal proportions from galactic and solar protons. Considering a simple model of an immature Kapoeta parent body regolith, the duration of this early galactic exposure was only ~3-6 Myr, which would be an upper limit to the solar exposure time of individual grains. Concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne in pyroxene separates and of cosmogenic 126Xe in both feldspar and pyroxene are consistent with this interpretation. The near-surface irradiation time of individual grains in the Kapoeta regolith probably varied considerably due to regolith mixing to an average GCR irradiation depth of ~10 cm. Because of the very different depth scales for production of solar ~Fe tracks, SCR Ne, and GCR Ne, the actual regolith exposure times for average grains probably differed correspondingly. However, both the SCR 21Ne and solar track ages appear to be longer because of enhanced production by early solar activity. The SCR/GCR production ratio of 21Ne inferred from the Kapoeta data is larger by a at least a factor of 10 and possibly as much as a factor of ~50 compared to recent solar

  19. The Proton-Activated Receptor GPR4 Modulates Glucose Homeostasis by Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giudici

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proton-activated G protein-coupled receptor GPR4 is expressed in many tissues including white adipose tissue. GPR4 is activated by extracellular protons in the physiological pH range (i.e. pH 7.7 - 6.8 and is coupled to the production of cAMP. Methods: We examined mice lacking GPR4 and examined glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in young and aged mice as well as in mice fed with a high fat diet. Expression profiles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in white adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle was assessed. Results: Here we show that mice lacking GPR4 have an improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and increased insulin sensitivity. Insulin levels were comparable but leptin levels were increased in GPR4 KO mice. Gpr4-/- showed altered expression of PPARα, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, and TGF-1β in skeletal muscle, white adipose tissue, and liver. High fat diet abolished the differences in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity between Gpr4+/+ and Gpr4-/- mice. In contrast, in aged mice (12 months old, the positive effect of GPR4 deficiency on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity was maintained. Liver and adipose tissue showed no major differences in the mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors between aged mice of both genotypes. Conclusion: Thus, GPR4 deficiency improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The effect may involve an altered balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in insulin target tissues.

  20. Energy-transducing H+-ATPase of Escherichia coli. Reconstitution of proton translocation activity of the intrinsic membrane sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrin, R S; Foster, D L; Fillingame, R H

    1980-06-25

    The intrinsic membrane sector (Fo) of the H+-ATPase complex of Escherichia coli has been purified, incorporated into liposomes, and its proton-translocating activity reconstituted. The Fo sector was prepared by treating a purified, particulate, F1FO-ATPase preparation with EDTA to solubilize the F1-ATPase. The resulting particulate Fo fraction was incorporated into liposomes of E. coli phospholipids by sonication. Proton efflux from these liposomes was measured with a pH electrode after imposition of a membrane potential. The kinetics of proton efflux fits that predicted by the Goldman-flux equation. The rate of proton efflux was increased maximally more than 100-fold on incorporation of the Fo sector into the liposomes. The rate of H+ efflux varied directly with the amount of Fo material added during reconstitution. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide blocked Fo-mediated H+ efflux. Inhibition was shown to be due to reaction of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide with a specific proteolipid subunit of Fo. The preparation of Fo used in these studies contained the three proteins that had previously been identified as likely subunits of Fo (Foster, D. L., and Fillingame, R. H. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 8230-8236). It remains to be determined whether all three components are required for reconstitution of proton translocation activity.

  1. Influence of protonation on substrate and inhibitor interactions at the active site of human monoamine oxidase-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Fierro, Angelica; Miranda-Rojas, Sebastian; Guajardo, Carlos; Saez-Briones, Patricio; Salgado, J Cristian; Celis-Barros, Cristian

    2012-05-25

    Although substrate conversion mediated by human monoaminooxidase (hMAO) has been associated with the deprotonated state of their amine moiety, data regarding the influence of protonation on substrate binding at the active site are scarce. Thus, in order to assess protonation influence, steered molecular dynamics (SMD) runs were carried out. These simulations revealed that the protonated form of the substrate serotonin (5-HT) exhibited stronger interactions at the protein surface compared to the neutral form. The latter displayed stronger interactions in the active site cavity. These observations support the possible role of the deprotonated form in substrate conversion. Multigrid docking studies carried out to rationalize the role of 5-HT protonation in other sites besides the active site indicated two energetically favored docking sites for the protonated form of 5-HT on the enzyme surface. These sites seem to be interconnected with the substrate/inhibitor cavity, as revealed by the tunnels observed by means of CAVER program. pK(a) calculations in the surface loci pointed to Glu³²⁷, Asp³²⁸, His⁴⁸⁸, and Asp¹³² as candidates for a possible in situ deprotonation step. Docking analysis of a group of inhibitors (structurally related to substrates) showed further interactions with the same two docking access sites. Interestingly, the protonated/deprotonated amine moiety of almost all compounds attained different docking poses in the active site, none of them oriented to the flavin moiety, thus producing a more variable and less productive orientations to act as substrates. Our results highlight the role of deprotonation in facilitating substrate conversion and also might reflect the necessity of inhibitor molecules to adopt specific orientations to achieve enzyme inhibition.

  2. [Activation and inhibition of photoinduced proton absorption in Rhodospirillum rubrum chromatophores by detergents and solvents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikova, M G; Pakshina, E V; Shubin, V V; Krasnovskiĭ, A A

    1979-01-01

    The effects of detergents (Triton X-100) and solvents (diethyl ether, metanol) on the reversible light-induced proton uptake, photophosphorylation and band shift of the carotenoid in chromatophores from R. rubrum are described. All these compounds were found to stimulate the extent of light-induced proton uptake with subsequent inhibition when the concentrations were increased. Stimulation of proton uptake is accompanied by inhibition of both phosphorylation and carotenoid absorbance shift.

  3. Retinoids activate proton transport by the uncoupling proteins UCP1 and UCP2.

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian brown adipose tissue, thermogenesis is explained by uncoupling mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) is responsible for this uncoupled state, because it allows proton re-entry into the matrix and thus dissipates the proton gradient generated by the respiratory chain. Proton transport by UCP1 is regulated negatively by nucleotides and positively by fatty acids. Adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocytes stimulates lipolysis and therefore enhance...

  4. Simple thermodynamic model of unassisted proton shuttle uncoupling and prediction of activity from calculated speciation, lipophilicity, and molecular geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-06-21

    A mechanistic model of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by lipophilic weak acids (i.e. proton shuttles) was developed for the purposes of predicting the relative activity of xenobiotics of widely varying structure and of guiding the design of optimized derivatives. The model is based on thermodynamic premises not formulated elsewhere that allow for the calculation of steady-state conditions and of rate of energy dissipation on the basis of acid-dissociation and permeability behavior, the later estimated from partitioning behavior and geometric considerations. Moreover, permeability of either the neutral or of the ionized species is proposed to be effectively enhanced under conditions of asymmetrical molecular distribution. Finally, special considerations were developed to accommodate multi-protic compounds. The comparison of predicted to measured activity for a diverse testset of 48 compounds of natural origin spanning a wide range of activity yielded a Spearman's rho of 0.90. The model was used to tentatively identify several novel proton shuttles, as well as to elucidate core structures particularly conducive to proton shuttle activity from which optimized derivatives can be designed. Principles of design were formulated and examples of derivatives projected to be active at concentrations on the order of 10(-7)M are proposed. Among these are di-protic compounds predicted to shuttle two protons per cycle iteration and proposed to maximally exploit the proton shuttle mechanism. This work promotes the design of highly active, yet easily-metabolized uncouplers for therapeutic applications, namely the indirect activation of AMP-kinase, as well as for various industrial applications where low persistence is desirable.

  5. Production study of high specific activity NCA Re-186g by proton and deuteron cyclotron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonardi, M.L., E-mail: mauro.bonardi@mi.infn.i [L.A.S.A., Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy); Groppi, F.; Manenti, S.; Persico, E.; Gini, L. [L.A.S.A., Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, Via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Very high specific activity (A{sub S}) {sup 186g}Re could be produced by either proton or deuteron cyclotron irradiation on highly enriched {sup 186}W target in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, leading to a A{sub S} very close to the theoretical carrier free (CF) value of 6.88 GBq {mu}g{sup -1}. Thick target yields (TTYs), obtained irradiating both thick metal W targets of natural isotopic composition and highly enriched pressed powdered {sup 186}W targets, were measured at different particles energies taking into account high accuracy and precision on both yield and beam energy. The measurement of radionuclidic purity of {sup 186g}Re obtained activating highly enriched {sup 186}W by both p and d beams were also carried out and accurately compared. The excitation function as thin-target yields (tty, i.e. proportional to the reaction cross-sections) and the integrated TTYs for all Re (A=181, 182, 183, 184, 186 and their metastable levels), W and Ta co-produced radionuclides will be presented elsewhere in deep details.

  6. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  7. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors.

  8. SU-E-T-230: Measurement of Proton-Activated Positron Emission with PRESAGE 3-D Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M; Mawlawi, O; Ibbott, G [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Adamovics, J [John Adamovics, Skillman, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurement of positron emission following proton beam irradiation of a target has been studied as a method of in-vivo dosimetry. Relative dosimetry studies between a phantom and treatment plan are susceptible to range uncertainties from material heterogeneities and setup error. By using the radiochromic polyurethane dosimeter PRESAGE, we can correlate the proton dose distribution to the PET activity measurement within a single detector. The PRESAGE formulation used was developed for high-LET proton radiotherapy, has similar density and RLSP to tissue, and consists of a greater carbon component, which gives it a higher positron signal than many other 3D detectors. Methods: Three cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters were irradiated semi-uniformly to 500 cGy with 180- MeV protons. The beam was directed along the dosimeter axis and delivered a 2-cm SOBP at the center of the dosimeter. The dosimeters were rushed to a nearby PET/CT where imaging began within 15 minutes, less than a single half-life of 11C. A 3-hr measurement captured the full activation decay. Afterwards, the dose profiles were measured by optical-CT. A direct comparison between the measured dose and the positron emission was performed using CERR software. Results: The correlations between dose distributions and PET activity were consistent with previous studies in that the proximal region of the SOBP displayed the highest activity. The spatial distributions between the dose and activity were similar. Along the central axis of the beam, we found a shift in the distal 80% of 1 cm. The lateral profile showed good agreement between dose and activity. PET imaging times between 30-min and 3-hrs showed <5% discrepancy. Conclusion: PRESAGE dosimeters offer a strong and unique potential to accurately correlate dosimetric and PET activation information. Implementation in an anthropomorphic phantom could be used to study representative treatment plans. NIH grant 5R01CA100835.

  9. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  10. On active disturbance rejection in temperature regulation of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Li, Chong; Gao, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qibing

    2015-06-01

    Operating a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system to maintain the stack temperature stable is one of the key issues in PEMFC's normal electrochemical reaction process. Its temperature characteristic is easily affected by inlet gas humidity, external disturbances, and electrical load changes and so on. Because of the complexity and nonlinearity of the reaction process, it is hard to build a model totally consistent with the real characteristic of the process. If model uncertainty, external disturbances, parameters changes can be regarded as "total disturbance", which is then estimated and compensated, the accurate model is no longer required and the control design can be greatly simplified to meet the practical needs. Based on this idea, an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) with a switching law is proposed for the problem of precise temperature regulation in PEMFC. Results of the work show that the proposed control system allows the PEMFC to operate successfully at the temperature of 343 K point in the presence of two different disturbances.

  11. Characteristics of active regions associated to large solar energetic proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronarska, K.; Michalek, G.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between properties of active regions (ARs) and solar energetic particles (SEP events, protons with energy ⩾10 MeV) is examined. For this purpose we study 84 SEP events recorded during the SOHO era (1996-2014). We compare properties of these SEP events with associated ARs, flares and CMEs. The ARs are characterized by McIntosh classification. Statistical analysis demonstrates that SEP events are more likely to be associated to the ARs having complex magnetic structures and the most energetic SEPs are ejected only from the associated ARs having a large and asymmetric penumbra. This tendency is used to estimate intensities of potential SEP events. For this purpose we express a probability of occurrence of an SEP event from a given AR which is correlated with fluxes of associated SEPs. We find that SEP events associated with ARs from eastern longitudes have to be more complex to produce SEP events at Earth. On the other hand, SEP particles originating from mid-longitudes (30 ° forecasting of space weather.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of ripple filters designed for proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy with active scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourhaleb, F; Givehchi, N; Iliescu, S; Rosa, A La; Pecka, A; Peroni, C [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita' di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy); Attili, A; Cirio, R; Marchetto, F; Donetti, M; Garella, M A; Giordanengo, S; Pardo, J [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy); Cirrone, P [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, Catania 95125 (Italy)], E-mail: bourhaleb@to.infn.it

    2008-02-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams have a very sharp Bragg peak. For proton beams of energies smaller than 100 MeV, fitting with a gaussian the region of the maximum of the Bragg peak, the sigma along the beam direction is smaller than 1 mm, while for carbon ion beams, the sigma derived with the same technique is smaller than 1 mm for energies up to 360 MeV. In order to use low energy proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy and to achieve an acceptable homogeneity of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) either the peak positions along the beam have to be quite close to each other or the longitudinal peak shape needs to be broaden at least few millimeters by means of a properly designed ripple filter. With a synchrotron accelerator in conjunction with active scanning techniques the use of a ripple filter is necessary to reduce the numbers of energy switches necessary to obtain a smooth SOBP, leading also to shorter overall irradiation times. We studied the impact of the design of the ripple filter on the dose uniformity in the SOBP region by means of Monte Carlo simulations, implemented using the package Geant4. We simulated the beam delivery line supporting both proton and carbon ion beams using different energies of the beams. We compared the effect of different kind of ripple filters and their advantages.

  13. A Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyacid with excellent acid catalytic activity and proton-conducting property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujun; Peng, Qingpo; Chen, Xuenian; Wang, Ruoya; Zhai, Jianxin; Hu, Weihua; Ma, Fengji; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shuxia

    2016-11-01

    A new HPAs H20[P8W60Ta12(H2O)4(OH)8O236]·125H2O (H-1) which comprises a Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyanion, 20 protons, and 125 crystalline water molecules has been prepared through ion-exchange method. The structure and properties of H-1 have been explored in detail. AC impedance measurements indicate that H-1 is a good solid state proton conducting material at room temperature with a conductivity value of 7.2×10-3 S cm-1 (25 °C, 30% RH). Cyclic voltammograms of H-1 indicate the electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of nitrite. Hammett acidity constant H0 of H-1 in CH3CN is -2.91, which is the strongest among the present known HPAs. Relatively, H-1 exhibits excellent catalytic activities toward acetal reaction.

  14. Collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry induces intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists in the literature as to the occurrence of intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens upon collisional activation of protonated peptides and proteins. This phenomenon has important implications for the application of CID as an experimental tool to obtain site......-specific information about the incorporation of deuterium into peptides and proteins in solution. Using a unique set of peptides with their carboxyl-terminal half labeled with deuterium we have shown unambiguously that hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling is such a dominating factor during low energy collisional activation.......127, 2785-2793). Taking further advantage of this unique test system we have now investigated the influence of the charge state and collision energy on the occurrence of scrambling in protonated peptides. Our MALDI tandem time-of-flight experiments clearly demonstrate that complete positional...

  15. GDP and carboxyatractylate inhibit 4-hydroxynonenal-activated proton conductance to differing degrees in mitochondria from skeletal muscle and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Enara; Cadenas, Susana

    2010-10-01

    The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) increases the proton conductance of the inner mitochondrial membrane through effects on uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT); however, the relative contribution of the two carriers to these effects is unclear. To clarify this we isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle and heart of wild-type and Ucp3 knockout (Ucp3KO) mice. To increase UCP3 expression, some mice were i.p. injected with LPS (12mg/kg body weight). In spite of the increased UCP3 expression levels, basal proton conductance did not change. HNE increased the proton conductance of skeletal muscle and heart mitochondria. In skeletal muscle, this increase was lower in Ucp3KO mice and higher in LPS-treated wild-type mice, and was partially abolished by GDP (UCPs inhibitor) and completely abolished by carboxyatractylate (ANT inhibitor) or addition of both inhibitors. GDP had no effect on HNE-induced conductance in heart mitochondria, but carboxyatractylate or administration of both inhibitors had a partial effect. GDP-mediated inhibition of HNE-activated proton conductance in skeletal muscle mitochondria was not observed in Ucp3KO mice, indicating that GDP is specific for UCP3, at least in muscle. Carboxyatractylate was able to inhibit UCP3, probably through an indirect mechanism. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that, in skeletal muscle, HNE-induced increase in proton conductance is mediated by UCP3 (30%) and ANT, whereas in the heart the increase is mediated by ANT and other carriers, possibly including UCP3.

  16. Range degradation and distal edge behavior of proton radiotherapy beams using 11C activation and Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmekawy, Ahmed Farouk

    The distal edge of therapeutic proton radiation beams was investigated by different methods. Proton beams produced at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI) were used to irradiate a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom for three different ranges (13.5, 17.0 and 21.0 cm) to investigate the distal slope dependence of the Bragg peak. The activation of 11 C was studied by scanning the phantom less than 10 minutes post-irradiation with a Philips Big Bore Gemini(c) PET/CT. The DICOM images were imported into the Varian Eclipse(c) Treatment Planning System (TPS) for analysis and then analyzed by ImageJ(c) . The distal slope ranged from ?0.1671 +/- 0.0036 to -0.1986 +/- 0.0052 (pixel intensity/slice number) for ranges 13.5 to 21.0 cm respectively. A realistic description of the setup was modeled using the GATE 7.0 Monte Carlo simulation tool and compared to the experiment data. The results show the distal slope ranged from -0.1158+/-0.0133 to -0.0787+/-0.002 (Gy/mm). Additionally, low activity, 11C were simulated to study the 11C reconstructed half-life dependence versus the initial activity for six ranges chosen around the previous activation study. The results of the expected/nominal half-life vs. activity ranged from -5 x 10-4 +/- 2.8104 x 10-4 to 1.6 x 10-3 +/- 9.44 x 10-4 (%diff./Bq). The comparison between two experiments with proton beams on a PMMA phantom and multi-layer ion chamber, and two GATE simulations of a proton beam incident on a water phantom and 11C PET study show that: (i) the distal fall-off variation of the steepness of the slopes are found to be similar thus validating the sensitivity of the PET technique to the range degradation and (ii) the average of the super-ratios difference between all studies observed is primarily due to the difference in the dose deposited in the media.

  17. Light activation of the isomerization and deprotonation of the protonated Schiff base retinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Salazar-Salinas, Karim; Perez-Angel, Emily C; Seminario, Jorge M

    2011-10-01

    We perform an ab initio analysis of the photoisomerization of the protonated Schiff base of retinal (PSB-retinal) from 11-cis to 11-trans rotating the C10-C11=C12-C13 dihedral angle from 0° (cis) to -180° (trans). We find that the retinal molecule shows the lowest rotational barrier (0.22 eV) when its charge state is zero as compared to the barrier for the protonated molecule which is ∼0.89 eV. We conclude that rotation most likely takes place in the excited state of the deprotonated retinal. The addition of a proton creates a much larger barrier implying a switching behavior of retinal that might be useful for several applications in molecular electronics. All conformations of the retinal compound absorb in the green region with small shifts following the dihedral angle rotation; however, the Schiff base of retinal (SB-retinal) at trans-conformation absorbs in the violet region. The rotation of the dihedral angle around the C11=C12 π-bond affects the absorption energy of the retinal and the binding energy of the SB-retinal with the proton at the N-Schiff; the binding energy is slightly lower at the trans-SB-retinal than at other conformations of the retinal.

  18. Simulation of a low-background proton detector for studying low-energy resonances relevant in thermonuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Loureiro, D

    2016-01-01

    A new detector is being developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) to measure low energy charged-particles from beta-delayed particle emission. These low energy particles are very important for nuclear astrophysics studies. The use of a gaseous system instead of a solid state detector decreases the sensitivity to betas while keeping high efficiency for higher mass charged particles like protons or alphas. This low sensitivity to betas minimizes their contribution to the background down to 150 keV. A detailed simulation tool based on \\textsc{Geant4} has been developed for this future detector.

  19. Leu85 in the beta1-beta2 linker of ASIC1 slows activation and decreases the apparent proton affinity by stabilizing a closed conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianbo; Yang, Youshan; Canessa, Cecilia M

    2010-07-16

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated channels expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems where they modulate neuronal activity in response to external increases in proton concentration. The size of ASIC1 currents evoked by a given local acidification is determined by the number of channels in the plasma membrane and by the apparent proton affinities for activation and steady-state desensitization of the channel. Thus, the magnitude of the pH drop and the value of the baseline pH both are functionally important. Recent characterization of ASIC1s from an increasing number of species has made evident that proton affinities of these channels vary across vertebrates. We found that in species with high baseline plasma pH, e.g. frog, shark, and fish, ASIC1 has high proton affinity compared with the mammalian channel. The beta1-beta2 linker in the extracellular domain, specifically by the substitution M85L, determines the interspecies differences in proton affinities and also the time course of ASIC1 macroscopic currents. The mechanism underlying these observations is a delay in channel opening after application of protons, most likely by stabilizing a closed conformation that decreases the apparent affinity to protons and also slows the rise and decay phases of the current. Together, the results suggest evolutionary adaptation of ASIC1 to match the value of the species-specific plasma pH. At the molecular level, adaptation is achieved by substitutions of nonionizable residues rather than by modification of the channel proton sensor.

  20. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  1. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando-IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd-CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  2. Affecting proton mobility in activated peptide and whole protein ions via lysine guanidination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Reid, Gavin E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of lysine guanidination in peptides and proteins on the dissociation of protonated ions in the gas phase. The dissociation of guanidinated model peptide ions compared to their unmodified forms showed behavior consistent with concepts of proton mobility as a major factor in determining favored fragmentation channels. Reduction of proton mobility associated with lysine guanidination was reflected by a relative increase in cleavages occurring C-terminal to aspartic acid residues as well as increases in small molecule losses. To evaluate the effect of guanidination on the dissociation behavior of whole protein ions, bovine ubiquitin was selected as a model. Essentially, all of the amide bond cleavages associated with the +10 charge state of fully guanidinated ubiquitin were observed to occur C-terminal to aspartic acid residues, unlike the dissociation behavior of the +10 ion of the unmodified protein, where competing cleavage N-terminal to proline and nonspecific amide bond cleavages were also observed. The +8 and lower charge states of the guanidinated protein showed prominent losses of small neutral molecules. This overall fragmentation behavior is consistent with current hypotheses regarding whole protein dissociation that consider proton mobility and intramolecular charge solvation as important factors in determining favored dissociation channels, and are also consistent with the fragmentation behaviors observed for the guanidinated model peptide ions. Further evaluation of the utility of condensed phase guanidination of whole proteins is necessary but the results described here confirm that guanidination can be an effective strategy for enhancing C-terminal aspartic acid cleavages. Gas phase dissociation exclusively at aspartic acid residues, especially for whole protein ions, could be useful in identifying and characterizing proteins via tandem mass spectrometry of whole protein ions.

  3. Proton and Electron Threshold Energy Measurements for Extravehicular Activity Space Suits. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.

    2003-01-01

    Construction of ISS will require more than 1000 hours of EVA. Outside of ISS during EVA, astronauts and cosmonauts are likely to be exposed to a large fluence of electrons and protons. Development of radiation protection guidelines requires the determination of the minimum energy of electrons and protons that penetrate the suits at various locations. Measurements of the water-equivalent thickness of both US. and Russian EVA suits were obtained by performing CT scans. Specific regions of interest of the suits were further evaluated using a differential range shift technique. This technique involved measuring thickness ionization curves for 6-MeV electron and 155-MeV proton beams with ionization chambers using a constant source-to-detector distance. The thicknesses were obtained by stacking polystyrene slabs immediately upstream of the detector. The thicknesses of the 50% ionizations relative to the maximum ionizations were determined. The detectors were then placed within the suit and the stack thickness adjusted until the 50% ionization was reestablished. The difference in thickness between the 50% thicknesses was then used with standard range-energy tables to determine the threshold energy for penetration. This report provides a detailed description of the experimental arrangement and results.

  4. Study of the unbound proton-rich nucleus $^{21}$Al with resonance elastic and inelastic scattering using an active target

    CERN Multimedia

    We intend to measure the structure of the unbound nucleus $^{21}$Al via resonance elastic and inelastic scattering with an active target. There are many goals: \\\\ a) to locate the 1/2$^{+}$ level in $^{21}$Al that brings information on the Thomas-Ehrman shift, \\\\ b) to measure the energy spectrum of $^{21}$Al which is a N=8 isotone with the resonance elastic scattering reaction, \\\\ c) to investigate via inelastic scattering the strength of core excitations in the existence of narrow unbound resonances beyond the proton drip-line.

  5. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Images related to Proton Therapy Videos related to Proton Therapy Sponsored by Please ...

  6. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Hikosaka, Koki

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  7. [Effects of palmitic acid on activity of uncoupling proteins and proton leak in in vitro cerebral mitochondria from the rats exposed to simulated high altitude hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Jun-Ze; Xia, Chen

    2008-02-25

    To reveal the roles of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation induced by free fatty acid during hypoxic exposure, the effects of palmitic acid on activity of UCPs, proton leak and mitochondrial membrane potential in hypoxia-exposed rat brain mitochondria were observed in vitro. Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were set randomly into control, acute hypoxia and chronic hypoxia groups (n=8 in each group). The acute and chronic hypoxic rats were exposed to simulated 5000 m high altitude in a hypobaric chamber 23 h/d for 3 d and 30 d, respectively. The brain mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation. UCP content and activity were detected by [(3)H]-GTP binding method. The proton leak was measured by TPMP(+) electrode and oxygen electrode. The membrane potential of mitochondria was calculated by detecting the fluorescence from Rodamine 123. Hypoxic exposure resulted in an increase in UCP activity and content as well as proton leak, but a decrease in the membrane potential of rat brain mitochondria. Palmitic acid resulted in further increases in UCP activity and content as well as proton leak, and further decrease in membrane potential of brain mitochondria in vitro from hypoxia-exposed rats, but hypoxic exposure decreased the reactivity of cerebral mitochondria to palmitic acid, especially in the acute hypoxia group. There was a negative correlation between mitochondrial proton leak and K(d) value (representing derivative of UCP activity, PB(max) (representing the maximal content of UCPs in mitochondrial inner membrane, P<0.01, r = 0.856). Cerebral mitochondrial membrane potential was negatively correlated with proton leak (P<0.01, r = -0.880). It is suggested that hypoxia-induced proton leak enhancement and membrane potential decrease are correlated with the increased activity of UCPs. Hypoxia can also decrease the sensitivity of cerebral mitochondria to palmitic acid, which may be a self-protective mechanism in high altitude

  8. Resonance scattering of 12C nuclei on protons in the Maya active target

    CERN Document Server

    Khodery, Mohammad

    This work is related to the realm of exotic nuclei. These are nuclei that exist far from the valley of stability. Study of these nuclei introduced many interesting phenomena and changed our understanding about the nuclear structure. As exotic nuclei are very short lived, their study has to be at the time of their production using radioactive beams of the exotic nuclei. The goal of the experiment was to study the $^{13}$Be low-lying energy levels. The experiment was performed at ISOLDE at CERN as $^{12}$Be beams are produced at this facility with suitable intensity and energy. The method used to study $^{13}$Be was elastic resonance reactions. This is a powerful tool to study unbound states. This thesis concentrates on the $^{12}$C nuclei that are present in the beam as isobaric contamination. $^{12}$C in the beam is scattered on the protons which is the target. The protons are introduced in the form of isobutene gas. The aim of this work is to prove the principle of the technique of elastic resonance scatteri...

  9. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of $^{51,48}$Cr, $^{48}$V, $^{48,47,46,44m,44g,43}$Sc and $^{43,42}$K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  10. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react to their co......Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  11. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  12. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium up to 70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkanyi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Takacs, S.; Ditroi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Kiraly, B. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)], E-mail: kiralyb@atomki.hu; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-01

    Cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium were measured up to 70 MeV by using the standard stacked foil irradiation technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Experimental cross sections and derived integral yields are reported for the first time for the {sup nat}Yb(p,xn){sup 173,172mg,171mg,170,167}Lu, {sup nat}Yb(p,x){sup 175cum,166cum}Yb and {sup nat}Yb(p,x){sup 173ind,172ind,168,167cum,165cum}Tm reactions. No earlier experimental cross section data were found in the literature. The experimental data were compared to and analyzed with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE. Production routes of medical radioisotope {sup 167}Tm are discussed.

  13. Experimental observation of $\\beta$-delayed neutrons from $^{9}$Li as a way to study short-pulse laser-driven deuteron production

    CERN Document Server

    Favalli, Andrea; Henzlova, Daniela; Falk, Katerina; Croft, Stephen; Gautier, Donald C; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Iliev, Metodi; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Roth, Markus; Fernandez, Juan C; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2016-01-01

    A short-pulse laser-driven deuteron beam is generated in the relativistic transparency regime and aimed at a beryllium converter to generate neutrons at the TRIDENT laser facility. These prompt neutrons have been used for active interrogation to detect nuclear materials, the first such demonstration of a laser-driven neutron source. During the experiments, delayed neutrons from $^9$Li decay was observed. It was identified by its characteristic half-life of 178.3 ms. Production is attributed to the nuclear reactions $^9$Be(d,2p)$^9$Li and $^9$Be(n,p)$^9$Li inside the beryllium converter itself. These reactions have energy thresholds of 18.42 and 14.26 MeV respectively, and we estimate the (d,2p) reaction to be the dominant source of $^9$Li production. Therefore, only the higher-energy portion of the deuteron spectrum contributes to the production of the delayed neutrons. It was observed that the delayed-neutron yield decreases with increasing distance between the converter and the deuteron source. This behavio...

  14. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  15. Investigation of activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on indium up to 70 MeV for practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Excitation functions were measured for production of the $^{113,111,110}$Sn, $^{115m,114m,113m,112m,111g,110g}$In and $^{111m,109}$Cd radioisotopes by bombardment of In targets with proton beams up to 70 MeV, some of them for the first time. The new results are compared with the earlier experimental data and with the theoretical data in the TENDL-2014 (Talys1.6 based) library. Thick target yields were deduced and application of the new data for production of medically relevant $^{110m}$In, $^{111g}$In, $^{113m}$In and $^{114m}$In, as well as applicability for thin layer activation (TLA) are discussed.

  16. Acidosis activation of the proton-sensing GPR4 receptor stimulates vascular endothelial cell inflammatory responses revealed by transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixue Dong

    Full Text Available Acidic tissue microenvironment commonly exists in inflammatory diseases, tumors, ischemic organs, sickle cell disease, and many other pathological conditions due to hypoxia, glycolytic cell metabolism and deficient blood perfusion. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to the acidic microenvironment are not well understood. GPR4 is a proton-sensing receptor expressed in endothelial cells and other cell types. The receptor is fully activated by acidic extracellular pH but exhibits lesser activity at the physiological pH 7.4 and minimal activity at more alkaline pH. To delineate the function and signaling pathways of GPR4 activation by acidosis in endothelial cells, we compared the global gene expression of the acidosis response in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC with varying level of GPR4. The results demonstrated that acidosis activation of GPR4 in HUVEC substantially increased the expression of a number of inflammatory genes such as chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, NF-κB pathway genes, and prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX-2 and stress response genes such as ATF3 and DDIT3 (CHOP. Similar GPR4-mediated acidosis induction of the inflammatory genes was also noted in other types of endothelial cells including human lung microvascular endothelial cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Further analyses indicated that the NF-κB pathway was important for the acidosis/GPR4-induced inflammatory gene expression. Moreover, acidosis activation of GPR4 increased the adhesion of HUVEC to U937 monocytic cells under a flow condition. Importantly, treatment with a recently identified GPR4 antagonist significantly reduced the acidosis/GPR4-mediated endothelial cell inflammatory response. Taken together, these results show that activation of GPR4 by acidosis stimulates the expression of a wide range of inflammatory genes in endothelial cells. Such inflammatory response can be

  17. Mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP activates proton conductance but does not block store-operated Ca(2+) current in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Minh-Son; Aromataris, Edoardo C; Castro, Joel; Roberts, Michael L; Barritt, Greg J; Rychkov, Grigori Y

    2010-03-15

    Uncouplers of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, including carbonilcyanide p-triflouromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and carbonilcyanide m-cholorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), are widely used in experimental research to investigate the role of mitochondria in cellular function. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to interpret the results obtained in intact cells using FCCP and CCCP, as these agents not only inhibit mitochondrial potential, but may also affect membrane potential and cell volume. Here we show by whole-cell patch clamping that in primary rat hepatocytes and H4IIE liver cells, FCCP induced large proton currents across the plasma membrane, but did not activate any other observable conductance. In intact hepatocytes FCCP inhibits thapsigargin-activated store-operated Ca(2+) entry, but in patch clamping under the conditions of strong Ca(2+) buffering it has no effect on store-operated Ca(2+) current (I(SOC)). These results indicate that there is no direct connection between mitochondria and activation of I(SOC) in liver cells and support the notion of indirect regulation of I(SOC) by mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering.

  18. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI 5232 (Switzerland); Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  19. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K [University of Pennsylvania, Sicklerville, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  20. Highly Stable and Active Pt/Nb-TiO2 Carbon-Free Electrocatalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are not sufficiently durable for commercial deployment. One of the major challenges lies in the development of an inexpensive, efficient, and highly durable and active electrocatalyst. Here a new type of carbon-free Pt/Nb-TiO2 electrocatalyst has been reported. Mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres were synthesized by the sol-gel method using polystyrene (PS sphere templates. Pt nanoparticles (NPs were then deposited onto mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres via a simple wet-chemical route in aqueous solution, without the need for surfactants or potentiostats. The growth densities of Pt NPs on Nb-TiO2 supports could be easily modulated by simply adjusting the experimental parameters. Electrochemical studies of Pt/Nb-TiO2 show much enhanced activity and stability than commercial E-TEK Pt/C catalyst. PtNP/Nb-TiO2 is a promising new cathode catalyst for PEMFC applications.

  1. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  2. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J., E-mail: jad.farah@irsn.fr; Trompier, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Pôle Radioprotection de l’Homme, BP17, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92260 (France); Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C. [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Trinkl, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching 85748 (Germany); Dufek, V. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoškova 28, Prague 140 00 (Czech Republic); Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Kubancak, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  3. The role of proton mobility in determining the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation channels of N-glycopeptide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Venkata; Roth, Heidi A; De La Cruz, Gabriela; Fernando, Ganga S; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-10-01

    Site-specific glycoproteomic analysis largely hinges on the use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to identify glycopeptides. Experiments of this type are usually aimed at drawing connections between individual oligosaccharide structures and their specific sites of attachment to the polypeptide chain. These determinations inherently require ion dissociation methods capable of interrogating both the monosaccharide and amino acid connectivity of the glycopeptide. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) shows potential to satisfy this requirement, as the vibrational activation/dissociation of protonated N-glycopeptides has been observed to access cleavage of either glycosidic bonds of the glycan or amide bonds of the peptide in an energy-resolved manner. Nevertheless, the relative energy requirement for these fragmentation pathways varies considerably among analytes. This research addresses the influence of proton mobility on the vibrational energy necessary to achieve either glycan or peptide cleavage in a collection of protonated N-glycopeptide ions. While greater proton mobility of the precursor ion was found to correlate with lower energy requirements for precursor ion depletion and appearance of glycosidic fragments, the vibrational energy deposition necessary for appearance of peptide backbone fragments showed no relation to the precursor ion proton mobility. These results are consistent with observations suggesting that peptide fragments arise from an intermediate fragment which is generally of lower proton mobility than the precursor ion. Such findings have potential to facilitate the rational selection of CID conditions which are best suited to provide either glycan or peptide cleavage products in MS/MS based N-glycoproteomic analysis.

  4. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J; Trompier, F [IRSN - Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M [Trento Proton Therapy Center, Trento (Italy); Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Dufek, V [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Frojdh, E; George, S [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Harrison, R [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Kubancak, J; Ploc, O [Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez (Czech Republic); Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  5. Measurement of activation reaction rate distributions in a lead assembly bombarded with 500-MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, H; Sasa, T; Tsujimoto, K; Yasuda, H

    2000-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co, /sup 197/Au(n,2n)/sup 196/Au, and /sup 197/Au(n,4n)/sup 194/Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code. (32 refs).

  6. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  7. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  8. Structure of a potentially open state of a proton-activated pentameric ligand-gated ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilf, Ricarda J C; Dutzler, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    The X-ray structure of a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) has recently provided structural insight into this family of ion channels at high resolution. The structure shows a homo-pentameric protein with a barrel-stave architecture that defines an ion-conduction pore located on the fivefold axis of symmetry. In this structure, the wide aqueous vestibule that is encircled by the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the five subunits narrows to a discontinuous pore that spans the lipid bilayer. The pore is constricted by bulky hydrophobic residues towards the extracellular side, which probably serve as barriers that prevent the diffusion of ions. This interrupted pore architecture in ELIC thus depicts a non-conducting conformation of a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel, the thermodynamically stable state in the absence of bound ligand. As ligand binding promotes pore opening in these ion channels and the specific ligand for ELIC has not yet been identified, we have turned our attention towards a homologous protein from the cyanobacterium Gloebacter violaceus (GLIC). GLIC was shown to form proton-gated channels that are activated by a pH decrease on the extracellular side and that do not desensitize after activation. Both prokaryotic proteins, ELIC and GLIC form ion channels that are selective for cations over anions with poor discrimination among monovalent cations, characteristics that resemble the conduction properties of the cation-selective branch of the family that includes acetylcholine and serotonin receptors. Here we present the X-ray structure of GLIC at 3.1 A resolution. The structure reveals a conformation of the channel that is distinct from ELIC and that probably resembles the open state. In combination, both structures suggest a novel gating mechanism for pentameric ligand-gated ion channels where channel opening proceeds by a change in the tilt of the pore-forming helices.

  9. Probing the putative active site of YjdL: an unusual proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter from E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Mørch Jensen

    Full Text Available YjdL from E. coli is an unusual proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT. Unlike prototypical POTs, dipeptides are preferred over tripeptides, in particular dipeptides with a positively charged C-terminal residue. To further understand this difference in peptide specificity, the sequences of YjdL and YdgR, a prototypical E. coli POT, were compared in light of the crystal structure of a POT from Shewanella oneidensis. Several residues found in the putative active site were mutated and the activities of the mutated variants were assessed in terms of substrate uptake assays, and changes in specificity in terms of uptake inhibition. Most strikingly, changing the YjdL specific Asp392 to the conserved Ser in YjdL obliterated the preference for a positively charged C-terminal residue. Based on this unique finding and previously published results indicating that the dipeptide N-terminus may interact with Glu388, a preliminary orientation model of a dipeptide in the YjdL cavity is presented. Single site mutations of particularly Ala281 and Trp278 support the presented orientation. A dipeptide bound in the cavity of YjdL appears to be oriented such that the N-terminal side chain protrudes into a sub pocket that opens towards the extracellular space. The C-terminal side chain faces in the opposite direction into a sub pocket that faces the cytoplasm. These data indicated a stabilizing effect on a bulky N-terminal residue by an Ala281Phe variant and on the dipeptide backbone by Trp278. In the presented orientation model, Tyr25 and Tyr58 both appear to be in proximity of the dipeptide backbone while Lys117 appears to be in proximity of the peptide C-terminus. Mutational studies of these conserved residues highlight their functional importance.

  10. Persistent activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bone marrow cells after exposure of mice to protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Reungpatthanaphong, Paiboon; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    Protons are the most abundant component of solar particle events (SPEs) in space. Information is limited on early-and late-occurring in vivo biological effects of exposure to protons at doses and dose rates that are similar to what astronauts encounter in space. We conducted a study series to fill this knowledge gap. We focused on the biological effects of 100 MeV/n protons, which are one of the most abundant types of protons induced during SPEs. We gave BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0.5 or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV/n protons, delivered at 0.5 or 1.0 cGy/min. These doses and dose rates of protons were selected because they are comparable to those of SPEs taking place in space. For each dose and dose rate of 100 MeV/n protons, mice exposed to 0 Gy of protons served as sham controls. Mice included in this study were also part of a study series conducted to examine the extent and the mechanisms involved in in vivo induction of genomic instability (expressed as late-occurring chromosome instability) by 100 MeV/n protons. Bone marrow (BM) cells were collected from groups of mice for analyses at different times post-exposure, i.e. early time-points (1.5, 3, and 24 hr) and late time-points (1 and 6 months). At each harvest time, there were five mice per treatment group. Several endpoints were used to investigate the biological effects of 100 MeV/n protons in BM cells from irradiated and sham control mice. The scope of this study was to determine the dose-rate effects of 0.5 Gy of 100 MeV/n protons in BM cells on the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation and the expression of selected NF-kappa B target proteins known to be involved in inflammatory response, i.e. pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6). Significantly high levels (p values ranging from p¡0.01 and p¡0.05) of activated NF-kappa B were observed in BM cells collected from irradiated mice, relative to those obtained from the corresponding sham controls, at all time

  11. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  12. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression.

  13. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natTl up to 42 MeV: review, new data and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Adam-Rebeles, R; Walravens, N; Cichelli, O; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural thallium have been studied for investigation of the production of the medical important 201Tl diagnostic radioisotope. The excitation functions of 204mPb, 203Pb, 202mPb, 201Pb, 200Pb, 199Pb, 202Tl (direct, cumulative), 201Tl (direct, cumulative), 200Tl(direct), and 203Hg were measured up to 42 MeV proton energy by stacked foil technique and activation method. The experimental data were compared with the critically analyzed experimental data in the literature, with the IAEA recommended data and with the results of model calculations by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  14. Dose-rate effects of protons on in vivo activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rithidech, K.N.; Rusek, A.; Reungpatthanaphong, P.; Honikel, L.; Simon, S.R.

    2010-05-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation and cytokine expression in bone marrow (BM) cells of exposed mice as a function of the dose rate of protons. The cytokines included in this study are pro-inflammatory [i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), and IL-6] and anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-10). We gave male BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0 (sham-controls) or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV protons, delivered at 5 or 10 mGy min{sup -1}, the dose and dose rates found during solar particle events in space. As a reference radiation, groups of mice were exposed to 0 (sham-controls) or 1 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays (10 mGy min{sup -1}). After irradiation, BM cells were collected at 1.5, 3, 24 h, and 1 month for analyses (five mice per treatment group per harvest time). The results indicated that the in vivo time course of effects induced by a single dose of 1 Gy of 100 MeV protons or {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, delivered at 10 mGy min{sup -1}, was similar. Although statistically significant levels of NF-{kappa}B activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in BM cells of exposed mice when compared to those in the corresponding sham controls (Student's t-test, p < 0.05 or < 0.01) were induced by either dose rate, these levels varied over time for each protein. Further, only a dose rate of 5 mGy min{sup -1} induced significant levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The results indicate dose-rate effects of protons.

  15. Synthesis, Coordination Chemistry, and Cooperative Activation of H2 with Ruthenium Complexes of ProtonResponsive METAMORPhos Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Terrade; M. Lutz; J.I. van der Vlugt; J.N.H. Reek

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic scope of proton-responsive sulfonamidophosphorus (METAMORPhos) ligands is expanded and design principles for the selective formation of particular tautomers, ion pairs, or double condensation products are elucidated. These systems have been introduced in the coordination sphere of Ru f

  16. Synthesis, coordination chemistry, and cooperative activation of H 2 with ruthenium complexes of proton-responsive METAMORPhos ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terrade, Frédéric G.; Lutz, Martin; Van Der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic scope of proton-responsive sulfonamidophosphorus (METAMORPhos) ligands is expanded and design principles for the selective formation of particular tautomers, ion pairs, or double condensation products are elucidated. These systems have been introduced in the coordination sphere of Ru f

  17. Tuning the activity of glutathione peroxidase mimics through intramolecular Se···N,O interactions: a DFT study incorporating solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayse, Craig A; Pavlou, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Diaryl diselenide mimics of the antioxidant selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase (GPx) often incorporate intramolecular Se···N,O interactions to enhance their GPx-like activity. Although the strength of the interaction is defined by the Lewis basicity of the donating group and the strength of the Se-X bond, there is not a clear relationship between the interaction and the GPx-like activity. Density-functional theory and natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations are used to show the range of Se···N,O interactions for various functional groups. The strongest interactions are found for groups which stabilize the donor-acceptor interaction through aromatic stabilization. The activation barriers for the GPx-like mechanism of activity of several substituted areneselenols are calculated using DFT and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a technique that incorporates networks of solvent molecules into the theoretical model to facilitate proton transfer between sites in the reactant and product. DFT-SAPE models show that, in addition to decreasing the barrier to oxidation of the selenol, Se···N,O interactions generally increase the barriers for selenenic acid reduction and selenol regeneration because the Se···N,O interaction must be broken for the reaction to proceed. Calculated activation barriers for the rate-determining step are consistent with the relative experimental GPx-like activities of a series of diaryl diselenides.

  18. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M. -J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  19. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attili, A; Vignati, A; Giordanengo, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Torino, Torino (Italy); Kraan, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dalmasso, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Torino, Torino (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Torino, Torino (Italy); Battistoni, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET-activity

  20. Activation cross-sections of longer lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on manganese up to 70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: •Experimental excitation function of proton induced reactions on manganese up to 70 MeV. •Model code calculations with EMPIRE-3 and TALYS (TENDL-2012). •Integral production yield calculation. •Thin Layer Activation (TLA) curves for {sup 54}Mn and {sup 51}Cr. •Tabulated experimental results. -- Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of the proton induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the {sup 55}Mn(p,x){sup 54,52g}Mn, {sup 51}Cr and {sup 48}V were measured up to 70 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using the stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental data are analyzed and compared to the earlier results and to the prediction of the EMPIRE-3 as well as the TALYS theoretical model code in the TENDL-2012 library. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated. Practical applications of the cross-sections e.g. for thin layer activation are discussed.

  1. $\\beta$- decay of the proton-rich T$_{z} = -1/2$ nucleus, $^{71}$Kr

    CERN Document Server

    Oinonen, M; Äystö, J; Baumann, P; Didierjean, François; Honkanen, J A; Huck, A; Huyse, M; Knipper, A; Marguier, G; Novikov, Yu N; Popov, A; Ramdhane, M; Seliverstov, D M; Van Duppen, P; Walter, G

    1997-01-01

    $\\beta$- decay of the T$_{z}$ = - 1/2 nuclide $^{71}$Kr has been studied at the ISOLDE PSB Facility at CERN. $^{71}$Kr ions were produced in spallation reactions in a Nb foil using the 1 GeV proton beam and studied by means of $\\beta$-delayed proton, $\\beta$- and $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. The half-life and the $\\beta$-decay energy of $^{71}$Kr were determined using the decay of protons and positrons. These results: T$_{1/2}$ = 100 ± 3 ms and $Q_\\textrm{EC}$ = 10$^{14}$ ± 0.32 MeV and the first observation of the b-branch to the 207 keV level in $^{71}$Br makes the extension of the systematics of Gamow-Teller matrix elements of mirror nuclei up to A = 71 possible. Gamow-Teller strength of the same magnitude as that of the $fp$-shell mirror nuclei is observed for the ground state transition.

  2. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  3. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-01

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame 1H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  4. CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, M; Wang, Z B; Li, J S; Tang, H L; Liu, W J; Wang, Y G

    2014-12-10

    Rapid degradation of cell performance still remains a significant challenge for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this work, we develop novel CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide nanocomposites as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell. We show that the use of CeO2 as the radical scavenger in the catalysts remarkably improves the durability of the catalyst. The catalytic activity retention of Pt-graphene oxide-8 wt.% CeO2 nanocomposites reaches as high as 69% after 5000 CV-cycles at a high voltage range of 0.8-1.23 V, in contrast to 19% for that of the Pt-graphene oxide composites. The excellent durability of the Pt-CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide catalyst is attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of CeO2, which significantly slows down the chemical degradation of Nafion binder in catalytic layers, and then alleviates the decay of Pt catalysts, resulting in the excellent cycle life of Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide nanocomposite catalysts. Additionally, the performance of single cell assembled with Nafion 211 membrane and Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide catalysts with different CeO2 contents in the cathode as well as the Pt-C catalysts in the anode are also recorded and discussed in this study.

  5. Changes of plasma membrane ATPase activity,membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in Kandelia candel and Avicennia marina seedlings with various salinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhong-qiu; ZHENG Hai-lei; ZHU Yong-guan

    2004-01-01

    The salt-secreting mangrove, Avicennia marina, and non-salt-secreting mangrove, Kandelia candel were cultivated in sand with various salinities(0 ‰, 10 ‰, 20 ‰, 30 ‰, 40 ‰) for 60 d. Plasma membrane vesicles of high-purity in leaves and roots of A.marina and K. candel seedlings were obtained by two-phase partitioning. The function of the plasma membranes, the activity of ATPase, membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient, at various salinities were investigated. The results showed that within a certain range of salinity(A. marina and roots of K. candel: 0-30‰;leaves of K.candel: 0-20‰), the activity of ATPase increased with increasing salinity, while high salinity(above 30‰ or 20‰) inhibited ATPase activity. In comparison with A. marina, K. candel appeared to be more sensitive to salinity. The dynamics of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in leaves and roots of A. marina and K. candel seedlings were similar to that of ATPase. When treated directly by NaCl all the indexes were inhibited markedly: there was a little increase within 0-10‰(K. candel) or 0-20‰(A. marina) followed by sharp declining. It indicated that the structure and function of plasma membrane was damaged severely.

  6. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  7. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  8. Measurements of the Backstreaming Proton IONS in the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) Diode Utilizing Copper Activation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarakis, Michael; Cuneo, Michael; Fournier, Sean; Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Leckbee, Joshua; Simpson, Sean; Renk, Timothy; Webb, Timothy; Bennett, Nichelle

    2016-10-01

    The results presented here were obtained with an SMP diode mounted at the front high voltage end of the 8-10-MV RITS Self-Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line (MITL) voltage adder. Our experiments had two objectives: first, to measure the contribution of the back-streaming proton currents emitted from the anode target, and second, to evaluate the energy of those ions and hence the actual Anode-Cathode (A-K) gap voltage. The accelerating voltage quoted in the literature is estimated utilizing para-potential flow theories. Thus, it is interesting to have another independent measurement of the A-K voltage. We have measured the back-streaming protons emitted from the anode and propagating through a hollow cathode tip for various diode configurations and different techniques of target cleaning treatment, namely, heating at very high temperatures with DC and pulsed current, with RF plasma cleaning, and with both plasma cleaning and heating. We have also evaluated the A-K gap voltage by energy filtering techniques. Sandia is operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE NNSA under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Organic ammonium ion-occluded flexible coordination polymers:Thermal activation,structure transformation and proton transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Solvothermal reactions of 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3btc) with cadmium acetate or zinc acetate yielded two compounds formulated as (Me2NH2)[Cd(btc)]·DMA (1) (btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide) and (Me2NH2)[Zn(btc)]·DMF (2) (DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide). Both are 3-D frameworks with the rutile topology, which are constructed from six-connected dimeric metal cores and three-connected btc linkers. The solvent molecules and counter cations are located in the 1-D channels of the frameworks. A slight difference between the two compounds is the different connectivity modes of the metal atoms with the carboxylate groups of the ligands. However, this slight difference results in distinct flexibilities of the two frameworks. Variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the framework of 1 collapses when heated at 180 °C with loss of the guest species, but compound 2 undergoes two structural transformations below 380 °C. Thermogravimetry-infrared spectroscopy analysis for 2 showed that the two structural transformations are induced by separate losses of solvent molecules and counter cations, and that the dimethylammonium cations are eliminated as neutral dimethylamine molecules. IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the protons are transferred from the counter cations onto the uncoordinated carboxylate oxygen atoms on the channel walls. Sorption and proton conduction studies have also been performed for the compounds.

  10. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules.

  11. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  12. Conserved phosphoryl transfer mechanisms within kinase families and the role of the C8 proton of ATP in the activation of phosphoryl transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Colin P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinome is made up of a large number of functionally diverse enzymes, with the classification indicating very little about the extent of the conserved kinetic mechanisms associated with phosphoryl transfer. It has been demonstrated that C8-H of ATP plays a critical role in the activity of a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. Results A number of conserved mechanisms within the prescribed kinase fold families have been identified directly utilizing the C8-H of ATP in the initiation of phosphoryl transfer. These mechanisms are based on structurally conserved amino acid residues that are within hydrogen bonding distance of a co-crystallized nucleotide. On the basis of these conserved mechanisms, the role of the nucleotide C8-H in initiating the formation of a pentavalent intermediate between the γ-phosphate of the ATP and the substrate nucleophile is defined. All reactions can be clustered into two mechanisms by which the C8-H is induced to be labile via the coordination of a backbone carbonyl to C6-NH2 of the adenyl moiety, namely a "push" mechanism, and a "pull" mechanism, based on the protonation of N7. Associated with the "push" mechanism and "pull" mechanisms are a series of proton transfer cascades, initiated from C8-H, via the tri-phosphate backbone, culminating in the formation of the pentavalent transition state between the γ-phosphate of the ATP and the substrate nucleophile. Conclusions The "push" mechanism and a "pull" mechanism are responsible for inducing the C8-H of adenyl moiety to become more labile. These mechanisms and the associated proton transfer cascades achieve the proton transfer via different family-specific conserved sets of amino acids. Each of these mechanisms would allow for the regulation of the rate of formation of the pentavalent intermediate between the ATP and the substrate nucleophile. Phosphoryl transfer within kinases is therefore a specific event mediated and regulated via the

  13. BiOBr/protonated graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunctions: Intimate interfaces by electrostatic interaction and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhichong; Li, Jun; Cheng, Fuxing [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, 928 Second Avenue, Xiasha Higher Education Zone, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Zhi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, 258 Xueyuan Street, Xiasha Higher Education Zone, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Dong, Xiaoping, E-mail: xpdong@zstu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, 928 Second Avenue, Xiasha Higher Education Zone, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by an electrostatically-driven in-situ growth method. • BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} exhibited a superior visible-light activity and stability. • The efficient separation of charges due to the intimate interface of BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this work, enhanced photocatalytic activity of BiOBr/graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunctions for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) were obtained by the protonation pretreatment of graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with hydrochloric acid. A possibly electrostatic interaction between protonated graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and BiOBr provided a closely intimate interface in the heterojunction, which was demonstrated by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This tight coupling was favorable for the charge transfer between pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BiOBr, and therefore promoted the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole pairs. The effect of composition in heterojunctions on photocatalytic activity was investigated, and the optimal photocatalyst with a BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} mass ratio of 7:3 showed a superior activity, which was 35.03 and 33.72 times higher than that over pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BiOBr, respectively. Radical trap experiments confirmed that the holes and superoxide radical species were the main reactive species in the RhB photodegradation process. Moreover, the stability of BiOBr/pg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunction was also tested and the RhB degradation efficiency declined by only 9.6% after seven successive cycles.

  14. Modeling the cathode in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using density functional theory How the carbon support can affect durability and activity of a platinum catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Michael Nelson

    The current global energy and environmental challenges need to be addressed by developing a new portfolio of clean power producing devices. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell has the potential to be included and can fit into a variety of niches ranging from portable electronics to stationary residential applications. One of the many barriers to commercial viability is the cost of the cathode layer which requires too much platinum metal to achieve a comparable power output as well as would need to be replaced more frequently when compared to conventional sources for most applications. Using density functional theory, an ab initio modeling technique, these durability and activity issues are examined for platinum catalysts on graphene and carbon nanotube supports. The carbon supports were also doped by replacing individual carbon atoms with other second row elements (beryllium, boron, nitrogen, and oxygen) and the effect on the platinum-surface interaction along with the interaction between the platinum and the oxygen reduction reaction intermediates are discussed. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cell, density functional theory, platinum catalyst, oxygen reduction reaction, doped carbon surfaces

  15. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  16. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  17. Experimental and computational X-ray emission spectroscopy as a direct probe of protonation states in oxo-bridged Mn(IV) dimers relevant to redox-active metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Boron, Thaddeus T; Krewald, Vera; Kern, Jan; Beckwith, Martha A; Delgado-Jaime, Mario U; Schroeder, Henning; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Neese, Frank; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; DeBeer, Serena; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Yano, Junko

    2013-11-18

    The protonation state of oxo bridges in nature is of profound importance for a variety of enzymes, including the Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II and the Mn2O2 cluster in Mn catalase. A set of dinuclear bis-μ-oxo-bridged Mn(IV) complexes in different protonation states was studied by Kβ emission spectroscopy to form the foundation for unraveling the protonation states in the native complex. The valence-to-core regions (valence-to-core XES) of the spectra show significant changes in intensity and peak position upon protonation. DFT calculations were performed to simulate the valence-to-core XES spectra and to assign the spectral features to specific transitions. The Kβ(2,5) peaks arise primarily from the ligand 2p to Mn 1s transitions, with a characteristic low energy shoulder appearing upon oxo-bridge protonation. The satellite Kβ" peak provides a more direct signature of the protonation state change, since the transitions originating from the 2s orbitals of protonated and unprotonated μ-oxo bridges dominate this spectral region. The energies of the Kβ" features differ by ~3 eV and thus are well resolved in the experimental spectra. Additionally, our work explores the chemical resolution limits of the method, namely, whether a mixed (μ-O)(μ-OH2) motif can be distinguished from a symmetric (μ-OH)2 one. The results reported here highlight the sensitivity of Kβ valence-to-core XES to single protonation state changes of bridging ligands, and form the basis for further studies of oxo-bridged polymetallic complexes and metalloenzyme active sites. In a complementary paper, the results from X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the same Mn(IV) dimer series are discussed.

  18. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of $^{161}$Er and $^{160}$Er medical isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65 MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of $^{161}$Er, $^{160}$Er and $^{159,157}$Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related $^{161}$Er and $^{160}$Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the $^{162}$Er(p,x)$^{161,160}$Er and $^{162}$Er(d,x)$^{161,160}$Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  19. Study of activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on barium: Production of {sup 131}Ba{yields}{sup 131}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkanyi, F.; Ditroi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Kiraly, B., E-mail: kiralyb@atomki.h [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of the therapeutic radioisotope {sup 131}Cs, excitation functions of the {sup nat}Ba(p,x){sup 135,132mg}La, {sup ind135m,cum133m,cum133mg,cum131mg}Ba and {sup 136mg,134mg,132,cum129}Cs reactions were measured in the 30-70 MeV energy range using stacked foil irradiation technique, activation method and gamma spectroscopy. Comparisons with new results of the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II codes and with existing data obtained with TALYS code are shown. From the measured cross section data integral yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. Potential use of proton induced reactions on Ba for production of {sup 131}Cs is discussed.

  20. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  1. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  2. {beta} decay of the proton-rich T{sub z}={minus}1/2 nucleus, {sup 71}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oinonen, M.; Aeystoe, J.; Honkanen, A. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Jokinen, A.; Aeystoe, J. [CERN, PPE Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Baumann, P.; Didierjean, F.; Huck, A.; Knipper, A.; Ramdhane, M.; Walter, G. [CRN, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Louis Pasteur, B.P. 28, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, University of Leuve n, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Marguier, G. [IPN, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard, F-69622 Villeurb anne (France); Novikov, Y.; Popov, A.; Seliverstov, D.M. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188350 St. Pete rsburg, Russia] [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    1997-08-01

    {beta} decay of the T{sub z}={minus}1/2 nuclide {sup 71}Kr has been studied at the ISOLDE PSB Facility at CERN. {sup 71}Kr ions were produced in spallation reactions in a Nb foil using the 1 GeV proton beam and studied by means of {beta}-delayed proton, {beta}- and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The half-life and the {beta}-decay energy of {sup 71}Kr were determined using the decay of protons and positrons. These results: T{sub 1/2}=100{plus_minus}3ms and Q{sub EC}=10.14{plus_minus}0.32MeV and the first observation of the {beta} branch to the 207 keV level in {sup 71}Br makes the extension of the systematics of Gamow-Teller matrix elements of mirror nuclei up to A=71 possible. The Gamow-Teller strength of the same magnitude as that of the fp-shell mirror nuclei is observed for the ground-state transition. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  4. Gas-silicon detector telescope for charged particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honkanen, A.; Oinonen, M.; Aeystoe, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Eskola, K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Phys.; Jokinen, A. [PPE Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ISOLDE Collaboration

    1997-08-11

    A gas-silicon detector telescope for charged particle spectroscopy has been constructed and tested. The lower detection limits were determined to be 155 keV for protons, 180 keV for deuterons and 350 keV for alpha particles. Typical energy resolution of the telescope measured for beta-delayed protons is 20 keV. Time resolution for the signals of the telescope was measured to be less than 10 ns. Examples of using the detector telescope in detection of beta-delayed proton activities are presented. (orig.).

  5. Noncoplanarity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, RGE; Gibson, BF; Li, Y; Liou, MK

    2002-01-01

    Using the soft-photon approximation, we address the issue of the importance of noncoplanarity effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung, We investigate the noncoplanar cross section as a function of the noncoplanarity angle (φ) over bar for the entire range of the photon polar angle psi(gamma). The (φ

  6. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  7. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  8. Structure of Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2003-01-01

    Electron--proton scattering in elastic and highly inelastic region is reviewed in a unified approach. The importance of parity--violating scattering due to electro--weak interference in probing the structure of proton is emphasized. The importance of longitudnal spin--spin asymmetry as well as parity violating longitudnal asymmetry to extract the structure functions of proton in both regions are discussed. The recoil polarization of proton in the elastic scattering is also discussed.

  9. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  10. Effect of catalyst distribution in the active layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells; Effet de la distribution du catalyseur dans les couches actives de piles a combustible de type PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultel, Y.; Durand, R.; Ozil, P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Electrochimie et d' Electrometallurgie, Lab. d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, UMR 5631, 38 - Grenoble (France); Antoine, O. [Geneva Univ., Dept. de Chimie Minerale, Analytique et Appliquee, Sciences 2 (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the distribution of the platinum catalyst in the active layers on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) electrodes. In the one hand, the results predicted by the classical models and those in which the active layers is modified have been compared; these results have allowed to demonstrate theoretically the effect of the discrete distribution of the platinum catalyst in the form of nano-particles. On the other hand, the influence of a distribution gradient of the platinum catalyst for porous and non-porous active layers of PEMFC cathode has been experimentally demonstrated and predicted by numerical simulations. (O.M.)

  11. Proton-assisted amino acid transporter PAT1 complexes with Rag GTPases and activates TORC1 on late endosomal and lysosomal membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrét H Ögmundsdóttir

    Full Text Available Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs, subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293 cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H(+-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments.

  12. Proton-assisted amino acid transporter PAT1 complexes with Rag GTPases and activates TORC1 on late endosomal and lysosomal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ögmundsdóttir, Margrét H; Heublein, Sabine; Kazi, Shubana; Reynolds, Bruno; Visvalingam, Shivanthy M; Shaw, Michael K; Goberdhan, Deborah C I

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs) to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs), subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1)/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments.

  13. Analysis of induced radionuclides in low-activation concrete (limestone concrete) using the 12 GeV proton synchrotron accelerator facility at KEK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K; Tanosaki, T; Fujii, H; Miura, T

    2005-01-01

    22Na is one of the long-lived radionuclides induced in shielding concrete of a beam-line tunnel of a high-energy particle accelerator facility and poses a problem of radiation wastes at the decommissioning of the facility. In order to estimate the 22Na concentration induced in shielding concrete, chemical reagents such as NaHCO3, MgO, Al203, SiO2 and CaCO3 were irradiated at several locations in the beam-line tunnel of the 12 GeV proton synchrotron accelerator at KEK, and the 22Na concentrations induced in those chemical reagents were measured. Low-activation concrete made up of limestone aggregates was also irradiated by secondary particles in the beam-line tunnel and the long-lived radionuclide, such as 22Na, concentrations induced in the concrete were measured. It was confirmed that 22Na concentrations induced in Mg, Al, Si and Ca were lower than that in Na, and that 22Na concentrations induced in the low-activation concrete was lower than those induced in ordinary concrete made up of sandstone aggregates.

  14. SYNTHESIS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER CATALYZED BY ACIDIC ION-EXCHANGE RESINS - INFLUENCE OF THE PROTON ACTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1995-01-01

    The catalytic activity of various strong acid ion-exchange resins on the synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) from methanol and isobutene has been investigated. Relative to Amberlyst 15, Kastel CS 381 and Amberlyst CSP have similar rate constants, whereas Duolite ES 276 and Amberlyst XE 307 h

  15. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  16. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on the activity and stability of carbon supported PtMo alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen oxidation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Carreras, Alejo; Trincavelli, Jorge; Ticianelli, Edson Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the activity, stability and CO tolerance of PtMo/C catalysts was studied, due to their applicability in the anode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To this purpose, a carbon supported PtMo (60:40) alloy electrocatalyst was synthesized by the formic acid reduction method, and samples of this catalyst were heat-treated at various temperatures ranging between 400 and 700 °C. The samples were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS). Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the stability, and polarization curves were used to investigate the performance of all materials as CO tolerant anode on a PEM single cell text fixture. The catalyst treated at 600 °C, for which the average crystallite size was 16.7 nm, showed the highest hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO, giving an overpotential induced by CO contamination of 100 mV at 1 Acm-2. This catalyst also showed a better stability up to 5000 potential cycles of cyclic voltammetry, as compared to the untreated catalyst. CV, SEM and WDS results indicated that a partial dissolution of Mo and its migration/diffusion from the anode to the cathode occurs during the single cell cycling. Polarization results showed that the catalytic activity and the stability can be improved by a heat treatment, in spite of a growth of the catalyst particles.

  18. Protonated 14-membered 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetrazacyclotetradeca-7,14-diene Salts and Their Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Fairus M. Yusoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 14-membered heterocyclic 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetrazacyclotetradeca-7,14-diene, [(Me6[14]N4diene], salts with structural formula of [(Me6[14]N4diene]Br2(H2O2, [(Me6[14]N4dieneCl2](H2O3, Me6[14]N4diene.(ClO42, Me6[14]N4diene.(PF62¬  and   Me6[14]N4diene.(NO32   have been  synthesized without the necessity of a template. The salts were characterized by FTIR, and NMR spectroscopic techniques. X-ray study showed that the macrocyclic cation consists of a pair of protonated amines and azomethine nitrogen atoms located diagonally and opposite to each other. Only the macrocylic bromide and perchlorate salts showed activity against gram-positive E. faecalis and gram-negative E. Coli.

  19. Determination of the optimal active area for proton exchange membrane fuel cells with parallel, interdigitated or serpentine designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xin-Xin [Department of Thermal Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yan, Wei-Mon [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Taipei, 22305 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106 (China); Su, Ay [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 300 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Effects of active area size on steady-state characteristics of a working PEM fuel cell, including local current densities, local oxygen transport rates, and liquid water transport were studied by applying a three-dimensional, two-phase PEM fuel cell model. The PEM fuel cells were with parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow channel design. At high operating voltages, the size effects on cell performance are not noticeable owing to the occurrence of oxygen supply limit. The electrochemical reaction rates are high at low operating voltages, producing large quantity of water, whose removal capability is significantly affected by flow channel design. The cells with long parallel flow field experience easy water accumulation, thereby presenting low oxygen transport rate and low current density. The cells with interdigitated and serpentine flow fields generate forced convection stream to improve reactant transport and liquid water removal, thereby leading to enhanced cell performance and different size effect from the parallel flow cells. Increase in active area significantly improves performance for serpentine cells, but only has limited effect on that of interdigitated cells. Size effects of pressure drop over the PEM cells were also discussed. (author)

  20. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  1. Beta Decay of the Proton-Rich Nuclei 102Sn and 104Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Batist, L. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute; Banu, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Becker, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Blazhev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brown, B. A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bruchle, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Doring, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Faestermann, T. [Technische Universitat Munchen; Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Jungclaus, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid; Kavatsyuk, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kavatsyuk, O. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kirchner, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; La Commara, M. [Universita Federico II and INFN Napoli; Mandal, S. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mazzocchi, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Muralithar, S. [University of Warsaw; Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Plochocki, A. [University of Warsaw; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Romoli, M. [Universita Federico II and INFN Napoli; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schadel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schmidt, K. [University of Warsaw; Schwengner, R. [University of Warsaw; Zylicz, J. [University of Warsaw

    2006-01-01

    The {beta} decays of {sup 102}Sn and {sup 104}Sn were studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). For {sup 104}Sn, with three new {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays identified, the total Gamow-Teller strength (BGT) value of 2.7(3) was obtained. For {sup 102}Sn, the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data were collected for the first time, allowing us to considerably extend the decay scheme. This scheme was used to unfold the TAS data and to deduce a BGT value of 4.2(8) for this decay. This result is compared to shell model predictions, yielding a hindrance factor of 3.6(7) in agreement with those obtained previously for {sup 98}Cd and {sup 100}In. Together with the latter two, {sup 102}Sn completes the triplet of Z {le} 50, N {ge} 50 nuclei with two proton holes, one proton hole and one neutron particle, and two neutron particles with respect to the doubly magic {sup 100}Sn core.

  2. Acceleration of Flare Protons by Langmuir Plasmons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓卿; 张航

    2002-01-01

    We analytically study the turbulent acceleration of solar protons by strong Langmuir plasmons in Cerenkov processes. It is shown that among the wave spectra with self-retained source only the Pelletier spectrum (Wk ∝ k-7/2) can result in the energy spectrum of non-relativistic protons, which gives a good fit to that observed from solarflare events. It is quite possible that strong Langmuir turbulence presents in coronal active region, with three-dimensional, isotropic and stationary spectrum proportional to k-7/2, and is responsible for the acceleration offlare protons.

  3. Neutron-gamma competition for $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Mumpower, Matthew; Moller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present a coupled Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation and Hauser-Feshbach (QRPA+HF) model for calculating delayed particle emission. This approach uses microscopic nuclear structure information which starts with Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the daughter nucleus, and then follows the statistical decay until the initial available excitation energy is exhausted. Explicitly included at each particle emission stage is $\\gamma$-ray competition. We explore this model in the context of neutron emission of neutron-rich nuclei and find that neutron-gamma competition can lead to both increases and decreases in neutron emission probabilities, depending on the system considered. A second consequence of this formalism is a prediction of more neutrons on average being emitted after $\\beta$-decay for nuclei near the neutron dripline compared to models that do not consider the statistical decay.

  4. Proton-proton physics in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, T K

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has several unique features which makes it an important contributor to proton-proton physics at the LHC, in addition to its specific design goal of studying the physics of strongly interacting matter in heavy-ion collisions. The unique capabilities include its low transverse momentum (\\pT) acceptance, excellent vertexing, particle identification over a broad \\pT range and jet reconstruction. In this report, a brief review of ALICE capabilities is given for studying bulk properties of produced particles which characterize the underlying events, and the physics of heavy-flavour, quarkonia, photons, di-leptons and jets.

  5. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  6. Effect of Solar Cycle Activity on High Energy Proton of Inner Radiation Belt in the Low Altitude Region%太阳周期活动对低高度内辐射带高能质子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师立勤; 林瑞淋; 刘四清; 郑惠南

    2012-01-01

    The NOAA-15 high energy proton observation from 1998 to 2011 is used to analyze the effect of solar cycle activity on high energy proton flux. The statistic research indicates that there is an inverse correlative relationship between the proton flux in inner radiation belt and solar activity. This anti-correlation is related to geomagnetic coordinates L and B, and more significant with the increasing of L and decreasing of B. There is also a phase lag between the solar activity and the proton flux. This hysteresis effect is more obvious in the region with smaller L or larger B. The lagcan reach one year in some regions. This hysteresis effect means it takes a long time to reach the dynamic balance between the source and the loss for the proton of inner radiation belt in the low altitude region. The unbalance between the source and loss is the reason why the intensity of proton flux at the same solar activity is different. The comparison with the result of AP8 model indicates the energetic proton flux from AP8 is higher than the satellite's observation in the region with large B, which suggests that the AP8 model may overstate the proton flux enhancement at inner radiation belt in the low altitude region if only the long-term variation of magnetic field is considered.%利用NOAA-15卫星1998年到2011年近13年的高能质子全向通量观测资料,分析了一个太阳活动周内,低高度内辐射带高能质子通量的分布变化特性及其物理原因,比较了观测结果与AP8模型的不同.研究表明,低高度内辐射带高能质子通量与太阳活动水平的反相关关系与磁壳参数L值及磁场B值有关;L值越低,B值越大的空间点,其高能质子通量与太阳活动水平的反向相关性越明显.高能质子通量随太阳活动水平的变化存在明显滞后现象,L值越高、B值越小的空间点,滞后现象就越明显,滞后严重时可以达到一年左右的时间;这种滞后现象反映出

  7. The impact of uncertainties in the CT conversion algorithm when predicting proton beam ranges in patients from dose and PET-activity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Samuel; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-12-21

    The advantages of a finite range of proton beams can only be partly exploited in radiation therapy unless the range can be predicted in patient anatomy with proton-induced PET imaging aims at ∼2 mm accuracy in range verification. The latter is done using Monte Carlo predicted PET images. Monte Carlo methods are based on CT images to describe patient anatomy. The dose calculation algorithm and the CT resolution/artifacts might affect dose calculation accuracy. Additionally, when using Monte Carlo for PET range verification, the biological decay model and the cross sections for positron emitter production affect predicted PET images. The goal of this work is to study the effect of uncertainties in the CT conversion on the proton beam range predicted by Monte Carlo dose calculations and proton-induced PET signals. Conversion schemes to assign density and elemental composition based on a CT image of the patient define a unique Hounsfield unit (HU) to tissue parameters relationship. Uncertainties are introduced because there is no unique relationship between HU and tissue parameters. In this work, different conversion schemes based on a stoichiometric calibration method as well as different numbers of tissue bins were considered in three head and neck patients. For Monte Carlo dose calculation, the results show close to zero (proton dose distributions based on Monte Carlo calculation are only slightly affected by the uncertainty on density and elemental composition introduced by unique assignment to each HU if a stoichiometric calibration is used. Calculated PET images used for range verification are more sensitive to conversion uncertainties causing an intrinsic limitation due to CT conversion alone of at least 1 mm.

  8. Strangeness in the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberg, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Both perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms contribute to strangeness in the proton sea. We have developed a hybrid model in which non-perturbative contributions are calculated in a meson cloud model which expands the proton in terms of meson-baryon states, and perturbative contributions are calculated in a statistical model which expands the proton in terms of quark-gluon states. The perturbative contributions are represented in the parton distributions of the ``bare'' hadrons in the meson cloud. We compare our results to the recent experimental data of ATLAS and HERMES. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  9. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  10. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  11. THEORY OF PROTON EMITTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. TALOU

    2000-08-01

    Modern theoretical methods used to interpret recent experimental data on ground-state proton emission near the proton drip line are reviewed. Most of them are stationary and are aimed to compute proton decay widths {Gamma}{sub p} only. Comparison is made between these approaches before being compared to experimental data. Our time-dependent approach based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for initial quasi-stationary single-proton states is then introduced. It is shown that much deeper insights into the physics of this clean multidimensional quantum tunneling effect can be accessed, and that in addition to {Gamma}{sub p}, other physical quantities could be tested experimentally, offering new stringent tests on nuclear physics models away from the valley of {beta}-stability. Finally, the necessity of using the TDSE approach in more complex, dynamical, problems is demonstrated.

  12. Proton transport in proton exchange membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmeisser, Jennifer Mary

    2007-01-01

    This work investigated several proton exchange membranes (PEMs): perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymers (Nafion®), sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (S-PEEK), radiation-grafted ethylenetetrafluoroethylene-grafted-poly(styrene sulfonic) acid (ETFE-g-PSSA), sulfonated trifluorostyrene-co-substituted trifluorostyrene (BAM®), sulfonated polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene-r-butylene)-b-polystyrene triblock copolymer (S-SEBS), and a series of novel photocurable polyelectrolytes. These polymer systems dif...

  13. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  14. Limits of proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  15. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  16. 1000-fold enhancement in proton conductivity of a MOF using post-synthetically anchored proton transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalini, Sorout; Dhavale, Vishal M.; Eldho, Kavalakal M.; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ajithkumar, Thallaseril G.; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2016-08-01

    Pyridinol, a coordinating zwitter-ionic species serves as stoichiometrically loadable and non-leachable proton carrier. The partial replacement of the pyridinol by stronger hydrogen bonding, coordinating guest, ethylene glycol (EG), offers 1000-fold enhancement in conductivity (10‑6 to 10‑3 Scm‑1) with record low activation energy (0.11 eV). Atomic modeling coupled with 13C-SSNMR provides insights into the potential proton conduction pathway functionalized with post-synthetically anchored dynamic proton transporting EG moieties.

  17. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patie

  18. Effect of Proton Beam on Cancer Progressive and Metastatic Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Y. H.; Nam, K. S.; Oh, Y. H.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, M. Y.; Jang, J. S. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of proton beam on enzymes for promotion/progression of carcinogenesis and metastasis of malignant tumor cells to clarify proton beam-specific biological effects. The changes of cancer chemopreventive enzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells irradiated with proton beams were tested by measuring the activities of quinine reductase (QR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), glutathione (GSH) levels, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We also examined the effect of proton beam on the ODC activity and expression of COX-2 in human breast cancer cell. We then assessed the metastatic capabilities of HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cells irradiated with proton beam by measuring the invasiveness of cells through Matrigel-coated membrane and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. QR activity of irradiated HT-29 cells was slightly increased. Proton irradiation at dose of 32 Gy in HT-29 cells increased GST activity by 1.23-fold. In addition GSH levels in HT-29 cells was significantly increased 1.23- (p<0.05), 1.32- (p<0.01) and 1.34-fold (p<0.01) with the proton irradiation at doses of 8, 16 and 32 Gy, respectively. These results suggest that colon cancer chemopreventive activity was increased with the proton irradiation by increasing QR and GST activities and GSH levels and inhibiting ODC activity. Proton ion irradiation decreased the invasiveness of TPA-treated HT-29 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells through Matrigel-coated membrane. Proton ion irradiation pretreatment decreased TPA-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. Further studies are necessary to investigate if these findings could be translated to in vivo situations

  19. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  20. Squeezing at entrance of proton transport pathway in proton-translocating pyrophosphatase upon substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Tzu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Lin, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yen-Wei; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lee, Ching-Hung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Pan, Rong-Long

    2013-07-05

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) is indispensable for many organisms in maintaining organellar pH homeostasis. This unique proton pump couples the hydrolysis of PPi to proton translocation across the membrane. H(+)-PPase consists of 14-16 relatively hydrophobic transmembrane domains presumably for proton translocation and hydrophilic loops primarily embedding a catalytic site. Several highly conserved polar residues located at or near the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase are essential for proton pumping activity. In this investigation single molecule FRET was employed to dissect the action at the pathway entrance in homodimeric Clostridium tetani H(+)-PPase upon ligand binding. The presence of the substrate analog, imidodiphosphate mediated two sites at the pathway entrance moving toward each other. Moreover, single molecule FRET analyses after the mutation at the first proton-carrying residue (Arg-169) demonstrated that conformational changes at the entrance are conceivably essential for the initial step of H(+)-PPase proton translocation. A working model is accordingly proposed to illustrate the squeeze at the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase upon substrate binding.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  3. Kinetics of proton release and uptake by channelrhodopsin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nack, Melanie; Radu, Ionela; Schultz, Bernd-Joachim; Resler, Tom; Schlesinger, Ramona; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; del Val, Coral; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano; Bamann, Christian; Bamberg, Ernst; Heberle, Joachim

    2012-05-07

    Electrophysiological experiments showed that the light-activated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) pumps protons in the absence of a membrane potential. We determined here the kinetics of transient pH change using a water-soluble pH-indicator. It is shown that ChR2 released protons prior to uptake with a stoichiometry of 0.3 protons per ChR2. Comparison to the photocycle kinetics revealed that proton release and uptake match rise and decay of the P(3)(520) intermediate. As the P(3)(520) state also represents the conductive state of cation channeling, the concurrence of proton pumping and channel gating implies an intimate mechanistic link of the two functional modes. Studies on the E123T and S245E mutants show that these residues are not critically involved in proton translocation.

  4. Characteristics of redox-linked proton ejection in cytochrome c oxidase reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. New observations support mechanisms different from proton pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, S; Lorusso, M; Capitanio, N; De Nitto, E

    1983-06-27

    Experimental observations reveal a number of characteristics of the redox-linked proton ejection from cytochrome c oxidase vesicles, which apparently cannot be explained by a proton pumping activity of the oxidase. These observations seem, on the other hand, to provide useful elements for alternative explanation(s) of the proton ejection. It is proposed here that the process is scalar and not vectorial and can derive from redox-linked rupture of protonated salt-bridges in the oxidase-lipid complex.

  5. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  7. Electrical Mobility of Protons and Proton-Holes in Pure Water Characterized by Physics-Based Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    Pure water has been characterized empirically for nearly a century, as dissociation into hydronium (H3O)1+ and hydroxide (HO)1- ions. Last March, we reported that the ~40 year experimental industrial standard of chemical equilibrium reaction constant, the ion product, can be accounted for by a statistical-physics-based concentration product of two electrical charge carriers, the positively charged protons, p+, and the negatively charged proton holes or prohols, p-, with a thermal activation energy or proton trapping well depth of Ep + / p - = 576 meV, in the 0-100OC pure liquid water. We now report that the empirically fitted industrial standard experimental data (1985, 1987, 2005) of the two dc ion mobilities in liquid water, can also be accounted for by trapping-limited drift of protons and prohols through proton channels of lower proton electrical potential valleys, Ep+/0 Pauling statistical model using the 1933 Bernal-Fowler water rule.

  8. Hydrostatic pressure decreases the proton mobility in the hydrated BaZr0.9Y0.1O3 proton conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianli; Braun, Artur; Ovalle, Alejandro; Savaniu, Cristian-Daniel; Graule, Thomas; Bagdassarov, Nikolai

    2010-07-01

    Impedance spectroscopy on the hydrated proton conductor BaZr0.9Y0.1O3 at high temperatures shows that the bulk proton conductivity activation energy Eb scales with the strain parameter ɛ, as achieved by hydrostatic pressures up to 2 GPa, suggesting that large lattices favor proton diffusivity. At high temperature, Eb increases upon pressure by 40%. The grain boundary activation energy Eg is around twice as Eb, indicating higher proton mobility in grain boundaries as a result of pressure induced sintering. An expanded lattice with strain parameter ɛ >1 should have lower Eb, suggesting that thin films expansive tensile strain could have larger proton conductivity.

  9. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  10. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  11. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity.

  12. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information o

  13. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  14. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  15. The Search for Proton Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  16. TU-EF-304-02: 4D Optimized Treatment Planning for Actively Scanned Proton Therapy Delivered to Moving Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernatowicz, K; Zhang, Y; Weber, D; Lomax, A [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-psi, Aargau (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 4D treatment optimization approach for Pencil Beam Scanned (PBS) proton therapy that includes breathing variability. Method: PBS proton therapy delivers a pattern of proton pencil beams (PBs), distributed to cover the target volume and optimized such as to achieve a homogenous dose distribution across the target. In this work, this optimization step has been enhanced to include advanced 4D dose calculations of liver tumors based on motion extracted from either 4D-CT (representing a single and averaged respiratory cycle) or 4D-CT(MRI) (including breathing variability). The 4D dose calculation is performed per PB on deforming dose grid, and according to the timestamp of each PB, a displacement due to patient’s motion and a change in radiological depth.Three different treatment fields have been optimized in 3D on the end-exhale phase of a 4D-CT liver data set (3D-opt) and then in 4D using the motion extracted from either 4D-CT or 4D-CT(MRI) using deformable image registration. All plans were calculated directly on the PTV without the use of an ITV. The delivery characteristics of the PSI Gantry 2 have been assumed for all calculations. Results: Dose inhomogeneities (D5-D95) in the CTV for the 3D optimized plans recalculated under conditions of variable motion were increased by on average 19.8% compared to the static case. These differences could be reduced by 4D-CT based 4D optimization to 10.5% and by 4D-CT(MRI) based optimization to only 2.3% of the static value. Liver V25 increased by less than 1% using 4D optimization. Conclusion: 4D optimized PBS treatment plans taking into account breathing variability provide for significantly improved robustness against motion and motion variability than those based on 4D-CT alone, and may negate the need of motion specific target expansions. Swiss National Fund Grant (320030-1493942-1)

  17. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors delivered with active raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT: early treatment results and study concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieken Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particle irradiation was established at the University of Heidelberg 2 years ago. To date, more than 400 patients have been treated including patients with primary brain tumors. In malignant glioma (WHO IV patients, two clinical trials have been set up-one investigating the benefit of a carbon ion (18 GyE vs. a proton boost (10 GyE in addition to photon radiotherapy (50 Gy, the other one investigating reirradiation with escalating total dose schedules starting at 30 GyE. In atypical meningioma patients (WHO °II, a carbon ion boost of 18 GyE is applied to macroscopic tumor residues following previous photon irradiation with 50 Gy. This study was set up in order to investigate toxicity and response after proton and carbon ion therapy for gliomas and meningiomas. Methods 33 patients with gliomas (n = 26 and meningiomas (n = 7 were treated with carbon ion (n = 26 and proton (n = 7 radiotherapy. In 22 patients, particle irradiation was combined with photon therapy. Temozolomide-based chemotherapy was combined with particle therapy in 17 patients with gliomas. Particle therapy as reirradiation was conducted in 7 patients. Target volume definition was based upon CT, MRI and PET imaging. Response was assessed by MRI examinations, and progression was diagnosed according to the Macdonald criteria. Toxicity was classified according to CTCAE v4.0. Results Treatment was completed and tolerated well in all patients. Toxicity was moderate and included fatigue (24.2%, intermittent cranial nerve symptoms (6% and single episodes of seizures (6%. At first and second follow-up examinations, mean maximum tumor diameters had slightly decreased from 29.7 mm to 27.1 mm and 24.9 mm respectively. Nine glioma patients suffered from tumor relapse, among these 5 with infield relapses, causing death in 8 patients. There was no progression in any meningioma patient. Conclusions Particle radiotherapy is safe and feasible in patients with primary brain

  18. Proton transfer pathways in Photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and the 1.9-Å crystal structure of Photosystem II (Umena, Y., Kawakami, K., Shen, J.-R., and Kamiya, N. (2011) Nature 473, 55-60), we investigated the H-bonding environment of the redox active tyrosine, TyrD and obtained insights that help explain its slow redox kinetics and the stability of TyrD radical. The water molecule distal to TyrD, 4 Å away from the phenolic O of TyrD (OTyrD) , corresponds to the presence of the tyrosyl radical state. The water molecule proximal to TyrD, in H-bonding distance to OTyrD, corresponds to the presence of the unoxidised tyrosine. The H+ released upon oxidation of TyrD is transferred to the proximal water, which shifts to the distal position, triggering a concerted proton transfer pathway involving D2-Arg180 and a series of waters, through which the proton reaches the aqueous phase at D2-His61. The water movement linked to the ejection of the proton from the hydrophobic environment near TyrD makes oxidation slow and quasi-irreversible, explaining the great stability of the TyrD radical. A symmetry-related proton pathway associated with TyrZ is pointed out and this is associated with one of the Cl- sites. This may represent a proton pathway functional in the water oxidation cycle.

  19. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  20. SU-E-T-231: Measurements of Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated Proton Dose Enhancement Due to Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission and Activation Products Using Radiochromic Films and CdTe Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J; Cho, S [Dept. of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Manohar, N [Dept. of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Medical Physics Program, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Krishnan, S [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There have been several reports of enhanced cell-killing and tumor regression when tumor cells and mouse tumors were loaded with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) prior to proton irradiation. While particle-induced xray emission (PIXE), Auger electrons, secondary electrons, free radicals, and biological effects have been suggested as potential mechanisms responsible for the observed GNP-mediated dose enhancement/radiosensitization, there is a lack of quantitative analysis regarding the contribution from each mechanism. Here, we report our experimental effort to quantify some of these effects. Methods: 5-cm-long cylindrical plastic vials were filled with 1.8 mL of either water or water mixed with cylindrical GNPs at the same gold concentration (0.3 mg Au/g) as used in previous animal studies. A piece of EBT2 radiochromic film (30-µm active-layer sandwiched between 80/175-µm outer-layers) was inserted along the long axis of each vial and used to measure dose enhancement due to PIXE from GNPs. Vials were placed at center-of-modulation (COM) and 3-cm up-/down-stream from COM and irradiated with 5 different doses (2–10 Gy) using 10-cm-SOBP 160-MeV protons. After irradiation, films were cleaned and read to determine the delivered dose. A vial containing spherical GNPs (20 mg Au/g) was also irradiated, and gamma-rays from activation products were measured using a cadmium-telluride (CdTe) detector. Results: Film measurements showed no significant dose enhancement beyond the experimental uncertainty (∼2%). There was a detectable activation product from GNPs, but it appeared to contribute to dose enhancement minimally (<0.01%). Conclusion: Considering the composition of EBT2 film, it can be inferred that gold characteristic x-rays from PIXE and their secondary electrons make insignificant contribution to dose enhancement. The current investigation also suggests negligible dose enhancement due to activation products. Thus, previously-reported GNP-mediated proton dose

  1. UV-activated conversion of Hoechst 33258, DAPI, and Vybrant DyeCycle fluorescent dyes into blue-excited, green-emitting protonated forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Kędracka-Krok, Sylwia; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2013-05-01

    Hoechst 33258, DAPI and Vybrant DyeCycle are commonly known DNA fluorescent dyes that are excited by UV and emit in the blue region of the spectrum of visible light. Conveniently, they leave the reminder of the spectrum for microscopy detection of other cellular targets labeled with probes emitting in green, yellow or red. However, an exposure of these dyes to UV induces their photoconversion and results in production of the forms of these dyes that are excited by blue light and show fluoresce maxima in green and a detectable fluorescence in yellow and orange regions of the spectrum. Photoconversion of Hoechst 33258 and DAPI is reversible and independent of the dye concentration or the presence of DNA. Spectrofluorimetry and mass spectrometry analyses indicate that exposure to UV induces protonation of Hoechst 33258 and DAPI.

  2. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C., E-mail: cinzia.talamonti@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Reggioli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Civinini, C. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Pallotta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  3. Bond breaking, electron pushing, and proton pulling: active and passive roles in the interaction between aqueous ions and water as manifested in the O 1s Auger decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokapanich, W; Ottosson, N; Svensson, S; Ohrwall, G; Winter, B; Björneholm, O

    2012-01-12

    A core-ionized H(2)O molecule in liquid water primarily relaxes through normal Auger decay, leading to a two-hole final state in which both valence holes are localized on the same water molecule. Electronic coupling to the environment, however, allows for alternative decays resembling Intermolecular Coulombic Decay (ICD), producing final states with one of the holes delocalized on a neighboring water molecule. Here we present an experimental study of such minority processes, which adds to our understanding of dynamic interactions of electronically excited H(2)O molecules with their local surrounding in liquid water and aqueous solution. We show that the solvation of metal-halide salts considerably influences these minority decay channels from the water O 1s(-1) state. By breaking water-water bonds, both the metal cations and halide anions are found to reduce the decay into water-water delocalized states, thus having a ″passive″ effect on the Auger spectrum. The halide anions also play an ″active″ role by opening a new ICD-like decay pathway into water-halide delocalized states. The importance of this contribution increases from F(-) to I(-), which we suggest to be caused by a directional polarization of the halide anion toward the core-ionized H(2)O(+) cation in the intermediate state of the Auger process. This increases the electronic overlap between the two centers and makes delocalized decays more probable. We furthermore show that F(-), the smallest and most strongly hydrated of the halides, plays an additional role as proton puller during the core-hole lifetime, resulting in proton dynamics on the low femtosecond time scale. Our results represent a step forward toward a better understanding of how aqueous solutions, when exposed to soft X-rays, channel excess energy. This has implications for several aspects of physical and radiation chemistry, as well as biology.

  4. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  5. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Radici, Marco; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-01-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions and it allows...

  6. Stereochemistry-Dependent Proton Conduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Tiwari, Omshanker; Gaikwad, Pramod; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2016-01-12

    Graphene oxide (GO) is impermeable to H2 and O2 fuels while permitting H(+) shuttling, making it a potential candidate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), albeit with a large anisotropy in their proton transport having a dominant in plane (σIP) contribution over the through plane (σTP). If GO-based membranes are ever to succeed in PEMFC, it inevitably should have a dominant through-plane proton shuttling capability (σTP), as it is the direction in which proton gets transported in a real fuel-cell configuration. Here we show that anisotropy in proton conduction in GO-based fuel cell membranes can be brought down by selectively tuning the geometric arrangement of functional groups around the dopant molecules. The results show that cis isomer causes a selective amplification of through-plane proton transport, σTP, pointing to a very strong geometry angle in ionic conduction. Intercalation of cis isomer causes significant expansion of GO (001) planes involved in σTP transport due to their mutual H-bonding interaction and efficient bridging of individual GO planes, bringing down the activation energy required for σTP, suggesting the dominance of a Grotthuss-type mechanism. This isomer-governed amplification of through-plane proton shuttling resulted in the overall boosting of fuel-cell performance, and it underlines that geometrical factors should be given prime consideration while selecting dopant molecules for bringing down the anisotropy in proton conduction and enhancing the fuel-cell performance in GO-based PEMFC.

  7. Proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase: insights from proton exchange kinetics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLoS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  8. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  9. Proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  10. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  11. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  12. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65 MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides $^{159}$Dy, $^{157}$Dy, $^{155}$Dy, $^{161}$Tb, $^{160}$Tb, $^{156}$Tb, $^{155}$Tb, $^{154m2}$Tb, $^{154m1}$Tb, $^{154g}$Tb, $^{153}$Tb, $^{152}$Tb and $^{151}$Tb are reported in the 36-65 MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  13. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  14. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    CERN Document Server

    Magro, G; Mairani, A; Mirandola, A; Panizza, D; Russo, S; Ferrari, A; Valvo, F; Fossati, P; Ciocca, M

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5–30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size r...

  15. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, G.; Molinelli, S.; Mairani, A.; Mirandola, A.; Panizza, D.; Russo, S.; Ferrari, A.; Valvo, F.; Fossati, P.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5-30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size ratio. The accuracy of the TPS was proved to be clinically acceptable in all cases but very small and shallow volumes. In this contest, the use of MC to validate TPS results proved to be a reliable procedure for pre-treatment plan verification.

  16. Preparations of an inorganic-framework proton exchange nanochannel membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. H.; Jiang, H. R.; Zhao, G.; Zeng, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a proton exchange membrane composed of straight and aligned proton conducting nanochannels is developed. Preparation of the membrane involves the surface sol-gel method assisted with a through-hole anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template to form the framework of the PEM nanochannels. A monomolecular layer (SO3Hsbnd (CH2)3sbnd Sisbnd (OCH3)3) is subsequently added onto the inner surfaces of the nanochannels to shape a proton-conducting pathway. Straight nanochannels exhibit long range order morphology, contributing to a substantial improvement in the proton mobility and subsequently proton conductivity. In addition, the nanochannel size can be altered by changing the surface sol-gel condition, allowing control of the active species/charge carrier selectivity via pore size exclusion. The proton conductivity of the nanochannel membrane is reported as high as 11.3 mS cm-1 at 70 °C with a low activation energy of 0.21 eV (20.4 kJ mol-1). First-principle calculations reveal that the activation energy for proton transfer is impressively low (0.06 eV and 0.07 eV) with the assistance of water molecules.

  17. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  18. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  19. Proton Fraction in Neutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰收; 陈列文

    2001-01-01

    The proton fraction in β-stable neutron stars is investigated within the framework of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction for the first time. The calculated results show that the proton fraction disappears at high density, which implies that the pure neutron matter may exist in the interior of neutron stars. The incompressibility of the nuclear equation-of-state is shown to be more important to determine the proton fraction. Meanwhile, it is indicated that the addition of muons in neutron stars will change the proton fraction. It is also found that the higher-order terms of the nuclear symmetry energy have obvious effects on the proton fraction and the parabolic law of the nuclear symmetry energy is not enough to determine the proton fraction.

  20. ``PROTON Sponges": a Rigid Organic Scaffold to Reveal the Quantum Structure of the Intramolecular Proton Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblase, Andrew F.; Johnson, Mark A.; Scerba, Michael T.; Bloom, Steven; Lectka, Thomas; Dudding, Travis

    2012-06-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of systems containing charged hydrogen bonds (e.g. the Zundel ion, {H}5{O}2+) in a vibrationally cold regime is useful in decongesting numerous anharmonic features common to room temperature measurements.[Roscioli, J. R.; et. al. Science 2007] This approach has been extended to conjugate acids of the ``Proton Sponge" family of organic compounds, which contain strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between proton donor (D) and acceptor (A) groups at the 1- and 8-positions. By performing {H}_2/{D}_2 vibrational predissociation spectroscopy on cryogenically cooled ions, we explore how the proximity and spatial orientation of D and A moieties relates to the spectroscopic signature of the shared proton. In the cases studied ({D = Me2N-H+; A = OH, O(C=O)Ph}), we observe strong anharmonic couplings between the shared proton and dark states that persist at these cryogenic temperatures. This leads to intense NH stretching features throughout the nominal CH stretching region (2800-3000 {cm}-1). Isotopic substitution has verified that the oscillator strength of these broad features is driven by NH stretching. Furthermore, the study of A = O(C=O)Ph has provided a spectroscopic snapshot of the shared proton at work as an active catalytic moiety fostering ester hydrolysis by first order acylium fission ({AAC1}). This is apparent by the high frequency carbonyl stretch at 1792 {cm}-1, which is a consequence of the strong hydrogen bond to the ether-ester oxygen atom. Thus, these ``Proton Sponges" are useful model systems that unearth the quantum structure and reactivity of shared proton interactions in organic compounds.

  1. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  2. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates.

  3. Enhanced tolerance to NaC1 and LiC1 stresses by over-expressing Caragana korshinskii sodium/proton exchange 1 (CkNHX1) and the hydrophilic C terminus is required for the activity of CkNHX1 in Atsos3-1 mutant and yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium/proton exchangers (NHX antiporters) play important roles in plant responses to salt stress. Previous research showed that hydrophilic C-terminal region of Arabidopsis AtNHX1 negatively regulates the Na+/H+ transporting activity. In this study, CkNHX1 were isolated from Caragana korshinskii,...

  4. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  5. Proton-therapy, present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, R P; Rembado, D; Serrato, R

    1993-06-01

    At the moment, proton-therapy is the most advanced radiotherapeutic technique in cancer treatment. The use of the high energy proton beam (from 70 MeV to 200 MeV) lets a Bragg's peak be moved to different depths, so allowing personal radiotherapeutic treatment. In recent years, many proton-therapy centers have grown up throughout the world with very satisfactory clinical results, first of all in eye melanoma treatment. The future expectations are very promising, even if the very high installation and maintenance expenses of a synchrotron (for proton production) hinder the development of such a method.

  6. Resonant scattering of central plasma sheet protons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant proton loss timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Liang, Jun; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Shi, Run; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Fu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    energies (~ keV) on the nightside. The pitch angle coverage for H+ band EMIC wave resonant scattering strongly depends on proton energy, L shell, and field model. He+ and O+ band EMIC waves tend to cause efficient scattering loss of protons at higher energies, thereby importantly contributing to the isotropic distribution of higher energy (> ~ 10 keV) protons at higher L shells on the nightside where the geomagnetic field line is highly stretched. Our results also suggest that scattering by H+ band EMIC waves may significantly contribute to the formation of the reversed-type CPS proton precipitation on the dawnside where both the wave activity and occurrence probability is statistically high.

  7. Density functional theory study of proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lidong; XIE Daiqian

    2005-01-01

    Proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase II has been studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(D) level. The active site model consists of the zinc ion, four histidine residues, two threonine residues, and three water molecules. Our calculations showed that the proton of the zinc-bound water molecule could be transferred to the nearest water molecule and an intermediate containing H3O+ is then formed. The intermediate is only 1.3 kJ·mol-1 above the reactant complex, whereas the barrier height for the proton transfer is about 8.1 kJ·mol-1.

  8. Two ligands for a GPCR, proton vs lysolipid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-soon IM

    2005-01-01

    Recently, two different chemicals have been matched as ligands with the same Gprotein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Double-pairing of OGR1 family GPCRs with proton and lysolipid raises several questions. First, whether both are the real ligands for the GPCRs. Second, whether modulation of a GPCR by two chemicals could be possible. Third, one of the chemicals is proton. Proton-sensing not only is a new action mode of GPCR activation, but also it could be generalized in other GPCRs.In this review, I'd like to summarize the issue and discuss questions with pharmacological criteria.

  9. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging.

  10. Effects of relativity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of negative-energy states in proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a fully relativistic framework using the T matrix of Fleischer and Tjon. The contribution from negative-energy states in the single-scattering diagrams is shown to be large, indicating that relativistic effects

  11. Unraveling the mechanism of proton translocation in the extracellular half-channel of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaoxia; Gunner, M R

    2016-05-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, a light activated protein that creates a proton gradient in halobacteria, has long served as a simple model of proton pumps. Within bacteriorhodopsin, several key sites undergo protonation changes during the photocycle, moving protons from the higher pH cytoplasm to the lower pH extracellular side. The mechanism underlying the long-range proton translocation between the central (the retinal Schiff base SB216, D85, and D212) and exit clusters (E194 and E204) remains elusive. To obtain a dynamic view of the key factors controlling proton translocation, a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulation was performed for eight bacteriorhodopsin models varying in retinal isomer and protonation states of the SB216, D85, D212, and E204. The side-chain orientation of R82 is determined primarily by the protonation states of the residues in the EC. The side-chain reorientation of R82 modulates the hydrogen-bond network and consequently possible pathways of proton transfer. Quantum mechanical intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of proton-transfer in the methyl guanidinium-hydronium-hydroxide model system show that proton transfer via a guanidinium group requires an initial geometry permitting proton donation and acceptance by the same amine. In all the bacteriorhodopsin models, R82 can form proton wires with both the CC and the EC connected by the same amine. Alternatively, rare proton wires for proton transfer from the CC to the EC without involving R82 were found in an O' state where the proton on D85 is transferred to D212.

  12. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  13. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  14. Phospholipids and glycolipids mediate proton containment and circulation along the surface of energy-transducing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Valentine, David L; Valentine, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Proton bioenergetics provides the energy for growth and survival of most organisms in the biosphere ranging from unicellular marine phytoplankton to humans. Chloroplasts harvest light and generate a proton electrochemical gradient (proton motive force) that drives the production of ATP needed for carbon dioxide fixation and plant growth. Mitochondria, bacteria and archaea generate proton motive force to energize growth and other physiologies. Energy transducing membranes are at the heart of proton bioenergetics and are responsible for catalyzing the conversion of energy held in high-energy electrons→electron transport chain→proton motive force→ATP. Whereas the electron transport chain is understood in great detail there are major gaps in understanding mechanisms of proton transfer or circulation during proton bioenergetics. This paper is built on the proposition that phospho- and glyco-glycerolipids form proton transport circuitry at the membrane's surface. By this proposition, an emergent membrane property, termed the hyducton, confines active/unbound protons or hydronium ions to a region of low volume close to the membrane surface. In turn, a von Grotthuß mechanism rapidly moves proton substrate in accordance with nano-electrochemical poles on the membrane surface created by powerful proton pumps such as ATP synthase.

  15. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton decay of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Mukha, I; Sümmerer, K; Acosta, L; Alvarez, M A G; Casarejos, E; Chatillon, A; Cortina-Gil, D; Espino, J; Fomichev, A; García-Ramos, J E; Geissel, H; Gómez-Camacho, J; Hofmann, J; Kiselev, O; Korsheninnikov, A; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Yu; Martel, I; Nociforo, C; Ott, W; Pfützner, M; Rodriguez-Tajes, C; Roeckl, E; Stanoiu, M; Weick, H; Woods, P J

    2008-01-01

    Proton-proton correlations were observed for the two-proton decays of the ground states of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne. The trajectories of the respective decay products, $^{17}$Ne+p+p and $^{14}$O+p+p, were measured by using a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of fragments projected on planes transverse to the precursor momenta. The measured three-particle correlations reflect a genuine three-body decay mechanism and allowed us to obtain spectroscopic information on the precursors with valence protons in the $sd$ shell.

  16. Transverse spin effects in proton-proton scattering and $Q \\bar Q$ production

    OpenAIRE

    Goloskokov, S. V.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss transverse spin effects caused by the spin-flip part of the Pomeron coupling with the proton. The predicted spin asymmetries in proton-proton scattering and QQ production in proton-proton and lepton-proton reactions are not small and can be studied in future polarized experiments.

  17. Low Earth orbit assessment of proton anisotropy using AP8 and AP9 trapped proton models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Walker, Steven A.; Santos Koos, Lindsey M.

    2015-04-01

    The completion of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community with an ideal evaluation and testing facility for future long duration human activities in space. Ionized and secondary neutral particles radiation measurements inside ISS form the ideal tool for validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear reaction cross sections and transport codes. Studies using thermo-luminescent detectors (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TPEC), and computer aided design (CAD) models of early ISS configurations confirmed that, as input, computational dosimetry at low Earth orbit (LEO) requires an environmental model with directional (anisotropic) capability to properly describe the exposure of trapped protons within ISS. At LEO, ISS encounters exposure from trapped electrons, protons and geomagnetically attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). For short duration studies at LEO, one can ignore trapped electrons and ever present GCR exposure contributions during quiet times. However, within the trapped proton field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of proton exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensity of trapped particles. Among the established trapped models are the historic AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. Since at LEO electrons have minimal exposure contribution to ISS, this work ignores the AE8 and AE9 components of the models and couples a measurement derived anisotropic trapped proton formalism to omnidirectional output from the AP8 and AP9 models, allowing the assessment of the differences between the two proton models. The assessment is done at a target point within the ISS-11A configuration (circa 2003) crew quarter (CQ) of Russian Zvezda service module (SM), during its ascending and descending nodes passes through the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The anisotropic formalism incorporates the contributions of proton narrow

  18. Low Earth orbit assessment of proton anisotropy using AP8 and AP9 trapped proton models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F; Walker, Steven A; Santos Koos, Lindsey M

    2015-04-01

    The completion of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community with an ideal evaluation and testing facility for future long duration human activities in space. Ionized and secondary neutral particles radiation measurements inside ISS form the ideal tool for validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear reaction cross sections and transport codes. Studies using thermo-luminescent detectors (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TPEC), and computer aided design (CAD) models of early ISS configurations confirmed that, as input, computational dosimetry at low Earth orbit (LEO) requires an environmental model with directional (anisotropic) capability to properly describe the exposure of trapped protons within ISS. At LEO, ISS encounters exposure from trapped electrons, protons and geomagnetically attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). For short duration studies at LEO, one can ignore trapped electrons and ever present GCR exposure contributions during quiet times. However, within the trapped proton field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of proton exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensity of trapped particles. Among the established trapped models are the historic AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. Since at LEO electrons have minimal exposure contribution to ISS, this work ignores the AE8 and AE9 components of the models and couples a measurement derived anisotropic trapped proton formalism to omnidirectional output from the AP8 and AP9 models, allowing the assessment of the differences between the two proton models. The assessment is done at a target point within the ISS-11A configuration (circa 2003) crew quarter (CQ) of Russian Zvezda service module (SM), during its ascending and descending nodes passes through the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The anisotropic formalism incorporates the contributions of proton narrow

  19. Proton therapy - Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David

    2017-01-15

    In principle, proton therapy offers a substantial clinical advantage over conventional photon therapy. This is because of the unique depth-dose characteristics of protons, which can be exploited to achieve significant reductions in normal tissue doses proximal and distal to the target volume. These may, in turn, allow escalation of tumor doses and greater sparing of normal tissues, thus potentially improving local control and survival while at the same time reducing toxicity and improving quality of life. Protons, accelerated to therapeutic energies ranging from 70 to 250MeV, typically with a cyclotron or a synchrotron, are transported to the treatment room where they enter the treatment head mounted on a rotating gantry. The initial thin beams of protons are spread laterally and longitudinally and shaped appropriately to deliver treatments. Spreading and shaping can be achieved by electro-mechanical means to treat the patients with "passively-scattered proton therapy" (PSPT) or using magnetic scanning of thin "beamlets" of protons of a sequence of initial energies. The latter technique can be used to treat patients with optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), the most powerful proton modality. Despite the high potential of proton therapy, the clinical evidence supporting the broad use of protons is mixed. It is generally acknowledged that proton therapy is safe, effective and recommended for many types of pediatric cancers, ocular melanomas, chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Although promising results have been and continue to be reported for many other types of cancers, they are based on small studies. Considering the high cost of establishing and operating proton therapy centers, questions have been raised about their cost effectiveness. General consensus is that there is a need to conduct randomized trials and/or collect outcomes data in multi-institutional registries to unequivocally demonstrate the advantage of protons. Treatment planning and plan

  20. Ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of aloesaponarin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Uno, Hidemitsu; Huppert, Dan

    2013-04-25

    Time-resolved emission of aloesaponarin I was studied with the fluorescence up-conversion and time-correlated single-photon-counting techniques. The rates of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, of the solvent and molecular rearrangements, and of the decay from the excited proton-transferred species were determined and interpreted in the light of time-dependent density functional calculations. These results were discussed in conjunction with UV protection and singlet-oxygen quenching activity of aloe.

  1. Synthesis and proton conductibility of ternary germanic heteropoly acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG Xiaoguang; WU Qingyin

    2004-01-01

    The ternary germanic heteropoly acids H5GeW11VO40·22H2O and H5GeMo11VOd0.24H2O were synthesized for the first time by the stepwise acidification and the stepwise addition of solution of the component elements. The products were characterized by ICP, IR, UV, XRD and TG-DTA. The proton conductibility and the activation energy of proton conduction of the heteropoly acids were investigated.

  2. Tomographic image of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Dupre, Raphael; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We determine, based on the latest experimental Deep Virtual Compton Scattering experimental data, the dependence of the spatial size of the proton on the quark's longitudinal momentum. This results in a three-dimensional momentum-space image and tomography of the proton.

  3. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  4. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romaine; C; Nichols; Soon; Huh; Zuofeng; Li; Michael; Rutenberg

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy.

  5. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  6. Ion-proton pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  7. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  8. Ion-proton pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  9. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  10. Towards structural and functional analysis of the plant plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Bo Højen

    The plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a proton pump essential for several physiological important processes in plants. Through the extrusion of protons from the cell, the PM H+-ATPase establishes and maintains a proton gradient used by proton coupled transporters and secondary active transport......, and regulation of H+-ATPases, key questions, in particular concerning the detailed interaction of regulator proteins with the H+-ATPases, remains answering that may require the use of new approaches. In this work the proton pump Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane H+-ATPase isoform 2 has been reconstituted...... into soluble nanoscale lipid bilayers, also termed nanodiscs. Extensive analysis confirms the correct assembly and reconstitution of active proton pump into nanodiscs. The pump inserts as a monomer, which through activity analysis confirms this as the minimal functional unit of the plasma membrane H...

  11. A proton recoil telescope for neutron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donzella, A., E-mail: antonietta.donzella@ing.unibs.i [Universita di Brescia, 38 Via Branze, I-25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, 6 Via Bassi, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Barbui, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 2 Viale dell' Universita, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Bocci, F. [INFN and Universita di Pavia, 6 Via Bassi, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Bonomi, G. [Universita di Brescia, 38 Via Branze, I-25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, 6 Via Bassi, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Cinausero, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 2 Viale dell' Universita, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Fabris, D. [INFN and Universita di Padova, 8 Via Marzolo, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fontana, A. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, 6 Via Bassi, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Giroletti, E. [INFN and Universita di Pavia, 6 Via Bassi, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G. [INFN and Universita di Padova, 8 Via Marzolo, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Necchi, M.M. [Universita di Brescia, 38 Via Branze, I-25123 Brescia (Italy); Pesente, S. [INFN and Universita di Padova, 8 Via Marzolo, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Prete, G.; Rizzi, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 2 Viale dell' Universita, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Viesti, G. [INFN and Universita di Padova, 8 Via Marzolo, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Zenoni, A. [Universita di Brescia, 38 Via Branze, I-25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, 6 Via Bassi, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2010-01-21

    A new proton recoil telescope (PRT) detector is presented: it is composed by an active multilayer of segmented plastic scintillators as neutron to proton converter, by two silicon strip detectors and by a final thick CsI(Tl) scintillator. The PRT can be used to measure neutron spectra in the range 2-160 MeV. The detector characteristics have been studied in detail with the help of Monte Carlo simulations. The overall energy resolution of the system ranges from about 20% at the lowest neutron energy to about 2% at 160 MeV. The global efficiency is about 3x10{sup -5}. Experimental tests have been performed by using the reaction {sup 13}C(d,n) at 40 MeV deuteron energy.

  12. FNAL Proton Source High Intensity Operations and Beam Loss Control

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, F G

    2014-01-01

    The 40-year-old Fermilab Proton Source machines, constituted by the Pre-Injector, Linac and the synchrotron Booster, have been the workhorse of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). During this time, the High Energy Physics Program has demanded an increase in proton throughput, especially during the past decade with the beginning of the neutrino program at Fermilab. In order to achieve a successful program, major upgrades and changes were made in Booster. Once again, the Proton Source has been charged to double their beam throughput, while maintain the present residual activation levels, to meet the laboratory Intensity Frontier program goals until new machines are built and operational to replace the Proton Source machines. This paper discusses the present performance of Booster and the plans involved in reaching even higher intensities.

  13. High specific activity ⁶¹Cu via ⁶⁴Zn(p,α)⁶¹Cu reaction at low proton energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Stefan; Walther, Martin; Preusche, Stephan; Rajander, Johan; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Lill, Jan-Olof; Kaden, Michael; Solin, Olof; Steinbach, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    The PET radionuclide (61)Cu is accessible through several nuclear reactions. Besides the common production route via (61)Ni(p,n)(61)Cu the (64)Zn(p,α)(61)Cu reaction offers some advantages. Especially the comparatively cheap enriched (64)Zn makes this process economical. For fast product purification and recycling of target material an ion exchange cascade was developed. In addition a separation technique with a copper selective resin was tested. (61)Cu with specific activities up to 1000 GBq/μmol was produced with these methods.

  14. Platinum Activated IrO2/SnO2 Nanocatalysts and Their Electrode Structures for High Performance Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Li, Qingfeng; Christensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    , which was attributed to the cooperative effects of improved electric conductivity and synergistic effect of Pt and IrO2/SnO2. Furthermore, catalyst layers based on IrO2/SnO2 catalysts were optimized with respect to microstructures, pore volume and pore size distribution. The performance was obviously...... improved due to the appropriate porosity and pore size distribution. The highest electrolyser performance of 1.63 V at 2 A cm-2 was achieved at 80 °C for optimized catalyst layers containing platinum activated IrO2/SnO2 catalyst....

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a novel proton salt of 2-amino-6-nitrobenzothiazole with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and its metal complexes and their antimicrobial and antifungal activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlkimen, Halil; Yenikaya, Cengiz; Gülbandılar, Aysel; Sarı, Musa

    2016-09-01

    A novel proton transfer compound, (O2NHABT)+(HDPC)-.0.4EtOH (1), obtained from 2-amino-6-nitrobenzothiazole (O2NABT) and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (H2DPC), and its Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes (2-5) have been prepared and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. Additionally, single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques were applied to complexes 3-5. While complexes 3 and 4 have distorted octahedral conformations, complex 5 exhibits a distorted square pyramidal structure. The structure of 2 might be proposed as octahedral according to spectral and analytical results. Furthermore, parent compounds, O2NABT and H2DPC, simple metal complexes of H2DPC, and the synthesised compounds (1-5) were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213) (Gram positive), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) (Gram negative) and Candida krusei (ATCC 6258), Candida parapisilosis(ATCC 22019) (yeast). The results were compared with the control compounds, Vancomycin, Cefepime, Levofloxasin as antibacterial, and Flucanozole as antifungal agents.

  16. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  17. Polarized protons and Siberian snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics

    1999-07-01

    The lecture started with a brief review of the history of polarized proton beams. Then it described the unexpected and still unexplained large transverse spin effects found in high energy proton spin experiments at the ZGS, AGS, and Fermilab. Next there was detailed discussion of Siberian snakes and some of their tests at the IUCF Cooler Ring. Finally there was a review of the use of Siberian Snakes in some possible high energy polarized proton beams at RHIC, HERA and Fermilab. Since a similar lecture is being published elsewhere, this manuscript will only contain this brief summary and the references. (author)

  18. Aspects of the fundamental theory of proton-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1973-01-01

    After recalling the existence of a high energy bound on proton-proton total cross-sections, the author discusses the various phenomena which occur when these cross-sections rise and especially when they have the qualitative behaviour of the bound: rising elastic cross- sections, shrinking diffraction peak, validity of the Pomeranchuk theorem for total and elastic cross-sections, existence of a positive real part of the forward amplitude at high energies. (16 refs).

  19. The proton-proton scattering without Coulomb force renormalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glöckle W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate numerically that proton-proton (pp scattering observables can be determined directly by standard short range methods using a screened pp Coulomb force without renormalization. We numerically investigate solutions of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS equation for an exponentially screened Coulomb potential. For the limit of large screening radii we confirm analytically predicted properties for off-shell, half-shell and on-shell elements of the Coulomb t-matrix.

  20. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  1. Exploring the proton pump and exit pathway for pumped protons in cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Choi, Sylvia K; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet Selim; Chen, Ying; Hemp, James; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2012-04-03

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps. In the current work, the effects of mutations in a proposed exit pathway for pumped protons are examined in the ba(3)-type oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, leading from the propionates of heme a(3) to the interface between subunits I and II. Recent studies have proposed important roles for His376 and Asp372, both of which are hydrogen-bonded to propionate-A of heme a(3), and for Glu126(II) (subunit II), which is hydrogen-bonded to His376. Based on the current results, His376, Glu126(II), and Asp372 are not essential for either oxidase activity or proton pumping. In addition, Tyr133, which is hydrogen-bonded to propionate-D of heme a(3), was also shown not to be essential for function. However, two mutations of the residues hydrogen-bonded to propionate-A, Asp372Ile and His376Asn, retain high electron transfer activity and normal spectral features but, in different preparations, either do not pump protons or exhibit substantially diminished proton pumping. It is concluded that either propionate-A of heme a(3) or possibly the cluster of groups centered about the conserved water molecule that hydrogen-bonds to both propionates-A and -D of heme a(3) is a good candidate to be the proton loading site.

  2. Proton radiography to improve proton radiotherapy: Simulation study at different proton beam energies

    CERN Document Server

    Biegun, A K; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E R; van Beuzekom, M; Visser, J; Brandenburg, S

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4\\% and even up to 10\\% in region containing bone~\\cite{USchneider1995,USchneider1996,WSchneider2000,GCirrone2007,HPaganetti2012,TPlautz2014,GLandry2013,JSchuemann2014}. As a consequence, part of a tumor may receive no dose, or a very high dose can be delivered in healthy ti\\-ssues and organs at risks~(e.g. brain stem)~\\cite{ACKnopf2013}. A transmission radiograph of high-energy protons measuring proton stopping powers directly will allow to reduce these uncertainties, and thus improve the quality of treatment. The best way to obtain a sufficiently accurate radiograph is by tracking individual protons traversing the phantom (patient)~\\cite{GCirrone2007,TPlautz2014,VSipala2013}. In our simulations ...

  3. First tests for an online treatment monitoring system with in-beam PET for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kraan, Aafke C; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Cappucci, F; Ciocca, M; Ferrari, A; Ferretti, S; Mairani, A; Molinelli, S; Pullia, M; Retico, A; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Del Guerra, A; Rosso, V

    2014-01-01

    PET imaging is a non-invasive technique for particle range verification in proton therapy. It is based on measuring the beta+ annihilations caused by nuclear interactions of the protons in the patient. In this work we present measurements for proton range verification in phantoms, performed at the CNAO particle therapy treatment center in Pavia, Italy, with our 10 x 10 cm^2 planar PET prototype DoPET. PMMA phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams and clinical treatment plans, and PET data were acquired during and shortly after proton irradiation. We created 1-D profiles of the beta+ activity along the proton beam-axis, and evaluated the difference between the proximal rise and the distal fall-off position of the activity distribution. A good agreement with FLUKA Monte Carlo predictions was obtained. We also assessed the system response when the PMMA phantom contained an air cavity. The system was able to detect these cavities quickly after irradiation.

  4. First tests for an online treatment monitoring system with in-beam PET for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, A. C.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cappucci, F.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferretti, S.; Mairani, A.; Molinelli, S.; Pullia, M.; Retico, A.; Sala, P.; Sportelli, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2015-01-01

    PET imaging is a non-invasive technique for particle range verification in proton therapy. It is based on measuring the β+ annihilations caused by nuclear interactions of the protons in the patient. In this work we present measurements for proton range verification in phantoms, performed at the CNAO particle therapy treatment center in Pavia, Italy, with our 10 × 10 cm2 planar PET prototype DoPET. PMMA phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams and clinical treatment plans, and PET data were acquired during and shortly after proton irradiation. We created 1-D profiles of the β+ activity along the proton beam-axis, and evaluated the difference between the proximal rise and the distal fall-off position of the activity distribution. A good agreement with FLUKA Monte Carlo predictions was obtained. We also assessed the system response when the PMMA phantom contained an air cavity. The system was able to detect these cavities quickly after irradiation.

  5. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoupil Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2 and hyperon (3/2 resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*’s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  6. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoupil, Dalibor; Bydžovský, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2) and hyperon (3/2) resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*'s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  7. Theoretical Studies of Proton Radioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ldia S Ferreira; Enrico Maglione

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, we will discuss the most recent theoretical approaches developed by our group, to understand the mechanisms of decay by one proton emission, and the structure and shape of exotic nuclei at the limits of stability.

  8. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  9. A New Proton CT Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Coutrakon, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rykalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Naimuddin, M

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction, and preliminary testing of a second generation proton CT scanner is presented. All current treatment planning systems at proton therapy centers use X-ray CT as the primary imaging modality for treatment planning to calculate doses to tumor and healthy tissues. One of the limitations of X-ray CT is in the conversion of X-ray attenuation coefficients to relative (proton) stopping powers, or RSP. This results in more proton range uncertainty, larger target volumes and therefore, more dose to healthy tissues. To help improve this, we present a novel scanner capable of high dose rates, up to 2~MHz, and large area coverage, 20~x~24~cm$^2$, for imaging an adult head phantom and reconstructing more accurate RSP values.

  10. Proton Football European Championship 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Check out the European championship of proton football 2016 at CERN. Produced by: CERN Audiovisual Productions Service Director: Jacques Fichet Editor: Jacques Fichet Music : Burnt of Jingle Punks You can follow us on:

  11. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  12. Proton interactions with high multiplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Afonin, A G; Ardashev, E N; Avdeichikov, V V; Balandin, V P; Basiladze, S G; Batouritski, M A; Berezhnev, S F; Bogdanova, G A; Borzunov, Yu T; Budilov, V A; Chentsov, Yu A; Golovkin, V F; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Grishin, N I; Grishkevich, Ya V; Ermakov, G G; Ermolov, P F; Furmanets, N F; Karmanov, D E; Karpov, A V; Kekelidze, G D; Kireev, V I; Kiryakov, A A; Kholodenko, A G; Kokoulina, E S; Konstantinov, V V; Kramarenko, V N; Kubarovsky, A V; Kulikov, A K; Kuraev, E A; Kurchaninov, L L; Kutov, A Ya; Kuzmin, N A; Leflat, G I Lanschikov A K; Lobanov, I S; Lobanova, E V; Lutov, S I; Lysan, V N; Merkin, M M; Mitrofanov, G A; Myalkovskiy, V V; Nikitin, V A; Peshehonov, V D; Petrov, V S; Petukhov, Y P; Pleskach, A V; Polkovnikov, M K; Popov, V V; Riadovikov, V N; Ronzhin, V N; Rufanov, I A; Senko, V A; Shalanda, N A; Soldatov, M M; Spiryakin, V I; Terletskiy, A V; Tikhonova, L A; Tsyupa, Yu P; Vishnevskaya, A M; Volkov, V Yu; Vorobiev, A P; Voronin, A G; Yakimchuk, V I; Yukaev, A I; Zapolskii, V N; Zhidkov, N K; Zotkin, S A; Zverev, E G

    2011-01-01

    Project Thermalization (Experiment SERP-E-190 at IHEP) is aimed to study the proton - proton interactions at 50 GeV with large number of secondary particles. In this report the experimentally measured topological cross sections are presented taking into account the detector response and procession efficiency. These data are in good agreement with gluon dominance model. The comparison with other models is also made and shows no essential discrepancies.

  13. High intensity protons in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  14. Exploring the proton spin structure

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spin structure of the proton is one of the main challenges in hadronic physics. While the concepts of spin and orbital angular momentum are pretty clear in the context of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the generalization of these concepts to quantum field theory encounters serious difficulties. It is however possible to define meaningful decompositions of the proton spin that are (in principle) measurable. We propose a summary of the present situation including recent developments and prospects of future developments.

  15. Relationship of proton motive force and the F(0)F (1)-ATPase with bio-hydrogen production activity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: effects of diphenylene iodonium, hydrogenase inhibitor, and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Gabrielyan, Lilit; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-08-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC 6521 was able to produce bio-hydrogen (H(2)) in anaerobic conditions under illumination. In this study the effects of the hydrogenase inhibitor-diphenylene iodonium (Ph(2)I) and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) on growth characteristics and H(2) production by R. sphaeroides were investigated. The results point out the concentration dependent DMSO effect: in the presence of 10 mM DMSO H(2) yield was ~6 fold lower than that of the control. The bacterium was unable to produce H(2) in the presence of Ph(2)I. In order to examine the mediatory role of proton motive force (∆p) or the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides, the effects of Ph(2)I and DMSO on ∆p and its components (membrane potential (∆ψ) and transmembrane pH gradient), and ATPase activity were determined. In these conditions ∆ψ was of -98 mV and the reversed ∆pH was +30 mV, resulting in ∆p of -68 mV. Ph(2)I decreased ∆ψ in concentrations of 20 μM and higher; lower concentrations of Ph(2)I as DMSO had no valuable effect on ∆ψ. The R. sphaeroides membrane vesicles demonstrated significant ATPase activity sensitive to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The 10-20 μM Ph(2)I did not affect the ATPase activity, whereas 40 μM Ph(2)I caused a marked inhibition (~2 fold) in ATPase activity. The obtained results provide novel evidence on the involvement of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides. Moreover, these data indicate the role of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in ∆p generation. In addition, DMSO might increase an interaction of nitrogenase with CO(2), decreasing nitrogenase activity and affecting H(2) production.

  16. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  17. A Multiple Scattering Theory for Proton Penetration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dai-Lun; WU Zhang-Wen; JIANG Steve-Bin; LUO Zheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ We extend the electron small-angle multiple scattering theory to proton penetration. After introducing the concept of narrow energy spectra, the proton energy loss process is included in the proton deep penetration theory. It precisely describes the whole process of proton penetration. Compared to the Monte Carlo method,this method maintains the comparable precision and possesses much higher computational efficiency. Thus, it shows the real feasibility of applying this algorithm to proton clinical radiation therapy.

  18. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1{alpha} induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1{alpha} in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1{alpha} whereas it increased HIF-1{alpha} stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  19. Acid extrusion from human spermatozoa is mediated by flagellar voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishko, Polina V; Botchkina, Inna L; Fedorenko, Andriy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2010-02-05

    Human spermatozoa are quiescent in the male reproductive system and must undergo activation once introduced into the female reproductive tract. This process is known to require alkalinization of sperm cytoplasm, but the mechanism responsible for transmembrane proton extrusion has remained unknown because of the inability to measure membrane conductance in human sperm. Here, by successfully patch clamping human spermatozoa, we show that proton channel Hv1 is their dominant proton conductance. Hv1 is confined to the principal piece of the sperm flagellum, where it is expressed at unusually high density. Robust flagellar Hv1-dependent proton conductance is activated by membrane depolarization, an alkaline extracellular environment, endocannabinoid anandamide, and removal of extracellular zinc, a potent Hv1 blocker. Hv1 allows only outward transport of protons and is therefore dedicated to inducing intracellular alkalinization and activating spermatozoa. The importance of Hv1 for sperm activation makes it an attractive target for controlling male fertility.

  20. Characterization of uniform scanning proton beams with analytical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demez, Nebi

    Tissue equivalent phantoms have an important place in radiation therapy planning and delivery. They have been manufactured for use in conventional radiotherapy. Their tissue equivalency for proton beams is currently in active investigation. The Bragg-Kleeman rule was used to calculate water equivalent thickness (WET) for available tissue equivalent phantoms from CIRS (Norfolk, VA, USA). WET's of those phantoms were also measured using proton beams at Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI). WET measurements and calculations are in good agreement within ˜1% accuracy except for high Z phantoms. Proton beams were also characterized with an analytical proton dose calculation model, Proton Loss Model (PLM) [26], to investigate protons interactions in water and those phantoms. Depth-dose and lateral dose profiles of protons in water and in those phantoms were calculated, measured, and compared. Water Equivalent Spreadness (WES) was also investigated for those phantoms using the formula for scattering power ratio. Because WES is independent of incident energy of protons, it is possible to estimate spreadness of protons in different media by just knowing WES. Measurements are usually taken for configuration of the treatment planning system (TPS). This study attempted to achieve commissioning data for uniform scanning proton planning with analytical methods, PLM, which have been verified with published measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Depth doses and lateral profiles calculated by PLM were compared with measurements via the gamma analysis method. While gamma analysis shows that depth doses are in >90% agreement with measured depth doses, the agreement falls to <80% for some lateral profiles. PLM data were imported into the TPS (PLM-TPS). PLM-TPS was tested with different patient cases. The PLM-TPS treatment plans for 5 prostate cases show acceptable agreement. The Planning Treatment Volume (PTV) coverage was 100 % with PLM-TPS except for one case in

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR......-microscopy experiment was performed on the protonic conductor Ba-3(Ca1-chiNb2-chi)O9-delta, x = 0.18. The H/D concentration profile of a cross-section of the sample after partial isotopic exchange can be visualised; proton containing La0.9Ca0.1ErO3 was studied up to 200degreesC by Raman spectroscopy. At 200degrees.......8Sr0.2ScO3, La0.9Sr0.1Sc0.9Mg0.1O3 and SrCe0.95Y0.05O3 shows at least three types of proton positions. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V....

  2. Manifestation of proton structure in ridge-like correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiczek, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the CMS collaboration reported a long range in rapidity, near-side ('ridge-like') angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions, so called ridge effect. This surprising observation suggests the presence of a collective flow that resembles the one believed to produce a similar correlation hydrodynamically in heavy-ion collisions. If the hydrodynamic description is valid then the effect is triggered by the initial spatial anisotropy of the colliding matter. Estimating this anisotropy within different models of the proton internal structure in comparison with measured angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collision data could in principle discriminate between different proton models. Inspired by recent theoretical developments, we propose several phenomenological models of the proton structure. Subsequently, we calculate the anisotropy coefficients of the dense matter formed in proton-proton collisions within the formalism of the Monte Carlo Glauber model. We find that some p...

  3. Research on quality testing for active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator%主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器质量检测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程金生; 袁继龙; 李明生

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the quality testing of dose delivery system of the active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator,in order to provide the reference for the quality control of related equipment.Methods In the four therapy rooms,both 0.6 cc chambers and Gafchromic EBT3 films were used,respectively,to test the accelerator for dose reproducibility,dose linearity,dose stability,depth dose distribution,beam scanning position deviation and radiation field uniformity in each therapy room.Results Dose reproducibility variation coefficients are all less than 1.5%,dose linearity's maximum deviations less than 2%,dose stability's deviations less than 2%,depth dose distribution stability within 2%,beam scanning position deviation less than 1 mm,consistency of irradiation field's deviation less than 2 mm,and flatness within ± 5%.Conclusions The indicators about quality testing for the active spot scanning proton and heavy ion accelerator are all in line with the requirements of IEC standards draft.%目的 对主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器剂量传输系统进行质量检测,为相关设备质量检测研究提供参考.方法 在4个治疗室中,分别采用0.6 CC指型电离室和辐射胶片测量质子重离子加速器在每间治疗室的输出剂量重复性、剂量线性、剂量日稳定性、深度剂量分布、束流扫描位置偏差和射野的一致性.结果 4个治疗室分别对应的4个终端的剂量重复性变异系数均<1.5%,剂量线性最大偏差均<2%,剂量日稳定性偏差均<2%,深度剂量分布稳定性均在2%之内,束流扫描位置偏差均<1 mm,射野一致性中射野大小偏差均<2 mm,射野平坦度均<±5%.结论 本研究涉及的主动式点扫描质子重离子加速器质量检测的各项指标均符合国际电工委员会(IEC)相关标准草案的要求.

  4. Protonic conduction domain of indium-doped calcium zirconate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Noriaki; Fukatsu, Norihiko; Ito, Kouhei; Ohashi, Teruo

    1995-05-01

    The conductivities of a protonic conductor, 10 mole percent (m/o) In2O3-doped CaZrO3, were measured in an atmosphere containing hydrogen or deuterium with the 4-wires ac impedance technique at temperatures ranging from 623 to 1673 K. In high oxygen activities, H(+)/D(+)-isotope effects were observed below about 1100 K. The ratio of conductivities of protons to deuterons increased as the temperature decreased and rose to about 1.6 at 673 K. It was made clear by this observation that at low temperatures electrical conduction is dominated by proton and at high temperatures by positive hole, respectively. On the other hand, at high hydrogen activities, the isotope effects were observed up to about 1600 K and it was concluded that proton is dominant below this temperature. Over that temperature, the isotope effects vanished and the electrical conductivities were independent of gas potentials. It was concluded that electrical conduction over 1600 K was dominated by oxide ions. As electrical carriers obey the thermally activated process, the activation energies were calculated by the least squares method. The obtained activation energies of protons, deuterons, positive holes, and oxide ion vacancies were 0.74 +/- 0.05, 0.70 +/- 0.05, 1.21 +/- 0.07, and 2.5 +/- 0.5 eV, respectively. Based on the model of defects equilibria and these experimental findings, the protonic conduction domain of the specimen was determined and is represented in temperature-potential diagrams.

  5. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  6. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  7. The general base in the thymidylate synthase catalyzed proton abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ananda K; Islam, Zahidul; Krueger, Jonathan; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-12-14

    The enzyme thymidylate synthase (TSase), an important chemotherapeutic drug target, catalyzes the formation of 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP), a precursor of one of the DNA building blocks. TSase catalyzes a multi-step mechanism that includes the abstraction of a proton from the C5 of the substrate 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (dUMP). Previous studies on ecTSase proposed that an active-site residue, Y94 serves the role of the general base abstracting this proton. However, since Y94 is neither very basic, nor connected to basic residues, nor located close enough to the pyrimidine proton to be abstracted, the actual identity of this base remains enigmatic. Based on crystal structures, an alternative hypothesis is that the nearest potential proton-acceptor of C5 of dUMP is a water molecule that is part of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) network comprised of several water molecules and several protein residues including H147, E58, N177, and Y94. Here, we examine the role of the residue Y94 in the proton abstraction step by removing its hydroxyl group (Y94F mutant). We investigated the effect of the mutation on the temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and found that these KIEs are more temperature dependent than those of the wild-type enzyme (WT). These results suggest that the phenolic -OH of Y94 is a component of the transition state for the proton abstraction step. The findings further support the hypothesis that no single functional group is the general base, but a network of bases and hydroxyls (from water molecules and tyrosine) sharing H-bonds across the active site can serve the role of the general base to remove the pyrimidine proton.

  8. An S-N2-model for proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism of proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds is suggested. The transition is regarded as totally adiabatic. Two closest water molecules that move synchronously by hindered translation to and from the reaction complex are crucial. The water molecules induce...... a shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor and acceptor. Expressions for the activation barrier and kinetic hydrogen isotope effect are derived. The general scheme is illustrated with the use...... of model molecular potentials, and with reference to the excess proton conductivity in aqueous solution....

  9. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  10. Mechanoassisted Synthesis of Sulfonated Covalent Organic Frameworks with High Intrinsic Proton Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongwu; Xu, Guodong; Hu, Zhigang; Cheng, Youdong; Chi, Chenglong; Yuan, Daqiang; Cheng, Hansong; Zhao, Dan

    2016-07-20

    It is challenging to introduce pendent sulfonic acid groups into modularly built crystalline porous frameworks for intrinsic proton conduction. Herein, we report the mechanoassisted synthesis of two sulfonated covalent organic frameworks (COFs) possessing one-dimensional nanoporous channels decorated with pendent sulfonic acid groups. These COFs exhibit high intrinsic proton conductivity as high as 3.96 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) with long-term stability at ambient temperature and 97% relative humidity (RH). In addition, they were blended with nonconductive polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) affording a series of mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) with proton conductivity up to 1.58 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) and low activation energy of 0.21 eV suggesting the Grotthuss mechanism for proton conduction. Our study has demonstrated the high intrinsic proton conductivity of COFs shedding lights on their wide applications in proton exchange membranes.

  11. Statistical analysis for solar proton events measured by goes spacecraft during the period (1976-1990)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam; Yousef, S.; El-Saied, O. M.

    During the period from January 1976 to January 1990 there were 81 solar proton flares affecting the solar-terrestrial environment, the events measured by GOES spacecraft at Geosynchronous orbit. Proton fluxes are integral 5-minute averages for energies > 10 MeV, given in particle flux unit (pfu) where 1 pfu = 1p/cm^2s^-1sr^-1. The data are published in the comprehensive reports of ``Solar-Geophysical Data'' by NOAA, Boulder - Colorado, USA. Statistical analysis was carried out for 81 solar proton events and their associated solar flares and active regions. The proton flux classified to seven levels from 10 to > 100.000 pfu. The delay time between the maximum flaring on the sun and the maximum proton flux of the event recorded by GOES has been taken into consideration. Also, the correlation between the proton flux and X-ray and radio bursts, and optical importance of the associated flare was performed.

  12. A simple solution of the proton crisis

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2014-01-01

    In this work we suggest a simple theoretical model of the proton able to effectively solve proton spin crisis. Within domain of applicability of this simple model proton consists only of two u quarks and one d quarks (two of which have spin opposite to proton and one identical to proton) and one neutral vector phi meson (with spin two times larger than proton spin and directed identically to proton spin). This model is in full agreement not only with existing DIS experiments, but also with spin and electric charge conservation as well as in a satisfactory agreement with rest mass-energy conservation (since phi meson mass is close to proton rest mass). Our model opens an interesting possibility of the solution of the quarks and leptons families problem (proton is not an absolutely non-strange particle, but only a particle with almost totally effectively hidden strange).

  13. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  14. Towards a proton imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C., E-mail: Carlo.Civinini@fi.infn.i [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Capineri, L. [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Mazzaglia, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Menichelli, D.; Pieri, S. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Hadron therapy for tumor treatment is nowadays used in several medical centres. The main advantage in using protons or light ions beams is the possibility of tightly shaping the radiation dose to the target volume. Presently the spatial accuracy of the therapy is limited by the uncertainty in stopping power distribution, which is derived, for each treatment, from the photon attenuation coefficients measured by X-ray tomography. A direct measurement of the stopping powers will help in reducing this uncertainty. This can be achieved by using a proton beam and a detection system able to reconstruct a tomography image of the patient. As a first step towards such a system an apparatus able to perform a proton transmission radiography (pCR) has been designed. It consists of a silicon microstrip tracker, measuring proton trajectories, and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to determine the particle residual energy. Proton beam and laboratory tests have been performed on the system components prototypes: the main results will be shown and discussed.

  15. Proton pump-driven cutaneous chloride uptake in anuran amphibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Willumsen, Niels J.; Amstrup, Jan

    2003-01-01

    is saturating, voltage independent, and sensitive to DIDS and carbonic-anhydrase inhibitors. Depending on anuran species and probably on acid/base balance of the animal, apical exit of protons is coupled to an exchange of Cl(-) with base (HCO(3)(-)) either in the apical membrane (gamma-type of MR cell......) or in the basolateral membrane (alpha-type MR cell). The gamma-cell model accounts for the rheogenic active uptake of Cl(-) observed in several anuran species. There is indirect evidence also for non-rheogenic active uptake accomplished by a beta-type MR cell with apical base secretion and basolateral proton pumping...... with serosa-negative V(t). In diluted freshwater, exchange of cellular HCO(3)(-) with external Cl(-) seems to be possible only if the proton pump has the additional function of keeping the external concentration of HCO(3)(-) low. Quantitative considerations also lead to the conclusion that with the above...

  16. ω Meson Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, W.; Abdel-Bary, M.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Clement, H.; Dietrich, J.; Doroshkevich, E.; Dshemuchadse, S.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Eyrich, W.; Freiesleben, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Jäkel, R.; Karsch, L.; Kilian, K.; Kuhlmann, E.; Marcello, S.; Morsch, H. P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Schroeder, W.; Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Teufel, A.; Ucar, A.; Wenzel, R.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Zupranski, P.

    One of the experimental programs at the TOF spectrometer located at the COSY-accelerator (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany) is the study of ω-meson production in proton proton collisions (pp → ppω). Recently, a measurement was performed with a polarized beam at an excess energy of ɛ = 129 MeV, which offers the possibility to analyze polarization observables of this reaction channel for the first time. The analyzing power (Ay) of the pp → ppω-reaction was determined to be compatible with zero.

  17. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  18. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  19. Proton therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Michael S; Flampouri, Stella; Hoppe, Bradford S

    2014-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma has gone from an incurable disease to one for which the majority of patients will be cured. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy achieves the best disease control rates and results in many long-term survivors. As a result, a majority of long-term Hodgkin lymphoma survivors live to experience severe late treatment-related complications, especially cardiovascular disease and second malignancies. The focus of research and treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma is to maintain the current high rates of disease control while reducing treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Efforts to reduce late treatment complications focus on improvements in both systemic therapies and radiotherapy. Herein we review the basis for the benefits of proton therapy over conventional X-ray therapy. We review outcomes of Hodgkin lymphoma treated with proton therapy, and discuss the ability of protons to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk and the impact on the most significant late complications related to the treatment.

  20. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  1. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  2. Protons in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cavalletti, R; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiarini, A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Feng, C C; Fiandrini, E; Finelli, F; Fisher, P H; Flaminio, R; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lolli, M; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Massera, F; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mezzanotte, F; Mezzenga, R; Mihul, A; Molinari, G; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Pancaldi, G; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilastrini, R; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Postolache, V; Prati, E; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Recupero, S; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torromeo, G; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A

    2000-01-01

    The proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 200 GeV was measuredby the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 atan altitude of 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the observed spectrum isparameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a substantial secondspectrum was observed concentrated at equatorial latitudes with a flux ~ 70m^-2 sec^-1 sr^-1. Most of these second spectrum protons follow a complicatedtrajectory and originate from a restricted geographic region.

  3. Proton therapy of hypophyseal adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirakova, E.I.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Lyass, F.M.; Snigireva, R.Ya.; Krymskij, V.A. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Nejrokhirurgii; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental' noj Ehndokrinologii i Khimii Gormonov)

    1983-10-01

    The authors present the results of proton therapy in 59 patients with different hypophyseal adenomas. The period of observation lasted from 6 mos. to 5 yrs. Irradiation was done using a multifield-convergent method and a proton beam of the ITEF synchrotron. The beam energy was 200 MeV, the beam diameter 7-15 mm. Radiation response and immediate results were evaluated for all the patients. The least favorable results were noted in the patients with prolactinomas, for which, in addition to irradiation, parlodel therapy is needed. No marked radiation reactions, neurological complications and manifestations of hypopituitarism were observed with the chosen doses and schemes of irradiation.

  4. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  5. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-02

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established.

  6. β-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Shuwei; LI; Zhankui; XIE; Yuanxiang; HUANG; Wenxue; SH

    2005-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the experimental study on β-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line published by our group during the period of 1996―2004, namely the first observation of the β-delayed proton decays of 9 new nuclides in the rare-earth region and the new measurements of β-delayed proton decays of 5 nuclides in the mass (90 region near the N = Z line with the aid of the "p-γ" coincidence in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In the meantime some important experimental technique details were supplemented. The experimental results, including the half-lives, spins, parities, deformations and production reaction cross sections for the 14 nuclei were summarized and compared with the current nuclear-model predictions, and then the following points were represented. (1) The experimental half-lives for 85Mo and 92Rh as well as the predicted "waiting point" nuclei 89Ru and 93Pd are 5―10 times longer than the theoretical predictions given by M(o)ller et al. using a macroscopic-microscopic model. It considerably influences the predictions of the abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp-process. (2) The current-model predictions are not consistent with the experimental assignments of the spins and parities for the proton drip-line nuclei 142Ho and 128Pm. However, the nuclear potential energy surface (PES) calculated by using a Woods- Saxon-Strutinsky method reproduced the experimental results. (3) The Alice code overestimated the production reaction cross sections of the studied 9 rare-earth nuclei by one order of magnitude or two, while HIVAP code overestimated them by one order of magnitude approximately.

  7. The chemistry of protonated species in the martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jane L.

    2015-05-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft entered orbit around Mars on 22 September 2014. The Neutral Gas Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) instrument on this spacecraft will measure the ion densities with unprecedented sensitivity of ∼1 cm-3 above the nominal periapsis altitude ∼150 km. The upper region of the martian ionosphere consists of a suite of ions that have been modeled many times, and several protonated species, for which there are fewer models. We model here the density profiles for 14 major ions that have been modeled previously and 10 additional protonated species, which include the most important 4 species, HCO+, OCOH+, OH+, and N2H+, with smaller densities of several minor species, including H2+, H3+, HOx2+, HNO+, ArH+, and CH+. To the ∼220 reactions that were already in our ionospheric models, we add ∼75 reactions that are of relevance to protonated species, including ion-molecule reactions and dissociative recombination reactions. These reactions also largely complete the chemistry of thermospheric H and H2, which we also show. We first discuss the chemistry of protonated species in general, and then we justify our choices for the rate coefficients of the reactions that we add here. We then describe the major production and loss mechanisms for the four major protonated species. Finally we present density profiles for all 10 protonated species that we consider here for low and high solar activity models, and show that most of their peak densities are anticorrelated with solar activity. This will confer an advantage to the MAVEN mission, which will enter the ionosphere during a period of declining solar activity. We compare our model to two previous models, and show that there are significant differences between them. The results presented here will provide a guide for the mass settings on the NGIMS instrument.

  8. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Conesa del Valle, Z; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B Z; Lansberg, J P; Lourenço, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Thereafter, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in a broader perspective, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  9. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa del Valle, Z. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS-IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Corcella, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E.Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy); Fleuret, F. [LLR, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Ferreiro, E.G. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and IGFAE, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Kartvelishvili, V. [Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB,United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Kopeliovich, B. [Departamento de Fisica Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Instituto de Estudios Avanzados en Ciencias e Ingenieria and Centro, Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Lansberg, J.P. [IPNO, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France); Lourenco, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Martinez, G. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, Nantes (France); Papadimitriou, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois, 60510, U.S.A (United States); Satz, H. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld (Germany); Scomparin, E. [INFN Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino, I-10125 (Italy); Ullrich, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Teryaev, O. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Vogt, R. [Physics Divsion, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Physics Department, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang, J.X. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2011-05-15

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  10. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    OpenAIRE

    Guo-Liang Ma; Adam Bzdak

    2014-01-01

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton-parton cross-section of $\\sigma=1.5 - 3$ mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We pe

  12. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references.

  13. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  14. Proton Conductivity and Operational Features Of PBI-Based Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Precht Noyé, Pernille;

    2005-01-01

    As an approach to high temperature operation of PEMFCs, acid-doped PBI membranes are under active development. The membrane exhibits high proton conductivity under low water contents at temperatures up to 200°C. Mechanisms of proton conduction for the membranes have been proposed. Based...... on the membranes fuel cell tests have been demonstrated. Operating features of the PBI cell include no humidification, high CO tolerance, better heat utilization and possible integration with fuel processing units. Issues for further development are also discussed....

  15. LHC Availability 2016: Proton Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Restart to Technical Stop 3 (TS3) in 2016. This covers the whole proton physics production period of 2016. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  16. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study

  17. The size of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebel, T., E-mail: tbn@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Antognini, A. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Amaro, F. D. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Biraben, F. [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Cardoso, J. M. R. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Covita, D. S. [Universidade de Aveiro, I3N, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Dax, A.; Dhawan, S. [Yale University, Physics Department (United States); Fernandes, L. M. P. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Giesen, A. [Dausinger and Giesen GmbH (Germany); Graf, T. [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Strahlwerkzeuge (Germany); Haensch, T. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Indelicato, P.; Julien, L. [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Kao, C.-Y. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg, Departement de Physique (Switzerland); Kottmann, F. [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik (Switzerland); Bigot, E. Le [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (France); Liu, Y.-W. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Lopes, J. A. M. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); and others

    2012-12-15

    The root-mean-square (rms) charge radius r{sub p} of the proton has so far been known only with a surprisingly low precision of about 1% from both electron scattering and precision spectroscopy of hydrogen. We have recently determined r{sub p} by means of laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift in the exotic 'muonic hydrogen' atom. Here, the muon, which is the 200 times heavier cousin of the electron, orbits the proton with a 200 times smaller Bohr radius. This enhances the sensitivity to the proton's finite size tremendously. Our new value r{sub p} = 0.84184 (67) fm is ten times more precise than the generally accepted CODATA-value, but it differs by 5 standard deviations from it. A lively discussion about possible solutions to the 'proton size puzzle' has started. Our measurement, together with precise measurements of the 1S-2S transition in regular hydrogen and deuterium, also yields improved values of the Rydberg constant, R{sub {infinity} } = 10,973,731.568160 (16) m{sup - 1}.

  18. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  19. Solid-state proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remick, R.J.; Jewulski, J.; Osif, T.

    1989-01-01

    Work on this project is divided into three tasks. In the first, a comprehensive literature review was performed for the purpose of collecting data on solid proton conductors. The data was then analyzed with the goal of correlating physical and chemical characteristics with protonic conductivity in order to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. In the second task, the results of the correlation study were used to choose an electrolyte system in which to work and to aid in the formulation of new candidate proton conductors. Under the third task, a universal test stand was constructed which can measure both electronic and protonic conductivity and which can be converted to use as a solid state fuel cell test stand. Samples of doped SrCe{sub 0.95}Yb{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} have been coated with palladium electrodes and the mechanism responsible for ionic conductivity through this material is currently under study. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Playing with Protons CREATIONS Demonstrator

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2017-01-01

    This document describes Playing with Protons, a CMS education initiative that seeks to enhance teachers’ pedagogical practice with creative, hands-on methodologies through which 10-12 year old students can, in turn, get engaged effectively with science, technology and innovation.

  1. Wide-dynamic-range kinetic investigations of deep proton tunnelling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Sage, J. Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Champion, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Directional proton transport along ‘wires’ that feed biochemical reactions in proteins is poorly understood. Amino-acid residues with high pKa are seldom considered as active transport elements in such wires because of their large classical barrier for proton dissociation. Here, we use the light-triggered proton wire of the green fluorescent protein to study its ground-electronic-state proton-transport kinetics, revealing a large temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect. We show that ‘deep’ proton tunnelling between hydrogen-bonded oxygen atoms with a typical donor-acceptor distance of 2.7-2.8 Å fully accounts for the rates at all temperatures, including the unexpectedly large value (2.5 × 109 s-1) found at room temperature. The rate-limiting step in green fluorescent protein is assigned to tunnelling of the ionization-resistant serine hydroxyl proton. This suggests how high-pKa residues within a proton wire can act as a ‘tunnel diode’ to kinetically trap protons and control the direction of proton flow.

  2. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  3. Trapped Proton Environment in Medium-Earth Orbit (2000-2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Friedel, Reinhard Hans [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kippen, Richard Marc [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This report describes the method used to derive fluxes of the trapped proton belt along the GPS orbit (i.e., a Medium-Earth Orbit) during 2000 – 2010, a period almost covering a solar cycle. This method utilizes a newly developed empirical proton radiation-belt model, with the model output scaled by GPS in-situ measurements, to generate proton fluxes that cover a wide range of energies (50keV- 6MeV) and keep temporal features as well. The new proton radiation-belt model is developed based upon CEPPAD proton measurements from the Polar mission (1996 – 2007). Comparing to the de-facto standard empirical model of AP8, this model is not only based upon a new data set representative of the proton belt during the same period covered by GPS, but can also provide statistical information of flux values such as worst cases and occurrence percentiles instead of solely the mean values. The comparison shows quite different results from the two models and suggests that the commonly accepted error factor of 2 on the AP8 flux output over-simplifies and thus underestimates variations of the proton belt. Output fluxes from this new model along the GPS orbit are further scaled by the ns41 in-situ data so as to reflect the dynamic nature of protons in the outer radiation belt at geomagnetically active times. Derived daily proton fluxes along the GPS ns41 orbit, whose data files are delivered along with this report, are depicted to illustrate the trapped proton environment in the Medium-Earth Orbit. Uncertainties on those daily proton fluxes from two sources are evaluated: One is from the new proton-belt model that has error factors < ~3; the other is from the in-situ measurements and the error factors could be ~ 5.

  4. Squalamine is not a proton ionophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinsky, B S; Smith, R; Frangiosi, A; Vonbaur, B; Pedersen, L

    2000-03-15

    Squalamine, an aminosterol antibiotic isolated from the dogfish shark, creates relatively large defects in phospholipid bilayers, allowing the unrestricted translocation of small molecules across these compromised membranes (B.S. Selinsky, Z. Zhou, K.G. Fotjik, S. R. Jones, N.R. Dollahon, A.E. Shinnar, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1370 (1998) 218-234). However, an aminosterol structurally similar to squalamine was found to act as a proton ionophore in anionic phospholipid vesicles. In contrast with squalamine, gross membrane disruption was not observed with this synthetic analog (G. Deng, T. Dewa, S.L. Regen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118 (1996) 8975-8976). In this report, the ionophoric activity of squalamine was tested in anionic and zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles. No ionophoric activity was observed for squalamine in vesicles comprised of phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), or a mixture of the two lipids. Experiments using radiolabeled squalamine indicated that all of the squalamine added to PG vesicles remained with the vesicles, while approximately one-half of the squalamine added to PC vesicles was incorporated. We have synthesized the aminosterol analog of squalamine possessing ionophoric activity, and its ionophoric activity in PG vesicles was confirmed. The synthetic compound possessed no measurable lytic activity when added to preformed phospholipid vesicles. As both compounds possess significant antimicrobial activity, these results suggest that either multiple mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of aminosterols exist, depending upon the aminosterol structure, or possibly an unrelated common mechanism for antimicrobial activity remains to be discovered.

  5. Development of Interpretive Simulation Tool for the Proton Radiography Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, M C; Wilks, S C; Ross, J S; Huntington, C M; Fiuza, F; Baring, M G; Park, H- S

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography is a useful diagnostic of high energy density (HED) plasmas under active theoretical and experimental development. In this paper we describe a new simulation tool that interacts realistic laser-driven point-like proton sources with three dimensional electromagnetic fields of arbitrary strength and structure and synthesizes the associated high resolution proton radiograph. The present tool's numerical approach captures all relevant physics effects, including effects related to the formation of caustics. Electromagnetic fields can be imported from PIC or hydrodynamic codes in a streamlined fashion, and a library of electromagnetic field `primitives' is also provided. This latter capability allows users to add a primitive, modify the field strength, rotate a primitive, and so on, while quickly generating a high resolution radiograph at each step. In this way, our tool enables the user to deconstruct features in a radiograph and interpret them in connection to specific underlying electromagneti...

  6. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Morth, Jens Preben;

    2007-01-01

    A prerequisite for life is the ability to maintain electrochemical imbalances across biomembranes. In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by the activity of P-type ATPase membrane proteins: H+-ATPase (the proton pump) in plants and fungi 1, 2......, 3 , and Na+,K+-ATPase (the sodium–potassium pump) in animals 4 . The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis 5 . The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na...... define the functional unit of ATP-coupled proton transport across the plasma membrane, and the structure is locked in a functional state not previously observed in P-type ATPases. The transmembrane domain reveals a large cavity, which is likely to be filled with water, located near the middle...

  7. Protic pharmaceutical ionic liquids and solids: aspects of protonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoimenovski, Jelena; Dean, Pamela M; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2012-01-01

    A series of new protic compounds based on active pharmaceutical ingredients have been synthesised and characterised. Some of the salts synthesised produced ionic liquids, while others that were associated with rigid molecular structures tended to produce high melting points. The "protonic" behaviour of these compounds was found to be a major determinant of their properties. Indicator studies, FTIR-ATR and transport properties (Walden plot) were used to probe the extent of proton transfer and ion association in these ionic liquids. While proton transfer was shown to have taken place in all cases, the Walden plot indicated strong ion association in the primary amine based examples due to hydrogen bonding. This was further explored via crystal structures of related compounds, which showed that extended hydrogen bonded clusters tend to form in these salts. These clusters may dictate membrane transport properties of these compounds in vivo.

  8. Analytical calculation of proton linear energy transfer in voxelized geometries including secondary protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Dolney, D; Kondrla, M; Fager, M; Carabe, A

    2016-02-21

    In order to integrate radiobiological modelling with clinical treatment planning for proton radiotherapy, we extended our in-house treatment planning system FoCa with a 3D analytical algorithm to calculate linear energy transfer (LET) in voxelized patient geometries. Both active scanning and passive scattering delivery modalities are supported. The analytical calculation is much faster than the Monte-Carlo (MC) method and it can be implemented in the inverse treatment planning optimization suite, allowing us to create LET-based objectives in inverse planning. The LET was calculated by combining a 1D analytical approach including a novel correction for secondary protons with pencil-beam type LET-kernels. Then, these LET kernels were inserted into the proton-convolution-superposition algorithm in FoCa. The analytical LET distributions were benchmarked against MC simulations carried out in Geant4. A cohort of simple phantom and patient plans representing a wide variety of sites (prostate, lung, brain, head and neck) was selected. The calculation algorithm was able to reproduce the MC LET to within 6% (1 standard deviation) for low-LET areas (under 1.7 keV μm(-1)) and within 22% for the high-LET areas above that threshold. The dose and LET distributions can be further extended, using radiobiological models, to include radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) calculations in the treatment planning system. This implementation also allows for radiobiological optimization of treatments by including RBE-weighted dose constraints in the inverse treatment planning process.

  9. Proton structure functions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  10. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  11. Two different zinc(II)-aqua complexes held up by a metal-oxide based support: Synthesis, crystal structure and catalytic activity of [HMTAH]2[{Zn(H2O)5}{Zn(H2O)4}{Mo7O24}].2H2O (HMTAH = protonated hexamethylenetetramine)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Arumuganathan; A Srinivasarao; T Vijay Kumar; Samar K Das

    2008-01-01

    An inorganic−organic hybrid material, [HMTAH]2[{Zn(H2O)5}{Zn(H2O)4}{Mo7O24}].2H2O (1) (where HMTAH = protonated hxamethylenetetramine) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The compound 1 crystallizes in a monoclinic space group 2/. The crystal data of 1: = 43.12(3), = 12.399(10), = 16.285(13), = 111.131(11), = 8. Its crystal structure shows that two different Zn(II)-aqua complexes, [Zn(H2O)5]2+ and [Zn(H2O)4]2+ are covalently coordinated to a heptamolybdateanion [Mo7O24]6- resulting in an anionic species of polyoxometalate supported zinc-aqua complexes, [{Zn(H2O)}{Zn(H2O)4}{Mo7O24}]2-, that is stabilized with two protonated hexamethylenetetramine cations in the title compound 1. In the crystal structure, both lattice water molecules are found to interact with the heptamolybdate cluster anion and the protonated hexamethylenetetramine cation resulting in an intricate three-dimensional hydrogen bonding network. Interestingly, compound 1 exhibits catalytic activity towards oxidation of some primary alcohols.

  12. The nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans uses a single specific proton pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Beek, Josy; Krause, Nils; Reimann, Joachim; Lachmann, Peter; Ädelroth, Pia

    2013-10-18

    The NO reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans reduces NO to N2O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) → N2O + H2O) with electrons donated by periplasmic cytochrome c (cytochrome c-dependent NO reductase; cNOR). cNORs are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily of integral membrane proteins, comprising the O2-reducing, proton-pumping respiratory enzymes. In contrast, although NO reduction is as exergonic as O2 reduction, there are no protons pumped in cNOR, and in addition, protons needed for NO reduction are derived from the periplasmic solution (no contribution to the electrochemical gradient is made). cNOR thus only needs to transport protons from the periplasm into the active site without the requirement to control the timing of opening and closing (gating) of proton pathways as is needed in a proton pump. Based on the crystal structure of a closely related cNOR and molecular dynamics simulations, several proton transfer pathways were suggested, and in principle, these could all be functional. In this work, we show that residues in one of the suggested pathways (denoted pathway 1) are sensitive to site-directed mutation, whereas residues in the other proposed pathways (pathways 2 and 3) could be exchanged without severe effects on turnover activity with either NO or O2. We further show that electron transfer during single-turnover reduction of O2 is limited by proton transfer and can thus be used to study alterations in proton transfer rates. The exchange of residues along pathway 1 showed specific slowing of this proton-coupled electron transfer as well as changes in its pH dependence. Our results indicate that only pathway 1 is used to transfer protons in cNOR.

  13. Controlling Proton Delivery through Catalyst Structural Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; 221 Science Center, State University of New York at Fredonia, Fredonia NY 14063 USA; Ginovska, Bojana [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Kumar, Neeraj [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Hou, Jianbo [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Raugei, Simone [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Helm, Monte L. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Appel, Aaron M. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Bullock, R. Morris [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; O' Hagan, Molly [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-09-27

    The fastest synthetic molecular catalysts for production and oxidation of H2 emulate components of the active site of natural hydrogenases. The role of controlled structural dynamics is recognized as a critical component in the catalytic performance of many enzymes, including hydrogenases, but is largely neglected in the design of synthetic molecular cata-lysts. In this work, the impact of controlling structural dynamics on the rate of production of H2 was studied for a series of [Ni(PPh2NC6H4-R2)2]2+ catalysts including R = n-hexyl, n-decyl, n-tetradecyl, n-octadecyl, phenyl, or cyclohexyl. A strong correlation was observed between the ligand structural dynamics and the rates of electrocatalytic hydrogen production in acetonitrile, acetonitrile-water, and protic ionic liquid-water mixtures. Specifically, the turnover frequencies correlate inversely with the rates of ring inversion of the amine-containing ligand, as this dynamic process dictates the positioning of the proton relay in the second coordination sphere and therefore governs protonation at either catalytically productive or non-productive sites. This study demonstrates that the dynamic processes involved in proton delivery can be controlled through modifications of the outer coordination sphere of the catalyst, similar to the role of the protein architecture in many enzymes. The present work provides new mechanistic insight into the large rate enhancements observed in aqueous protic ionic liquid media for the [Ni(PPh2NR2)]2+ family of catalysts. The incorporation of controlled structural dynamics as a design parameter to modulate proton delivery in molecular catalysts has enabled H2 production rates that are up to three orders of magnitude faster than the [Ni(PPh2NPh2)]2+complex. The observed turnover frequencies are up to 106 s-1 in acetonitrile-water, and over 107 s-1 in protic ionic liquid-water mixtures, with a minimal increase in overpotential. This material is based upon work supported as part of

  14. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Markus K

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision.\\\\ Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium.\\\\ To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-...

  15. Near Threshold Proton-Proton Fusion in Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Yu, Shen-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    The astrophysical S-factor for proton-proton fusion, S_11(E), is obtained with the nuclear matrix element analytically calculated in pionless effective field theory. To the third order, the zero-energy result S_11(0) and the first energy derivative S'_11(0) are found to be (3.99 \\pm 0.14)* 10^-25 MeV b and S_11(0)*(11.3 \\pm 0.1) MeV^{-1}, respectively; both consistent with the current adopted values. The second energy derivative is also calculated for the first time, and the result S"_11(0) = S_11(0)*(170 \\pm 2) MeV^-2 only contributes at the level of 0.05% to the fusion rate at the solar center, which is smaller than 1% as previously estimated.

  16. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; Status of the proton therapy center at Samsung Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kwang Zoo; Han, Young Yih; Kim, Jin Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  17. Proton radius puzzle in Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Glazek, Stanislaw D

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic lepton-proton bound-state eigenvalue equations for Hamiltonians derived from quantum field theory using second-order renormalization group procedure for effective particles, are reducible to two-body Schroedinger eigenvalue equations with the effective Coulomb potential that exhibits a tiny sensitivity to the characteristic momentum-scale of the bound system. The scale dependence is shown to be relevant to the theoretical interpretation of precisely measured lepton-proton bound-state energy levels in terms of a 4 percent difference between the proton radii in muon-proton and electron-proton bound states.

  18. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  19. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe, E-mail: Christophe.jouvet@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, UMR-7345, Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires (PIIM), Marseille (France)

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  20. Golden Jubilee photos: ISR - The first proton-proton interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) on 16 October 1971, the man in charge of their construction, Kjell Johnsen, presented the "key" to the machine to Edoardo Amaldi, President of Council. Seated on the stage with them for this symbolic event were Victor Weisskopf, Marcel Antonioz, Willy Jentschke (seen on the left of the photo) and Werner Heisenberg (on the far right). On 27 January that year, in a world premier, signals produced by proton-proton collisions had been observed at the ISR. The protons, supplied by the PS, were injected into two identical rings, each measuring 300 metres in diameter, and collided head on at the 8 points where the rings intersected. The installation, which remained in operation until 1984, gave physicists access to a wide range of energies for hadron physics, hitherto restricted to the data from cosmic ray studies. The many technological challenges that were met at the ISR, in the fields of vacuum technology and stochastic cooling for instance,...

  1. Dose energy dependence in proton imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denyak, V.V., E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Paschuk, S.A.; Schelin, H.R.; Rocha, R.L.; Setti, J.A.P.; Klock, M.C.L.; Evseev, I.G. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Yevseyeva, O.I. [Polytechnic Institute of the Rio de Janeiro State University, Nova Friburgo 28610-970 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the earliest works dedicated to proton radiography and proton computed tomography it was shown that the advantage of image creation using proton beams appears when the energy is chosen as small as possible, but enough to pass the object. This phenomenon is based on the great sensitivity of the energy flux of the proton beam in relation to the length and density of the object at the end of the proton range. However, this fact was proved experimentally only with thin detectors, such as photographic films, which detect only part of the exit energy of protons. Another method which is based on the measurement of total exit energy of protons contains two effects that act in opposite ways: the necessary irradiation dose increases when the energy of the proton is reduced. In this work, the dependence of the irradiation dose on proton initial energy was studied using analytical formulas and computer simulations. The investigation shows that the irradiation dose depends slightly on the proton energy beyond the region at the end of the proton range and increases sharply in it.

  2. Gluons and the spin of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubelskyi, Oleksandr

    2010-12-23

    The structure of the proton and the origin of the proton spin has been a puzzle for many years. The EMC collaboration at CERN provided the first experimental data on the spin structure of the proton. The result was almost zero net contribution from quarks. Over the past 20 years new measurements of polarized parton distributions became available. The present value of the quark contribution to the proton spin is one third. The remaining 60 percent of the proton spin come from the gluons and orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons. We investigate how the spin of the proton originates from the spin of its constituents. We study the proton using the phenomenologically accessible parameters such as distribution functions for quarks and gluons. The basic understanding of the proton structure (and in particular its spin structure) is important for interpreting the results of the LHC, which in turn can be used to refine the present knowledge. The proton spin structure gives a detailed information about the dynamical structure of the proton. Based on the present experimental data we suggest that the gluons and quarks play equally important role in the structure of the proton. (orig.)

  3. Calibration of CR-39 with monoenergetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojiao, Duan; Xiaofei, Lan; Zhixin, Tan; Yongsheng, Huang; Shilun, Guo; Dawei, Yang; Naiyan, Wang

    2009-10-01

    Calibration of solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 was carried out with very low-energy monoenergetic protons of 20-100 keV from a Cockcroft Walton accelerator. To reduce the beam of the proton from the accelerator, a novel method was adopted by means of a high voltage pulse generator. The irradiation time of the proton beam on each CR-39 sheet was shortened to one pulse with duration of 100 ns, so that very separated proton tracks around 104 cm-2 can be irradiated and observed and measured on the surface of the CR-39 detector after etching. The variations of track diameter with etching time as well as with proton energy response curve has been carefully calibrated for the first time in this very low energy region. The calibration shows that the optical limit for the observation of etched tracks of protons in CR-39 is about or a little lower that 20 keV, above which the proton tracks can be seen clearly and the response curve can be used to distinguish protons from the other ions and determine the energy of the protons. The extension of response curve of protons from traditionally 20 to 100 keV in CR-39 is significant in retrieving information of protons produced in the studies of nuclear physics, plasma physics, ultrahigh intensity laser physics and laser acceleration.

  4. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  5. $\\beta$3$p$-spectroscopy and proton-$\\gamma$ width determination in the decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to perform a detailed study of the $\\beta$-decay of the dripline nucleus $^{31}$Ar. This will allow a detailed study of the $\\beta$-delayed 3$p$-decay as well as provide important information on the resonances of $^{30}$S and $^{29}$P, in particular the ratio between the $p$- and $\\gamma$- partial widths relevant for astrophysics.

  6. Proton Radiography at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos National Lab uses high energy protons to acquire multiple frame flash radiographic sequences at megahertz speeds: that is, it can make movies of the inside of explosions as they happen. The facility is primarily used to study the damage to and failure of metals subjected to the shock forces of high explosives as well as to study the detonation of the explosives themselves. Applications include improving our understanding of the underlying physical processes that drive the performance of the nuclear weapons in the United States stockpile and developing novel armor technologies in collaboration with the Army Research Lab. The principle and techniques of pRad will be described, and examples of some recent results will be shown.

  7. Proton decay and grand unification

    CERN Document Server

    Senjanovic, Goran

    2009-01-01

    I review the theoretical and experimental status of proton decay theory and experiment. Regarding theory, I focus mostly, but not only, on grand unification. I discuss only the minimal, well established SU(5) and SO(10) models, both ordinary and supersymmetric. I show how the minimal realistic extensions of the original Georgi - Glashow model can lead to interesting LHC physics, and I demonstrate that the minimal supersymmetric SU(5) theory is in perfect accord with experiment. Since no universally accepted model has of yet emerged, I discuss the effective operator analysis of proton decay and some related predictions from a high scale underlying theory. A strong case is made for the improvement of experimental limits, or better the search of, two body neutron decay modes into charged kaons and charged leptons. Their discovery would necessarily imply a low energy physics since they practically vanish in any theory with a desert in energies between M_W and M_GUT.

  8. Proton spin: A topological invariant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2016-11-01

    Proton spin problem is given a new perspective with the proposition that spin is a topological invariant represented by a de Rham 3-period. The idea is developed generalizing Finkelstein-Rubinstein theory for Skyrmions/kinks to topological defects, and using non-Abelian de Rham theorems. Two kinds of de Rham theorems are discussed applicable to matrix-valued differential forms, and traces. Physical and mathematical interpretations of de Rham periods are presented. It is suggested that Wilson lines and loop operators probe the local properties of the topology, and spin as a topological invariant in pDIS measurements could appear with any value from 0 to ℏ 2, i.e. proton spin decomposition has no meaning in this approach.

  9. Characterization and partial purification of a proton translocating ATPase from corn coleoptile tonoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandala, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    ATP-dependent proton translocating activity in microsomal membranes from corn coleoptiles was characterized. Proton pumping activity, detected by either /sup 14/C-methylamine uptake or quinacrine fluorescence quenching, had a broad optimum at pH 7.5, and was substrate specific for MgATP. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, and protonophores were found to inhibit proton transport, while vanadate and oligomycin had little effect. Proton pumping activity was stimulated 10 fold with Cl/sup -/ but was almost completely inhibited by 50 mM, KNO/sub 3/. Uptake studies with /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ indicated the Cl/sup -/ was transported into the microsomal vesicles in response to the pH gradient. ATP-stimulated proton pumping activity was localized on linear density gradients. On sucrose gradients, the activity cosedimented with the marker for endoplasmic reticulum at 1.11 g/cc. Sucrose gradients prepared in the presence of MgCl/sub 2/ were used to shift the ER marker to a heavier density, away from proton pumping activity. Linear dextran gradients also resulted in a clear separation of ATP-stimulated methylamine, thiocyanate, and /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake, from markers for ER, Golgi, mitochondria, and plasma membranes. The tonoplast ATPase was solubilized with octylglucoside and partially purified on linear sucrose gradients. The specific activity of the KNO/sub 3/-sensitive ATPase increased 30-fold during purification.

  10. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Blumenfeld; E Khan; F Maréchal; T Suomijärvi

    2001-08-01

    Recent improvements in the intensities and optical qualities of radioactive beams have made possible the study of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on unstable nuclei. The design and performances of an innovative silicon strip detector array devoted to such experiments are described. The quality of the data obtained are illustrated with recent results obtained at the GANIL facility for unstable oxygen, sulfur and argon isotopes. Methods to analyse the data using phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials are discussed.

  11. Proton Decay Searches with DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be comprised of a beam line and near detector complex at Fermilab, Illinois as well as a massive far detector located 1300 km away at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota. To achieve its rich physics program, DUNE plans to construct a 40kt fiducial volume Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) far detector almost a mile underground. The size, location, and technology of the proposed far detector make it an attractive tool to search for proton decay, which has yet to be observed. Observation of such a rare event requires high sensitivity to the signal and high background rejection rate. A particular background of interest arises from cosmic muons interacting with rock surrounding the detector and producing a variety of particles which can enter the detector and leave signatures similar to that of proton decay. In order to keep this background to a reasonable level without sacrificing signal acceptance efficiency, precise tracking, made possible by the LArTPC technology, is required. Precise 3D localization of proton decay events relies on the detector's ability to identify the prompt emission of scintillation light from proton decay events as the t0-defining signal. Therefore, low background rate and high detection efficiency of this light are the crucial to the search. This work examines these characteristics in a detailed Monte Carlo simulation using DUNE`s far detector reference design and demonstrates a high signal efficiency while keeping the expected number of cosmogenic background events sufficiently low.

  12. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, Jr, J F

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  13. Proton Scattering on Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabid, Ryan; LArIAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LArIAT (Liquid Argon In A Test-beam) is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) positioned in a charged particle beamline whose primary purpose is to study the response of LArTPC's to charged particle interactions. This previously unmeasured experimental data will allow for improvement of Monte Carlo simulations and development of identification techniques, important for future planned LArTPC neutrino experiments. LArIAT's beamline is instrumented to allow for the identification of specific particles as well as measurement of those particles' incoming momenta. Among the particles present in the beamline, the analysis presented here focuses on proton-Argon interactions. This study uses particle trajectories and calorimetric information to identify proton-Argon interaction candidates. We present preliminary data results on the measurement of the proton-Argon cross-section. Liquid Argon In A Test Beam. The work is my analysis made possible through the efforts of LArIAT detector, data, and software.

  14. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  15. Solid-state proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Solid-state proton conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewulski, J. R.; Osif, T. L.; Remick, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling, and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies are described which include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells are presented which include the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms.

  17. Metal Phosphates as Proton Conducting Materials for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana

    The present thesis presents the results achieved during my ph.d. project on a subject of intermediate temperature proton conducting metal phosphates as electrolyte materials for fuel cells and electrolysers. Fuel cells and electrolysers are electrochemical devices with high energy conversion...... with a proton conductivity of above 10-2S cm-1. Chapter 1 of the thesis is an introduction to basics of fuel cell and electrolyser technologies as well as proton conducting materials. Extended discussion on the proton conducting materials, a particularly phosphates is made in Chapter 2. Three major types...... of phosphates were systematically reviewed including solid acids or alkali hydrogen phosphates, pyrophosphates, and rare earth metal phosphates. Demonstration of the fuel cell technology based on solid acid proton conductor CsH2PO4 has inspired the active research in the area. Based on the literature survey...

  18. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks (HOFs): A New Class of Porous Crystalline Proton-Conducting Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Avishek; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Sen, Arunabha; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-08-26

    Two porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) based on arene sulfonates and guanidinium ions are reported. As a result of the presence of ionic backbones appended with protonic source, the compounds exhibit ultra-high proton conduction values (σ) 0.75× 10(-2)  S cm(-1) and 1.8×10(-2)  S cm(-1) under humidified conditions. Also, they have very low activation energy values and the highest proton conductivity at ambient conditions (low humidity and at moderate temperature) among porous crystalline materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs). These values are not only comparable to the conventionally used proton exchange membranes, such as Nafion used in fuel cell technologies, but is also the highest value reported in organic-based porous architectures. Notably, this report inaugurates the usage of crystalline hydrogen-bonded porous organic frameworks as solid-state proton conducting materials.

  19. Hydrogen-bonded proton transfer in the protonated guanine-cytosine (GC+H)+ base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuexia; Wang, Hongyan; Gao, Simin; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-10-13

    The single proton transfer at the different sites of the Watson-Crick (WC) guanine-cytosine (GC) DNA base pair are studied here using density functional methods. The conventional protonated structures, transition state (TS) and proton-transferred product (PT) structures of every relevant species are optimized. Each transition state and proton-transferred product structure has been compared with the corresponding conventional protonated structure to demonstrate the process of proton transfer and the change of geometrical structures. The relative energies of the protonated tautomers and the proton-transfer energy profiles in gas and solvent are analyzed. The proton-transferred product structure G(+H(+))-H(+)C(N3)(-H(+))(PT) has the lowest relative energy for which only two hydrogen bonds exist. Almost all 14 isomers of the protonated GC base pair involve hydrogen-bonded proton transfer following the three pathways, with the exception of structure G-H(+)C(O2). When the positive charge is primarily "located" on the guanine moiety (H(+)G-C, G-H(+)C(C4), and G-H(+)C(C6)), the H(1) proton transfers from the N(1) site of guanine to the N(3) site of cytosine. The structures G-H(+)C(C5) and G-H(+)C(C4) involve H(4a) proton transfer from the N(4) of cytosine to the O(6) site of guanine. H(2a) proton transfer from the N(2) site of guanine to the O(2) site of cytosine is found only for the structure G-H(+)C(C4). The structures to which a proton is added on the six-centered sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds are more prone to proton transfer in the gas phase, whereas a proton added on the minor groove and the sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds is favorable to the proton transfer in energy in the aqueous phase.

  20. Effect of interface on surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Akihiro; Kuroda, Seiichi; Mohamed, Hamdy F M; Tavernier, Bruno

    2013-07-21

    To understand the relationship between surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films, perfluorinated ionomer Nafion® thin films were prepared on different substrates such as glassy carbon (GC), hydrophilic-GC (H-GC), and platinum (Pt) as models for the ionomer film within a catalyst layer. Atomic force microscopy coupled with an electrochemical (e-AFM) technique revealed that proton conduction decreased with film thickness; an abrupt decrease in proton conductance was observed when the film thickness was less than ca. 10 nm on GC substrates in addition to a significant change in surface morphology. Furthermore, thin films prepared on H-GC substrates with UV-ozone treatment exhibited higher proton conduction than those on untreated GC substrates. However, Pt substrates exhibited proton conduction comparable to that of GCs for films thicker than 20 nm; a decrease in proton conduction was observed at ∼5 nm thick film but was still much higher than for carbon substrates. These results indicate that the number of active proton-conductive pathways and/or the connectivity of the proton path network changed with film thickness. The surface morphology of thinner films was significantly affected by the film/substrate interface and was fundamentally different from that of the bulk thick membrane.

  1. Contribution of mitochondrial proton leak to skeletal muscle respiration and to standard metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, D F; Brand, M D

    1996-10-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that the leak of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (proton leak) is a significant contributor to standard metabolic rate (SMR). We found that proton leak accounts for around one-half of the resting respiration rate of perfused rat skeletal muscle. Proton leak is known to make a significant (26%) contribution to the resting respiration rate of isolated rat hepatocytes (M. D. Brand, L.-F. Chien, E. K. Ainscow, D. F. S. Rolfe, and R. K. Porter. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1187: 132-139, 1994). If the importance of proton leak in these isolated and perfused systems is similar to its importance in vivo, then using literature values for the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to SMR, we can calculate that proton leak in liver and skeletal muscle alone accounts for 11-26% (mean 20%) of the SMR of the rat. If proton leak activity in the other tissues of the rat is similar to that in liver cells, then the contribution of proton leak to rat SMR would be 16-31% (mean 25%).

  2. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in electron scattering induced by meson-exchange currents

    CERN Document Server

    Simo, I Ruiz; Barbaro, M B; De Pace, A; Caballero, J A; Megias, G D; Donnelly, T W

    2016-01-01

    We use a relativistic model of meson-exchange currents to compute the proton-neutron and proton-proton yields in $(e,e')$ scattering from $^{12}$C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross section with the relativistic Fermi gas model for a range of kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the $\\Delta$ isobar current. We also analyze the effect of the exchange contribution and show that the direct/exchange interference strongly affects the determination of the np/pp ratio.

  3. A novel treatment of the proton-proton Coulomb force in proton-deuteron Faddeev calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glöckle W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We present resently introduced novel approach to include th e proton-proton (pp Coulomb force into the momentum space three-nucleon (3N Faddeev calculations. It is based on a standard formulation for short range forces and relies on a screening of the long-range Coul omb interaction. In order to avoid all uncertainties connected with an application of the partial wave expansion, unsuitable when working with long-range forces, we apply directly the 3-dimensional pp screened Coulomb t-matrix. That main new ingredient, the 3-dimensional screened pp Coulomb t-matrix, is obtained by a numerical sol ution of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS equation. Using a simple dynamical model for the nuclear part of the interaction we demonstrate the feasibility of that approach. The physical elastic pd scattering amplitude has a well defined screening limit and does not require renormalisation. Well converged elastic pd cro ss sections are obtained at finite screening radii. Also the proton-deuteron (pd breakup observables can be determ ined from the resulting on-shell 3N amplitudes increasing the screening radius. However, contrary to the pd e lastic scattering, the screening limit exists only after renormalisation of the pp t-matrices.

  4. The Response of Debris-Flow Events to Solar Proton Flares (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Mingtao; WEI Fangqiang; ZHANG Jinghong; WANG Hongjuan

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the observation data from Dongchuan Debris Flow Observation and Research Station and historical data from year 1965 to 1990 gotten from National Astronomical Observatories/ Yunnan Observatory, the responding of debris flow in Jiangjia Ravine to Solar Proton Flare is studied. The following conclusion can be drawn. Solar Proton Flare, as one of most important astronomical factors, affects the activity of debris flow in Yunnan. Generally, from 1965 to 1990, the more active Solar Proton Flare is, the greater the probability of high frequency and large runoff of debris flow is. On the contrary, the less active Solar Proton Flare is, the greater the probability of low frequency, small runoff, and low sediment transport of debris flow is.

  5. Kinetics of proton transport in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Spohr, E.

    2003-01-01

    The excess proton mobility in water has attracted scientific attention for more than a century. Detailed theoretical concepts and models are also presently in strong focus in efforts toward understanding this ubiquitous phenomenon. In the present report, we discuss a theoretical framework...... for rationalizing the excess proton mobility, based on computer simulations, theory of proton transfer (PT) in condensed media, and analysis of classical proton conductivity experiments over broad temperature ranges. The mechanistic options involved are (i) classical hydrodynamic motion of the hydronium ion (H3O......+), (ii) proton transfer from hydronium to a neighboring water molecule, and (iii) structural diffusion of the Zundel complex (H5O2+), the processes all controlled by orientational fluctuations or hydrogen bond breaking in neighboring hydration shells. Spontaneous conversion of excess proton states...

  6. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  7. The ins and outs of proton complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambron, Jean-Claude; Meyer, Michel

    2009-06-01

    Proton complexation differs from simple protonation by the fact that the coordinated hydrogen atom is bound intramolecularly to more than one donor atom. This is usually achieved by covalent bonding supplemented by hydrogen bonding. In a few cases, however, the complexed proton is hydrogen-bound to all donor atoms, which gives rise to single well (SWHB) and low barrier (LBHB) hydrogen bonds. This tutorial review highlights a full range of proton complexes formed with chelating and "proton-sponge"-type ligands, cryptand-like macropolycycles, and molecules of topological relevance, such as rotaxanes and catenanes. The concept of proton complexation can explain how the smallest cation possible can bring molecules to order and trigger intramolecular molecular rearrangements and motions.

  8. Energy Loss of Proton in Extraction Window

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Bao-jie; ZENG; Zi-qiang

    2015-01-01

    The particle is transported in vacuum in accelerator,and is exported through extraction windows.The Kapton foil is used in a 3 MeV proton accelerator.The energy loss of 3 MeV proton is calculated when it comes through Kapton foil of different thicknesses with Monte Carlo method.The energy loss of 3 MeV proton in

  9. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Presti, D. Lo; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.

    2017-02-01

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to 1% and spatial resolutions CT in hadron-therapy.

  10. Accelerating Polarized Protons with Siberian Snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)

    1998-05-01

    There is a brief review of the history of polarized proton beams and the unexpected and still unexplained large transverse spin effects found in high energy proton spin experiments at the ZGS, AGS and Fermilab. Next there is a detailed discussion of Siberian snakes and some of their tests at the IUCF Cooler Ring. Finally there is a report on the use of Siberian snakes in some possible high energy polarized proton beams at RHIC, HERA and Fermilab. (author) 19 refs, 12 figs

  11. Polarized photon or proton Primakoff effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, J.; Vidal, J. (Deparatment de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, e IFIC Centre Mixt Univ. Valencia-CSIC, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)); Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A.; Gonzalez Sprinberg, G.A. (Departmento de Fisica, Universidad Nacionalde La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata, Argentina and CONICET (Argentina))

    1992-02-01

    A proposal to determine the axial coupling of the proton for the neutral strangeness current is discussed. By means of the [gamma][minus][ital Z][minus][pi][degree] triangle anomaly, the parity violating asymmetries for polarized photon or polarized proton Primakoff effect filter the couplings so as to leave the proton axial coupling only. We calculate the relevant observables induced by the electroweak interference and study the regions of energy and [ital Q][sup 2] of possible experimental interest.

  12. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  13. Calcium uptake and proton transport by acidocalcisomes of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rohloff

    Full Text Available Acidocalcisomes are acidic calcium stores found in diverse organisms, being conserved from bacteria to humans. They possess an acidic matrix that contains several cations bound to phosphates, which are mainly present in the form of short and long polyphosphate chains. Their matrix is acidified through the action of proton pumps such as a vacuolar proton ATPase and a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase. Calcium uptake occurs through a Ca(2+/H(+ countertransporting ATPase located in the membrane of the organelle. Acidocalcisomes have been identified in a variety of microorganisms, including Apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Eimeria species, and in Toxoplasma gondii. We report the purification and characterization of an acidocalcisome fraction from T. gondii tachyzoites after subcellular fractionation and further discontinuous iodixanol gradient purification. Proton and calcium transport activities in the fraction were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and spectrophotometric methods using acridine orange and arsenazo III, respectively. This work will facilitate the understanding of the function of acidocalcisomes in Apicomplexan parasites, as we can now isolate highly purified fractions that could be used for proteomic analysis to find proteins that may clarify the biogenesis of these organelles.

  14. Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS), 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J; Benedikt, Michael; Crescenti, M; Holy, P; Maier, A T; Pullia, M; Reimoser, S; Rossi, S; Borri, G; Knaus, P; Gramatica, F; Pavlovic, M; Weisser, L

    2000-01-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) group was formed following an agreement between the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and the TERA Foundation (Italy) to combine their efforts in the design of a cancer therapy synchrotron capable of accelerating either light ions or protons. CERN agreed to support and host this study in its PS Division. A close collaboration was also set up with GSI (Germany). The study group was later joined by Onkologie-2000 (Czech Republic). Effort was first focused on the theoretical understanding of slow extraction and the techniques required to produce a smooth beam spill for the conformal treatment of complex-shaped tumours with a sub-millimetre accuracy by active scanning with proton and carbon ion beams. Considerations for passive beam spreading were also included for protons. The study has been written in two parts. The more general and theoretical aspects are recorded in Part I and the specific technical design considerations are presented in the present volume, Part II. An accompa...

  15. Insights into proton translocation in cbb3 oxidase from MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheda, Catarina A; Pisliakov, Andrei V

    2017-03-01

    Heme-copper oxidases are membrane protein complexes that catalyse the final step of the aerobic respiration, namely the reduction of oxygen to water. The energy released during catalysis is coupled to the active translocation of protons across the membrane, which contributes to the establishment of an electrochemical gradient that is used for ATP synthesis. The distinctive C-type (or cbb3) cytochrome c oxidases, which are mostly present in proteobacteria, exhibit a number of unique structural and functional features, including high catalytic activity at low oxygen concentrations. At the moment, the functioning mechanism of C-type oxidases, in particular the proton transfer/pumping mechanism presumably via a single proton channel, is still poorly understood. In this work we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and continuum electrostatics calculations to obtain atomic-level insights into the hydration and dynamics of a cbb3 oxidase. We provide the details of the water dynamics and proton transfer pathways for both the "chemical" and "pumped" protons, and show that formation of protonic connections is strongly affected by the protonation state of key residues, namely H243, E323 and H337.

  16. Recent results on the development of a proton computed tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civinini, C., E-mail: Carlo.Civinini@fi.infn.it [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Florence (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Università di Firenze, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN sez. di Cagliari, S.P. Sestu, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, Via Vienna 2, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via. S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [INFN sez. Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università of Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Università di Firenze, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3, Florence (Italy); Pugliatti, C. [INFN sez. Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università of Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN sez. Catania, Via. S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-12-21

    Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a medical imaging technique based on the use of proton beams with energies above 200 MeV to directly measure stopping power distributions inside the tissue volume. PRIMA (PRoton IMAging) is an Italian collaboration working on the development of a pCT scanner based on a tracker and a calorimeter to measure single protons trajectory and residual energy. The tracker is composed of four planes of silicon microstrip detectors to measure proton entry and exit positions and angles. Residual energy is measured by a calorimeter composed of YAG:Ce scintillating crystals. A first prototype of pCT scanner, with an active area of about 5×5 cm{sup 2}, has been constructed and characterized with 60 MeV protons at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy) and with 180 MeV protons at Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden). A new pre-clinical prototype with an extended active area up to 20×5 cm{sup 2}, real time data acquisition and a data rate up to 1 MHz is under development. A description of the two prototypes will be presented together with first results concerning tomographic image reconstruction.

  17. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level.

  18. Determining the size of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Nowakowski, M

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the Lamb shift of 49,881.88(76) GHz in muonic hydrogen in conjunction with theoretical estimates of the proton structure effects was recently used to deduce an accurate but rather small radius of the proton. Such an important shift in the understanding of fundamental values needs reconfirmation. Using a different approach with electromagnetic form factors of the proton, we obtain a new expression for the transition energy, $\\Delta = E_{2P_{{3}/{2}}}^{f=2} - E_{2S_{{1}/{2}}}^{f=1}$, in muonic hydrogen and deduce a proton radius, $r_p = 0.83623$ fm.

  19. Towards Proton Therapy and Radiography at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, M.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Varentsov, D.; Durante, M.

    2015-04-01

    Protons having energies in the GeV range have been proposed as an alternative to Bragg-peak hadron therapy. This strategy reduces lateral scattering and overcomes uncertainties of particle range and relative biological effectiveness. GeV protons could additionally be used for targeting in image guided stereotactic radiosurgery. We experimentally demonstrated the potential of GeV protons for imaging of biological samples using E=0.8 GeV protons and the pRad setup at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In this setup, a system of magnetic lenses creates a point-to-point mapping from object to detector. This mapping compensates image blur due to lateral scattering inside the imaged (biological) object. We produced 2-dim proton radiographs of biological samples, an anthropomorphic phantom and performed simple dosimetry. High resolution tomographic reconstructions were derived from the 2-dim proton radiographs. Our experiment was performed within the framework of the PANTERA (Proton Therapy and Radiography) project. In the future, the proton microscope PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR) located in the FAIR facility (Darmstadt), will focus on optimizing the technique for imaging of lesions implanted in animals and couple the irradiation with standard radiotherapy.

  20. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, M B; Arendse, G J; Cowley, A A; Richter, W A; Lawrie, J J; Newman, R T; Pilcher, J V; Smit, F D; Steyn, G F; Koen, J W; Stander, J A

    1999-01-01

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  1. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  2. High Energy Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering in Reggeon-Pomeron Exchange Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; HU Zhao-Hui; MA Wei-Xing

    2006-01-01

    We initially propose a Reggeon-Pomeron exchange model to describe proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies in this short paper. A calculation for total cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies is performed without any free parameters. Our new finding from this work is that the Reggeon-Pomeron model gives a perfect fit to experimental data of the total cross section at the whole energy region where experimental data exist.

  3. SU-E-T-649: Quality Assurances for Proton Therapy Delivery Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjomandy, B; Kase, Y; Flanz, J; Yorke, E; Followill, D [McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, MI (United States); Klein, E [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Taylor, P [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ainsley, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Safai, S [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen - Psi (Switzerland); Sahoo, N [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pankuch, M [CDH Proton Center, Warrenville, IL (United States); Park, S [McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The number of proton therapy centers has increased dramatically over the past decade. Currently, there is no comprehensive set of guidelines that addresses quality assurance (QA) procedures for the different technologies used for proton therapy. The AAPM has charged task group 224 (TG-224) to provide recommendations for QA required for accurate and safe dose delivery, using existing and next generation proton therapy delivery equipment. Methods: A database comprised of QA procedures and tolerance limits was generated from many existing proton therapy centers in and outside of the US. These consist of proton therapy centers that possessed double scattering, uniform scanning, and pencil beams delivery systems. The diversity in beam delivery systems as well as the existing devices to perform QA checks for different beam parameters is the main subject of TG-224. Based on current practice at the clinically active proton centers participating in this task group, consensus QA recommendations were developed. The methodologies and requirements of the parameters that must be verified for consistency of the performance of the proton beam delivery systems are discussed. Results: TG-224 provides procedures and QA checks for mechanical, imaging, safety and dosimetry requirements for different proton equipment. These procedures are categorized based on their importance and their required frequencies in order to deliver a safe and consistent dose. The task group provides daily, weekly, monthly, and annual QA check procedures with their tolerance limits. Conclusions: The procedures outlined in this protocol provide sufficient information to qualified medical physicists to perform QA checks for any proton delivery system. Execution of these procedures should provide confidence that proton therapy equipment is functioning as commissioned for patient treatment and delivers dose safely and accurately within the established tolerance limits. The report will be published in late

  4. Effects of fotemustine or dacarbasine on a melanoma cell line pretreated with therapeutic proton irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privitera Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that HTB140 melanoma cells have shown a poor response to either protons or alkylating agents, the effects of a combined use of these agents have been analysed. Methods Cells were irradiated in the middle of the therapeutic 62 MeV proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP. Irradiation doses were 12 or 16 Gy and are those frequently used in proton therapy. Four days after irradiation cells were treated with fotemustine (FM or dacarbazine (DTIC. Drug concentrations were 100 and 250 μM, values close to those that produce 50% of growth inhibition. Cell viability, proliferation, survival and cell cycle distribution were assessed 7 days after irradiation that corresponds to more than six doubling times of HTB140 cells. In this way incubation periods providing the best single effects of drugs (3 days and protons (7 days coincided at the same time. Results Single proton irradiations have reduced the number of cells to ~50%. FM caused stronger cell inactivation due to its high toxicity, while the effectiveness of DTIC, that was important at short term, almost vanished with the incubation of 7 days. Cellular mechanisms triggered by proton irradiation differently influenced the final effects of combined treatments. Combination of protons and FM did not improve cell inactivation level achieved by single treatments. A low efficiency of the single DTIC treatment was overcome when DTIC was introduced following proton irradiation, giving better inhibitory effects with respect to the single treatments. Most of the analysed cells were in G1/S phase, viable, active and able to replicate DNA. Conclusion The obtained results are the consequence of a high resistance of HTB140 melanoma cells to protons and/or drugs. The inactivation level of the HTB140 human melanoma cells after protons, FM or DTIC treatments was not enhanced by their combined application.

  5. Saturating Cronin effect in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Fái, G; Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Fai, George

    2000-01-01

    Pion and photon production cross sections are analyzed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at energies 20 GeV < s^1/2 < 60 GeV. We separate the proton-proton and nuclear contributions to transverse-momentum broadening and suggest a new mechanism for the nuclear enhancement in the high transverse-momentum region.

  6. Instrumental and analytic techniques for separating protons from electrons in the cosmic ray flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crannell, C. J.; Jones, W. V.; Kurz, R. J.; Silverberg, R. F.; Viehmann, W.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques are being investigated to aid in distinguishing between electrons and the large background of interacting protons which simulate electron-induced electromagnetic cascades. For cosmic ray primaries, incident on the HECRE ionization spectrometer, statistical criteria are employed to test the cascade curves with the incident energy and starting point as free parameters. The physical significance of the distribution of apparent cascade starting points is being studied using Monte Carlo 100-GeV protons. The proposed use of a CsI detector module (totally-active and high Z) to further discriminate against protons is described.

  7. Localized proton MR spectroscopic detection of nonketotic hyperglycinemia in an infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Yoon, Jong Hyun [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    Nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH) is a rare metabolic brain disease caused by deficient activity of the glycine cleveage system. Localized proton MR spectroscopy (echo-time 166 msec), performed in an infant with the typical clinical and biochemical features of neonatal NKH, showed a markedly increased peak intensity at 3.55 ppm, which was assigned to glycine. Serial proton MR spectrosocpic studies indicated that glycine/choline and glycine/total creatine ratios correlated closely with the patient's clinical course. Proton MR spectroscopy was useful for the non-invasive detection and monitoring of cerebral glycine levels in this infant with NKH.

  8. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  9. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yuki, E-mail: ynagao@jaist.ac.jp; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin film was investigated. • The thin film structure differed greatly from the partially protonated one. • Proton transport occurs on the surface, not inside of the thin film. • This result contributes to biological transport systems such as bacteriorhodopsin. - Abstract: Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120–670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  10. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; Nakaji, Taku; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; Koffeman, E.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, shou

  11. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning : a Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; Nakaji, Taku; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; Koffeman, E.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, shou

  12. Universality of multiplicity distribution in proton-proton and electron-positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that the multiplicity distribution in proton-proton ($pp$) collisions, which is often parameterized by the negative binomial distribution, results from the multiplicity distribution measured in electron-positron ($e^{+}e^{-}$) collisions, once the fluctuating energy carried by two leading protons in $pp$ is taken into account.

  13. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, A. [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Research Division, ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), Darmstadt (Germany); Arleo, F. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Palaiseau (France); Universite de Savoie, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Arnaldi, R.; Beraudo, A.; Bruna, E.; Scomparin, E. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Turin (Italy); Caffarri, D.; Lourenco, C.; Woehri, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Del Valle, Z.C.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J.P. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, IPNO, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Contreras, J.G.; Trzeciak, B.A. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Dahms, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Dainese, A. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Djordjevic, M. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics Belgrade (Serbia); Ferreiro, E.G. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, IGFAE, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fujii, H. [University of Tokyo, Institute of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Gossiaux, P.B.; Martinez-Garcia, G.; Peigne, S.; Stocco, D. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Cassagnac, R.G. de; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Palaiseau (France); He, M. [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing (China); Hees, H. van [FIAS, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt (Germany); Horowitz, W.A. [University of Cape Town, Department of Physics, Cape Town (South Africa); Kolevatov, R. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of High Energy Physics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Potashnikova, I.K.; Schmidt, I. [Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Lombardo, M.P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Massacrier, L. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, IPNO, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS-IN2P3, SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, LAL, Orsay (France); Mischke, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Institute for Subatomic Physics, Utrecht (Netherlands); National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nahrgang, M. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham (United States); Nystrand, J. [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen (Norway); Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Rosnet, P. [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire (LPC), Clermont-Ferrand (France); Rakotozafindrabe, A. [IRFU/SPhN, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rapp, R. [Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cyclotron Institute, College Station (United States); Robbe, P. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, LAL, Orsay (France); Rosati, M. [Iowa State University, Ames (United States); Satz, H. [Universitaet Bielefeld, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Bielefeld (Germany); Schicker, R.; Stachel, J. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Schienbein, I. [Universite Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Sharma, R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mumbai (India); Strickland, M. [Kent State University, Department of Physics, Kent (United States); Tieulent, R. [IPN-Lyon, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Uphoff, J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vitev, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physics Division, Livermore (United States); University of California, Physics Department, Davis (United States); Watanabe, K. [University of Tokyo, Institute of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Zhuang, P. [Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Tsinghua University, Physics Department, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photoproduction in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme. (orig.)

  14. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronic, A; Arleo, F; Arnaldi, R; Beraudo, A; Bruna, E; Caffarri, D; Del Valle, Z Conesa; Contreras, J G; Dahms, T; Dainese, A; Djordjevic, M; Ferreiro, E G; Fujii, H; Gossiaux, P-B; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Hadjidakis, C; He, M; van Hees, H; Horowitz, W A; Kolevatov, R; Kopeliovich, B Z; Lansberg, J-P; Lombardo, M P; Lourenço, C; Martinez-Garcia, G; Massacrier, L; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Nahrgang, M; Nguyen, M; Nystrand, J; Peigné, S; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Potashnikova, I K; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Rapp, R; Robbe, P; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Satz, H; Schicker, R; Schienbein, I; Schmidt, I; Scomparin, E; Sharma, R; Stachel, J; Stocco, D; Strickland, M; Tieulent, R; Trzeciak, B A; Uphoff, J; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Watanabe, K; Woehri, H; Zhuang, P

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photoproduction in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7[Formula: see text] Framework Programme.

  15. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A; Arnaldi, R.; Beraudo, A.; Bruna, E.; Caffarri, D.; del Valle, Z.Conesa; Contreras, J.G.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Djordjevic, M.; Ferreiro, E.G.; Fujii, H.; Gossiaux, P.B.; de Cassagnac, R.Granier; Hadjidakis, C.; He, M.; van Hees, H.; Horowitz, W.A.; Kolevatov, R.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Lansberg, J.P.; Lombardo, M.P.; Lourenço, C.; Martinez-Garcia, G.; Massacrier, L.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Nahrgang, M.; Nguyen, M.; Nystrand, J.; Peigné, S.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Potashnikova, I.K.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Rapp, R.; Robbe, P.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Satz, H.; Schicker, R.; Schienbein, I.; Schmidt, I.; Scomparin, E.; Sharma, R.; Stachel, J.; Stocco, D.; Strickland, M.; Tieulent, R.; Trzeciak, B.A.; Uphoff, J.; Vitev, I.; Vogt, R.; Watanabe, K.; Woehri, H.; Zhuang, P.

    2016-01-01

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Unio...

  16. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  17. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Prabhala, Bala K

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguis...

  18. The ATLAS Forward Proton Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Trzebinski, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton Programme - talk for the Low-x 2012 Meeting Quartic anomalous couplings measurement at μ = 46 and a total luminosity of 300 fb−1 is possible. The full AFP simulation in presence of pile-up confirms the gain in sensitivity between one and two orders of magnitude with respect to the standard (non-AFP) ATLAS methods. The use of the AFP allows reaching the values expected in Higgs-less or extra-dimension models. The production of exclusive dijet for μ = 23 and a total luminosity of 40 fb−1 the measurement is possible and interesting due to the huge model uncertainties at present level of the theory understanding. The measurement of the W asymmetry in a specific configuration at low μ allows to get a decisive understanding on the diffractive exchange. For all physics cases, AFP capabilities in terms of proton tagging and timing resolution are key and unique features unprecedented sensitivity to quartic anomalous coupling or novel QCD measurements.

  19. Proton pump inhibitors and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarne Nesgaard; Johansen, Per Birger; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months and a di......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months...... and a discussion of these findings and how this has influenced our understanding of this association, the clinical impact and the underlying pathophysiology. RECENT FINDINGS: New studies have further strengthened existing evidence linking use of PPIs to osteoporosis. Short-term use does not appear to pose a lower...... risk than long-term use. There is a continued lack of conclusive studies identifying the pathogenesis. Direct effects on calcium absorption or on osteoblast or osteoclast action cannot at present plausibly explain the mechanism. SUMMARY: The use of PPIs is a risk factor for development of osteoporosis...

  20. Beta-Delayed Multiparticle Emission Studies at ISOL-type Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Bergmann, U.C. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); EP Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boutami, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cederkaell, J. [EP Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dendooven, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Fraile, L.M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fynbo, H.O.U. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Huang, W.X. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Huikari, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Jading, Y. [EP Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Jeppesen, H. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jokinen, A. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Jonson, B. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Martel, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Meister, M. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, T. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Nyman, G. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Prezado, Y. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Riisager, K. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)] [and others

    2004-12-27

    We report here on the recent {beta}-decay studies made at ISOL-type Facilities to determine the multiparticle breakup mechanism of excited states in light nuclei by studying them in full kinematics. In particular the results obtained for the A = 9 isobars and the breakup of the 12.7 MeV state in {sup 12}C of unnatural parity are discussed. The breakup of the latter has been debated since more than a decade. Mirror beta transitions in the A=9 chain are compared and a large asymmetry factor is deduced for the transitions to high excitation energy in {sup 9}Be (11.8 MeV) and {sup 9}B (12.2 MeV) fed in the {beta}-decay of {sup 9}Li and {sup 9}C respectively. It is shown that the asymmetry is not due to experimental problems or differences in the mechanisms of breakup or in the spin of the states. As no asymmetry is found in the gs to gs transition it must be due to the particular structure of these excited states. The controversy on the breakup mechanism of the 12.7 MeV state is resolved.

  1. Beta-delayed deuteron emission from 11Li: decay of the halo

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The deuteron-emission channel in the beta decay of the halo nucleus 11Li was measured at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator facility at TRIUMF by implanting post-accelerated 11Li ions into a segmented silicon detector. The events of interest were identified by correlating the decays of 11Li with those of the daughter nuclei. This method allowed the energy spectrum of the emitted deuterons to be extracted, free from contributions from other channels, and a precise value for the branching ra...

  2. Decay study of 20Na and its beta-delayed 16O recoiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文学; 徐晓冀; 马瑞昌; 胡志强; 郭俊盛; 郭应祥; 刘洪业; 徐连联

    1997-01-01

    The decay of 20Na of astrophysical reactions has been studied deeply via 20Ne(p, n)20Na reaction. A new β-delayed α decay with α energy of 5 896 ± 6 keV and relative intensity of 0. 002 4 ± 0. 000 3 was discovered. At the same time the 16O recoiling in β+-delayed α decay of 20Na was observed in experiment for the first time. From these, it is inferred that a β-delayed low energy α decay of 20Na with energy of-780 keV and relative intensity of -1.4 was mixed in 16O recoiling. In 16O recoiling and the low energy α decay, the energy loss for low energy charged particles through matter was discussed in detail. At last, two methods for discriminating the β-delayed low energy α decay of 20Na were proposed.

  3. $\\beta$-delayed neutrons from oriented $^{137,139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Grzywacz, Robert; Stone, Nicholas; Köster, Ulli; Singh, Barlaj; Bingham, Carrol; Gaulard, S; Kolos, Karolina; Madurga, Miguel; Nikolov, J; Otsubo, T; Roccia, S; Veskovic, Miroslav; Walker, Phil; Walters, William

    2013-01-01

    We propose a world-­‐first measurement of the angular distribution of $\\beta$-­‐delayed n and $\\gamma$- radiation from oriented $^{137, 139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei, polarised at low temperature at the NICOLE facility. $\\beta$-­‐delayed neutron emission is an increasingly important decay mechanism as the drip line is approached and its detailed understanding is essential to phenomena as fundamental as the r‐process and practical as the safe operation of nuclear power reactors. The experiments offer sensitive tests of theoretical input concerning the allowed and first-­‐forbidden $\\beta$‐decay strength, the spin-­‐density of neutron emitting states and the partial wave barrier penetration as a function of nuclear deformation. In $^{137}$I and $^{87}$Br the decay feeds predominantly the ground state of the daughters $^{136}$Xe and $^{86}$Kr whereas in $^{139}$I and $^{89}$Br we will explore the use of n-$\\gamma$- coincidence to study neutron transitions to the first and second excited state...

  4. $\\beta$-delayed neutrons from oriented $^{137,139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose a world-first measurement of the angular distribution of $\\beta$‐delayed n and $\\gamma$-radiation from oriented $^{137, 139}$I and $^{87,89}$Br nuclei, polarised at low temperature at the NICOLE facility. $\\beta$­-delayed neutron emission is an increasingly important decay mechanism as the drip line is approached and its detailed understanding is essential to phenomena as fundamental as the r‐process and practical as the safe operation of nuclear power reactors. The experiments offer sensitive tests of theoretical input concerning the allowed and first­‐forbidden $\\beta$‐decay strength, the spin-density of neutron emitting states and the partial wave barrier penetration as a function of nuclear deformation. In $^{137}$I and $^{87}$Br the decay feeds predominantly the ground state of the daughters $^{136}$Xe and $^{86}$Kr whereas in $^{139}$I and $^{89}$Br we will explore the use of n-$\\gamma$- coincidence to study neutron transitions to the first and second excited states in the daughters...

  5. Beta-delayed deuteron emission from 11Li: decay of the halo

    CERN Document Server

    Raabe, R; García-Borge, M J; Buchmann, L; Capel, P; Fynbo, H O U; Huyse, M; Kanungo, R; Kirchner, T; Mattoon, C; Morton, A C; Mukha, I; Pearson, J; Ponsaers, J; Ressler, J J; Riisager, K; Ruiz, C; Ruprecht, G; Sarazin, F; Tengblad, O; Van Duppen, P; Walden, P

    2008-01-01

    The deuteron-emission channel in the beta-decay of the halo-nucleus 11Li was measured at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF by implanting post-accelerated 11Li ions into a segmented silicon detector. The events of interest were identified by correlating the decays of 11Li with those of the daughter nuclei. This method allowed the energy spectrum of the emitted deuterons to be extracted, free from contributions from other channels, and a precise value for the branching ratio B_d = 1.30(13) x 10-4 to be deduced for E(c.m.) > 200 keV. The results provide the first unambiguous experimental evidence that the decay takes place essentially in the halo of 11Li, and that it proceeds mainly to the 9Li + d continuum, opening up a new means to study of the halo wave function of 11Li.

  6. NMR analysis, protonation equilibria and decomposition kinetics of tolperisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgován, Gábor; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-05

    The rate constants of spontaneous and hydroxide-catalyzed decomposition and the tautomer-specific protonation constants of tolperisone, a classical muscle relaxant were determined. A solution NMR method without any separation techniques was elaborated to quantitate the progress of decomposition. All the rate and equilibrium constants were determined at four different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The molecular mechanism of decomposition is proposed.

  7. Search for Pentaquark States on Proton Target at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffaella De Vita

    2004-07-01

    Baryon states beyond the usual qqq configuration has been searched for many years but no evidence was found until recently. The findings about a possible pentaquark state have driven a rebirth of the experimental activity in this field. A broad experimental program for the search for pentaquark states is presently in progress at Jefferson Lab with the CLAS detector. In this proceedings the results and perspective for experiments using proton targets are discussed.

  8. Proton mobilities in crambin and glutathione S-transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Corsaro, C.; Hayward, R. L.; Bée, M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2003-08-01

    Using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements derived from window-integrated quasielastic spectra was measured for two D 2O-hydrated proteins: crambin and glutathione S-transferase. Analyses show that the anharmonic dynamics observed around and above 200 K is consistent with a description in terms of proton/deuteron jumps within asymmetric double-minimum potentials. Also determined were activation energies along with estimates of effective masses and average oscillator energies.

  9. Proton-proton correlations in distinguishing the two-proton emission mechanism of $^{23}$Al and $^{22}$Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, D Q; Sun, X Y; Zhou, P; Togano, Y; Aoi, N; Baba, H; Cai, X Z; Cao, X G; Chen, J G; Fu, Y; Guo, W; Hara, Y; Honda, T; Hu, Z G; Ieki, K; Ishibashi, Y; Ito, Y; Iwasa, N; Kanno, S; Kawabata, T; Kimura, H; Kondo, Y; Kurita, K; Kurokawa, M; Moriguchi, T; Murakami, H; Ooishi, H; Okada, K; Ota, S; Ozawa, A; Sakurai, H; Shimoura, S; Shioda, R; Takeshita, E; Takeuchi, S; Tian, W D; Wang, H W; Wang, J S; Wang, M; Yamada, K; Yamada, Y; Yasuda, Y; Yoneda, K; Zhang, G Q; Motobayashi, T

    2016-01-01

    The proton-proton momentum correlation functions ($C_{pp}(q)$) for kinematically complete decay channels of $^{23}$Al $\\rightarrow$ p + p + $^{21}$Na and $^{22}$Mg $\\rightarrow$ p + p + $^{20}$Ne have been measured at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. From the very different correlation strength of $C_{pp}(q)$ for $^{23}$Al and $^{22}$Mg, the source size and emission time information were extracted from the $C_{pp}(q)$ data by assuming a Gaussian source profile in the correlation function calculation code (CRAB). The results indicated that the mechanism of two-proton emission from $^{23}$Al was mainly sequential emission, while that of $^{22}$Mg was mainly three-body simultaneous emission. By combining our earlier results of the two-proton relative momentum and the opening angle, it is pointed out that the mechanism of two-proton emission could be distinguished clearly.

  10. The R/D of high power proton accelerator technology in China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guan Xialing

    2002-12-01

    In China, a multipurpose verification system as a first phase of our ADS program consists of a low energy accelerator (150 MeV/3 mA proton LINAC) and a swimming pool light water subcritical reactor. In this paper the activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China, which includes the intense proton ECR source, the RFQ accelerator and some other technology of HPPA, are described.

  11. Protonation of a Glutamate Residue Modulates the Dynamics of the Drug Transporter EmrE

    OpenAIRE

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate wi...

  12. Nuclear design aspect of the Korean high intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Song, Tae-Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusong, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-01

    A plan to construct a high current proton accelerator has been proposed by KAERI. We are presenting the required nuclear design to support the project as well as a brief overview of the proposed proton accelerator. The target and core design is highlighted to show feasibility of incineration of minor actinides from the spent fuel of light water reactors. Radiation shielding and activation analyses are also important for the design and the license of the accelerator. (author)

  13. BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

    2004-07-05

    One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

  14. First Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Brennan, J. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fliller, R.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; van Zeijts, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Deshpande, A.; Kurita, K.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; Syphers, M.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.; Ranjbar, V.; Tojo, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Okamura, M.; Saito, N.

    2003-05-01

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180° about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV.

  15. [Interaction between clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsze, A.M.; Boer, A. de; Boot, H.; Deneer, V.H.; Heringa, M.; Mol, P.G.; Schalekamp, T.; Verduijn, M.M.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Comte, M. le

    2011-01-01

    The drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel has been the subject of much study in recent years. Contradictory results regarding the effect of proton pump inhibitors on platelet reactivity and on clinical outcome in clopidogrel-treated patients have been reported in literature

  16. Progress of the Intense ECR Proton Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An intense ECR proton source has been developed to meet the needs of intense proton RFQ. The source is tested on a newly built oil-free and high speed test-bench. The feed of microwave, structure ofionization chamber,HV sparks and especially the problem of BN disc facing plasma is investigated. The

  17. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  18. Radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maximon, LC; Tjon, JA

    2000-01-01

    The radiative corrections to elastic electron-proton scattering are analyzed in a hadronic model including the finite size of the nucleon. For initial electron energies above 8 GeV and large scattering angles, the proton vertex correction in this model increases by at least 2% of the overall factor

  19. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  20. Simulation of proton radiography terminal at IMP

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yan; Huang, Zhi-Wu; Wang, Jie; Yao, Ze-En; Wang, Jun-Run; Wei, Zheng; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, You-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography is used for advanced hydrotesting as a new type radiography technology due to its powerful penetration capability and high detection efficiency. A new proton radiography terminal will be developed to radiograph static samples at Institute of Modern Physics of Chinese Academy of Science (IMP-CAS). The proton beam with the maximum energy of 2.6 GeV will be produced by Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooling Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR). The proton radiography terminal consists of the matching magnetic lens and the Zumbro lens system. In this paper, the design scheme and all optic parameters of this beam terminal for 2.6GeV proton energy are presented by simulating the beam optics using WINAGILE code. My-BOC code is used to test the particle tracking of proton radiography beam line. Geant4 code and G4beamline code are used for simulating the proton radiography system. The results show that the transmission efficiency of proton without target is 100%, and the effect of secondary particles ca...

  1. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  2. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2.64E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  3. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.7E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  4. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.85E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  5. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  6. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.3E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  7. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  8. Proton diffusion in SrZr{sub 0.95}Y{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} observed by quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, Noriko; Ishigame, Mareo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Scientific Measurements; Shin, Shik; Shibata, Kaoru

    1999-11-01

    Proton diffusion was observed in Y-dopedSrZrO{sub 3} ceramics above 500 deg C by quasielastic neutron scattering. The line width of the quasielastic component varies with energy transfer Q and temperature. The temperature dependence is well elucidated by the thermal activation-type proton migration with activation energy of 0.2eV. The observed hopping distance was 1.7A, which is comparable to one of the distances between two proton sites. (author)

  9. Microporous Inorganic Membranes as Proton Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichi, F.M. Tejedor-Tejedor, M.I. Anderson, Marc A

    2002-08-28

    Porous oxide electrolyte membranes provide an alternative approach to fabricating proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on inorganic materials. This study focused on elucidating the properties of these inorganic membranes that make them good electrolyte materials in membrane electrode assemblies; in particular, we investigated several properties that affect the nature of proton conductivity in these membranes. This report discusses our findings on the effect of variables such as site density, amount of surface protonation and surface modification on the proton conductivity of membranes with a fixed pore structure under selected conditions. Proton conductivities of these inorganic membranes are similar to conductivities of nafion, the polymeric membrane most commonly used in low temperature fuel cells.

  10. Modelling proton transfer in water molecule chains

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhimanov, Artem; Shutova, Tatiana; Samuelsson, Goran

    2011-01-01

    The process of protons transport in molecular water chains is of fundamental interest for many biological systems. Although many features of such systems can be analyzed using large-scale computational modeling, other features are better understood in terms of simplified model problems. Here we have tested, analytically and numerically, a model describing the classical proton hopping process in molecular water chains. In order to capture the main features of the proton hopping process in such molecular chains, we use a simplified model for our analysis. In particular, our discrete model describes a 1D chain of water molecules situated in an external protein channel structure, and each water molecule is allowed to oscillate around its equilibrium point in this system, while the protons are allowed to move along the line of neighboring oxygen atoms. The occurrence and properties of nonlinear solitary transport structures, allowing for much faster proton transport, are discussed, and the possible implications of...

  11. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Varentsov, D; Bakhmutova, A; Barnes, C W; Bogdanov, A; Danly, C R; Efimov, S; Endres, M; Fertman, A; Golubev, A A; Hoffmann, D H H; Ionita, B; Kantsyrev, A; Krasik, Ya E; Lang, P M; Lomonosov, I; Mariam, F G; Markov, N; Merrill, F E; Mintsev, V B; Nikolaev, D; Panyushkin, V; Rodionova, M; Schanz, M; Schoenberg, K; Semennikov, A; Shestov, L; Skachkov, V S; Turtikov, V; Udrea, S; Vasylyev, O; Weyrich, K; Wilde, C; Zubareva, A

    2015-01-01

    Recently a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR) has been designed, constructed and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum f\\"ur Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 um spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demostrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI.

  12. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, S.; Nair, Balakrishnan G.; Small, Troy; Heck, Brian

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  13. Mechanism of proton transport in ionic-liquid-doped perfluorosulfonic acid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Milan; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2013-11-21

    Ionic-liquid-doped perfluorosulfonic acid membranes (PFSA) are promising electrolytes for intermediate/high-temperature fuel cell applications. In the present study, we examine proton-transport pathways in a triethylammonium-triflate (TEATF) ionic liquid (IL)-doped Nafion membrane using quantum chemistry calculations. The IL-doped membrane matrix contains triflic acid (TFA), triflate anions (TFA(-)), triethylamine (TEA), and triethylammonium cations (TEAH(+)). Results show that proton abstraction from the sulfonic acid end groups in the membrane by TFA(-) facilitates TEAH(+) interaction with the side-chains. In the IL-doped PFSA membrane matrix, proton transfer from TFA to TEA and TFA to TFA(-) occurs. However, proton transfer from a tertiary amine cation (TEAH(+)) to a tertiary amine (TEA) does not occur without an interaction with an anion (TFA(-)). An anion interaction with the amine increases its basicity, and as a consequence, it takes a proton from a cation either instantly (if the cation is freely moving) or with a small activation energy barrier of 2.62 kcal/mol (if the cation is interacting with another anion). The quantum chemistry calculations predict that anions are responsible for proton-exchange between cations and neutral molecules of a tertiary amine. Results from this study can assist the experimental choice of IL to provide enhanced proton conduction in PFSA membrane environments.

  14. Progress On Neutrino-Proton Neutral-Current Scattering In MicroBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, Stephen [New Mexico State U.

    2017-01-16

    The MicroBooNE Experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, an 89-ton active mass liquid argon time projection chamber, affords a unique opportunity to observe low-$Q^2$ neutral-current neutrino-proton scattering events. Neutral-current neutrino-proton scattering at $Q^2 < 1$ GeV$^2$ is dominated by the proton's axial form factor, which can be written as a combination of contributions from the up, down, and strange quarks: $G_A(Q^2) = \\frac{1}{2}[-G_A^u(Q^2)+G_A^d(Q^2)+G_A^s(Q^2)]$. The contribution from up and down quarks has been established in past charged-current measurements. The contribution from strange quarks at low $Q^2$ remains unmeasured; this is of great interest since the strange quark contribution to the proton spin can be determined from the low-$Q^2$ behavior: $\\Delta S = G_A^s(Q^2=0)$. MicroBooNE began operating in the Booster Neutrino Beam in October 2015. I will present the status in observing isolated proton tracks in the MicroBooNE detector as a signature for neutral-current neutrino-proton events. The sensitivity of the MicroBooNE experiment for measuring the strange quark contribution to the proton spin will be discussed.

  15. Proton induced luminescence of minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo del Castillo, H.; Millan, A.; Calderon, T. [Depto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra. Colmenar, km. 15, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Beneitez, P. [Departamento Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ruvalcaba S, J.L. [lFUNAM, Circuito de la lnvestigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of Ionoluminescence (IL) for several minerals commonly found in jewellery pieces and/or artefacts of historical interest. Samples including silicates and non-silicates (native elements, halide, oxide, carbonate and phosphate groups) have been excited with a 1.8 MeV proton beam, and IL spectra in the range of 200- 900 nm have been collected for each one using a fiber optic coupled spectrometer. Light emissions have been related to Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Pr{sup 3+} ions, as well as intrinsic defects in these minerals. Results show the potential of IL for impurity characterization with high detection limits, local symmetry studies, and the study of the origin of minerals. (Author)

  16. Liquid hydrogen in protonic chabazite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Carlo; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-05-04

    Due to its fully reversible nature, H(2) storage by molecular adsorption could represent an advantage with respect to dissociative processes, where kinetic effects during the charging and discharging processes are present. A drawback of this strategy is represented by the extremely weak interactions that require low temperature and high pressure. High surface area materials hosting polarizing sites can represent a viable way toward more favorable working conditions. Of these, in this contribution, we have studied hydrogen adsorption in a series of zeolites using volumetric techniques and infrared spectroscopy at 15 K. We have found that in H-SSZ-13 zeolite the cooperative role played by high surface area, internal wall topology, and presence of high binding energy sites (protons) allows hydrogen to densify inside the nanopores at favorable temperature and pressure conditions.

  17. The "heartbeat of the proton"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Victor F.

    Once Nino came to my office to tell me about his ideas of studying lepton pair production at PS. I was still not Director General, but Research Director at CERN. In addition to (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) pairs, he wanted to search for (e±μ∓) pairs as a signature of a new lepton carrying its own lepton number. He told me that if such a lepton existed with one GeV mass, it would have escaped detection in hadron accelerator experiments for two reasons: i) it would decay with a lifetime of order 10-11 sec and ii) because there is no π → μ mechanism for such a heavy new lepton: for its production a time-like photon would be needed. Time-like photons could be produced in hadronic interactions: for example in (bar{p}p) annihilation. This was before Lederman-Schwartz and Steinberger had discovered the two neutrinos. To think of a "sequential" Heavy Lepton and to work out the possible ways to get it in a hadron machine was for me extremely interesting Nino had just finished his first high precision work on the muon (g-2). It was some time after the Rochester Conference in 1960. I gave Nino the following suggestion: if you want to search for something so revolutionary as a Heavy Lepton carrying its own lepton number you should work out a proposal for a series of experiments where the study of lepton pairs (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) could be justified in terms of physics accepted by the community. In addition a high intensity antiproton beam was needed. He came later to tell me that he had two very good friends, both excellent engineers: Mario Morpurgo and Guido Petrucci. A very high intensity antiproton beam could be built to study the electromagnetic form factor of the proton in the time-like region. If the proton was "point-like" in the time-like region, the rate of time-like photons yielding (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) pairs could be accessible to experimental observation, thus allowing to establish some limits on the new Heavy Lepton mass, or to see it, via the (e±μ∓) channel. The

  18. Water exit pathways and proton pumping mechanism in B-type cytochrome c oxidase from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Longhua; Skjevik, Åge A; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis; Walker, Ross C; Götz, Andreas W

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a vital enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen to water and pumps protons across mitochondrial and bacterial membranes. While proton uptake channels as well as water exit channels have been identified for A-type CcOs, the means by which water and protons exit B-type CcOs remain unclear. In this work, we investigate potential mechanisms for proton transport above the dinuclear center (DNC) in ba3-type CcO of Thermus thermophilus. Using long-time scale, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several relevant protonation states, we identify a potential mechanism for proton transport that involves propionate A of the active site heme a3 and residues Asp372, His376 and Glu126(II), with residue His376 acting as the proton-loading site. The proposed proton transport process involves a rotation of residue His376 and is in line with experimental findings. We also demonstrate how the strength of the salt bridge between residues Arg225 and Asp287 depends on the protonation state and that this salt bridge is unlikely to act as a simple electrostatic gate that prevents proton backflow. We identify two water exit pathways that connect the water pool above the DNC to the outer P-side of the membrane, which can potentially also act as proton exit transport pathways. Importantly, these water exit pathways can be blocked by narrowing the entrance channel between residues Gln151(II) and Arg449/Arg450 or by obstructing the entrance through a conformational change of residue Tyr136, respectively, both of which seem to be affected by protonation of residue His376.

  19. Theoretical studies on proton transfer reaction of 3(5)-substituted pyrazoles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alireza Najafi Chermahini; Abbas Teimouri

    2014-01-01

    The inter and intra molecular proton transfer reactions of a series of pyrazole derivatives have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) andMP2 methods implementing 6-311++G(d,p) atomic basis set. The substituents have been selected to cover a wide range of electronic effects. Proton transfer process was studied for mechanisms including single proton transfer, double proton transfer and proton transfer assisted by a water or ammonia molecule. The results showed single proton transfer reactions for interconversion pyrazole derivatives need highest activation energies in the range of 45.7−51.59 and 49.4−53.96 kcal/mol at B3LYP and MP2 levels, respectively. It was found that for the 3-substituted pyrazoles, electron withdrawing groups form stronger dimers but in the 5-substituted tautomers electron donating groups form stronger hydrogen bond. The double proton transfer reactions between dimers were studied and transition states calculated. The ranges of activation energies were found to be 17.51−19.36 and 17.02−17.80 kcal/mol for the C → E and D → D reactions respectively. In addition, the activation energies for the proton transfer reaction assisted by water or ammonia molecules were found to be in the range of 26.62−31.78 and 17.25−22.46 kcal/mol, respectively, calculated at MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  20. Ionic Liquids and New Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belieres, Jean-Philippe

    2004-01-01

    There is currently a great surge of activity in fuel cell research as laboratories across the world seek to take advantage of the high energy capacity provided by &el cells relative to those of other portable electrochemical power systems. Much of this activity is aimed at high temperature fie1 cells, and a vital component of such &el cells must be the availability of a high temperature stable proton-permeable membrane. NASA Glenn Research Center is greatly involved in developing this technology. Other approaches to the high temperature fuel cell involve the use of single- component or almost-single-component electrolytes that provide a path for protons through the cell. A heavily researched case is the phosphoric acid fuel cell, in which the electrolyte is almost pure phosphoric acid and the cathode reaction produces water directly. The phosphoric acid fie1 cell delivers an open circuit voltage of 0.9 V falling to about 0.7 V under operating conditions at 170 C. The proton transport mechanism is mainly vehicular in character according to the viscosity/conductance relation. Here we describe some Proton Transfer Ionic Liquids (PTILs) with low vapor pressure and high temperature stability that have conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems. The first requirement of an ionic liquid is that, contrary to experience with most liquids consisting of ions, it must have a melting point that is not much above room temperature. The limit commonly suggested is 100 C. PTILs constitute an interesting class of non-corrosive proton-exchange electrolyte, which can serve well in high temperature (T = 100 - 250 C) fuel cell applications. We will present cell performance data showing that the open circuit voltage output, and the performance of a simple H2(g)Pt/PTIL/Pt/O2(g) fuel cell may be superior to those of the equivalent phosphoric acid electrolyte fuel cell both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200 C. My work at NASA Glenn Research

  1. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, Lowell D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Focsan, A Ligia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konovalova, Tatyana A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence, Jesse [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowman, Michael K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Molnar, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deli, Jozsef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-06-11

    lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy dissipation. Quenching requires zeaxanthin, a pigment-binding protein PsbS, and low pH in the thylalkoid lumen. Low pH in excess light activates the xanthophyll cycle through the enzyme violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE) which drives deepoxidation of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin. Also a low thylakoid lumen pH activates binding of zeaxanthin to PsbS by protonating carboxylate chains of VDE and PsbS, facilitating attachment to the membrane and the conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin. The low pH also drives ATP synthesis.

  2. Study on Solar Energetic proton (SEP) Prediction using Regression Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) can cause significant effects on electric devices in satellite such as displacement damage and single event effect. It can be dangerous to flight crew/passenger flying high altitude with polar route, and therefore, it is essential that it should be predicted in advance to mitigate radiation exposure risk. However, SEP has been hard to predict, because it is not well-connected solar activities such as solar flare, coronal mass ejection (CME). In this study, we analyzed the variation pattern of proton event from 2000 to 2015, and suggested optimum Gaussian function which can well describe the maximum value of previous event, after then, we finally adopted the regression technique to predict SEP value repetitively. This paper shows that the maximum value and duration of ongoing SEP events can be well predicted, but this model typically has large errors in case of predicting starting point and occurrence of SEP events.

  3. Restoration of electron transport without proton pumping in mammalian mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales-Clemente, Ester; Bayona-Bafaluy, Maria Pilar; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Barrientos, Antoni; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-01-01

    We have restored the CoQ oxidative capacity of mouse mtDNA-less cells (ρ° cells) by transforming them with the alternative oxidase Aox of Emericella nidulans. Cotransforming ρ° cells with the NADH dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ndi1 and Aox recovered the NADH DH/CoQ reductase and the CoQ oxidase activities. CoQ oxidation by AOX reduces the dependence of ρ° cells on pyruvate and uridine. Coexpression of AOX and NDI1 further improves the recycling of NAD+. Therefore, 2 single-protein enzymes restore the electron transport in mammalian mitochondria substituting >80 nuclear DNA-encoded and 11 mtDNA-encoded proteins. Because those enzymes do not pump protons, we were able to split electron transport and proton pumping (ATP synthesis) and inquire which of the metabolic deficiencies associated with the loss of oxidative phosphorylation should be attributed to each of the 2 processes. PMID:19020091

  4. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  5. Magnetically scanned proton therapy beams: rationales and principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. T. L.; Schreuder, A. N.

    2001-06-01

    High-energy proton therapy is finding increased application in radiation oncology because of the unique physical characteristics of proton beams which allow superior conformation of the high-dose region to the target volume. The standard method of "painting" the required dose over the target volume is to use passive mechanical means involving multiple scattering and variable thickness absorbers. However, this technique dose not allow proximal surface dose conformation which can only be achieved using beam scanning techniques. Apart from reducing the integral dose, intensity modulation and inverse planning are possible, there is less activation of the surroundings and no field-specific modification devices are required. However, scanning systems are very complicated and there are very high instantaneous dose rates which require sophisticated control systems.

  6. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Naimuddin, Md; Blazey, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rukalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P

    2015-01-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantageous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  7. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Markus Konrad

    2015-10-01

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision. Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium. To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-ion collisions. The analysis of pp collisions is an essential step towards the extraction of medium influences on the vector meson spectral functions and the thermal radiation in heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the production of electron-positron pairs (dielectrons) in pp collisions at a collision energy of 7 TeV in the ALICE central barrel is analysed. ALICE has unique particle identification capabilities at low momentum. Electrons and positrons are identified with a high purity and combined to pairs. The invariant mass distribution of dielectrons is corrected for detector effects and the selection criteria in the analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. The dielectron invariant mass spectrum of known hadronic sources is calculated based on the cross sections measured in other decay channels using the known decay kinematics. This so called hadronic cocktail represents the dielectron spectrum at the moment of kinematic freeze-out and can be compared to the

  8. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ooi, Motoki [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  9. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  10. Considering protonation as a posttranslational modification regulating protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönichen, André; Webb, Bradley A; Jacobson, Matthew P; Barber, Diane L

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating protein activity, binding affinity, and stability. Compared with established posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitination, posttranslational modification by protons within physiological pH ranges is a less recognized mechanism for regulating protein function. By changing the charge of amino acid side chains, posttranslational modification by protons can drive dynamic changes in protein conformation and function. Addition and removal of a proton is rapid and reversible and, in contrast to most other posttranslational modifications, does not require an enzyme. Signaling specificity is achieved by only a minority of sites in proteins titrating within the physiological pH range. Here, we examine the structural mechanisms and functional consequences of proton posttranslational modification of pH-sensing proteins regulating different cellular processes.

  11. Experimental and Computer Simulation Study of Radioactivity of Materials Irradiated by Intermediate Energy Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Titarenko, Y E; Batyaev, V F; Karpikhin, E I; Zhivun, V M; Mulambetov, R D; Mashnik, S G; Prael, R E; Wilson, W B; Titarenko, Yu. E.

    1999-01-01

    The results of measurements and computer simulations of radioactivities and dose rates as functions of decay time are presented for Pb-nat and Bi-209 irradiated by 1.5-GeV protons, Co-59, Cu-63, and Cu-65 irradiated by 0.13- and 1.2-GeV protons, and Th-232 and U-nat irradiated by 0.1- and 0.8-GeV protons. The activities and dose rates are measured by direct high-precision gamma spectrometry. The irradiations were made using external beams extracted from the ITEP U-10 proton synchrotron. Simulations made using the LCS and CINDER'90 code systems are compared with measurements.

  12. Proton transfer reactions in carbon nanotubes endohedrally functionalized with selected polar amino acid sidechains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi, T.G. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Taraphder, Srabani, E-mail: srabani@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2012-09-11

    Graphical abstract: Free Energies of activation and reaction for intramolecular proton transfer between polar amino acid sidechains and hydroxyl groups inside the core of endohedrally functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EVB based free energy simulation of proton transfer in hydrophobic confinement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoacid sidechain and OH group suspended within carbon nanotube act as reactants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Donors like His and Glu are efficient in confinement aided by local hydrogen bonds. -- Abstract: We use the empirical-valence-bond (EVB) theory to investigate intramolecular proton transfer reactions between a selected set of polar amino acid sidechains and hydroxyl groups suspended inside carbon nanotubes to model the effect of hydrophobic confinement on the energetics of proton transfer involving (i) translocation of an excess protonic charge (with protonated histidine sidechain as donor) and (ii) transformation of a neutral reactant state to a charge-separated product state (with sidechains of Asp, Glu, Ser and Thr as donor). In both the cases, confinement in hydrophobic medium is found to change the associated free energies compared to their respective values in the bulk solution phase. Presence of stable hydrogen bonding within the pore is found to have a significant effect on both free energies of reaction and activation and thus governs the thermodynamic and kinetic feasibilities of these intramolecular reactions in hydrophobic confinement.

  13. Protonic conductors for proton exchange membrane fuel cells: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurado Ramon Jose

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, Nation, which is a perfluorinated polymer, is one of the few materials that deliver the set of chemical and mechanical properties required to perform as a good electrolyte in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. However, Nation presents some disadvantages, such as limiting the operational temperature of the fuel system (So°C, because of its inability to retain water at higher temperatures and also suffers chemical crossover. In addition to these restrictions, Nation membranes are very expensive. Reducing costs and using environmentally friendly materials are good reasons to make a research effort in this field in order to achieve similar or even better fuel-cell performances. Glass materials of the ternary system SiO2-ZrO2-P2O5, hybrid materials based on Nation, and nanopore ceramic membranes based on SiO2 TiO2, Al2O3, etc. are considered at present, as promising candidates to replace Nation as the electrolyte in PEMFCs. These types of materials are generally prepared by sol-gel processes in order to tailor their channel-porous structure and pore size. In this communication, the possible candidates in the near future as electrolytes (including other polymers different than Nation in PEMFCs are briefly reviewed. Their preparation methods, their electrical transport properties and conduction mechanisms are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of these materials with respect to Nation are also discussed.

  14. Protic Salt Polymer Membranes: High-Temperature Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasio, Dominic Francis [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-09-30

    This research on proton-containing (protic) salts directly addresses proton conduction at high and low temperatures. This research is unique, because no water is used for proton ionization nor conduction, so the properties of water do not limit proton fuel cells. A protic salt is all that is needed to give rise to ionized proton and to support proton mobility. A protic salt forms when proton transfers from an acid to a base. Protic salts were found to have proton conductivities that are as high as or higher than the best aqueous electrolytes at ambient pressures and comparable temperatures without or with water present. Proton conductivity of the protic salts occurs providing two conditions exist: i) the energy difference is about 0.8 eV between the protic-salt state versus the state in which the acid and base are separated and 2) the chemical constituents rotate freely. The physical state of these proton-conducting salts can be liquid, plastic crystal as well as solid organic and inorganic polymer membranes and their mixtures. Many acids and bases can be used to make a protic salt which allows tailoring of proton conductivity, as well as other properties that affect their use as electrolytes in fuel cells, such as, stability, adsorption on catalysts, environmental impact, etc. During this project, highly proton conducting (~ 0.1S/cm) protic salts were made that are stable under fuel-cell operating conditions and that gave highly efficient fuel cells. The high efficiency is attributed to an improved oxygen electroreduction process on Pt which was found to be virtually reversible in a number of liquid protic salts with low water activity (< 1% water). Solid flexible non-porous composite membranes, made from inorganic polymer (e.g., 10%indium 90%tin pyrophosphate, ITP) and organic polymer (e.g., polyvinyl pyridinium phosphate, PVPP), were found that give conductivity and fuel cell performances similar to phosphoric acid electrolyte with no need for hydration at

  15. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  16. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariam, Fesseha G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  17. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  18. Hydrogen Energy by Means of Proton Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    , but matching supply and demand in time as well as in form calls for new engineering solutions. Hydrogen as energy carrier and energy storage medium has often been mentioned as an option for the future. A protons is an elementary particles, but at the same time the ion of hydrogen. When hydrogen (H2......) is extracted from water (H2O) it can happen via formation of protons (hydrogen ions, H+) which must be transported away by proton conducting materials to form molecular hydrogen (H2). This process is called electrolysis and converts electrical energy into the chemical energy of a fuel. The reverse process...

  19. Proton Radioactivity Within a Hybrid Metho d

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鸿飞

    2016-01-01

    The proton radioactivity half-lives are investigated theoretically within a hybrid method. The potential barriers preventing the emission of protons are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). The penetrability is calculated with the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. The spectroscopic factor has been taken into account in half-life calculation, which is obtained by employing the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory combined with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) method. The half-lives within the present hybrid method repro-duced the experimental data very well. Some predictions for proton radioactivity are made for future experiments.

  20. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihovilovič Miha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.