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Sample records for beta-cell burst period

  1. The effect of noise on beta-cell burst period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2006-01-01

    isolated and coupled cells has been suggested to be due to stochastic fluctuations of the plasma membrane ions channels, which are supposed to have a stronger effect on single cells than on cells situated in clusters (the channel sharing hypothesis). This effect of noise has previously been studied based...... system, but with a quantitative description of the effect of noise. This approach supports previous investigations of the channel sharing hypothesis....... on numerical simulations. We show here how the application of two recent methods allows an analytic treatment of the stochastic effects on the location of the saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcations, which determine the burst period. Thus, the stochastic system can be analyzed similarly to the deterministic...

  2. Phantom bursting is highly sensitive to noise and unlikely to account for slow bursting in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells show bursting electrical activity with a wide range of burst periods ranging from a few seconds, often seen in isolated cells, over tens of seconds (medium bursting), usually observed in intact islets, to several minutes. The phantom burster model [Bertram, R., Previte, J...

  3. Analysis of the noise-induced bursting-spiking transition in a pancreatic beta-cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, J.; Mosekilde, Erik; Sanjuan, M.A.F.

    2004-01-01

    A stochastic model of the electrophysiological behavior of the pancreatic beta cell is studied, as a paradigmatic example of a bursting biological cell embedded in a noisy environment. The analysis is focused on the distortion that a growing noise causes to the basic properties of the membrane...... potential signals, such as their periodic or chaotic nature, and their bursting or spiking behavior. We present effective computational tools to obtain as much information as possible from these signals, and we suggest that the methods could be applied to real time series. Finally, a universal dependence...

  4. The hyperbolic effect of density and strength of inter beta-cell coupling on islet bursting: a theoretical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xujing

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin, the principal regulating hormone of blood glucose, is released through the bursting of the pancreatic islets. Increasing evidence indicates the importance of islet morphostructure in its function, and the need of a quantitative investigation. Recently we have studied this problem from the perspective of islet bursting of insulin, utilizing a new 3D hexagonal closest packing (HCP model of islet structure that we have developed. Quantitative non-linear dependence of islet function on its structure was found. In this study, we further investigate two key structural measures: the number of neighboring cells that each β-cell is coupled to, nc, and the coupling strength, gc. Results β-cell clusters of different sizes with number of β-cells nβ ranging from 1–343, nc from 0–12, and gc from 0–1000 pS, were simulated. Three functional measures of islet bursting characteristics – fraction of bursting β-cells fb, synchronization index λ, and bursting period Tb, were quantified. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the combined effect of nc and gc. From this we propose to define a dimensionless cluster coupling index or CCI, as a composite measure for islet morphostructural integrity. We show that the robustness of islet oscillatory bursting depends on CCI, with all three functional measures fb, λ and Tb increasing monotonically with CCI when it is small, and plateau around CCI = 1. Conclusion CCI is a good islet function predictor. It has the potential of linking islet structure and function, and providing insight to identify therapeutic targets for the preservation and restoration of islet β-cell mass and function.

  5. The genesis of period-adding bursting without bursting-chaos in the Chay model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhuoqin; Lu Qishao; Li Li

    2006-01-01

    According to the period-adding firing patterns without chaos observed in neuronal experiments, the genesis of the period-adding 'fold/homoclinic' bursting sequence without bursting-chaos is explored by numerical simulation, fast/slow dynamics and bifurcation analysis of limit cycle in the neuronal Chay model. It is found that each periodic bursting, from period-1 to 7, is separately generated by the corresponding periodic spiking pattern through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via a Hopf bifurcation. Consequently, it can be revealed that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure with transitions from spiking to bursting, which is closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence

  6. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  7. Millihertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations and Thermonuclear Bursts from Terzan 5: A Showcase of Burning Regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Altamirano, D.; Chakrabarty, D.; Cumming, A.; Keek, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst,

  8. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  9. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades......, but the mechanisms involved are still not clarified. In this review the information obtained in previous studies is recapitulated together with some of the current attempts to resolve the controversy in the field: identification of the putative progenitor cells, identification of the factors involved...

  10. Periodic or chaotic bursting dynamics via delayed pitchfork bifurcation in a slow-varying controlled system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Zhengdi; Han, Xiujing

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we aim to demonstrate the novel routes to periodic and chaotic bursting, i.e., the different bursting dynamics via delayed pitchfork bifurcations around stable attractors, in the classical controlled Lü system. First, by computing the corresponding characteristic polynomial, we determine where some critical values about bifurcation behaviors appear in the Lü system. Moreover, the transition mechanism among different stable attractors has been introduced including homoclinic-type connections or chaotic attractors. Secondly, taking advantage of the above analytical results, we carry out a study of the mechanism for bursting dynamics in the Lü system with slowly periodic variation of certain control parameter. A distinct delayed supercritical pitchfork bifurcation behavior can be discussed when the control item passes through bifurcation points periodically. This delayed dynamical behavior may terminate at different parameter areas, which leads to different spiking modes around different stable attractors (equilibriums, limit cycles, or chaotic attractors). In particular, the chaotic attractor may appear by Shilnikov connections or chaos boundary crisis, which leads to the occurrence of impressive chaotic bursting oscillations. Our findings enrich the study of bursting dynamics and deepen the understanding of some similar sorts of delayed bursting phenomena. Finally, some numerical simulations are included to illustrate the validity of our study.

  11. MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATION WITH MILLISECOND BURSTS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 AUGUST 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Baolin; Tan Chengming, E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-04-10

    A peculiar microwave quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) accompanying a hard X-ray (HXR) QPP of about 20 s duration occurred just before the maximum of an X6.9 solar flare on 2011 August 9. The most interesting aspect is that the microwave QPP consists of millisecond timescale superfine structures. Each microwave QPP pulse is made up of clusters of millisecond spike bursts or narrowband type III bursts. There are three different frequency drift rates: the global frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse group, the frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse, and the frequency drift rate of individual millisecond spikes or type III bursts. The physical analysis indicates that the energetic electrons accelerating from a large-scale highly dynamic magnetic reconnecting current sheet above the flaring loop propagate downward, impact the flaring plasma loop, and produce HXR bursts. The tearing-mode (TM) oscillations in the current sheet modulate HXR emission and generate HXR QPP; the energetic electrons propagating downward produce Langmuir turbulence and plasma waves, resulting in plasma emission. The modulation of TM oscillation on the plasma emission in the current-carrying plasma loop may generate microwave QPP. The TM instability produces magnetic islands in the loop. Each X-point will be a small reconnection site and will accelerate the ambient electrons. These accelerated electrons impact the ambient plasma and trigger the millisecond spike clusters or the group of type III bursts. Possibly, each millisecond spike burst or type III burst is one of the elementary bursts (EBs). A large number of such EB clusters form an intense flaring microwave burst.

  12. Dynamical analysis of periodic bursting in piece-wise linear planar neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ying; Zhang, Xiaofang; Liang, Minjie; Hua, Tingting; Wang, Yawei

    2015-12-01

    A piece-wise linear planar neuron model, namely, two-dimensional McKean model with periodic drive is investigated in this paper. Periodical bursting phenomenon can be observed in the numerical simulations. By assuming the formal solutions associated with different intervals of this non-autonomous system and introducing the generalized Jacobian matrix at the non-smooth boundaries, the bifurcation mechanism for the bursting solution induced by the slowly varying periodic drive is presented. It is shown that, the discontinuous Hopf bifurcation occurring at the non-smooth boundaries, i.e., the bifurcation taking place at the thresholds of the stimulation, leads the alternation between the rest state and spiking state. That is, different oscillation modes of this non-autonomous system convert periodically due to the non-smoothness of the vector field and the slow variation of the periodic drive as well.

  13. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Nakariakov, Valery M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: pankaj.kumar@nasa.gov [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ∼664–1416 km s{sup −1}. Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ∼70 and ∼140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70–140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172–273 km s{sup −1}. The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  14. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ˜664-1416 km s-1. Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ˜70 and ˜140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, I.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70-140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172-273 km s-1. The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  15. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ∼664–1416 km s −1 . Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ∼70 and ∼140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70–140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172–273 km s −1 . The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  16. Computer measurement system of reactor period for China fast burst reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wuwen; Jiang Zhiguo

    1997-01-01

    The author simply introduces the hardware, principle, and software of the reactor period computer measure system for China Fast Burst Reactor-II (CFBR-II). It also gives the relation between Fission yield and Pre-reactivity of CFBR-II reactor system of bared reactor with decoupled-component and system of bared reactor with multiple light-material. The computer measure system makes the reactor period measurement into automation and intellectualization and also improves the speed and precision of period data process on-line

  17. The computerized reactor period measurement system for China fast burst reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wuwen; Jiang Zhiguo

    1996-01-01

    The article simply introduces the hardware, principle, and software of the computerized reactor period measurement system for China Fast Burst Reactor-II (CFBR-II). It also gives the relation between fission yield and pre-reactivity of CFBR-II reactor system of bared reactor with decoupled-component and system of bared reactor with multiple light-material. The computerized measurement system makes the reactor period measurement into automatical and intelligent and also improves the speed and precision of period data on-line process

  18. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingør, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles...

  19. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges can survive anesthesia and result in asymmetric drug-induced burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced burst suppression (DIBS is bihemispheric and bisymmetric in adults and older children. However, asymmetric DIBS may occur if a pathological process is affecting one hemisphere only or both hemispheres disproportionately. The usual suspect is a destructive lesion; an irritative or epileptogenic lesion is usually not invoked to explain DIBS asymmetry. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with new-onset seizures who was found to have a hemorrhagic cavernoma and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs in the right temporal region. After levetiracetam and before anesthetic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs were administered, the electroencephalogram (EEG showed continuous PLEDs over the right hemisphere with maximum voltage in the posterior temporal region. Focal electrographic seizures also occurred occasionally in the same location. Propofol resulted in bihemispheric, but not in bisymmetric, DIBS. Remnants or fragments of PLEDs that survived anesthesia increased the amplitude and complexity of the bursts in the right hemisphere leading to asymmetric DIBS. Phenytoin, lacosamide, ketamine, midazolam, and topiramate were administered at various times in the course of EEG monitoring, resulting in suppression of seizures but not of PLEDs. Ketamine and midazolam reduced the rate, amplitude, and complexity of PLEDs but only after producing substantial attenuation of all burst components. When all anesthetics were discontinued, the EEG reverted to the original preanesthesia pattern with continuous non-fragmented PLEDs. The fact that PLEDs can survive anesthesia and affect DIBS symmetry is a testament to the robustness of the neurodynamic processes underlying PLEDs.

  20. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators....

  1. Dynamics of ponderomotive self-focusing and periodic bursts of stimulated Brillouin backscattering in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.E.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Tarakanov, S.V.; Zykov, A.I.

    1993-01-01

    The space--time evolution of ponderomotive self-focusing of electromagnetic beams in a plasma is investigated. The quasineutral, hydrodynamic plasma response to the ponderomotive force is considered. The set of coupled quasioptic and acoustic equations is solved both analytically and numerically for slab and cylindrical beams. It is shown that the transient process of self-focusing has the form of a nonlinear wave propagating along the beam axis from boundary into the interior of a plasma with velocity considerably higher than the ion-sound velocity. Mutual dynamics of self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) is computed. It is shown that self-focusing results in the high intensity periodical bursts of SBBS. However, the time average level of scattered radiation is quite low

  2. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved...... in beta cell differentiation and proliferation may lead to new ways of forming beta cells for treatment of diabetes in man....

  3. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...

  4. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators....

  5. Search for bursts of extensive air showers arriving successively over a short period

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Katsufumi; Kitamura, Takashi; Konishi, Takeharu; Chikawa, Michiyuki

    1993-01-01

    [Abstract] Extensive air showers have been observed with eight plastic scintillation counters since June 1991. The time structure of the air shower events is confirmed to follow a Poisson distribution. To search for air shower bursts, we have analyzed arrival times of air showers with an adaptive cluster method and selected five burst candidates. A cluster of four arrival times within 3.87 s was the best candidate. We also suggest that air shower rate increased noticeably at 22 hours sidereal...

  6. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    cloned a novel GH/PRL stimulated rat islet gene product, Pref-1 (preadipocyte factor-1). This protein contains six EGF-like motifs and may play a role both in embryonic pancreas differentiation and in beta cell growth and function. In summary, the increasing knowledge about the mechanisms involved......Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...

  7. Millisecond-Period Meltdown Experiments on Prompt - Burst Effects and Molten-Tin-Water Dropping Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Coats, R.L.; Schmidt, T.R.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program of confirmatory research for the safety assessment of LMFBR plants. In the sodium-fuel interactions area, this research includes a series of real-time in-pile experiments on the pressure and work potential of prompt-burst excursions as well as laboratory dropping experiments with molten tin and water. The in-pile experiments are performed by Sandia Laboratories in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR), which has a minimum period of 1.3 milliseconds. These single-pin experiments are performed in a piston-loaded, stagnant-sodium autoclave, that is conceptually similar to the one used in the S-11 TREAT test. Unlike the S-11 test, however, realistic radial temperature profiles are obtained in the fuel, the cladding, and the sodium by pre-pulsing the reactor about 1/2 second before the main pulse. A series of preparatory runs have been made with helium-filled capsules and at low energy with sodium-filled capsules. The first significant fuel-coolant interaction run is scheduled for late March 1976. This will be a double-pulsed run at 2700 j/gm UO 2 . A continuing series of experiments is planned with oxide and advanced fuels in both fresh and irradiated form. In molten-tin-water dropping experiments at UCLA, microsecond duration multi-flash photography has been used for event diagnostics. Transition or nucleate boiling was found to trigger energetic interactions or vapor explosions. Temperature stratification in the water was found to reduce the threshold tin temperature necessary to produce vapor explosions below that the predicted by the coolant homogeneous nucleation hypothesis. Interaction zone growth times of a few msec were measured

  8. Beta Cell Count Instead of Beta Cell Mass to Assess and Localize Growth in Beta Cell Population following Pancreatic Duct Ligation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintinne, Marie; Stangé, Geert; Denys, Bart; Ling, Zhidong; In ‘t Veld, Peter; Pipeleers, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic-tail duct ligation (PDL) in adult rodents has been reported to induce beta cell generation and increase beta cell mass but increases in beta cell number have not been demonstrated. This study examines whether PDL increases beta cell number and whether this is caused by neogenesis of small clusters and/or their growth to larger aggregates. Methodology Total beta cell number and its distribution over small (100 µm) clusters was determined in pancreatic tails of 10-week-old mice, 2 weeks after PDL or sham. Principal findings PDL increased total beta cell mass but not total beta cell number. It induced neogenesis of small beta cell clusters (2.2-fold higher number) which contained a higher percent proliferating beta cells (1.9% Ki67+cells) than sham tails (beta cell number represented beta cell number and was associated with a similar increase in alpha cell number. It is unknown whether the regenerative process is causally related to the inflammatory infiltration in PDL-tails. Human pancreases with inflammatory infiltration also exhibited activation of proliferation in small beta cell clusters. Conclusions/significance The PDL model illustrates the advantage of direct beta cell counts over beta cell mass measurements when assessing and localizing beta cell regeneration in the pancreas. It demonstrates the ability of the adult mouse pancreas for neogenesis of small beta cell clusters with activated beta cell proliferation. Further studies should investigate conditions under which neoformed small beta cell clusters grow to larger aggregates and hence to higher total beta cell numbers. PMID:22952825

  9. Beta cell count instead of beta cell mass to assess and localize growth in beta cell population following pancreatic duct ligation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Chintinne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic-tail duct ligation (PDL in adult rodents has been reported to induce beta cell generation and increase beta cell mass but increases in beta cell number have not been demonstrated. This study examines whether PDL increases beta cell number and whether this is caused by neogenesis of small clusters and/or their growth to larger aggregates. METHODOLOGY: Total beta cell number and its distribution over small (100 µm clusters was determined in pancreatic tails of 10-week-old mice, 2 weeks after PDL or sham. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PDL increased total beta cell mass but not total beta cell number. It induced neogenesis of small beta cell clusters (2.2-fold higher number which contained a higher percent proliferating beta cells (1.9% Ki67+cells than sham tails (<0.2%; their higher beta cell number represented <5% of total beta cell number and was associated with a similar increase in alpha cell number. It is unknown whether the regenerative process is causally related to the inflammatory infiltration in PDL-tails. Human pancreases with inflammatory infiltration also exhibited activation of proliferation in small beta cell clusters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The PDL model illustrates the advantage of direct beta cell counts over beta cell mass measurements when assessing and localizing beta cell regeneration in the pancreas. It demonstrates the ability of the adult mouse pancreas for neogenesis of small beta cell clusters with activated beta cell proliferation. Further studies should investigate conditions under which neoformed small beta cell clusters grow to larger aggregates and hence to higher total beta cell numbers.

  10. FAST OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF A NAKED-EYE BURST-MANIFESTATION OF THE PERIODIC ACTIVITY OF AN INTERNAL ENGINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-01-01

    We imaged the position of the naked-eye burst, GRB080319B, before, during, and after its gamma-ray activity with sub-second temporal resolution using the TORTORA wide-field camera. The burst optical prompt emission, which reached 5.3 mag, has been detected, and its periodic optical variability has been discovered in the form of four equidistant flashes with a duration of several seconds. We also detected a strong correlation (r ∼ 0.82) between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a 2 s delay of the optical emission with respect to the gamma-ray emission. The revealed temporal structure of the optical light curve in comparison with the gamma-ray light curve can be interpreted in the framework of the model of shell collisions in the ejecta containing a significant neutron component. All observed emission features reflect the non-stationary behavior of the burst internal engine-supposedly, a hyperaccreting solar-mass black hole formed in the collapse of a massive stellar core.

  11. Involvement of dying beta cell originated messenger molecules in differentiation of pancreatic mesenchymal stem cells under glucotoxic and glucolipotoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezginci-Oktayoglu, Selda; Onay-Ucar, Evren; Sancar-Bas, Serap; Karatug-Kacar, Ayse; Arda, Emine S N; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2018-05-01

    Beta cell mass regulation represents a critical issue for understanding and treatment of diabetes. The most important process in the development of diabetes is beta cell death, generally induced by glucotoxicity or glucolipotoxicity, and the regeneration mechanism of new beta cells that will replace dead beta cells is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the generation mechanism of new beta cells by considering the compensation phase of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, pancreatic islet derived mesenchymal stem cells (PI-MSCs) were isolated from adult rats and characterized. Then, beta cells isolated from rats were co-cultured with PI-MSCs and they were exposed to glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity and glucolipotoxicity conditions for 72 hr. As the results apoptotic and necrotic cell death were increased in both PI-MSCs and beta cells especially by the exposure of glucotoxic and glucolipotoxic conditions to the co-culture systems. Glucotoxicity induced-differentiated beta cells were functional due to their capability of insulin secretion in response to rising glucose concentrations. Moreover, beta cell proliferation was induced in the glucotoxicity-treated co-culture system whereas suppressed in lipotoxicity or glucolipotoxicity-treated co-culture systems. In addition, 11 novel proteins, that may release from dead beta cells and have the ability to stimulate PI-MSCs in the direction of differentiation, were determined in media of glucotoxicity or glucolipotoxicity-treated co-culture systems. In conclusion, these molecules were considered as important for understanding cellular mechanism of beta cell differentiation and diabetes. Thus, they may be potential targets for diagnosis and cellular or therapeutic treatment of diabetes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 932838 ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta cells * reactive oxygen species homeostasis * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  13. Uncovering Factors Related to Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Aoife M.; Ryan, Miriam F.; Drummond, Elaine; Gibney, Eileen R.; Gibney, Michael J.; Roche, Helen M.; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The incidence of type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly on a global scale. Beta-cell dysfunction contributes to the overall pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, factors contributing to beta-cell function are not clear. The aims of this study were (i) to identify factors related to pancreatic beta-cell function and (ii) to perform mechanistic studies in vitro. Methods: Three specific measures of beta-cell function were assessed for 110 participants who completed an oral glucose tolera...

  14. Search for High-Frequency Periodicities in Time-tagged Event Data from Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Adam T.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Wasserman, Ira

    2002-09-01

    We analyze the time-tagged event (TTE) data from observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). These data provide the best available time resolution for GRBs and SGRs. We have performed an extensive search for weak periodic signals in the frequency range of 400-2500 Hz using the burst records for 2203 GRBs and 152 SGR flares. The study employs the Rayleigh power as a test statistic to evaluate the evidence for periodic emissions. We find no evidence of periodic emissions from these events at these frequencies. In all but a very few cases, the maximum power values obtained are consistent with what would be expected by chance from a nonperiodic signal. In those few instances in which there is marginal evidence for periodicity, there are problems with the data that cast doubt on the reality of the signal. For classical GRBs, the largest Rayleigh power occurs in bursts whose TTE data appear to be corrupted. For SGRs, our largest Rayleigh power, with a significance of ~1%, occurs in one record for SGR 1900+14 (at ~2497 Hz) and in no other outbursts associated with this source; we thus consider it unlikely to represent detection of a real periodicity. From simulations, we deduce that the Rayleigh test would have detected significant oscillations with a relative amplitude of ~10% about half the time. Thus, we conclude that high-frequency oscillations, if present, must have small relative amplitudes.

  15. Chemical Methods to Induce Beta-Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Vetere

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell regeneration, for example, by inducing proliferation, remains an important goal in developing effective treatments for diabetes. However, beta cells have mainly been considered quiescent. This “static” view has recently been challenged by observations of relevant physiological conditions in which metabolic stress is compensated by an increase in beta-cell mass. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlining these process could open the possibility of developing novel small molecules to increase beta-cell mass. Several cellular cell-cycle and signaling proteins provide attractive targets for high throughput screening, and recent advances in cell culture have enabled phenotypic screening for small molecule-induced beta-cell proliferation. We present here an overview of the current trends involving small-molecule approaches to induce beta-cell regeneration by proliferation.

  16. Coherent dynamics of exciatable coupled beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P; Petersen, Mette Vesterager; Aslanidi, Oleg

    2004-01-01

    Propagation of excitation waves through a cluster of insulin-secreting beta-cells (a pancreatic islet of Langerhans) is modelled, and the results are related to recent image analysis experiments.......Propagation of excitation waves through a cluster of insulin-secreting beta-cells (a pancreatic islet of Langerhans) is modelled, and the results are related to recent image analysis experiments....

  17. Glucose regulates rat beta cell number through age-dependent effects on beta cell survival and proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerihun Assefa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose effects on beta cell survival and DNA-synthesis suggest a role as regulator of beta cell mass but data on beta cell numbers are lacking. We examined outcome of these influences on the number of beta cells isolated at different growth stages in their population. METHODS: Beta cells from neonatal, young-adult and old rats were cultured serum-free for 15 days. Their number was counted by automated whole-well imaging distinguishing influences on cell survival and on proliferative activity. RESULTS: Elevated glucose (10-20 versus 5 mmol/l increased the number of living beta cells from 8-week rats to 30%, following a time- and concentration-dependent recruitment of quiescent cells into DNA-synthesis; a glucokinase-activator lowered the threshold but did not raise total numbers of glucose-recruitable cells. No glucose-induced increase occurred in beta cells from 40-week rats. Neonatal beta cells doubled in number at 5 mmol/l involving a larger activated fraction that did not increase at higher concentrations; however, their higher susceptibility to glucose toxicity at 20 mmol/l resulted in 20% lower living cell numbers than at start. None of the age groups exhibited a repetitively proliferating subpopulation. CONCLUSIONS: Chronically elevated glucose levels increased the number of beta cells from young-adult but not from old rats; they interfered with expansion of neonatal beta cells and reduced their number. These effects are attributed to age-dependent differences in basal and glucose-induced proliferative activity and in cellular susceptibility to glucose toxicity. They also reflect age-dependent variations in the functional heterogeneity of the rat beta cell population.

  18. Glucose Regulates Rat Beta Cell Number through Age-Dependent Effects on Beta Cell Survival and Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Christophe; Stangé, Geert; Martens, Geert A.; Ling, Zhidong; Hellemans, Karine; Pipeleers, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucose effects on beta cell survival and DNA-synthesis suggest a role as regulator of beta cell mass but data on beta cell numbers are lacking. We examined outcome of these influences on the number of beta cells isolated at different growth stages in their population. Methods Beta cells from neonatal, young-adult and old rats were cultured serum-free for 15 days. Their number was counted by automated whole-well imaging distinguishing influences on cell survival and on proliferative activity. Results Elevated glucose (10–20 versus 5 mmol/l) increased the number of living beta cells from 8-week rats to 30%, following a time- and concentration-dependent recruitment of quiescent cells into DNA-synthesis; a glucokinase-activator lowered the threshold but did not raise total numbers of glucose-recruitable cells. No glucose-induced increase occurred in beta cells from 40-week rats. Neonatal beta cells doubled in number at 5 mmol/l involving a larger activated fraction that did not increase at higher concentrations; however, their higher susceptibility to glucose toxicity at 20 mmol/l resulted in 20% lower living cell numbers than at start. None of the age groups exhibited a repetitively proliferating subpopulation. Conclusions Chronically elevated glucose levels increased the number of beta cells from young-adult but not from old rats; they interfered with expansion of neonatal beta cells and reduced their number. These effects are attributed to age-dependent differences in basal and glucose-induced proliferative activity and in cellular susceptibility to glucose toxicity. They also reflect age-dependent variations in the functional heterogeneity of the rat beta cell population. PMID:24416358

  19. Progress in molecular nuclear medicine imaging of pancreatic beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Haifei; Yin Hongyan; Liu Shuai; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common and frequently occurring disease which seriously threaten the health of human beings. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively results from being destroyed and insufficient beta-cell mass. The associated symptoms appear until 50%-60% decrease of beta-cell mass. Because pancreas is deeply located in the body, with few beta-cell mass, the current methods of clinical diagnosis are invasive and late. So diagnosis of metabolism disease of beta-cell early non-invasively becomes more and more popular, imaging diagnosis of diabetes mellitus becomes the focus of researches, but how to estimate the mass of beta-cell still an important subject in imaging technology. (authors)

  20. Uncovering Factors Related to Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Aoife M; Ryan, Miriam F; Drummond, Elaine; Gibney, Eileen R; Gibney, Michael J; Roche, Helen M; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly on a global scale. Beta-cell dysfunction contributes to the overall pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, factors contributing to beta-cell function are not clear. The aims of this study were (i) to identify factors related to pancreatic beta-cell function and (ii) to perform mechanistic studies in vitro. Three specific measures of beta-cell function were assessed for 110 participants who completed an oral glucose tolerance test as part of the Metabolic Challenge Study. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters were assessed as potential modulators of beta-cell function. Subsequent in vitro experiments were performed using the BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta-cell line. Validation of findings were performed in a second human cohort. Waist-to-hip ratio was the strongest anthropometric modulator of beta-cell function, with beta-coefficients of -0.33 (p = 0.001) and -0.30 (p = 0.002) for beta-cell function/homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and disposition index respectively. Additionally, the resistin-to-adiponectin ratio (RA index) emerged as being strongly associated with beta-cell function, with beta-coefficients of -0.24 (p = 0.038) and -0.25 (p = 0.028) for beta-cell function/HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively. Similar results were obtained using a third measure for beta-cell function. In vitro experiments revealed that the RA index was a potent regulator of acute insulin secretion where a high RA index (20ng ml-1 resistin, 5nmol l-1 g-adiponectin) significantly decreased insulin secretion whereas a low RA index (10ng ml-1 resistin, 10nmol l-1 g-adiponectin) significantly increased insulin secretion. The RA index was successfully validated in a second human cohort with beta-coefficients of -0.40 (p = 0.006) and -0.38 (p = 0.008) for beta-cell function/ HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively. Waist-to-hip ratio and RA index were identified as significant modulators of

  1. Uncovering Factors Related to Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife M Curran

    Full Text Available The incidence of type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly on a global scale. Beta-cell dysfunction contributes to the overall pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, factors contributing to beta-cell function are not clear. The aims of this study were (i to identify factors related to pancreatic beta-cell function and (ii to perform mechanistic studies in vitro.Three specific measures of beta-cell function were assessed for 110 participants who completed an oral glucose tolerance test as part of the Metabolic Challenge Study. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters were assessed as potential modulators of beta-cell function. Subsequent in vitro experiments were performed using the BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta-cell line. Validation of findings were performed in a second human cohort.Waist-to-hip ratio was the strongest anthropometric modulator of beta-cell function, with beta-coefficients of -0.33 (p = 0.001 and -0.30 (p = 0.002 for beta-cell function/homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively. Additionally, the resistin-to-adiponectin ratio (RA index emerged as being strongly associated with beta-cell function, with beta-coefficients of -0.24 (p = 0.038 and -0.25 (p = 0.028 for beta-cell function/HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively. Similar results were obtained using a third measure for beta-cell function. In vitro experiments revealed that the RA index was a potent regulator of acute insulin secretion where a high RA index (20ng ml-1 resistin, 5nmol l-1 g-adiponectin significantly decreased insulin secretion whereas a low RA index (10ng ml-1 resistin, 10nmol l-1 g-adiponectin significantly increased insulin secretion. The RA index was successfully validated in a second human cohort with beta-coefficients of -0.40 (p = 0.006 and -0.38 (p = 0.008 for beta-cell function/ HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively.Waist-to-hip ratio and RA index were identified as significant modulators

  2. Imaging the Beta-cell mass: why and how

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saudek, Frantisek; Brogren, Carl-Henrik; Manohar, Srirang

    2008-01-01

    to the lack of a beta-cell-specific contrast agent. The only existing method to monitor islet cells in vivo consists of labeling islet transplants with iron nanoparticles prior to transplantation and visualization of the transplanted islets by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, accurate assessment......Diabetes is a disorder characterized by beta-cell loss or exhaustion and insulin deficiency. At present, knowledge is lacking on the underlying causes and for the therapeutic recovery of the beta-cell mass. A better understanding of diabetes pathogenesis could be obtained through exact monitoring...

  3. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  4. On the coherent behavior of pancreatic beta cell clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Capolupo, Antonio; Cherubini, Christian; Gizzi, Alessio; Bertolaso, Marta; Filippi, Simonetta; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Beta cells in pancreas represent an example of coupled biological oscillators which via communication pathways, are able to synchronize their electrical activity, giving rise to pulsatile insulin release. In this work we numerically analyze scale free self-similarity features of membrane voltage signal power density spectrum, through a stochastic dynamical model for beta cells in the islets of Langerhans fine tuned on mouse experimental data. Adopting the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism, we show how coherent molecular domains can arise from proper functional conditions leading to a parallelism with “phase transition” phenomena of field theory. - Highlights: • Beta cells in pancreas are coupled oscillators able to synchronize their activity. • We analyze scale free self-similarity features for beta cells. • We adopt the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism. • We show that coherent molecular domains arise from functional conditions

  5. Detailed transcriptome atlas of the pancreatic beta cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizirik Decio L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression patterns provide a detailed view of cellular functions. Comparison of profiles in disease vs normal conditions provides insights into the processes underlying disease progression. However, availability and integration of public gene expression datasets remains a major challenge. The aim of the present study was to explore the transcriptome of pancreatic islets and, based on this information, to prepare a comprehensive and open access inventory of insulin-producing beta cell gene expression, the Beta Cell Gene Atlas (BCGA. Methods We performed Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS analysis of human pancreatic islet samples and microarray analyses of purified rat beta cells, alpha cells and INS-1 cells, and compared the information with available array data in the literature. Results MPSS analysis detected around 7600 mRNA transcripts, of which around a third were of low abundance. We identified 2000 and 1400 transcripts that are enriched/depleted in beta cells compared to alpha cells and INS-1 cells, respectively. Microarray analysis identified around 200 transcription factors that are differentially expressed in either beta or alpha cells. We reanalyzed publicly available gene expression data and integrated these results with the new data from this study to build the BCGA. The BCGA contains basal (untreated conditions gene expression level estimates in beta cells as well as in different cell types in human, rat and mouse pancreas. Hierarchical clustering of expression profile estimates classify cell types based on species while beta cells were clustered together. Conclusion Our gene atlas is a valuable source for detailed information on the gene expression distribution in beta cells and pancreatic islets along with insulin producing cell lines. The BCGA tool, as well as the data and code used to generate the Atlas are available at the T1Dbase website (T1DBase.org.

  6. Detailed transcriptome atlas of the pancreatic beta cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Burak; Burdick, David; Baxter, David; Rasschaert, Joanne; Flamez, Daisy; Eizirik, Decio L; Welsh, Nils; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy

    2009-01-15

    Gene expression patterns provide a detailed view of cellular functions. Comparison of profiles in disease vs normal conditions provides insights into the processes underlying disease progression. However, availability and integration of public gene expression datasets remains a major challenge. The aim of the present study was to explore the transcriptome of pancreatic islets and, based on this information, to prepare a comprehensive and open access inventory of insulin-producing beta cell gene expression, the Beta Cell Gene Atlas (BCGA). We performed Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) analysis of human pancreatic islet samples and microarray analyses of purified rat beta cells, alpha cells and INS-1 cells, and compared the information with available array data in the literature. MPSS analysis detected around 7600 mRNA transcripts, of which around a third were of low abundance. We identified 2000 and 1400 transcripts that are enriched/depleted in beta cells compared to alpha cells and INS-1 cells, respectively. Microarray analysis identified around 200 transcription factors that are differentially expressed in either beta or alpha cells. We reanalyzed publicly available gene expression data and integrated these results with the new data from this study to build the BCGA. The BCGA contains basal (untreated conditions) gene expression level estimates in beta cells as well as in different cell types in human, rat and mouse pancreas. Hierarchical clustering of expression profile estimates classify cell types based on species while beta cells were clustered together. Our gene atlas is a valuable source for detailed information on the gene expression distribution in beta cells and pancreatic islets along with insulin producing cell lines. The BCGA tool, as well as the data and code used to generate the Atlas are available at the T1Dbase website (T1DBase.org).

  7. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  8. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... that transferrin is the only obligatory factor whereas growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and TRH had modulating effects. A heat-labile heparin binding serum factor which stimulated thymidine incorporation but not cell proliferation was demonstrated in human serum. Measurements...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  9. Beta-cell regeneration from vimentin+/MafB+ cells after STZ-induced extreme beta-cell ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Kang, Hongjun; Shen, Jing; Hao, Haojie; Liu, Jiejie; Guo, Yelei; Mu, Yiming; Han, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Loss of functional beta-cells is fundamental in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In situ beta-cell regeneration therefore has garnered great interest as an approach to diabetes therapy. Here, after elimination of pre-existing beta cells by a single high-dose of streptozotocin (STZ), we demonstrated that a considerable amount of beta-like-cells was generated within 48 hrs. But the newly formed insulin producing cells failed to respond to glucose challenge at this time and diminished afterwards. Insulin treatment to normalize the glucose level protected the neogenic beta-like cells and the islet function was also gradually matured. Strikingly, intermediate cells lacking epithelial marker E-cadherin but expressing mesenchymal cell-specific marker vimentin appeared within 16 hrs following STZ exposure, which served as the major source of insulin-producing cells observed at 24 hrs. Moreover, these intermediate cells strongly expressed alpha-cell-specific marker MafB. In summary, the data presented here identified a novel intermediate cell type as beta-cell progenitors, showing mesenchymal cell feature as well as alpha-cell marker MafB. Our results might have important implications for efforts to stimulate beta-cell regeneration.

  10. Foodborne cereulide causes beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Vangoitsenhoven

    Full Text Available To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function.Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6 and rat (INS-1E beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1. Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests.24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05. Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05 and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05 and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05 following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively.Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell.

  11. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists...... and the synchronized behavior of many coupled beta-cells as well as to the synchrony of islets. Rather than developing new biophysical models, the thesis investigates existing models, their integration and simplifications, and analyzed the corresponding dynamics, in order to use these models for investigating...

  12. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    . We then develop a non-parametric test statistic that allows for the identification of drift bursts from noisy high-frequency data. We apply this methodology to a comprehensive set of tick data and show that drift bursts form an integral part of the price dynamics across equities, fixed income......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  13. Effect of solar radio bursts on GNSS signal reception over Europe for the period 1999-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Bergeot, Nicolas; Marqué, Christophe; Aerts, Wim; Bruyninx, Carine

    2015-04-01

    Intense solar radio bursts (SRB) emitted at L-band frequencies can affect the carrier-to-noise C/N0 ratio of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals by increasing the background noise. Such space weather events can consequently decrease the quality of GNSS-based results especially for kinematic high-precision positioning. It is thus important to develop a method capable to detect such events in near real time on a wide area. For this purpose, the ROB-IONO software was adapted for analysing the effect of SRB on the dense EUREF Permanent GNSS Network (EPN). First, S1 and S2 raw data extracted from RINEX files were converted into the C/N0 unit (dB.Hz) taking into account manufacturer corrections. Then, the differences (ΔC/N0) between all these C/N0observables and their medians of the 7 previous satellite ground track repeat cycles, i.e. their normal quiet state, were computed. The mean of all these well-calibrated ΔC/N0values from different GNSS receivers and satellites offer at each epoch a reliable metric to detect and quantify the impact of a SRB. We investigated the degradation of GPS and GLONASS C/N0 on the entire EPN during 10 intense SRBs occurring at daylight over Europe between 1999 and 2013. The analysis shows that: (1) GPS and GLONASS ΔC/N0 agree at the 0.1±0.2dB.Hz level; (2) The standard deviation of the mean ΔC/N0of the EPN GNSS receivers is below 1dB.Hz 96% of the time, and below 0.6dB.Hz 76% of the time; (3) maximum ΔC/N0 degradation occurs at the epoch of maximum solar peak flux delivered by the solar ground observatories; (4) C/N0 degradation becomes larger with increasing solar zenithal angle. Consequently, the ROB-IONO software is capable to detect the degradation of GNSS signal reception over Europe due to SRBs. In addition, by taking advantage of the increasing number of EPN stations delivering C/N0 data since 2005, even less intense SRB events can now be detected. Finally, the developed method can be completely applied in near

  14. Pancreatic beta-cell overexpression of the glucagon receptor gene results in enhanced beta-cell function and mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelling, Richard W; Vuguin, Patricia M; Du, Xiu Quan

    2009-01-01

    in vivo, we generated mice overexpressing the Gcgr specifically on pancreatic beta-cells (RIP-Gcgr). In vivo and in vitro insulin secretion in response to glucagon and glucose was increased 1.7- to 3.9-fold in RIP-Gcgr mice compared with controls. Consistent with the observed increase in insulin release...

  15. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pancreas Pancreatic beta cells... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 Histone Pancreas Pancreatic beta cells S...RX1035141,SRX1035146,SRX1035144,SRX1035145,SRX1035140 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic beta ...cells SRX445035,SRX445033,SRX445034 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 Histone Pancreas Pancreatic beta cells S...RX1035146,SRX1035141,SRX1035144,SRX1035140,SRX1035145 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  20. GLP-1 derivative liraglutide in rats with beta-cell deficiencies: influence of metabolic state on beta-cell mass dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, Jeppe; Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Rømer, John

    2003-01-01

    (1) Liraglutide is a long-acting GLP-1 derivative, designed for once daily administration in type II diabetic patients. To investigate the effects of liraglutide on glycemic control and beta-cell mass in rat models of beta-cell deficiencies, studies were performed in male Zucker diabetic fatty (Z...... antihyperglycemic effects in rodent models of beta-cell deficiencies, and the in vivo effect of liraglutide on beta-cell mass may in part depend on the metabolic state of the animals....

  1. Microculture system for studying monolayers of functional beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobersen, M J; Scharff, J E; Notkins, A L

    1980-04-01

    A method is described for growing monolayers of newborn rat beta-cells in microculture trays. After disruption of the pancreas with collagenase, islets were isolated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, trypsinized to obtain individual cells, and plated in 96-well tissue culture trays. The cells were incubated for the first 3 days in growth medium containing 0.1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine to promote monolayer formation. The cultures could be maintained in a functional state, as defined by their responsiveness to known modulators of insulin secretion, for at least 2 weeks. As few as 1 X 10(3) islet cells/well gave results that were reproducible within +/- 10%. It is suggested that the microculture system for islet cells might prove to be a rapid and reproducible screening technique for studying drugs, viruses, or other agents that affect beta-cell function.

  2. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Azar; Shafiee-Nick, Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreat...

  3. Circadian-scale periodic bursts in theta and gamma-band coherence between hippocampus, cingulate and insular cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G.K. Munn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that mean activity levels in the hippocampus oscillate on a circadian timescale, both at the single neuron and EEG level. This oscillation is also entrained by the availability of food, suggesting that the circadian modulation of hippocampal activity might comprise part of the recently discovered food-entrainable circadian oscillator (FEO. In order to determine whether the circadian oscillation in hippocampal activity is linked to activity in other brain regions, we recorded field-potential EEG from hippocampus and two cortical regions known to connect to hippocampus; the anterior cingulate cortex and the agranular insular cortex. These latter regions are involved in executive control (cingulate and gustatory feedback (insula and so are in a position where they could usefully contribute to, or benefit from, hippocampal memorial information in order to undertake task-related processing. We recorded EEG from these three regions for 20 m every hour for 58 consecutive hours in one continuous exposure to the recording environment. We found that there are regular and distinct increases in magnitude coherence between hippocampus and both cortical regions for EEG in both theta (6–12 Hz and gamma (30–48 Hz bands. These periods of increased coherence are spaced approximately one solar day apart, appear not to be specifically light-entrained, and are most apparent for gamma frequency activity. The gamma association between the two cortical regions shows the same temporal pattern of coherence peaks as the hippocampal-cortical coherences. We propose that these peaks in coherence represent the transient synchronization of temporally tagged memorial information between the hippocampus and other brain regions for which this information may be relevant. These findings suggest that the FEO involves coordinated activity across a number of brain regions and may underlie a mechanism via which an organism can store and recall

  4. Conditional islet hypovascularisation does not preclude beta cell expansion during pregnancy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staels, Willem; Heremans, Yves; Leuckx, Gunter; Van Gassen, Naomi; Salinno, Ciro; De Groef, Sofie; Cools, Martine; Keshet, Eli; Dor, Yuval; Heimberg, Harry; De Leu, Nico

    2017-06-01

    Endothelial-endocrine cell interactions and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A signalling are deemed essential for maternal islet vascularisation, glucose control and beta cell expansion during mouse pregnancy. The aim of this study was to assess whether pregnancy-associated beta cell expansion was affected under conditions of islet hypovascularisation. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFLT1), a VEGF-A decoy receptor, was conditionally overexpressed in maternal mouse beta cells from 1.5 to 14.5 days post coitum. Islet vascularisation, glycaemic control, beta cell proliferation, individual beta cell size and total beta cell volume were assessed in both pregnant mice and non-pregnant littermates. Conditional overexpression of sFLT1 in beta cells resulted in islet hypovascularisation and glucose intolerance in both pregnant and non-pregnant mice. In contrast to non-pregnant littermates, glucose intolerance in pregnant mice was transient. sFLT1 overexpression did not affect pregnancy-associated changes in beta cell proliferation, individual beta cell size or total beta cell volume. Reduced intra-islet VEGF-A signalling results in maternal islet hypovascularisation and impaired glycaemic control but does not preclude beta cell expansion during mouse pregnancy.

  5. Reduction in placental growth factor impaired gestational beta-cell proliferation through crosstalk between beta-cells and islet endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaosheng; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reduced placental growth factor (PLGF) during pregnancy is known to be a reason for developing preeclampsia (PE) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, it has been shown that reduced PLGF may induce GDM through suppressing beta-cell mass growth in a PI3k/Akt signalling-dependent manner. Here, we dissected the interaction between beta-cells and islet endothelial cells in this model. We analysed proliferation of beta-cells and islet endothelial cells at different time points of gestation in mice. We cultured mouse islet endothelial cells (MS1), with or without PLGF. We cultured primary mouse beta-cells in conditioned media from PLGF-treated MS1. We cultured MS1 cells in conditioned media from proliferating beta-cells that were activated with conditioned media from PLGF-treated MS1 cells. We analysed cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation. We analysed cell growth by a MTT assay. We found that during mouse gestation, the increases in cell proliferation occurred earlier in beta-cells than in islet endothelial cells. In vitro, PLGF itself failed to induce proliferation of MS1 cells. However, conditioned media from the PLGF-treated MS1 cells induced beta-cell proliferation, resulting in increases in beta-cell number. Moreover, proliferation of MS1 cells significantly increased when MS1 cells were cultured in conditioned media from proliferating beta-cells activated with conditioned media from PLGF-treated MS1 cells. Thus, our data suggest that gestational PLGF may stimulate islet endothelial cells to release growth factors to promote beta-cell proliferation, and proliferating beta-cells in turn release endothelial cell growth factor to increase proliferation of endothelial cells. PE-associated reduction in PLGF impairs these processes to result in islet growth impairment, and subsequently the onset of GDM.

  6. Absence of cannabinoid 1 receptor in beta cells protects against high-fat/high-sugar diet-induced beta cell dysfunction and inflammation in murine islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Montoro, Rodrigo A; Doyle, Máire E; Liu, Qing-Rong; Rouse, Michael; O'Connell, Jennifer F; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Ghosh, Soumita; Carlson, Olga D; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Chia, Chee W; Ghosh, Paritosh; Egan, Josephine M

    2018-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) regulates insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in peripheral tissues. CB1R is expressed on pancreatic beta cells and is coupled to the G protein Gαi, suggesting a negative regulation of endogenous signalling in the beta cell. Deciphering the exact function of CB1R in beta cells has been confounded by the expression of this receptor on multiple tissues involved in regulating metabolism. Thus, in models of global genetic or pharmacological CB1R blockade, it is difficult to distinguish the indirect effects of improved insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues from the direct effects of inhibiting CB1R in beta cells per se. To assess the direct contribution of beta cell CB1R to metabolism, we designed a mouse model that allows us to determine the role of CB1R specifically in beta cells in the context of whole-body metabolism. We generated a beta cell specific Cnr1 (CB1R) knockout mouse (β-CB1R -/- ) to study the long-term consequences of CB1R ablation on beta cell function in adult mice. We measured beta cell function, proliferation and viability in these mice in response to a high-fat/high-sugar diet and induction of acute insulin resistance with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. β-CB1R -/- mice had increased fasting (153 ± 23% increase at 10 weeks of age) and stimulated insulin secretion and increased intra-islet cAMP levels (217 ± 33% increase at 10 weeks of age), resulting in primary hyperinsulinaemia, as well as increased beta cell viability, proliferation and islet area (1.9-fold increase at 10 weeks of age). Hyperinsulinaemia led to insulin resistance, which was aggravated by a high-fat/high-sugar diet and weight gain, although beta cells maintained their insulin secretory capacity in response to glucose. Strikingly, islets from β-CB1R -/- mice were protected from diet-induced inflammation. Mechanistically, we show that this is a consequence of curtailment of oxidative stress and reduced activation of

  7. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Plaisance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes.

  8. Lipids and immunoinflammatory pathways of beta cell destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yumi; Dobrian, Anca D.; Morris, Margaret A.; Taylor-Fishwick, David A.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Islet inflammation contributes to beta cell demise in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. 12-Lipoxygenase (12-LO, gene expressed as ALOX12 in human and 12-Lo in rodents in this manuscript) produces proinflammatory metabolites such as 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids through dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. 12-LO was first implicated in diabetes when the increase in 12-Lo expression and 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid was noted in rodent models of diabetes. Subsequently, germline 12-Lo−/− was shown to prevent the development of hyperglycemia in mouse models of type 1 diabetes and in high-fat fed mice. More recently, beta cell-specific 12-Lo−/− was shown to protect mice against hyperglycaemia after streptozotocin and a high-fat diet. In humans, 12-LO expression is increased in pancreatic islets of autoantibody-positive, type 1 diabetic and type 2 diabetic organ donors. Interestingly, the high expression of ALOX12 is associated with the alteration in first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in human type 2 diabetic islets. To further clarify the role of islet 12-LO in diabetes and to validate 12-LO as a therapeutic target of diabetes, we have studied selective pharmacologic inhibitors for 12-LO. The compounds we have identified show promise: they protect beta cell lines and human islets from apoptosis and preserve insulin secretion when challenged by proinflammatory cytokine mixture. Currently studies are underway to test the compounds in mouse models of diabetes. This review summarizes a presentation given at the ‘Islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes’ symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied two other mini-reviews on topics from this symposium (by Simone Baltrusch, DOI: XXX and Marc Donath, DOI: XXX) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Piero Marchetti (DOI: XXX). PMID:26868492

  9. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    (2003), El Perello, Spain (2006) and Peebles, Scotland (2009). The meeting drew 190 attendees from 12 different countries. There were 37 main oral presentations, and 68 posters covered virtually all aspects of the pancreas and provided a dynamic snapshot of the most interesting areas of current...... investigation. In addition, six parallel workshops on stem cells, epigenetics, autoimmunity, β-cell imaging, β-cell identity, omics in β-cell research and a panel discussion on "to be or not to be a beta cell" were held. Here, we will review some of the newest highlights and still unanswered questions...

  10. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease characterised by specific T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Yet, except for insulin, no beta cell-specific antigens have been discovered. This may imply that the autoantigens in type 1 diabetes exist in modified...... forms capable of specifically triggering beta cell destruction. In other immune-mediated diseases, autoantigens targeted by the immune system have undergone post-translational modification (PTM), thereby creating tissue-specific neo-epitopes. In a similar manner, PTM of beta cell proteins might create...... beta cell-specific neo-epitopes. We suggest that the current paradigm of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease should be reconsidered since the immune response may not be directed against native beta cell proteins. A modified model for the pathogenetic events taking place in islets leading...

  11. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending...... on the activity of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP. Here we show that the Fas pathway also regulates beta cell secretory function. We observed impaired glucose tolerance in Fas-deficient mice due to a delayed and decreased insulin secretory pattern. Expression of PDX-1, a beta cell-specific transcription factor...... regulating insulin gene expression and mitochondrial metabolism, was decreased in Fas-deficient beta cells. As a consequence, insulin and ATP production were severely reduced and only partly compensated for by increased beta cell mass. Up-regulation of FLIP enhanced NF-kappaB activity via NF...

  12. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  13. Beta-cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing a hybrid insulin gene-oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efrat, S; Linde, S; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Three pancreatic beta-cell lines have been established from insulinomas derived from transgenic mice carrying a hybrid insulin-promoted simian virus 40 tumor antigen gene. The beta tumor cell (beta TC) lines maintain the features of differentiated beta cells for about 50 passages in culture...... by glucose, although with a lower threshold for maximal stimulation than that for normal beta cells. beta TC lines can be repeatedly derived from primary beta-cell tumors that heritably arise in the transgenic mice. Thus, targeted expression of an oncogene with a cell-specific regulatory element can be used...

  14. MST1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in pancreatic beta-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Amin; Khobragade, Vrushali; Yuan, Ting; Frogne, Thomas; Tao, Wufan; Oberholzer, Jose; Pattou, Francois; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is a hallmark of the loss of insulin producing beta-cells in all forms of diabetes mellitus. Current treatment fails to halt the decline in functional beta-cell mass. Strategies to prevent beta-cell apoptosis and dysfunction are urgently needed. Here, we identified Mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) as a critical regulator of apoptotic beta-cell death and function. MST1 was strongly activated in beta-cells under diabetogenic conditions and correlated with beta-cell apoptosis. MST1 specifically induced the mitochondrial-dependent pathway of apoptosis in beta-cells through up-regulation of the BH3-only protein Bim. MST1 directly phosphorylated PDX1 at Thr11, resulting in its ubiquitination, degradation and impaired insulin secretion. Mst1 deficiency completely restored normoglycemia, beta-cell function and survival in vitro and in vivo. We show MST1 as novel pro-apoptotic kinase and key mediator of apoptotic signaling and beta-cell dysfunction, which may serve as target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. PMID:24633305

  15. Cellular models for beta-cell function and diabetes gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A D; Vasu, S; Flatt, P R

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes is characterized by the destruction and/or relative dysfunction of insulin-secreting beta-cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Consequently, considerable effort has been made to understand the physiological processes governing insulin production and secretion in these cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their deterioration in the pathogenesis of diabetes. To date, considerable research has exploited clonal beta-cell lines derived from rodent insulinomas. Such cell lines have proven to be a great asset in diabetes research, in vitro drug testing, and studies of beta-cell physiology and provide a sustainable, and in many cases, more practical alternative to the use of animals or primary tissue. However, selection of the most appropriate rodent beta cell line is often challenging and no single cell line entirely recapitulates the properties of human beta-cells. The generation of stable human beta-cell lines would provide a much more suitable model for studies of human beta-cell physiology and pathology and could potentially be used as a readily available source of implantable insulin-releasing tissue for cell-based therapies of diabetes. In this review, we discuss the history, development, functional characteristics and use of available clonal rodent beta-cell lines, as well as reflecting on recent advances in the generation of human-derived beta-cell lines, their use in research studies and their potential for cell therapy of diabetes. © 2017 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Massive parallel gene expression profiling of RINm5F pancreatic islet beta-cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, K; Bovin, L F; Josefsen, K

    2000-01-01

    found that 146 full-length genes and a large number of expressed sequence tags were differentially regulated 3-fold or more. Most of the differentially regulated transcripts have not previously been described to be regulated by IL-1beta in beta-cells. We have analysed the expression data and sorted......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with the potential to kill pancreatic beta-cells, and this unique property is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of type I diabetes mellitus. We therefore determined the quantitative expression of 24,000 mRNAs of RINm5F, an insulinoma cell line...... derived from rat pancreatic beta-cells, before and after challenge with 30 and 1,000 pg/ml of recombinant human IL-1beta. The highest concentration resulted in decreased insulin production and cell death over a period of 4 days. Using three different time points, 2, 4 and 24 hours after challenge, we...

  17. Both conditional ablation and overexpression of E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme (UBC9) in mouse pancreatic beta cells result in impaired beta cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyu; Lai, Qiaohong; Chen, Cai; Li, Na; Sun, Fei; Huang, Wenting; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Yang, Ping; Xiong, Fei; Chen, Zhishui; Gong, Quan; Ren, Boxu; Weng, Jianping; Eizirik, Décio L; Zhou, Zhiguang; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2018-04-01

    Post-translational attachment of a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to the lysine (K) residue(s) of target proteins (SUMOylation) is an evolutionary conserved regulatory mechanism. This modification has previously been demonstrated to be implicated in the control of a remarkably versatile regulatory mechanism of cellular processes. However, the exact regulatory role and biological actions of the E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme (UBC9)-mediated SUMOylation function in pancreatic beta cells has remained elusive. Inducible beta cell-specific Ubc9 (also known as Ube2i) knockout (KO; Ubc9 Δbeta ) and transgenic (Ubc9 Tg ) mice were employed to address the impact of SUMOylation on beta cell viability and functionality. Ubc9 deficiency or overexpression was induced at 8 weeks of age using tamoxifen. To study the mechanism involved, we closely examined the regulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) through SUMOylation in beta cells. Upon induction of Ubc9 deficiency, Ubc9 Δbeta islets exhibited a 3.5-fold higher accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than Ubc9 f/f control islets. Islets from Ubc9 Δbeta mice also had decreased insulin content and loss of beta cell mass after tamoxifen treatment. Specifically, at day 45 after Ubc9 deletion only 40% of beta cell mass remained in Ubc9 Δbeta mice, while 90% of beta cell mass was lost by day 75. Diabetes onset was noted in some Ubc9 Δbeta mice 8 weeks after induction of Ubc9 deficiency and all mice developed diabetes by 10 weeks following tamoxifen treatment. In contrast, Ubc9 Tg beta cells displayed an increased antioxidant ability but impaired insulin secretion. Unlike Ubc9 Δbeta mice, which spontaneously developed diabetes, Ubc9 Tg mice preserved normal non-fasting blood glucose levels without developing diabetes. It was noted that SUMOylation of NRF2 promoted its nuclear expression along with enhanced transcriptional activity, thereby preventing ROS accumulation in

  18. The effect of noise and coupling on beta cell excitation dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    numerical simulations. We show here how the application of two recent methods allows an analytic treatment of the stochastic effects on the location of the saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcations, which determine the burst period. Thus, the stochastic system can be analyzed similarly to the deterministic...

  19. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goalstone, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, VA Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States); Kamath, Vasudeva [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Kowluru, Anjaneyulu, E-mail: akowluru@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet {beta}-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 {beta}-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the {alpha}-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the {beta}-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  20. Cx36 makes channels coupling human pancreatic beta-cells, and correlates with insulin expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serre-Beinier, Veronique; Bosco, Domenico; Zulianello, Laurence; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothee; Charpantier, Eric; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Diaferia, Giuseppe R.; Giepmans, Ben N.; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Deng, Shaoping; Buhler, Leo; Berney, Thierry; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Meda, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that the insulin-producing beta-cells of laboratory rodents are coupled by gap junction channels made solely of the connexin36 (Cx36) protein, and have shown that loss of this protein desynchronizes beta-cells, leading to secretory defects reminiscent of those

  1. Effect of iron on pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    the incidence of diabetes mellitus was investigated on the pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance in normal ... hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia, inflammation and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction thus predisposing the ..... and antioxidant status in alpha-thalassemia major: iron overload and ...

  2. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic beta ce...6,SRX1035143,SRX1035140,SRX1035142 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_beta_cells.bed ...

  3. CRFR1 activation protects against cytokine-induced beta cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Lykke; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Matsumoto, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    During diabetes development beta cells are exposed to elevated concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β which in vitro, induce beta cell death. The class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): Corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) and CRFR2 are expressed in pancreatic...

  4. NOX, NOX who is there?, The contribution of NADPH Oxidase to beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eTaylor-Fishwick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of diabetes prevalence over the next decades warrant the aggressive discovery of new approaches to stop or reverse loss of functional beta cell mass. Beta cells are recognized to have a relatively high sensitivity to reactive oxygen species (ROS and become dysfunctional under oxidative stress conditions. New discoveries have identified NADPH oxidases in beta cells as contributors to elevated cellular ROS. Reviewed are recent reports that evidence a role for NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1 in beta cell dysfunction. NOX-1 is stimulated by inflammatory cytokines that are elevated in diabetes. First, regulation of cytokine-stimulated NOX-1 expression has been linked to inflammatory lipid mediators derived from 12-lipoxyganase activity. For the first time in beta cells these data integrate distinct pathways associated with beta cell dysfunction. Second, regulation of NOX-1 in beta cells involves feed-forward control linked to elevated ROS and Src-kinase activation. This potentially results in unbridled ROS generation and identifies candidate targets for pharmacologic intervention. Third, consideration is provided of new, first-in-class, selective inhibitors of NOX-1. These compounds could have an important role in assessing a disruption of NOX-1/ROS signaling as a new approach to preserve and protect beta cell mass in diabetes.

  5. NOX, NOX Who is There? The Contribution of NADPH Oxidase One to Beta Cell Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Predictions of diabetes prevalence over the next decades warrant the aggressive discovery of new approaches to stop or reverse loss of functional beta cell mass. Beta cells are recognized to have a relatively high sensitivity to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and become dysfunctional under oxidative stress conditions. New discoveries have identified NADPH oxidases in beta cells as contributors to elevated cellular ROS. Reviewed are recent reports that evidence a role for NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) in beta cell dysfunction. NOX-1 is stimulated by inflammatory cytokines that are elevated in diabetes. First, regulation of cytokine-stimulated NOX-1 expression has been linked to inflammatory lipid mediators derived from 12-lipoxygenase activity. For the first time in beta cells these data integrate distinct pathways associated with beta cell dysfunction. Second, regulation of NOX-1 in beta cells involves feed-forward control linked to elevated ROS and Src-kinase activation. This potentially results in unbridled ROS generation and identifies candidate targets for pharmacologic intervention. Third, consideration is provided of new, first-in-class, selective inhibitors of NOX-1. These compounds could have an important role in assessing a disruption of NOX-1/ROS signaling as a new approach to preserve and protect beta cell mass in diabetes. PMID:23565109

  6. Pancreatic Beta-Cell Purification by Altering FAD and NAD(PH Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. de Vos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of primary beta cells from other cells within in the pancreatic islets is of importance for many fields of islet research. However, up to now, no satisfactory method has been developed that gained high numbers of viable beta cells, without considerable alpha-cell contamination. In this study, we investigated whether rat beta cells can be isolated from nonbeta endocrine cells by manipulating the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(PH autofluorescence. Beta cells were isolated from dispersed islets by flow cytometry, based on their high FAD and NAD(PH fluorescence. To improve beta cell yield and purity, the cellular FAD and NAD(PH contents were altered by preincubation in culture media containing varying amounts of D-glucose and amino acids. Manipulation of the cellular FAD and NAD(PH fluorescence improves beta cell yield and purity after sorting. This method is also a fast and reliable method to measure beta cell functional viability. A conceivable application is assessing beta cell viability before transplantation.

  7. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  8. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...

  9. Lysine deacetylase inhibition prevents diabetes by chromatin-independent immunoregulation and beta-cell protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, D.P.; Gysemans, C.; Lundh, M.; Dahllof, M.S.; Noesgaard, D.; Schmidt, S.F.; Mandrup, S; Birkbak, N.; Workman, C.T.; Piemonti, L.; Blaabjerg, L.; Monzani, V.; Fossati, G.; Mascagni, P.; Paraskevas, S.; Aikin, R.A.; Billestrup, N.; Grunnet, L.G.; Dinarello, C.A.; Mathieu, C.; Mandrup-Poulsen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is due to destruction of pancreatic beta-cells. Lysine deacetylase inhibitors (KDACi) protect beta-cells from inflammatory destruction in vitro and are promising immunomodulators. Here we demonstrate that the clinically well-tolerated KDACi vorinostat and givinostat revert diabetes

  10. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum adipokines as biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh Nguyet; Kolb, Hubert; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes.......We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes....

  12. Update on the Protective Molecular Pathways Improving Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Puddu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary function of pancreatic beta-cells is to produce and release insulin in response to increment in extracellular glucose concentrations, thus maintaining glucose homeostasis. Deficient beta-cell function can have profound metabolic consequences, leading to the development of hyperglycemia and, ultimately, diabetes mellitus. Therefore, strategies targeting the maintenance of the normal function and protecting pancreatic beta-cells from injury or death might be crucial in the treatment of diabetes. This narrative review will update evidence from the recently identified molecular regulators preserving beta-cell mass and function recovery in order to suggest potential therapeutic targets against diabetes. This review will also highlight the relevance for novel molecular pathways potentially improving beta-cell dysfunction.

  13. Genetic predisposition for beta cell fragility underlies type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Tian, Lei; Schonefeldt, Susann; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Di Marino, Daniele; Carr, Edward J; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Franckaert, Dean; Lagou, Vasiliki; Overbergh, Lut; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Allemeersch, Joke; Chabot-Roy, Genevieve; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Laybutt, D Ross; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Socha, Luis; Gevaert, Kris; Jetten, Anton M; Lambrechts, Diether; Linterman, Michelle A; Goodnow, Chris C; Nolan, Christopher J; Lesage, Sylvie; Schlenner, Susan M; Liston, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes share pathophysiological characteristics, yet mechanistic links have remained elusive. T1D results from autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells, whereas beta cell failure in T2D is delayed and progressive. Here we find a new genetic component of diabetes susceptibility in T1D non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, identifying immune-independent beta cell fragility. Genetic variation in Xrcc4 and Glis3 alters the response of NOD beta cells to unfolded protein stress, enhancing the apoptotic and senescent fates. The same transcriptional relationships were observed in human islets, demonstrating the role of beta cell fragility in genetic predisposition to diabetes.

  14. Time-stepping techniques to enable the simulation of bursting behavior in a physiologically realistic computational islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuvis, Samuel; Gobbert, Matthias K; Peercy, Bradford E

    2015-05-01

    Physiologically realistic simulations of computational islets of beta cells require the long-time solution of several thousands of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs), resulting from the combination of several ODEs in each cell and realistic numbers of several hundreds of cells in an islet. For a reliable and accurate solution of complex nonlinear models up to the desired final times on the scale of several bursting periods, an appropriate ODE solver designed for stiff problems is eventually a necessity, since other solvers may not be able to handle the problem or are exceedingly inefficient. But stiff solvers are potentially significantly harder to use, since their algorithms require at least an approximation of the Jacobian matrix. For sophisticated models, systems of several complex ODEs in each cell, it is practically unworkable to differentiate these intricate nonlinear systems analytically and to manually program the resulting Jacobian matrix in computer code. This paper demonstrates that automatic differentiation can be used to obtain code for the Jacobian directly from code for the ODE system, which allows a full accounting for the sophisticated model equations. This technique is also feasible in source-code languages Fortran and C, and the conclusions apply to a wide range of systems of coupled, nonlinear reaction equations. However, when we combine an appropriately supplied Jacobian with slightly modified memory management in the ODE solver, simulations on the realistic scale of one thousand cells in the islet become possible that are several orders of magnitude faster than the original solver in the software Matlab, a language that is particularly user friendly for programming complicated model equations. We use the efficient simulator to analyze electrical bursting and show non-monotonic average burst period between fast and slow cells for increasing coupling strengths. We also find that interestingly, the arrangement of the connected fast

  15. Enhancing pancreatic Beta-cell regeneration in vivo with pioglitazone and alogliptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yin

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass.Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery.These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus.

  16. Bmal1 and Beta cell clock are required for adaptation to circadian disruption, and their loss of function leads to oxidative stress-induced Beta cell failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian disruption has deleterious effects on metabolism. Global deletion of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in Beta cell dysfunction and diabetes. However, it is unknown if this is due to loss of cell-autonomous function of Bmal1 in Beta cells. To address this, we generated mice with Beta cell ...

  17. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane Song

    Full Text Available One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of

  18. Investigating remission and relapse in type 1 diabetes. Immune correlates of clinical outcome in beta-cell replacement therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torren, van der C.R.

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is caused by destruction of insulin producing beta-cells by autoimmune T-cells. Replacement of beta-cells through transplantation can supply new beta-cells, however these are at renewed peril of destruction through auto- and alloreactive immune responses. In this thesis, immune

  19. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kover, Karen, E-mail: kkover@cmh.edu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa [Kansas City University Medical Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V. [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  20. Exploring functional beta-cell heterogeneity in vivo using PSA-NCAM as a specific marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Karaca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mass of pancreatic beta-cells varies according to increases in insulin demand. It is hypothesized that functionally heterogeneous beta-cell subpopulations take part in this process. Here we characterized two functionally distinct groups of beta-cells and investigated their physiological relevance in increased insulin demand conditions in rats. METHODS: Two rat beta-cell populations were sorted by FACS according to their PSA-NCAM surface expression, i.e. beta(high and beta(low-cells. Insulin release, Ca(2+ movements, ATP and cAMP contents in response to various secretagogues were analyzed. Gene expression profiles and exocytosis machinery were also investigated. In a second part, beta(high and beta(low-cell distribution and functionality were investigated in animal models with decreased or increased beta-cell function: the Zucker Diabetic Fatty rat and the 48 h glucose-infused rat. RESULTS: We show that beta-cells are heterogeneous for PSA-NCAM in rat pancreas. Unlike beta(low-cells, beta(high-cells express functional beta-cell markers and are highly responsive to various insulin secretagogues. Whereas beta(low-cells represent the main population in diabetic pancreas, an increase in beta(high-cells is associated with gain of function that follows sustained glucose overload. CONCLUSION: Our data show that a functional heterogeneity of beta-cells, assessed by PSA-NCAM surface expression, exists in vivo. These findings pinpoint new target populations involved in endocrine pancreas plasticity and in beta-cell defects in type 2 diabetes.

  1. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  2. Lysine deacetylases are produced in pancreatic beta cells and are differentially regulated by proinflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Rasmussen, D N

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine-induced beta cell toxicity is abrogated by non-selective inhibitors of lysine deacetylases (KDACs). The KDAC family consists of 11 members, namely histone deacetylases HDAC1 to HDAC11, but it is not known which KDAC members play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death. The aim...... of the present study was to examine the KDAC gene expression profile of the beta cell and to investigate whether KDAC expression is regulated by cytokines. In addition, the protective effect of the non-selective KDAC inhibitor ITF2357 and interdependent regulation of four selected KDACs were investigated....

  3. Pancreatic beta-cell lipotoxicity induced by overexpression of hormone-sensitive lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Svensson, Håkan; Enerbäck, Sven

    2003-01-01

    Lipid perturbations associated with triglyceride overstorage in beta-cells impair insulin secretion, a process termed lipotoxicity. To assess the role of hormone-sensitive lipase, which is expressed and enzymatically active in beta-cells, in the development of lipotoxicity, we generated transgenic...... mice overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase specifically in beta-cells. Transgenic mice developed glucose intolerance and severely blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion when challenged with a high-fat diet. As expected, both lipase activity and forskolin-stimulated lipolysis was increased...

  4. Complex transitions between spike, burst or chaos synchronization states in coupled neurons with coexisting bursting patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Hua-Guang; Chen Sheng-Gen; Li Yu-Ye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the synchronization dynamics of a coupled neuronal system composed of two identical Chay model neurons. The Chay model showed coexisting period-1 and period-2 bursting patterns as a parameter and initial values are varied. We simulated multiple periodic and chaotic bursting patterns with non-(NS), burst phase (BS), spike phase (SS), complete (CS), and lag synchronization states. When the coexisting behavior is near period-2 bursting, the transitions of synchronization states of the coupled system follows very complex transitions that begins with transitions between BS and SS, moves to transitions between CS and SS, and to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting while only a few lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting. When the coexisting behavior is near period-1 bursting, the transitions begin with NS, move to transitions between SS and BS, to transitions between SS and CS, and then to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting but a few lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting. The BS was identified as chaos synchronization. The patterns for NS and transitions between BS and SS are insensitive to initial values. The patterns for transitions between CS and SS and the CS state are sensitive to them. The number of spikes per burst of non-CS bursting increases with increasing coupling strength. These results not only reveal the initial value- and parameter-dependent synchronization transitions of coupled systems with coexisting behaviors, but also facilitate interpretation of various bursting patterns and synchronization transitions generated in the nervous system with weak coupling strength. (paper)

  5. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them...... to those of primary beta-cells using DIGE followed by MS. The results were validated by Western blotting. An average of 1800 spots was detected with less than 1% exhibiting differential abundance. Proteins more abundant in human islets, such as Caldesmon, are involved in the regulation of cell......, a molecular snapshot of the orchestrated changes in expression of proteins involved in key processes which could be correlated with the altered phenotype of human beta-cells. Collectively our observations prompt research towards the establishment of bioengineered human beta-cells providing a new and needed...

  6. The effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the beta cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease characterized by insulin resistance and impaired beta-cell function. Treatments that prevent further beta-cell decline are therefore essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is known...... to stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Furthermore, GLP-1 appears to have multiple positive effects on beta cells. However, GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), which limits the clinical relevance of GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two main classes of GLP-1-based...... with type 2 diabetes, as assessed by homoeostasis model assessment-B analysis and proinsulin : insulin ratio. Additionally, liraglutide and exenatide are able to enhance first- and second-phase insulin secretion and are able to restore beta-cell sensitivity to glucose. Preclinical studies have shown...

  7. Effect of aerobic exercise on Pancreas Beta-cells function in adult obese males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Eizadi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Aerobic exercise training increases beta cells function and decreases FBS in obese men. These findings support the hypothesis that regular physical activity postpones the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in adult obese subjects.

  8. mTOR links incretin signaling to HIF induction in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Sam; Hogan, Meghan F; Montminy, Marc

    2011-10-11

    Under feeding conditions, the incretin hormone GLP-1 promotes pancreatic islet viability by triggering the cAMP pathway in beta cells. Increases in PKA activity stimulate the phosphorylation of CREB, which in turn enhances beta cell survival by upregulating IRS2 expression. Although sustained GLP-1 action appears important for its salutary effects on islet function, the transient nature of CREB activation has pointed to the involvement of additional nuclear factors in this process. Following the acute induction of CREB-regulated genes, cAMP triggers a second delayed phase of gene expression that proceeds via the HIF transcription factor. Increases in cAMP promote the accumulation of HIF1α in beta cells by activating the mTOR pathway. As exposure to rapamycin disrupts GLP-1 effects on beta cell viability, these results demonstrate how a pathway associated with tumor growth also mediates salutary effects of an incretin hormone on pancreatic islet function.

  9. The Importance of REST for Development and Function of Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2017-01-01

    these, the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is expressed in most cells of the body, excluding most populations of neurons, as well as pancreatic beta and alpha cells. In the cell types where it is expressed, REST represses the expression of hundreds of genes......Beta cells are defined by the genes they express, many of which are specific to this cell type, and ensure a specific set of functions. Beta cells are also defined by a set of genes they should not express (in order to function properly), and these genes have been called forbidden genes. Among...... is expressed in the progenitors of both neurons and beta cells during development, but it is down-regulated as the cells differentiate. Although REST mutations and deregulation have yet to be connected to diabetes in humans, REST activation during both development and in adult beta cells leads to diabetes...

  10. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Beta-Cell Protection or Exhaustion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Verchere, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists enhance insulin secretion and may improve pancreatic islet cell function. However, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist treatment may have more complex, and sometimes deleterious, effects on beta cells. We discuss the concepts of beta cell protection versus exhaustion for different GLP-1R agonists based on recent data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of beta-cell secretory capacity using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Nielsen, Mette Toft; Krarup, T

    2000-01-01

    Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients.......Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients....

  12. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. S. Esguerra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D.

  13. Beta-cell autoantibodies and their function in Taiwanese children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yi-Ching; Chen, Mei-Huei; Lee, Cheng-Ting; Tsai, Wen-Yu

    2009-11-01

    To understand the importance of autoimmunity in the development of type 1 diabetes in Taiwanese children, we evaluated the presence of beta-cell autoantibodies and their correlation with residual beta-cell function. From 1989 to 2006, 157 Taiwanese children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes were enrolled in this study. We determined the presence of beta-cell autoantibodies, such as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADAs), insulinoma antigen 2 autoantibodies (IA-2As), and insulin autoantibodies (IAAs). A 6-minute glucagon test was also performed at diagnosis. At diagnosis, 73% of children tested positive for GADAs, 76% for IA-2As and 21% for IAAs. Ninety-two percent of them had at least one of the beta-cell autoantibodies detected. Positivity for IAAs was more frequent in patients younger than 5 years than in those older than 5 years (45% vs. 13%). Using multiple regression analysis, the presence of GADAs or IAAs, or age of onset of these patients was an independent factor for residual beta-cell function. Younger patients and those with GADAs had less residual beta-cell function at disease onset, whereas those with IAAs had more insulin reserve. Autoimmunity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in Taiwanese children, and the presence of IAAs tends to be more common in younger children.

  14. CRFR1 is expressed on pancreatic beta cells, promotes beta cell proliferation, and potentiates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huising, Mark O; van der Meulen, Talitha; Vaughan, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), originally characterized as the principal neuroregulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, has broad central and peripheral distribution and actions. We demonstrate the presence of CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) on primary beta cells and show that acti...

  15. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  16. Insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in healthy cats: assessment with the use of the hyperglycemic glucose clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingerland, L I; Robben, J H; van Haeften, T W; Kooistra, H S; Rijnberk, A

    2007-05-01

    A hyperglycemic clamp (HGC) was developed for use in conscious cats. In 21 healthy, normal glucose tolerant cats glucose disposal rate (M), insulin sensitivity (ISI (HGC)), and beta-cell response (I) at arterial plasma glucose of 9 mmol.l (-1) were measured. The HGC was tolerated well and steady state glucose infusion was achieved. Compared to values reported for humans, M values for the cats were low, which appeared to relate to both a low ISI (HGC) and a low I. HGC measures correlated with fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as with their HOMA (homeostasis model assessment) and QUICKI (quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) counterparts. Also, I and ISI (HGC) correlated with their counterparts derived from intravenous glucose tolerance tests. In conclusion, this is the first report of hyperglycemic glucose clamping in cats. The procedure (HGC) allows for measurements of glucose disposal, beta-cell response and insulin sensitivity. Compared to human data, both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion appeared to be low in cats. This is compatible with the carnivorous nature of this species, for which insulin resistance would be advantageous during periods of restricted food availability.

  17. Role of insulin sensitivity and beta cell function in the development of periodontal disease in adults without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Petra; Saxlin, Tuomas; Knuuttila, Matti; Suominen, Anna Liisa; Jula, Antti; Tervonen, Tellervo; Ylöstalo, Pekka

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to explore whether insulin resistance and beta cell function are related to periodontal pocket formation, indicative of infectious periodontal disease in non-smoking adults without manifest diabetes. We analysed data from a Health 2000 Survey consisting of dentate subjects without any indication of diabetes, aged between 30 and 64, who had never smoked and who had participated in the Follow-up Study on Finnish Adults' Oral Health about 4 years later (n = 157). The Homeostasis Model Assessment Indices were used to measure insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-B). The development of periodontal disease was measured by means of the incidence of deepened periodontal pockets (4 mm deep or deeper) during the follow-up period. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Poisson regression models. Both HOMA-IR and HOMA-B indices were associated with periodontal pocket formation during the 4-year follow-up. The results of this follow-up study suggest that impaired glucose metabolism measured as insulin resistance and altered beta cell function predict the breakdown of periodontal tissues. Further studies about their role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K.; Raha, Sandeep; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  19. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Raha, Sandeep [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Nicholson, Catherine J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  20. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  1. Regulation of the susceptibility to oxidative stress by cysteine availability in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Harumi; Aoki, Risa; Taira, Toshio; Yoshida, Takemi

    2008-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells are susceptible to oxidative stress, which is related closely to the islet dysfunction. In the present study, using the pancreatic cell lines HIT-T15 and RINm5F as known in vitro models of impaired beta-cell function as well as primary rat islet beta-cells, we observed a relationship between intracellular glutathione levels and oxidative stress-mediated cell dysfunction. Hydrogen peroxide and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal caused cell death in HIT-T15 and RINm5F cells at lower concentrations compared with non-beta-cells, such as HepG2 and NRK-49F cells. The extent of the cytotoxicity caused by the model oxidants was inversely correlated well with intracellular glutathione levels in the cell lines used. Treatment of HIT-T15 and RINm5F cells with l-cysteine or l-cystine significantly augmented the glutathione contents, surpassing the effect of N-acetylcysteine, and abrogated 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-mediated cytotoxicity almost completely. l-Cysteine increased intracellular glutathione levels in primary beta-cells as well. Supplementation of l-cysteine to the RINm5F cell culture inhibited 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-mediated cytosolic translocation of PDX-1, a key transcription factor for beta-cell function. Intrinsic transport activities (V(max)/K(m)) of the l-cystine/l-glutamate exchanger in HIT-T15 and RINm5F cells were considerably lower than that in NRK-49F cells, although gene expressions of the exchanger were similar in these cells. Results obtained from the present study suggest that the restricted activity of the l-cystine/l-glutamate exchanger controls the levels of intracellular glutathione, thereby making beta-cells become susceptible to oxidative stress.

  2. Endothelial and beta cell composite aggregates for improved function of a bioartificial pancreas encapsulation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Barrera, Yazmin Brito; Groth, Thomas; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2018-03-01

    Encapsulation of pancreatic islets or beta cells is a promising strategy for treatment of type 1 diabetes by providing an immune isolated environment and allowing for transplantation in a different location than the liver. However, islets used for encapsulation often show lower functionality due to the damaging of islet endothelial cells during the isolation procedure. Factors produced by endothelial cells have great impact on beta cell insulin secretion. Therefore, mutual signaling between endothelial cells and beta cells should be considered for the development of encapsulation systems to achieve high insulin secretion and maintain beta cell viability. Here, we investigate whether co-culture of beta cells with endothelial cells could improve beta cell function within encapsulation devices. Mouse insulinoma MIN6 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used for creating composite aggregates on agarose microwell platform. The composite aggregates were encapsulated within flat poly(ether sulfone)/polyvinylpyrrolidone device. Their functionality was assessed by glucose-induced insulin secretion test and compared to non-encapsulated free-floating aggregates. We created composite aggregates of 80-100 µm in diameter, closely mimicking pancreatic islets. Upon glucose stimulation, their insulin secretion is improved in comparison to aggregates consisting of only MIN6 cells. Moreover, the composite aggregates encapsulated within a device secrete more insulin than aggregates consisting of only MIN6 cells. Composite aggregates of MIN6 cells with human umbilical vein endothelial cells have improved insulin secretion in comparison to MIN6 aggregates showing that the interaction of beta cell and endothelial cell is crucial for a functional encapsulation system.

  3. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Hypoxia in Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Philipp A; Rutter, Guy A

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a frequent precursor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), a disease that currently affects ∼8% of the adult population worldwide. Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and loss are central to the disease process, although understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still fragmentary. Recent Advances: Oversupply of nutrients, including glucose and fatty acids, and the subsequent overstimulation of beta cells, are believed to be an important contributor to insulin secretory failure in T2D. Hypoxia has also recently been implicated in beta-cell damage. Accumulating evidence points to a role for oxidative stress in both processes. Although the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) results from enhanced mitochondrial respiration during stimulation with glucose and other fuels, the expression of antioxidant defense genes is unusually low (or disallowed) in beta cells. Not all subjects with metabolic syndrome and hyperglycemia go on to develop full-blown diabetes, implying an important role in disease risk for gene-environment interactions. Possession of common risk alleles at the SLC30A8 locus, encoding the beta-cell granule zinc transporter ZnT8, may affect cytosolic Zn 2+ concentrations and thus susceptibility to hypoxia and oxidative stress. Loss of normal beta-cell function, rather than total mass, is increasingly considered to be the major driver for impaired insulin secretion in diabetes. Better understanding of the role of oxidative changes, its modulation by genes involved in disease risk, and effects on beta-cell identity may facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies to this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 501-518.

  4. Osteopontin Affects Insulin Vesicle Localization and Ca2+ Homeostasis in Pancreatic Beta Cells from Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wendt

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetic patients suffer from insulin resistance and reduced insulin secretion. Osteopontin (OPN, a versatile protein expressed in several tissues throughout the body including the islets of Langerhans, has previously been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Here we have investigated the role of OPN in insulin secretion using an OPN knock out mouse model (OPN-/-. Ultra-structural analyzes of islets from OPN-/- and WT mice indicated weaker cell-cell connections between the islet cells in the OPN-/- mouse compared to WT. Analysis of the insulin granule distribution in the beta cells showed that although OPN-/- and WT beta cells have the same number of insulin granules OPN-/- beta cells have significantly fewer docked granules. Both OPN-/- and WT islets displayed synchronized Ca2+ oscillations indicative of an intact beta cell communication. OPN-/- islets displayed higher intracellular Ca2+ concentrations when stimulated with 16.7 mM glucose than WT islets and the initial dip upon elevated glucose concentrations (which is associated with Ca2+ uptake into ER was significantly lower in these islets. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was similar in OPN-/- and WT islets. Likewise, non-fasted blood glucose levels were the same in both groups. In summary, deletion of OPN results in several minor beta-cell defects that can be compensated for in a healthy system.

  5. Empagliflozin Treatment is Associated with Improved Beta Cell Function in T2DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jobori, Hussein; Daniele, Giuseppe; Adams, John; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Solis-Herrera, Carolina; Triplitt, Curtis; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2018-01-12

    To examine whether lowering the plasma glucose concentration with empagliflozin (SGLT2 inhibitor) improves beta cell function in T2DM. 15 T2DM patients received empagliflozin (25 mg/day) for 2 weeks, and beta cell function was measured with 9-step hyperglycemic clamp (each step = +40 mg/dl) before and 48 hours and 14 days after empagliflozin. Empagliflozin caused 101±10 and 117±11 grams glucosuria on days 1 and 14 and produced 25±6 and 38±8 mg/dl reduction (pEmpagliflozin increased the incremental area under the plasma C-peptide concentration curve by 48±12% and 61±10% during the stepped hyperglycemic clamp performed 48 hours and 14 days, respectively (both p empagliflozin. Empagliflozin also caused an increase in the glucose infusion rate during the hyperglycemic clamp performed on days 3 and 14 compared to baseline by 15% and 16% (both pempagliflozin. Empagliflozin also enhanced beta cell glucose sensitivity during the hyperglycemic clamp by 42% and 54% after 48 hours and 14 days, respectively (both pempagliflozin in T2DM patients: (1) augments beta cell glucose sensitivity and (2) improves beta cell function (IS/IR index). Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society

  6. Effect of Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine on oxidative stress and the glutathione system in beta cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle M.P.H.J. Boesten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications is the formation of excessive levels of advanced glycation end (AGE products. Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine (CML is one of the best-characterized AGEs. Because little is known about the effects of AGEs on pancreatic beta cells, we investigated the effect of CML on human pancreatic cells and determined the activity and gene expression of glutathione system components. CML at a concentration of 0.5 mM induced cell death in human pancreatic beta cells, which was accompanied by increased intracellular oxidative stress. No changes in the gene expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE were found, although an increase in the level of a target cytokine of RAGE after CML exposure was observed. Additionally we found that CML lowered the levels of GSH and affected the activity and expression of other components of the glutathione system. These changes indicate that the cells are even more vulnerable for oxidative stress after exposure to CML. Since beta cells are low in antioxidant enzymes and repair for oxidized DNA, CML, but most likely also other AGEs, accelerates beta cell dysfunction and increases beta cell death during chronic hyperglycemia.

  7. New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent or Delay Beta-Cell Failure in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Floriana Elvira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The most recent estimates of International Diabetes Federation indicate that 382 million people have diabetes, and the incidence of this disease is increasing. While in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM beta-cell death is autoimmunemediated, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors that impair beta-cell function and insulin action. Many people with T2DM remain unaware of their illness for a long time because symptoms may take years to appear or be recognized, while the body is affected by excess blood glucose. These patients are often diagnosed only when diabetes complications have already developed. The aim of this article was to perform a review based on literature data on therapeutic modalities to prevent/delay beta cell function decline. Material and Methods: We searched MEDLINE from 2000 to the present to identify the therapeutic approaches to prevent or delay beta-cell failure in patients with T2DM. Results and conclusions: Several common polymorphisms in genes linked to monogenic forms of diabetes appear to influence the response to T2DM pharmacotherapy. Recent studies report the role of the G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40, also known as Free Fatty Acids Receptor 1 (FFAR1 in the regulation of beta-cell function- CNX-011-67 (a GPR40 agonist has the potential to provide good and durable glycemic control in T2DM patients.

  8. High fat programming of beta cell compensation, exhaustion, death and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2015-03-01

    Programming refers to events during critical developmental windows that shape progeny health outcomes. Fetal programming refers to the effects of intrauterine (in utero) events. Lactational programming refers to the effects of events during suckling (weaning). Developmental programming refers to the effects of events during both fetal and lactational life. Postnatal programming refers to the effects of events either from birth (lactational life) to adolescence or from weaning (end of lactation) to adolescence. Islets are most plastic during the early life course; hence programming during fetal and lactational life is most potent. High fat (HF) programming is the maintenance on a HF diet (HFD) during critical developmental life stages that alters progeny metabolism and physiology. HF programming induces variable diabetogenic phenotypes dependent on the timing and duration of the dietary insult. Maternal obesity reinforces HF programming effects in progeny. HF programming, through acute hyperglycemia, initiates beta cell compensation. However, HF programming eventually leads to chronic hyperglycemia that triggers beta cell exhaustion, death and dysfunction. In HF programming, beta cell dysfunction often co-presents with insulin resistance. Balanced, healthy nutrition during developmental windows is critical for preserving beta cell structure and function. Thus early positive nutritional interventions that coincide with the development of beta cells may reduce the overwhelming burden of diabetes and metabolic disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Beta-cell-tropin is associated with short-term stimulation of food intake in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Steven L; Smith, Marissa L; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    Beta-cell-tropin, a peptide derived from adrenocorticotropic hormone, is an insulin secretagogue. When centrally injected, it increases food intake in rats, but its appetite-associated effects have not been reported in any other species. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of central beta-cell-tropin on appetite-associated parameters in an alternative vertebrate model, the chick. Central injection of 2 or 4 nmol beta-cell-tropin increased food intake for 60 min. Whole hypothalamus was collected at 60 min post-injection, and real-time PCR performed to measure mRNA abundance of agouti-related peptide, corticotropin releasing factor, galanin, melanin concentrating hormone, neuropeptide Y, orexin, prohormone convertase 2, pro-opiomelanocortin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, urotensin 2, and visfatin, not one of which were affected by beta-cell-tropin treatment. Results demonstrate that beta-cell-tropin is associated with short-term stimulation of food intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of growth factors in control of pancreatic beta cell mass: focus on betatrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, Lynne L; Ardestani, Goli; Rhoads, David B

    2014-08-01

    Betatrophin is a newly described hormone, which potently stimulates beta cell replication in mice. This discovery has engendered great hope that it could prove clinically important in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Betatrophin, a 198-amino acid protein secreted by liver and adipose tissue, stimulates growth of pancreatic beta cell mass in insulin-resistant mice. Betatrophin has previously been named RIFL, lipasin, and ANGPLT8, and its salutory effects on lipid metabolism have been described in mouse and human studies. Serum betatrophin levels in humans correlate with improved adipose tissue lipid storage and lower serum triglyceride levels in the fed state, but do not correlate with insulin resistance or carbohydrate tolerance in humans. Betatrophin has not yet been shown to have an effect on beta cell replication in human pancreatic islets. Many endocrine and paracrine factors, of which betatrophin is the newest described, increase beta cell mass in murine models. None of these factors, including betatrophin, have displayed the same activity in clinical studies. This may reflect a profound species difference in beta cell regeneration pathways in mice and humans.

  11. Liraglutide protects pancreatic beta cells during an early intervention in Gato-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiu; Pan, Linlin; Nie, Aifang; Wang, Qidi; Gu, Yanyun; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Hongli; Li, Wenyi; Li, Xiaoying

    2013-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues have emerged as insulin secretagogues and are widely used in type 2 diabetic patients. GLP-1 analogues also demonstrate a promotion of beta cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis in rodents. In the present study, we investigated the protection of pancreatic beta cells by early use (at the age of 2 weeks) of GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide in Gato-Kakizaki (GK) rats and explored the underlying mechanisms. The effects of liraglutide on glucose tolerance were evaluated by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and insulin release tests (IRT). Ki67 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) immunostaining, Western blots and real-time polymerase chain reaction were applied to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis and related gene expressions. Our results demonstrated that early use of liraglutide improved glucose tolerance during liraglutide treatment in GK rats. Liraglutide increased pancreatic insulin contents and markedly reduced beta cell apoptosis. Liraglutide also downregulated pro-apoptotic gene expressions and reduced intra-islet macrophage infiltration. This experiment reported for the first time that early use of liraglutide could protect beta cell failure in pre-diabetic GK rats through reduction of beta cell apoptosis and ameliorating islet inflammation. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  13. Sodium fluorocitrate having protective effect on palmitate-induced beta cell death improves hyperglycemia in diabetic db/db mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Ik-Rak; Choi, Sung-E.; Hong, Seung A.; Hwang, Yoonjung; Kang, Yup

    2017-01-01

    Beta cell loss and insulin resistance play roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of free fatty acids in plasma might contribute to the loss of beta cells. The objective of this study was to find a chemical that could protect against palmitate-induced beta cell death and investigate whether such chemical could improve hyperglycemia in mouse model of type 2 diabetes. Sodium fluorocitrate (SFC), an aconitase inhibitor, was found to be strongly and specifically protective ...

  14. AICA-riboside induces apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells through stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefas, B A; Heimberg, H; Vaulont, S; Meisse, D; Hue, L; Pipeleers, D; Van de Casteele, M

    2003-02-01

    Prolonged exposure of beta cells to low glucose concentrations triggers their apoptosis and is known to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in beta cell lines. We examined whether prolonged activation of AMPK can trigger apoptosis in rodent beta cells. Primary beta cells were FACS-purified from rats, and from wild-type and AMPK(alpha2)-deficient mice. AMPK activation in beta cells was induced by the adenosine analog AICA-riboside and detected by immunoblotting using a phosphospecific antibody. Apoptosis of rodent beta cells was monitored by FACS analysis of beta cell DNA content, by direct counting of apoptotic cells using fluorescence microscopy, or by measurement of their caspase-3 activity. Dose-dependent and time-dependent apoptosis of the cells, concommittant with an activation of caspase-3, were suppressed by the caspase inhibitors zVAD-fmk and zDEVD-fmk. Apoptosis induction by AICA-riboside was also prevented by adding the MAPK-inhibitor SB203580 which blocked the AICA-riboside-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Beta cells isolated from AMPK-(alpha2)-deficient mice were resistant against AICA-riboside induced apoptosis. Sustained activation of AMPK by AICA-riboside can trigger a caspase-dependent apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells.

  15. Feedback inhibition of CREB signaling promotes beta cell dysfunction in insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Emilie; Van de Velde, Sam; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Hao, Ergeng; LeLay, John; Kaestner, Klaus; Montminy, Marc

    2015-02-24

    Although persistent elevations in circulating glucose concentrations promote compensatory increases in pancreatic islet mass, unremitting insulin resistance causes deterioration in beta cell function that leads to the progression to diabetes. Here, we show that mice with a knockout of the CREB coactivator CRTC2 in beta cells have impaired oral glucose tolerance due to decreases in circulating insulin concentrations. CRTC2 was found to promote beta cell function in part by stimulating the expression of the transcription factor MafA. Chronic hyperglycemia disrupted cAMP signaling in pancreatic islets by activating the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF1)-dependent induction of the protein kinase A inhibitor beta (PKIB), a potent inhibitor of PKA catalytic activity. Indeed, disruption of the PKIB gene improved islet function in the setting of obesity. These results demonstrate how crosstalk between nutrient and hormonal pathways contributes to loss of pancreatic islet function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proinflammatory cytokines activate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Lars G; Aikin, Reid; Tonnesen, Morten F

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Proinflammatory cytokines are cytotoxic to beta-cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and islet graft failure. The importance of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cytokine-induced beta-cell death is unclear. Here, cytokine activation...... of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the role of the two proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, Bad and Bax, were examined in beta-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Human and rat islets and INS-1 cells were exposed to a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, and/or tumor necrosis...... to investigate the role of Bad and Bax activation, respectively. RESULTS: We found that proinflammatory cytokines induced calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of Bad Ser136, mitochondrial stress, cytochrome c release, activation of caspase-9 and -3, and DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of Bad Ser136...

  17. A subset of human pancreatic beta cells express functional CD14 receptors: a signaling pathway fot beta cell-related glycolipids, sulfatide and beta-galactosylceramide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osterbye, T.; Funda, David P.; Fundová, Petra; Mansson, J.-E.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Buschard, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 8 (2010), s. 656-667 E-ISSN 1520-7560 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/06/1329; GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GA310/09/1640 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : human beta-cell * cd14 * innate immunity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  18. Zip4 mediated zinc influx stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre B Hardy

    Full Text Available Zinc has an important role in normal pancreatic beta cell physiology as it regulates gene transcription, insulin crystallization and secretion, and cell survival. Nevertheless, little is known about how zinc is transported through the plasma membrane of beta cells and which of the class of zinc influx transporters (Zip is involved. Zip4 was previously shown to be expressed in human and mouse beta cells; however, its function there is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define the zinc transport role of Zip4 in beta cells. To investigate this, Zip4 was over-expressed in MIN6 beta cells using a pCMV6-Zip4GFP plasmid. Organelle staining combined with confocal microscopy showed that Zip4 exhibits a widespread localization in MIN6 cells. Time-lapse zinc imaging experiments showed that Zip4 increases cytoplasmic zinc levels. This resulted in increased granular zinc content and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, it is unlikely that the increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion was triggered by a modulation of mitochondrial function, as mitochondrial membrane potential remained unchanged. To define the role of Zip4 in-vivo, we generated a beta cell-specific knockout mouse model (Zip4BKO. Deletion of the Zip4 gene was confirmed in Zip4BKO islets by PCR, RT-PCR, and immuno-histochemistry. Zip4BKO mice showed slightly improved glucose homeostasis but no change in insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test. While Zip4 was not found to be essential for proper glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in vivo in mice, this study also found that Zip4 mediates increases in cytoplasmic and granular zinc pools and stimulates glucose dependant insulin secretion in-vitro.

  19. Determination of Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function in Healthy Obese and Non-obese Individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmi, A.; Sattar, A.; Tariq, K. M.; Najamussahar; Hashim, R.; Almani, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine insulin resistance and beta cell function in healthy obese and nonobese individuals of the local population. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: AFIP Rawalpindi in collaboration with department of medicine military hospital(MH) Rawalpindi, from Aug 2008 to Mar 2009. Methods: Eighty obese(n=40) and non-obese(n=40) subjects were selected by non-probability convenience sampling. Plasma insulin, glucose, and serum total cholestrol were estimated in fasting state. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR and beta cell function by HOMA- equation. Results: Significant differences were observed between obese and non-obese individuals regarding insulin resistance, beta cell function, and BMI and serum total cholesterol. Mean insulin resistance in obese group was found to be 11.1 +- 5.1(range 7.0-16.2) and in non-obese group it was 0.9+-0.4 (range 0.5-1.3). This difference was highly significant (p=0.001). There was a highly significant difference between the two groups in term of beta cell function with mean rank 60.1 for obese group and 20.9 non obese groups (Asym sig. 2 tailed 0.000). Also the correlation (r = 0.064) between insulin resistance and beta cell function in obese group is highly significant (p = 0.000). Mean serum leptin levels were lower (6.3 ng/ml) in non-obese, and high (57.2 ng/ml) in the obese group. Conclusions: Insulin resistance is found higher in obese individuals. Beta cell function is significantly different between obese and non-obese groups. (author)

  20. Effects of ethanol on pancreatic beta-cell death: interaction with glucose and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Korami; Nguyen, K Hoa; Hernandez, Tiffany A; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2009-04-01

    Western lifestyle plays an important role in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes by causing insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. High fat diet and alcohol are major components of the western diet. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ethanol and fatty acids on beta-cell survival and metabolism. We treated the rat beta-cell line RINm5F with ethanol, a mixture of palmitic and oleic acids, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by (5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate) (CM-H2DCFDA) fluorescence assay, and mitochondrial activity was assessed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay and by determining ATP production. Cell viability was assessed with a cell counter and trypan blue exclusion, and the mode of cell death by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining. With both ethanol and fatty acid treatments, MTT reduction and ATP production decreased, whereas ROS production increased. Ethanol treatment had no effect on cell number, whereas fatty acid treatment reduced the cell number. Cell incubation with ethanol, fatty acids, or both increased the number of Hoechst 33342-positive nuclei. However, the majority of nuclei from fatty acid-treated cells were stained with propidium iodide, indicating a loss of plasma membrane integrity. We conclude that both ethanol and fatty acids generate cellular oxidative stress, and affect mitochondrial function in RINm5F beta-cells. However, ethanol causes beta-cell death by apoptosis, whereas fatty acids cause cell death predominantly by necrosis. It is not known whether these results are applicable to human beta-cells.

  1. Mathematical Beta Cell Model for Insulin Secretion following IVGTT and OGTT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Karlsson, Mats

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of beta cell function is conducted by a variety of glucose tolerance tests and evaluated by a number of different models with less than perfect consistency among results obtained from different tests. We formulated a new approximation of the distributed threshold model for insulin...... secretion in order to approach a model for quantifying beta cell function, not only for one, but for several different experiments. Data was obtained from 40 subjects that had both an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and an intravenous tolerance test (IVGTT) performed. Parameter estimates from the two...

  2. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  3. Intermittent fasting preserves beta-cell mass in obesity-induced diabetes via the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Javaheri, Ali; Godar, Rebecca J; Murphy, John; Ma, Xiucui; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Mahadevan, Jana; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Saftig, Paul; Marshall, Connie; McDaniel, Michael L; Remedi, Maria S; Razani, Babak; Urano, Fumihiko; Diwan, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-induced diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and progressive beta cell failure. In islets of mice with obesity-induced diabetes, we observe increased beta cell death and impaired autophagic flux. We hypothesized that intermittent fasting, a clinically sustainable therapeutic strategy, stimulates autophagic flux to ameliorate obesity-induced diabetes. Our data show that despite continued high-fat intake, intermittent fasting restores autophagic flux in islets and improves glucose tolerance by enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, beta cell survival, and nuclear expression of NEUROG3, a marker of pancreatic regeneration. In contrast, intermittent fasting does not rescue beta-cell death or induce NEUROG3 expression in obese mice with lysosomal dysfunction secondary to deficiency of the lysosomal membrane protein, LAMP2 or haplo-insufficiency of BECN1/Beclin 1, a protein critical for autophagosome formation. Moreover, intermittent fasting is sufficient to provoke beta cell death in nonobese lamp2 null mice, attesting to a critical role for lysosome function in beta cell homeostasis under fasting conditions. Beta cells in intermittently-fasted LAMP2- or BECN1-deficient mice exhibit markers of autophagic failure with accumulation of damaged mitochondria and upregulation of oxidative stress. Thus, intermittent fasting preserves organelle quality via the autophagy-lysosome pathway to enhance beta cell survival and stimulates markers of regeneration in obesity-induced diabetes.

  4. Stimulation of pancreatic beta-cell replication by incretins involves transcriptional induction of cyclin D1 via multiple signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Neubauer, Nicole; Lee, Ying C

    2006-01-01

    The incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), have been suggested to act as beta-cell growth factors and may therefore be of critical importance for the maintenance of a proper beta-cell mass. We have investigated the molecular mechanis...

  5. Phenotypic and gene expression changes between low (glucose-responsive) and High (glucose non-responsive) MIN-6 beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Driscoll, L.; Gammell, p.; McKierman, E.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term potential to routinely use replacement beta cells/islets as cell therapy for type 1 diabetes relies on our ability to culture such cells/islets, in vitro, while maintaining their functional status. Previous beta cell studies, by ourselves and other researchers, have indicated that t...

  6. Targeted inactivation of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-met in beta-cells leads to defective insulin secretion and GLUT-2 downregulation without alteration of beta-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccisana, Jennifer; Reddy, Vasumathi; Vasavada, Rupangi C; Gonzalez-Pertusa, Jose A; Magnuson, Mark A; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo

    2005-07-01

    Overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the beta-cell of transgenic mice enhances beta-cell proliferation, survival, and function. In the current studies, we have used conditional ablation of the c-met gene to uncover the physiological role of HGF in beta-cell growth and function. Mice in which c-met is inactivated in the beta-cell (MetCKO mice) display normal body weight, blood glucose, and plasma insulin compared with control littermates. In contrast, MetCKO mice displayed significantly diminished glucose tolerance and reduced plasma insulin after a glucose challenge in vivo. This impaired glucose tolerance in MetCKO mice was not caused by insulin resistance because sensitivity to exogenous insulin was similar in both groups. Importantly, in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in MetCKO islets was decreased by approximately 50% at high glucose concentrations compared with control islets. Furthermore, whereas insulin and glucokinase expression in MetCKO islets were normal, GLUT-2 expression was decreased by approximately 50%. These changes in beta-cell function in MetCKO mice were not accompanied by changes in total beta-cell mass, islet morphology, islet cell composition, and beta-cell proliferation. Interestingly, however, MetCKO mice display an increased number of small islets, mainly single and doublet beta-cells. We conclude that HGF/c-met signaling in the beta-cell is not essential for beta-cell growth, but it is essential for normal glucose-dependent insulin secretion.

  7. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  8. X-ray burst observations of Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajno, M.; Basinska, E. M.; Cominsky, L. R.; Marshall, F. J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-seven X-ray bursts observed with SAS 3 in the period 1976 July to 1979 March are reported. Their general features (e.g., maximum burst flux, integrated burst flux, spectral hardness, and rise time) and the relations between them are discussed. Also a comparison is made between these burst features and the associated persistent X-ray flux. The latter appears to be correlated with the maximum burst flux; the temperature of the plasma that produces the persistent flux is roughly proportional to this flux.

  9. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway...

  10. Beta cell imaging - a key tool in optimized diabetes prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotthardt, M.; Eizirik, D.L.; Cnop, M.; Brom, M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is 382 million worldwide, and is expected to rise to 592 million in 2035 (http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas); 2.5-15\\% of national annual healthcare budgets are related to diabetes care, potentially increasing to 40\\% in high-prevalence countries. Beta cell dysfunction and

  11. Autophagy in adipose tissue and the beta cell: implications for obesity and diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, R.; Haim, Y.; Riahi, Y.; Netea, M.; Rudich, A.; Leibowitz, G.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway recycling intracellular long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, thereby maintaining cellular homeostasis. In addition to inflammatory processes, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of adipose tissue and beta cell functions. In obesity and

  12. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Nika N; Walensky, Loren D; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K; Molina, Anthony J A; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L; Bird, Gregory H; Wikstrom, Jakob D; Deeney, Jude T; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne; Kim, Sheene; Greenberg, Michael E; Corkey, Barbara E; Shirihai, Orian S; Shulman, Gerald I; Lowell, Bradford B; Korsmeyer, Stanley J

    2008-02-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeable, hydrocarbon-stapled BAD BH3 helices that target glucokinase, restore glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration and correct the insulin secretory response in Bad-deficient islets. Our studies uncover an alternative target and function for the BAD BH3 domain and emphasize the therapeutic potential of phosphorylated BAD BH3 mimetics in selectively restoring beta cell function. Furthermore, we show that BAD regulates the physiologic adaptation of beta cell mass during high-fat feeding. Our findings provide genetic proof of the bifunctional activities of BAD in both beta cell survival and insulin secretion.

  13. PDX1, Neurogenin-3, and MAFA: critical transcription regulators for beta cell development and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxi Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transcription factors regulate gene expression through binding to specific enhancer sequences. Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1 (PDX1, Neurogenin-3 (NEUROG3, and V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MAFA are transcription factors critical for beta cell development and maturation. NEUROG3 is expressed in endocrine progenitor cells and controls islet differentiation and regeneration. PDX1 is essential for the development of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells including beta cells. PDX1 also binds to the regulatory elements and increases insulin gene transcription. Likewise, MAFA binds to the enhancer/promoter region of the insulin gene and drives insulin expression in response to glucose. In addition to those natural roles in beta cell development and maturation, ectopic expression of PDX1, NEUROG3, and/or MAFA has been successfully used to reprogram various cell types into insulin-producing cells in vitro and in vivo, such as pancreatic exocrine cells, hepatocytes, and pluripotent stem cells. Here, we review biological properties of PDX1, NEUROG3, and MAFA, and their applications and limitations for beta cell regenerative approaches. The primary source literature for this review was acquired using a PubMed search for articles published between 1990 and 2017. Search terms include diabetes, insulin, trans-differentiation, stem cells, and regenerative medicine.

  14. Inhibition of beta cell growth and function by bone morphogenetic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Jacobsen, Marie L B

    2014-01-01

    proliferation of rodent beta cells. The expression of Id mRNAs was induced by BMP4 in rat and human islets. Finally, glucose-induced insulin secretion was significantly impaired in rodent and human islets pre-treated with BMP4, and inhibition of BMP activity resulted in enhanced insulin release. CONCLUSIONS...

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment reduces beta cell mass in normoglycaemic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, J.H.; Tons, H.A.; Westerouen van Meeteren, M.J.; de Graaf, N.; Hanegraaf, M.A.; Rabelink, T.J.; Carlotti, F.; de Koning, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Incretin-based therapies improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. In animal models of diabetes, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) increase beta cell mass. GLP-1RAs are also evaluated in non-diabetic individuals with obesity and cardiovascular

  16. MicroRNAs as regulators of beta-cell function and dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmai, Mirwais; Osmai, Yama; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner

    2016-01-01

    , recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are important regulators of the islet transcriptome, controlling apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation, as well as regulating unique islet and beta-cell functions and pathways such as insulin expression, processing and secretion. Furthermore, a large...

  17. Pancreatic beta-Cell Dysfunction and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes After Kidney Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, D.M.; Corpeleijn, E.; Deinum, J.; Stolk, R.P.; Gans, R.O.B.; Navis, G.; Bakker, S.J.L.

    OBJECTIVE-Chronic exposure to calcineurin inhibitors and corticosteroids poses renal transplant recipients (RTR) at high risk for development of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT). Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction may be crucial to the pathophysiology of NODAT and specific markers for

  18. Glucocorticoids suppress beta-cell development and induce hepatic metaplasia in embryonic pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chia-Ning; Seckl, Jonathan R; Slack, Jonathan M W; Tosh, David

    2003-10-01

    Elevated glucocorticoids are associated with low birth weight and fetal 'programming' of hypertension and glucose intolerance. In the present paper, we show that treatment of fetal rats with dexamethasone during the last week of gestation reduces the insulin content of their pancreatic beta-cells. We reproduce this effect of dexamethasone in vitro using organ cultures of mouse embryonic pancreas, and show that it is associated with an elevation of expression of the transcription factor C/EBPbeta (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta) and a reduction of the transcription factor Pdx-1 (pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1). Dexamethasone also induces the appearance of hepatocyte-like cells in organ cultures of pancreas, based on the expression of liver markers, albumin, alpha1-antitrypsin and transthyretin. Evidence that C/EBPbeta is responsible for compromising the differentiation and later function of beta-cells is obtained from its effects on the beta-cell-like cell line RIN-5F. Transfection with a constitutive form of C/EBPb suppresses insulin formation, whereas introduction of a dominant-negative inhibitor of C/EBPb has no effect. We conclude that dexamethasone inhibits insulin expression in pancreatic beta-cells via a mechanism involving down-regulation of Pdx-1 and induction of C/EBPbeta. This mechanism may operate in combination with other changes during fetal programming, leading to type 2 diabetes in later life.

  19. Pdx1 restores beta cell function in Irs2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Jake A; Ye, Jing; Schubert, Markus; Burks, Deborah J; Dow, Matthew A; Flint, Carrie L; Dutta, Sanjoy; Wright, Christopher V E; Montminy, Marc R; White, Morris F

    2002-05-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Pdx1 is required for pancreas development, including the differentiation and function of beta cells. Mutations in Pdx1 or upstream hepatocyte nuclear factors cause autosomal forms of early-onset diabetes (maturity-onset diabetes of the young [MODY]). In mice, the Irs2 branch of the insulin/Igf signaling system mediates peripheral insulin action and pancreatic beta cell growth and function. To investigate whether beta cell failure in Irs2(-/-) mice might be related to dysfunction of MODY-related transcription factors, we measured the expression of Pdx1 in islets from young Irs2(-/-) mice. Before the onset of diabetes, Pdx1 was reduced in islets from Irs2(-/-) mice, whereas it was expressed normally in islets from wild-type or Irs1(-/-) mice, which do not develop diabetes. Whereas male Irs2(-/-)Pdx1(+/+) mice developed diabetes between 8 and 10 weeks of age, haploinsufficiency for Pdx1 caused diabetes in newborn Irs2(-/-) mice. By contrast, transgenic expression of Pdx1 restored beta cell mass and function in Irs2(-/-) mice and promoted glucose tolerance throughout life, as these mice survived for at least 20 months without diabetes. Our results suggest that dysregulation of Pdx1 might represent a common link between ordinary type 2 diabetes and MODY.

  20. Glucose transport by radiation-induced insulinoma and clonal pancreatic beta-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meglasson, M.D.; Manning, C.D.; Najafi, H.; Matschinsky, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Sugar uptake was measured in dispersed cells prepared from radiation-induced insulinomas transplantable in NEDH rats and in three clonal beta-cell lines maintained in continuous culture (RIN m5F, RIN 1046, HIT). Uptake of D-glucose and 3-O-methyl-D-glucose by insulinoma cells was rapid so that the intracellular concentration of D-hexoses approximated the concentration in the incubation medium by 15-30 s. L-Glucose was taken up only slowly. 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake by RIN m5F, RIN 1046, and HIT cells was slow; with 1 mM 3-O-methylglucose in the medium, equilibrium was attained at 20 min, but with 10 mM 3-O-methylglucose, equilibrium was not attained even at 20 min. In HIT cells incubated with D-glucose for 30 min, the intracellular concentration of glucose was less than the medium glucose concentration, indicating glucose transport is a nonequilibrium reaction in this cell line. These data indicate that radiation-induced insulinoma cells retain the capacity of normal beta-cells to transport sugar at high rates. RIN m5F, RIN 1046, and HIT cells transport sugar slowly, however, and thus differ from normal beta-cells. In RIN m5F, RIN 1046, and HIT cells, unlike in normal beta-cells, glucose transport may be the site regulating glucose metabolism

  1. Beta-cell autoimmunity in pediatric celiac disease: the case for routine screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Giannattasio, Alessandro; Poggi, Elena; Castellano, Emanuela; Calvi, Angela; Pistorio, Angela; Barabino, Arrigo; Lorini, Renata

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of beta-cell autoimmunity and the usefulness of a type 1 diabetes screening in patients with celiac disease. We measured GAD antibodies (GADAs), insulinoma-associated protein 2 antigens (IA-2As), and insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) in 188 young Italian patients with celiac disease (66 male [35.1%]). Mean age at celiac disease diagnosis was 5.4 years (0.5-17.1), and mean celiac disease duration was 4.2 years (0-28.8). Celiac disease was diagnosed by jejunal biopsy after positivity for endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibody was confirmed. GADAs were positive in seven patients (3.7%), and IA-2As were positive in two patients. IAAs were negative in all cases. Metabolic evaluation was normal, and no patients developed diabetes during follow-up. There was no significant association among beta-cell autoimmunity and sex, age, pubertal stage, family history, or coexistence of other autoimmune disorders; compliance to a gluten-free diet was confirmed. Our results showed a low prevalence of beta-cell autoimmunity and do not support a precocious screening for beta-cell autoimmunity in young celiac disease patients.

  2. Effect of iron on pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increase in total body iron store has been reported in the aetiology and development of diabetes mellitus. The effect of iron supplementation in female with respect to the incidence of diabetes mellitus was investigated on the pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance in normal female rats. Methods: ...

  3. Measuring beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth: Does the hyperglycemic clamp suffice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    To compare beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), calculated from two clamps (2cDI, insulin sensitivity from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and first-phase insulin from the hyperglycemic clamp) with the DI calculated from the hyperglycemic clamp alone (hcD...

  4. Impact of fetal and neonatal environment on beta cell function and development of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens H; Haase, Tobias N; Jaksch, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    nutrients and gut microbiota on appetite regulation, mitochondrial activity and the immune system that may affect beta cell growth and function directly and indirectly is discussed. The possible role of epigenetic changes in the transgenerational transmission of the adverse programming may be the most...

  5. Enteroviruses, pancreatic beta-cells, and dendritic cells: a dangerous triangle in type 1 diabetes etiology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) is an endocrine autoimmune disorder in which the insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas are gradually destroyed. Enterovirus infections (in particular coxsackievirus and echovirus) have been implicated in the development of

  6. Rac1-NADPH oxidase signaling promotes CD36 activation under glucotoxic conditions in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumalai, Suma; Karunakaran, Udayakumar; Lee, In Kyu; Moon, Jun Sung; Won, Kyu Chang

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that cluster determinant 36 (CD36), a fatty acid transporter, plays a pivotal role in glucotoxicity-induced β-cell dysfunction. However, little is known about how glucotoxicity influences CD36 expression. Emerging evidence suggests that the small GTPase Rac1 is involved in the pathogenesis of beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes (T2D). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the role of Rac1 in CD36 activation and its impact on β-cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. To address this question, we subjected INS-1 cells and human beta cells (1.1B4) to high glucose conditions (30mM) in the presence or absence of Rac1 inhibition either by NSC23766 (Rac1 GTPase inhibitor) or small interfering RNA. High glucose exposure in INS-1 and human beta cells (1.1b4) resulted in the activation of Rac1 and induced cell apoptosis. Rac1 activation mediates NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation leading to elevated ROS production in both cells. Activation of the Rac1-NOX complex by high glucose levels enhanced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. The inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 inhibited NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation induced by high glucose concentrations in INS-1 & human 1.1b4 beta cells. Inhibition of Rac1-NOX complex activation by NSC23766 significantly reduced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. In addition, Rac1 inhibition by NSC23766 significantly reduced high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibition by VAS2870 also attenuated high glucose-induced ROS generation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Rac1-NADPH oxidase dependent CD36 expression contributes to high glucose-induced beta cell dysfunction and cell death. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Beta cell 5'-shifted isomiRs are candidate regulatory hubs in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Baran-Gale

    Full Text Available Next-generation deep sequencing of small RNAs has unveiled the complexity of the microRNA (miRNA transcriptome, which is in large part due to the diversity of miRNA sequence variants ("isomiRs". Changes to a miRNA's seed sequence (nucleotides 2-8, including shifted start positions, can redirect targeting to a dramatically different set of RNAs and alter biological function. We performed deep sequencing of small RNA from mouse insulinoma (MIN6 cells (widely used as a surrogate for the study of pancreatic beta cells and developed a bioinformatic analysis pipeline to profile isomiR diversity. Additionally, we applied the pipeline to recently published small RNA-seq data from primary human beta cells and whole islets and compared the miRNA profiles with that of MIN6. We found that: (1 the miRNA expression profile in MIN6 cells is highly correlated with those of primary human beta cells and whole islets; (2 miRNA loci can generate multiple highly expressed isomiRs with different 5'-start positions (5'-isomiRs; (3 isomiRs with shifted start positions (5'-shifted isomiRs are highly expressed, and can be as abundant as their unshifted counterparts (5'-reference miRNAs. Finally, we identified 10 beta cell miRNA families as candidate regulatory hubs in a type 2 diabetes (T2D gene network. The most significant candidate hub was miR-29, which we demonstrated regulates the mRNA levels of several genes critical to beta cell function and implicated in T2D. Three of the candidate miRNA hubs were novel 5'-shifted isomiRs: miR-375+1, miR-375-1 and miR-183-5p+1. We showed by in silico target prediction and in vitro transfection studies that both miR-375+1 and miR-375-1 are likely to target an overlapping, but distinct suite of beta cell genes compared to canonical miR-375. In summary, this study characterizes the isomiR profile in beta cells for the first time, and also highlights the potential functional relevance of 5'-shifted isomiRs to T2D.

  8. Regulation of NOX-1 expression in beta cells: a positive feedback loop involving the Src-kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J R; Taylor-Fishwick, D A

    2013-04-30

    NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) is upregulated in beta cells in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity blocked stimulated NOX-1 expression (pNOX-1 expression in beta cells followed modulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS); pro-oxidants increased NOX-1 (pNOX-1 (pNOX-1 expression (pNOX-1 preserved beta cell function and survival. Collectively, these data indicate that expression of NOX-1 in beta cells is regulated in a feed-forward loop mediated by ROS and Src-kinase. Uncoupling of this feed-forward activation could provide new approaches to preserve and protect beta cells in diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trans fatty acids increase nitric oxide levels and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusmiyati Tjahjono DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of diabetes in Indonesia is increasing due to various factors, including life style changes such as trans fatty acid (TFA intake. High TFA intake is known to be related to blood lipid profile changes resulting in cardiovascular disorders. This study was to identify the effect of TFA on nitric oxide (NO production and on necrosis of pancreatic beta cells. Methods A study of randomized pre-test post–test design with control group. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e. group K (control, group P1 receiving a diet with 5% TFA, and P2 receiving 10% TFA. The intervention was performed for 8 weeks. NO level and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis were analyzed using Pearson’s chi square test. Results After 4 weeks of treatment there was no change in NO levels in group K, but increased NO in P2 (2.6-3.8 ìM. At 8 weeks after treatment, NO levels in groups P1 and P2 increased to 2.6-3.4 ìM and 4.2-14.3 ìM, respectively, while in group K only 2 rats had increased NO levels of 2.8-2.9 ìM. With Pearson’s chi-square test, there was a signifant difference in the proportions of necrotic pancreatic beta cells after 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p=0.000. No necrosis of beta cells was found in group K, mild necrosis in group P1 (1-25% and moderate necrosis in group P2 (26-50%. Conclusion TFA consumption significantly increases NO levels in Sprague Dawley rats and also results in moderate grades of necrosis of pancreatic beta cells.

  10. Trans fatty acids increase nitric oxide levels and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusmiyati Tjahjono DK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The prevalence of diabetes in Indonesia is increasing due to various factors, including life style changes such as trans fatty acid (TFA intake. High TFA intake is known to be related to blood lipid profile changes resulting in cardiovascular disorders. This study was to identify the effect of TFA on nitric oxide (NO production and on necrosis of pancreatic beta cells. METHODS A study of randomized pre-test post–test design with control group. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e. group K (control, group P1 receiving a diet with 5% TFA, and P2 receiving 10% TFA. The intervention was performed for 8 weeks. NO level and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis were analyzed using Pearson’s chi square test. RESULTS After 4 weeks of treatment there was no change in NO levels in group K, but increased NO in P2 (2.6-3.8 ìM. At 8 weeks after treatment, NO levels in groups P1 and P2 increased to 2.6-3.4 ìM and 4.2-14.3 ìM, respectively, while in group K only 2 rats had increased NO levels of 2.8-2.9 ìM. With Pearson’s chi-square test, there was a signifant difference in the proportions of necrotic pancreatic beta cells after 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p= 0.000. No necrosis of beta cells was found in group K, mild necrosis in group P1 (1-25% and moderate necrosis in group P2 (26-50%. CONCLUSION TFA consumption significantly increases NO levels in Sprague Dawley rats and also results in moderate grades of necrosis of pancreatic beta cells

  11. Hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects of andrographolide analogue for diabetes treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larrick James W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While all anti-diabetic agents can decrease blood glucose level directly or indirectly, few are able to protect and preserve both pancreatic beta cell mass and their insulin-secreting functions. Thus, there is an urgent need to find an agent or combination of agents that can lower blood glucose and preserve pancreatic beta cells at the same time. Herein, we report a dual-functional andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate (AL-1. The anti-diabetic and beta cell protective activities of this novel andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate were investigated. Methods In alloxan-treated mice (a model of type 1 diabetes, drugs were administered orally once daily for 6 days post-alloxan treatment. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin were determined. Pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic islets were performed. Translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4 in soleus muscle was detected by western blot. In RIN-m cells in vitro, the effect of AL-1 on H2O2-induced damage and reactive oxidative species production stimulated by high glucose and glibenclamide were measured. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation induced by IL-1β and IFN-γ was investigated. Results In alloxan-induced diabetic mouse model, AL-1 lowered blood glucose, increased insulin and prevented loss of beta cells and their dysfunction, stimulated glucose transport protein subtype 4 (GLUT4 membrane translocation in soleus muscles. Pretreatment of RIN-m cells with AL-1 prevented H2O2-induced cellular damage, quenched glucose and glibenclamide-stimulated reactive oxidative species production, and inhibited cytokine-stimulated NF-κB activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated that AL-1 had both hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects which translated into antioxidant and NF-κB inhibitory activity. AL-1 is a potential new anti-diabetic agent.

  12. Hypothyroidism in utero stimulates pancreatic beta cell proliferation and hyperinsulinaemia in the ovine fetus during late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Shelley E; De Blasio, Miles J; Davis, Melissa A; Kelly, Amy C; Davenport, Hailey M; Wooding, F B Peter; Blache, Dominique; Meredith, David; Anderson, Miranda; Fowden, Abigail L; Limesand, Sean W; Forhead, Alison J

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of growth and maturation before birth, although the extent to which their actions are mediated by insulin and the development of pancreatic beta cell mass is unknown. Hypothyroidism in fetal sheep induced by removal of the thyroid gland caused asymmetric organ growth, increased pancreatic beta cell mass and proliferation, and was associated with increased circulating concentrations of insulin and leptin. In isolated fetal sheep islets studied in vitro, thyroid hormones inhibited beta cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while high concentrations of insulin and leptin stimulated proliferation. The developing pancreatic beta cell is therefore sensitive to thyroid hormone, insulin and leptin before birth, with possible consequences for pancreatic function in fetal and later life. The findings of this study highlight the importance of thyroid hormones during pregnancy for normal development of the fetal pancreas. Development of pancreatic beta cell mass before birth is essential for normal growth of the fetus and for long-term control of carbohydrate metabolism in postnatal life. Thyroid hormones are also important regulators of fetal growth, and the present study tested the hypotheses that thyroid hormones promote beta cell proliferation in the fetal ovine pancreatic islets, and that growth retardation in hypothyroid fetal sheep is associated with reductions in pancreatic beta cell mass and circulating insulin concentration in utero. Organ growth and pancreatic islet cell proliferation and mass were examined in sheep fetuses following removal of the thyroid gland in utero. The effects of triiodothyronine (T 3 ), insulin and leptin on beta cell proliferation rates were determined in isolated fetal ovine pancreatic islets in vitro. Hypothyroidism in the sheep fetus resulted in an asymmetric pattern of organ growth, pancreatic beta cell hyperplasia, and elevated plasma insulin and leptin concentrations. In pancreatic

  13. IKKβ inhibition prevents fat-induced beta cell dysfunction in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivovic, Aleksandar; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Mori, Yusaku; Eversley, Judith A; Zhang, Liling; Nino-Fong, Rodolfo; Lewis, Gary F; Donath, Marc Y; Karin, Michael; Wheeler, Michael B; Ehses, Jan; Volchuk, Allen; Chan, Catherine B; Giacca, Adria

    2017-10-01

    We have previously shown that oxidative stress plays a causal role in beta cell dysfunction induced by fat. Here, we address whether the proinflammatory kinase inhibitor of (nuclear factor) κB kinase β (IKKβ), which is activated by oxidative stress, is also implicated. Fat (oleate or olive oil) was infused intravenously in Wistar rats for 48 h with or without the IKKβ inhibitor salicylate. Thereafter, beta cell function was evaluated in vivo using hyperglycaemic clamps or ex vivo in islets isolated from fat-treated rats. We also exposed rat islets to oleate in culture, with or without salicylate and 4(2'-aminoethyl)amino-1,8-dimethylimidazo(1,2-a)quinoxaline; BMS-345541 (BMS, another inhibitor of IKKβ) and evaluated beta cell function in vitro. Furthermore, oleate was infused in mice treated with BMS and in beta cell-specific Ikkb-null mice. 48 h infusion of fat impaired beta-cell function in vivo, assessed using the disposition index (DI), in rats (saline: 1.41 ± 0.13; oleate: 0.95 ± 0.11; olive oil [OLO]: 0.87 ± 0.15; p vivo (i.e., insulin secretion, units are pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ) in rat islets (saline: 1.51 ± 0.13; oleate: 1.03 ± 0.10; OLO: 0.91 ± 0.13; p vivo and by salicylate in rat islets ex vivo (oleate + salicylate: 1.74 ± 0.31; OLO + salicylate: 1.54 ± 0.29). In cultured islets, 48 h exposure to oleate impaired beta-cell function ([in pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ] control: 0.66 ± 0.12; oleate: 0.23 ± 0.03; p vivo ([in pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ] control saline: 0.16 ± 0.02; control oleate: 0.10 ± 0.02; knockout oleate: 0.17 ± 0.04; p vivo (DI: control saline: 3.86 ± 0.40; control oleate: 1.95 ± 0.29; knockout oleate: 2.96 ± 0.24; p vivo and in vivo.

  14. Stronger control of ATP/ADP by proton leak in pancreatic beta-cells than skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affourtit, Charles; Brand, Martin D

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells respond to rising blood glucose concentrations by increasing their oxidative metabolism, which leads to an increased ATP/ADP ratio, closure of K(ATP) channels, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential, influx of calcium and the eventual secretion of insulin. Such a signalling mechanism implies that the ATP/ADP ratio is flexible in beta cells (beta-cells), which is in contrast with other cell types (e.g. muscle and liver) that maintain a stable ATP/ADP poise while respiring at widely varying rates. To determine whether this difference in flexibility is accounted for by mitochondrial peculiarities, we performed a top-down metabolic control analysis to quantitatively assess how ATP/ADP is controlled in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle and cultured beta cells. We show that the ATP/ADP ratio is more strongly controlled (approx. 7.5-fold) by proton leak in beta cells than in muscle. The comparatively high importance of proton leak in beta cell mitochondria (relative to phosphorylation) is evidenced furthermore by its relatively high level of control over membrane potential and overall respiratory activity. Modular-kinetic analysis of oxidative phosphorylation reveals that these control differences can be fully explained by a higher relative leak activity in beta cell mitochondria, which results in a comparatively high contribution of proton leak to the overall respiratory activity in this system.

  15. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Rositsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996–2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  16. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteva, Rositsa; Samwel, Susan W.; Krupar, Vratislav

    2017-12-01

    We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996-2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection) we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  17. A Nontriggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommers, Jefferson M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    2001-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the on-board burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the on-board detection threshold, or it may occur while the on-board burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper describes a catalog of 873 "nontriggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  18. Islet neuropeptide Y receptors are functionally conserved and novel targets for the preservation of beta-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Zara J; Tsakmaki, Anastasia; Fonseca Pedro, Patricia; King, Aileen J; Huang, Guo Cai; Amjad, Sakeena; Persaud, Shanta J; Bewick, Gavin A

    2018-03-01

    Two unmet therapeutic strategies for diabetes treatment are prevention of beta-cell death and stimulation of beta-cell replication. Our aim was to characterize the role of neuropeptide Y receptors in the control of beta-cell mass. We used endogenous and selective agonists of the NPY receptor system to explore its role in the prevention of beta-cell apoptosis and proliferation in islets isolated from both mouse and human donors. We further explored the intra-cellular signalling cascades involved, using chemical inhibitors of key signalling pathways. As proof of principle we designed a long-acting analogue of [Leu 31 Pro 34 ]-NPY, an agonist of the islet-expressed Y receptors, to determine if targeting this system could preserve beta-cell mass in vivo. Our data reveal that NPY Y1, 4 and 5 receptor activation engages a generalized and powerful anti-apoptotic pathway that protects mouse and human islets from damage. These anti-apoptotic effects were dependent on stimulating a Gαi-PLC-PKC signalling cascade, which prevented cytokine-induced NFkB signalling. NPY receptor activation functionally protected islets by restoring glucose responsiveness following chemically induced injury in both species. NPY receptor activation attenuated beta-cell apoptosis, preserved functional beta-cell mass and attenuated the hyperglycaemic phenotype in a low-dose streptozotocin model of diabetes. Taken together, our observations identify the islet Y receptors as promising targets for the preservation of beta-cell mass. As such, targeting these receptors could help to maintain beta-cell mass in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and may also be useful for improving islet transplantation outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivas Yurena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation.

  20. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...... biosynthesis of pancreatic beta-cells in monolayer culture. In culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 2% normal human serum islets or dissociated islet cells from newborn rats maintained their insulin-producing capacity. When supplemented with 1-1000 ng/ml pituitary or recombinant human GH the islet cells...... was accompanied with a continuous increase in insulin release to the culture medium reaching a 10- 20-fold increase after 2-3 months with a half-maximal effect at about 10 ng/ml human GH. The biosynthesis of (pro)insulin was markedly increased with a normal rate of conversion of proinsulin to insulin...

  1. Characterization of GLP-1 effects on beta-cell function after meal ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrén, Bo; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that augments insulin secretion after meal intake and is developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. As a novel therapeutic agent, characteristics of its beta-cell effects are important to establish. Previously, beta-cell effects of GLP-1...... have been characterized in humans during graded intravenous infusions of glucose, whereas its effects after more physiological stimuli, like meal intake, are not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Eight women (aged 69 years, fasting glucose 3.7-10.3 mmol/l, BMI 22.4-43.9 kg/m(2)) who had fasted...... meal augments insulin secretion in humans by a dose...

  2. Targeting dysfunctional beta-cell signaling for the potential treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Rachel J; Kimple, Michelle E

    2018-03-01

    Since its discovery and purification by Frederick Banting in 1921, exogenous insulin has remained almost the sole therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. While insulin alleviates the primary dysfunction of the disease, many other aspects of the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus are unaffected. Research aimed towards the discovery of novel type 1 diabetes mellitus therapeutics targeting different cell signaling pathways is gaining momentum. The focus of these efforts has been almost entirely on the impact of immunomodulatory drugs, particularly those that have already received FDA-approval for other autoimmune diseases. However, these drugs can often have severe side effects, while also putting already immunocompromised individuals at an increased risk for other infections. Potential therapeutic targets in the insulin-producing beta-cell have been largely ignored by the type 1 diabetes mellitus field, save the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor. While there is preliminary evidence to support the clinical exploration of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor-based drugs as type 1 diabetes mellitus adjuvant therapeutics, there is a vast space for other putative therapeutic targets to be explored. The alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G z protein (Gα z ) has been shown to promote beta-cell inflammation, dysfunction, death, and failure to replicate in the context of diabetes in a number of mouse models. Genetic loss of Gα z or inhibition of the Gα z signaling pathway through dietary interventions is protective against the development of insulitis and hyperglycemia. The multifaceted effects of Gα z in regards to beta-cell health in the context of diabetes make it an ideal therapeutic target for further study. It is our belief that a low-risk, effective therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus will involve a multidimensional approach targeting a number of regulatory systems, not the least of which is the insulin-producing beta-cell. Impact statement The expanding

  3. Reference intervals for glucose, beta-cell polypeptides and counterregulatory factors during prolonged fasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wildner-Christensen, M; Eshøj, O

    2001-01-01

    To establish reference intervals for the pancreatic beta-cell response and the counterregulatory hormone response to prolonged fasting, we studied 33 healthy subjects (16 males, 17 females) during a 72-h fast. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin levels decreased (P ... of counterregulatory factors increased during the fast [P fasting (P ... decreased from the second to third day of fasting (P = 0.03). Males had higher glucose and glucagon levels and lower FFA levels during the fast (P

  4. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Danial, Nika N.; Walensky, Loren D.; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K.; Molina, Anthony J. A.; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Bird, Gregory H.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Deeney, Jude T.; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeab...

  5. Location of the sulphonylurea receptor at the cytoplasmic face of the beta-cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanstecher, M; Schwanstecher, C; Dickel, C; Chudziak, F; Moshiri, A; Panten, U

    1994-11-01

    1. In insulin-secreting cells the location of the sulphonylurea receptor was examined by use of a sulphonylurea derivative representing the glibenclamide molecule devoid of its cyclohexy moiety (compound III) and a benzenesulphonic acid derivative representing the glibenclamide molecule devoid of its cyclohexylurea moiety (compound IV). At pH 7.4 compound IV is only present in charged form. 2. Lipid solubility declined in the order tolbutamide > compound III > compound IV. 3. The dissociation constant (KD) for binding of compound IV to the sulphonylurea receptor in HIT-cells (pancreatic beta-cell line) was similar to the KD value for tolbutamide and fourfold higher than the KD value for compound III. 4. In mouse pancreatic beta-cells, drug concentrations inhibiting adenosine 5'-triphosphate-sensitive K+ channels (KATP-channels) half-maximally (EC50) were determined by use of the patch-clamp technique. When the drugs were applied to the extracellular side of outside-out or the intracellular side of inside-out membrane patches, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular EC50 values was 281 for compound IV, 25.5 for compound III and 1.2 for tolbutamide. 5. In mouse pancreatic beta-cells, measurement of KATP-channel activity in cell-attached patches and recording of insulin release displayed much higher EC50 values for compound IV than inside-out patch experiments. A corresponding, but less pronounced difference in EC50 values was observed for compound III, whereas the EC50 values for tolbutamide did not differ significantly. 6. It is concluded that the sulphonylurea receptor is located at the cytoplasmic face of the beta-cell plasma membrane. Receptor activation is induced by the anionic forms of sulphonylureas and their analogues.

  6. Inflammatory Cytokines Stimulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Release from Pancreatic Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urizar, Adriana Ibarra; Friberg, Josefine; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2016-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are expre......The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4...... 6- and 3-fold in isolated islets of Langerhans from neonatal rat and human. Downstream target genes of the BMP pathway were also increased by cytokine treatment and could be reversed by neutralization of endogenous BMP activity. Nuclear factor kappa B- (NFκB) binding sites were identified in the rat...... BMP-2 promoter, and reporter assays verified the role of NFκB in cytokine-induced BMP-2 expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed NFκB binding to BMP-2 promoter upon IL-1β stimulation in beta cells. In conclusion, we suggest that NFκ...

  7. Vanadyl Sulfate Treatment Stimulates Proliferation and Regeneration of Beta Cells in Pancreatic Islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Missaoui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of vanadium sulfate (VOSO4 treatment at 5 and 10 mg/kg for 30 days on endocrine pancreas activity and histology in nondiabetic and STZ-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic group, blood glucose levels significantly increased while insulinemia level markedly decreased. At the end of treatment, VOSO4 at a dose of 10 mg/Kg normalized blood glucose level in diabetic group, restored insulinemia, and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. VOSO4 also increased in a dose-dependent manner the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells in pancreatic islets of nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, in the STZ-diabetic group, the decrease in the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells was corrected to reach the control level mainly with the higher dose of vanadium. Therefore, VOSO4 treatment normalized plasma glucose and insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity in STZ-experimental diabetes and induced beta cells proliferation and/or regeneration in normal or diabetic rats.

  8. Critical Bursts in Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Filippo; Thielmann, Marcel; de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Herrmann, Hans Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Particle detachment bursts during the flow of suspensions through porous media are a phenomenon that can severely affect the efficiency of deep bed filters. Despite the relevance in several industrial fields, little is known about the statistical properties and the temporal organization of these events. We present experiments of suspensions of deionized water carrying quartz particles pushed with a peristaltic pump through a filter of glass beads measuring simultaneously the pressure drop, flux, and suspension solid fraction. We find that the burst size distribution scales consistently with a power law, suggesting that we are in the presence of a novel experimental realization of a self-organized critical system. Temporal correlations are present in the time series, like in other phenomena such as earthquakes or neuronal activity bursts, and also an analog to Omori's law can be shown. The understanding of burst statistics could provide novel insights in different fields, e.g., in the filter and petroleum industries.

  9. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  10. Islet autoimmunity identifies a unique pattern of impaired pancreatic beta-cell function, markedly reduced pancreatic beta cell mass and insulin resistance in clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Subauste

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of literature describing metabolic and histological data in adult-onset autoimmune diabetes. This subgroup of diabetes mellitus affects at least 5% of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM and it is termed Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA. We evaluated indexes of insulin secretion, metabolic assessment, and pancreatic pathology in clinically diagnosed T2DM patients with and without the presence of humoral islet autoimmunity (Ab. A total of 18 patients with at least 5-year duration of clinically diagnosed T2DM were evaluated in this study. In those subjects we assessed acute insulin responses to arginine, a glucose clamp study, whole-body fat mass and fat-free mass. We have also analyzed the pancreatic pathology of 15 T2DM and 43 control cadaveric donors, using pancreatic tissue obtained from all the T2DM organ donors available from the nPOD network through December 31, 2013. The presence of islet Ab correlated with severely impaired β-cell function as demonstrated by remarkably low acute insulin response to arginine (AIR when compared to that of the Ab negative group. Glucose clamp studies indicated that both Ab positive and Ab negative patients exhibited peripheral insulin resistance in a similar fashion. Pathology data from T2DM donors with Ab or the autoimmune diabetes associated DR3/DR4 allelic class II combination showed reduction in beta cell mass as well as presence of autoimmune-associated pattern A pathology in subjects with either islet autoantibodies or the DR3/DR4 genotype. In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence indicating that islet Ab positive long-term T2DM patients exhibit profound impairment of insulin secretion as well as reduced beta cell mass seemingly determined by an immune-mediated injury of pancreatic β-cells. Deciphering the mechanisms underlying beta cell destruction in this subset of diabetic patients may lead to the development of novel immunologic therapies aimed at

  11. Islet autoimmunity identifies a unique pattern of impaired pancreatic beta-cell function, markedly reduced pancreatic beta cell mass and insulin resistance in clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subauste, Angela; Gianani, Roberto; Chang, Annette M; Plunkett, Cynthia; Pietropaolo, Susan L; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Kuller, Lewis H; Galecki, Andrzej; Halter, Jeffrey B; Pietropaolo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature describing metabolic and histological data in adult-onset autoimmune diabetes. This subgroup of diabetes mellitus affects at least 5% of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM) and it is termed Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). We evaluated indexes of insulin secretion, metabolic assessment, and pancreatic pathology in clinically diagnosed T2DM patients with and without the presence of humoral islet autoimmunity (Ab). A total of 18 patients with at least 5-year duration of clinically diagnosed T2DM were evaluated in this study. In those subjects we assessed acute insulin responses to arginine, a glucose clamp study, whole-body fat mass and fat-free mass. We have also analyzed the pancreatic pathology of 15 T2DM and 43 control cadaveric donors, using pancreatic tissue obtained from all the T2DM organ donors available from the nPOD network through December 31, 2013. The presence of islet Ab correlated with severely impaired β-cell function as demonstrated by remarkably low acute insulin response to arginine (AIR) when compared to that of the Ab negative group. Glucose clamp studies indicated that both Ab positive and Ab negative patients exhibited peripheral insulin resistance in a similar fashion. Pathology data from T2DM donors with Ab or the autoimmune diabetes associated DR3/DR4 allelic class II combination showed reduction in beta cell mass as well as presence of autoimmune-associated pattern A pathology in subjects with either islet autoantibodies or the DR3/DR4 genotype. In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence indicating that islet Ab positive long-term T2DM patients exhibit profound impairment of insulin secretion as well as reduced beta cell mass seemingly determined by an immune-mediated injury of pancreatic β-cells. Deciphering the mechanisms underlying beta cell destruction in this subset of diabetic patients may lead to the development of novel immunologic therapies aimed at halting the

  12. SIRT6-mediated transcriptional suppression of Txnip is critical for pancreatic beta cell function and survival in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunhua; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Zhao; Nipper, Michael; Zhu, Zhenxin; Leighton, Jake; Xu, Kexin; Musi, Nicolas; Wang, Pei

    2018-04-01

    Better understanding of how genetic and epigenetic components control beta cell differentiation and function is key to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent beta cell dysfunction and failure in the progression of type 2 diabetes. Our goal was to elucidate the role of histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) in beta cell development and homeostasis. Sirt6 endocrine progenitor cell conditional knockout and beta cell-specific knockout mice were generated using the Cre-loxP system. Mice were assayed for islet morphology, glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and susceptibility to streptozotocin. Transcriptional regulatory functions of SIRT6 in primary islets were evaluated by RNA-Seq analysis. Reverse transcription-quantitative (RT-q)PCR and immunoblot were used to verify and investigate the gene expression changes. Chromatin occupancies of SIRT6, H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and active RNA polymerase II were evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Deletion of Sirt6 in pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells did not affect endocrine morphology, beta cell mass or insulin production but did result in glucose intolerance and defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. Conditional deletion of Sirt6 in adult beta cells reproduced the insulin secretion defect. Loss of Sirt6 resulted in aberrant upregulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in beta cells. SIRT6 deficiency led to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 9 (H3K9Ac), acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 56 (H3K56Ac) and active RNA polymerase II at the promoter region of Txnip. SIRT6-deficient beta cells exhibited a time-dependent increase in H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and TXNIP levels. Finally, beta cell-specific SIRT6-deficient mice showed increased sensitivity to streptozotocin. Our results reveal that SIRT6 suppresses Txnip expression in beta cells via deacetylation of histone H3 and plays a critical role in maintaining beta cell function and viability

  13. CISH has no non-redundant functions in glucose homeostasis or beta cell proliferation during pregnancy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Rieck, Sebastian; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2013-11-01

    Increased beta cell proliferation during pregnancy is mediated by the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (JAK2/STAT5) signalling pathway in response to increased lactogen levels. Activation of the pathway leads to transcriptional upregulation of Cish (encoding cytokine-inducible SH2 domain-containing protein), a member of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) family of genes, forming a negative-feedback loop. Here, we examined whether conditional gene ablation of Cish in the pancreas improves beta cell proliferation and beta cell function during pregnancy in mice. We derived mice with a novel, conditional loxP allele for Cish. Pancreas-specific ablation of Cish was achieved by crossing Cish (loxP/loxP) mice with Pdx1-Cre (Early) mice. Beta cell proliferation was quantified by BrdU labelling. Glucose homeostasis was examined with glucose tolerance tests and determination of plasma insulin levels. The expression of other Socs genes and target genes of p-STAT5 related to beta cell function and beta cell proliferation was determined by quantitative PCR. There was no difference in beta cell proliferation or glucose homeostasis between the Cish mutant group and the control group. The p-STAT5 protein level was the same in Cish mutant and control mice. Socs2 gene expression was higher in Cish mutant than control mice at pregnancy day 9.5. The expression of other Socs genes was the same between control and mutant mice. Our results show that CISH has no non-redundant functions in beta cell proliferation or glucose homeostasis during pregnancy in mice. Socs2 might compensate for the loss of Cish during pregnancy.

  14. Islet autoantibodies and residual beta cell function in type 1 diabetes children followed for 3-6 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Sand; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Maziarz, M

    2012-01-01

    To test if islet autoantibodies at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and after 3-6 years with T1D predict residual beta-cell function (RBF) after 3-6 years with T1D.......To test if islet autoantibodies at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and after 3-6 years with T1D predict residual beta-cell function (RBF) after 3-6 years with T1D....

  15. The neurosurvival factor Humanin inhibits beta cell apoptosis via Stat3 activation and delays and ameliorates diabetes in NOD mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, P. T.; Park, P.; Cobb, L. J.; Paharkova-Vatchkova, V.; Hakimi, M.; Cohen, P.; Lee, K.-W.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of Type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether Humanin, a recently described survival factor for neurons, could improve the survival of beta cells and delay or treat diabetes in the NOD model. Humanin reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation in NIT-1 cells and decreased apoptosis induced by cytokine treatment. Humanin induced Stat3 and ERK phosphorylation over a 24 hour time course. Specific inhibition o...

  16. New approach to beta cell function screening by nitric oxide assessment of obese individuals at the population level

    OpenAIRE

    Chaim, Elinton Adami; Gobato, Renata Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Elinton Adami Chaim, Renata Cristina GobatoUniversity of Campinas (UNICAMP), Faculty of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, BrazilBackground: Approximately 27% of Americans today are obese, and this condition increases the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The UK Prospective Diabetes Study suggests that loss of beta cell function can begin at least 10 years before diagnosis, and mean beta cell function i...

  17. WATCH observations of gamma ray bursts during 1990–1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1994-01-01

    The first WATCH/GRANAT Gamma‐Ray Burst Catalogue comprises 70 events which have been detected by WATCH during the period December 1989–September 1992. 32 GRBs could be localized within a 3σ error radii of 1°. We have found a weak (2.2σ) clustering of these 32 bursts towards the Galactic Center...

  18. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  19. Effect of Hypertriglyceridemia on Beta Cell Mass and Function in ApoC3 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Zi; Cheng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Yamauchi, Jun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Gittes, George; Qu, Shen; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Dong, H Henry

    2016-07-08

    Hypertriglyceridemia results from increased production and decreased clearance of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins, a pathological condition that accounts for heightened risk of ischemic vascular diseases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite its intimate association with insulin resistance, whether hypertriglyceridemia constitutes an independent risk for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes is unknown. Answering this fundamental question is stymied by the fact that hypertriglyceridemia is intertwined with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. To circumvent this limitation, we took advantage of apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3)-transgenic mice, a model with genetic predisposition to hypertriglyceridemia. We showed that ApoC3-transgenic mice, as opposed to age/sex-matched wild-type littermates, develop hypertriglyceridemia with concomitant elevations in plasma cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Anti-insulin and anti-glucagon dual immunohistochemistry in combination with morphometric analysis revealed that ApoC3-transgenic and wild-type littermates had similar beta cell and alpha cell masses as well as islet size and architecture. These effects correlated with similar amplitudes of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and similar degrees of postprandial glucose excursion in ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. Oil Red O histology did not visualize lipid infiltration into islets, correlating with the lack of ectopic triglyceride and cholesterol depositions in the pancreata of ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. ApoC3-transgenic mice, despite persistent hypertriglyceridemia, maintained euglycemia under both fed and fasting conditions without manifestation of insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia. Thus, hypertriglyceridemia per se is not an independent risk factor for beta cell dysfunction in ApoC3 transgenic mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  20. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  1. The Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Streptozotocin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Cao, Diyong; Liu, Hua; Liu, Xinghai; Mai, Wenli; Lan, Haitao; Huo, Wen; Zheng, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Our previous work found that Cordyceps sinensis (CS) improves the activity and secretory function of pancreatic islet beta cells. The objective was to observe a further possible role of CS in the protection of insulin-secreting cells. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was developed with streptozotocin (STZ) and a high-energy fat diet (HFD). CS was administered in the successful model of rats with type 2 diabetes. After 4 weeks, the biochemistry index of blood samples was measured, and pathologic observation was performed by immunohistochemistry. In the rats with type 2 diabetes induced by a HFD and STZ, the levels of fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were elevated, and the insulin sensitivity index was decreased. Pathologic examination found an increased number of apoptotic cells, an elevated protein expression of pro-apoptotic C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and an increased c-Jun level by means of JNK phosphorylation, responsive to the endoplasmic reticulum stress of islet beta cells. With treatment by CS for 4 weeks, the elevated levels of both fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin in the rats with type 2 diabetes were significantly lower, and the decreased insulin sensitivity index was reversed. Compared to the control rats with type 2 diabetes, CS application significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and decreased protein expression of both CHOP and c-Jun. The herbal compound CS could protect pancreatic beta cells from the pro-apoptotic endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by HFD-STZ. This suggests an alternative approach to treating type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 and its role in insulin release from rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Shou Cao

    Full Text Available Several transient receptor potential (TRP channels are expressed in pancreatic beta cells and have been proposed to be involved in insulin secretion. However, the endogenous ligands for these channels are far from clear. Here, we demonstrate the expression of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 ion channel in the pancreatic beta cells and its role in insulin release. TRPA1 is an attractive candidate for inducing insulin release because it is calcium permeable and is activated by molecules that are produced during oxidative glycolysis.Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot techniques were used to determine the expression of TRPA1 channel. Ca²⁺ fluorescence imaging and electrophysiology (voltage- and current-clamp techniques were used to study the channel properties. TRPA1-mediated insulin release was determined using ELISA.TRPA1 is abundantly expressed in a rat pancreatic beta cell line and freshly isolated rat pancreatic beta cells, but not in pancreatic alpha cells. Activation of TRPA1 by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, and cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PGJ₂ and a novel agonist methylglyoxal (MG induces membrane current, depolarization, and Ca²⁺ influx leading to generation of action potentials in a pancreatic beta cell line and primary cultured pancreatic beta cells. Activation of TRPA1 by agonists stimulates insulin release in pancreatic beta cells that can be inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists such as HC030031 or AP-18 and by RNA interference. TRPA1-mediated insulin release is also observed in conditions of voltage-gated Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ channel blockade as well as ATP sensitive potassium (K(ATP channel activation.We propose that endogenous and exogenous ligands of TRPA1 cause Ca²⁺ influx and induce basal insulin release and that TRPA1-mediated depolarization acts synergistically with K(ATP channel blockade to facilitate insulin release.

  3. Functional Beta Cell Mass from Device-Encapsulated hESC-Derived Pancreatic Endoderm Achieving Metabolic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Robert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cells represent a potential source for implants that replace the depleted functional beta cell mass (FBM in diabetes patients. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm (hES-PE can generate implants with glucose-responsive beta cells capable of reducing hyperglycemia in mice. This study with device-encapsulated hES-PE (4 × 106 cells/mouse determines the biologic characteristics at which implants establish metabolic control during a 50-week follow-up. A metabolically adequate FBM was achieved by (1 formation of a sufficient beta cell number (>0.3 × 106/mouse at >50% endocrine purity and (2 their maturation to a functional state comparable with human pancreatic beta cells, as judged by their secretory responses during perifusion, their content in typical secretory vesicles, and their nuclear NKX6.1-PDX1-MAFA co-expression. Assessment of FBM in implants and its correlation with in vivo metabolic markers will guide clinical translation of stem cell-derived grafts in diabetes. : In this article, Pipeleers and colleagues demonstrate that subcutaneous implants of device-encapsulated human stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm can generate a functional beta cell mass that establishes sustained glucose control in mice. They identified their biologic characteristics and correlation with in vivo outcome. Data and methods are expected to guide clinical translation to beta cell replacement therapy in diabetes. Keywords: stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm, stem cell therapy, diabetes, encapsulation, differentiation, functional maturation, functional beta cell mass, metabolic control

  4. Energy depletion and not ROS formation is a crucial step of glucolipotoxicity (GLTx) in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso Oquendo, Morgana; Layer, Nikolas; Wagner, Rebecca; Krippeit-Drews, Peter; Drews, Gisela

    2018-03-01

    We have shown previously that genetic or pharmacological deletion of K ATP channels protect against beta cell dysfunction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since it is assumed that glucolipotoxicity (GLTx) causes ROS production, we aimed to evaluate whether suppression of K ATP channel activity can also prevent beta cell damage evoked by GLTx. We used an in vitro model of GLTx and measured distinct parameters of stimulus-secretion coupling. GLTx gradually induced disturbances of Ca 2+ oscillations over 3 days. This impairment in Ca 2+ dynamics was partially reversed in beta cells without functional K ATP channels (SUR1 -/- ) and by the sulfonylurea gliclazide but not by tolbutamide. By contrast, the GLTx-induced suppression of glucose-induced insulin secretion could not be rescued by decreased K ATP channel activity pointing to a direct interaction of GLTx with the secretory capacity. Accordingly, GLTx also suppressed KCl-induced insulin secretion. GLTx was not accompanied by decisively increased ROS production or enhanced apoptosis. Insulin content of beta cells was markedly reduced by GLTx, an effect not prevented by gliclazide. Since GLTx markedly diminished the mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP content, lack of ATP is assumed to decrease insulin biosynthesis. The deleterious effect of GLTx is therefore caused by direct interference with the secretory capacity whereby reduction of insulin content is one important parameter. These findings deepen our understanding how GLTx damages beta cells and reveal that GLTx is disconnected from ROS formation, a notion important for targeting beta cells in the treatment of diabetes. Overall, GLTx-induced energy depletion may be a primary step in the cascade of events leading to loss of beta cell function in type-2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Cytokines and beta-cell biology: from concept to clinical translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donath, M.Y.; Storling, J.; Berchtold, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The tale of cytokines and the beta-cell is a long story, starting with in vitro discovery in 1984, evolving via descriptive and phenomenological studies to detailed mapping of the signalling pathways, gene- and protein expression patterns, molecular and biochemical effector mechanisms to in vivo ...... as other laboratories that serve to illuminate the road from concept to clinical translation....... studies in spontaneously diabetic and transgenic animal models. Only very recently have steps been taken to translate the accumulating compelling preclinical data into clinical trials. The aim of this chapter is to present an overview of early and recent key observations from our own groups as well...

  6. Antioxidant and regulatory role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 in pancreatic beta-cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Olejár, Tomáš; Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Špaček, Tomáš; Engstová, Hana; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S73-S91 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * uncoupling protein UCP2 * pancreatic beta-cells * reactive oxygen species * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  7. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation by SOCS-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, K; Rønn, S G; Tornehave, D

    2005-01-01

    ) signaling pathway. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are specific inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway acting through a negative-feedback loop. To investigate in vivo effects of SOCS-3 in growth hormone (GH)/prolactin signaling in beta-cells we generated transgenic mice with beta...... tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT-5 when compared with wild-type islets. Transduction of primary islet cultures with adenoviruses expressing various SOCS proteins followed by stimulation with GH or glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) revealed that SOCS-3 inhibited GH- but not GLP-1-mediated islet cell...

  8. Study on cosmic gamma bursts in the ''KONUS'' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazets, E.P.; Golenetskij, S.V.; Il'inskij, V.N.; Panov, V.N.; Aptekar', R.L.; Gur'yan, Yu.A.; Sokolov, I.A.; Sokolova, Z.Ya.; Kharitonova, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    Made are the investigations of cosmic gamma bursts with the help of the ''Konus'' apparatus, positioned on the ''Venera 11'' and ''Venera 12'' automatic interplanetary stations. 37 gamma bursts have been recorded in the energy range from 50 to 150 keV during the observation period from September to December 1978. Time profiles of bursts on 4, 9 and 24.11.1978 are presented. For the most events the time of burst increase and decrease constitute parts and units of seconds. Differential energy spectra are measured for all recorded bursts. In many cases the spectrum shape is similar to the grade one with the 1.5-2.3 index. In a graphical form built up are the integral distributions of gamma bursts appearence frequency in dependence on their intensity and maximum capacity in the burst peak. Galaxy coordinates of the 17-teen bursts, for which a simple localization is possible, are put on the celestial sphere map. The type of the integral distributions and the source distribution about the celestial sphere show that the gamma burst sources are whithin the Galaxy

  9. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    insulin-dependent IR autophosphorylation and IRS/PI3K pathway in a way comparable to IL-1beta treatment in RINm5F cells. We propose that IL-1beta decreases insulin action in beta-cells through the induction of SOCS-3 expression, and that this effect potentially alters insulin-induced beta-cell survival.......Defects in insulin secretion, resulting from loss of function or destruction of pancreatic beta-cells, trigger diabetes. Interleukin (IL)-1beta is a proinflammatory cytokine that is involved in type 1 and type 2 diabetes development and impairs beta-cell survival and function. Because effective...... insulin signaling is required for the optimal beta-cell function, we assessed the effect of IL-1beta on the insulin pathway in a rat pancreatic beta-cell line. We show that IL-1beta decreases insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS...

  10. The time has come to test the beta cell preserving effects of exercise in patients with new onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narendran, Parth; Solomon, Thomas; Kennedy, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterised by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. Significant beta cell function is usually present at the time of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes, and preservation of this function has important clinical benefits. The last 30 years have seen a number...... for physical exercise as a therapy for the preservation of beta cell function in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. We highlight possible mechanisms by which exercise could preserve beta cell function and then present evidence from other models of diabetes that demonstrate that exercise preserves...... beta cell function. We conclude by proposing that there is now a need for studies to explore whether exercise can preserve beta cell in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes....

  11. Analysis of the effect of diabetes type 2 duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes type 2 is a chronic metabolic disorder. Pathogenesis of diabetes type 2 results from the impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action and increased endogenous glucose production. Diabetes evolves through several phases characterized by qualitative and quantitative changes of beta cell secretory function. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of diabetes duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance. The results indicated significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and fasting insulinemia, as well as beta cell secretory function assessed by HOMA β index. Our study also found significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index. Significant positive correlation was established between beta cell secretory capacity (fasting insulinemia and HOMA β and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index, independently of diabetes duration. These results indicate that: beta cell secretory capacity, assessed by HOMA β index, significantly decreases with diabetes duration. In parallel with decrease of fasting insulinemia, reduction of insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index was found as well.

  12. Involvement of interleukin 1 and interleukin 1 antagonist in pancreatic beta-cell destruction in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Zumsteg, U; Reimers, J

    1993-01-01

    In this review we propose that the balance between the action of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and its natural antagonist IL-1ra on the level of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cell may play a decisive role in the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We argue that IL-1...... potentiated by other cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma) is an important effector molecule involved in both early and late events in the immune-mediated process that leads to beta-cell destruction and IDDM. We also point out that surprisingly high molar excesses of IL-1ra over IL-1...... are necessary to block the action of IL-1 on islet beta-cells compared to islet alpha-cells in vitro and in animals. We suggest that the selectivity of beta-cell destruction in IDDM may be conferred on several levels: (1) homing of beta-cell antigen specific T cells, (2) targeted delivery of cytokines...

  13. Unmethylated Insulin DNA Is Elevated After Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation: Assessment of a Novel Beta Cell Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, M D; Clark, P; Usmani-Brown, S; Dunn, T B; Beilman, G J; Chinnakotla, S; Pruett, T L; Ptacek, P; Hering, B J; Wang, Z; Gilmore, T; Wilhelm, J J; Hodges, J S; Moran, A; Herold, K C

    2017-04-01

    Beta cell death may occur both after islet isolation and during infusion back into recipients undergoing total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT) for chronic pancreatitis. We measured the novel beta cell death marker unmethylated insulin (INS) DNA in TPIAT recipients before and immediately after islet infusion (n = 21) and again 90 days after TPIAT, concurrent with metabolic functional assessments (n = 25). As expected, INS DNA decreased after pancreatectomy (p = 0.0002). All TPIAT recipients had an elevated unmethylated INS DNA ratio in the first hours following islet infusion. In four samples (three patients), INS DNA was also assessed immediately after islet isolation and again before islet infusion to assess the impact of the isolation process: Unmethylated and methylated INS DNA fractions both increased over this interval, suggesting death of beta cells and exocrine tissue before islet infusion. Higher glucose excursion with mixed-meal tolerance testing was associated with persistently elevated INS DNA at day 90. In conclusion, we observed universal early elevations in the beta cell death marker INS DNA after TPIAT, with pronounced elevations in the islet supernatant before infusion, likely reflecting beta cell death induced by islet isolation. Persistent posttransplant elevation of INS DNA predicted greater hyperglycemia at 90 days. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  14. T Cell-Mediated Beta Cell Destruction: Autoimmunity and Alloimmunity in the Context of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Burrack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from destruction of pancreatic beta cells by T cells of the immune system. Despite improvements in insulin analogs and continuous blood glucose level monitoring, there is no cure for T1D, and some individuals develop life-threatening complications. Pancreas and islet transplantation have been attractive therapeutic approaches; however, transplants containing insulin-producing cells are vulnerable to both recurrent autoimmunity and conventional allograft rejection. Current immune suppression treatments subdue the immune system, but not without complications. Ideally a successful approach would target only the destructive immune cells and leave the remaining immune system intact to fight foreign pathogens. This review discusses the autoimmune diabetes disease process, diabetic complications that warrant a transplant, and alloimmunity. First, we describe the current understanding of autoimmune destruction of beta cells including the roles of CD4 and CD8 T cells and several possibilities for antigen-specific tolerance induction. Second, we outline diabetic complications necessitating beta cell replacement. Third, we discuss transplant recognition, potential sources for beta cell replacement, and tolerance-promoting therapies under development. We hypothesize that a better understanding of autoreactive T cell targets during disease pathogenesis and alloimmunity following transplant destruction could enhance attempts to re-establish tolerance to beta cells.

  15. Impact of incretin hormones on beta-cell function in subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Mari, Andrea; Natali, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C-peptide deconvolu......The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C......-peptide deconvolution to calculate insulin secretion rates and mathematical modeling to quantitate beta-cell function. The incretin effect was taken to be the ratio of oral to IV responses. In NGT, incretin-mediated insulin release [oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)/IV ratio = 1.59 +/- 0.18, P = 0.004] amounted to 18......, with a predominance of glucose-induced vs. incretin-mediated stimulation. We conclude that, under physiological circumstances, incretin-mediated stimulation of insulin secretion results from an enhancement of all dynamic aspects of beta-cell function, particularly beta-cell glucose sensitivity. In IGT, beta...

  16. Different contributions of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction in overweight Israeli Arabs with IFG and IGT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Sabbah, Muhammad; Kher, Joseph; Minuchin, Oscar; Vardi, Pnina; Raz, Itamar

    2006-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are both intermediate stages that exist between normal glucose tolerance and overt type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies demonstrated that the two categories define distinct populations. In this study, we examined the contributions of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction to both states in overweight subjects of Arab origin. Twelve subjects with isolated IFG, 10 with isolated IGT, and 20 with IFG and IGT (combined glucose in tolerance-CGT) were compared with 30 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects; all were of Arab origin and were overweight or obese. Different indices for insulin resistance and beta-cell function were calculated from oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) values. Subjects with isolated IFG and CGT were more obese and had significantly higher values of insulin resistance than subjects with isolated IGT and NFG. There was no significant difference between the insulin resistance in subjects with isolated IGT and that in subjects with NGT. Indices of beta cell function were severely reduced among subjects with isolated IGT and CGT when compared with those with both isolated IFG and NGT, while subjects with isolated IFG had similar beta-cell indices to subjects with NGT. These data demonstrate that beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance contribute differently to the pathogenesis of IFG and IGT among overweight Arab subjects. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Sodium fluorocitrate having protective effect on palmitate-induced beta cell death improves hyperglycemia in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ik-Rak; Choi, Sung-E; Hong, Seung A; Hwang, Yoonjung; Kang, Yup

    2017-10-10

    Beta cell loss and insulin resistance play roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of free fatty acids in plasma might contribute to the loss of beta cells. The objective of this study was to find a chemical that could protect against palmitate-induced beta cell death and investigate whether such chemical could improve hyperglycemia in mouse model of type 2 diabetes. Sodium fluorocitrate (SFC), an aconitase inhibitor, was found to be strongly and specifically protective against palmitate-induced INS-1 beta cell death. However, the protective effect of SFC on palmitate-induced cell death was not likely to be due to its inhibitory activity for aconitase since inhibition or knockdown of aconitase failed to protect against palmitate-induced cell death. Since SFC inhibited the uptake of palmitate into INS-1 cells, reduced metabolism of fatty acids was thought to be involved in SFC's protective effect. Ten weeks of treatment with SFC in db/db diabetic mice reduced glucose level but remarkably increased insulin level in the plasma. SFC improved impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release and also reduced the loss of beta cells in db/db mice. Conclusively, SFC possessed protective effect against palmitate-induced lipotoxicity and improved hyperglycemia in mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can...

  19. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  20. Synergistic Effect of Hyperglycemia and Suppression on Adult Mouse Islet Beta Cell Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Tah Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The complementary role of hyperglycemia and suppression on islet beta cell regeneration was investigated in a syngeneic mouse model. gene silencing was performed by infecting islets of C57BL/6 with shRNA lentiviral particles. At 54 hours after viral infection, protein content in cultured targeting islets was 22% of that in freshly isolated islets. Six days after transplantation to diabetic mice, targeting islet graft had considerably more cells with Ki67-staining nuclei than nontargeting islets. The mice in the targeting-islet group had a significantly shorter duration of temporary hyperglycaemia than mice in the non-targeting-islet group. The long-term ex vivo beneficial effect of silencing on graft function was also indicated by the significantly higher cumulative cure rate for diabetes in mice receiving 200 targeting islets than that in mice receiving 200 non-targeting islets. Our data suggest that hyperglycemia and persistent suppression have a synergistic effect on islet beta cell replication in adult mice.

  1. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  3. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  4. Maternal diabetes, programming of beta-cell disorders and intergenerational risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavey, A; Ah Kioon, M-D; Bailbé, D; Movassat, J; Portha, B

    2014-11-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that an abnormal intra-uterine milieu elicited by maternal metabolic disturbances as diverse as malnutrition, placental insufficiency, diabetes and obesity may be able to programme susceptibility of the foetus to later develop chronic degenerative diseases such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes (T2D). As insulin-producing cells have been placed centre stage in the development of T2D, this review examines developmental programming of the beta-cell mass (BCM) in various rodent models of maternal protein restriction, calorie restriction, overnutrition and diabetes. The main message is that whatever the initial maternal insult (F0 generation) and whether alone or in combination, it gives rise to the same programmed BCM outcome in the daughter generation (F1). The altered BCM phenotype in F1 females prohibits normal BCM adaptation during pregnancy and, thus, diabetes (gestational diabetes) ensues. This gestational diabetes is then passed from one generation (F1) to the next (F2, F3 and so on). This review highlights a number of studies that have identified epigenetic mechanisms that may contribute to altered BCM development and beta-cell failure, as observed in diabetes. In addition to their role in instilling the programmed defect, these non-genomic mechanisms may also be involved in its intergenerational transmission. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio, E-mail: fujitani@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  6. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  7. Pancreatic beta cells from db/db mice show cell-specific [Ca2+]i and NADH responses to glucose but not to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2005-01-01

    induced cell-specific NADH responses in all 3 models, but KIC did so only in lean mouse [beta] cells. CONCLUSIONS: A cell-specific response may be induced at several steps of beta-cell stimulus-secretion coupling. Mitochondrial metabolism generates a cell-specific response in normal beta cells......OBJECTIVE: We recently showed that timing and magnitude of the glucose-induced cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i response are reproducible and specific for the individual beta cell. We now wanted to identify which step(s) of stimulus-secretion coupling determine the cell specificity of the [Ca2+]i...

  8. Burst Populations and Detector Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The F(sub T) (peak bolometric photon flux) vs. E(sub p) (peak energy) plane is a powerful tool to compare the burst populations detected by different detectors. Detector sensitivity curves in this plane demonstrate which burst populations the detectors will detect. For example, future CZT-based detectors will show the largest increase in sensitivity for soft bursts, and will be particularly well- suited to study X-ray rich bursts and X-ray Flashes. Identical bursts at different redshifts describe a track in the F(sub T)-E(sub p) plane.

  9. The Effect of Tacrolimus on Reactive Oxygen Species and Total Antioxidant Status in Pancreatic Beta Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namvaran, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Ali; Namvaran, Mohamad Mehdi; Maruf, Neda; Azarpira, Negar

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism responsible for the development of posttransplant diabetes mellitus associated with tacrolimus treatment remains unclear. To investigate the possible effect of tacrolimus on the development of impaired glucose tolerance in transplant recipients, this study focused on early and second phase insulin secretion, which may be affected by reactive oxygen species under tacrolimus therapy. We measured the anti-oxidant status and reactive oxygen species levels before and after tacrolimus treatment. The pro-duction of reactive oxygen species was determined by flow cytometry. Total antioxidant status was measured using total antioxidant status kits. The antioxidant status decreased while reactive oxygen species level increased significantly (P = .032) CONCLUSIONS: Tacrolimus treatment resulted in dose- and time-dependent increases in the production of reactive oxygen species by beta cells. The antioxidant status decreased in beta cells after tacrolimus treatment. Increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased antioxidant status by tacrolimus in beta cells may lead to some adverse events.

  10. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell......-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However......, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell...

  11. Fasting serum levels of ferritin are associated with impaired pancreatic beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, L.; Ellervik, C.; Friedrich, N.

    2014-01-01

    diabetes due to its association with impaired beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity. Methods: We investigated 6,392 individuals from the Danish general population. Surrogate measures of beta cell function and insulin sensitivity were calculated for approximately 6,100 individuals based...... on OGTT examinations. Results: The ORs for type 2 diabetes were 4.2 (95% CI 2.4, 7.2) for the highest vs the lowest quintile of serum ferritin, and 17 (95% CI 8.9, 33) for serum ferritin levels ≥97.5th percentile vs ... glucose levels at 0, 30 and 120 min (p beta cell function estimated as the insulinogenic index and corrected insulin response (p 

  12. Intact proinsulin and beta-cell function in lean and obese subjects with and without type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, M E; Dinesen, B; Hartling, S G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease in which both beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance are pathogenetic factors. Disproportionate hyperproinsulinemia (elevated proinsulin/insulin) is another abnormality in type 2 diabetes whose mechanism is unknown. Increased demand due...... to obesity and/or insulin resistance may result in secretion of immature beta-cell granules with a higher content of intact proinsulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated the impact of obesity on beta-cell secretion in normal subjects and in type 2 diabetic patients by measuring intact proinsulin......, total proinsulin immunoreactivity (PIM), intact insulin, and C-peptide (by radioimmunoassay) by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in the fasting state and during a 120-min glucagon (1 mg i.v.) stimulation test. Lean (BMI 23.5 +/- 0.3 kg/m2) (LD) and obese (30.1 +/- 0.4 kg/m2) (OD) type 2...

  13. Burst suppression in sleep in a routine outpatient EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Kheder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS is an electroencephalogram (EEG pattern that is characterized by brief bursts of spikes, sharp waves, or slow waves of relatively high amplitude alternating with periods of relatively flat EEG or isoelectric periods. The pattern is usually associated with coma, severe encephalopathy of various etiologies, or general anesthesia. We describe an unusual case of anoxic brain injury in which a BS pattern was seen during behaviorally defined sleep during a routine outpatient EEG study.

  14. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  15. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Mirshahi, Faridoddin [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Grider, John R. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Murthy, Karnam S., E-mail: skarnam@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Sanyal, Arun J., E-mail: asanyal@mcvh-vcu.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  16. Study of beta-cell function (by HOMA model) in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M K; Dutta, M K; Mahalle, Namita

    2011-07-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors is termed the metabolic syndrome (MS), which strongly predict risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Many studies implicate insulin resistance (IR) in the development of diabetes, but ignore the contribution of beta-cell dysfunction. Hence, we studied beta-cell function, as assessed by HOMA model, in subjects with MS. We studied 50 subjects with MS diagnosed by IDF criteria and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Clinical evaluation included anthropometry, body fat analysis by bioimpedance, biochemical, and insulin measurement. IR and secretion were calculated by HOMA model. Subjects with MS had more IR (HOMA-IR) than controls (3.35 ± 3.14 vs. 1.76 ± 0.53, P = 0.029) and secreted less insulin (HOMA-S) than controls (66.80 ± 69.66 vs. 144.27 ± 101.61, P = 0.0003), although plasma insulin levels were comparable in both groups (10.7 ± 10.2 vs. 8.2 ± 2.38, P = 0.44). HOMA-IR and HOMA-S were related with number of metabolic abnormalities. HOMA-IR was positively associated with body mass index, waist hip ratio, body fat mass, and percent body fat. HOMA-S was negatively associated with waist hip ratio, fasting plasma glucose and total cholesterol and positively with basal metabolic rate. Percent body fat was an independent predictor of HOMA-IR and waist hip ratio of HOMA-S in multiple regression analysis. Subjects with MS have increased IR and decreased insulin secretion compared with healthy controls. Lifestyle measures have been shown to improve IR, insulin secretion, and various components and effects of MS. Hence, there is an urgent need for public health measures to prevent ongoing epidemic of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits intracellular calcium release in beta-cells by a plasma membrane-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongmin; Ren, Min; Bing, Xinyu; Stotts, Corey; Deorah, Sundeep; Love-Homan, Laurie; Dillon, Joseph S

    2006-08-01

    Both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) affect glucose stimulated insulin secretion, though their cellular mechanisms of action are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that human physiological concentrations of DHEA alter insulin secretion by an action initiated at the plasma membrane of beta-cells. DHEA alone had no effect on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a rat beta-cell line (INS-1). However, it caused an immediate and dose-dependent inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, with a 25% inhibition at zero. One nanometer DHEA. DHEA also inhibited the Ca(2+) mobilizing effect of bombesin (29% decrease), but did not inhibit the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) evoked by glyburide (100 microM) or glucose (15 mM). The steroids (androstenedione, 17-alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, and DHEAS) had no inhibitory effect on carbachol-induced intracellular Ca(2+) release. The action of DHEA depended on a signal initiated at the plasma membrane, since membrane impermeant DHEA-BSA complexes also inhibited the carbachol effect on [Ca(2+)](i) (39% decrease). The inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca(2+) release by DHEA was blocked by pertussis toxin (PTX). DHEA also inhibited the carbachol induction of phosphoinositide generation, with a maximal inhibition at 0.1 nM DHEA. Furthermore, DHEA inhibited insulin secretion induced by carbachol in INS-1 cells by 25%, and in human pancreatic islets by 53%. Taken together, this is the first report showing that human physiological concentrations of DHEA decrease agonist-induced Ca(2+) release by a rapid, non-genomic mechanism in INS-1 cells. Furthermore, these data provide evidence consistent with the existence of a specific plasma membrane DHEA receptor, mediating this signal transduction pathway by pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins.

  18. Dietary manipulation of beta cell autoimmunity in infants at increased risk of type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerblom, H K; Virtanen, S M; Ilonen, J; Savilahti, E; Vaarala, O; Reunanen, A; Teramo, K; Hämäläinen, A-M; Paronen, J; Riikjärv, M-A; Ormisson, A; Ludvigsson, J; Dosch, H-M; Hakulinen, T; Knip, M

    2005-05-01

    We aimed to assess the feasibility of a dietary intervention trial with weaning to hydrolysed formula in infants at increased risk of type 1 diabetes and to study the effect of the intervention on the emergence of diabetes-associated autoantibodies in early childhood. We studied 242 newborn infants who had a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes and carried risk-associated HLA-DQB1 alleles. After exclusive breastfeeding, the infants underwent a double-blind, randomised pilot trial of either casein hydrolysate (Nutramigen; Mead Johnson) or conventional cow's milk-based formula until the age of 6-8 months. During a mean observation period of 4.7 years, autoantibodies to insulin, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase and insulinoma-associated antigen-2 were measured by radiobinding assays, and islet cell antibodies (ICA) by immunofluorescence. The feasibility of screening and identifying a cohort of first-degree relatives with HLA-conferred disease susceptibility, enrolling them in a dietary intervention trial and following them for seroconversion to autoantibody positivity is established. The cumulative incidence of autoantibodies was somewhat smaller in the casein hydrolysate vs control formula group, suggesting the need for a larger well-powered study. After adjustment for duration of study formula feeding, life-table analysis showed a significant protection by the intervention from positivity for ICA (p=0.02) and at least one autoantibody (p=0.03). The present study provides the first evidence ever in man, despite its limited power, that it may be possible to manipulate spontaneous beta cell autoimmunity by dietary intervention in infancy.

  19. The stimulatory effect of growth hormone, prolactin, and placental lactogen on beta-cell proliferation is not mediated by insulin-like growth factor-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1991-01-01

    The effects of GH, PRL, and placental lactogen (PL) on the proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells in vitro were studied as well as the possible effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in mediating this effect. Proliferating beta-cells were identified by staining with a monoclonal antibody ...

  20. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    insulin-dependent IR autophosphorylation and IRS/PI3K pathway in a way comparable to IL-1beta treatment in RINm5F cells. We propose that IL-1beta decreases insulin action in beta-cells through the induction of SOCS-3 expression, and that this effect potentially alters insulin-induced beta-cell survival....

  1. Autophagy protects pancreatic beta cell mass and function in the setting of a high-fat and high-glucose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qingfeng; Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Chen, Congde; Ming, Yungching; Fusco, Joseph; Gangopadhyay, Nupur N; Ricks, David; Gittes, George K

    2017-11-27

    Autophagy is a major regulator of pancreatic beta cell homeostasis. Altered autophagic activity has been implicated in the beta cells of patients with type 2 diabetes, and in the beta cells of obese diabetic rodents. Here, we show that autophagy was induced in beta cells by either a high-fat diet or a combined high-fat and high-glucose diet, but not by high-glucose alone. However, a high-glucose intake alone did increase beta cell mass and insulin secretion moderately. Depletion of Atg7, a necessary component of the autophagy pathway, in beta cells by pancreatic intra-ductal AAV8-shAtg7 infusion in C57BL/6 mice, resulted in decreased beta cell mass, impaired glucose tolerance, defective insulin secretion, and increased apoptosis when a combined high-fat and high-glucose diet was given, seemingly due to suppression of autophagy. Taken together, our findings suggest that the autophagy pathway may act as a protective mechanism in pancreatic beta cells during a high-calorie diet.

  2. MicroRNA-29a is up-regulated in beta-cells by glucose and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Annika; Clausen, Trine R; Larsen, Sylvester

    2012-01-01

    Chronically elevated levels of glucose impair pancreatic beta-cell function while inducing beta-cell proliferation. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased in several tissues in diabetic animals and mediate decreased insulin-stimulated glucose-transport of adipocytes. The aim was to investiga...

  3. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  4. Species-specific vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression in mammalian pancreatic beta cells: implications for optimising radioligand-based human beta cell mass (BCM) imaging in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M K-H; Hartwig, N R; Kalmbach, N; Klietz, M; Anlauf, M; Eiden, L E; Weihe, E

    2013-05-01

    Imaging of beta cell mass (BCM) is a major challenge in diabetes research. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is abundantly expressed in human beta cells. Radiolabelled analogues of tetrabenazine (TBZ; a low-molecular-weight, cell-permeant VMAT2-selective ligand) have been employed for pancreatic islet imaging in humans. Since reports on TBZ-based VMAT2 imaging in rodent pancreas have been fraught with confusion, we compared VMAT2 gene expression patterns in the mouse, rat, pig and human pancreas, to identify appropriate animal models with which to further validate and optimise TBZ imaging in humans. We used a panel of highly sensitive VMAT2 antibodies developed against equivalently antigenic regions of the transporter from each species in combination with immunostaining for insulin and species-specific in situ hybridisation probes. Individual pancreatic islets were obtained by laser-capture microdissection and subjected to analysis of mRNA expression of VMAT2. The VMAT2 protein was not expressed in beta cells in the adult pancreas of common mouse or rat laboratory strains, in contrast to its expression in beta cells (but not other pancreatic endocrine cell types) in the pancreas of pigs and humans. VMAT2- and tyrosine hydroxylase co-positive (catecholaminergic) innervation was less abundant in humans than in rodents. VMAT2-positive mast cells were identified in the pancreas of all species. Primates and pigs are suitable models for TBZ imaging of beta cells. Rodents, because of a complete lack of VMAT2 expression in the endocrine pancreas, are a 'null' model for assessing interference with BCM measurements by VMAT2-positive mast cells and sympathetic innervation in the pancreas.

  5. The pancreatic beta-cell as a target of estrogens and xenoestrogens: Implications for blood glucose homeostasis and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Angel; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Soriano, Sergi; Quesada, Ivan; Ropero, Ana B

    2009-05-25

    The estrogen receptor ERalpha is emerging as a key molecule involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. The main functions of pancreatic beta-cells are the biosynthesis and release of insulin, the only hormone that can directly decrease blood glucose levels. Estrogen receptors ERalpha and ERbeta exist in beta-cells. The role of ERbeta is still unknown, yet ERalpha plays an important role in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis, insulin secretion and beta-cell survival. Activation of ERalpha by 17beta-estradiol (E2) and the environmental estrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) promotes an increase of insulin biosynthesis through a non-classical estrogen-activated pathway that involves phosphorylation of ERK1/2. The activation of ERalpha by physiological concentrations of E2 may play an important role in the adaptation of the endocrine pancreas to pregnancy. However, if ERalpha is over stimulated by an excess of E2 or the action of an environmental estrogen such as BPA, it will produce an excessive insulin signaling. This may provoke insulin resistance in the liver and muscle, as well as beta-cell exhaustion and therefore, it may contribute to the development of type II diabetes.

  6. Strain-dependent differences in sensitivity of rat beta-cells to interleukin 1 beta in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether strain-dependent differences in beta-cell sensitivity to interleukin (IL) 1 beta exist in vitro and in vivo and if so, whether these differences correlate to variations in IL-1 beta-induced islet inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression...

  7. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Tong, Jenny; Montgomery, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 22 subjects with IFG (11 female and 11 male, mean +/- SD...

  8. Rebranding asymptomatic type 1 diabetes: the case for autoimmune beta cell disorder as a pathological and diagnostic entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Ezio; Mathieu, Chantal; Nepom, Gerald T; Ziegler, Anette-G; Anhalt, Henry; Haller, Michael J; Harrison, Leonard C; Hebrok, Matthias; Kushner, Jake A; Norris, Jill M; Peakman, Mark; Powers, Alvin C; Todd, John A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    The asymptomatic phase of type 1 diabetes is recognised by the presence of beta cell autoantibodies in the absence of hyperglycaemia. We propose that an accurate description of this stage is provided by the name 'Autoimmune Beta Cell Disorder' (ABCD). Specifically, we suggest that this nomenclature and diagnosis will, in a proactive manner, shift the paradigm towards type 1 diabetes being first and foremost an immune-mediated disease and only later a metabolic disease, presaging more active therapeutic intervention in the asymptomatic stage of disease, before end-stage beta cell failure. Furthermore, we argue that accepting ABCD as a diagnosis will be critical in order to accelerate pharmaceutical, academic and public activities leading to clinical trials that could reverse beta cell autoimmunity and halt progression to symptomatic insulin-requiring type 1 diabetes. We recognize that there are both opportunities and challenges in the implementation of the ABCD concept but hope that the notion of 'asymptomatic autoimmune disease' as a disorder will be widely discussed and eventually accepted.

  9. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the in vivo memory to glucose of pancreatic beta cell in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guyen, J M; Magnan, C; Laury, M C; Thibault, C; Leveteau, J; Gilbert, M; Pénicaud, L; Ktorza, A

    1994-01-01

    The fact that the potentiating effect of prolonged hyperglycemia on the subsequent insulin secretion is observed in vivo but not in vitro suggests the involvement of extrapancreatic factors in the in vivo memory of pancreatic beta cells to glucose. We have investigated the possible role of the autonomic nervous system. Rats were made hyperglycemic by a 48-h infusion with glucose (HG rats). At the end of glucose infusion as well as 6 h postinfusion, both parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activities were profoundly altered: parasympathetic and sympathetic activities, assessed by the firing rate either of the thoracic vagus nerve or the superior cervical ganglion, were dramatically increased and decreased, respectively. Moreover, 6 h after the end of glucose infusion, insulin secretion in response to a glucose load was dramatically increased in HG rats compared to controls. To determine whether these changes could be responsible for the increased sensitivity of the beta cell to glucose, insulin release in response to glucose was measured in HG and control rats, either under subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or after administration of the alpha 2A-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline. Both treatments partially abolished the hyperresponsiveness of the beta cell to glucose in HG rats. Therefore chronic hyperglycemia brings about changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system, which in turn are responsible, at least in part, for the generation of enhanced beta cell responsiveness to glucose in vivo. PMID:7929821

  10. High normal fasting glucose level in obese youth: a marker for insulin resistance and beta cell dysregulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, G

    2010-06-01

    A high but normal fasting plasma glucose level in adults is a risk factor for future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether normal fasting plasma glucose levels (<5.60 mmol\\/l) are associated with decreases in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, as well as an adverse cardiovascular profile in obese youth.

  11. A proteomic study of the regulatory role for STAT-1 in cytokine-induced beta-cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondas, Dieter; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; D’Hertog, Wannes

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) plays a crucial role in cytokine-induced beta-cell destruction. However, its precise downstream pathways have not been completely clarified. We performed a proteome analysis of cytokine-exposed C57Bl/6 and STAT-1-/- mouse islets...

  12. Alkali pH directly activates ATP-sensitive K+ channels and inhibits insulin secretion in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Karaman, Gunce; Wheeler, Michael B

    2006-11-17

    Glucose stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells is reported to lead to sustained alkalization, while extracellular application of weak bases is reported to inhibit electrical activity and decrease insulin secretion. We hypothesize that beta-cell K(ATP) channel activity is modulated by alkaline pH. Using the excised patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate a direct stimulatory action of alkali pH on recombinant SUR1/Kir6.2 channels due to increased open probability. Bath application of alkali pH similarly activates native islet beta-cell K(ATP) channels, leading to an inhibition of action potentials, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential. In situ pancreatic perfusion confirms that these cellular effects of alkali pH are observable at a functional level, resulting in decreases in both phase 1 and phase 2 glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our data are the first to report a stimulatory effect of a range of alkali pH on K(ATP) channel activity and link this to downstream effects on islet beta-cell function.

  13. Search for bursts in air shower data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, T.E.G.; Clay, R.W.; Dawson, B.R.; Protheroe, R.J.; Blair, D.G.; Cinquini, P.

    1985-01-01

    There have been reports in recent years of the possible observation of bursts in air shower data. If such events are truly of an astrophysical nature then, they represent an important new class of phemonenon since no other bursts have been observed above the MeV level. The spectra of conventional gamma ray bursts are unknown at higher energies but their observed spectra at MeV energies appear generally to exhibit a steepening in the higher MeV range and are thus unlikely to extrapolate to measurable fluxes at air shower energies. An attempt has been made to look for deviations from randomness in the arrival times of air showers above approx. 10 to the 14th power eV with a number of systems and results so far are presented here. This work will be continued for a substantial period of time with a system capable of recording bursts with multiple events down to a spacing of 4 microns. Earlier data have also been searched for the possible association of air shower events with a glitch of the Vela pulsar

  14. Novel Transgenic Mice for Inducible Gene Overexpression in Pancreatic Cells Define Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulations of Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massouridès, Emmanuelle; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Valtat, Bérengère; Dorchene, Delphine; Jaisser, Frédéric; Bréant, Bernadette; Tronche, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Conditional gene deletion in specific cell populations has helped the understanding of pancreas development. Using this approach, we have shown that deleting the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in pancreatic precursor cells leads to a doubled beta-cell mass. Here, we provide genetic tools that permit a temporally and spatially controlled expression of target genes in pancreatic cells using the Tetracycline inducible system. To efficiently target the Tetracycline transactivator (tTA) in specific cell populations, we generated Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC) transgenic mice expressing the improved Tetracycline transactivator (itTA) either in pancreatic progenitor cells expressing the transcription factor Pdx1 (BAC-Pdx1-itTA), or in beta cells expressing the insulin1 gene (BAC-Ins1-itTA). In the two transgenic models, itTA-mediated activation of reporter genes was efficient and subject to regulation by Doxycycline (Dox). The analysis of a tetracycline-regulated LacZ reporter gene shows that in BAC-Pdx1-itTA mice, itTA is expressed from embryonic (E) day 11.5 in all pancreatic precursor cells. In the adult pancreas, itTA is active in mature beta, delta cells and in few acinar cells. In BAC-Ins1-itTA mice tTA is active from E13.5 and is restricted to beta cells in fetal and adult pancreas. In both lines, tTA activity was suppressed by Dox treatment and re-induced after Dox removal. Using these transgenic lines, we overexpressed the GR in selective pancreatic cell populations and found that overexpression in precursor cells altered adult beta-cell fraction but not glucose tolerance. In contrast, GR overexpression in mature beta cells did not alter beta-cell fraction but impaired glucose tolerance with insufficient insulin secretion. In conclusion, these new itTA mouse models will allow fine-tuning of gene expression to investigate gene function in pancreatic biology and help us understand how glucocorticoid signaling affects on the long-term distinct aspects of

  15. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  17. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international...... and from our previous proposal for the observation period 2006-2007. Comparing these observations with the current burst theories confirms the relation between bursting regimes and the accretion states of the system....

  18. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E [Livermore, CA; Pratt, Garth C [Discovery Bay, CA; Haugen, Peter C [Livermore, CA; Zumstein, James M [Livermore, CA; Vigars, Mark L [Livermore, CA; Romero, Carlos E [Livermore, CA

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  19. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  20. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PARP-1 and YY1 are important novel regulators of CXCL12 gene transcription in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Marković

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12 transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1 in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the

  2. Use of RGD-Functionalized Sandwich Cultures to Promote Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Beta Cells After In Vitro Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloy-Reverté, Caterina; Moreno-Amador, José L; Nacher, Montserrat; Montanya, Eduard; Semino, Carlos E

    2018-03-01

    Islet transplantation has provided proof of concept that cell therapy can restore normoglycemia in patients with diabetes. However, limited availability of islet tissue severely restricts the clinical use of the treatment. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies to generate an abundant source of insulin-producing cells that could be used to treat diabetes. A potential approach is the in vitro expansion of pancreatic beta cells obtained from cadaveric organ donors. However, when human beta cells are expanded in vitro, they dedifferentiate and lose the expression of insulin, probably as a consequence of pancreatic islet dissociation into single cells. We have studied whether reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-matrix relationships with a biomimetic synthetic scaffold could induce redifferentiation of expanded dedifferentiated beta cells. Cells isolated from human islet preparations were expanded in monolayer cultures and allowed to reaggregate into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). Afterward, ICCs were embedded between two thin layers of the noninstructive self-assembling peptide (SAP), RAD16-I or RAD16-I functionalized with the integrin-binding motif RGD (RAD16-I/RGD) (R: arginine, G: glycine, D: aspartic acid), which was expected to promote cell-extracellular matrix interactions. ICCs cultured with RAD16-I were viable, maintained their cluster conformation, and increased in size by aggregation of ICCs, suggesting a self-organizing process. ICCs cultured in RAD16-I/RGD showed enhanced cell adhesion to RAD16-I matrix and reexpression of the beta cell-specific genes, Ins, Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and MafA. Redifferentiation was caused solely by bioactive cues introduced to the RAD16-I peptide since no differentiation factors were added to the culture medium. The results indicate that RGD-functionalized SAP in sandwich conformation is a promising three-dimensional platform to induce redifferentiation toward a beta cell phenotype and to generate insulin

  3. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  4. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, S.; Kushner, J.A.; Buchholz, B.A.; Meeker, A.K.; Stein, G.M.; Hsieh, M.; Kirby, M.; Pechhold, S.; Liu, E.H.; Harlan, D.M.; Tisdale, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ( 14 C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). 14 C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA 14 C content relative to a well-established 14 C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA 14 C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  5. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  6. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.

    2001-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other. The transit......One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other....... The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...

  7. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.

    2001-01-01

    . The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...... behavior is born, slightly overlapping with a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation in which n-spike bursting behavior loses its stability.......One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other...

  8. MicroRNA-29a is up-regulated in beta-cells by glucose and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagge, Annika; Clausen, Trine R.; Larsen, Sylvester; Ladefoged, Mette; Rosenstierne, Maiken W.; Larsen, Louise; Vang, Ole; Nielsen, Jens H.; Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased by glucose in human and rat islets and INS-1E cells. ► miR-29a increases proliferation of INS-1E beta-cells. ► Forced expression of miR-29a decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). ► Depletion of beta-cell miR-29a improves GSIS. ► miR-29a may be a mediator of glucose toxicity in beta-cells. -- Abstract: Chronically elevated levels of glucose impair pancreatic beta-cell function while inducing beta-cell proliferation. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased in several tissues in diabetic animals and mediate decreased insulin-stimulated glucose-transport of adipocytes. The aim was to investigate the impact of glucose on miR-29a levels in INS-1E beta-cells and in human islets of Langerhans and furthermore to evaluate the impact of miR-29a on beta-cell function and proliferation. Increased glucose levels up-regulated miR-29a in beta-cells and human and rat islets of Langerhans. Glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion (GSIS) of INS-1E beta-cells was decreased by forced expression of miR-29a, while depletion of endogenous miR-29a improved GSIS. Over-expression of miR-29a increased INS-1E proliferation. Thus, miR-29a up-regulation is involved in glucose-induced proliferation of beta-cells. Furthermore, as depletion of miR-29a improves beta-cell function, miR-29a is a mediator of glucose-induced beta-cell dysfunction. Glucose-induced up-regulation of miR-29a in beta-cells could be implicated in progression from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes.

  9. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  10. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hals, Ingrid K., E-mail: ingrid.hals@ntnu.no [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpen, Frank [Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Grill, Valdemar [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the

  11. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  12. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  13. Coherent combining pulse bursts in time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2018-01-09

    A beam combining and pulse stacking technique is provided that enhances laser pulse energy by coherent stacking pulse bursts (i.e. non-periodic pulsed signals) in time domain. This energy enhancement is achieved by using various configurations of Fabry-Perot, Gires-Tournois and other types of resonant cavities, so that a multiple-pulse burst incident at either a single input or multiple inputs of the system produces an output with a solitary pulse, which contains the summed energy of the incident multiple pulses from all beams. This disclosure provides a substantial improvement over conventional coherent-combining methods in that it achieves very high pulse energies using a relatively small number of combined laser systems, thus providing with orders of magnitude reduction in system size, complexity, and cost compared to current combining approaches.

  14. The Cytotoxic Role of Intermittent High Glucose on Apoptosis and Cell Viability in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose fluctuations are both strong predictor of diabetic complications and crucial factor for beta cell damages. Here we investigated the effect of intermittent high glucose (IHG on both cell apoptosis and proliferation activity in INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms. Methods. Cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L, constant high glucose (CHG (25 mmol/L, and IHG (rotation per 24 h in 11.1 or 25 mmol/L for 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, xanthine oxidase (XOD level, apoptosis, cell viability, cell cycle, and expression of cyclinD1, p21, p27, and Skp2 were determined. Results. We found that IHG induced more significant apoptosis than CHG and normal glucose; intracellular ROS and XOD levels were more markedly increased in cells exposed to IHG. Cells treated with IHG showed significant decreased cell viability and increased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle related proteins such as cyclinD1 and Skp2 were decreased significantly, but expressions of p27 and p21 were increased markedly. Conclusions. This study suggested that IHG plays a more toxic effect including both apoptosis-inducing and antiproliferative effects on INS-1 cells. Excessive activation of cellular stress and regulation of cyclins might be potential mechanism of impairment in INS-1 cells induced by IHG.

  15. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    2005-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst s spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times (Delta)t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT s softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT s longer accumulation times increase the detection rate of long, soft bursts. Consequently, Swift is detecting long, low fluence bursts (2-3 x fainter than BATSE).

  16. APPL1 prevents pancreatic beta cell death and inflammation by dampening NFκB activation in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhou, Yawen; Wu, Kelvin K L; Chen, Zhanrui; Xu, Aimin; Cheng, Kenneth K Y

    2017-03-01

    Beta cell inflammation and demise is a feature of type 1 diabetes. The insulin-sensitising molecule 'adaptor protein, phosphotyrosine interacting with PH domain and leucine zipper 1' (APPL1), which contains an NH 2 -terminal Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs domain, a central pleckstrin homology domain and a COOH-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain, has been shown to modulate inflammatory response in various cell types but its role in regulating beta cell mass and inflammation in type 1 diabetes remains unknown. Thus, we investigated whether APPL1 prevents beta cell apoptosis and inflammation in diabetes. Appl1-knockout mice and their wild-type littermates, as well as C57BL/6N mice injected with adeno-associated virus encoding APPL1 or green fluorescent protein, were treated with multiple-low-dose streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce experimental type 1 diabetes. Their glucose metabolism and beta cell function were assessed. The effect of APPL1 deficiency on beta cell function upon exposure to a diabetogenic cytokine cocktail (CKS; consisting of TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ) was assessed ex vivo. Expression of APPL1 was significantly reduced in pancreatic islets from mouse models of type 1 diabetes or islets treated with CKS. Hyperglycaemia, beta cell loss and insulitis induced by MLDS were exacerbated by genetic deletion of Appl1 but were alleviated by beta cell-specific overexpression of APPL1. APPL1 preserved beta cell mass by reducing beta cell apoptosis upon treatment with MLDS. Mechanistically, APPL1 deficiency potentiate CKS-induced phosphorylation of NFκB inhibitor, α (IκBα) and subsequent phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of p65, leading to a dramatic induction of NFκB-regulated apoptotic and proinflammatory programs in beta cells. Pharmacological inhibition of NFκB or inducible NO synthase (iNOS) largely abrogate the detrimental effects of APPL1 deficiency on beta cell functions. APPL1 negatively regulates inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic beta

  17. Insulin resistance and beta-cell function in different ethnic groups in Kenya: the role of abdominal fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, D.L.; Faurholt-Jepsen, D.; Faerch, K.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of diabetes in Africans. Thus, we assessed whether insulin resistance and beta-cell function differed by ethnicity in Kenya and whether differences were modified by abdominal fat distribution. A cross-sectional study in 1,087 rural Luo (n = 361), Kamba (n...... beta-cell function compared to the Luo and Kamba. These differences were primarily explained by abdominal fat distribution....... to the Luo and Kamba, respectively. Adjustments of SAT (range 0.1–7.1 cm) and VAT (range 1.5–14.2 cm) largely explained these inter-group differences with the Maasai having the highest combined abdominal fat accumulation. The Maasai had the highest insulin resistance and secretion, but the lowest relative...

  18. HDAC Inhibitor-Mediated Beta-Cell Protection Against Cytokine-Induced Toxicity Is STAT1 Tyr701 Phosphorylation Independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahllöf, Mattias Salling; Christensen, Dan P; Harving, Mette

    2015-01-01

    inhibition using either IL-1β or IFN-γ alone. Whereas HDAC inhibition has been shown to regulate NFκB-activity, related primarily to IL-1β signaling, it is unknown whether the inhibition of HDACs affect IFN-γ signaling in beta-cells. Further, in non-beta-cells, there is a dispute whether HDAC inhibition...... regulates IFN-γ signaling at the level of STAT1 Tyr701 phosphorylation. Using different small molecule HDAC inhibitors with varying class selectivity, INS-1E wild type and stable HDAC1-3 knockdown pancreatic INS-1 cell lines, we show that IFN-γ-induced Cxcl9 and iNos expression as well as Cxcl9 and GAS...... reporter activity were decreased by HDAC inhibition in a STAT1 Tyr701 phosphorylation-independent fashion. In fact, knockdown of HDAC1 increased IFN-γ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation....

  19. The long-acting GLP-1 derivative NN2211 ameliorates glycemia and increases beta-cell mass in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolin, Bidda; Larsen, Marianne O; Gotfredsen, Carsten F

    2002-01-01

    NN2211 is a long-acting, metabolically stable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) derivative designed for once daily administration in humans. NN2211 dose dependently reduced the glycemic levels in ob/ob mice, with antihyperglycemic activity still evident 24 h postdose. Apart from an initial reduction...... in food intake, there were no significant differences between NN2211 and vehicle treatment, and body weight was not affected. Histological examination revealed that beta-cell proliferation and mass were not increased significantly in ob/ob mice with NN2211, although there was a strong tendency...... for increased proliferation. In db/db mice, exendin-4 and NN2211 decreased blood glucose compared with vehicle, but NN2211 had a longer duration of action. Food intake was lowered only on day 1 with both compounds, and body weight was unaffected. beta-Cell proliferation rate and mass were significantly...

  20. cAMP promotes pancreatic beta-cell survival via CREB-mediated induction of IRS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhala, Ulupi S; Canettieri, Gianluca; Screaton, Robert A; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Krajewski, Stan; Reed, John; Walker, John; Lin, Xueying; White, Morris; Montminy, Marc

    2003-07-01

    The incretin hormone GLP1 promotes islet-cell survival via the second messenger cAMP. Here we show that mice deficient in the activity of CREB, caused by expression of a dominant-negative A-CREB transgene in pancreatic beta-cells, develop diabetes secondary to beta-cell apoptosis. Remarkably, A-CREB severely disrupted expression of IRS2, an insulin signaling pathway component that is shown here to be a direct target for CREB action in vivo. As induction of IRS2by cAMP enhanced activation of the survival kinase Akt in response to insulin and IGF-1, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which opposing pathways cooperate in promoting cell survival.

  1. Impaired beta cell sensitivity to incretins in type 2 diabetes is insufficiently compensated by higher incretin response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tura, A.; Bagger, J. I.; Ferrannini, E.

    2017-01-01

    -like peptide-1 (GLP-1) during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), thereby estimating incretin sensitivity of the beta cell, and its associated factors. Methods and results Eight patients with T2D and eight matched subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) received 25, 75, and 125 g OGTTs and corresponding...... was correlated with that of both GIP and GLP-1 in each subject (median r = 0.67 in NGT and 0.45 in T2D). We calculated an individual beta cell sensitivity to incretins (SINCR) using a weighted average of GIP and GLP-1 (pooled incretin concentration, PIC), as the slope of the relationship between PINCR and PIC......Background and aims The incretin effect is impaired in type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. We investigated the relationships between the time course of the incretin effect and that of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon...

  2. Amelioration of high fat diet-induced glucose intolerance by blockade of Smad4 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H Y; Oh, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Lee, E-K; Jung, H S; Jun, H-S

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated whether Smad4 signaling is involved in the regulation of beta-cell function using a high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model. Beta-cell-specific Smad4-knockout mice (Smad4(-/-)RIP-Cre(+); β-Smad4KO) were generated by mating Smad4 (flox/flox) mice with rat insulin promoter (RIP)-Cre mice. Mice were fed a HFD beginning at 6 weeks of age for 16 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting and fed glucose levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance were measured. The expression of Smad4 mRNA was significantly decreased in the islets of β-Smad4KO mice. In wild-type mice, Smad4 mRNA was significantly decreased at 18 weeks of age as compared with 8 weeks of age. On a regular chow diet, β-Smad4KO mice showed no differences in body weight, fed and fasting blood glucose levels, and glucose tolerance compared with wild-type mice. When fed a HFD, body weight gain was significantly reduced in β-Smad4KO mice as compared with wild-type mice, although the amount of food intake was not different. During the HFD, fed and fasting blood glucose levels, glucose stimulated insulin secretion, disposition index and glucose tolerance were significantly improved in β-Smad4KO mice as compared with wild-type mice. However, insulin tolerance tests showed no differences between the 2 groups. Inhibition of Smad4 in beta-cells conferred mild but significant improvements in glucose levels and glucose tolerance in HFD-induced obese mice. Therefore, regulation of Smad4 expression may be one of the mechanisms regulating physiological expansion of beta-cells during development of type 2 diabetes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not bee...... weight gain was preserved. The results demonstrate that GDH is essential for the full development of the secretory response in beta-cells. However, maximal secretory capacity is not required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in normo-caloric conditions....

  4. Effects of low intensity laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guoxin; Xiong, Leilei; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of low intensity semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes, a method using a high-fat diet and low-dose intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin established a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model. Model rats were randomly divided into a laser acupoint irradiation group, rosiglitazone control group, and placebo group; each group had 10 rats. In addition, 10 normal male rats were selected for the normal control group. The Housanli, Neiting and Yishu acupoints of the rats in the laser acupoint irradiation group were irradiated with a 10 mW semiconductor laser; each point was irradiated for 15 min, once every 2 d over 28 d, for a total of 14 episodes of irradiation. The rosiglitazone group rats were given rosiglitazone (0.2 mg kg-1) intragastrically; the placebo group rats were given 0.9% brine (0.2 mg kg-1) intragastrically, once daily, for four consecutive weeks. The change of fasting blood glucose was determined before and after each treatment. The islet beta-cell apoptosis was determined. The islet beta-cell apoptosis rates of the laser acupoint irradiation group and the rosiglitazone group were significantly lower than the rate of the placebo group. Even though the rate was lower in the laser acupoint irradiation group than in the rosiglitazone group, there was no significant difference between them. It is shown that acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can effectively inhibit islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes.

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maayan Shaked

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP regulates critical biological processes including inflammation, stress and apoptosis. TXNIP is upregulated by glucose and is a critical mediator of hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In contrast, the saturated long-chain fatty acid palmitate, although toxic to the beta-cell, inhibits TXNIP expression. The mechanisms involved in the opposing effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression are unknown. We found that both palmitate and oleate inhibited TXNIP in a rat beta-cell line and islets. Palmitate inhibition of TXNIP was independent of fatty acid beta-oxidation or esterification. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has an important role in cellular energy sensing and control of metabolic homeostasis; therefore we investigated its involvement in nutrient regulation of TXNIP. As expected, glucose inhibited whereas palmitate stimulated AMPK. Pharmacologic activators of AMPK mimicked fatty acids by inhibiting TXNIP. AMPK knockdown increased TXNIP expression in presence of high glucose with and without palmitate, indicating that nutrient (glucose and fatty acids effects on TXNIP are mediated in part via modulation of AMPK activity. TXNIP is transcriptionally regulated by carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP. Palmitate inhibited glucose-stimulated ChREBP nuclear entry and recruitment to the Txnip promoter, thereby inhibiting Txnip transcription. We conclude that AMPK is an important regulator of Txnip transcription via modulation of ChREBP activity. The divergent effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression result in part from their opposing effects on AMPK activity. In light of the important role of TXNIP in beta-cell apoptosis, its inhibition by fatty acids can be regarded as an adaptive/protective response to glucolipotoxicity. The finding that AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of TXNIP may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment

  6. Drp1 guarding of the mitochondrial network is important for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Florian; Schultz, Julia; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone, E-mail: simone.baltrusch@med.uni-rostock.de

    2016-06-10

    Mitochondria form a tubular network in mammalian cells, and the mitochondrial life cycle is determined by fission, fusion and autophagy. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has a pivotal role in these processes because it alone is able to constrict mitochondria. However, the regulation and function of Drp1 have been shown to vary between cell types. Mitochondrial morphology affects mitochondrial metabolism and function. In pancreatic beta cells mitochondrial metabolism is a key component of the glucose-induced cascade of insulin secretion. The goal of the present study was to investigate the action of Drp1 in pancreatic beta cells. For this purpose Drp1 was down-regulated by means of shDrp1 in insulin-secreting INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In INS1 cells reduced Drp1 expression resulted in diminished expression of proteins regulating mitochondrial fusion, namely mitofusin 1 and 2, and optic atrophy protein 1. Diminished mitochondrial dynamics can therefore be assumed. After down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells and spread mouse islets the initially homogenous mitochondrial network characterised by a moderate level of interconnections shifted towards high heterogeneity with elongated, clustered and looped mitochondria. These morphological changes were found to correlate directly with functional alterations. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation were significantly reduced in INS1 cells after Drp1down-regulation. Finally, a significant loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was demonstrated in INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In conclusion, Drp1 expression is important in pancreatic beta cells to maintain the regulation of insulin secretion. -- Highlights: •Down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells reduces mitochondrial fusion protein expression. •Mitochondrial membrane potential in INS1 cells is diminished after Drp1 down-regulation. •Mitochondria become elongated after down-regulation of Drp1 in beta cells. •Down-regulation of

  7. Chronic fetal hypoglycemia inhibits the later steps of stimulus-secretion coupling in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozance, Paul J; Limesand, Sean W; Zerbe, Gary O; Hay, William W

    2007-05-01

    We measured the impact of chronic late gestation hypoglycemia on pancreatic islet structure and function to determine the cause of decreased insulin secretion in this sheep model of fetal nutrient deprivation. Late gestation hypoglycemia did not decrease pancreas weight, insulin content, beta-cell area, beta-cell mass, or islet size. The pancreatic islet isolation procedure selected a group of islets that were larger and had an increased proportion of beta-cells compared with islets measured in pancreatic sections, but there were no morphologic differences between islets isolated from control and hypoglycemic fetuses. The rates of glucose-stimulated pancreatic islet glucose utilization (126.2 +/- 25.3 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), hypoglycemic, vs. 93.5 +/- 5.5 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), control, P = 0.47) and oxidation (10.5 +/- 1.7 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), hypoglycemic, vs. 10.6 +/- 1.6 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), control) were not different in hypoglycemic fetuses compared with control fetuses. Chronic late gestation hypoglycemia decreased insulin secretion in isolated pancreatic islets by almost 70% in response to direct nonnutrient membrane depolarization and in response to increased extracellular calcium entry. beta-Cell ultrastructure was abnormal with markedly distended rough endoplasmic reticulum in three of the seven hypoglycemic fetuses studied, but in vitro analysis of hypoglycemic control islets showed no evidence that these changes represented endoplasmic reticulum stress, as measured by transcription of glucose regulatory protein-78 and processing of X-box binding protein-1. In conclusion, these studies show that chronic hypoglycemia in late gestation decreases insulin secretion by inhibiting the later steps of stimulus-secretion coupling after glucose metabolism, membrane depolarization, and calcium entry.

  8. Beneficial Effect of Jojoba Seed Extracts on Hyperglycemia-Induced Oxidative Stress in RINm5f Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahla Belhadj

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia occurs during diabetes and insulin resistance. It causes oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, leading to cellular damage. Polyphenols play a central role in defense against oxidative stress. In our study, we investigated the antioxidant properties of simmondsin, a pure molecule present in jojoba seeds, and of the aqueous extract of jojoba seeds on fructose-induced oxidative stress in RINm5f beta cells. The exposure of RINm5f beta cells to fructose triggered the loss of cell viability (−48%, p < 0.001 and disruption of insulin secretion (p < 0.001 associated with of reactive oxygen species (ROS production and a modulation of pro-oxidant and antioxidant signaling pathway. Cell pre-treatments with extracts considerably increased cell viability (+86% p < 0.001 for simmondsin and +74% (p < 0.001 for aqueous extract and insulin secretion. The extracts also markedly decreased ROS (−69% (p < 0.001 for simmondsin and −59% (p < 0.001 for aqueous extract and caspase-3 activation and improved antioxidant defense, inhibiting p22phox and increasing nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 levels (+70%, p < 0.001 for aqueous extract. Simmondsin had no impact on Nrf2 levels. The richness and diversity of molecules present in jojoba seed extract makes jojoba a powerful agent to prevent the destruction of RINm5f beta cells induced by hyperglycemia.

  9. GeneSpeed Beta Cell: An Online Genomics Data Repository and Analysis Resource Tailored for the Islet Cell Biologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayeem Quayum

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We here describe the development of a freely available online database resource, GeneSpeed Beta Cell, which has been created for the pancreatic islet and pancreatic developmental biology investigator community. Research Design and Methods. We have developed GeneSpeed Beta Cell as a separate component of the GeneSpeed database, providing a genomics-type data repository of pancreas and islet-relevant datasets interlinked with the domain-oriented GeneSpeed database. Results. GeneSpeed Beta Cell allows the query of multiple published and unpublished select genomics datasets in a simultaneous fashion (multiexperiment viewing and is capable of defining intersection results from precomputed analysis of such datasets (multidimensional querying. Combined with the protein-domain categorization/assembly toolbox provided by the GeneSpeed database, the user is able to define spatial expression constraints of select gene lists in a relatively rigid fashion within the pancreatic expression space. We provide several demonstration case studies of relevance to islet cell biology and development of the pancreas that provide novel insight into islet biology. Conclusions. The combination of an exhaustive domain-based compilation of the transcriptome with gene array data of interest to the islet biologist affords novel methods for multidimensional querying between individual datasets in a rapid fashion, presently not available elsewhere.

  10. Nuclear import of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cells is mediated by a nuclear localization signal and modulated by SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Bente Berg; Fjeld, Karianne; Solheim, Marie Holm; Shirakawa, Jun; Zhang, Enming; Keindl, Magdalena; Hu, Jiang; Lindqvist, Andreas; Døskeland, Anne; Mellgren, Gunnar; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Wierup, Nils; Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2017-10-15

    The localization of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cell nuclei is a controversial issue. Although previous reports suggest such a localization, the mechanism for its import has so far not been identified. Using immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation and mass spectrometry, we present evidence in support of glucokinase localization in beta-cell nuclei of human and mouse pancreatic sections, as well as in human and mouse isolated islets, and murine MIN6 cells. We have identified a conserved, seven-residue nuclear localization signal ( 30 LKKVMRR 36 ) in the human enzyme. Substituting the residues KK 31,32 and RR 35,36 with AA led to a loss of its nuclear localization in transfected cells. Furthermore, our data indicates that SUMOylation of glucokinase modulates its nuclear import, while high glucose concentrations do not significantly alter the enzyme nuclear/cytosolic ratio. Thus, for the first time, we provide data in support of a nuclear import of glucokinase mediated by a redundant mechanism, involving a nuclear localization signal, and which is modulated by its SUMOylation. These findings add new knowledge to the functional role of glucokinase in the pancreatic beta-cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The neurosurvival factor Humanin inhibits beta cell apoptosis via Stat3 activation and delays and ameliorates diabetes in NOD mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, P. T.; Park, P.; Cobb, L. J.; Paharkova-Vatchkova, V.; Hakimi, M.; Cohen, P.; Lee, K.-W.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of Type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether Humanin, a recently described survival factor for neurons, could improve the survival of beta cells and delay or treat diabetes in the NOD model. Humanin reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation in NIT-1 cells and decreased apoptosis induced by cytokine treatment. Humanin induced Stat3 and ERK phosphorylation over a 24 hour time course. Specific inhibition of Stat3 resulted in nullifying the protective effect of Humanin. Humanin normalized glucose tolerance in diabetic NOD mice treated for 6-weeks and their pancreata revealed decreased lymphocyte infiltration and severity. In addition, Humanin delayed/prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice treated for 20 weeks. In summary, Humanin treatment decreases cytokine-induced apoptosis in beta cells in vitro and improved glucose tolerance and onset of diabetes in NOD mice in vivo. This indicates that Humanin may be useful for islet protection and survival in a spectrum of diabetes-related therapeutics. PMID:19800083

  12. Serum albumin protects from cytokine-induced pancreatic beta cell death by a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiaer, Caroline; Thams, Peter

    2009-01-01

    /l) increased cell death. This demise was prevented by serum albumin, dependent on its free sulfhydryl group, emphasizing that albumin may scavenge H(2)O(2) due to its antioxidant properties. Culture for 48 h with a cytokine mixture of IL-1beta (160 pg/ml), IFN-gamma (200 ng/ml), and TNF-alpha (2 ng....../ml) revealed that albumin, also protected against cytokine-induced death of both mouse islets and INS-1E beta cells. This protective effect against cytokine-induced beta cell death was, however, not dependent on albumins free sulfhydryl group, but was inhibited by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K......) inhibitors LY294002 (25 micromol/l) and wortmannin (1 micromol/l), suggesting that albumin may rescue beta cells from cytokine-induced cell death by activation of PI3K. In accordance, albumin stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, a down-stream target for PI3K. In conclusion, it is suggested that albumin may...

  13. Development and control of epileptiform bursting in dissociated cortical cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    Cortical cells in dissociated culture form densely interconnected networks. Within days after plating, neurons become electrically active, and soon after start to synchronize their activity into culture-wide bursts. By growing cultures on multi-electrode arrays (Petri dishes with a grid of substrate-embedded electrodes), their electrical activity can be recorded non-invasively.I developed software, MEABench, for online visualization and analysis of multi-electrode data, and used it to follow the development of cultures obtained from (E18) embryonic rats. Globally synchronized bursting was observed in all but the most sparsely plated cultures. A remarkable range of bursting behaviors was observed, even in cultures with identical plating parameters. Activity patterns varied widely in terms of the frequency, intensity, duration, and degree of temporal clustering of bursts. During the 2nd week in vitro, bursts in many dense cultures clustered into well-defined trains, separated by long periods without bursts. The number of bursts within these 'superbursts' and their spatiotemporal structure were found to be stable for hours or days.Cortical cultures on multi-electrode arrays are ideal for studying two-way communication between biological systems and computers. I designed and built hardware to deliver electrical stimuli in arbitrary patterns, developed software to remove stimulation artifacts from recordings, and studied the efficacy of several voltage-defined and current-defined stimulus waveforms. MEABench can control the stimulator in real-time. Thus, stimuli can be made dependent on a culture's activity with only 15 ms lag-time.We hypothesized that synchronized bursting can dominate activity patterns, because lack of external input puts cultures in a hypersensitive state. Indeed, by feeding cultures a steady stream of stimuli, distributed over many electrodes, bursting could be prevented completely. The number of electrodes required for successful burst control

  14. Effects of Liraglutide Monotherapy on Beta Cell Function and Pancreatic Enzymes Compared with Metformin in Japanese Overweight/Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Subpopulation Analysis of the KIND-LM Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kumiko; Saisho, Yoshifumi; Manesso, Erica; Tanaka, Masami; Meguro, Shu; Irie, Junichiro; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Kawai, Toshihide; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Cobelli, Claudio; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are becoming one of the major therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study was conducted as an exploratory analysis to clarify the effects of liraglutide, a GLP-1RA, on beta cell function, fat distribution and pancreas volume compared with metformin in Japanese overweight/obese patients with T2DM. A subpopulation of the Keio study for Initial treatment of type 2 Diabetes with Liraglutide versus Metformin (KIND-LM) study participants (n = 20, 10 in oral metformin group and 10 in subcutaneous liraglutide group) who were enrolled at Keio University Hospital and underwent frequently sampled mixed meal tolerance test (MTT) and abdominal computed tomography (CT) at weeks 0 and 24 were included in this analysis. The patients were treated with either metformin or liraglutide throughout the 24-week study period. Changes in glycemic parameters such as glycated hemoglobulin (HbA1c), glycated albumin and 1,5-anhydroglucitol at week 24 were comparable between the groups. An oral minimal model based on MTT revealed that static-phase beta cell responsiveness (Φ s) and static-phase disposition index were significantly increased at week 24 in the liraglutide group but not in the metformin group. There was no significant change in fat distribution as well as body weight at week 24 in either group. Serum amylase and lipase levels modestly but significantly increased in the liraglutide group during the study; however, there was no incidence of pancreatitis and pancreas volume was not changed in the liraglutide group. Liraglutide monotherapy for 24 weeks improved beta cell responsiveness with no change in either body weight or fat distribution. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism by which liraglutide increases serum pancreatic enzymes. The University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Clinical Trials Registry ( http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ ); UMIN000004243.

  15. Minor long-term changes in weight have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Rasmussen, M H

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of changes in body composition induced by weight loss on insulin sensitivity (SI), non-insulin mediated glucose disposal, glucose effectiveness (SG)and beta-cell function....

  16. The zinc transporter ZNT3 co-localizes with insulin in INS-1E pancreatic beta cells and influences cell survival, insulin secretion capacity, and ZNT8 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smidt, Kamille; Larsen, Agnete; Brønden, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage...... in the granules whereas ZNT3 knockout negatively affects beta cell function and survival. Here, we describe for the first time the sub-cellular localization of ZNT3 by immuno-gold electron microscopy and supplement previous data from knockout experiments with investigations of the effect of ZNT3 in a pancreatic...... beta cell line, INS-1E overexpressing ZNT3. In INS-1E cells, we found that ZNT3 was abundant in insulin containing granules located close to the plasma membrane. The level of ZNT8 mRNA was significantly decreased upon over-expression of ZNT3 at different glucose concentrations (5, 11 and 21 mM glucose...

  17. GPR39 receptors and actions of trace metals on pancreatic beta cell function and glucose homoeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Brian M; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H A; Vasu, Srividya; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor 39 (GPR39) has been implicated in glucose homoeostasis, appetite control and gastrointestinal tract function. This study used clonal BRIN-BD11 cells and mouse pancreatic islets to assess the insulin-releasing actions of trace metals believed to act via GPR39, and the second messenger pathways involved in mediating their effects. Micromolar concentrations of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+) were examined under normoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic conditions. Mechanistic studies investigated changes of intracellular Ca(2+), cAMP generation and assessment of cytotoxicity by LDH release. Cellular localisation of GPR39 was determined by double immunohistochemical staining. All trace metals (7.8-500 µmol/l) stimulated insulin release with Cu(2+) being the most potent in isolated islets, with an EC50 value of 87 μmol/l. Zn(2+) was the most selective with an EC50 value of 125 μmol/l. Enhancement of insulin secretion was also observed with Ni(2+) (179 μmol/l) and Co(2+) (190 μmol/l). These insulin-releasing effects were confirmed using clonal BRIN-BD11 cells which exhibited enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) (p metals. Oral administration of Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) (50 µmol/kg together with 18 mmol/kg glucose) decreased the glycaemic excursion (p metals on BRIN-BD11 cells and pancreatic beta cells, together with their antihyperglycaemic actions in vivo. These data suggest that development of agonists capable of specifically activating GPR39 may be a useful new therapeutic approach for diabetes management.

  18. Distinct glucose lowering and beta cell protective effects of vanadium and food restriction in streptozotocin-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, M C; Rodrigues, B; McNeill, J H

    1999-11-01

    Vanadium is an oral insulin-mimetic agent that diminishes hyperglycemia, improves beta-cell insulin store and secretory function, and can reverse the diabetic state chronically after withdrawal from treatment. As food restriction has been reported to enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin demand, we assessed the contribution of a reduced food intake to the glucose lowering and beta-cell protective effects of vanadium. Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were untreated (D) or administered vanadyl sulfate in the drinking water (DT) at one week prior to and for 5 weeks following the administration of STZ. An additional group was pair-fed (DP) with an equal amount of food as that consumed by the DT group. Shortly after the induction of diabetes, hyperglycemic D rats demonstrated a significant rise in plasma insulin to levels that initially exceeded that of the controls. This was followed by a steady reduction over several weeks, suggesting a gradual depletion of functional beta-cells. Both vanadium treatment and pair-feeding abolished the insulin hypersecretory response following STZ administration. Glucose lowering was enhanced in DT animals when administered higher concentrations of vanadium, despite no further reduction in food intake, and all DT animals (10/10) were normoglycemic by 5 weeks. Mean pancreatic insulin content in DT rats was improved fourfold and was associated with a greater number of granulated beta-cells. Conversely, food restriction only modestly improved glycemia and the pancreatic insulin store and, unlike DT, DP rats remained highly glucose-intolerant. At 5 weeks of diabetes, fed circulating glucose and insulin levels were strongly correlated (P=0.0002) in the D and DP groups, supporting the notion that glucose lowering with food restriction is dependent on improved plasma insulin levels. A separate correlation was observed in DT animals within a lower range of plasma insulin, suggesting that vanadium, unlike food restriction, reduced

  19. **-Postprandial pancreatic [11C]methionine uptake after pancreaticoduodenectomy mirrors basal beta cell function and insulin release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, Emanuel; Kazianka, Lukas; Breuer, Robert; Miholic, Johannes; Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Stimpfl, Thomas; Reiter, Birgit; Karanikas, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    [S-methyl- 11 C]-L-methionine ([ 11 C]MET) uptake in the pancreas might be a central indicator of beta cell function. Since gastric emptying was recently shown to influence glycemic control in subjects after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, the surgical treatment of neoplasms of the pancreas head), we looked for imaginable relationships between gastric emptying, pre- and postprandial insulin concentrations, and [ 11 C]MET uptake. Nineteen tumor-free survivors after PD (age mean ± SD: 61 ± 8.7 yrs.; 10 male, 9 female) and 10 healthy controls (age: 27 ± 8.7 yrs.; 7 male, 3 female) were given a mixed test meal. One gram of paracetamol was ingested with the meal to evaluate the speed of gastric emptying. Insulin, glucose, and paracetamol plasma concentrations were measured before and over 180 minutes after ingestion. Beta cell function was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. Simultaneously, 800 MBq of [ 11 C]MET were administered and the activity (maximum tissue standardized uptake values [SUVmax]) over the pancreas was measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Total integrated SUVmax (area under the curve [AUC]) and incremental SUVmax were calculated. The uptake of [ 11 C]MET in the pancreas was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in controls compared to the PD group. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in controls compared to pancreatectomy subjects (p < 0.0001). Paracetamol AUC 30 correlated with the SUVmax increment between 15 and 30 minutes (R 2 = 0.27, p = 0.0263), suggesting a relationship between gastric emptying and the uptake of [ 11 C]MET. Total integrated SUVmax correlated with insulin AUC 60 (R 2 = 0.66,p < 0.0001) in patients after PD. Multivariate regression analysis revealed insulin AUC 60 and beta cell function, calculated from the fasting insulin to glucose ratio, as independent predictors of 11 C-methionine uptake, i.e. total integrated SUVmax, in patients after PD (R 2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001). Postprandial

  20. **-Postprandial pancreatic [{sup 11}C]methionine uptake after pancreaticoduodenectomy mirrors basal beta cell function and insulin release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Emanuel; Kazianka, Lukas; Breuer, Robert; Miholic, Johannes [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Stimpfl, Thomas; Reiter, Birgit [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Forensic Toxicology, Vienna (Austria); Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Divisional Head PET-PET/CT (Nuclear Medicine), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    [S-methyl-{sup 11}C]-L-methionine ([{sup 11}C]MET) uptake in the pancreas might be a central indicator of beta cell function. Since gastric emptying was recently shown to influence glycemic control in subjects after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, the surgical treatment of neoplasms of the pancreas head), we looked for imaginable relationships between gastric emptying, pre- and postprandial insulin concentrations, and [{sup 11}C]MET uptake. Nineteen tumor-free survivors after PD (age mean ± SD: 61 ± 8.7 yrs.; 10 male, 9 female) and 10 healthy controls (age: 27 ± 8.7 yrs.; 7 male, 3 female) were given a mixed test meal. One gram of paracetamol was ingested with the meal to evaluate the speed of gastric emptying. Insulin, glucose, and paracetamol plasma concentrations were measured before and over 180 minutes after ingestion. Beta cell function was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. Simultaneously, 800 MBq of [{sup 11}C]MET were administered and the activity (maximum tissue standardized uptake values [SUVmax]) over the pancreas was measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Total integrated SUVmax (area under the curve [AUC]) and incremental SUVmax were calculated. The uptake of [{sup 11}C]MET in the pancreas was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in controls compared to the PD group. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in controls compared to pancreatectomy subjects (p < 0.0001). Paracetamol AUC{sub 30} correlated with the SUVmax increment between 15 and 30 minutes (R{sup 2} = 0.27, p = 0.0263), suggesting a relationship between gastric emptying and the uptake of [{sup 11}C]MET. Total integrated SUVmax correlated with insulin AUC{sub 60} (R{sup 2} = 0.66,p < 0.0001) in patients after PD. Multivariate regression analysis revealed insulin AUC{sub 60} and beta cell function, calculated from the fasting insulin to glucose ratio, as independent predictors of {sup 11}C-methionine uptake, i.e. total integrated SUVmax, in

  1. Thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10 12 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. 13 M 0 yr -1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10 20 to 10 22 g km -2 . Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56 Ni releases from 10 38 to 10 40 erg km -2 and pushes hot plasma with β > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered

  2. Magnetron: Fitting bursts from magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Brewer, Brendon J.; Hogg, David W.; Murray, Iain; Frean, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Magnetron, written in Python, decomposes magnetar bursts into a superposition of small spike-like features with a simple functional form, where the number of model components is itself part of the inference problem. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and reversible jumps between models with different numbers of parameters are used to characterize the posterior distributions of the model parameters and the number of components per burst.

  3. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) protects against oleate-induced INS-1E beta cell dysfunction by preserving carbohydrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, F; Brun, T; Bartley, C

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Pancreatic beta cells chronically exposed to fatty acids may lose specific functions and even undergo apoptosis. Generally, lipotoxicity is triggered by saturated fatty acids, whereas unsaturated fatty acids induce lipodysfunction, the latter being characterised by elevated basal...... insulin release and impaired glucose responses. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) has been proposed to play a protective role in this process, although the cellular mechanisms involved are unclear. METHODS: We modulated PPARalpha production in INS-1E beta cells...

  5. The roles of ATF3, an adaptive-response gene, in high-fat-diet-induced diabetes and pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuda, Erik J; Qi, Ling; Zhu, Michael X; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Montminy, Marc R; Hai, Tsonwin

    2010-07-01

    Most people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have reduced beta-cell mass, and apoptosis is a key factor for this reduction. Previously, we showed that ATF3, an adaptive-response gene, is induced by various stress signals relevant to T2D, such as high glucose and high fatty acid. Because ATF3 is proapoptotic in beta-cells, we tested the hypothesis that ATF3 plays a detrimental role and contributes to the development of T2D. We compared wild-type (WT) and ATF3 knockout (KO) mice in an animal model for T2D, high-fat diet-induced diabetes. We also used INS-1 beta-cells and primary islets to analyze the roles of ATF3 in beta-cell function, including insulin gene expression and glucose-induced insulin secretion. Surprisingly, WT mice performed better in glucose tolerance test than KO mice, suggesting a protective, rather than detrimental, role of ATF3. At 12 wk on high-fat diet, no beta-cell apoptosis was observed, and the WT and KO mice had comparable beta-cell areas. However, ATF3 deficiency significantly reduced serum insulin levels in the KO mice without affecting insulin sensitivity, suggesting reduced beta-cell function in the KO mice. Analyses using INS-1 cells and primary islets support the notion that this defect is due, at least partly, to reduced insulin gene transcription in the KO islets without detectable reduction in glucose-induced calcium influx, a critical step for insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support a model in which, before apoptosis becomes obvious, expression of ATF3 can be beneficial by helping beta-cells to cope with higher metabolic demand.

  6. New approach to beta cell function screening by nitric oxide assessment of obese individuals at the population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaim EA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Elinton Adami Chaim, Renata Cristina GobatoUniversity of Campinas (UNICAMP, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, BrazilBackground: Approximately 27% of Americans today are obese, and this condition increases the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The UK Prospective Diabetes Study suggests that loss of beta cell function can begin at least 10 years before diagnosis, and mean beta cell function is already less than 50% at diagnosis. The aim of this research was to assess the possibility of detecting loss of beta cell function in obese patients by a novel approach involving nitric oxide assessment using a combination of technologies.Materials and methods: One hundred and fifteen obese patients (93 women, 22 men of mean age 39 (range 17–62 years, who were candidates for bariatric surgery were included in the study, and underwent laboratory tests, including fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin plasma, and examination with the Electro Sensor complex. The Electro Sensor complex offers a new way to assess nitric oxide production using five technologies managed by software, ie, the galvanic skin response, photoelectrical plethysmography, heart rate variability analysis, bioimpedance analysis, and blood pressure oscillometric measurements. The homeostasis model assessment 2% beta cell function (HOMA2% β algorithm was calculated from fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin plasma using free software provided by The University of Oxford Diabetes Trial Unit. The Electro Sensor complex percent beta (ESC% β algorithm was calculated from the Electro Sensor complex data and statistical neural network. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate ESC% β and HOMA2% β using the coefficient of correlation and Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were also constructed to determine the specificity and sensitivity of ESC% β in

  7. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki [Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kawata, Sumio, E-mail: Sumio_Kawata@pref.hyogo.lg.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Hyogo Prefectural Nishinomiya Hospital, 13-9 Rokutanji-cho, Nishinomiya 662-0918 (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  8. Nicotinamide-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes increase insulin production in pancreatic beta cells via MIF pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilie I

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ioana Ilie,1 Razvan Ilie,2 Teodora Mocan,3 Flaviu Tabaran,4 Cornel Iancu,4 Lucian Mocan4 1Department of Endocrinology, 2Department of Microbiology, 3Department of Physiology, 4Third Surgery Clinic, Department of Nanomedicine, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania Abstract: Recent data in the literature support the role of nicotinamide (NA as a pharmacologic agent that stimulates pancreatic beta-cells to produce insulin in vitro. There are data showing that carbon nanotubes may be useful in initiating and maintaining cellular metabolic responses. This study shows that administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs functionalized with nicotinamide (NA-MWCNTs leads to significant insulin production compared with individual administration of NA, MWCNTs, and a control solution. Treatment of 1.4E7 cells for 30 minutes with NA-MWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/L to 20 mg/L resulted in significantly increased insulin release (0.18 ± 0.026 ng/mL for 1 mg/L, 0.21 ± 0.024 ng/mL for 5 mg/L, and 0.27 ± 0.028 ng/mL for 20 mg/L. Thus, compared with cells treated with NA only (0.1 ± 0.01 ng/mL for 1 mg/L, 0.12 ± 0.017 ng/mL for 5 mg/L, and 0.17 ± 0.01 ng/mL for 20 mg/L we observed a significant positive effect on insulin release in cells treated with NA-MWCNTs. The results were confirmed using flow cytometry, epifluorescence microscopy combined with immunochemistry staining, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. In addition, using immunofluorescence microscopy techniques, we were able to demonstrate that MWCNTs enhance insulin production via the macrophage migration inhibitory factor pathway. The application and potential of NA combined with MWCNTs as an antidiabetic agent may represent the beginning of a new chapter in the nanomediated treatment of diabetes mellitus. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, NA, insulin-producing cells, insulin, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, diabetes mellitus

  9. MicroRNA expression in alpha and beta cells of human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Klein

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in pancreatic development and adult β-cell physiology. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that each islet cell type has a specific pattern of miRNA expression. We sought to determine the profile of miRNA expression in α-and β-cells, the main components of pancreatic islets, because this analysis may lead to a better understanding of islet gene regulatory pathways. Highly enriched (>98% subsets of human α-and β-cells were obtained by flow cytometric sorting after intracellular staining with c-peptide and glucagon antibody. The method of sorting based on intracellular staining is possible because miRNAs are stable after fixation. MiRNA expression levels were determined by quantitative high throughput PCR-based miRNA array platform screening. Most of the miRNAs were preferentially expressed in β-cells. From the total of 667 miRNAs screened, the Significant Analysis of Microarray identified 141 miRNAs, of which only 7 were expressed more in α-cells (α-miRNAs and 134 were expressed more in β-cells (β-miRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis identified potential targets of β-miRNAs analyzing the Beta Cell Gene Atlas, described in the T1Dbase, the web platform, supporting the type 1 diabetes (T1D community. cMaf, a transcription factor regulating glucagon expression expressed selectively in α-cells (TFα is targeted by β-miRNAs; miR-200c, miR-125b and miR-182. Min6 cells treated with inhibitors of these miRNAs show an increased expression of cMaf RNA. Conversely, over expression of miR-200c, miR-125b or miR-182 in the mouse alpha cell line αTC6 decreases the level of cMAF mRNA and protein. MiR-200c also inhibits the expression of Zfpm2, a TFα that inhibits the PI3K signaling pathway, at both RNA and protein levels.In conclusion, we identified miRNAs differentially expressed in pancreatic α- and β-cells and their potential transcription factor targets that could add new insights into different

  10. Differential protective effects of exenatide, an agonist of GLP-1 receptor and Piragliatin, a glucokinase activator in beta cell response to streptozotocin-induced and endoplasmic reticulum stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Kyung Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonists of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R and glucokinase activators (GKA act as antidiabetic agents by their ability protect beta cells, and stimulate insulin secretion. Oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stresses aggravate type 2 diabetes by causing beta cell loss. It was shown that GLP-1R agonists protect beta cells from oxidative and ER stresses. On the other hand, little is known regarding how GKAs protect beta cells. We hypothesized that GKAs protect beta cells by mechanisms distinct from those underlying GLP-1R agonist and tested our hypothesis by comparing the molecular effects of exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, and piragliatin, a GKA, on INS-1 cells under oxidative and ER-induced stresses. METHODS: BETA CELLS WERE TREATED WITH STREPTOZOTOCIN (STZ TO INDUCE OXIDATIVE STRESS AND WITH PALMITATE OR THAPSIGARGIN (TG TO INDUCE ER STRESS RESPECTIVELY, AND THE EFFECTS OF EXENATIDE AND PIRAGLIATIN ON THESE CELLS WERE INVESTIGATED BY: a characterizing the kinases involved employing specific kinase inhibitors, and b by identifying the differentially regulated proteins in response to stresses with proteomic analysis. RESULTS: Exenatide protected INS-1 cells from both ER and STZ-induced death. In contrast, piragliatin rescued the cells only from STZ-induced stress. Akt activation by exenatide appeared to contribute to its protective effects of beta cells while enhanced glucose utilization was the contributing factor in the case of piragliatin. Also, exenatide, not piragliatin, blocked changes in proteins 14-3-3β, ε and θ, and preserved the 14-3-3θ levels under the ER stress. Isoform-specific modifications of 14-3-3, and the reduction of 14-3-3θ, commonly associated with beta cell death were assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Exenatide and piragliatin exert distinct effects on beta cell survival and thus on type 2 diabetes. This study which confirmed our hypothesis is also the first to observe specific modulation of 14-3-3 isoform

  11. Detection of intensity bursts using Hawkes processes: An application to high-frequency financial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaldi, Marcello; Filimonov, Vladimir; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2018-03-01

    Given a stationary point process, an intensity burst is defined as a short time period during which the number of counts is larger than the typical count rate. It might signal a local nonstationarity or the presence of an external perturbation to the system. In this paper we propose a procedure for the detection of intensity bursts within the Hawkes process framework. By using a model selection scheme we show that our procedure can be used to detect intensity bursts when both their occurrence time and their total number is unknown. Moreover, the initial time of the burst can be determined with a precision given by the typical interevent time. We apply our methodology to the midprice change in foreign exchange (FX) markets showing that these bursts are frequent and that only a relatively small fraction is associated with news arrival. We show lead-lag relations in intensity burst occurrence across different FX rates and we discuss their relation with price jumps.

  12. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  13. GRANAT/WATCH catalogue of cosmic gamma-ray bursts: December 1989 to September 1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.Y.; Sunyaev, R.A.; Terekhov, O.V.

    1998-01-01

    We present the catalogue of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) observed with the WATCH all-sky monitor on board the GRANAT satellite during the period December 1989 to September 1994. The cosmic origin of 95 bursts comprising the catalogue is confirmed either bg their localization with WATCH or by their dete...

  14. IFN-α induces a preferential long-lasting expression of MHC class I in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomans de Brachène, Alexandra; Dos Santos, Reinaldo S; Marroqui, Laura; Colli, Maikel L; Marselli, Lorella; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Marchetti, Piero; Eizirik, Decio L

    2018-03-01

    IFN-α, a cytokine expressed in human islets from individuals affected by type 1 diabetes, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetes by upregulating inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and MHC class I overexpression, three hallmarks of islet histology in early type 1 diabetes. We tested whether expression of these mediators of beta cell loss is reversible upon IFN-α withdrawal or IFN-α pathway inhibition. IFN-α-induced MHC class I overexpression, ER stress and inflammation were evaluated by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and real-time PCR in human EndoC-βH1 cells or human islets exposed to IFN-α with or without the presence of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. Protein expression was evaluated by western blot. IFN-α-induced expression of inflammatory and ER stress markers returned to baseline after 24-48 h following cytokine removal. In contrast, MHC class I overexpression at the cell surface persisted for at least 7 days. Treatment with JAK inhibitors, when added with IFN-α, prevented MHC class I overexpression, but when added 24 h after IFN-α exposure these inhibitors failed to accelerate MHC class I return to baseline. IFN-α mediates a long-lasting and preferential MHC class I overexpression in human beta cells, which is not affected by the subsequent addition of JAK inhibitors. These observations suggest that IFN-α-stimulated long-lasting MHC class I expression may amplify beta cell antigen presentation during the early phase of type 1 diabetes and that IFN-α inhibitors might need to be used at very early stages of the disease to be effective.

  15. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2014-01-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na+-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na+-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS. PMID:24904078

  16. Maternal obesity accelerates fetal pancreatic beta-cell but not alpha-cell development in sheep: prenatal consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephen P; Zhang, Liren; Zhu, Meijun; Miller, Myrna M; Smith, Derek T; Hess, Bret W; Moss, Gary E; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    Maternal obesity affects offspring weight, body composition, and organ function, increasing diabetes and metabolic syndrome risk. We determined effects of maternal obesity and a high-energy diet on fetal pancreatic development. Sixty days prior to breeding, ewes were assigned to control [100% of National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or obesogenic (OB; 150% NRC) diets. At 75 days gestation, OB ewes exhibited elevated insulin-to-glucose ratios at rest and during a glucose tolerance test, demonstrating insulin resistance compared with control ewes. In fetal studies, ewes ate their respective diets from 60 days before to 75 days after conception when animals were euthanized under general anesthesia. OB and control ewes increased in body weight by approximately 43% and approximately 6%, respectively, from diet initiation until necropsy. Although all organs were heavier in fetuses from OB ewes, only pancreatic weight increased as a percentage of fetal weight. Blood glucose, insulin, and cortisol were elevated in OB ewes and fetuses on day 75. Insulin-positive cells per unit pancreatic area were 50% greater in fetuses from OB ewes as a result of increased beta-cell mitoses rather than decreased programmed cell death. Lambs of OB ewes were born earlier but weighed the same as control lambs; however, their crown-to-rump length was reduced, and their fat mass was increased. We conclude that increased systemic insulin in fetuses from OB ewes results from increased glucose exposure and/or cortisol-induced accelerated fetal beta-cell maturation and may contribute to premature beta-cell function loss and predisposition to obesity and metabolic disease in offspring.

  17. Arsenic Exposure and Calpain-10 Polymorphisms Impair the Function of Pancreatic Beta-Cells in Humans: A Pilot Study of Risk Factors for T2DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Cruz, Laura; Cebrián, Arturo; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U.; Hiriart, Marcia; García-Vargas, Gonzálo; Bassol, Susana; Sordo, Monserrat; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Klimecki, Walter T.; López-Carillo, Lizbeth; Cebrián, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing worldwide and diverse environmental and genetic risk factors are well recognized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN-10), which encodes a protein involved in the secretion and action of insulin, and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water have been independently associated with an increase in the risk for T2DM. In the present work we evaluated if CAPN-10 SNPs and iAs exposure jointly contribute to the outcome of T2DM. Insulin secretion (beta-cell function) and insulin sensitivity were evaluated indirectly through validated indexes (HOMA2) in subjects with and without T2DM who have been exposed to a gradient of iAs in their drinking water in northern Mexico. The results were analyzed taking into account the presence of the risk factor SNPs SNP-43 and -44 in CAPN-10. Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. An inverse association was found between beta-cell function and iAs exposure, the association being more pronounced in subjects with T2DM. Subjects without T2DM who were carriers of the at-risk genotype SNP-43 or -44, also had significantly lower beta-cell function. The association of SNP-43 with beta-cell function was dependent on iAs exposure, age, gender and BMI, whereas the association with SNP-44 was independent of all of these factors. Chronic exposure to iAs seems to be a risk factor for T2DM in humans through the reduction of beta-cell function, with an enhanced effect seen in the presence of the at-risk genotype of SNP-43 in CAPN-10. Carriers of CAPN-10 SNP-44 have also shown reduced beta-cell function. PMID:23349674

  18. Early deficits in insulin secretion, beta cell mass and islet blood perfusion precede onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in BioBreeding rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Anya; Parween, Saba; Ullsten, Sara; Vishnu, Neelanjan; Siu, Yuk Ting; Quach, My; Bennet, Hedvig; Balhuizen, Alexander; Åkesson, Lina; Wierup, Nils; Carlsson, Per Ola; Ahlgren, Ulf; Lernmark, Åke; Fex, Malin

    2018-04-01

    Genetic studies show coupling of genes affecting beta cell function to type 1 diabetes, but hitherto no studies on whether beta cell dysfunction could precede insulitis and clinical onset of type 1 diabetes are available. We used 40-day-old BioBreeding (BB) DRLyp/Lyp rats (a model of spontaneous autoimmune type 1 diabetes) and diabetes-resistant DRLyp/+ and DR+/+ littermates (controls) to investigate beta cell function in vivo, and insulin and glucagon secretion in vitro. Beta cell mass was assessed by optical projection tomography (OPT) and morphometry. Additionally, measurements of intra-islet blood flow were performed using microsphere injections. We also assessed immune cell infiltration, cytokine expression in islets (by immunohistochemistry and qPCR), as well as islet Glut2 expression and ATP/ADP ratio to determine effects on glucose uptake and metabolism in beta cells. DRLyp/Lyp rats were normoglycaemic and without traces of immune cell infiltrates. However, IVGTTs revealed a significant decrease in the acute insulin response to glucose compared with control rats (1685.3 ± 121.3 vs 633.3 ± 148.7; p beta cell ATP/ADP ratio in DRLyp/Lyp rats vs control rats. The present study identifies a deterioration of beta cell function and mass, and intra-islet blood flow that precedes insulitis and diabetes development in animals prone to autoimmune type 1 diabetes. These underlying changes in islet function may be previously unrecognised factors of importance in type 1 diabetes development.

  19. Arsenic exposure and calpain-10 polymorphisms impair the function of pancreatic beta-cells in humans: a pilot study of risk factors for T2DM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Díaz-Villaseñor

    Full Text Available The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing worldwide and diverse environmental and genetic risk factors are well recognized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN-10, which encodes a protein involved in the secretion and action of insulin, and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs through drinking water have been independently associated with an increase in the risk for T2DM. In the present work we evaluated if CAPN-10 SNPs and iAs exposure jointly contribute to the outcome of T2DM. Insulin secretion (beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were evaluated indirectly through validated indexes (HOMA2 in subjects with and without T2DM who have been exposed to a gradient of iAs in their drinking water in northern Mexico. The results were analyzed taking into account the presence of the risk factor SNPs SNP-43 and -44 in CAPN-10. Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. An inverse association was found between beta-cell function and iAs exposure, the association being more pronounced in subjects with T2DM. Subjects without T2DM who were carriers of the at-risk genotype SNP-43 or -44, also had significantly lower beta-cell function. The association of SNP-43 with beta-cell function was dependent on iAs exposure, age, gender and BMI, whereas the association with SNP-44 was independent of all of these factors. Chronic exposure to iAs seems to be a risk factor for T2DM in humans through the reduction of beta-cell function, with an enhanced effect seen in the presence of the at-risk genotype of SNP-43 in CAPN-10. Carriers of CAPN-10 SNP-44 have also shown reduced beta-cell function.

  20. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Zhao, Xiaojian [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton CT (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  1. Progenitor potential of nkx6.1-expressing cells throughout zebrafish life and during beta cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaye, Aurélie P; Bergemann, David; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefania; Flasse, Lydie C; Von Berg, Virginie; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L; Manfroid, Isabelle

    2015-09-02

    In contrast to mammals, the zebrafish has the remarkable capacity to regenerate its pancreatic beta cells very efficiently. Understanding the mechanisms of regeneration in the zebrafish and the differences with mammals will be fundamental to discovering molecules able to stimulate the regeneration process in mammals. To identify the pancreatic cells able to give rise to new beta cells in the zebrafish, we generated new transgenic lines allowing the tracing of multipotent pancreatic progenitors and endocrine precursors. Using novel bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic nkx6.1 and ascl1b reporter lines, we established that nkx6.1-positive cells give rise to all the pancreatic cell types and ascl1b-positive cells give rise to all the endocrine cell types in the zebrafish embryo. These two genes are initially co-expressed in the pancreatic primordium and their domains segregate, not as a result of mutual repression, but through the opposite effects of Notch signaling, maintaining nkx6.1 expression while repressing ascl1b in progenitors. In the adult zebrafish, nkx6.1 expression persists exclusively in the ductal tree at the tip of which its expression coincides with Notch active signaling in centroacinar/terminal end duct cells. Tracing these cells reveals that they are able to differentiate into other ductal cells and into insulin-expressing cells in normal (non-diabetic) animals. This capacity of ductal cells to generate endocrine cells is supported by the detection of ascl1b in the nkx6.1:GFP ductal cell transcriptome. This transcriptome also reveals, besides actors of the Notch and Wnt pathways, several novel markers such as id2a. Finally, we show that beta cell ablation in the adult zebrafish triggers proliferation of ductal cells and their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. We have shown that, in the zebrafish embryo, nkx6.1+ cells are bona fide multipotent pancreatic progenitors, while ascl1b+ cells represent committed endocrine precursors. In

  2. Characterization of stimulus-secretion coupling in the human pancreatic EndoC-βH1 beta cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta E Andersson

    Full Text Available Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets.Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay, gene expression (Gene Chip array, metabolite levels (GC/MS, respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, glucose utilization (radiometric, lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric, ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets.Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells.Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings in isolated islets, EndoC-βH1 cells have the

  3. High-fat diet increases autophagic flux in pancreatic beta cells in vivo and ex vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kwan Yi; O'Reilly, Liam; Ramm, Georg; Biden, Trevor J

    2015-09-01

    Defective beta cell function during lipid oversupply and type 2 diabetes is associated with dysregulation of lysosomal function and autophagy. Whether this dysregulation represents augmentation or inhibition is unclear because of technical limitations in assaying autophagy. The current aim was to determine the effects of high-fat feeding on true autophagic flux in beta cells in vivo in mice, and to establish the relationship between autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. Green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) mice were fed chow or high-fat diets for 8-10 weeks and injected with 100 mg kg(-1) day(-1) chloroquine for 5 days, prior to being killed, to block clearance of autophagic markers. Pancreases and livers were fixed and GFP-LC3 aggregates or autophagosomes were detected by fluorescence or electron microscopy, respectively. Independently, islets isolated from chow or high-fat-fed mice were treated for 2 h with chloroquine ex vivo, and immunoblotting was performed for markers of autophagy (LC3 lipidation - LC3II and p62/SQSTM1), ER stress (C/EBP homology protein [CHOP], phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α [p-eIFα] and inositol requiring enzyme 1α [p-IRE1α]) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3). Numbers of autophagosomes and GFP puncta were increased in beta cells by combined high-fat feeding and chloroquine injection, indicative of enhanced autophagic flux. By contrast, GFP puncta were attenuated in liver under the same conditions. Relative to chow-fed controls, islets isolated from fat-fed mice exhibited higher LC3II levels when treated ex vivo with chloroquine. The combination of high-fat feeding and acute chloroquine treatment induced CHOP, p-eIF2α and caspase-3, but not either treatment alone. We provide the first in vivo demonstrations that high-fat feeding increases autophagic flux in pancreatic beta cells, and that this serves to protect against induction of terminal ER stress. We

  4. Massive parallel gene expression profiling of RINm5F pancreatic islet beta-cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, K; Bovin, L F; Josefsen, K

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with the potential to kill pancreatic beta-cells, and this unique property is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of type I diabetes mellitus. We therefore determined the quantitative expression of 24,000 mRNAs of RINm5F, an insulinoma cell li......, e.g. alpha-endosulfine and K+ channel Kir6.2 are differentially regulated. A number of transcripts in the biosynthesis pathway for cholesterol are also differentially regulated....

  5. Fast Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshaya Rane

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... The duration of these GPs is short compared to the period of the pulsar, lasting on the order of 10 ns .... with this FRB at the 3.2σ to 3.4σ confidence level with Swift. This transient, J0644.5−5111, was ...... Wolszczan, A., Cordes, J., Stinebring, D. 1984, Birth and. Evolution of Neutron Stars: Issues Raised by ...

  6. Effect of long-term transfusion therapy on the glycometabolic status and pancreatic beta cell function in patients with beta Thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakshi G Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major complication of iron overload in patients with beta thalassemia major. Design: This is a descriptive study conducted in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital to analyze beta cell function and insulin resistance, and their relation to iron overload status in beta thalassemia major. Fasting glucose, two-hour post load glucose, fasting insulin, alanine amino transaminase (ALT, and ferritin were used as outcome measures. The homeostatic model assessment (HOMA model was used to calculate the beta cell function and insulin resistance index. Results: Of the 30 cases, 20% had impaired fasting glucose, 3.3% had impaired glucose tolerance, and none had diabetes. Fasting glucose was not significant between the cases and controls (P = 0.113. Fasting insulin (P = 0.001, ferritin (P = 0.001, and ALT (P = 0.001 levels were significantly high in the cases. Insulin resistance index was significantly higher in the cases (P = 0.001 as also the beta cell function (P = 0.001. With increase in age and the number of units transfused there is a decline in beta cell function, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance after attaining the maximum level. This suggests that initial insulin resistance is followed by insulin depletion due to loss of beta cell function, leading to diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and insulin resistance precede the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes and adequate chelation therapy is essential for delaying the onset or for prevention of diabetes.

  7. Coxsackie B4 virus infection of beta cells and natural killer cell insulitis in recent-onset type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Francesco; Censini, Stefano; van Halteren, Astrid G S; Marselli, Lorella; Masini, Matilde; Dionisi, Sabrina; Mosca, Franco; Boggi, Ugo; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Del Prato, Stefano; Elliott, John F; Covacci, Antonello; Rappuoli, Rino; Roep, Bart O; Marchetti, Piero

    2007-03-20

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Several studies have suggested an association between Coxsackie enterovirus seroconversion and onset of disease. However, a direct link between beta cell viral infection and islet inflammation has not been established. We analyzed pancreatic tissue from six type 1 diabetic and 26 control organ donors. Immunohistochemical, electron microscopy, whole-genome ex vivo nucleotide sequencing, cell culture, and immunological studies demonstrated Coxsackie B4 enterovirus in specimens from three of the six diabetic patients. Infection was specific of beta cells, which showed nondestructive islet inflammation mediated mainly by natural killer cells. Islets from enterovirus-positive samples displayed reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose and other secretagogues. In addition, virus extracted from positive islets was able to infect beta cells from human islets of nondiabetic donors, causing viral inclusions and signs of pyknosis. None of the control organ donors showed signs of viral infection. These studies provide direct evidence that enterovirus can infect beta cells in patients with type 1 diabetes and that infection is associated with inflammation and functional impairment.

  8. The central role of calcium in the effects of cytokines on beta-cell function: implications for type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, James W; Steiner, Stephen R; O'Neill, Christina M; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2011-12-01

    The appropriate regulation of intracellular calcium is a requirement for proper cell function and survival. This review focuses on the effects of proinflammatory cytokines on calcium regulation in the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cell and how normal stimulus-secretion coupling, organelle function, and overall beta-cell viability are impacted. Proinflammatory cytokines are increasingly thought to contribute to beta-cell dysfunction not only in type 1 diabetes (T1D), but also in the progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Cytokine-induced disruptions in calcium handling result in reduced insulin release in response to glucose stimulation. Cytokines can alter intracellular calcium levels by depleting calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and by increasing calcium influx from the extracellular space. Depleting ER calcium leads to protein misfolding and activation of the ER stress response. Disrupting intracellular calcium may also affect organelles, including the mitochondria and the nucleus. As a chronic condition, cytokine-induced calcium disruptions may lead to beta-cell death in T1D and T2D, although possible protective effects are also discussed. Calcium is thus central to both normal and pathological cell processes. Because the tight regulation of intracellular calcium is crucial to homeostasis, measuring the dynamics of calcium may serve as a good indicator of overall beta-cell function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interferon-α mediates human beta cell HLA class I overexpression, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis, three hallmarks of early human type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroqui, Laura; Dos Santos, Reinaldo S; Op de Beeck, Anne; Coomans de Brachène, Alexandra; Marselli, Lorella; Marchetti, Piero; Eizirik, Decio L

    2017-04-01

    Three hallmarks of the pancreatic islets in early human type 1 diabetes are overexpression of HLA class I, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and beta cell apoptosis. The mediators of these phenomena remain to be defined. The type I interferon IFNα is expressed in human islets from type 1 diabetes patients and mediates HLA class I overexpression. We presently evaluated the mechanisms involved in IFNα-induced HLA class I expression in human beta cells and determined whether this cytokine contributes to ER stress and apoptosis. IFNα-induced inflammation, ER stress and apoptosis were evaluated by RT-PCR, western blot, immunofluorescence and nuclear dyes, and proteins involved in type I interferon signalling were inhibited by small interfering RNAs. All experiments were performed in human islets or human EndoC-βH1 cells. IFNα upregulates HLA class I, inflammation and ER stress markers in human beta cells via activation of the candidate gene TYK2, and the transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 and IFN regulatory factor 9. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with IL-1β to induce beta cell apoptosis. The innate immune effects induced by IFNα may induce and amplify the adaptive immune response against human beta cells, indicating that IFNα has a central role in the early phases of diabetes.

  10. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  11. Relationship of Soluble RAGE with Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function during Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Kumar Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE alter in prediabetes and correlate with insulin resistance (IR and beta cell function in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Subjects without previous history of diabetes were recruited and grouped as control, prediabetes, and newly diagnosed T2DM. The control subjects (n=40 and people with prediabetes (n=52 and diabetes (n=66 were similar in terms of age, sex, BMI, systolic and diastolic BP, and fasting insulin level. HOMA-IR was found significantly higher in people with diabetes than control subjects (p<0.001 and people with prediabetes (p=0.005; and HOMA-%B was found significantly deteriorated in people with diabetes (p<0.001 compared to control subjects and people with prediabetes. However, serum sRAGE levels did not show any significant alteration in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses did not identify any significant correlation and statistical association of sRAGE with HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed T2DM. Our data suggest that serum sRAGE levels do not alter in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects and do not correlate or associate with IR and beta cell function during development of T2DM.

  12. Relationship of Soluble RAGE with Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function during Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subrata Kumar; Mohtarin, Sabreena; Mudi, Sonchita Rani; Anwar, Taznuva; Banu, Laila Anjuman; Alam, Sheikh Md Khorshed; Fariduddin, Md; Arslan, M Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) alter in prediabetes and correlate with insulin resistance (IR) and beta cell function in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects without previous history of diabetes were recruited and grouped as control, prediabetes, and newly diagnosed T2DM. The control subjects (n = 40) and people with prediabetes (n = 52) and diabetes (n = 66) were similar in terms of age, sex, BMI, systolic and diastolic BP, and fasting insulin level. HOMA-IR was found significantly higher in people with diabetes than control subjects (p alteration in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses did not identify any significant correlation and statistical association of sRAGE with HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed T2DM. Our data suggest that serum sRAGE levels do not alter in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects and do not correlate or associate with IR and beta cell function during development of T2DM.

  13. Genes Associated with Pancreas Development and Function Maintain Open Chromatin in iPSCs Generated from Human Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Thurner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current in vitro islet differentiation protocols suffer from heterogeneity and low efficiency. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from pancreatic beta cells (BiPSCs preferentially differentiate toward endocrine pancreas-like cells versus those from fibroblasts (FiPSCs. We interrogated genome-wide open chromatin in BiPSCs and FiPSCs via ATAC-seq and identified ∼8.3k significant, differential open chromatin sites (DOCS between the two iPSC subtypes (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.05. DOCS where chromatin was more accessible in BiPSCs (Bi-DOCS were significantly enriched for known regulators of endodermal development, including bivalent and weak enhancers, and FOXA2 binding sites (FDR < 0.05. Bi-DOCS were associated with genes related to pancreas development and beta-cell function, including transcription factors mutated in monogenic diabetes (PDX1, NKX2-2, HNF1A; FDR < 0.05. Moreover, Bi-DOCS correlated with enhanced gene expression in BiPSC-derived definitive endoderm and pancreatic progenitor cells. Bi-DOCS therefore highlight genes and pathways governing islet-lineage commitment, which can be exploited for differentiation protocol optimization, diabetes disease modeling, and therapeutic purposes.

  14. Fetal pancreatic beta-cell function in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus: relationship to fetal acidemia and macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, D R; Brudenell, J M; Proudler, A J; Crook, D; Nicolaides, K H

    1993-05-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between fetal pancreatic beta-cell function and fetal acidemia and macrosomia in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study at the Harris Birthright Research Centre for Fetal Medicine, London, was performed. In 32 pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus cordocentesis was performed at 36 to 39 weeks' gestation for the measurement of umbilical venous blood pH, PO2, PCO2, lactate, and glucose concentration; plasma insulin immunoreactivity; and insulin/glucose ratio. A reference range for plasma insulin and insulin/glucose ratio was constructed by studying fetal blood samples from 80 women who did not have diabetes mellitus. Mean umbilical venous blood pH was significantly lower and plasma insulin immunoreactivity and insulin/glucose ratio were significantly higher than the appropriate normal mean for gestation. There were significant associations between (1) maternal and fetal blood glucose concentrations (r = 0.95, p < 0.0001), (2) fetal blood glucose and plasma insulin immunoreactivity (r = 0.57, p < 0.01), (3) fetal plasma insulin immunoreactivity and blood pH (r = -0.39, p < 0.05), and (4) fetal insulin/glucose ratio and degree of macrosomia (r = 0.76, p < 0.0001). Fetal pancreatic beta-cell hyperplasia is implicated in the pathogenesis of both fetal acidemia and macrosomia.

  15. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  16. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This suggests either larger bulk Lorentz factors or spatially closer locations for the short GRBs [13]. From luminosity function studies, the local space density of the short GRBs is likely to be lower than that of the long ones by a factor of ~3 [14]. While analysing time tagged event (TTE) data for 156 category A type bursts.

  17. Cosmological Time Dilation in Gamma Ray Bursts?

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. (1994) report that the temporal structure of faint gamma ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  18. SHOCKS Fast-Fracture Periodic-Intermittency VS. Random-Sporadicity in Burst Acoustic-Emission (BAE): Dislocation-Line-Defects Special-Relativity Classical Acoustic-Phonon Maser(CAPM) EDDTA Orgins of ``Bak''-``SOC''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Peter; Klimontovich, Yuri; Nabarro, Frank; Brailsford, Alan; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    Glassy fast-fracture instabilities and patterns, long-known semi-infinite crack-propagation sub-terminal-velocity Rayleigh-wave-speed versus ``2''-D linear-elasticity theory predictions, but rather asymptotic to maximum-speed < 0.6 v(Rayleigh), explicitly experimentally identifies a fast-fracture DYNAMIC-instability(FFDI) not included within fracture linear-elasticity theory. FFDI causes PERIODIC-BAE[E. S.:MSE 8.310(71); PSS:(a) 5, 601/ 607 (71); Xl..-Latt. Defects 5, 277(74);Scripta-Met.:6,785(72);8, 587/617(74); 3rd Tokyo A.-E. Symp. (76); Acta- Met.25,383(77); JMMM 7,312(78); ...] emitted/radiated from advancing-crack in addition to crack-velocity fluctuations causing such low sub-Rayleigh crack-velocities, hinting at dimensionality-dominance in 2-D VS. 3-D lattice-``models'' very-provacatively yet another special-case subset of Siegel[MRS Fall-Mtg.,Boston:Symp. On Fractals(89)-5-papers!!!; Symp. On Scaling(90)] SPD/FUZZYICS. Hirth-Lothe-Nabarro-Weertman-... provocative finite Burgers-vector dislocations/line-defects singularities terminal-velocity special-case of Einstein's special-relativity, almost word-for-word Jackson electromagnetics, replaces light-speed by sound-speed!!! Siegel[3rd Tokyo A.-E. Symp.(76); Intl.Quantum-Electronics Conf., Boston (80)

  19. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Beta-cell dysfunction and low insulin clearance in insulin-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Vølund, Aage

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain a better understanding of the physiological aspects of glucose homeostasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy, we evaluated separately beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity after an oral glucose load. DESIGN: Beta-cell function...... was investigated during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (75 g, 180 min) in 16 lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients and in 15 age- and weight-matched nonlipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. All participants were sedentary Caucasian males, who were on highly active antiretroviral therapy with no history...... and diabetes mellitus (63%vs. 20%, P HIV-infected patients relates to a failure of the beta-cells to fully compensate for decrements in insulin sensitivity despite simultaneous reduction in insulin clearance....

  1. Development of biomarker specific of pancreatic beta cells (incretin radiolabelled) for image of beta functional mass in diabetic and obese: study in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity worldwide, has become a vast concern, stimulating investigations focusing prevention and therapy of this condition. The association of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance aggravates the prognosis of obesity. Even patients successfully submitted to bariatric or metabolic surgery, may not be cured of diabetes, as improvement of circulating values of glucose and insulin not necessarily reflects recovery of pancreatic beta cell mass. There is no consensus about how to estimate beta cell mass in vivo. Available tools suffer from low sensitivity and specificity, often being as well cumbersome and expensive. Radiolabeled incretins, such as glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs, seem to be promising options for the measurement of beta cell mass in diabetes and insulinoma. The objective of this study was the development of two conjugates of GLP-1 analog, radiolabeled with 99m Technetium, as a noninvasive imaging method for the estimation of pancreatic beta cell mass, in the presence of obesity. Animal models were selected, including hyperlipidic diet-induced obesity, diet restricted obesity, and as controls, alloxan diabetes. Results indicated that both radiotracers achieved over 97% radiochemical yield. The most successful product was 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Exendin-4. Low beta cell mass uptake occurred in diet-induced obesity. Diet-restricted obesity, with substantial shedding of excess body weight, was followed by remarkable decrease of fasting blood glucose, however beta cell mass uptake was only mildly improved. Future studies are recommended in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dieting, including bariatric and metabolic operations. (author)

  2. Exendin-4 improves blood glucose control in both young and aging normal non-diabetic mice, possible contribution of beta cell independent effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Fan

    Full Text Available AIMS: Type 2 diabetes is highly prevalent in the elderly population. Glucagon like Peptide-1 mimetic such as exendin-4 augments post-prandial insulin secretion. However, the potential influence of aging on the therapeutic effects of this peptide has not been well studied. In this study, we examined the glucose regulatory effects of exendin-4 in mice with different ages. METHODS: We treated 3-month and 20 to 22-month old C57/DBA mice with 10 nM/kg exendin-4 for 10 days with measurements of blood glucose and body weight. We performed OGTT and ITT to evaluate the glucose response and insulin sensitivity. Islet morphology and beta cell mass were measured by immuno-staining and beta cell proliferation was evaluated by BrdU incorporation and PCNA staining. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to measure protein changes in the liver tissue after exendin-4 treatment. RESULTS: Exendin-4 treatment improved glycemic control in both 3-month and 20 to 22-month old mice. In both groups of mice, the blood glucose lowering effect was independent of beta cell function as indicated by unchanged beta cell proliferation, insulin secretion or beta cell mass. Moreover, we found that exendin-4 treatment increased hepatic AKT and FOXO1 phosphorylation and inhibited glucose-6-phosphotase (G6P and Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK expression in young mice, but this effect was attenuated in aging mice while the insulin sensitivity showed no change in the young group but significantly improved in aging mice. CONCLUSION: Based on these data, we conclude that the glucose lowering effect of exendin-4 in normal non-diabetic mice was not blunted by aging. We further showed that although there was slight difference in the glucose modulating mechanism of exendin-4 therapy in young and aged mice, the improved glucose control seemed uncorrelated with increased beta cell mass or insulin secretion.

  3. Gluten-free diet increases beta-cell volume and improves glucose tolerance in an animal model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel K; Josefsen, Knud; Antvorskov, Julie Christine

    2016-10-01

    Gluten-free (GF) diet alleviates type 1 diabetes in animal models and possibly in humans. We recently showed that fatty acid-induced insulin secretion is enhanced by enzymatically digested gluten (gliadin) stimulation in INS-1E insulinoma cells. We therefore hypothesized that GF diet would induce beta-cell rest and ameliorate type 2 diabetes. C57BL/6JBomTac (B6) mice were fed a high-fat (HF), gluten-free high-fat (GF-HF), standard (STD) or gluten-free (GF) diet for 42 weeks. Short-term (6-24 weeks) GF-HF versus HF feeding impaired glucose tolerance and increased fasting glucose. Long-term (36-42 weeks) GF-HF versus HF feeding improved glucose tolerance and decreased fasting leptin. Mice fed a GF-HF versus HF diet for 42 weeks showed higher volumes of beta cells, islets and pancreas. The beta-cell volume correlated with the islet- and pancreas volume as well as body weight. GF-HF versus HF diet did not influence toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA expression in intestine. STD versus GF feeding did not affect any parameter studied. Long-term feeding with GF-HF versus HF increases beta-cell volume and improves glucose tolerance in B6 mice. The mechanism may include beta-cell rest, but is unlikely to include TLR4 and proinflammatory cytokines in the intestine. Beta-cell volume correlates with pancreas volume and body weight, indicating that insulin secretion capacity controls pancreas volume. Thus, long-term GF diets may be beneficial for obese type 2 diabetes patients and trials should be performed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO......), 18 patients without lipodystrophy on HAART (NONLIPO) and seven patients who were naive to antiretroviral therapy (NAIVE) respectively). beta-cell function was evaluated by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: Compared with NONLIPO and NAIVE separately, LIPO displayed markedly reduced ratio...... of limb to trunk fat (RLF; > 34%, P 40%, P 50%, P 50%, P

  5. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spectral lag τl for a burst was estimated by taking the difference between time centroids obtained using arrival instants (from TTE data) corresponding to photon energies larger than 100 keV, and to energies less than 100 keV so that τl ≡ τ > 100 keV − τ < 100 keV. (1). The time centroid for an energy channel is given by.

  6. On the neutron bursts origin.

    CERN Document Server

    Stenkin, Yu V

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the neutron bursts in Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is explained using results of the experiments and CORSIKA based Monte-Carlo simulations. It is shown that events with very high neutron multiplicity observed last years in neutron monitors as well as in surrounding detectors, are caused by usual EAS core with primary energies > 1 PeV. No exotic processes were needed for the explanation.

  7. Spectral Trends of Solar Bursts at Sub-THz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Kudaka, A. S.; Marun, A.; Pereyra, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous sub-THz studies were derived from single-event observations. We here analyze for the first time spectral trends for a larger collection of sub-THz bursts. The collection consists of a set of 16 moderate to small impulsive solar radio bursts observed at 0.2 and 0.4 THz by the Solar Submillimeter-wave Telescope (SST) in 2012 - 2014 at El Leoncito, in the Argentinean Andes. The peak burst spectra included data from new solar patrol radio telescopes (45 and 90 GHz), and were completed with microwave data obtained by the Radio Solar Telescope Network, when available. We critically evaluate errors and uncertainties in sub-THz flux estimates caused by calibration techniques and the corrections for atmospheric transmission, and introduce a new method to obtain a uniform flux scale criterion for all events. The sub-THz bursts were searched during reported GOES soft X-ray events of class C or larger, for periods common to SST observations. Seven out of 16 events exhibit spectral maxima in the range 5 - 40 GHz with fluxes decaying at sub-THz frequencies (three of them associated to GOES class X, and four to class M). Nine out of 16 events exhibited the sub-THz spectral component. In five of these events, the sub-THz emission fluxes increased with a separate frequency from that of the microwave spectral component (two classified as X and three as M), and four events have only been detected at sub-THz frequencies (three classified as M and one as C). The results suggest that the THz component might be present throughout, with the minimum turnover frequency increasing as a function of the energy of the emitting electrons. The peculiar nature of many sub-THz burst events requires further investigations of bursts that are examined from SST observations alone to better understand these phenomena.

  8. NICER Eyes on Bursting Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    What happens to a neutron stars accretion disk when its surface briefly explodes? A new instrument recently deployed at the International Space Station (ISS) is now watching bursts from neutron stars and reporting back.Deploying a New X-Ray MissionLaunch of NICER aboard a Falcon 9 rocket in June 2017. [NASA/Tony Gray]In early June of 2017, a SpaceX Dragon capsule on a Falcon 9 rocket launched on a resupply mission to the ISS. The pressurized interior of the Dragon contained the usual manifest of crew supplies, spacewalk equipment, and vehicle hardware. But the unpressurized trunk of the capsule held something a little different: the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER).In the two weeks following launch, NICER was extracted from the SpaceX Dragon capsule and installed on the ISS. And by the end of the month, the instrument was already collecting its first data set: observations of a bright X-ray burst from Aql X-1, a neutron star accreting matter from a low-mass binary companion.Impact of BurstsNICERs goal is to provide a new view of neutron-star physics at X-ray energies of 0.212 keV a window that allows us to explore bursts of energy that neutron stars sometimes emit from their surfaces.Artists impression of an X-ray binary, in which a compact object accretes material from a companion star. [ESA/NASA/Felix Mirabel]In X-ray burster systems, hydrogen- and helium-rich material from a low-mass companion star piles up in an accretion disk around the neutron star. This material slowly funnels onto the neutron stars surface, forming a layer that gravitationally compresses and eventually becomes so dense and hot that runaway nuclear fusion ignites.Within seconds, the layer of material is burned up, producing a burst of emission from the neutron star that outshines even the inner regions of the hot accretion disk. Then more material funnels onto the neutron star and the process begins again.Though we have a good picture of the physics that causes these bursts

  9. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  10. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadena, Ariel; Agreda, Jesus; Barragan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce 4+ to Ce 3+ and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  11. Circulating microRNA levels predict residual beta cell function and glycaemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samandari, Nasim; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Nielsen, Lotte B.

    2017-01-01

    from the Danish Remission Phase Cohort, and profiled for miRNAs. At the same time points, meal-stimulated C-peptide and HbA1c levels were measured and insulin-dose adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1c) calculated. miRNAs that at 3 months after diagnosis predicted residual beta cell function and glycaemic control...... in this subgroup were further validated in the remaining cohort (n = 83). Statistical analysis of miRNA prediction for disease progression was performed by multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. Results: In the discovery analysis, six miRNAs (hsa-miR-24-3p, hsa-miR-146a-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p...

  12. Alpha- and beta-cell abnormalities in haemoglobin A1c-defined prediabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calanna, Salvatore; Scicali, Roberto; Di Pino, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    separate days after a 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test and an isoglycaemic intravenous glucose infusion, respectively. Blood was analysed for glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, and incretin hormones. Insulinogenic index, disposition index, glucagon suppression, and incretin effect were evaluated......-diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. The patients with type 2 diabetes showed lower insulinogenic index (P = 0.0003), disposition index (P effect was significantly (P ... compared to subjects with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and controls. Plasma levels of incretin hormones were similar across the three groups. HbA1c associated negatively with insulinogenic index, disposition index, and incretin effect. Our findings show clear alpha- and beta-cell dysfunction in HbA1c...

  13. Pancreatic beta cell function increases in a linear dose-response manner following exercise training in adults with prediabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malin, Steven K; Solomon, Thomas; Blaszczak, Alecia

    2013-01-01

    intervention (5d/wk for 60min at ~85% HRmax). Insulin and C-peptide (n=23) responses to an OGTT were used to define the first and second phase disposition index (DI; beta-cell function = glucose-stimulated insulin secretion x clamp-derived insulin sensitivity). Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) and body...... composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography) were also measured before and after the intervention. Exercise dose was computed using VO2-heart rate derived linear-regression equations. Subjects expended 474.5±8.8 kcal/session (2372.5±44.1 kcal/week) during the intervention, and lost...

  14. High-fat feeding and Staphylococcus intermedius infection impair beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in mongrel dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Evgeni; Georgiev, Ivan Penchev; Dzhelebov, Petko; Kanelov, Ivan; Andonova, Maria; Mircheva Georgieva, Teodora; Dimitrova, Silviya

    2010-03-01

    As obesity is a state of low-grade inflammation, we aimed to investigate the combined effect of high-fat diet and bacterial infection on beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in dogs. We used 20 healthy, male, mongrel dogs randomly divided into four groups: control group-healthy, non-obese dogs; infected group-non-obese dogs with experimentally induced infection (Staphylococcus intermedius); obese group-obese dogs (after 90 day high-fat diet) and obese-infected group-obese dogs with experimentally induced infection (Staphylococcus intermedius). To evaluate insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed. Plasma insulin increased in all group after glucose infusion. The lowest values were found in obese-infected group. Blood glucose also increased on 3 min after glucose infusion and then gradually decreased. In obese-infected group glucose concentration on 30 min was still significantly higher than initial levels, while in other groups glucose concentration returned to the initial values. The lowest rate of glucose elimination was found in infected group. In dogs of obese group and obese-infected group AUC(ins 0-60 min) was lower compared to controls. AUC(glucose 0-60 min) values were lowest in infected group, while in obese-infected group values were the highest. Levels of I/G in dogs of obese-infected group were significantly lower compared to controls and infected group. In conclusion, these results reveal that infection in obese dogs leads to impaired glucose tolerance, which is result of impairment in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity.

  15. Elevated systemic glutamic acid level in the non-obese diabetic mouse is Idd linked and induces beta cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Viqar Showkat; Lejon, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Although type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-mediated disease in the effector stage, the mechanism behind the initial beta cell assault is less understood. Metabolomic differences, including elevated levels of glutamic acid, have been observed in patients with T1D before disease onset, as well as in pre-diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Increased levels of glutamic acid damage both neurons and beta cells, implying that this could contribute to the initial events of T1D pathogenesis. We investigated the underlying genetic factors and consequences of the increased levels of glutamic acid in NOD mice. Serum glutamic acid levels from a (NOD×B6)F 2 cohort (n = 182) were measured. By genome-wide and Idd region targeted microsatellite mapping, genetic association was detected for six regions including Idd2, Idd4 and Idd22. In silico analysis of potential enzymes and transporters located in and around the mapped regions that are involved in glutamic acid metabolism consisted of alanine aminotransferase, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family, alutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase, glutamic acid transporters GLAST and EAAC1. Increased EAAC1 protein expression was observed in lysates from livers of NOD mice compared with B6 mice. Functional consequence of the elevated glutamic acid level in NOD mice was tested by culturing NOD. Rag2 -/- Langerhans' islets with glutamic acid. Induction of apoptosis of the islets was detected upon glutamic acid challenge using TUNEL assay. Our results support the notion that a dysregulated metabolome could contribute to the initiation of T1D. We suggest that targeting of the increased glutamic acid in pre-diabetic patients could be used as a potential therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Histone deacetylases 1 and 3 but not 2 mediate cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 cells and dispersed primary islets from rats and are differentially regulated in the islets of type 1 diabetic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundh, M.; Christensen, D.P.; Damgaard Nielsen, M.; Richardson, S.J.; Dahllof, M.S.; Skovgaard, T.; Berthelsen, J.; Dinarello, C.A.; Stevenazzi, A.; Mascagni, P.; Grunnet, L.G.; Morgan, N.G.; Mandrup-Poulsen, T.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising pharmacological targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases. All 11 classical HDACs (HDAC1-11) are found in the pancreatic beta cell, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) protect beta cells from inflammatory insults. We investigated which HDACs

  17. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the hybrid and the FAT algorithms in terms of burst end-to-end delay, packet end-to-end delay, and packet loss ratio.

  18. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 activation is sufficient to drive transcriptional induction of cyclin D2 gene and proliferation of rat pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Richter, Henrijette E; Hansen, Johnny A

    2003-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation plays a central role in GH- and prolactin-mediated signal transduction in the pancreatic beta-cells. In previous experiments we demonstrated that STAT5 activation is necessary for human (h)GH-stimulated proliferation of INS-1 c...

  19. Effect of coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum L.) ethanol extract on insulin release from pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Saeidi, Ali; Molanaei, Saadat; Sadeghipour, Alireza; Bahar, Massih; Bahar, Kamal

    2009-03-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is grown as a spice crop all over the world. The seeds have been used to treat indigestion, diabetes, rheumatism and pain in the joints. In the present study, an ethanol extract of the seeds was investigated for effects on insulin release from the pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood samples were drawn from the retro-orbital sinus before and 1.5, 3 and 5 h after administration of the seed extract. Serum glucose levels were determined by the glucose oxidase method. To determine the insulin releasing activity, after extract treatment the animals were anaesthetized by diethyl ether, the pancreas was excised, fixed in 10% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin for sectioning. Pancreatic sections of 5 microm were processed for examination of insulin-releasing activity using an immunocytochemistry kit. The results showed that administration of the ethanol extract (200 and 250 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significant reduction in serum glucose. Administration of streptozotocin decreased the number of beta cells with insulin secretory activity in comparison with intact rats, but treatment with the coriander seed extract (200 mg/kg) increased significantly the activity of the beta cells in comparison with the diabetic control rats. The extract decreased serum glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and increased insulin release from the beta cells of the pancreas. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A. C.; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B.; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants

  1. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals : findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to

  2. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood...

  3. Restoring Mitochondrial Function: A Small Molecule-mediated Approach to Enhance Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Cholesterol Accumulated Pancreatic beta cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asalla, Suman; Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S.; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kandagatla, Bhaskar; Oruganti, Srinivas; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Kalivendi, Shasi Vardhan; Rao, Swetha Pavani; Row, Anupama; Ibrahim, A.; Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2016-06-01

    Dyslipidemia, particularly the elevated serum cholesterol levels, aggravate the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In the present study we explored the relationship between fasting blood sugar and serum lipid parameters in human volunteers which revealed a significant linear effect of serum cholesterol on fasting blood glucose. Short term feeding of cholesterol enriched diet to rodent model resulted in elevated serum cholesterol levels, cholesterol accumulation in pancreatic islets and hyperinsulinemia with modest increase in plasma glucose level. To explore the mechanism, we treated cultured BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta cells with soluble cholesterol. Our data shows that cholesterol treatment of cultured pancreatic beta cells enhances total cellular cholesterol. While one hour cholesterol exposure enhances insulin exocytosis, overnight cholesterol accumulation in cultured pancreatic beta cells affects cellular respiration, and inhibits Glucose stimulated insulin secretion. We further report that (E)-4-Chloro-2-(1-(2-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) hydrazono) ethyl) phenol (small molecule M1) prevents the cholesterol mediated blunting of cellular respiration and potentiates Glucose stimulated insulin secretion which was abolished in pancreatic beta cells on cholesterol accumulation.

  4. Cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulate different transcriptional and alternative splicing networks in primary beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortis, Fernanda; Naamane, Najib; Flamez, Daisy

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cytokines contribute to pancreatic beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes. This effect is mediated by complex gene networks that remain to be characterized. We presently utilized array analysis to define the global expression pattern of genes, including spliced variants, modified by the cy...

  5. Oleate protects beta-cells from the toxic effect of palmitate by activating pro-survival pathways of the ER stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ernest; Artemenko, Konstantin; Manukyan, Levon; Bergquist, Jonas; Bergsten, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Long-term exposure of beta cells to saturated fatty acids impairs insulin secretion and increases apoptosis. In contrast, unsaturated fatty acids protect beta-cells from the long-term negative effects of saturated fatty acids. We aimed to identify the mechanisms underlying this protective action of unsaturated fatty acids. To address the aim, insulin-secreting MIN6 cells were exposed to palmitate in the absence or presence of oleate and analyzed by using nano-LC MS/MS based proteomic approach. Important findings were validated by using alternative approaches. Proteomic analysis identified 34 proteins differentially expressed in the presence of palmitate compared to control samples. These proteins play a role in insulin processing, mitochondrial function, metabolism of biomolecules, calcium homeostasis, exocytosis, receptor signaling, ER protein folding, antioxidant activity and anti-apoptotic function. When oleate was also present during culture, expression of 15 proteins was different from the expression in the presence of palmitate alone. Most of the proteins affected by oleate are targets of the ER stress response and play a pro-survival role in beta cells such as protein folding and antioxidative defence. We conclude that restoration of pro-survival pathways of the ER stress response is a major mechanism underlying the protective effect of unsaturated fatty acids in beta-cells treated with saturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...

  7. Pancreatic beta cells from db/db mice show cell-specific [Ca2+]i and NADH responses to glucose but not to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We recently showed that timing and magnitude of the glucose-induced cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i response are reproducible and specific for the individual beta cell. We now wanted to identify which step(s) of stimulus-secretion coupling determine the cell specificity of the [Ca2+]i resp...

  8. STAT5 activity in pancreatic beta-cells influences the severity of diabetes in animal models of type 1 and 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackerott, Malene; Møldrup, Annette; Thams, Peter

    2006-01-01

    glucose levels, lower plasma insulin levels, and lower pancreatic insulin content than wild-type mice, whereas RIP-CASTAT5 mice maintained higher levels of plasma insulin. In conclusion, our results indicate that STAT5 activity in beta-cells influences the susceptibility to experimentally induced type 1...

  9. Differences in beta-cell function and insulin secretion in Black vs. White obese adolescents: Do incretin hormones play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black youth are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) than their White peers. Previously we demonstrated that for the same degree of insulin sensitivity, Black youth have an upregulated beta-cell function and insulin hypersecretion, in response to intravenous (IV) glucose, compared with Whites. T...

  10. Exposure to the viral by-product dsRNA or Coxsackievirus B5 triggers pancreatic beta cell apoptosis via a Bim / Mcl-1 imbalance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel L Colli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The rise in type 1 diabetes (T1D incidence in recent decades is probably related to modifications in environmental factors. Viruses are among the putative environmental triggers of T1D. The mechanisms regulating beta cell responses to viruses, however, remain to be defined. We have presently clarified the signaling pathways leading to beta cell apoptosis following exposure to the viral mimetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and a diabetogenic enterovirus (Coxsackievirus B5. Internal dsRNA induces cell death via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In this process, activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR promotes eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis inhibition, leading to downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1. Mcl-1 decrease results in the release of the BH3-only protein Bim, which activates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Indeed, Bim knockdown prevented both dsRNA- and Coxsackievirus B5-induced beta cell death, and counteracted the proapoptotic effects of Mcl-1 silencing. These observations indicate that the balance between Mcl-1 and Bim is a key factor regulating beta cell survival during diabetogenic viral infections.

  11. The stimulatory effect of growth hormone, prolactin, and placental lactogen on beta-cell proliferation is not mediated by insulin-like growth factor-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1991-01-01

    to bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) after cells were incubated for 1 h in the presence of 10 microM BrdU. By double staining with insulin antibodies it was found that 6.3% of the beta-cells had incorporated BrdU when cultured for 7 days in the presence of 1 microgram/ml human GH (hGH) compared to 0.6% when cultured...... in the absence of hGH. Similar results were obtained using rat GH. The half-maximal effect of hGH on beta-cell proliferation was observed at 10 ng/ml, and the maximal effect at 100 ng/ml. Islet cells cultured in the presence of PRL or PL caused a dose-dependent increase in beta-cell proliferation similar...... to that caused by hGH. GH, PRL, and PL had no effect on the proliferation of glucagon- or somatostatin-producing cells. The addition of 100 ng/ml IGF-I to either control or GH-stimulated islet cells did not affect the labeling index. When GH-stimulated proliferation of beta-cells was measured in the presence...

  12. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... analyzed in this study. GAD65 has a shorter half-life than the GAD64 forms, remains hydrophilic and soluble, and does not resolve into isomers. Comparative analysis of the brain and beta-cell forms of GAD show that GAD65 and GAD64 in pancreatic beta-cells correspond to the larger and smaller forms of GAD...... in brain, respectively. The expression of different forms and the flexibility in subcellular localization of the GAD autoantigen in beta-cells may have implications for both its function and autoantigenicity....

  13. Histone deacetylases 1 and 3 but not 2 mediate cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 cells and dispersed primary islets from rats and are differentially regulated in the islets of type 1 diabetic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Damgaard Nielsen, M

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising pharmacological targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases. All 11 classical HDACs (HDAC1-11) are found in the pancreatic beta cell, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) protect beta cells from inflammatory insults. We investigated which HDACs...... mediate inflammatory beta cell damage and how the islet content of these HDACs is regulated in recent-onset type 1 diabetes. METHODS: The rat beta cell line INS-1 and dispersed primary islets from rats, either wild type or HDAC1-3 deficient, were exposed to cytokines and HDACi. Molecular mechanisms were...... of HDAC1, -2 and -3 rescued INS-1 cells from inflammatory damage. Small hairpin RNAs against HDAC1 and -3, but not HDAC2, reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 and primary rat islets. The protective properties of specific HDAC knock-down correlated with attenuated cytokine...

  14. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  15. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies

  16. Nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 regulate alpha- and beta-cell formation in zebrafish by acting on pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binot, A-C; Manfroid, I; Flasse, L; Winandy, M; Motte, P; Martial, J A; Peers, B; Voz, M L

    2010-04-15

    In mice, the Nkx6 genes are crucial to alpha- and beta-cell differentiation, but the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate pancreatic subtype specification remain elusive. Here it is shown that in zebrafish, nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 are co-expressed at early stages in the first pancreatic endocrine progenitors, but that their expression domains gradually segregate into different layers, nkx6.1 being expressed ventrally with respect to the forming islet while nkx6.2 is expressed mainly in beta-cells. Knockdown of nkx6.2 or nkx6.1 expression leads to nearly complete loss of alpha-cells but has no effect on beta-, delta-, or epsilon-cells. In contrast, nkx6.1/nkx6.2 double knockdown leads additionally to a drastic reduction of beta-cells. Synergy between the effects of nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 knockdown on both beta- and alpha-cell differentiation suggests that nkx6.1 and nkx6.2 have the same biological activity, the required total nkx6 threshold being higher for alpha-cell than for beta-cell differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that the nkx6 act on the establishment of the pancreatic endocrine progenitor pool whose size is correlated with the total nkx6 expression level. On the basis of our data, we propose a model in which nkx6.1 and nkx6.2, by allowing the establishment of the endocrine progenitor pool, control alpha- and beta-cell differentiation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The anti-aging protein Klotho is induced by GABA therapy and exerts protective and stimulatory effects on pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Gérald J; Glinka, Yelena; Kurt, Merve; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Qinghua

    2017-12-02

    Systemic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) therapy prevents or ameliorates type 1 diabetes (T1D), by suppressing autoimmune responses and stimulating pancreatic beta cells. In beta cells, it increases insulin secretion, prevents apoptosis, and induces regeneration. It is unclear how GABA mediates these effects. We hypothesized that Klotho is involved. It is a multi-functional protein expressed in the kidneys, brain, pancreatic beta cells, other tissues, and is cell-bound or soluble. Klotho knockout mice display accelerated aging, and in humans Klotho circulating levels decline with age, renal disease and diabetes. Here, we report that GABA markedly increased circulating levels of Klotho in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. GABA also increased Klotho in the islet of Langerhans of normal mice, as well as the islets and kidneys of STZ-treated mice. In vitro, GABA stimulated production and secretion of Klotho by human islet cells. Knockdown (KD) of Klotho with siRNA in INS-1E insulinoma cells abrogated the protective effects of GABA against STZ toxicity. Following KD, soluble Klotho reversed the effects of Klotho deficiency. In human islet cells soluble Klotho protected against cell death, and stimulated proliferation and insulin secretion. NF-κB activation triggers beta-cell apoptosis, and both GABA and Klotho suppress this pathway. We found Klotho KD augmented NF-κB p65 expression, and abrogated the ability of GABA to block NF-κB activation. This is the first report that GABAergic stimulation increases Klotho expression. Klotho protected and stimulated beta cells and lack of Klotho (KD) was reversed by soluble Klotho. These findings have important implications for the treatment of T1D. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of NEFA composition with insulin sensitivity and beta cell function in the Prospective Metabolism and Islet Cell Evaluation (PROMISE) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Luke W; Harris, Stewart B; Retnakaran, Ravi; Giacca, Adria; Liu, Zhen; Bazinet, Richard P; Hanley, Anthony J

    2018-04-01

    Our aim was to determine the longitudinal associations of individual NEFA with the pathogenesis of diabetes, specifically with differences in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function over 6 years in a cohort of individuals who are at risk for diabetes. In the Prospective Metabolism and Islet Cell Evaluation (PROMISE) longitudinal cohort, 477 participants had serum NEFA measured at the baseline visit and completed an OGTT at three time points over 6 years. Outcome variables were calculated using the OGTT values. At each visit, insulin sensitivity was assessed using the HOMA2 of insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-%S) and the Matsuda index, while beta cell function was assessed using the insulinogenic index over HOMA-IR (IGI/IR) and the insulin secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2). Generalised estimating equations were used, adjusting for time, waist, sex, ethnicity, baseline age, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and physical activity. NEFA were analysed as both concentrations (nmol/ml) and proportions (mol%) of the total fraction. Participants' (73% female, 70% with European ancestry) insulin sensitivity and beta cell function declined by 14-21% over 6 years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, several NEFA (e.g. 18:1 n-7, 22:4 n-6) were associated with lower insulin sensitivity, however, nearly all of these associations were attenuated in fully adjusted models. In adjusted models, total NEFA, 16:0, 18:1 n-9 and 18:2 n-6 (as concentrations) were associated with 3.7-8.0% lower IGI/IR and ISSI-2, while only 20:5 n-3 (as mol%) was associated with 7.7% higher HOMA2-%S. Total NEFA concentration was a strong predictor of lower beta cell function over 6 years. Our results suggest that the association with beta cell function is due to the absolute size of the serum NEFA fraction, rather than the specific fatty acid composition.

  19. Relative clock verifies endogenous bursts of human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Changsong

    2012-01-01

    Temporal bursts are widely observed in many human-activated systems, which may result from both endogenous mechanisms like the highest-priority-first protocol and exogenous factors like the seasonality of activities. To distinguish the effects from different mechanisms is thus of theoretical significance. This letter reports a new timing method by using a relative clock, namely the time length between two consecutive events of an agent is counted as the number of other agents' events appeared during this interval. We propose a model, in which agents act either in a constant rate or with a power-law inter-event time distribution, and the global activity either keeps unchanged or varies periodically vs. time. Our analysis shows that the bursts caused by the heterogeneity of global activity can be eliminated by setting the relative clock, yet the bursts from real individual behaviors still exist. We perform extensive experiments on four large-scale systems, the search engine by AOL, a social bookmarking system —Delicious, a short-message communication network, and a microblogging system —Twitter. Seasonality of global activity is observed, yet the bursts cannot be eliminated by using the relative clock.

  20. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  1. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  2. Chaotic bursting in semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Stefan; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamic mechanisms for low frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers subjected to delayed optical feedback, using the Lang-Kobayashi model. This system of delay differential equations displays pronounced envelope dynamics, ranging from erratic, so called low frequency fluctuations to regular pulse packages, if the time scales of fast oscillations and envelope dynamics are well separated. We investigate the parameter regions where low frequency fluctuations occur and compute their Lyapunov spectra. Using the geometric singular perturbation theory, we study this intermittent chaotic behavior and characterize these solutions as bursting slow-fast oscillations.

  3. Cosmology from gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouri, Athina; Basilakos, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    In this study we propose to use Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) as standard candles in order to constrain the expansion history of the universe up to redshifts of z ∼ 6. In particular, we utilize the 69 GRB dataset recently compiled by Cardone et al. (2009). Performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent supernovae type Ia (SNIa) data and the GRBs we can put constraints on the main cosmological parameters (Ω m , w). However, the use of the current GRBs to trace the Hubble relation, as an alternative to the traditionally used SNIa, can not break the degeneracy between the Ω m and the dark energy equation of state parameter.

  4. Rapid optical variability of the gamma-ray burst grb 080319b and its central engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Greco, D.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of observations of the optical emission that accompanied the gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B are reported. Observations were made using the TORTORA fast wide-field camera mounted on the REM robotic telescope in Chile. The behavior of the light curve before, during, and after the gamma-ray burst is described. The light curve consists of four, possibly periodic, 5-7 s long peaks 8-9 s apart. The behavior of the burst in the gamma and optical energy ranges are compared and the results of the theoretical interpretation of this comparison are reported.

  5. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are propo......The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We...

  6. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurczyk A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agata Jurczyk,1 Philip diIorio,1 Dean Brostowin,1 Linda Leehy,1 Chaoxing Yang,1 Fumihiko Urano,2 David M Harlan,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA Purpose: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation. Results: Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice

  7. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eBojak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG is a well described phenomenon that occurs during deep anaesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterisation as a ``global brain state'' has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anaesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anaesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterisation.Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anaesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex.

  8. Ginga Gamma-Ray Burst Line Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project is the statistical evaluation of the occurrence of spectral lines in the gamma-ray burst spectra detected by the Ginga burst detector, and the comparison of the Ginga results to the BATSE observations. Two significant line features were detected in the Ginga bursts, but thus far none have been detected in the bursts BATSE detected. These line features may indicate the presence of strong magnetic fields in bursts, and therefore are important physical diagnostics of the conditions in the plasma which radiates the observed gamma-rays. The issue is whether there is a discrepancy between the Ginga and BATSE results; the potential discrepancy must be evaluated statistically. Even if BATSE line detections are announced, the statistical methodology we have developed can be used to estimate the rate at which different types of spectral features occur.

  9. DPP-4 inhibitor des-F-sitagliptin treatment increased insulin exocytosis from db/db mice {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Anti-diabetic new drug, DPP-4 inhibitor, can affect the insulin exocytosis. {yields} DPP-4 inhibitor treatment altered syntaxin 1 expression. {yields} Treatment of db/db mice with DPP-4 inhibitor increased insulin release. -- Abstract: Incretin promotes insulin secretion acutely. Recently, orally-administered DPP-4 inhibitors represent a new class of anti-hyperglycemic agents. Indeed, inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4), sitagliptin, has just begun to be widely used as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of sitagliptin-treatment on insulin exocytosis from single {beta}-cells are yet unknown. We therefore investigated how sitagliptin-treatment in db/db mice affects insulin exocytosis by treating db/db mice with des-F-sitagliptin for 2 weeks. Perfusion studies showed that 2 weeks-sitagliptin treatment potentiated insulin secretion. We then analyzed insulin granule motion and SNARE protein, syntaxin 1, by TIRF imaging system. TIRF imaging of insulin exocytosis showed the increased number of docked insulin granules and increased fusion events from them during first-phase release. In accord with insulin exocytosis data, des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the number of syntaxin 1 clusters on the plasma membrane. Thus, our data demonstrated that 2-weeks des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the fusion events of insulin granules, probably via increased number of docked insulin granules and that of syntaxin 1 clusters.

  10. TORTORA discovery of Naked-Eye Burst fast optical variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Karpov, Sergey; Bondar, Sergey; Greco, Giuseppe; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Molinari, Emilio; Chincarini, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Features characterizing gamma-ray bursts in the different spectral bands may be a clue for the nature of their inner engine. Up to now, only several bursts have been observed in optical band during the gamma activity, and the only one-GRB080319B-was covered from rise till fall with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss these data, acquired with TORTORA fast wide-field monitoring optical camera, as well as results of its analysis. The camera observed the position of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080318B, before, during and after the trigger. It detected the fast rise of optical emission, which reached the peak of V 5.3 at the eighteenth second, had a complex evolution till T+43s and monotonously faded then. The brightest part of the light curve contains two 15-20 s segments with different fluxes, each having two clearly-seen peaks of 5-8 s duration; all four peaks look quasi-periodic with separation of 9 s. There is no clear evidence of any sub-second variability. However, there are signs of quasi-periodic variability on 1s time scale at around the last peak (T+40 till T+50). The general properties of the optical light curve and its variability time scales look similar to the gamma one, but there is no clear correlation between them. This raises serious problems in interpretation of mechanisms generating such variability.

  11. Beta Cell Hubs Dictate Pancreatic Islet Responses to Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Natalie R; Mitchell, Ryan K; Haythorne, Elizabeth; Pessoa, Maria Paiva; Semplici, Francesca; Ferrer, Jorge; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Marchetti, Piero; Bugliani, Marco; Bosco, Domenico; Berishvili, Ekaterine; Duncanson, Philip; Watkinson, Michael; Broichhagen, Johannes; Trauner, Dirk; Rutter, Guy A; Hodson, David J

    2016-09-13

    The arrangement of β cells within islets of Langerhans is critical for insulin release through the generation of rhythmic activity. A privileged role for individual β cells in orchestrating these responses has long been suspected, but not directly demonstrated. We show here that the β cell population in situ is operationally heterogeneous. Mapping of islet functional architecture revealed the presence of hub cells with pacemaker properties, which remain stable over recording periods of 2 to 3 hr. Using a dual optogenetic/photopharmacological strategy, silencing of hubs abolished coordinated islet responses to glucose, whereas specific stimulation restored communication patterns. Hubs were metabolically adapted and targeted by both pro-inflammatory and glucolipotoxic insults to induce widespread β cell dysfunction. Thus, the islet is wired by hubs, whose failure may contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function.......OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects...

  13. Glucose, other secretagogues, and nerve growth factor stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line, INS-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Sekine, N; Roche, E

    1995-01-01

    The signaling pathways whereby glucose and hormonal secretagogues regulate insulin-secretory function, gene transcription, and proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells are not well defined. We show that in the glucose-responsive beta-cell line INS-1, major secretagogue-stimulated signaling pathways...... converge to activate 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Thus, glucose-induced insulin secretion was found to be associated with a small stimulatory effect on 44-kDa MAP kinase, which was synergistically enhanced by increased levels of intracellular cAMP and by the hormonal secretagogues......-1. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase by both Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent pathways. Nerve growth factor, independently of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, efficiently stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase without causing insulin release, indicating that activation...

  14. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T

    2006-01-01

    , the mechanism underlying this transcriptional repression by glucose remains unclear. Here we report that glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in INS-1E cells is independent of beta-cell excitation and insulin secretion but requires activation of protein phosphatase 2A in a process involving...... but not AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....... inactivation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Pharmacological activation of AMPK at high glucose concentrations interferes with glucose repression of PPARalpha and PPARalpha target genes in INS-1E cells as well as in rat islets. Specific knock-down of the catalytic AMPK-subunit AMPKalpha2...

  15. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects...... of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function....

  16. Improved pancreatic beta-cell function in type 2 diabetic patients after lifestyle-induced weight loss is related to glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M; Kelly, Karen R

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of insulin secretion is critical for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Exercise and diet can alter glucose-induced insulin responses, but whether this is due to changes in beta-cell function per se is not clear. The mechanisms by which lifestyle intervention may modify insulin secretion...... in type 2 diabetes have also not been examined but may involve the incretin axis....

  17. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) protects non-obese Swiss mice against type 2 diabetes by increasing beta cell mass and reducing insulin clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L F; Santos, G J; Santos-Silva, J C; Carneiro, E M; Boschero, A C

    2012-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) improves metabolic variables of obese animals with characteristics of type 2 diabetes, mainly by reducing insulin resistance. We evaluated whether CNTF was able to improve other metabolic variables in mouse models of type 2 diabetes, such as beta cell mass and insulin clearance, and whether CNTF has any effect on non-obese mice with characteristics of type 2 diabetes. Neonatal mice were treated with 0.1 mg/kg CNTF or citrate buffer via intraperitoneal injections, before injection of 250 mg/kg alloxan. HEPG2 cells were cultured for 3 days in the presence of citrate buffer, 1 nmol/l CNTF or 50 mmol/l alloxan or a combination of CNTF and alloxan. Twenty-one days after treatment, we determined body weight, epididymal fat weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, NEFA, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, insulin clearance and beta cell mass. Finally, we assessed insulin receptor and protein kinase B phosphorylation in peripheral organs, as well as insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) protein production and alternative splicing in the liver and HEPG2 cells. CNTF improved insulin sensitivity and beta cell mass, while reducing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin clearance in Swiss mice, improving glucose handling in a non-obese type 2 diabetes model. This effect was associated with lower IDE production and activity in liver cells. All these effects were observed even at 21 days after CNTF treatment. CNTF protection against type 2 diabetes is partially independent of the anti-obesity actions of CNTF, requiring a reduction in insulin clearance and increased beta cell mass, besides increased insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, knowledge of the long-term effects of CNTF expands its pharmacological relevance.

  18. Nitric oxide contributes to cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via potentiation of JNK activity and inhibition of Akt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, J; Binzer, J; Andersson, Annica

    2005-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines cause beta cell secretory dysfunction and apoptosis--a process implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Cytokines induce the expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) leading to NO production. NO contributes to cytokine-induced apoptosis......, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether NO modulates signalling via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt....

  19. Extracellular ATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient is mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zheng; Li, Zhengzheng; Peng, Gong; Chen, Xiaoli; Yin, Wenxuan [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Kotlikoff, Michael I. [Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yuan, Zeng-qiang, E-mail: zqyuan@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Ji, Guangju, E-mail: gj28@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)

    2009-05-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) induces an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transient by activating phospholipase C (PLC)-associated P2X4 purinergic receptors, leading to production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and subsequent Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, Ca{sup 2+} indicator fluo-4 AM, and the cell permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342, we examined the properties of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei. eATP induced a higher nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei than in the cytosol. After pretreatment with thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA) pumps, the amplitude of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients in the nucleus was still much higher than those in the cytosol. This effect of eATP was not altered by inhibition of either the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) or the plasma membrane Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX) by LaCl{sub 3} or by replacement of Na{sup +} with N-Methyl-Glucosamine. eATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients were abolished by a cell-permeable IP3R inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), but were not blocked by the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist ryanodine. Immunofluorescence studies showed that IP3Rs are expressed on the nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells. These results indicate that eATP triggers nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients by mobilizing a nuclear Ca{sup 2+} store via nuclear IP3Rs.

  20. Effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic Beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Aman; Singh, Surender; Tandon, Nikhil; Gupta, Nandita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Statins are commonly used for the management of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could modulate the beta-cell function by altering the levels of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic lipoproteins and could also have an effect on insulin resistance. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of atorvastatin 10 mg on pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in patients with hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes by using the homeostasis model assessment-2 (HOMA2) index. Fifty-one type 2 diabetes patients receiving oral antidiabetes drugs, not taking statins, with baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between 2.6 mmol/L and 4.1 mmol/L were included. Forty-three patients (21 in placebo group and 22 in atorvastatin group) completed the study and were taken up for final analysis. Fasting blood samples were obtained at baseline and at 12 weeks to determine levels of blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). Atorvastatin nonsignificantly increased fasting serum insulin (+14.29%, p=0.18), accompanied by marginal nonsignificant increases in fasting plasma glucose and A1C. There was a decrease in HOMA2 percent beta-cell function (-2.9%, p=0.72) and increase in HOMA2 insulin resistance (+14%, p=0.16) in the atorvastatin group as compared with baseline, but the difference was not statistically significant. Atorvastatin in the dose used failed to produce significant change in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients as assessed by the HOMA2 index. The possible explanations include absence of lipotoxicity at prevailing levels of dyslipidemia at baseline or inadequacy of statin dose used in the study. (Clinical Trials Registry-India: CTRI/2008/091/000099). Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetic beta-cells can achieve self-protection against oxidative stress through an adaptive up-regulation of their antioxidant defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Lacraz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress (OS, through excessive and/or chronic reactive oxygen species (ROS, is a mediator of diabetes-related damages in various tissues including pancreatic beta-cells. Here, we have evaluated islet OS status and beta-cell response to ROS using the GK/Par rat as a model of type 2 diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Localization of OS markers was performed on whole pancreases. Using islets isolated from 7-day-old or 2.5-month-old male GK/Par and Wistar control rats, 1 gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR; 2 insulin secretion rate was measured; 3 ROS accumulation and mitochondrial polarization were assessed by fluorescence methods; 4 antioxidant contents were quantified by HPLC. After diabetes onset, OS markers targeted mostly peri-islet vascular and inflammatory areas, and not islet cells. GK/Par islets revealed in fact protected against OS, because they maintained basal ROS accumulation similar or even lower than Wistar islets. Remarkably, GK/Par insulin secretion also exhibited strong resistance to the toxic effect of exogenous H(2O(2 or endogenous ROS exposure. Such adaptation was associated to both high glutathione content and overexpression (mRNA and/or protein levels of a large set of genes encoding antioxidant proteins as well as UCP2. Finally, we showed that such a phenotype was not innate but spontaneously acquired after diabetes onset, as the result of an adaptive response to the diabetic environment. CONCLUSIONS: The GK/Par model illustrates the effectiveness of adaptive response to OS by beta-cells to achieve self-tolerance. It remains to be determined to what extend such islet antioxidant defenses upregulation might contribute to GK/Par beta-cell secretory dysfunction.

  2. Oral insulin treatment suppresses virus-induced antigen-specific destruction of beta cells and prevents autoimmune diabetes in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    von Herrath, M G; Dyrberg, T; Oldstone, M B

    1996-01-01

    Oral administration of self-antigens has been proposed as a therapy to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases. Here we report that oral treatment with insulin prevents virus-induced insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in a transgenic (tg) mouse model. Such mice express the viral nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) under control of the rat insulin promoter in their pancreatic beta cells and < 2% spontaneously develop diabetes. However, 2 mo after challenge wit...

  3. The effects of a HTR2B stop codon and testosterone on energy metabolism and beta cell function among antisocial Finnish males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Roope; Saukkonen, Tero; Fex, Malin; Bennet, Hedvig; Rautiainen, Marja-Riitta; Paunio, Tiina; Koskinen, Mika; Panarsky, Rony; Bevilacqua, Laura; Sjöberg, Rickard L; Tiihonen, Jari; Virkkunen, Matti

    2016-10-01

    Herein, we examined insulin resistance (IR), insulin sensitivity (IS), beta cell activity, and glucose metabolism in subjects with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and whether the serotonin 2B (5-HT2B) receptor and testosterone have a role in energy metabolism. A cohort of subjects belonging to a founder population that included 98 ASPD males, aged 25-30, was divided into groups based on the presence of a heterozygous 5-HT2B receptor loss-of-function gene mutation (HTR2B Q20*; n = 9) or not (n = 89). Serum glucose and insulin levels were measured in a 5 h oral glucose tolerance test (75 g) and indices describing IR, IS, and beta cell activity were calculated. Body mass index (BMI) was also determined. Concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were measured in cerebrospinal fluid, and testosterone levels from serum. An IR-like state comprising high IR, low IS, and high beta cell activity indices was observed among ASPD subjects without the HTR2B Q20* allele. By contrast, being an ASPD HTR2B Q20* carrier appeared to be preventive of these pathophysiologies. The HTR2B Q20* allele and testosterone predicted lower BMI independently, but an interaction between HTR2B Q20* and testosterone lead to increased insulin sensitivity among HTR2B Q20* carriers with low testosterone levels. The HTR2B Q20* allele also predicted reduced beta cell activity and enhanced glucose metabolism. Reduced 5-HT2B receptor function at low or normal testosterone levels may be protective of obesity. Results were observed among Finnish males having an antisocial personality disorder, which limits the generality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, R. F.; Lyutikov, M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P. [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Esposito, P.; Rea, N. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Israel, G. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Kerr, M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Parkes Observatory, P.O. Box 276, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada)

    2017-11-10

    Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation-powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here, we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119−6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR , and at radio energies with the Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts and recovers on a timescale of ∼70 s. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio-emitting particles.

  5. The Bursting Pulsar GRO J1744-28: the Slowest Transitional Pulsar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, J. M. C.; Altamirano, D.; Sanna, A.

    2018-04-01

    GRO J1744-28 (the Bursting Pulsar) is a neutron star LMXB which shows highly structured X-ray variability near the end of its X-ray outbursts. In this letter we show that this variability is analogous to that seen in Transitional Millisecond Pulsars such as PSR J1023+0038: `missing link' systems consisting of a pulsar nearing the end of its recycling phase. As such, we show that the Bursting Pulsar may also be associated with this class of objects. We discuss the implications of this scenario; in particular, we discuss the fact that the Bursting Pulsar has a significantly higher spin period and magnetic field than any other known Transitional Pulsar. If the Bursting Pulsar is indeed transitional, then this source opens a new window of oppurtunity to test our understanding of these systems in an entirely unexplored physical regime.

  6. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu [Department of Endocrinology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, No. 14, 3rd Section, Renmin South Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Tong, Nanwei, E-mail: buddyjun@hotmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  7. The neurosurvival factor Humanin inhibits beta-cell apoptosis via signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation and delays and ameliorates diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Phuong T; Park, Patricia; Cobb, Laura J; Paharkova-Vatchkova, Valdislava; Hakimi, Michael; Cohen, Pinchas; Lee, Kuk-Wha

    2010-03-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. We investigated whether Humanin, a recently described survival factor for neurons, could improve the survival of beta-cells and delay or treat diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) model. Humanin reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation in NIT-1 cells and decreased apoptosis induced by cytokine treatment. Humanin induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation over a 24-hour time course. Specific inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 resulted in nullifying the protective effect of Humanin. Humanin normalized glucose tolerance in NOD mice treated for 6 weeks, and their pancreata revealed decreased lymphocyte infiltration and severity. In addition, Humanin delayed/prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice treated for 20 weeks. In summary, Humanin treatment decreases cytokine-induced apoptosis in beta-cells in vitro and improved glucose tolerance and onset of diabetes in NOD mice in vivo. This indicates that Humanin may be useful for islet protection and survival in a spectrum of diabetes-related therapeutics. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Matteson, J.; Ford, L.; Schaefer, B.; Teegarden, B.; Cline, T.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1992-01-01

    BATSE's Spectral Detectors provide a series of high resolution spectra over the duration of a gamma-ray burst; fits to these spectra show the evolution of the continuum as the burst progresses. The burst continuum can usually be fit by the spectral form AE sup alpha exp(-E/kT) from around 25 keV to more than 3 MeV, with varying trends in the value and evolution of the spectral parameters. As a result of limited statistics for E greater than 1 - 2 MeV in the individual spectra, a high energy power law is not required. Only long duration strong bursts can be studied by fitting a series of spectra, and therefore our conclusions concern only this class of burst. The bursts we analyzed tend to be characterized by a hard-to-soft trend both for individual intensity spikes and for the burst as a whole: the hardness leads the count rate in spectra which resolve the temporal variations, while the hardness of successive spikes decreases. We also summarize the performance of the Spectral Detectors and the development of analysis tools to date.

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts Have Millisecond Variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Katharine C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Fenimore, E. E.

    2000-01-01

    We have performed searches for isolated flares and for steady flickering in the initial ∼1 s of gamma-ray burst light curves on the microsecond to millisecond timescales. Two bursts among our sample of 20 revealed four isolated flares with timescales from 256 to 2048 μs. A wavelet analysis for our sample showed low-level flickering for all bursts on timescales from 256 μs to 33 ms, with the majority of bursts containing rise times faster than 4 ms and 30% having rise times faster than 1 ms. These results show that millisecond variability is common in classical bursts and not some exceptional activity by a possibly separate class of bursts. These fast rise times can be used to place the following severe limits on burst models. (1) The characteristic thickness of the energy generation region must be less than 1200 km along the line of sight. (2) The angular size of the gamma-ray emission region as subtended from the central source must be less than 42''. (3) The expanding ejecta must have a range of Lorentz factors along a radius line with a dispersion of less than roughly 2%. (4) Within the external shock scenario, the characteristic dimension of the impacted cloud must be smaller than 16 AU on average. (5) Within the collimated jet scenario, the collimation angle must be smaller than 42''. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society

  10. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  11. A pulse-burst laser system for Thomson scattering on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Borchardt, M. T.; Holly, D. J.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B.

    2017-10-01

    A pulse-burst laser system has been built for Thomson scattering on NSTX-U, and is currently being integrated into the NSTX-U Thomson scattering diagnostic system. The laser will be operated in three distinct modes. The base mode is continuous 30 Hz rep rate, and is the standard operating mode of the laser. The base mode will be interrupted to produce a "slow burst" (specified 1 kHz rep rate for 50 ms) or a "fast burst" (specified 10 kHz rep rate for 5 ms). The combination of base mode→ interruption→ burst mode is new and has not been implemented on any previous pulse-burst laser system. Laser pulsing is halted for a set period (~ 1 minute) following a burst to allow the YAG rods to cool; this type of operation is called a heat-capacity laser. The laser is Nd:YAG operated at 1064 nm, q-switched to produce >= 1.5 J pulses with ~ 20 ns FWHM. It is flashlamp pumped, with dual-rod oscillator (9 mm) and dual-rod amplifier (12 mm). Variable pulsewidth drive of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction. The laser system has demonstrated compliance with all specifications, and is capable of exceeding design specifications by significant margins, e.g., higher rep rates for longer burst periods. Burst operation of this laser system will be used to capture fast time evolution of the electron temperature and density profiles during events such as ELMs, the L-H transition, and various MHD modes.

  12. Associations between the intake of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and measures of insulin sensitivity and beta cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loopstra-Masters, R C; Liese, A D; Haffner, S M; Wagenknecht, L E; Hanley, A J

    2011-02-01

    Although protective relationships between coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes mellitus have consistently been observed, few studies have examined the relationships between coffee consumption and underlying pathophysiological defects that characterise diabetes aetiology. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption and measures of insulin sensitivity and secretion. The study population included 954 multi-ethnic non-diabetic adults from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS). Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the cross-sectional relationships between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake and insulin sensitivity and acute insulin response, measured by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, 2 h postload glucose measured by OGTT, fasting insulin, and proinsulin to C-peptide ratios. Caffeinated coffee intake was positively associated with insulin sensitivity (β = 0.054; SE = 0.026; p = 0.04) and inversely related to 2 h postload glucose (β = -0.37; SE = 0.10; p = 0.0003) in fully adjusted models. Caffeinated coffee intake was not associated with acute insulin response or proinsulin ratios. Decaffeinated coffee intake was inversely related to 2 h postload glucose (β = -0.47; SE = 0.18; p = 0.0096) and positively related to acute insulin response (β = 0.191; SE = 0.077; p = 0.0132). Decaffeinated coffee intake was inversely related to the ratios of both intact and split proinsulin to C-peptide (β = -0.150; SE = 0.061; p = 0.0148; β = -0.254; SE = 0.068; p = 0.0002, respectively). In this cross-sectional study, caffeinated coffee was positively related to insulin sensitivity and decaffeinated coffee was favourably related to measures of beta cell function. These results provide pathophysiological insight as to how coffee could impact the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Improved Pain Relief With Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Two Weeks in Patients Using Tonic Stimulation: Results From a Small Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Peter; Espinet, Anthony; Mitchell, Bruce; Russo, Marc; Muir, Andrew; Verrills, Paul; Davis, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a tonic waveform with consistent stream of pulses; burst delivers groups of pulses separated by short pulse-free periods. The current study compared the short-term safety and efficacy of burst with tonic stimulation in subjects already receiving SCS. At 4 IRB-approved sites, 22 subjects previously implanted with an SCS device for intractable, chronic pain gave informed consent and received burst stimulation for 14 days. Subjects reported average daily Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for overall, trunk, and limb pain using tonic stimulation and after 7 and 14 days of burst stimulation. Thoughts about pain were assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Areas of paresthesia were assessed during tonic and burst stimulation using body maps. Assessment of patient satisfaction and preferred stimulation occurred after 14 days of burst. Average daily overall VAS reduced 46% from a mean of 53.5 (±20.2) mm during tonic SCS to 28.5 (±18.1) mm during burst (p pain relief was the most common reason cited for preference. A majority of subjects reported improved pain relief using burst compared with tonic stimulation. Most subjects experienced less paresthesia during burst and preferred burst citing better pain relief. © 2015 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. Log (TG)/HDL-C ratio as a predictor of decreased islet beta cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes: 6-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meicen; Li, Zengyi; Min, Rui; Dong, Yaxiu; Sun, Qi; Li, Yuxiu

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore whether the triglyceride to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio [log (TG)/HDL-C] and peripheral blood leukocytes DNA telomere length could predict future islet beta cell function decreased in Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) during a 6-year cohort. Sixty T2DM patients (without insulin treatment at baseline) were included in the 6-year cohort study. Peripheral blood leukocytes DNA telomere length, HbA1c, blood lipid profile, fatty fat acid, glucose, insulin and C peptide (3 h after a mixed meal) were determined. Delta C peptide area under curve (Delta CP AUC) was used to reflect change in beta cell secretion function (Delta CP AUC = baseline CP AUC - CP AUC after 6 years). Subjects were divided into slow decrease of beta cell function group (Delta CP AUCslow group) and fast decrease group (Delta CP AUCfast group) according to median of Delta CP AUC. Baseline demographic characteristics, clinical variables between two groups were compared. Correlations between baseline data and Delta CP AUC were analyzed. Baseline log (TG)/HDL-C was positively correlated with Delta CP AUC (r = 0.306, P = 0.027); log (TG)/HDL-C in Delta CP AUCfast group was higher than that in Delta CP AUCslow group (0.103 ± 0.033 vs 0.083 ± 0.030, P = 0.027). There was no significant difference in DNA telomere length between the two groups. Change in DNA telomere length over 6 years was not significantly correlated with baseline blood lipid. In Chinese T2DM patients, high baseline log (TG)/HDL-C ratio predicts fast progression of islet beta cell dysfunction. It may be a simple index to predict progression speed of islet beta cell dysfunction. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Limitations of the HOMA-B score for assessment of beta-cell functionality in interventional trials-results from the PIOglim study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Derwahl, Michael; Jacob, Stephan; Hohberg, Cloth; Blümner, Ernst; Lehmann, Ute; Fuchs, Winfried; Forst, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Drugs with unspecific stimulating effects on beta-cell secretion increase the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B score, indicating improved beta-cell "function." We investigated whether the beta-cell protection provided by adding pioglitazone (PIO) to glimepiride (GLIM) in comparison to up-titrating the GLIM dose alone is reflected by appropriate changes in several measures of beta-cell function, including HOMA-B score. This double-blind, parallel prospective 6-month study was performed with 82 patients (47 men, 35 women; age, 61 +/- 9 years; duration of disease, 5.3 +/- 4.4 years; body mass index, 32.6 +/- 6.0 kg/m(2); hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], 7.3 +/- 0.7%) with GLIM monotherapy (1-3 mg). They were randomized to receive a GLIM + PIO combination with up-titration (2 mg + 30 mg/4 mg + 30 mg/4 mg + 4 mg) or to remain on GLIM (up-titration 4/5/6 mg). Observation parameters determined at baseline and end point included HOMA-B, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, glucose, insulin, and intact proinsulin. There was a slight increase in the HOMA-B score in the GLIM group but not in the GLIM + PIO arm (baseline/end point: for GLIM, 71 +/- 48/88 +/- 64; for PIO + GLIM, 74 +/- 56/69 +/- 52). Improvements in the other observation parameters were predominantly detected in the PIO + GLIM group (HbA1c, 7.20 +/- 0.61%/6.36 +/- 0.90%; HOMA-IR, 7.0 +/- 4.5/4.1 +/- 2.1; intact proinsulin, 12.4 +/- 10.3/7.6 +/- 4.8 pmol/L [all P HOMA-IR, 7.4 +/- 4.5/7.5 +/- 4.3 [not significant]; intact proinsulin, 17.3 +/- 21.6/16.3 +/- 15.5 pmol/L [not significant]). The PIO + GLIM combination led to overall improvement of laboratory biomarkers for beta-cell function, except for HOMA-B. Glimepiride up-titration had no such effects but increased the HOMA-B score. HOMA-B seems to provide misleading results when used as a diagnostic tool in patients treated with sulfonylurea drugs. A corrective term for consideration of proinsulin in the HOMA-B equation may address this limitation.

  16. Fasting and meal-stimulated residual beta cell function is positively associated with serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and negatively associated with anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh-Long; Kolb, H; Battelino, T

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines may promote or inhibit disease progression in type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether systemic proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines associated differently with fasting and meal-stimulated beta cell function in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes.......Cytokines may promote or inhibit disease progression in type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether systemic proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines associated differently with fasting and meal-stimulated beta cell function in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes....

  17. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  18. Fast radio burst source properties and curvature radiation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Lu, Wenbin; Bhattacharya, Mukul

    2017-07-01

    We use the observed properties of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and a number of general physical considerations to provide a broad-brush model for the physical properties of FRB sources and the radiation mechanism. We show that the magnetic field in the source region should be at least 1014 G. This strong field is required to ensure that the electrons have sufficiently high ground state Landau energy so that particle collisions, instabilities and strong electromagnetic fields associated with the FRB radiation do not perturb electrons' motion in the direction transverse to the magnetic field and destroy their coherent motion; coherence is required by the high observed brightness temperature of FRB radiation. The electric field in the source region required to sustain particle motion for a wave period is estimated to be of the order of 1011 esu. These requirements suggest that FRBs are produced near the surface of magnetars perhaps via forced reconnection of magnetic fields to produce episodic, repeated, outbursts. The beaming-corrected energy release in these bursts is estimated to be about 1036 erg, whereas the total energy in the magnetic field is at least ˜1045 erg. We provide a number of predictions for this model which can be tested by future observations. One of which is that short duration FRB-like bursts should exist at much higher frequencies, possibly up to optical.

  19. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  20. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Erik; Groen, Oeyvind

    1999-01-01

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  1. Astrophysics: Burst of support for relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni

    2009-11-01

    Light from a distant γ-ray burst backs up a key prediction of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity - that photon speed is the same regardless of energy. But it might set the stage for evolution of the theory.

  2. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  3. Heat stress enhances arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity via increased sensitivity of burst gating, not burst area, in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D M; Cui, J; Davis, S L; Low, D A; Crandall, C G

    2006-06-01

    The relationship between muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and diastolic blood pressure has been used to describe two sites for arterial baroreflex control of MSNA. By determining both the likelihood of occurrence for sympathetic bursts and the area of each burst for a given diastolic blood pressure, both a 'gating' and an 'area' control site has been described in normothermic humans. Assessing the effect of heat stress on these mechanisms will improve the understanding of baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure under this thermal condition. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that heat stress enhances arterial baroreflex control of burst gating and area. In 10 normotensive subjects (age, 32+/-2 years; mean+/-s.e.m.), MSNA (peroneal) was assessed using standard microneurographic techniques. Five minute periods of data were examined during normothermic and whole-body heating conditions. The burst incidence (i.e. number of sympathetic bursts per 100 cardiac cycles) and the area of each burst were determined for each cardiac cycle and were placed into 3 mmHg intervals of diastolic blood pressure. During normotheric conditions, there was a moderate, negative relationship between burst incidence and diastolic blood pressure (slope=-2.49+/-0.38; r(2)=0.73+/-0.06; mean+/-s.e.m.), while area per burst relative to diastolic blood pressure exhibited a less strong relationship (slope=-1.13+/-0.46; r(2)=0.45+/-0.09). During whole-body heating there was an increase in the slope of the relationship between burst incidence and diastolic blood pressure (slope=-4.69+/-0.44; r(2)=0.84+/-0.03) compared to normothermia (Pburst and diastolic blood pressure was unchanged (slope=-0.92+/-0.29; r(2)=0.41+/-0.08) (P=0.50). The primary finding of this investigation is that, at rest, whole-body heating enhanced arterial baroreflex control of MSNA through increased sensitivity of a 'gating' mechanism, as indicated by an increase in the slope of the

  4. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  5. Beta Cell Breakthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough islets into a patient to achieve insulin independence." The so-called "Edmonton protocol" has some major ... in response to Melton's article in Cell, Baylor College of Medicine researcher Jake Kushner, MD, argued that ...

  6. Formation of Radio Type II Bursts During a Multiple Coronal Mass Ejection Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamadani, Firas; Pohjolainen, Silja; Valtonen, Eino

    2017-12-01

    We study the solar event on 27 September 2001 that consisted of three consecutive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originating from the same active region, which were associated with several periods of radio type II burst emission at decameter-hectometer (DH) wavelengths. Our analysis shows that the first radio burst originated from a low-density environment, formed in the wake of the first, slow CME. The frequency-drift of the burst suggests a low-speed burst driver, or that the shock was not propagating along the large density gradient. There is also evidence of band-splitting within this emission lane. The origin of the first shock remains unclear, as several alternative scenarios exist. The second shock showed separate periods of enhanced radio emission. This shock could have originated from a CME bow shock, caused by the fast and accelerating second or third CME. However, a shock at CME flanks is also possible, as the density depletion caused by the three CMEs would have affected the emission frequencies and hence the radio source heights could have been lower than usual. The last type II burst period showed enhanced emission in a wider bandwidth, which was most probably due to the CME-CME interaction. Only one shock that could reliably be associated with the investigated CMEs was observed to arrive near Earth.

  7. The influence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies in conjunction with gestational hyperglycemia on neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Wu, Tian-mei; Ming, Wei-jie; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Xiao-min

    2015-01-01

    To determine the predictive value of the presence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies with respect to neonatal outcomes. A total of 311 pregnant women with abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results were enrolled in this study. Maternal glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA), islet cell autoantibodies (ICA) and insulin autoantibodies (IAA) were tested in fasting blood both on the day following the routine OGTT and before delivery. The birth weight, Apgar score, blood glucose and outcomes of each neonate were later evaluated and recorded. 1. In this study, 33.9% of the pregnant women with gestational hyperglycemia had detectable levels of one or more types of anti-islet cell antibodies in the third trimester. The proportion of women who produced GADA and/or ICA was significantly higher in the group of women with gestational hyperglycemia than in the control group (P<0.05). The groups similarly differed in the proportion of women who tested positive for any anti-islet cell antibody (P<0.05). 2. Of the patients in our study, those who produced GADA exhibited an increase in uterine and umbilical arterial pulsatility indexes (PIs) during the third trimesters compared with the control group (P˂0.05). Additionally, an increased frequency of fetal growth restriction (FGR) was observed in the infants of women who produced IAA during pregnancy compared with those without autoantibodies (P˂0.05). 3. The rate of newborn admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was significantly associated with the presence of maternal ICA during the third trimester (OR, 6.36; 95% CI, 1.22-33.26). 4. The incidence of neonatal asphyxia was associated with the presence of maternal GADA in both the second (OR, 10.44; 95% CI, 1.46-74.92) and the third (OR, 8.33; 95% CI, 1.45-47.82) trimesters. Approximately one-third of the women with gestational hyperglycemia produced anti-islet cell antibodies. The incidence of FGR was higher in women with gestational

  8. The influence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies in conjunction with gestational hyperglycemia on neonatal outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Li

    Full Text Available To determine the predictive value of the presence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies with respect to neonatal outcomes.A total of 311 pregnant women with abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT results were enrolled in this study. Maternal glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA, islet cell autoantibodies (ICA and insulin autoantibodies (IAA were tested in fasting blood both on the day following the routine OGTT and before delivery. The birth weight, Apgar score, blood glucose and outcomes of each neonate were later evaluated and recorded.1. In this study, 33.9% of the pregnant women with gestational hyperglycemia had detectable levels of one or more types of anti-islet cell antibodies in the third trimester. The proportion of women who produced GADA and/or ICA was significantly higher in the group of women with gestational hyperglycemia than in the control group (P<0.05. The groups similarly differed in the proportion of women who tested positive for any anti-islet cell antibody (P<0.05. 2. Of the patients in our study, those who produced GADA exhibited an increase in uterine and umbilical arterial pulsatility indexes (PIs during the third trimesters compared with the control group (P˂0.05. Additionally, an increased frequency of fetal growth restriction (FGR was observed in the infants of women who produced IAA during pregnancy compared with those without autoantibodies (P˂0.05. 3. The rate of newborn admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU was significantly associated with the presence of maternal ICA during the third trimester (OR, 6.36; 95% CI, 1.22-33.26. 4. The incidence of neonatal asphyxia was associated with the presence of maternal GADA in both the second (OR, 10.44; 95% CI, 1.46-74.92 and the third (OR, 8.33; 95% CI, 1.45-47.82 trimesters.Approximately one-third of the women with gestational hyperglycemia produced anti-islet cell antibodies. The incidence of FGR was higher in women with

  9. ASKAP Joins the Hunt for Mysterious Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A new telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), has joined the search for energetic and elusive fast radio bursts. And in just a few days of looking, its already had success!Elusive TransientsThe Parkes radio telescope, which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date, has a very narrow field of view. [CSIRO]Fast radio bursts are mysterious millisecond-duration radio pulses that were first discovered around a decade ago. Since that time particularly in recent years weve made some progress toward the goal of localizing them. Were now fairly convinced that fast radio bursts come from outside of the galaxy, and yet theyre enormously bright orders of magnitude more luminous than any pulse seen from the Milky Way.Better identification of where these mysterious bursts come from would help us to determine what they are. But so far, weve discovered only around 30 such bursts, despite the fact that theyre estimated to occur at a rate of 3,000 events per day across the whole sky.Why are they so hard to find? Due to their short duration, effective detection would require instantaneous coverage of a very large fraction of the sky. The Parkes radio telescope which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date has a field of view spanning less than a square degree,significantly limiting our ability to rapidly survey for these transients.FRB 170107s band-averaged pulse (top) and dynamic spectrum (bottom). [Bannister et al. 2017]A New Array in TownA new player is now on the scene, however, and its already had huge success. ASKAP is a wide-field radio telescope made up of an array of 12-meter antennas. Using phased-array-feed technology, ASKAP is able to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 square degrees an enormous field compared to Parkes 0.6 square degrees! This capability significantly increases our chances of being able to detect fast radio bursts.In a new study led by Keith Bannister

  10. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  11. A Plant-Based Dietary Intervention Improves Beta-Cell Function and Insulin Resistance in Overweight Adults: A 16-Week Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kahleova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the effect of a plant-based dietary intervention on beta-cell function in overweight adults with no history of diabetes. Participants (n = 75 were randomized to follow a low-fat plant-based diet (n = 38 or to make no diet changes (n = 37 for 16 weeks. At baseline and 16 weeks, beta-cell function was quantified with a mathematical model. Using a standard meal test, insulin secretory rate was calculated by C-peptide deconvolution. The Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR index was used to assess insulin resistance while fasting. A marked increase in meal-stimulated insulin secretion was observed in the intervention group compared with controls (interaction between group and time, Gxt, p < 0.001. HOMA-IR index fell significantly (p < 0.001 in the intervention group (treatment effect −1.0 (95% CI, −1.2 to −0.8; Gxt, p = 0.004. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated positively with changes in body mass index (BMI and visceral fat volume (r = 0.34; p = 0.009 and r = 0.42; p = 0.001, respectively. The latter remained significant after adjustment for changes in BMI (r = 0.41; p = 0.002. Changes in glucose-induced insulin secretion correlated negatively with BMI changes (r = −0.25; p = 0.04, but not with changes in visceral fat. Beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were significantly improved through a low-fat plant-based diet in overweight adults.

  12. Carriers of loss-of-function mutations in EXT display impaired pancreatic beta-cell reserve due to smaller pancreas volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie J Bernelot Moens

    Full Text Available Exotosin (EXT proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME. Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46-1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69-3.36] nmol·l-1·min-1, p<0.05. Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22-10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91-12.70] nmol·l-1·min-1 p<0.05, indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04. In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Durante, A.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. → GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. → GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. → GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. → GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  14. A live-cell, high-content imaging survey of 206 endogenous factors across five stress conditions reveals context-dependent survival effects in mouse primary beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Wills, Quin F; Johnson, James D

    2015-06-01

    Beta cell death is a hallmark of diabetes. It is not known whether specific cellular stresses associated with type 1 or type 2 diabetes require specific factors to protect pancreatic beta cells. No systematic comparison of endogenous soluble factors in the context of multiple pro-apoptotic conditions has been published. Primary mouse islet cells were cultured in conditions mimicking five type 1 or type 2 diabetes-related stresses: basal 5 mmol/l glucose, cytokine cocktail (25 ng/ml TNF-α, 10 ng/ml IL-1β, 10 ng/ml IFN-γ), 1 μmol/l thapsigargin, 1.5 mmol/l palmitate and 20 mmol/l glucose (all in the absence of serum). We surveyed the effects of a library of 206 endogenous factors (selected based on islet expression of their receptors) on islet cell survival through multi-parameter, live-cell imaging. Our survey pointed to survival factors exhibiting generalised protective effects across conditions meant to model different types of diabetes and stages of the diseases. For example, our survey and follow-up experiments suggested that OLFM1 is a novel protective factor for mouse and human beta cells across multiple conditions. Most strikingly, we also found specific protective survival factors for each model stress condition. For example, semaphorin4A (SEMA4A) was toxic to islet cells in the serum-free baseline and serum-free 20 mmol/l glucose conditions, but protective in the context of lipotoxicity. Rank product testing supported the consistency of our observations. Collectively, our survey reveals previously unidentified islet cell survival factors and suggest their potential utility in individualised medicine.

  15. Non-neural tyrosine hydroxylase, via modulation of endocrine pancreatic precursors, is required for normal development of beta cells in the mouse pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Patricia; Robles, Ana M; de Pablo, Flora; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina

    2014-11-01

    Apart from transcription factors, little is known about the molecules that modulate the proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells. The early expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in a subset of glucagon(+) cells led us to investigate whether catecholamines have a role in beta cell development. We studied the immunohistochemical characteristics of TH-expressing cells in wild-type (Th (+/+) ) mice during early pancreas development, and analysed the endocrine pancreas phenotype of TH-deficient (Th (-/-) ) mice. We also studied the effect of dopamine addition and TH-inhibition on insulin-producing cells in explant cultures. In the mouse pancreas at embryonic day (E)12.5-E13.5, the ∼10% of early glucagon(+) cells that co-expressed TH rarely proliferated and did not express the precursor marker neurogenin 3 at E13.5. The number of insulin(+) cells in the Th (-/-) embryonic pancreas was decreased as compared with wild-type embryos at E13.5. While no changes in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1)(+)-progenitor cell number were observed between groups at E12.5, the number of neurogenin 3 and NK2 homeobox 2 (NKX2.2)-expressing cells was reduced in Th (-/-) embryonic pancreas, an effect that occurred in parallel with increased expression of the transcriptional repressor Hes1. The potential role of dopamine as a pro-beta cell stimulus was tested by treating pancreas explants with this catecholamine, which resulted in an increase in total insulin content and insulin(+) cells relative to control explants. A non-neural catecholaminergic pathway appears to modulate the pancreatic endocrine precursor and insulin producing cell neogenesis. This finding may have important implications for approaches seeking to promote the generation of beta cells to treat diabetes.

  16. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdanov D.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4–8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with EUV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrence, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates, whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to those at other frequencies.

  17. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  18. The EndoC-βH1 cell line is a valid model of human beta cells and applicable for screenings to identify novel drug target candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Georgieva Tsonkova

    2018-02-01

    Conclusions: Overall, the EndoC-βH1 cells strongly resemble human islet beta cells in terms of glucose and incretin stimulated insulin secretion capabilities. The cell line has an active cytokine induced caspase 3/7 apoptotic pathway and is responsive to ER stress initiation factors. The cells' ability to proliferate can be further increased by already known compounds as well as by novel peptides and proteins. Based on its robust performance during the functionality assessment assays, the EndoC-βH1 cell line was successfully used as a screening platform for identification of novel anti-diabetic drug candidates.

  19. The EndoC-βH1 cell line is a valid model of human beta cells and applicable for screenings to identify novel drug target candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsonkova, Violeta Georgieva; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Wolf, Xenia Asbæk; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Kirstine Ringgaard, Anna; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Winkel, Louise; Kalisz, Mark; Dalgaard, Kevin; Bruun, Christine; Fels, Johannes Josef; Helgstrand, Charlotte; Hastrup, Sven; Öberg, Fredrik Kryh; Vernet, Erik; Sandrini, Michael Paolo Bastner; Shaw, Allan Christian; Jessen, Carsten; Grønborg, Mads; Hald, Jacob; Willenbrock, Hanni; Madsen, Dennis; Wernersson, Rasmus; Hansson, Lena; Jensen, Jan Nygaard; Plesner, Annette; Alanentalo, Tomas; Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Honoré, Christian; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Ravassard, Philippe; Madsen, Ole D; Rescan, Claude; Frogne, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    To characterize the EndoC-βH1 cell line as a model for human beta cells and evaluate its beta cell functionality, focusing on insulin secretion, proliferation, apoptosis and ER stress, with the objective to assess its potential as a screening platform for identification of novel anti-diabetic drug candidates. EndoC-βH1 was transplanted into mice for validation of in vivo functionality. Insulin secretion was evaluated in cells cultured as monolayer and as pseudoislets, as well as in diabetic mice. Cytokine induced apoptosis, glucolipotoxicity, and ER stress responses were assessed. Beta cell relevant mRNA and protein expression were investigated by qPCR and antibody staining. Hundreds of proteins or peptides were tested for their effect on insulin secretion and proliferation. Transplantation of EndoC-βH1 cells restored normoglycemia in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, we observed a clear insulin response to glucose, and, in vitro, we found a significant increase in insulin secretion from EndoC-βH1 pseudoislets compared to monolayer cultures for both glucose and incretins. Apoptosis and ER stress were inducible in the cells and caspase 3/7 activity was elevated in response to cytokines, but not affected by the saturated fatty acid palmitate. By screening of various proteins and peptides, we found Bombesin (BB) receptor agonists and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptides (PACAP) to significantly induce insulin secretion and the proteins SerpinA6, STC1, and APOH to significantly stimulate proliferation. ER stress was readily induced by Tunicamycin and resulted in a reduction of insulin mRNA. Somatostatin (SST) was found to be expressed by 1% of the cells and manipulation of the SST receptors was found to significantly affect insulin secretion. Overall, the EndoC-βH1 cells strongly resemble human islet beta cells in terms of glucose and incretin stimulated insulin secretion capabilities. The cell line has an active

  20. Valine pyrrolidide preserves intact glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and improves abnormal glucose tolerance in minipigs with reduced beta-cell mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Olholm; Rolin, Bidda; Ribel, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    for type 2 diabetes was evaluated in a new large animal model of insulin-deficient diabetes and reduced beta-cell mass, the nicotinamide (NIA) (67 mg/kg) and streptozotocin (STZ) (125 mg/kg)-treated minipig, using the DPPIV inhibitor, valine pyrrolidide (VP) (50 mg/kg). VP did not significantly affect...... glucose tolerance test (OGTT) but increased the insulinogenic index in normal animals (from 83 +/- 42 to 192 +/- 108; P animals. GIP seems to contribute to the antihyperglycemic effect of VP in this model...

  1. Improved Pain Relief With Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Two Weeks in Patients Using Tonic Stimulation: Results From a Small Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Peter; Espinet, Anthony; Mitchell, Bruce; Russo, Marc; Muir, Andrew; Verrills, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a tonic waveform with consistent stream of pulses; burst delivers groups of pulses separated by short pulse‐free periods. The current study compared the short‐term safety and efficacy of burst with tonic stimulation in subjects already receiving SCS. Materials and Methods At 4 IRB‐approved sites, 22 subjects previously implanted with an SCS device for intractable, chronic pain gave informed consent and received burst stimulation for 14 days. Subjects reported average daily Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for overall, trunk, and limb pain using tonic stimulation and after 7 and 14 days of burst stimulation. Thoughts about pain were assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Areas of paresthesia were assessed during tonic and burst stimulation using body maps. Assessment of patient satisfaction and preferred stimulation occurred after 14 days of burst. Results Average daily overall VAS reduced 46% from a mean of 53.5 (±20.2) mm during tonic SCS to 28.5 (±18.1) mm during burst (p VAS scores were also reduced by 33% and 51%, respectively. During burst, 16 subjects (73%) reported no paresthesia, 5 (23%) reported a reduction, and 1 (4%) reported increased paresthesia. After 14 days, 21 subjects (95%) reported being very satisfied or satisfied with burst. Burst was preferred by 20 subjects (91%), tonic by 1 (5%), and 1 (5%) reported no preference. Better pain relief was the most common reason cited for preference. Conclusions A majority of subjects reported improved pain relief using burst compared with tonic stimulation. Most subjects experienced less paresthesia during burst and preferred burst citing better pain relief. PMID:25879884

  2. Burst-suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram of newborns and infants. Its clinical expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Blanco Jorge Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Burst-suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram (EEG is associated with severe brain damage and has a bad prognosis in 85% of the cases. Objectives. To identify the prevalence of the EEG burst-suppression pattern (BSP in fullterm newborns and infants, determine its etiol- ogy, clinical features and course. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 4,891 EEGs were reviewed. The EEGs of newborns and infants (< 3 months of age with BSP were selected. Results. 11 cases identified with burst suppression pattern. The overall prevalence of which was 3.5%; 8.1% among the newborns and 1.2% among infants. Seizures were the main reason for doing an EEG in the newborn period in 7 patients and after day 28 in three. The clinical manifestations were abnormal level of consciousness (n=8, hypotonia (n=2, and spasticity (n=6. The main causes were hypoxic ischemic injury, stroke and kernicterus. There were two cases of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Two patients died before the third month of age; 8 survived an average of 13 months. All had epilepsy, neurologic retardation and disability. Two patients had persistent EEG burst-suppression pattern; 1 and 3 months after the neonatal period respectively; 7 had focal spikes and an asymmetric pattern. Conclusions. Electroencephalographic burst-suppression pat- tern predicts a severe neurologic injury in fullterm newborns and infants.

  3. Gamma-Ray Burst Intensity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; Norris, Jay P.; Bonnell, Jerry T.

    2004-01-01

    We use the lag-luminosity relation to calculate self-consistently the redshifts, apparent peak bolometric luminosities L(sub B1), and isotropic energies E(sub iso) for a large sample of BATSE bursts. We consider two different forms of the lag-luminosity relation; for both forms the median redshift, for our burst database is 1.6. We model the resulting sample of burst energies with power law and Gaussian dis- tributions, both of which are reasonable models. The power law model has an index of a = 1.76 plus or minus 0.05 (95% confidence) as opposed to the index of a = 2 predicted by the simple universal jet profile model; however, reasonable refinements to this model permit much greater flexibility in reconciling predicted and observed energy distributions.

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  5. Localised Microwave Bursts During ELMs on MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freethy Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of microwave emission are observed during ELM events on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak. In agreement with observations on other machines, these bursts are up to 3 orders of magnitude more intense than the thermal background, but are electron cyclotron in nature. The peak in microwave emission is ~20μ before the peak in midplane Dα emission. Using the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging radiometer, we are able to demonstrate that these bursts are often highly spatially localised and preferentially occur at the tokamak midplane. It is hypothesised that the localisation is a result of Doppler resonance broadening for electron Bernstein waves and the high perpendicular electron energies could be the result of pitch angle scattering in high collisionality regions of the plasma.

  6. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  7. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  8. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  9. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  10. BATSE observations of gamma-ray burst spectra. 2: Peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, L. A.; Band, D. L.; Matteson, J. L.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Preece, R. D.; Paciesas, W. S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Palmer, D. M.; Schaefer, B. E.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) spectroscopy detectors. High-resolution spectra are chracterized by the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu), and the evolution of this quantity is examined relative to the emission intensity. In most cases it is found that this peak energy either rises with or slightly precedes major intensity increases and softens for the remainder of the pulse. Interpulse emission is generally harder early in the burst. For bursts with multiple intensity pulses, later spikes tend to be softer than earlier ones, indicating that the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu) is bounded by an envelope which decays with time. Evidence is found that bursts in which the bulk of the flux comes well after the event which triggers the instrument tend to show less peak energy variability and are not as hard as several bursts in which the emission occurs promptly after the trigger. Several recently proposed burst models are examined in light of these results and no qualitative conflicts with the observations presented here are found.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE BURSTS USING INTERPLANETARY NETWORK GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukwatta, T. N. [Director' s Postdoctoral Fellow, Space and Remote Sensing (ISR-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); MacGibbon, J. H. [Department of Physics, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal' shin, V. D. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kozyrev, A. S. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A.; Kienlin, A. von; Zhang, X. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Yamaoka, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Ohno, M. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Ohmori, N. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki-shi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Feroci, M. [INAF/IAPS-Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133, Roma (Italy); Frontera, F., E-mail: tilan@lanl.gov [Department of Physics and Earth Science, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2016-07-20

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10{sup 13}–10{sup 18} cm (7–10{sup 5} au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  12. Radon and rock bursts in deep mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulashevich, Yu.P.; Utkin, V.I.; Yurkov, A.K.; Nikolaev, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Variation fields of radon concentration in time to ascertain stress-strain state of the North Ural bauxite mines have been studied. It is shown that dynamic changes in the stress-strain state of the rocks prior to the rock burst bring about variations in radon concentration in the observation wells. Depending on mutual positioning of the observation points and the rock burst epicenter, the above-mentioned variations differ in principle, reduction of radon concentration in the near zone and its increase in the far zone are observed [ru

  13. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  14. The origin of behavioral bursts in decision-making circuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Sorribes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available From ants to humans, the timing of many animal behaviors comes in bursts of activity separated by long periods of inactivity. Recently, mathematical modeling has shown that simple algorithms of priority-driven behavioral choice can result in bursty behavior. To experimentally test this link between decision-making circuitry and bursty dynamics, we have turned to Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that the statistics of intervals between activity periods in endogenous activity-rest switches of wild-type Drosophila are very well described by the Weibull distribution, a common distribution of bursty dynamics in complex systems. The bursty dynamics of wild-type Drosophila walking activity are shown to be determined by this inter-event distribution alone and not by memory effects, thus resembling human dynamics. Further, using mutant flies that disrupt dopaminergic signaling or the mushroom body, circuitry implicated in decision-making, we show that the degree of behavioral burstiness can be modified. These results are thus consistent with the proposed link between decision-making circuitry and bursty dynamics, and highlight the importance of using simple experimental systems to test general theoretical models of behavior. The findings further suggest that analysis of bursts could prove useful for the study and evaluation of decision-making circuitry.

  15. Deletion of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 protects pancreatic beta-cells from stress-induced death but not from glucose homeostasis alterations under pro-inflammatory conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Pepin

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is characterized by pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and is associated with low-grade inflammation. Recent observations suggest that apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 is involved in beta-cell death in response to different stressors. In this study, we tested whether ASK1 deficiency protects beta-cells from glucolipotoxic conditions and cytokines treatment or from glucose homeostasis alteration induced by endotoxemia.Insulin secretion was neither affected upon shRNA-mediated downregulation of ASK1 in MIN6 cells nor in islets from ASK1-deficient mice. ASK1 silencing in MIN6 cells and deletion in islets did not prevent the deleterious effect of glucolipotoxic conditions or cytokines on insulin secretion. However, it protected MIN6 cells from death induced by ER stress or palmitate and islets from short term caspase activation in response to cytokines. Moreover, endotoxemia induced by LPS infusion increased insulin secretion during hyperglycemic clamps but the response was similar in wild-type and ASK1-deficient mice. Finally, insulin sensitivity in the presence of LPS was not affected by ASK1-deficiency.Our study demonstrates that ASK1 is not involved in beta-cell function and dysfunction but controls stress-induced beta-cell death.

  16. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex ...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1....... was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase...

  17. First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A.C.A.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M.P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhofer, A.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Herold, B.; Hossl, J.; Hsu, C.C.; De Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G.E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G.V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schock, F.; Schuller, J.P.; Schussler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV-PeV neutrinos

  18. EDGE: Explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Herder, J.W.; Hermsen, W.; Hoevers, H.

    2007-01-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysics. EDGE1 will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosions, through the period of galax...

  19. EDGE: explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Herder, J.W.; Piro, L.; Ohashi, T.; Amati, L.; Atteia, J.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Barbera, M.; Barret, D.; Basso, S.; de Boer, M.; Borgani, S.; Boyarskiy, O.; Branchini, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Briggs, M.; Brunetti, G.; Budtz-Jorgensenf, C.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Caroli, E.; Chincarini, G.; Christensen, F.; Cocchi, M.; Comastri, A.; Corsi, A.; Cotroneo, V.; Conconi, P.; Colasanti, L.; Cusamano, G.; Rosa, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ettori, S.; Ezoe, Y.; Ferrari, L.; Feroci, M.; Finger, M.; Fishman, G.; Fujimoto, R.; Galeazzi, M.; Galli, A.; Gatti, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gendre, B.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Giommi, P.; Girardi, M.; Guzzo, L.; Haardt, F.; Hepburn, I.; Hermsen, W.; Hoevers, H.; Holland, A.; in 't Zand, J.J.M.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kawahara, H.; Kawai, N.; Kaastra, J.; Kippen, M.; de Korte, P.A.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kusenko, A.; Labanti, C.; Lieu, R.; Macculi, C.; Makishima, K.; Matt, G.; Mazotta, P.; McCammon, D.; Méndez, M.; Mineo, T.; Mitchell, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Molendi, S.; Moscardini, L.; Mushotzky, R.; Natalucci, L.; Nicastro, F.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.; Paerels, F.; Page, M.; Paltani, S.; Pareschi, G.; Perinati, E.; Perola, C.; Ponman, T.; Rasmussen, A.; Roncarelli, M.; Rosati, P.; Ruchayskiy, O.; Quadrini, E.; Sakurai, I.; Salvaterra, R.; Sasaki, S.; Wijers, R.; et al., [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysics. EDGE will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosions, through the period of galaxy

  20. First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J-L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J-P.; Schuessler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV-PeV neutrinos

  1. The Nkx6.1 homeodomain transcription factor suppresses glucagon expression and regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islet beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schisler, Jonathan C; Jensen, Per Bo; Harper, David Alexander Taylor

    2005-01-01

    -unresponsive/glucagon-negative; and class 3, glucose-responsive/glucagon-negative. The transcription factor Nkx2.2 was expressed with relative abundance of 3.3, 1.0, and 1.0 in class 1, class 2, and class 3 cells, respectively, whereas Nkx6.1 expression had the opposite trend: 1.0, 2.6, and 6.4 in class 1, class 2, and class 3 cells......, respectively. In class 1 cells, overexpressed Nkx6.1 suppressed glucagon expression but did not affect the levels of several other prominent beta cell transcription factors. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 in class 3 cells resulted in a doubling of glucagon mRNA, with no effect on Pdx1...... levels, whereas suppression of Pdx1 in class 3 cells caused a 12-fold increase in glucagon transcript levels, demonstrating independent effects of Nkx6.1 and Pdx1 on glucagon expression in beta cell lines. RNAi-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 expression in class 3 cells also caused a decrease in GSIS from...

  2. The relationship between chronic kidney function and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and beta cell function in Korean adults with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang Seok; Kim, Sung Gil; Kim, Han Soo; Hwang, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Yoon, Hyun

    2017-12-28

    The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta cell function (HOMA-B) in Korean adults with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study included 5,188 adults aged 20 or older using the 2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data, which represents national data in Korea. A covariance test adjusted for covariates was performed for HOMA-IR and HOMA-B in relation to CKD. The present study has several key findings. First, in T2DM, HOMA-IR (p = 0.035) was higher in the CKD group than in the non-CKD group after adjusting for the related variables but HOMA-B (p = 0.141) was not significant. Second, in non-T2DM, HOMA-IR (p = 0.163) and HOMA-B (p = 0.658) were not associated with CKD after adjusting for the related variables (except age). However, when further adjusted for age, HOMA-IR (p = 0.020) and HOMA-B (p = 0.006) were higher in the CKD group than in the non-CKD group. In conclusion, insulin resistance was positively associated CKD with in Korean adults with or without T2DM. Beta cell function was positively associated CKD with in Korean adults without T2DM but not in Korean adults with T2DM.

  3. Is serum zinc associated with pancreatic beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in pre-diabetic and normal individuals? Findings from the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanrin P Vashum

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine if there is a difference in serum zinc concentration between normoglycaemic, pre-diabetic and type-2 diabetic groups and if this is associated with pancreatic beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in the former 2 groups. METHOD: Cross sectional study of a random sample of older community-dwelling men and women in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Beta cell function, insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance were calculated for normoglycaemic and prediabetes participants using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-2 calculator. RESULT: A total of 452 participants were recruited for this study. Approximately 33% (N = 149 had diabetes, 33% (N = 151 had prediabetes and 34% (N = 152 were normoglycaemic. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA parameters were found to be significantly different between normoglycaemic and prediabetes groups (p<0.001. In adjusted linear regression, higher serum zinc concentration was associated with increased insulin sensitivity (p = 0.01 in the prediabetic group. There was also a significant association between smoking and worse insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Higher serum zinc concentration is associated with increased insulin sensitivity. Longitudinal studies are required to determine if low serum zinc concentration plays a role in progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes.

  4. The Nkx6.1 homeodomain transcription factor suppresses glucagon expression and regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islet beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schisler, Jonathan C; Jensen, Per Bo; Harper, David Alexander Taylor

    2005-01-01

    , respectively. In class 1 cells, overexpressed Nkx6.1 suppressed glucagon expression but did not affect the levels of several other prominent beta cell transcription factors. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 in class 3 cells resulted in a doubling of glucagon mRNA, with no effect on Pdx1...... levels, whereas suppression of Pdx1 in class 3 cells caused a 12-fold increase in glucagon transcript levels, demonstrating independent effects of Nkx6.1 and Pdx1 on glucagon expression in beta cell lines. RNAi-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 expression in class 3 cells also caused a decrease in GSIS from...... 13.9- to 3.7-fold, whereas suppression of Pdx1 reduced absolute amounts of insulin secretion without affecting fold response. Finally, RNAi-mediated suppression of Nkx6.1 mRNA in primary rat islets was accompanied by a significant decrease in GSIS relative to control cells. In sum, our studies have...

  5. Spectral Tests of the Homogeneity of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    We proposed to determine whether the spectral-hardness-intensity relation found when comparing dim and bright bursts is also found within the set of bright bursts. In the simplest cosmological burst paradigm all bursts have the same intrinsic brightness (they are "standard candles") and the faintest BATSE bursts are at a redshift of approx. 1. The cumulative intensity distribution, which is a -3/2 power law at the bright end but flatter at the low intensity end, is explained by the cosmological curvature of space. Thus bursts at the bright end should be at such low redshifts that they do not suffer cosmological redshifting of their spectra or time dilation of their lightcurves. The spectral-hardness and burst intensity are correlated when dim and bright bursts are compared, consistent with cosmological redshifting. However, the actual redshifts of a number of bursts have been determined, showing that bursts are not standard candles, and that their redshifts are frequently greater than approx. 1; the maximum redshift is 3.4! Consequently many bright bursts are at redshifts where cosmological effects are significant. We had proposed to determine A,hether the redshifting effect continued into the bright bursts; even moderately bright bursts should be at cosmological distances.

  6. Glucose- and interleukin-1beta-induced beta-cell apoptosis requires Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation and is prevented by a sulfonylurea receptor 1/inwardly rectifying K+ channel 6.2 (SUR/Kir6.2) selective potassium channel opener in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Størling, Joachim; Sturis, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    for the beta-cell potassium channel SUR1/Kir6.2, on glucose- and IL-1beta-induced apoptosis and impaired function in human beta-cells. Exposure of human islets for 4 days to 11.1 and 33.3 mmol/l glucose, 2 ng/ml IL-1beta, or 10 and 100 micromol/l of the sulfonylurea tolbutamide induced beta-cell apoptosis...

  7. Aliasing of the Schumann resonance background signal by sprite-associated Q-bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Anirban; Williams, Earle; Boldi, Robert; Sátori, Gabriella; Nagy, Tamás; Bór, József; Montanyà, Joan; Ortega, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's naturally occurring Schumann resonances (SR) are composed of a quasi-continuous background component and a larger-amplitude, short-duration transient component, otherwise called 'Q-burst' (Ogawa et al., 1967). Sprites in the mesosphere are also known to accompany the energetic positive ground flashes that launch the Q-bursts (Boccippio et al., 1995). Spectra of the background Schumann Resonances (SR) require a natural stabilization period of ∼10-12 min for the three conspicuous modal parameters to be derived from Lorentzian fitting. Before the spectra are computed and the fitting process is initiated, the raw time series data need to be properly filtered for local cultural noise, narrow band interference as well as for large transients in the form of global Q-bursts. Mushtak and Williams (2009) describe an effective technique called Isolated Lorentzian (I-LOR), in which, the contributions from local cultural and various other noises are minimized to a great extent. An automated technique based on median filtering of time series data has been developed. These special lightning flashes are known to have greater contribution in the ELF range (below 1 kHz) compared to general negative CG strikes (Huang et al., 1999; Cummer et al., 2006). The global distributions of these Q-bursts have been studied by Huang et al. (1999) Rhode Island, USA by wave impedance methods from single station ELF measurements at Rhode Island, USA and from Japan Hobara et al. (2006). The present work aims to demonstrate the effect of Q-bursts on SR background spectra using GPS time-stamped observation of TLEs. It is observed that the Q-bursts selected for the present work do alias the background spectra over a 5-s period, though the amplitudes of these Q-bursts are far below the background threshold of 16 Core Standard Deviation (CSD) so that they do not strongly alias the background spectra of 10-12 min duration. The examination of one exceptional Q-burst shows that appreciable

  8. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants associated with insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction among this population. Data from the cross-sectional multicentre Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study were analysed. Participants included Ghanaian individuals without diabetes, aged 18-96 years old, who were residing in Amsterdam (n = 1337), Berlin (n = 502), London (n = 961), urban Ghana (n = 1309) and rural Ghana (n = 970). Glucose and insulin were measured in fasting venous blood samples. Anthropometrics were assessed during a physical examination. Questionnaires were used to assess demographics, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. Insulin resistance and beta cell function were determined using homeostatic modelling (HOMA-IR and HOMA-B, respectively). Logistic regression analysis was used to study the contribution of HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B (beta cell dysfunction) to geographical differences in IFBG (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/l). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B. IFBG was more common in individuals residing in urban Ghana (OR 1.41 [95% CI 1.08, 1.84]), Amsterdam (OR 3.44 [95% CI 2.69, 4.39]) and London (OR 1.58 [95% CI 1.20 2.08), but similar in individuals living in Berlin (OR 1.00 [95% CI 0.70, 1.45]), compared with those in rural Ghana (reference population). The attributable risk of IFBG per 1 SD increase in HOMA-IR was 69.3% and in inverse HOMA-B was 11.1%. After adjustment for HOMA-IR, the odds for IFBG reduced to 0.96 (95% CI 0.72, 1.27), 2.52 (95%CI 1.94, 3.26) and 1.02 (95% CI 0.78, 1.38) for individuals in Urban Ghana

  9. Na(+)/K(+) pump interacts with the h-current to control bursting activity in central pattern generator neurons of leeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueh, Daniel; Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2016-09-02

    The dynamics of different ionic currents shape the bursting activity of neurons and networks that control motor output. Despite being ubiquitous in all animal cells, the contribution of the Na(+)/K(+) pump current to such bursting activity has not been well studied. We used monensin, a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, to examine the role of the pump on the bursting activity of oscillator heart interneurons in leeches. When we stimulated the pump with monensin, the period of these neurons decreased significantly, an effect that was prevented or reversed when the h-current was blocked by Cs(+). The decreased period could also occur if the pump was inhibited with strophanthidin or K(+)-free saline. Our monensin results were reproduced in model, which explains the pump's contributions to bursting activity based on Na(+) dynamics. Our results indicate that a dynamically oscillating pump current that interacts with the h-current can regulate the bursting activity of neurons and networks.

  10. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs

  11. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts; radio astronomy. ... Even though radio band is the least explored of the afterglow spectrum, it has played an important role in the progress of GRB physics, specifically in confirming the hypothesized relativistic effects. ... Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum 695 547, India.

  12. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  13. Magnetized environs of a repeating radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-03-01

    One of the astrophysical sources that gives rise to the mysterious transients known as fast radio bursts is embedded in a highly magnetized environment, such as the vicinity of an accreting massive black hole or the birth nebula of a highly magnetized neutron star.

  14. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  15. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  16. Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

  17. A storm of type 3 bursts observed by RAE-1 in August 1968

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    Curves of the number of type 3 bursts as a function of time are presented for six fixed frequencies (2.8, 1.65, 1.31, 0.995, 0.700, and 0.54 MHz). The curves peak at approximately 0500 UT August 20, 1968, and are symmetrical on both sides. Sakurai (1971) has shown that this time correlates well with the CMP of the McMath Region 9597. The maximum rate of bursts is approximately 150 per hour at the higher frequency of 2.8 MHz. Over 20,000 bursts were counted during the 15-day period from August 13 to August 27 when the active region was visible to the earth. A least-squares normal curve has been fitted to the observational data and calculations of variance and standard deviation are given.

  18. Mimicking the brain: evaluation of St Jude Medical's Prodigy Chronic Pain System with Burst Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Plazier, Mark; Vancamp, Tim

    2015-03-01

    The Prodigy is a new type of internal pulse generator that controls the delivery of electrical stimuli to nervous tissue. It is capable of delivering burst stimulation, which is a novel waveform that consists of closely spaced high-frequency electrical impulses delivered in packets riding on a plateau, and followed by a quiescent period. Its inception was based on mimicking burst firing in the nervous system and usually delivered by unmyelinated fibers that uniformly have a motivational affective homeostatic function. It thereby targets a multimodal salience network, even though the stimuli are delivered at the level of the spinal cord. As such, it is specifically capable of influencing the affective/attentional components of pain. Burst stimulation was initially safely applied off-label to the auditory cortex for tinnitus, and later also to the spinal cord, the somatosensory cortex for neuropathic pain, subcutaneously for failed back surgery syndrome, and cingulate cortex for addiction and tinnitus.

  19. The Fermi-GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs: The First Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissaldi E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRBs every three days. Here we present the main results from the latest two catalogs provided by the Fermi-GBM science team, namely the third GBM GRB catalog [1] and the first GBM time-resolved spectral catalog [2]. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected bursts. It comprises 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. For each one, location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, the peak flux and the fluence are derived. The GBM time-resolved spectral catalog presents high-quality time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in a shorter period than the former catalog, namely four years. It comprises 1491 spectra from 81 bursts. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained.

  20. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadena, Ariel; Agreda, Jesus, E-mail: jaagredab@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Barragan, Daniel [Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2013-12-01

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+} and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  1. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  2. Is there cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. report that the temporal structure of faint gamma-ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  3. A Turbo-Coded Burst-by-Burst Adaptive Wide-Band Speech Transceiver

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, T.; Münster, M.; Hanzo, L.

    2000-01-01

    Turbo-coded burst-by-burst adaptive orthogonal frequency division multiplex (AOFDM) wide-band speech transceivers are proposed. A constant throughput adaptive OFDM transceiver was designed and benchmarked against a time-variant rate scheme. The proposed joint adaptation of source-codec, channel-codec, and modulation regime results in attractive, robust, high-quality audio systems, capable of conveying near-unimpaired wide-band audio signals over fading dispersive channels for signal-to-noise ...

  4. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  5. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the cargo tank, the cargo pump discharge, or the vapor compressor discharge must have a bursting pressure of...

  6. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; Van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rierveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  7. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject to...

  8. Phasic bursts of the antagonistic jaw muscles during REM sleep mimic a coordinated motor pattern during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T; Nakamura, N; Masuda, Y; Yoshida, A; Morimoto, T; Yamamura, K; Yamashita, S; Sato, F

    2013-02-01

    Sleep-related movement disorders are characterized by the specific phenotypes of muscle activities and movements during sleep. However, the state-specific characteristics of muscle bursts and movement during sleep are poorly understood. In this study, jaw-closing and -opening muscle electromyographic (EMG) activities and jaw movements were quantified to characterize phenotypes of motor patterns during sleep in freely moving and head-restrained guinea pigs. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, both muscles were irregularly activated in terms of duration, activity, and intervals. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, clusters of phasic bursts occurred in the two muscles. Compared with NREM sleep, burst duration, activity, and intervals were less variable during REM sleep for both muscles. Although burst activity was lower during the two sleep states than during chewing, burst duration and intervals during REM sleep were distributed within a similar range to those during chewing. A trigger-averaged analysis of muscle bursts revealed that the temporal association between the bursts of the jaw-closing and -opening muscles during REM sleep was analogous to the temporal association during natural chewing. The burst characteristics of the two muscles reflected irregular patterns of jaw movements during NREM sleep and repetitive alternating bilateral movements during REM sleep. The distinct patterns of jaw muscle bursts and movements reflect state-specific regulations of the jaw motor system during sleep states. Phasic activations in the antagonistic jaw muscles during REM sleep are regulated, at least in part, by the neural networks involving masticatory pattern generation, demonstrating that waking jaw motor patterns are replayed during sleep periods.

  9. External Shock in a Multi-bursting Gamma-Ray Burst: Energy Injection Phase Induced by the Later Launched Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Da-Bin; Huang, Bao-Quan; Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min; Mu, Hui-Jun; Liang, En-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be intermittent and launch several episodes of ejecta separated by a long quiescent interval. In this scenario, an external shock is formed due to the propagation of the first launched ejecta into the circum-burst medium and the later launched ejecta may interact with the external shock at a later period. Owing to the internal dissipation, the later launched ejecta may be observed at a later time (t jet). In this paper, we study the relation of t b and t jet, where t b is the collision time of the later launched ejecta with the formed external shock. It is found that the relation of t b and t jet depends on the bulk Lorentz factor (Γjet) of the later launched ejecta and the density (ρ) of the circum-burst medium. If the value of Γjet or ρ is low, the t b would be significantly larger than t jet. However, the t b ∼ t jet can be found if the value of Γjet or ρ is significantly large. Our results can explain the large lag of the optical emission relative to the γ-ray/X-ray emission in GRBs, e.g., GRB 111209A. For GRBs with a precursor, our results suggest that the energy injection into the external shock and thus more than one external-reverse shock may appear in the main prompt emission phase. According to our model, we estimate the Lorentz factor of the second launched ejecta in GRB 160625B.

  10. The Konus-Wind Catalog of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Known Redshifts. I. Bursts Detected in the Triggered Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, A.; Frederiks, D.; Golenetskii, S.; Lysenko, A.; Oleynik, P.; Pal'shin, V.; Svinkin, D.; Ulanov, M.; Cline, T.; Hurley, K.; Aptekar, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this catalog, we present the results of a systematic study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with reliable redshift estimates detected in the triggered mode of the Konus-Wind (KW) experiment during the period from 1997 February to 2016 June. The sample consists of 150 GRBs (including 12 short/hard bursts) and represents the largest set of cosmological GRBs studied to date over a broad energy band. From the temporal and spectral analyses of the sample, we provide the burst durations, the spectral lags, the results of spectral fits with two model functions, the total energy fluences, and the peak energy fluxes. Based on the GRB redshifts, which span the range 0.1≤slant z≤slant 5, we estimate the rest-frame, isotropic-equivalent energy, and peak luminosity. For 32 GRBs with reasonably constrained jet breaks, we provide the collimation-corrected values of the energetics. We consider the behavior of the rest-frame GRB parameters in the hardness-duration and hardness-intensity planes, and confirm the “Amati” and “Yonetoku” relations for Type II GRBs. The correction for the jet collimation does not improve these correlations for the KW sample. We discuss the influence of instrumental selection effects on the GRB parameter distributions and estimate the KW GRB detection horizon, which extends to z˜ 16.6, stressing the importance of GRBs as probes of the early universe. Accounting for the instrumental bias, we estimate the KW GRB luminosity evolution, luminosity and isotropic-energy functions, and the evolution of the GRB formation rate, which are in general agreement with those obtained in previous studies.

  11. Lixisenatide accelerates restoration of normoglycemia and improves human beta-cell function and survival in diabetic immunodeficient NOD–scid IL-2rgnull RIP-DTR mice engrafted with human islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaoxing Yang,1 Matthias Loehn,2 Agata Jurczyk,1 Natalia Przewozniak,1 Linda Leehy,1 Pedro L Herrera,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 David M Harlan,5 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, Diabetes Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Sanofi-Aventis, Diabetes Division, Frankfurt, Germany; 3University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; 5Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA Objective: Glucagon-like peptide-1 induces glucose-dependent insulin secretion and, in rodents, increases proliferation and survival of pancreatic beta cells. To investigate the effects on human beta cells, we used immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The goal was to determine whether lixisenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, improves human islet function and survival in vivo. Methods: Five independent transplant studies were conducted with human islets from five individual donors. Diabetic human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice were treated with lixisenatide (50, 150, and 500 µg/kg or vehicle. Islet function was determined by blood glucose, plasma human insulin/C-peptide, and glucose tolerance tests. Grafts were analyzed for total beta- and alpha-cell number, percent proliferation, and levels of apoptosis. Results: Diabetic mice transplanted with marginal human islet mass and treated with lixisenatide were restored to euglycemia more rapidly than vehicle-treated mice. Glucose tolerance tests, human plasma insulin, and glucose-stimulation indices of lixisenatide-treated mice were significantly improved compared to vehicle-treated mice. The percentages of proliferating or apoptotic beta cells at graft recovery were not different between lixisenatide-treated and vehicle-treated mice. Nevertheless, in one experiment we found a significant twofold to threefold

  12. Correlation Between Glycated Hemoglobin and Homa Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prediction of Beta-Cell Function from Glycated Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hakeim, Hussein Kadhem; Abdulzahra, Mohammed Saied

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to determine the most efficient insulin resistance function related to glycemic control expressed as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM). The other aim is to derive equations for the prediction of beta cell functions containing HbA1c as a parameter in addition to fasting glucose and insulin. T2DM Patients were grouped according to the following: (1) degree of control (good, fair, and poor control) and (2) insulin resistance as observed in obtained data and significant differences revealed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of related parameters (insulin resistance = HOMA2IR, beta-cell function = HOMA%B, and insulin sensitivity = HOMA%S) among groups. Correlations and forecasting regression analysis were calculated. HbA1c was found to be correlated with insulin resistance parameters in T2DM subgroups. This correlation was also significantly correlated with HOMA%B and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in fair and poor control groups. Regression analysis was used to predict the forecasting equations for HOMA%B. The best applicable equations were derived for healthy control (HOMA2%B=-1.76*FBG+5.00*Insulin+4.69*HbA1c+189.84) and poor control groups (HOMA2%B=0.001* FBG+0.5*Insulin-8.67*HbA1c+101.96). These equations could be used to predict β-cell function (HOMA%B) after FBG, insulin and HbA1c values were obtained for healthy and poor control groups. In the good and fair control groups, the applicability of the HOMA model fails to yield appropriate results. Beta-cell function is correlated with QUICKI and HbA1c and could be predicted properly from HbA1c, insulin, and glucose in the healthy and poor control groups. New regression equations were established that involve HbA1c.

  13. Calbindin-D(28k) controls [Ca(2+)](i) and insulin release. Evidence obtained from calbindin-d(28k) knockout mice and beta cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooy, K.; Schermerhorn, T.; Noda, M.; Surana, M.; Rhoten, W. B.; Meyer, M.; Fleischer, N.; Sharp, G. W.; Christakos, S.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D(28k) in potassium/depolarization-stimulated increases in the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and insulin release was investigated in pancreatic islets from calbindin-D(28k) nullmutant mice (knockouts; KO) or wild type mice and beta cell lines stably transfected and overexpressing calbindin. Using single islets from KO mice and stimulation with 45 mM KCl, the peak of [Ca(2+)](i) was 3.5-fold greater in islets from KO mice compared with wild type islets (p < 0.01) and [Ca(2+)](i) remained higher during the plateau phase. In addition to the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in response to KCl there was also a significant increase in insulin release in islets isolated from KO mice. Evidence for modulation by calbindin of [Ca(2+)](i) and insulin release was also noted using beta cell lines. Rat calbindin was stably expressed in betaTC-3 and betaHC-13 cells. In response to depolarizing concentrations of K(+), insulin release was decreased by 45-47% in calbindin expressing betaTC cells and was decreased by 70-80% in calbindin expressing betaHC cells compared with insulin release from vector transfected betaTC or betaHC cells (p < 0.01). In addition, the K(+)-stimulated intracellular calcium peak was markedly inhibited in calbindin expressing betaHC cells compared with vector transfected cells (225 nM versus 1,100 nM, respectively). Buffering of the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i) was also observed in calbindin expressing betaTC cells. In summary, our findings, using both isolated islets from calbindin-D(28k) KO mice and beta cell lines, establish a role for calbindin in the modulation of depolarization-stimulated insulin release and suggest that calbindin can control the rate of insulin release via regulation of [Ca(2+)](i).

  14. Diagnostics from three rising submillimeter bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts that occurred sequentially in Super Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu GHz −1 (corresponding to spectral index α of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of the 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, but it attained values of 235 sfu GHz −1 (α = 4.8) in the 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of highly relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV, but it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than in the microwave (MW) source. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20%–50% during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW source increased by 28% for the 2003 November 2 event. In the paper we will present a formula that can be used to calculate the energy released by ultrarelativistic electrons, taking the relativistic correction into account for the first time. We find that the energy released by energetic electrons in the THz source exceeds that in the MW source due to the strong GS radiation loss in the THz range, although the modeled THz source area is 3–4 orders smaller than the modeled MW source one. The total energies released by energetic electrons via the GS radiation in radio sources are estimated, respectively, to be 5.2 × 10 33 , 3.9 × 10 33 and 3.7 × 10 32 erg for the October 28, November 2 and 4 bursts, which are 131, 76 and 4 times as large as the thermal energies of 2.9 × 10 31 , 2.1 × 10 31 and 5.2 × 10 31 erg estimated from soft X-ray GOES observations. (paper)

  15. From Enigma to Tool: Gamma-Ray Burst Reveals Secrets of Host Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    , astronomers debated whether the explosions were close, in our own Milky Way Galaxy, or far, in distant galaxies. In addition, a plethora of theories attempted to explain the bursts, but a lack of observational data prevented scientists from choosing among the theories. Optical and radio telescopes first spotted the "afterglows" from gamma- ray bursts in 1997. It was quickly determined that the explosions are occurring in very distant galaxies. Subsequent observations, most astronomers believe, have narrowed the theories down to two: either the explosions are the result of pairs of old, superdense neutron stars colliding with each other or are the death throes of young, very massive stars. "This burst in 1998 came from a region near the center of its host galaxy, where star birth is occuring at a rapid rate. This supports the theory that gamma-ray bursts come from the death explosions of very young, massive stars," said Kulkarni. The burst, known as GRB 980703, was detected by a satellite on July 3, 1998, and the VLA first observed it a day later. The astronomers continued to observe the object with the VLA at intervals over the next 1,000 days. This is the longest period over which a gamma-ray-burst afterglow ever has been observed; the previous record-holder was a burst in 1997 that was followed with the VLA for a period of 445 days. "The afterglow of the burst kept getting fainter with time, but we then noticed that the intensity of radio emission was leveling off. We realized that the burst afterglow was still fading, but what was remaining steady was radio emission from the galaxy itself," Berger said. This allowed the scientists to study the characteristics of the galaxy, and of the region within the galaxy where the burst occurred. They concluded that the gamma-ray burst occurred near the center of the galaxy in a region where the galaxy is experiencing its maximum amount of star formation. "If, as we believe, gamma-ray bursts come from the super-explosions of massive

  16. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Finger, Mark H.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert; Chaplin, Vandiver; Bhat, Narayan; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T 90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T 90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E peak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10 -6 erg cm -2 s -1 , increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, L iso , corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 10 40 erg s -1 ).

  17. Liraglutide effects on beta-cell, insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness in patients with stable coronary artery disease and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anholm, Christian; Kumarathurai, Preman; Pedersen, Lene R.

    2017-01-01

    characteristics were: HbA1c 47 mmol/mol (SD 6), BMI 31.6 kg/m2 (SD 4.8), fasting plasma-glucose 6.9 mmol/L (IQR 6.1; 7.4) and HOMA-IR 4.9 (IQR 3.0; 7.5). Liraglutide treatment improved AIRg by 3-fold, 497 mU × L−1 × min (IQR 342; 626, P ... weight loss of −2.7 kg (−6.7; −0.6) during liraglutide treatment, we found no improvement in HOMA-IR, Si or Sg. Weight loss during liraglutide therapy did not result in a carry-over effect. Conclusion: Liraglutide as add-on to metformin induces a clinically significant improvement in beta-cell function...

  18. Gluten-free diet increases beta-cell volume and improves glucose tolerance in an animal model of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haupt-Jørgensen, Martin; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2016-01-01

    Background Gluten-free (GF) diet alleviates type 1 diabetes in animal models and possibly in humans. We recently showed that fatty acid-induced insulin secretion is enhanced by enzymatically digested gluten (gliadin) stimulation in INS-1E insulinoma cells. We therefore hypothesized that GF diet...... would induce beta-cell rest and ameliorate type 2 diabetes. Methods C57BL/6JBomTac (B6) mice were fed a high-fat (HF), gluten-free high-fat (GF–HF), standard (STD) or gluten-free (GF) diet for 42 weeks. Results Short-term (6–24 weeks) GF–HF versus HF feeding impaired glucose tolerance and increased...... capacity controls pancreas volume. Thus, long-term GF diets may be beneficial for obese type 2 diabetes patients and trials should be performed....

  19. cPLA2alpha-evoked formation of arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids is required for exocytosis in mouse pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Kirstine; Høy, Marianne; Olsen, Hervør L

    2003-01-01

    Using capacitance measurements, we investigated the effects of intracellularly applied recombinant human cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha) and its lipolytic products arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in single mouse pancreatic beta-cells. cPLA2alpha...... from 70-80 to 280-300. cPLA2alpha-stimulated exocytosis was antagonized by the specific cPLA2 inhibitor AACOCF3. Ca2+-evoked exocytosis was reduced by 40% in cells treated with AACOCF3 or an antisense oligonucleotide against cPLA2alpha. The action of cPLA2alpha was mimicked by a combination...... of arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine (470% stimulation) in which each compound alone doubled the exocytotic response. Priming of insulin-containing secretory granules has been reported to involve Cl- uptake through ClC-3 Cl- channels. Accordingly, the stimulatory action of cPLA2alpha was inhibited...

  20. Proteomic screening of glucose-responsive and glucose non-reponsive MIN-6 beta cells reveals differential expression of protein involved in protein fo