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Sample records for beta tokamak research

  1. [High beta tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our activities on High Beta Tokamak Research during the past 20 months of the present grant period can be divided into six areas: reconstruction and modeling of high beta equilibria in HBT; measurement and analysis of MHD instabilities observed in HBT; measurements of impurity transport; diagnostic development on HBT; numerical parameterization of the second stability regime; and conceptual design and assembly of HBT-EP. Each of these is described in some detail in the sections of this progress report

  2. High-beta tokamak research. Annual progress report, 1 August 1982-1 August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main research objectives during the past year fell into four areas: (1) detailed observations over a range of high-beta tokamak equilibria; (2) fabrication of an improved and more flexible high-beta tokamak based on our understanding of the present Torus II; (3) extension of the pulse length to 100 usec with power crowbar operation of the equilibrium field coil sets; and (4) comparison of our equilibrium and stability observations with computational models of MHD equilibrium and stability

  3. High-beta tokamak research. Annual progress report, August 1, 1983-July 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our main research objectives during the past year fell into four areas: (1) construction and initial operation of the new tokamak, HBT; (2) further numerical modeling of the Torus II experimental equilibria using the PPPL equilibrium and stability codes; (3) diagnostic development; and (4) ICRF antenna coupling calculation in 2D and rf current drive

  4. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Neoclassical transport in high [beta] tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, S.C.

    1992-12-01

    Neoclassical, transport in high [beta] large aspect ratio tokamaks is calculated. The variational method introduced by Rosenbluth, et al., is used to calculate the full Onsager matrix in the banana regime. These results are part of a continuing study of the high [beta] large aspect ratio equilibria introduced in Cowley, et al. All the neoclassical coefficients are reduced from their nominal low [beta] values by a factor ([var epsilon]/q[sup 2][beta])[sup [1/2

  6. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of the IAEA-sponsored meeting held in Nice, France 10-11 October, 1988, contain the manuscripts of the 21 reports dealing with research using small tokamaks. The purpose of this meeting was to highlight some of the achievements of small tokamaks and alternative magnetic confinement concepts and assess the suitability of starting new programs, particularly in developing countries. Papers presented were either review papers, or were detailed descriptions of particular experiments or concepts. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  8. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive coordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project, is presented

  10. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  11. Neoclassical transport in high {beta} tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, S.C.

    1992-12-01

    Neoclassical, transport in high {beta} large aspect ratio tokamaks is calculated. The variational method introduced by Rosenbluth, et al., is used to calculate the full Onsager matrix in the banana regime. These results are part of a continuing study of the high {beta} large aspect ratio equilibria introduced in Cowley, et al. All the neoclassical coefficients are reduced from their nominal low {beta} values by a factor ({var_epsilon}/q{sup 2}{beta}){sup {1/2}} II. This factor is the ratio of plasma volume in the boundary layer to the volume in the core. The fraction of trapped particles on a given flux surface (f{sub t}) is also reduced by this factor so that {approximately} {sub ({var_epsilon}}/q{sup 2}{beta}){sup {1/2}}. Special attention is given to the current equation, since this is thought to be relevant at low 3 and therefore may also be relevant at high {beta}. The bootstrap current term is found to exceed the actual current by a factor of the square root of the aspect ratio.

  12. Resistive MHD studies of high-beta tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, V.E.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.

    1982-02-01

    Numerical calculations have been performed to study the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in high-beta tokamaks such as ISX-B. These initial value calculations have been built on earlier low-beta techniques, but the beta effects create several new numerical issues. These issues are discussed and resolved. In addition to time-stepping modules, our system of computer codes includes equilibrium solvers (used to provide an initial condition) and output modules, such as a magnetic field line follower and an x-ray diagnostic code. The transition from current-driven modes at low beta to predominantly pressure-driven modes at high beta is described. The nonlinear studies yield x-ray emissivity plots which are compared with experiment.

  13. Resistive MHD studies of high-. beta. -tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, V.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Garcia, L.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been performed to study the MHD activity in high-..beta.. tokamaks such as ISX-B. These initial value calculations built on earlier low ..beta.. techniques, but the ..beta.. effects create several new numerical issues. These issues are discussed and resolved. In addition to time-stepping modules, our system of computer codes includes equilibrium solvers (used to provide an initial condition) and output modules, such as a magnetic field line follower and an X-ray diagnostic code. The transition from current driven modes at low ..beta.. to predominantly pressure driven modes at high ..beta.. is described. The nonlinear studies yield X-ray emissivity plots which are compared with experiment.

  14. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs

  15. Tokamak research in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important milestones on the way to the tokamak fusion reactor are recapitulated. Soviet tokamak research concentrated at the I.V. Kurchatov Institute in Moscow, the A.F. Ioffe Institute in Leningrad and the Physical-Technical Institute in Sukhumi successfully provides necessary scientific and technological data for reactor design. Achievments include, the successful operation of the first tokamak with superconducting windings (T-7) and the gyrotron set for microwave plasma heating in the T-10 tokamak. The following problems have intensively been studied: Various methods of additional plasma heating, heat and particle transport, and impurity control. The efficiency of electron-cyclotron resonance heating was demonstrated. In the Joule heating regime, both the heat conduction and diffusion rates are anomalously high, but the electron heat conduction rate decreases with increasing plasma density. Progress in impurity control makes it possible to obtain a plasma with effective charge approaching unity. (J.U.)

  16. Beta limits in long-pulse tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, O.; La Haye, R.J.; Chang, Z.; Gates, D.A.; Kamada, Y.; Zohm, H.; Bondeson, A.; Boucher, D.; Callen, J.D.; Chu, M.S.; Gianakon, T.A.; Gruber, O.; Harvey, R.W.; Hegna, C.C.; Lao, L.L.; Monticello, D.A.; Perkins, F.; Pletzer, A.; Reiman, A.H.; Rosenbluth, M.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Waelbroeck, F.; Wesley, J.C.; Wilson, H.R.; Yoshino, R. [CRPP, Assoc. Euratom-Switzerland, PPB-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]|[ITER-JCT, 11025 N Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla, California 92037 (United States)]|[General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)]|[Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)]|[UKAEA Fusion, Culham, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)]|[JAERI, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 311-01 (Japan)]|[MIP fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)]|[Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)]|[University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-16787 (United States)]|[CompX, 12839 Via Grimaldi, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)]|[IFS, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The maximum normalized beta achieved in long-pulse tokamak discharges at low collisionality falls significantly below both that observed in short pulse discharges and that predicted by the ideal MHD theory. Recent long-pulse experiments, in particular those simulating the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [M. Rosenbluth {ital et al.}, {ital Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion} (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995), Vol. 2, p. 517] scenarios with low collisionality {nu}{sub e{sup {asterisk}}}, are often limited by low-m/n nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The effect of saturated MHD modes is a reduction of the confinement time by 10{percent}{endash}20{percent}, depending on the island size and location, and can lead to a disruption. Recent theories on neoclassical destabilization of tearing modes, including the effects of a perturbed helical bootstrap current, are successful in explaining the qualitative behavior of the resistive modes and recent results are consistent with the size of the saturated islands. Also, a strong correlation is observed between the onset of these low-m/n modes with sawteeth, edge localized modes (ELM), or fishbone events, consistent with the seed island required by the theory. We will focus on a quantitative comparison between both the conventional resistive and neoclassical theories, and the experimental results of several machines, which have all observed these low-m/n nonideal modes. This enables us to single out the key issues in projecting the long-pulse beta limits of ITER-size tokamaks and also to discuss possible plasma control methods that can increase the soft {beta} limit, decrease the seed perturbations, and/or diminish the effects on confinement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Poloidal beta and internal inductance measurement on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B; Sun, Y W; Wan, B N; Qian, J P

    2007-09-01

    Poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) measurements are very important for tokamak operation. Much more plasma parameters can be inferred from the two parameters, such as the plasma energy confinement time, the plasma toroidal current profile, and magnetohydrodynamics instability. Using diamagnetic and compensation loop, combining with poloidal magnetic probe array signals, poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) are measured. In this article, the measurement system and arithmetic are introduced. Different experimental results are given in different plasma discharges on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

  18. SST and ADITYA tokamak research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state operation of tokamaks plays an important role in high temperature magnetically confined plasma research. Steady state Superconducting Tokamak (SST) programme in India deals with the development of various technologies in this direction. SST-1 machine has been engineered and is being fabricated at the Institute for Plasma Research. The objectives of the machine are to study physics of plasma processes under steady state condition and develop the technologies related to steady state operation. Various sub-systems are being prototyped and developed. SST-1 is a large aspect ratio machine with a major radius of 1.1 m and a plasma minor radius of 0.2 m with elongation of 1.7 to 1.9 and triangularity of 0.5 to 0.7. It has been designed for 1000 sec operation at 3 T toroidal magnetic eld. Neutral beam Injection and Radio frequency heating systems are being developed to heat the plasma. Lower hybrid Current Drive system would sustain 200 kA of plasma current during 1000 sec operation. ADITYA tokamak has been upgraded with new diagnostics and RF heating systems. Thomson Scattering and ECE diagnostics have been operated. 200 kW Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) systems have been successfully commissioned. RF assisted initial breakdown experiments have been initiated with these systems. (author)

  19. ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] heating and antenna coupling in a high beta tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell's Equations are solved in two-dimensions for the electromagnetic fields in a toroidal cavity using the cold plasma fluid dielectric tensor in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). The Vector Wave Equation is transformed to a set of two, coupled second-order partial differential equations with inhomogeneous forcing functions which model a wave launcher. The resulting equations are finite differenced and solved numerically with a complex banded matrix algorithm on a Cray-2 computer using a code described in this report. This code is used to study power coupling characteristics of a wave launcher for low and high beta tokamaks. The low and high beta equilibrium tokamak magnetic fields applied in this model are determined from analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation. The code shows good correspondence with the results of low field side ICRF heating experiments performed on the Tokamak of Fontenay-Aux-Roses (TFR). Low field side and high field side antenna coupling properties for ICRF heating in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT) experiment are calculated with this code. Variations of antenna position in the tokamak, ionic concentration and plasma density, and volume-averaged beta have been analyzed for HBT. It is found that the location of the antenna with respect to the plasma has the dominant role in the design of an ICRF heating experiment in HBT. 10 refs., 52 figs., 13 tabs

  20. Safety and deterministic failure analyses in high-beta D-D tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and deterministic failure analyses were performed to compare major component failure characteristics for different high-beta D-D tokamak reactors. The primary focus was on evaluating damage to the reactor facility. The analyses also considered potential hazards to the general public and operational personnel. Parametric designs of high-beta D-D tokamak reactors were developed, using WILDCAT as the reference. The size, and toroidal field strength were reduced, and the fusion power increased in an independent manner. These changes were expected to improve the economics of D-D tokamaks. Issues examined using these designs were radiation induced failurs, radiation safety, first wall failure from plasma disruptions, and toroidal field magnet coil failure

  1. Production and maintenance of high poloidal beta tokamak plasmas by means of rf current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckhardt, S.C.; Chen, K.; Coda, S.; Kesner, J.; Kirkwood, R.; Lane, B.; Porkolab, M.; Squire, J.

    1989-03-27

    It is shown that in tokamak plasmas sustained by rf current drive, the contribution of the suprathermal rf-driven electron population to the poloidal beta (..beta../sub p/) can be substantial if the total current is comparable to the Alfven critical current, I/sub A/ = (4..pi..mcv/..mu../sub 0/ec)..gamma... Equilibria with values of epsilon..beta../sub p/ up to approximately 1.3 were obtained, and no equilibrium or gross stability limits were observed.

  2. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  3. High-beta operation and magnetohydrodynamic activity on the TFTR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.; Arunasalam, V.; Barnes, C. W.; Bell, M. G.; Bitter, M.; Boivin, R.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T. K.; Cohen, S. A.; Colestock, P.; Davis, S. L.; Dimock, D. L.; Dylla, H. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ehrhrardt, A. B.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E.; Furth, H. P.; Gammel, G.; Goldston, R. J.; Greene, G.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Hendel, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hinnov, E.; Hoffman, D. J.; Hosea, J.; Howell, R. B.; Hsuan, H.; Hulse, R. A.; Janos, A. C.; Jassby, D.; Jobes, F.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kaita, R.; Kieras-Phillips, C.; Kilpatrick, S. J.; LaMarche, P. H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manos, D. M.; Mansfield, D. K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; McCune, M. C.; McNeill, D. H.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Monticello, D.; Motley, R.; Mueller, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagayama, Y.; Nazakian, D. R.; Neischmidt, E. B.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Pitcher, S.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rutherford, P. H.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Sinnis, J. C.; Stevens, J.; Stratton, B. C.; Stodiek, W.; Synakowski, E. J.; Tang, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J. R.; Towner, H. H.; Ulrickson, M.; von Goeler, S.; Wieland, R.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K.-L.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity within three zones (core, half-radius, and edge) of TFTR ( Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 51) tokamak plasmas are discussed. Near the core of the plasma column, sawteeth are often observed. Two types of sawteeth are studied in detail; one with complete, and the other with incomplete, magnetic reconnection. Their characteristics are determined by the shape of the q profile. Near the half-radius the m/n =3/2 and 2/1 resistive ballooning modes are found to correlate with a beta collapse. The pressure and the pressure gradient at the mode rational surface are found to play an important role in stability. MHD activity is also studied at the plasma edge during limiter H modes. The edge localized modes (ELM's) are found to have a precursor mode with a frequency between 50--500 kHz and a mode number m/n=1/0. The mode does not show a ballooning structure. While these instabilities have been studied on many other machines, on TFTR the studies have been extended to high pressure (plasma pressure greater than 4 x 10⁵ Pa) and low collisionality ( vi*(a/2) < 0.002, ve* ( a/2)< 0.01).

  4. Spectroscopic study of turbulent heating in the high beta tokamak - Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visible spectroscopy, involving line profile and line intensity measurements, was used to study the turbulent heating of the rectangular cross-section high-beta tokamak Torus II. The spectroscopy was done in the visible wave-length region using a six channel polychrometer having 0.2 A resolution, which is capable of radial scans of the plasma. The plasma, obtained by ionizing helium, is heated by poloidal skin currents, induced by a rapid (tau/sub R/ approx. = 1.7 μsec) change of the toroidal magnetic field either parallel or anti-parallel to the initial toroidal bias magnetic field, which converts a cold toroidal Z-pinch plasma into a hot tokamak plasma

  5. Spectroscopic study of turbulent heating in the high beta tokamak - Torus II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Visible spectroscopy, involving line profile and line intensity measurements, was used to study the turbulent heating of the rectangular cross-section high-beta tokamak Torus II. The spectroscopy was done in the visible wave-length region using a six channel polychrometer having 0.2 A resolution, which is capable of radial scans of the plasma. The plasma, obtained by ionizing helium, is heated by poloidal skin currents, induced by a rapid (tau/sub R/ approx. = 1.7 ..mu..sec) change of the toroidal magnetic field either parallel or anti-parallel to the initial toroidal bias magnetic field, which converts a cold toroidal Z-pinch plasma into a hot tokamak plasma.

  6. Proposal for the construction of a High-Beta Tokamak at LASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Laan, P.C.T.; Freidberg, J.P.; Thomas, K.S.

    1976-06-01

    The large heating rate inherent to implosion heating allows the rapid generation of high-beta tokamak plasmas. A study of these plasmas in the proposed HBT machine can give information on how MHD equilibrium and stability limit ..beta.. and q. Both a wide current profile and a moderate elongation of the minor cross section should help to raise the permissible peak ..beta.. values in HBT to at least 20 percent. The longer term loss processes occurring in MHD-stable plasmas are to be investigated. The main parameters of HBT are: R = 0.30 m, minor cross section a racetrack of width and height 0.24 m and 0.48 m, B/sub phi/ = 2 T, I/sub phi/ approximately 750 kA.

  7. Research using small tokamaks. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports in these proceedings were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on research Using Small Tokamaks, held in Ahmedabad, India, 6-7 December 1995. The purpose of this annual meeting is to provide a forum for the exchange of information on various small and medium sized plasma experiments, not only for tokamaks. The potential benefits of these research programmes are to: test theories, such as effects of the plasma rotation; check empirical scalings, such as density limits; develop fusion technology hardware; develop plasma diagnostics; such as tomography; and to train scientists, engineers, technicians, and students, particularly in developing IAEA Member States

  8. Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meglicki, Z

    1995-09-19

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs.

  9. Application of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance in determination of input power time of Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Ehsanallah; Sadeghi, Yahya; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    In this study, magnetic measurement of poloidal fields were used to determine poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance of Damavand tokamak combination of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance (β _p+{l_i}/{2} ), known as Shafranov parameter, was obtained experimentally in terms of normal and tangential components of the magnetic field. Plasma internal inductance and poloidal beta were obtained using parametrization method based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) and compared with parabolic-like profile of toroidal current density approach for determination of the plasma internal inductance. Finding evolution of β _p+{l_i}/{2} and plasma internal inductance. Finding poloidal beta (Shafranov parameter and internal inductance) and using energy balance equation, thermal energy and energy confinement were determined qualitatively in terms of poloidal beta during a regular discharge of Damavand tokamak.

  10. Spherical tokamak research for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between ITER and the commercial fusion reactor, there are many technological problems to be solved such as cost, neutron and steady-state operation. In the conceptual design of VECTOR and Slim CS reactors it was shown that the key is 'low aspect ratio'. The spherical tokamak (ST) has been expected as the base for fusion reactors. In US, ST is considered as a non-superconducting reactor for use in the neutron irradiation facility. Conceptual design of the superconducting ST reactor is conducted in Japan and Korea independently. In the present article, the prospect of the ST reactor design is discussed. (author)

  11. DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Research Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of long-pulse, high performance discharges on the DIII-D tokamak. It is highlighted by a discharge achieving simultaneously βNH of 9, bootstrap current fraction of 0.5, noninductive current fraction of 0.75, and sustained for 16 energy confinement times. The physics challenge has changed in the long-pulse regime. Non-ideal MHD modes are limiting the stability, fast ion driven modes may play a role in fast ion transport which limits the stored energy and plasma edge behavior can affect the global performance. New control tools are being developed to address these issues

  12. Measurement of high-beta tokamak pressure profiles with multipoint Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multipoint Thomson-scattering system has been developed to obtain pressure profiles along the major radius of Torus II, a high-beta tokamak. The profiles obtained during the 20 to 25 μs lifetime of the discharge indicates that the plasma has a peak temperature of 80 eV and density of 1.0 x 1015 cm-3. The profiles remain fairly constant during this time until the equilibrium is lost, after which the temperature and density decays to 10 eV and 1014 cm-3 very quickly (approx. 1 μs). Experimental results show Torus II has a high-beta ( approx. 10%) equilibrium, with a strong shift of the peak of the pressure profile towards the outside. Numerical results from a 2-D free boundary MHD equilibrium code have obtained equilibria which closely approximate the experimentally measured profiles

  13. Role of explosive instabilities in high-$\\beta$ disruptions in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Aydemir, A Y; Lee, S G; Seol, J; Park, B H; In, Y K

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically explosive growth of a ballooning finger is demonstrated in nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic calculations of high-$\\beta$ disruptions in tokamaks. The explosive finger is formed by an ideally unstable n=1 mode, dominated by an m/n=2/1 component. The quadrupole geometry of the 2/1 perturbed pressure field provides a generic mechanism for the formation of the initial ballooning finger and its subsequent transition from exponential to explosive growth, without relying on secondary processes. The explosive ejection of the hot plasma from the core and stochastization of the magnetic field occur in Alfv\\'enic time scales, accounting for the extremely fast growth of the precursor oscillations and the rapidity of the thermal quench in some high-$\\beta$ disruptions.

  14. Abstracts of the International seminar 'Experimental possibilities of KTM tokamak and research programme'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International seminar 'Experimental possibilities of KTM tokamak and research programme' was held in 10-12 October 2005 in Astana city (Kazakhstan). The seminar was dedicated to problems of KTM tokamak commissioning. The Collection of abstracts comprises 45 papers

  15. Finite beta effects on turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research on the transport properties of magnetically confined plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical nuclear fusion energy. An economically viable fusion reactor is expected to operate at high plasma pressure. This implies that the detailed study of the impact of electromagnetic effects, whose strength increases with increasing pressure, is of critical importance. In the present work, the electromagnetic effects on the particle, momentum and heat transport channels have been investigated, with both analytical and numerical calculations. Transport processes due to a finite plasma pressure have been identified, their physical mechanisms have been explained, and their contributions have been quantified, showing that they can be significant under experimentally relevant conditions.

  16. Effect of the Shafranov shift and the gradient of $\\beta$ on intrinsic momentum transport in up-down asymmetric tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Justin; Lee, Jungpyo; Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-01-01

    Tokamaks with up-down asymmetric poloidal cross-sections spontaneously rotate due to turbulent transport of momentum. In this work, we investigate the effect of the Shafranov shift on this intrinsic rotation, primarily by analyzing tokamaks with tilted elliptical flux surfaces. By expanding the Grad-Shafranov equation in the large aspect ratio limit we calculate the magnitude and direction of the Shafranov shift in tilted elliptical tokamaks. The results show that, while the Shafranov shift becomes up-down asymmetric and depends strongly on the tilt angle of the flux surfaces, it is insensitive to the shape of the current and pressure profiles (when specific experimental parameters are kept fixed). Next, local nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of these MHD equilibria are performed with GS2, which reveal that the Shafranov shift can significantly enhance the momentum transport. However, to be consistent, the effect of $\\beta'$ (i.e. the radial gradient of $\\beta$) on the magnetic equilibrium was also included....

  17. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak ''HBT'' [High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (ne ∼ 1 - 5 x 1014 (cm-3), Te ∼ 4 - 10 (eV), Bt ∼ 0.2 - 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of CII(4267A, emitted by the C+ ions) and CIII (4647A, emitted by the C++ ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is ''classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the Hα emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time τp is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time τE; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy

  18. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits

  19. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  20. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov`s results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov`s result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  1. Passive stabilization of MHD instabilities at high {beta}n in the HBT-EP Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    The HBT-EP Tokamak has been designed, built, and is now fully operational in the Columbia University Plasma Physics Laboratory. One of the primary purposes of this facility is to study the effects of a conducting wall on the MHD modes that lead up to plasma disruptions. Of particular interest are the types of instabilities that are driven by the kinetic pressure of the plasma, because these instabilities are believed to be responsible for the present limit to plasma {beta} with {beta} {proportional_to}

    /B{sup 2}, where the

    is the volume averaged pressure and B is the magnetic field. To this end, a movable conducting wall has been installed inside the HBT-EP vacuum chamber. The primary result of this thesis are the initial results from experiments that study the effect of this wall on plasma instabilities. The experiment shows that the conducting wall significantly reduces the growth rate of instabilities that precede a plasma disruption that occurs when the value of {beta} is near the Troyon limit. The location of the wall required for significant stabilization is b/a {approximately}1.2 where a is the minor radius of the plasma and b is the minor radial location of the wall. Moving the wall closer than b/a = 1.2 slightly degrades the stabilizing effect, which is consistent with recent theories.

  2. Reversal of particle flux in collisional-finite beta tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Weiland, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Chalmers University of Technology and EURATOM-VR Association, Gothenburg (Sweden); Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The mixed gradient method [Zhong et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265001 (2013)] is adopted and effects of collisions and finite beta are included in the Weiland 9-equation fluid model. The particle flux and particle pinch, obtained using the Weiland anomalous transport fluid model, are compared with Tore Supra experimental results. Particle transport is also studied using predictive simulation data for an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak discharge in which neutral beam heating is utilized. The effects of collisions on particle transport are studied by turning collisions on and off in the Weiland model. It is found that the particle pinch region is related to the mode structure. The particle pinch region coincides with the region where the strong ballooning modes are present due to large gradients. The general properties of the fluid model are examined by finding regions where collisions can enhance the particle pinch.

  3. Future directions in fusion research: Super high field tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental results and advances in magnet engineering suggest that super high field, high aspect ratio tokamak devices could be a very efficient way to achieve burning plasma conditions and could open up a new area of research. Copper magnet devices with fields of 13 to 25 T at the plasma are considered. The super high field approach could also provide advantages for ETR and demonstration/commercial reactor concepts (magnetic fields at the plasma in the 8 to 13 T range)

  4. High-beta equilibria in tokamaks with pressure anisotropy and toroidal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, B.; Hole, M. J.; Ridden-Harper, R.

    2015-12-01

    We extend previous analytical calculations of 2D high-β equilibria in order-unity aspect ratio tokamaks with toroidal flow to include pressure anisotropy, assuming guiding-center theory for a bi-Maxwellian plasma and the ideal MHD Ohm's law. Equilibrium solutions are obtained in the core region (which fills most of the plasma volume) and the boundary layer. We find that pressure anisotropy with p∥>p⊥ ( p∥Ωmin ) were previously found to suppress the field-free region (diamagnetic hole) that exists in static isotropic high-β equilibria. We find that all equilibrium solutions with pressure anisotropy suppress the diamagnetic hole. For the static case with a volume-averaged toroidal beta of 70%, plasmas with max (p∥/p⊥)>α1=1.07 have equilibrium solutions. We find that α1 decreases with increasing toroidal flow speed, and above the flow threshold Ωmin we find α1=1 , so that all p∥>p⊥ plasmas have equilibrium solutions. On the other hand, for p∥p⊥ , while the converse is true for p∥

  5. Observations of toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macroscopic rotation of plasma in a toroidal containment device is an important feature of the equilibrium. Toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II is measured experimentally by examining the Doppler shift of the 4685.75 A He II line emitted from the plasma. The toroidal flow at an average velocity of 1.6 x 106 cm/sec, a small fraction of the ion thermal speed, moves in the same direction as the toroidal plasma current. The poloidal flow follows the ion diamagnetic current direction, also at an average speed of 1.6 x 106 cm/sec. In view of certain ordering parameters, the toroidal flow is compared with predictions from neoclassical theory in the collosional, Pfirsch-Schluter regime. The poloidal motion, however results from an E x B drift in a positive radial electric field, approaching a stable ambipolar state. This radial electric field is determined from theory by using the measured poloidal velocity. Mechanisms for the time evolution of rotation are also examined. It appears that the circulation damping is governed by a global decay of the temperature and density gradients which, in turn, may be functions of radiative cooling, loss of equilibrium due to external field decay, or the emergence of a growing instability, occasionally observed in CO2 interferometry measurements

  6. Proposals for an influential role of small tokamaks in mainstream fusion physics and technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small tokamaks may significantly contribute to the better understanding of phenomena in a wide range of fields such as plasma confinement and energy transport; plasma stability in different magnetic configurations; plasma turbulence and its impact on local and global plasma parameters; processes at the plasma edge and plasma-wall interaction; scenarios of additional heating and non-inductive current drive; new methods of plasma profile and parameter control; development of novel plasma diagnostics; benchmarking of new numerical codes and so on. Furthermore, due to the compactness, flexibility, low operation costs and high skill of their personnel small tokamaks are very convenient to develop and test new materials and technologies, which because of the risky nature cannot be done in large machines without preliminary studies. Small tokamaks are suitable and important for broad international cooperation, providing the necessary environment and manpower to conduct dedicated joint research programmes. In addition, the experimental work on small tokamaks is very appropriate for the education of students, scientific activities of post-graduate students and for the training of personnel for large tokamaks. All these tasks are well recognised and reflected in documents and understood by the large tokamak teams. Recent experimental results will be presented of contributions to mainstream fusion physics and technology research on small tokamaks involved in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project 'Joint Research using small tokamaks', started in 2004

  7. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new

  8. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, C. K.; Hong, B. G.; Hong, G. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new.

  9. Stabilization of ideal modes by resistive walls in tokamaks with plasma rotation and its effect on the beta limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that pressure-driven, ideal external modes in tokamaks can be fully stabilized by resistive walls when the plasma rotates at some fraction of the sound speed. For wall stabilized plasmas, there are two types of potentially unstable external modes: those which are nearly locked to the wall and those which rotate with the plasma. For the modes rotating with the plasma, the stabilizing effect of the wall increases when the wall is brought closer to the plasma, while, for the wall-locked modes, the stabilization improves with increasing wall distance. When the plasma rotates at some fraction of the sound speed, there is a window of stability to both the wall-locked and the rotating mode. This window closes when beta exceeds a new limit which can be significantly higher than the wall-at-infinity limit. The stabilization depends principally on the toroidal coupling to sound waves and is affected by ion Landau damping. Two dimensional stability calculations are presented to evaluate the gains in beta limit resulting from this wall stabilization for different equilibria and rotation speeds. In particular, results are shown for advanced tokamak configurations with bootstrap fractions of ≅ 100%. (author) 14 figs., 25 refs

  10. Experimental study of external kink instabilities in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of power through controlled thermonuclear fusion reactions in a magnetically confined plasma holds promise as a means of supplying mankind's future energy needs. The device most technologically advanced in pursuit of this goal is the tokamak, a machine in which a current-carrying toroidal plasma is thermally isolated from its surroundings by a strong magnetic field. To be viable, the tokamak reactor must produce a sufficiently large amount of power relative to that needed to sustain the fusion reactions. Plasma instabilities may severely limit this possibility. In this work, I describe experimental measurements of the magnetic structure of large-scale, rapidly-growing instabilities that occur in a tokamak when the current or pressure of the plasma exceeds a critical value relative to the magnetic field, and I compare these measurements with theoretical predictions

  11. Probe diagnostics in the far scrape-off layer plasma of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak using a sideband harmonic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma characteristics in the far scrape-off layer region of tokamak play a crucial role in the stable plasma operation and its sustainability. Due to the huge facility, electrical diagnostic systems to measure plasma properties have extremely long cable length resulting in large stray current. To overcome this problem, a sideband harmonic method was applied to the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak plasma. The sideband method allows the measurement of the electron temperature and the plasma density without the effect of the stray current. The measured plasma densities are compared with those from the interferometer, and the results show reliability of the method

  12. Probe diagnostics in the far scrape-off layer plasma of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak using a sideband harmonic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hwan [Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suk-Ho [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Il-Seo; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Plasma characteristics in the far scrape-off layer region of tokamak play a crucial role in the stable plasma operation and its sustainability. Due to the huge facility, electrical diagnostic systems to measure plasma properties have extremely long cable length resulting in large stray current. To overcome this problem, a sideband harmonic method was applied to the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak plasma. The sideband method allows the measurement of the electron temperature and the plasma density without the effect of the stray current. The measured plasma densities are compared with those from the interferometer, and the results show reliability of the method.

  13. Probe diagnostics in the far scrape-off layer plasma of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak using a sideband harmonic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Hong, Suk-Ho; Park, Il-Seo; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    Plasma characteristics in the far scrape-off layer region of tokamak play a crucial role in the stable plasma operation and its sustainability. Due to the huge facility, electrical diagnostic systems to measure plasma properties have extremely long cable length resulting in large stray current. To overcome this problem, a sideband harmonic method was applied to the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak plasma. The sideband method allows the measurement of the electron temperature and the plasma density without the effect of the stray current. The measured plasma densities are compared with those from the interferometer, and the results show reliability of the method.

  14. Overview of recent and current research on the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Codathe TCV Team

    2013-10-01

    Through a diverse research programme, the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) addresses physics issues and develops tools for ITER and for the longer term goals of nuclear fusion, relying especially on its extreme plasma shaping and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) launching flexibility and preparing for an ECRH and NBI power upgrade. Localized edge heating was unexpectedly found to decrease the period and relative energy loss of edge localized modes (ELMs). Successful ELM pacing has been demonstrated by following individual ELM detection with an ECRH power cut before turning the power back up to trigger the next ELM, the duration of the cut determining the ELM period. Negative triangularity was also seen to reduce the ELM energy release. H-mode studies have focused on the L-H threshold dependence on the main ion species and on the divertor leg length. Both L- and H-modes have been explored in the snowflake configuration with emphasis on edge measurements, revealing that the heat flux to the strike points on the secondary separatrix increases as the X-points approach each other, well before they coalesce. In L-mode, a systematic scan of the auxiliary power deposition profile, with no effect on confinement, has ruled it out as the cause of confinement degradation. An ECRH power absorption observer based on transmitted stray radiation was validated for eventual polarization control. A new profile control methodology was introduced, relying on real-time modelling to supplement diagnostic information; the RAPTOR current transport code in particular has been employed for joint control of the internal inductance and central temperature. An internal inductance controller using the ohmic transformer has also been demonstrated. Fundamental investigations of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) seed island formation by sawtooth crashes and of NTM destabilization in the absence of a sawtooth trigger were carried out. Both stabilizing and destabilizing agents

  15. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  16. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D3He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  17. 20 years of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwald, Martin; Bader, A; Baek, S.; M. Bakhtiari; Barnard, H.; Beck, W.; Bergerson, W; Bespamyatnov, I; Bonoli, P.; Brower, D; Brunner, D.; Burke, W.; Candy, J.; Churchill, M; Cziegler, I.

    2014-01-01

    The object of this review is to summarize the achievements of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994) and Marmar, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)] and to place that research in the context of the quest for practical fusion energy. C-Mod is a compact, high-field tokamak, whose unique design and operating parameters have produced a wealth of new and important results since it began operation in 1993, contributing data that extends tests of crit...

  18. Preliminary Study of Ideal Operational MHD Beta Limit in HL-2A Tokamak Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Yong; DONG Jiaqi; HE Hongda; A. D. TURNBULL

    2009-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) n=1 kink mode with n the toroidal mode number is studied and the operational beta limit, constrained by the mode, is calculated for the equilibrium of HL-2A by using the GATO code. Approximately the same beta limit is obtained for configurations with a value of the axial safety factor q0 both larger and less than 1. Without the stabilization of the conducting wall, the beta limit is found to be 0.821% corresponding to a normalized beta value of βcN=2.56 for a typical HL-2A discharge with a plasma current Ip=0.245 MA, and the scaling of βcN~constant is confirmed.

  19. Preliminary Study of Ideal Operational MHD Beta Limit in HL-2A Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Dong, Jiaqi; He, Hongda; D. Turnbull, A.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) n = 1 kink mode with n the toroidal mode number is studied and the operational beta limit, constrained by the mode, is calculated for the equilibrium of HL-2A by using the GATO code. Approximately the same beta limit is obtained for configurations with a value of the axial safety factor q0 both larger and less than 1. Without the stabilization of the conducting wall, the beta limit is found to be 0.821% corresponding to a normalized beta value of βcN = 2.56 for a typical HL-2A discharge with a plasma current Ip = 0.245 MA, and the scaling of βcN ~constant is confirmed.

  20. An experimental study of lower-hybrid wave driven high-poloidal beta plasmas in the Versator II tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    High poloidal beta plasma equilibria have been produced by both toroidally asymmetric and symmetric lower-hybrid rf injection in the Versator II tokamak. (Here [beta][sub p] is the ratio of the plasma pressure to the poloidal magnetic field pressure, and [epsilon] = a/R[sub 0] is the inverse aspect ratio). In both cases the plasma current was fully sustained by the rf, with the loop voltage negligibly small. The rf-created high energy electron distribution function, which provides a large fraction of plasma current and pressure in these plasmas, is studied by means of X-ray spectroscopy of the electron-ion perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field and emission measurements at a full range of angles to the toroidal magnetic field have been carried out. For low plasma current equilibria, [beta][sub p] is enhanced, and an outward shift in major radius of the X-ray emission profile peak was observed, corresponding to a Shafranov shift of the magnetic axis. The LHCD equilibrium current profiles was determined from the X-ray emission profile. The LHCD X-ray data indicate a highly anisotropic energetic electron distribution function with a density approximately 1% of the bulk electron density at the center. The stored energy of this distribution is much larger than the bulk energy and the global energy confinement time scales in agreement with the Kaye-Goldston L-mode scaling. At high values of [beta][sub p] [approximately] 3, LHH generates nearly the same plasma current as LHCD. The LHH equilibria has a reduction of up to a factor of four in the high energy X-ray emission flux, as compared to LHCD. Modeling of the electron distribution function in the LHH case indicates that only one third of the current is carried by the high energy electrons. At lower values of [beta][sub p] [approximately] 1.5, LHH requires the assistance of a small applied loop voltage to maintain the plasma current and the high energy electrons carry a majority of the plasma current.

  1. A Research Program of Spherical Tokamak in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何也熙

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this program is to explore the spherical torus plasma with a SUNIST spherical tokamak. Main experiments in the start phase will be involved with breakdown and plasma current set-up with a mode of saving volt-second and without ohmic heating system, equilibrium and instability, current driving, heating and profile modification. The SUNIST is a university-scale conceptual spherical tokamak, with R = 0.3 m, A 1.3, Ip ~ 50 kA, BT < 0.15 T, and PRF = 100 kW. The only peculiarity of SUNIST is that there is a toroidal insulating break along the outer wall of vacuum vessel. The expected that advantages of this arrangement are helpful not only for saving flux swing, but also for having a deep understanding of what will influence the discharge startup and globe performances of plasma under different conditions of strong vessel eddy and ECR power assistance. Of course, the vessel structure of cross seal will be at a great risk of controlling vacuum quality, although we have achieved positive results on simulation test and vacuum vessel test.

  2. Electromagnetic stabilization of tokamak microturbulence in a high-$\\beta$ regime

    CERN Document Server

    Citrin, J; Goerler, T; Jenko, F; Mantica, P; Told, D; Bourdelle, C; Hatch, D R; Hogeweij, G M D; Johnson, T; Pueschel, M J; Schneider, M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of electromagnetic stabilization and flow shear stabilization on ITG turbulence is investigated. Analysis of a low-$\\beta$ JET L-mode discharge illustrates the relation between ITG stabilization, and proximity to the electromagnetic instability threshold. This threshold is reduced by suprathermal pressure gradients, highlighting the effectiveness of fast ions in ITG stabilization. Extensive linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are then carried out for the high-$\\beta$ JET hybrid discharge 75225, at two separate locations at inner and outer radii. It is found that at the inner radius, nonlinear electromagnetic stabilization is dominant, and is critical for achieving simulated heat fluxes in agreement with the experiment. The enhancement of this effect by suprathermal pressure also remains significant. It is also found that flow shear stabilization is not effective at the inner radii. However, at outer radii the situation is reversed. Electromagnetic stabilization is negligible while the flow...

  3. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available

  4. Analysis of line integrated electron density using plasma position data on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 280 GHz single-channel horizontal millimeter-wave interferometer system has been installed for plasma electron density measurements on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. This system has a triangular beam path that does not pass through the plasma axis due to geometrical constraints in the superconducting tokamak. The term line density on KSTAR has a different meaning from the line density of other tokamaks. To estimate the peak density and the mean density from the measured line density, information on the position of the plasma is needed. The information has been calculated from tangentially viewed visible images using the toroidal symmetry of the plasma. Interface definition language routines have been developed for this purpose. The calculated plasma position data correspond well to calculation results from magnetic analysis. With the position data and an estimated plasma profile, the peak density and the mean density have been obtained from the line density. From these results, changes of plasma density themselves can be separated from effects of the plasma movements, so they can give valuable information on the plasma status.

  5. Korea Superconducting tokamak advanced research project - Development of heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    The heating and current drive systems for KSTAR based on multiple technologies (neutral beam, ion cyclotron, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron) have been designed to provide heating and current drive capabilities as well as flexibility in the control of current density and pressure profiles needed to meet the mission and research objectives of the machine. They are designed to operate for long-pulse lengths of up to 300 s. The NBI system initially delivers 8 MW of neutral beam power to the plasma from one co-directed beam line and shall be upgraded to provide 20 MW of neutral beam power with two co-directed beam lines plus one counter-directed beam line. It will be capable of being reconfigured such that the source arrangement is changed from horizontal to vertical stacking, with 6 MW beam power to the plasmas per beam line, in order to facilitate profile control. The RF system initially delivers 6 MW of rf power to the plasma, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. The system will be upgraded to proved 12 MW of rf power through 2 adjacent ports. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of RF system and the system have the capabilities to be operationable for pulse length up to 300 sec and in the 25-60 MHz frequency range. Lower hybrid system initially provides 1.5 MW LH rf power to the plasma at 3.7 GHz through a horizontal port, which has a capability to be operated for pulse length up to 300 sec, and shall be upgraded to provide 4.5 MW of LH rf power to the plasma. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of LHCD system which incorporate the TPX-type launcher and independently phase-changeable transmission system for the fully phased coupler. The ECH system will deliver up to 0.5 MW of power to the plasma for up to 0.5 sec. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of ECH system which includes an 84 GHz gyrotron system, a transmission system, and a launcher. The basic design of the low loss transmission system

  6. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  7. RESEARCH OF BETA AS ADEQUATE RISK MEASURE-IS BETA STILL ALIVE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ante Perković

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The capital asset pricing model (CAPM is one of the most important models in financial economics and it has a long history of theoretical and empirical investigations. The main underlying concept of the CAPM model is that assets with a high risk (high beta should earn a higher return than assets with a low risk (low beta and vice versa. The implication which can be drawn out of this is that all assets with a beta above zero bear some risk and therefore their expected return is above the return of the risk-free rate. In this research observation on monthly stock prices on Croatian stock market from January 1st 2005 until December 31st 2009 is used to form our sample. CROBEX index is used as proxy of the market portfolio. The results demonstrate that beta can not be trusted in making investment decisions and rejects the validity of the whole CAPM model on Croatian stock market.

  8. The CIT [compact ignition tokamak] pellet injection system: Description and supporting research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) will use an advance, high-velocity pellet injection system to achieve and maintain ignited plasmas. Two pellet injectors are provided: a moderate-velocity (1-to 1.5-km/s), single-stage pneumatic injector with high reliability and a high-velocity (4- to 5-km/s), two-stage pellet injector that uses frozen hydrogenic pellets encased in sabots. Both pellet injectors are qualified for operation with tritium feed gas. Issues such as performance, neutron activation of injector components, maintenance, design of the pellet injection vacuum line, gas loads to the reprocessing system, and equipment layout are discussed. Results and plans for supporting research and development (R and D) in the areas of tritium pellet fabrication and high-velocity, repetitive two-stage pneumatic injectors are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Remote maintenance design activities and research and development accomplishments for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations. The remote operations consist of removing and replacing such components as first wall armor protection tiles, radio-frequency (rf) heating modules, and diagnostic modules. The major pieces of equipment being developed for maintenance activities internal to the vacuum vessel include an articulated boom manipulator (ABM), an inspection manipulator, and special tooling. For activities external to the vessel, the equipment includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system, decontamination equipment, hot cell equipment, and solid radiation-waste (rad-waste) handling and packaging equipment. The CIT Project is completing the conceptual design phase; research and development (R and D) activities, which include demonstrations of remote maintenance operations on full-size partial mock-ups are under way. 5 figs

  10. Researches on the Neutral Gas Pressure in the Divertor Chamber of the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMingxu; LIBo; YANGZhigang; YANLongwen; HONGWenyu; YUANBaoshan; LIULi; CAOZeng; CUIChenghe; LIUYong; WANGEnyao; ZHANGNianman

    2003-01-01

    The neutral gas pressure in divertor chamber is a very basic and important physics parameter because it determines the temperature of charged particles, the thermal flux density onto divertor plates, the erosion of divertor plates, impurity retaining and exhausting, particle transportation and confinement performance of plasma in tokamaks. Therefore, the pressure measurement in divertor chamber is taken into account in many large tokamaks.

  11. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  12. The Fusion Science Research Plan for the Major U.S. Tokamaks. Advisory report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In summary, the community has developed a research plan for the major tokamak facilities that will produce impressive scientific benefits over the next two years. The plan is well aligned with the new mission and goals of the restructured fusion energy sciences program recommended by FEAC. Budget increases for all three facilities will allow their programs to move forward in FY 1997, increasing their rate of scientific progress. With a shutdown deadline now established, the TFTR will forego all but a few critical upgrades and maximize operation to achieve a set of high-priority scientific objectives with deuterium-tritium plasmas. The DIII-D and Alcator C-Mod facilities will still fall well short of full utilization. Increasing the run time in vii DIII-D is recommended to increase the scientific output using its existing capabilities, even if scheduled upgrades must be further delayed. An increase in the Alcator C-Mod budget is recommended, at the expense of equal and modest reductions (~1%) in the other two facilities if necessary, to develop its capabilities for the long-term and increase its near-term scientific output.

  13. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  14. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category

  15. Planning for US ion cyclotron heating research relevant to the Compact Ignition Tokamak and Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion cyclotron heating (ICH) has been chosen as the primary method for providing auxiliary heating power to the plasma in the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Sustained progress in ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating experiments, together with supporting technology development, continues to justify selection of this technique as the preferred one for heating CIT to ignition. However, the CIT requirements are sufficiently different from existing achievements that continued experimentation and development are needed to meet the goals of the CIT experiment with a high degree of reliability. The purpose of this report is fourfold: (1) to review briefly the physics and technology research and development (R and D) needs for ICH on CIT, (2) to review the status of and planned programs for ICH on US and international machines, (3) to propose a unified ''mainline'' R and D program specifically geared to testing components for CIT, and (4) to assess the needs for experiments including C-Mod, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), and DIII-D to provide earlier information and improved probability of success for CIT ICH. 4 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  17. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  18. Solenoid-free plasma start-up in spherical tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    The central solenoid is an intrinsic part of all present-day tokamaks and most spherical tokamaks. The spherical torus (ST) confinement concept is projected to operate at high toroidal beta and at a high fraction of the non-inductive bootstrap current as required for an efficient reactor system. The use of a conventional solenoid in a ST-based fusion nuclear facility is generally believed to not be a possibility. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is therefore an area of extensive worldwide research activity. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is also relevant to steady-state tokamak operation, as the central transformer coil of a conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactor would be located in a high radiation environment but would be needed only during the initial discharge initiation and current ramp-up phases. Solenoid-free operation also provides greater flexibility in the selection of the aspect ratio and simplifies the reactor design. Plasma start-up methods based on induction from external poloidal field coils, helicity injection and radio frequency current drive have all made substantial progress towards meeting this important need for the ST. Some of these systems will now undergo the final stages of test in a new generation of large STs, which are scheduled to begin operations during the next two years. This paper reviews research to date on methods for inducing the initial start-up current in STs without reliance on the conventional central solenoid.

  19. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  20. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  1. Edge localized mode characteristics during edge localized mode mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) is an effective means of edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation. This paper newly reports the changes in the ELM, plasma profiles, and fluctuation characteristics during ELM mitigation by SMBI in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. During the mitigated ELM phase, the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 2–3 and the ELM size, which was estimated from the Dα amplitude, the fractional changes in the plasma-stored energy and the line-averaged electron density, and divertor heat flux during an ELM burst, decreased by a factor of 0.34–0.43. Reductions in the electron and ion temperatures rather than in the electron density were observed during the mitigated ELM phase. In the natural ELM phase, frequency chirping of the plasma fluctuations was observed before the ELM bursts; however, the ELM bursts occurred without changes in the plasma fluctuation frequency in the mitigated ELM phase

  2. Design of a collective scattering system for small scale turbulence study in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Lee, D. J.; Nam, Y. U.; Leem, J.; Kim, T. K.

    2016-04-01

    The design characteristics of a multi-channel collective (or coherent) scattering system for small scale turbulence study in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR), which is planned to be installed in 2017, are given in this paper. A few critical issues are discussed in depth such as the Faraday and Cotton-Mouton effects on the beam polarization, radial spatial resolution, probe beam frequency, polarization, and power. A proper and feasible optics with the 300 GHz probe beam, which was designed based on these issues, provides a simultaneous measurement of electron density fluctuations at four discrete poloidal wavenumbers up to 24 cm-1. The upper limit corresponds to the normalized wavenumber kθρe of ˜0.15 in nominal KSTAR plasmas. To detect the scattered beam power and extract phase information, a quadrature detection system consisting of four-channel antenna/detector array and electronics will be employed.

  3. Researches on operating region of Tokamak device with soft X-ray tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林忠; 梁荣庆; 尹协锦; 邱励俭

    1997-01-01

    The structures of three operating regions in HT-6B Tokamak have been studied by soft X-ray tomo-graphic system with high sensibility and high time-space resolution. One of the requisites for forming sawtooth discharge is the effective heating action in the central region. In the sawtooth region there are five evolutional phases and five types of magnetic surface structures correspondingly; that is, the concentric, the eccentric, the double-core, the "MHD-type" and the "ultra-MHD type" magnetic surface structures. In the MHD oscillation region, there is a stable "MHD-type" magnetic surface structure. It consists of a crescent "hot core" and a circular "cold bubble" and rotates in the diamagnetic direction of electrons. In the resonant region, the resonant helical field improves the heating status and suppresses the MHD disturbances; therefore the single "MHD-type" magnetic surface changes into a sawtooth type one

  4. Annual report of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and the Division of Large Tokamak Development for the period of April 1, 1977 to March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development works in fiscal year 1977 of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and the Division of Large Tokamak Development are described. 1) Theoretical studies on tokamak confinement have continued with more emphasis on computations. A task was started of developing a computer code system for mhd behavior of tokamak plasmas. 2) Experimental studies of lower hybrid heating up to 140 kW were made in JFT-2. The ion temperature was increased by 50% -- 60% near the plasma center. Plasma-wall interactions (particle and thermal fluxes to the wall, and titanium gettering) were studied. In JFT-2a (DIVA) ion sputtering, arcing and evaporation were identified, and the impurity ion sputtering was found to be a dominant origin of metal impurities in the present tokamaks. High temperature and high-density plasma divertor actions were demonstrated; i.e. the divertor decreases the radiation power loss by a factor of 3 and increases the energy confinement time by a factor of 2.5. Various diagnostic instruments operated sufficiently to provide useful information for the research with JFT-2 and JFT-2a(DIVA). 3) JFT-2 and JFT-2a(DIVA) operated as scheduled. Technological improvements were made such as titanium coating of the chamber wall, discharge cleaning and pre-ionization. 4) Detailed design of the prototype JT-60 neutral beam injector was made. A 200 kW, 650 MHz radiofrequency heating system for JFT-2 was completed; a lower hybrid heating experiment in JFT-2 was successful 5) In particle-surface interactions, the sputtering and surface erosion were studied. 6) Improvement designs of a superconducting cluster test facility and a test module coil were made in the toroidal coil development. 7) Second preliminary design of the tokamak experimental fusion reactor JXFR started in April 1977. Safety analyses were made of the main components and system of JXFR on the basis of the first preliminary design. (J.P.N.)

  5. Fluid-particle hybrid simulation on the transports of plasma, recycling neutrals, and carbon impurities in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research divertor region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Kyu; Hong, Sang Hee

    2005-06-01

    A two-dimensional simulation modeling that has been performed in a self-consistent way for analysis on the fully coupled transports of plasma, recycling neutrals, and intrinsic carbon impurities in the divertor domain of tokamaks is presented. The numerical model coupling the three major species transports in the tokamak edge is based on a fluid-particle hybrid approach where the plasma is described as a single magnetohydrodynamic fluid while the neutrals and impurities are treated as kinetic particles using the Monte Carlo technique. This simulation code is applied to the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak [G. S. Lee, J. Kim, S. M. Hwang et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 575 (2000)] to calculate the peak heat flux on the divertor plate and to explore the divertor plasma behavior depending on the upstream conditions in its base line operation mode for various values of input heating power and separatrix plasma density. The numerical modeling for the KSTAR tokamak shows that its full-powered operation is subject to the peak heat loads on the divertor plate exceeding an engineering limit, and reveals that the recycling zone is formed in front of the divertor by increasing plasma density and by reducing power flow into the scrape-off layer. Compared with other researchers' work, the present hybrid simulation more rigorously reproduces severe electron pressure losses along field lines by the presence of recycling zone accounting for the transitions between the sheath limited and the detached divertor regimes. The substantial profile changes in carbon impurity population and ionic composition also represent the key features of this divertor regime transition.

  6. Experimental and modeling researches of dust particles in the HL-2A tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄治辉; 严龙文; 冨田幸博; 冯震; 程钧; 洪文玉; 潘宇东; 杨青巍; 段旭如

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of dust particle characteristics in fusion devices has become more and more imperative. In the HL-2A tokamak, the morphologies and compositions of dust particles are analyzed by using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with mapping. The results indicate that the sizes of dust particles are in a range from 1 µm to 1 mm. Surprisingly, the stainless steel spheres with a diameter of 2.5 µm–30 µm are obtained. Production mechanism of the dust particles includes flaking, disintegration, agglomeration, and arcing. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the flaking dust particles are observed by a CMOS fast framing camera and simulated by a computer program. Both of the results display that the ion friction force is dominant in the toroidal direction, while the centrifugal force is crucial in the radial direction. Therefore, the visible dust particles are accelerated toriodally by the ion friction force and migrated radially by the centrifugal force. The averaged velocity of the grain is on the order of∼100 m/s. These results provide an additional supplement for one of critical plasma-wall interaction (PWI) issues in the framework of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme.

  7. DIII-D research operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. In doing so, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R ampersand D outputs to aid the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY93 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics. The major goals of the Divertor and Boundary Physics studies are the control of impurities, efficient heat removal and understanding the strong role that the edge plasma plays in the global energy confinement of the plasma. The advanced tokamak studies initiated the investigation into new techniques for improving energy confinement, controlling particle fueling and increasing plasma beta. The major goal of the Tokamak Physics Studies is the understanding of energy and particle transport in a reactor relevant plasma

  8. High Beta Steady State Research and Future Directions on JT-60U and JFT-2M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Shinichi

    2003-10-01

    JT-60U and JFT-2M research is focused on high beta steady state operation towards economically and environmentally attractive reactors. In JT-60U, a high-βp H-mode plasma was sustained with βN 2.7 for 7.4 s in which neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) limited the attainable β_N. Real-time tracking NTM stabilization system using ECCD demonstrated complete suppression of NTM leading to recovery of βN before onset of NTM. Performance in a fully non-inductive H-mode plasma was improved up to n_i(0) τE T_i(0) = 3.1 x 10^20 keV s m-3 using N-NBCD with βN 2.4, HH_y,2=1.2 and bootstrap fraction f_BS 0.5. ECH experiments extended the confinement enhancement for dominantly electron heated reversed shear plasmas up to HH_y,2 2 at T_e/Ti 1.25. A world record ECCD efficiency, 4.2 x 10^18 A/W/m^2, was achieved at Te 23 keV with a highly localized central current density. Innovative initiation and current build-up without center solenoid currents were established by LHCD/ECH and bootstrap current up to f_BS 0.9. In JFT-2M, the inside of the vacuum vessel wall was fully covered with low-activation ferritic steel plates to investigate their use in plasmas near fusion conditions. High βN plasmas were produced up to βN = 3.3 with an internal transport barrier (ITB) and a steady H-mode edge. A new H-mode regime with steady high recycling (HRS) and an ITB was exploited leading to βN H_89P 6.2 at n_e/nG 0.7. In 2003, JT-60U will be able to operate for the duration up to 65 s at 1 MA/2.7 T and the heating/current-drive duration up to 30 s at 17 MW to prolong high-βN and/or high-f_BS discharges with feedback controls. JFT-2M is planning to implement wall stabilization experiments in 2004 to pursue plasmas above the ideal no-wall limit using a ferritic wall. The modification of JT-60 to a fully superconducting tokamak is under discussion to explore high-β steady state operation in collision-less plasmas well above no-wall limit with ferritic wall in a steady state.

  9. Tokamak burn control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research of the fusion plasma thermal instability and its control is reviewed. General models of the thermonuclear plasma are developed. Techniques of stability analysis commonly employed in burn control research are discussed. Methods for controlling the plasma against the thermal instability are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications to tokamak confinement concepts. Additional research which extends the results of previous research is suggested. Issues specific to the development of control strategies for mid-term engineering test reactors are identified and addressed. 100 refs., 24 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Options for an ignited tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is expected that the next phase of the fusion program will involve a tokamak with the goals of providing an ignited plasma for pulses of hundreds of seconds. A simple model is described in this memorandum which establishes the physics conditions for such a self-sustaining plasma, for given ion and electron thermal diffusivities, in terms of R/a, b/a, I, B/q, epsilon ..beta../sub p/, anti T/sub i/, and anti T/sub e//anti T/sub i/. The model is used to produce plots showing the wide range of tokamaks that may ignite or have a given ignition margin. The constraints that limit this range are discussed.

  11. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRELL,KH

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, the authors have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) the authors have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {le} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. They have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiation power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  12. Research on High Pressure Gas Injection As a Method of Fueling, Disruption Mitigation and Plasma Termination for Future Tokamak Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    High-pressure gas injection has proved to be an effective disruption mitigation technique in DⅢ-D tokamak experiments. If the method can be applied in future tokamak reactors not only for disruption mitigation but also for plasma termination and fueling, it will have an attractive advantage over the pellet and liquid injection from the viewpoint of economy and engineering design. In order to investigate the feasibility of this option, a study has been carried out with relevant parameters for conveying tubes of different geometrical sizes and for different gases.These parameters include pressure drop, lagger time after the valve's opening, gas diffusion in an ultra-high vacuum condition, and particle number contour.

  13. The ETE spherical Tokamak project. IAEA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Del Bosco, E.; Berni, L.A.; Ferreira, J.G.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of October, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  14. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  15. Control of a burning tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, R.E.; Mandrekas, J.; Stacey, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    This report is a review of the literature relevant to the control of the thermonuclear burn in a tokamak plasma. Some basic tokamak phenomena are reviewed, and then control by modulation of auxiliary heating and fueling is discussed. Other possible control methods such as magnetic ripple, plasma compression, and impurity injection as well as more recent proposed methods such as divertor biasing and L- to H-mode transition are also reviewed. The applications of modern control theory to the tokamak burn control problem are presented. The control results are summarized and areas of further research are identified.

  16. ITER tokamak device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-07-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER, a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fueling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (1) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (2) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (3) first wall, (4) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (5) blanket/shield system, (6) maintenance equipment, (7) current drive and heating, (8) fuel cycle system, and (9) diagnostics.

  17. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  18. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  19. Tokamak concept innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the results of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Tokamak Concept Innovations held 13-17 January 1986 in Vienna. Although it is the most advanced fusion reactor concept the tokamak is not without its problems. Most of these problems should be solved within the ongoing R and D studies for the next generation of tokamaks. Emphasis for this meeting was placed on innovations that would lead to substantial improvements in a tokamak reactor, even if they involved a radical departure from present thinking

  20. Resistive interchange instability in reversed shear tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Masaru; Nakamura, Yuji; Wakatani, Masahiro [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Resistive interchange modes become unstable due to the magnetic shear reversal in tokamaks. In the present paper, the parameter dependences, such as q (safety factor) profile and the magnetic surface shape are clarified for improving the stability, using the local stability criterion. It is shown that a significant reduction of the beta limit is obtained for the JT-60U reversed shear configuration with internal transport barrier, since the local pressure gradient increases. (author)

  1. Confinement of a self-stabilized tokamak under average magnetic well conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the average favorable magnetic curvature of a tokamak is stabilizing with respect to pressure-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities at low beta and that self-stabilization occurs at finite beta in the so-called second stability regime. Here we self-consistently investigate how these two effects, viz., the mean magnetic well and the self-stabilization, influence the energy confinement time in a tokamak, using the ballooning mode transport model

  2. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL

    2014-01-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  3. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics for the U.S. Department of Energy. The DIII-D is the most flexible and best diagnosed tokamak in the world and the second largest tokamak in the U.S. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by ITER and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated in three major areas: Tokamak Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, and Advanced Tokamak Studies

  4. Role of the tokamak ISTTOK on the EURATOM fusion programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the role of the tokamak ISTTOK on the development of the portuguese fusion research team, in the frame of the EURATOM Fusion Programme. Main tasks on education and training, control and data acquisition, diagnostics and tokamak physics are summarized. Work carried out on ISTTOK in collaboration with foreign teams is also reported. (author)

  5. Design and construction of electronic components for a ''Novillo'' Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this effort was to design, construct and make functional the electronic components for a ''Novillo'' Tokamak currently being experimentally investigated at the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. The problem was to develop programmable electronic switches capable of discharging high voltage kilowatt energies stored in capacitator banks onto the coils of the Tokamak. (author)

  6. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUMPHREYS,D.A; FERRON,J.R; JOHNSON,R.D; LEUER,J.A; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance.

  7. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  8. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  9. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  10. The Experiments of the small Spherical Tokamak Gutta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GUTTA is a small spherical tokamak (R = 16cm, a = 8cm, Ip = 150kA) operating at the St. Petersburg State University since 2004 in the scope of the IAEA CRP ''Joint Research using Small Tokamaks''. Main scientific activities on GUTTA include development of new and improvement of existing mathematical models of plasma control, relevant for application on large tokamaks and ITER and verification of them on GUTTA; studies on the ECRH/EBW assisted breakdown and non-solenoid plasma formation in low aspect ratio tokamak; development of diagnostics; training and education of students.In this paper design properties of Gutta will be presented. Regimes of operation of the tokamak and plasma shape parameters are described and first results of the plasma formation and start-up studied will be discussed

  11. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  13. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration. PMID:21033954

  14. Measurement of helicon wave coupling for current drive and anticipated role for high beta KSTAR plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Wi, H. H.; Kim, H.-S.

    2015-11-01

    Helicon wave current drive has been suggested for efficient off-axis current drive in high electron beta tokamak plasmas. Fast wave drives centrally peaking current in the frequency range up to several ion cyclotron harmonics in the present tokamaks, such as KSTAR. Increasing fast wave frequency up to LH resonance frequency at the plasma edge, the spiral propagation of wave at the outer region of plasma lengthens the wave path to the plasma center. Also, optical thickness increases with frequency. It is expected that these effects produce efficient off-axis power deposition depending on the electron beta and magnetic field pitch. A low power TWA for helicon wave was installed and tested in KSTAR tokamak which is aiming for the steady-state high beta plasma requiring off-axis current drive. The power coupling properties of TWA at various plasma conditions will be presented. In addition to the coupling efficiency, issues such as load sensitivity and unwanted slow wave coupling will be addressed. Also, the simulation of plasma performance with the combination of helicon wave current drive and other conventional heating and current drive power in KSTAR will be discussed. This work was supported by the Korean Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and by R&D Program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI) funded by the Government funds.

  15. Stability of Tokamaks with respect to slip motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the energy principle in Tokamaks we investigate a class of perturbations which, if unstable, cannot be stabilized by the toroidal main field. On the assumptions of usual Tokamak ordering and in the limit of infinite aspect ratio, these perturbations are shown to be minimizing among all axisymmetric perturbations. In the case of finite aspect ratio, a detailed stability analysis is carried out using a constant pressure surface current model with elliptic, triangular or rectangular plasma cross-section. Definite stabilization by toroidal effects and by beta poloidal is demonstrated. (orig.)

  16. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRELL,HK

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  17. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by, General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics

  18. Research and Development Supporting a Next Generation Germanium Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steve; Chu, Pinghan; Goett, Johnny; Massarczyk, Ralph; Xu, Wenqin

    2015-10-01

    To improve the search for neutrinoless double beta decay, the next-generation experiments will increase in source mass and continue to reduce backgrounds in the region of interest. A promising technology for the next generation experiment is large arrays of Germanium p-type point contact detectors enriched in 76-Ge. The experience, expertise and lessons learned from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and GERDA experiments naturally lead to a number of research and development activities that will be useful in guiding a future experiment utilizing Germanium. We will discuss some R&D activities including a hybrid cryostat design, background reduction in cabling, connectors and electronics, and modifications to reduce assembly time. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  19. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  20. Tokamak experimental section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descriptions of research during this period are given for the following topics: (1) ion and electron heating, (2) high-beta and gas puff experiments, (3) beam trapping by impurities, (4) counterinjection studies, (5) impurity measurements, (6) Balmer alpha line profiles, (7) internal mode structure, (8) sawtooth oscillations and plasma transport, (9) Ormak plasma modeling, (10) charge exchange measurements, (11) wall power measurements, (12) neutron time behavior due to deuterium neutral beam injection into a hydrogen plasma, (13) wall impurities in Ormak, (14) relativistic electron studies, (15) fast x-ray energy analyzer for the 1 to 10 keV range, and (16) CTR related atomic physics

  1. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  2. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the 'advanced tokamak' physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs

  3. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyoo; Chang, In Soon; Chung, Moon Kyoo; Hwang, Chul Kyoo; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Choi, Byung Ho; Hong, Bong Keun; Oh, Byung Hoon; Chung, Seung Ho; Yoon, Byung Joo; Yoon, Jae Sung; Song, Woo Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong Suk; Chang, Hong Yung; Choi, Duk In; Nam, Chang Heui [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoo Sun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sang Heui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heui Dong [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Koo [Pohang Inst. of Science and Technology, Kyungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-01

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the `advanced tokamak` physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs.

  4. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robert John [UCLA/retired

    2014-02-04

    The results of UCLA experimental fusion program are summarized. Starting with smaller devices like Microtor, Macrotor, CCT and ending the research on the large (5 m) Electric Tokamak. CCT was the most diagnosed device for H-mode like physics and the effects of rotation induced radial fields. ICRF heating was also studied but plasma heating of University Type Tokamaks did not produce useful results due to plasma edge disturbances of the antennae. The Electric Tokamak produced better confinement in the seconds range. However, it presented very good particle confinement due to an "electric particle pinch". This effect prevented us from reaching a quasi steady state. This particle accumulation effect was numerically explained by Shaing's enhanced neoclassical theory. The PI believes that ITER will have a good energy confinement time but deleteriously large particle confinement time and it will disrupt on particle pinching at nominal average densities. The US fusion research program did not study particle transport effects due to its undue focus on the physics of energy confinement time. Energy confinement time is not an issue for energy producing tokamaks. Controlling the ash flow will be very expensive.

  5. Reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations with several different computer codes based on the resistive MHD equations have shown that (m = 1, n = 1) tearing modes in tokamak plasmas grow by magnetic reconnection. The observable behavior predicted by the codes has been confirmed in detail from the waveforms of signals from x-ray detectors and recently by x-ray tomographic imaging

  6. Sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigaions of sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks is presented. Different types of sawtooth oscillations, scaling laws and methods of interanl disruption stabilization are described. Theoretical models of the sawtooth instability are discussed. 122 refs.; 4 tabs

  7. Advanced tokamak concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described and the main e

  8. Advanced tokamak concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    1996-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described and the main e

  9. DIII-D research operations annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The mission of the DIII-D research program is to advance fusion energy science understanding and predictive capability and to improve and optimize the tokamak concept. A long term goal remains to integrate these products into a demonstration of high confinement, high plasma pressure (plasma {beta}), sustained long pulse operation with fusion power plant relevant heat and particle handling capability. The DIII-D program is a world recognized leader in tokamak concept improvement and a major contributor to the physics R and D needs of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The scientific objectives of the DIII-D program are given in Table 1-2. The FY96 DIII-D research program was highly successful, as described in this report. A moderate sized tokamak, DIII-D is a world leader in tokamak innovation with exceptional performance, measured in normalized parameters.

  10. Measurement requirements for the advanced tokamak operation of a burning plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R L [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Casper, T [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551-9900 (United States); Young, K M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The optimization of a tokamak towards steady state and high performance has been the focus of advanced tokamak (AT) research for the past decade. A central theme of AT research line is plasma control: control of the plasma shape; of the profiles of current, pressure, and rotation; of transport; and of MHD stability. To optimize the performance, measurements of crucial parameters such as the current density and the plasma pressure are required with appropriate spatial coverage and resolution. In addition, measurements of other parameters will be necessary to develop a fundamental understanding of the complex nonlinear interactions amongst the current density profile, the pressure profile and transport (e.g. turbulence) in high {beta} AT plasmas. Present day experiments are providing physics insight into what a burning plasma experiment (BPX) will require as measurements. Recent research has focused on MHD stability aspects such as the neoclassical tearing mode and resistive wall mode stabilization and control of the current profile. However, in burning plasmas, new factors such as alpha particles, with their heating contribution and their relationship to transport barriers, will be increasingly important. The close relationship between measurements and active control, and the resultant impact on the requirements, will be discussed.

  11. Spontaneous generation of rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra Diaz, Felix [Oxford University

    2013-12-24

    Three different aspects of intrinsic rotation have been treated. i) A new, first principles model for intrinsic rotation [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has been implemented in the gyrokinetic code GS2. The results obtained with the code are consistent with several experimental observations, namely the rotation peaking observed after an L-H transition, the rotation reversal observed in Ohmic plasmas, and the change in rotation that follows Lower Hybrid wave injection. ii) The model in [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has several simplifying assumptions that seem to be satisfied in most tokamaks. To check the importance of these hypotheses, first principles equations that do not rely on these simplifying assumptions have been derived, and a version of these new equations has been implemented in GS2 as well. iii) A tokamak cross-section that drives large intrinsic rotation has been proposed for future large tokamaks. In large tokamaks, intrinsic rotation is expected to be very small unless some up-down asymmetry is introduced. The research conducted under this contract indicates that tilted ellipticity is the most efficient way to drive intrinsic rotation.

  12. Radioactivity evaluation for the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium-deuterium (D-D) reaction in the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak generates neutrons with a peak yield of 2.5 x 1016 s-1 through a pulse operation of 300 s. Since the structure material of the tokamak is irradiated with neutrons, this environment will restrict work around and inside the tokamak from a radiation protection physics point of view after shutdown. Identification of neutron-produced radionuclides and evaluation of absorbed dose in the structure material are needed to develop a guiding principle for radiation protection. The activation level was evaluated by MCNP4C2 and an inventory code, FISPACT. The absorbed dose in the working area decreased by 4.26 x 10-4 mrem h-1 in the inner vessel 1.5 d after shutdown. Furthermore, tritium strongly contributes to the contamination in the graphite tile. The amount of tritium produced by neutrons was 3.03 x 106 Bq kg-1 in the carbon graphite of a plasma-facing wall. (authors)

  13. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  14. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  15. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  16. Next tokamak facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies on a superconducting, long-pulse, current-driven, ignited tokamak, called the Toroidal Fusion Core Demonstration (TFCD), are being conducted by the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) with additional broad community involvement. Options include the use of all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils, a superconducting-copper hybrid arrangement of TF coils, or all-copper TF coils. Only the first two options have been considered to date. The general feasibility of these approaches has been established with the goal of high performance (ignition, approx. 390 MW; wall loading approx. 2.2 MW/m2) at minimum capital cost. The preconceptual effort will be completed in early FY 1984 and a selection made from the indicated options. The TFCD is judged to represent a reasonable necessary step between the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Engineering Test Reactor

  17. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the 3He from the D(D,n)3He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general)

  18. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  19. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  20. Simulating Plasma Turbulence in Tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Kepner, J V; Decyk, V; Kepner, Jeremy; Parker, Scott; Decyk, Viktor

    1997-01-01

    A challenging and fundamental research problem is the better understanding and control of the turbulent transport of heat in present-day tokamak fusion experiments. Recent developments in numerical methods along with enormous gains in computing power have made large-scale simulations an important tool for improving our understanding of this phenomena. Simulating this highly non-linear behavior requires solving for the perturbations of the phase space distribution function in five dimensions. We use a particle-in-cell approach to solve the equations. The code has been parallelized for a variety of architectures (C90, CM-5, T3D) using a 1-D domain decomposition along the toroidal axis, for which the number of particles in each cell remains approximately constant. The quasi-uniform distribution of particles, which minimizes load imbalance, coupled with the relatively small movement of particles across cells, which minimizes communications, makes this problem ideally suited to massively parallel architectures. We...

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines. S

  2. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  3. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta Plant Introductions from the USDA, Agricultural Research Service's National Plant Germplasm System, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. The Rhizoctonia sc...

  4. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  5. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization.

  6. The tokamak as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  7. [Fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer

  8. (Fusion energy research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  9. Steady state operation of tokamaks. Report on the IAEA technical committee meeting held at Hefei, China, 13-15 October 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Steady State Operation of Tokamaks was held in October 1998 in Hefei, China. This meeting marks the timely start of Technical Committee Meetings in an important area of tokamak research since several experiments are already yielding impressive results and several new experiments are under construction. Among the ongoing experiments interesting results were reported from the superconducting tokamaks TRIAM 1-M, Tore Supra, and HT-7 and from a conventional tokamak, HL-1M

  10. EBT: an alternate concept to tokamaks and mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowienka, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is a hybrid magnetic trap formed by a series of toroidally connected simple mirrors. It differs from a tokamak, the present main-line approach, in that plasma stability and heating are obtained in a current-free geometry by the application of steady-state, high power, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) producing a steady-state plasma. The primary motivation for EBT confinement research is the potential for a steady-state, highly accessible reactor with high ..beta... In the present EBT-I/S device, electron confinement has been observed to agree with the predictions of theory. The major emphasis of the experimental program is on the further scaling of plasma parameters in the EBT-I/S machine with ECH frequency (10.6, 18, and 28 GHz), resonant magnetic field (0.3, 0.6, and 1 T), and heating power (30, 60, and 200 kW). In addition, substantial efforts are under way or planned in the areas of ion cyclotron heating, neutral beam heating, plasma-wall interactions, impurity control, synchrotron radiation, and divertors. Recently, EBT has been selected as the first alternative concept to be advanced to the proof-of-principle stage; this entails a major device scale-up to allow a reasonable extrapolation to a DT-burning facility. The status and future plans of the EBT program, in particular the proof-of-principle experiment (EBT-P), are discussed.

  11. VDE characteristics during disruption process and its underlying acceleration mechanism in the ITER-EDA tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Yukiharu; Nishio, Satoshi; Yoshino, Ryuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Kessel, C.E.; Jardin, S.C.

    1996-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of vertical displacement events (VDEs) during a disruption and acceleration mechanisms that govern VDEs in the ITER-EDA tokamak are investigated using the Tokamak Simulation Code. A sudden plasma pressure drop ({beta}{sub p} collapse) does not accelerate VDEs for the ITER tokamak. The geometry of the ITER resistive shell is shown to be suitable for preventing a {beta}{sub p} collapse-induced VDE, because the magnetic field decay n-index after the {beta}{sub p} collapse does not considerably degrade. On the other hand, it is shown that the plasma current quench (I{sub p} quench) following the energy quench can accelerate VDEs due to the vertical imbalance of the attractive force arising from the up-down asymmetric shell. The vertical location of the neutral point where the I{sub p} quench-induced VDE almost disappears is found to lie at {approx}22 cm below the plasma magnetic axis of the nominal equilibrium (Z = 1.44 m). An upward and moderate I{sub p} quench-induced VDE can be expected for the nominal configuration in the ITER-EDA tokamak. It is shown that the ITER tokamak has an advantage of avoiding the fatal damage of the complicated structures of the bottom-divertor. (author)

  12. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System.

  13. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/2/q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs

  14. Development of Simultaneous Beta-and-Coincidence-Gamma Imager for Plant Imaging Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine

    2016-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a novel imaging system that can simultaneously acquire beta and coincidence gamma images of positron sources in thin objects such as leaves of plants. This hybrid imager can be used to measure carbon assimilation in plants quantitatively and in real-time after C-11 labeled carbon-dioxide is administered. A better understanding of carbon assimilation, particularly under the increasingly elevated atmospheric CO2 level, is extremely critical for plant scientists who study food crop and biofuel production. Phase 1 of this project is focused on the technology development with 3 specific aims: (1) develop a hybrid detector that can detect beta and gamma rays simultaneously; (2) develop an imaging system that can differentiate these two types of radiation and acquire beta and coincidence gamma images in real-time; (3) develop techniques to quantify radiotracer distribution using beta and gamma images. Phase 2 of this project is to apply technologies developed in phase 1 to study plants using positron-emitting radionuclide such as 11C to study carbon assimilation in biofuel plants.

  15. DIII-D research operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D. (ed.)

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R D; and collaborative efforts.

  16. DIII-D research operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R ampersand D; and collaborative efforts

  17. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  18. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  19. Axisymmetric control in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically elongated tokamak plasmas are intrinsically susceptible to vertical axisymmetric instabilities as a result of the quadrupole field which must be applied to produce the elongation. The present work analyzes the axisymmetric control necessary to stabilize elongated equilibria, with special application to the Alcator C-MOD tokamak. A rigid current-conserving filamentary plasma model is applied to Alcator C-MOD stability analysis, and limitations of the model are addressed. A more physically accurate nonrigid plasma model is developed using a perturbed equilibrium approach to estimate linearized plasma response to conductor current variations. This model includes novel flux conservation and vacuum vessel stabilization effects. It is found that the nonrigid model predicts significantly higher growth rates than predicted by the rigid model applied to the same equilibria. The nonrigid model is then applied to active control system design. Multivariable pole placement techniques are used to determine performance optimized control laws. Formalisms are developed for implementing and improving nominal feedback laws using the C-MOD digital-analog hybrid control system architecture. A proportional-derivative output observer which does not require solution of the nonlinear Ricatti equation is developed to help accomplish this implementation. The nonrigid flux conserving perturbed equilibrium plasma model indicates that equilibria with separatrix elongation of at least sep = 1.85 can be stabilized robustly with the present control architecture and conductor/sensor configuration

  20. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  1. Relativistic runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, R.E.

    1995-02-03

    Runaway electrons are inherently present in a tokamak, in which an electric field is applied to drive a toroidal current. The experimental work is performed in the tokamak TEXTOR. Here runaway electrons can acquire energies of up to 30 MeV. The runaway electrons are studied by measuring their synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared wavelength range. The studies presented are unique in the sense that they are the first ones in tokamak research to employ this radiation. Hitherto, studies of runaway electrons revealed information about their loss in the edge of the discharge. The behaviour of confined runaways was still a terra incognita. The measurement of the synchrotron radiation allows a direct observation of the behaviour of runaway electrons in the hot core of the plasma. Information on the energy, the number and the momentum distribution of the runaway electrons is obtained. The production rate of the runaway electrons, their transport and the runaway interaction with plasma waves are studied. (orig./HP).

  2. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is managed by General Atomics (GA) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Major program participants include GA, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of California together with several other national laboratories and universities. The DIII-D is a moderate sized tokamak with great flexibility and extremely capable subsystems. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data for development of a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive fusion power plant. In so doing, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R ampersand D output to aid the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Princeton Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) projects. Specific DIII-D objectives include the achievement of steady-state plasma current as well as the demonstration of techniques for radio frequency heating, divertor heat removal, particle exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion in plasmas with high beta and with high confinement. The long-range plan is organized with two principal elements, the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two elements have a common goal: an improved demonstration reactor (DEMO) with lower cost and smaller size than present DEMO concepts. In order to prepare for this long-range development, in FY94 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak studies, and Tokamak Physics

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Box, F.M.A.; Kolk, E. van de [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Howard, J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Science and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Meijer, F.G. [Physics Faculty, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-03-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines. Several spectrometers, equipped with a charge-coupled device array, are being used with spectral ranges in the visible, the vacuum UV and the extreme UV. (orig.)

  4. A Model Reference Adaptive Control for Radial Plasma Position on HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOSuying; YUANBaoshan; LIQiang

    2003-01-01

    The radial plasma position control is one of the basic plasma controls of tokamak. In order to maintain a plasma column in the geometrical center of its vacuum vessel, the externally applied vertical field (VF) must be adjusted to the changes in the plasma parameters such as the plasma current, poloidal beta and the internal inductance.

  5. Application of MDSplus on EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Lianzheng; LUO Jiarong; LI lingling; ZHANG Mingxing; WANG Yong

    2007-01-01

    EAST is a fully superconducting Tokamak in China used for controlled fusion research. MDSplus, a special software package for fusion research, has been used successfully as a central repository for analysed data and PCS (Plasma Control System) data since the debugging experiment in the spring of 2006 . In this paper, the reasons for choosing MDSplus as the analysis database and the way to use it are presented in detail, along with the solution to the problem that part of the MDSplus library does not work in the multithread mode. The experiment showed that the data system based on MDSplus operated stably and it could provide a better performance especially for remote users.

  6. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to

  7. Spheromak injection into a tokamak

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M R; Bellan, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the Caltech spheromak injection experiment [to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.] are reported. First, current drive by spheromak injection into the ENCORE tokamak as a result of the process of magnetic helicity injection is observed. An initial 30% increase in plasma current is observed followed by a drop by a factor of 3 because of sudden plasma cooling. Second, spheromak injection results in an increase of tokamak central density by a factor of 6. The high-current/high-density...

  8. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cTe/eB(δni/ni)rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a2/D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  9. On the economic prospects of nuclear fusion with tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirsch, D.; Schmitter, K. H.

    1987-12-01

    A method of cost and construction energy estimation for tokamak fusion power stations conforming to the present stage of fusion development is described. The method is based on first-wall heat load constraints rather than Beta limitations, which, however, might eventually be the more critical of the two. It is used to discuss the economic efficiency of pure fusion, with particular reference to the European study entitled Environmental Impact and Economic Prospects of Nuclear Fusion (1986). It is shown that the claims made therein for the economic prospects of pure fusion with tokamaks, when discussed on the basis of the present-day technology, do not stand up to critical examination. A fusion-fission hybrid, however, could afford more positive prospects. Support for the stated method is derived when it is properly applied for cost estimation of advanced gas-cooled and Magnox reactors, the two examples presented by the European study to disprove it.

  10. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    observed decrease of this limit with elongation is also in qualitative agreement with ideal MHD theory. Edge localised modes (ELMs), occurring in TCV Ohmic high-confinement mode discharges, were observed to be preceded by coherent magnetic oscillations. The detected poloidal and toroidal mode structures are consistent with a resonant flux surface close to the plasma edge. Unlike conventional MHD modes, these precursors start at a random toroidal location and then grow in amplitude and toroidal extent until they encompass the whole toroidal circumference. Thus, the asymmetry causing and maintaining the toroidal localisation of the ELM precursor must be intrinsic to the plasma. Soft X-ray measurements show that the localised precursor always coincides with a central m = 1 mode, which can usually be associated with the sawtooth pre- or postcursor mode. A comparison of the phases indicates a correlation with the maximum of the central mode preceding the toroidal location of the ELM precursor and, therefore, a hitherto unobserved coupling between central modes and ELMs. Highly elongated plasmas promise several advantages, among them higher current and beta limits. During TCV experiments dedicated to an increasing of the plasma elongation, a new disruptive current limit, at values well below the conventional current limit corresponding to q{sub a} > 2, was encountered for {kappa} > 2.3. This limit, which is preceded by a kink-type mode, is found to be consistent with ideal MHD stability calculations. The TCV observations, therefore, provide the first experimental confirmation of a deviation of the linear Troyon-scaling of the ideal beta limit with normalised current at high elongation, which was predicted over 10 years ago. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), which have been observed to limit the achievable beta in a number of tokamaks, arise from a helical perturbation of the bootstrap current caused by an existing seed island. Neoclassical m/n = 2/1 tearing modes have been

  11. Research of TGF-beta1 Inducing Lung Adencarcinoma PC9 Cells to Mesenchymal Cells Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Heyong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Huijun

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective It has been proven that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) not only correlated with embryonic development but also could promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) has been identified as the main inducer of tumor EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on EMT and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in lung adencarcinoma PC9 cells. Methods Cultured PC9 cells were treated with different concentrations of TGF...

  12. Study of the heating of tokamaks by high energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research program has encompassed a number of design studies for a steady state (or long pulse) Auto-Resonant Accelerator (ARA) capable of producing intense beams of high energy (4-20 MEV) ions suitable for the heating of large tokamak devices. The different research topics addressed have ranged over a number of questions related to the design of the individual elements of the accelerator itself, along with studies of the injection and stripping of the accelerated ions in the tokamak and their subsequent energy deposition in the tokamak plasma

  13. Kinetic analysis of MHD ballooning modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive analysis of the stability properties of the appropriate kinetically generalized form of MHD ballooning modes together with the usual trapped-particle drift modes is presented. The calculations are fully electromagnetic and include the complete dynamics associated with compressional ion acoustic waves. Trapped-particle effects along with all forms of collisionless dissipation are taken into account without approximations. The influence of collisions is estimated with a model Krook operator. Results from the application of this analysis to realistic tokamak operating conditions indicate that unstable short-wavelength modes with significant growth rates can extend from β = 0 to value above the upper ideal-MHD-critical-beta associated with the so-called second stability regime. Since the strength of the relevant modes appears to vary gradually with β, these results support a soft beta limit picture involving a continuous (rather than abrupt or hard) modification of anomalous transport already present in low-β-tokamaks. However, at higher beta the increasing dominance of the electromagnetic component of the perturbations indicated by these calculations could also imply significantly different transport scaling properties

  14. MHD analysis of edge instabilities in the JET tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez von Thun, Christian Pedro

    2004-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion energy research is to demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear fusion reactors as a future energy source. The tokamak is the most advanced fusion machine to date, and is most likely the first system to be converted into a reactor. An important subject of nuclear fusion resear

  15. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  16. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  17. Development of large insulator rings for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses research and development leading to the manufacture of large ceramic insulator rings for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor). Material applications, fabrication approach and testing activities are highlighted

  18. First-wall sputtering effects in Cat-D tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat-D tokamaks offer the important advantages of elimination of the need to breed tritium and less frequent first-wall replacement due to reduced neutron damage effects. To capitalize on these features, however, the erosion of the low-Z first-wall coating must be addressed. As shown here, this appears to be feasible if a highly efficient (beta > 0.9) mechanical limiter system can be developed. Still, due to the many uncertainties involved, the simultaneous development of in situ techniques for redeposition coatings appears desirable

  19. Plasma boundary phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this review is on processes occurring at the edge, and on the connection between boundary plasma - the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the radiating layer - and central plasma processes. Techniques used for edge diagnosis are reviewed and basic experimental information (ne and Te) is summarized. Simple models of the SOL are summarized, and the most important effects of the boundary plasma - the influence on the fuel particles, impurities, and energy - on tokamak operation dealt with. Methods of manipulating and controlling edge conditions in tokamaks and the experimental data base for the edge during auxiliary heating of tokamaks are reviewed. Fluctuations and asymmetries at the edge are also covered. (9 tabs., 134 figs., 879 refs.)

  20. Research of TGF-beta1 Inducing Lung Adencarcinoma PC9 Cells to Mesenchymal Cells Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng CHEN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT not only correlated with embryonic development but also could promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1 has been identified as the main inducer of tumor EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on EMT and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in lung adencarcinoma PC9 cells. Methods Cultured PC9 cells were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 48 h. The morphological changes were observed under phase-contrast microscopy; EMT relative marker protein changes were assessed by Western blot and immunoflurescence staining. In addition, the expression of AKT and P-AKT were also measured by Western blot. Results The data showed that TGF-β1 could induce PC9 morphological alteration from epithelial to mesenchymal and upregulate the expression of mesenchymal maker protein Fibronectin. Obviously, the expression of P-AKT was downregulated by TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h. Conclusion TGF-β1 might induce EMT of PC9 cells , accompanied by the changes of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  1. The design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Goldston, R.J.; Sinnis, J.C.; Bernabei, S.; Bialek, J.M.; Bronner, G.; Chen, S.J.; Chrzanowski, J.; Citrolo, J.; Dahlgren, F.

    1993-09-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is designed to develop the scientific basis for a compact and continuously operating tokamak fusion reactor. It is based on an emerging class of tokamak operating modes, characterized by beta limits well in excess of the Troyon limit, confinement scaling well in excess of H-mode, and bootstrap current fractions approaching unity. Such modes are attainable through the use of advanced, steady state plasma controls including strong shaping, current profile control, and active particle recycling control. Key design features of the TPX are superconducting toroidal and poloidal field coils; actively-cooled plasma-facing components; a flexible heating and current drive system; and a spacious divertor for flexibility. Substantial deuterium plasma operation is made possible with an in-vessel remote maintenance system, a low-activation titanium vacuum vessel, and shielding of ex-vessel components. The facility will be constructed as a national project with substantial participation of US industry. Operation will begin with first plasma in the year 2000.

  2. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor

  3. LHCD experiments on tokamak CASTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short survey is given of the experimental activities at the small Prague tokamak CASTOR. They concern primarily the LH current drive using multijunction waveguide grills as launching antennae. During two last years the, efforts were focused on a study of the electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations under conditions of combined inductive/LHCD regimes and of the relation of the level of these fluctuations to the anomalous particles transport in tokamak CASTOR. Results of the study are discussed in some detail. (author). 24 figs., 51 refs

  4. Industry roles in the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several distinguishing features of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) to be found in the TPX program and in the organizations for constructing and operating the machine. Programmatically, TPX addresses several issues critical to the viability of magnetic fusion power plants. Organizationally, it is a multi-institutional partnership to construct and operate the machine and carry out its program mission. An important part of the construction partnership is the integrated industrial responsibility for design, R ampersand D, and construction. The TPX physics design takes advantage of recent research on advanced tokamak operating modes achieved for time scales of the order of seconds that are consistent with continuous operation. This synergism of high performance (higher power density) modes with plasma current driven mostly by internal pressure (boot-strap effect) points toward tokamak power plants that will be cost-competitive and operate continuously. A large fraction of the project is subcontracted to industry. By policy, these contracts are at a high level in the project breakdown of work, giving contractors much of the overall responsibility for a given major system. That responsibility often includes design and R ampersand D in addition to the fabrication of the system in question. Each contract is managed through one of three national laboratories: PPPL, LLNL, and ORNL. Separate contracts for system integration and construction management round out the industry involvement in the project. This integrated, major responsibility attracts high-level corporate attention within each company, which are major corporations with long-standing interest in fusion. Through the contracts already established on the TPX project, a new standard for industry involvement in fusion has been set, and these industries will be well prepared for future fusion projects

  5. Controlling fusion yield in tokamaks with spin polarized fuel, and feasibility studies on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The march towards electricity production through tokamaks requires the construction of new facilities and the inevitable replacement of the previous generation. There are, however, research topics that are better suited to the existing tokamaks, areas of great potential that are not sufficiently mature for implementation in high power machines, and these provide strong support for a balanced policy that includes the redirection of existing programs. Spin polarized fusion, in which the nuclei of tokamak fuel particles are spin-aligned and favorably change both the fusion cross-section and the distribution of initial velocity vectors of charged fusion products, is described here as an example of a technological and physics topic that is ripe for development in a machine such as the DIII-D tokamak. In this study, such research and development experiments may not be efficient at the ITER-scale, while the plasma performance, diagnostic access, and collaborative personnel available within the United States' magnetic fusion research program, and at the DIII-D facility in particular, provide a unique opportunity to further fusion progress

  6. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    observed decrease of this limit with elongation is also in qualitative agreement with ideal MHD theory. Edge localised modes (ELMs), occurring in TCV Ohmic high-confinement mode discharges, were observed to be preceded by coherent magnetic oscillations. The detected poloidal and toroidal mode structures are consistent with a resonant flux surface close to the plasma edge. Unlike conventional MHD modes, these precursors start at a random toroidal location and then grow in amplitude and toroidal extent until they encompass the whole toroidal circumference. Thus, the asymmetry causing and maintaining the toroidal localisation of the ELM precursor must be intrinsic to the plasma. Soft X-ray measurements show that the localised precursor always coincides with a central m = 1 mode, which can usually be associated with the sawtooth pre- or postcursor mode. A comparison of the phases indicates a correlation with the maximum of the central mode preceding the toroidal location of the ELM precursor and, therefore, a hitherto unobserved coupling between central modes and ELMs. Highly elongated plasmas promise several advantages, among them higher current and beta limits. During TCV experiments dedicated to an increasing of the plasma elongation, a new disruptive current limit, at values well below the conventional current limit corresponding to q{sub a} > 2, was encountered for {kappa} > 2.3. This limit, which is preceded by a kink-type mode, is found to be consistent with ideal MHD stability calculations. The TCV observations, therefore, provide the first experimental confirmation of a deviation of the linear Troyon-scaling of the ideal beta limit with normalised current at high elongation, which was predicted over 10 years ago. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), which have been observed to limit the achievable beta in a number of tokamaks, arise from a helical perturbation of the bootstrap current caused by an existing seed island. Neoclassical m/n = 2/1 tearing modes have been

  7. A wide variety of putative extremophiles and large beta-diversity at the Mars Desert Research Station (Utah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Susana O. L.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Marees, Andries; Staats, Martijn; Foing, Bernard; Röling, Wilfred F. M.

    2011-07-01

    Humankind's innate curiosity makes us wonder whether life is or was present on other planetary bodies such as Mars. The EuroGeoMars 2009 campaign was organized at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) to perform multidisciplinary astrobiology research. MDRS in southeast Utah is situated in a cold arid desert with mineralogy and erosion processes comparable to those on Mars. Insight into the microbial community composition of this terrestrial Mars analogue provides essential information for the search for life on Mars: including sampling and life detection methodology optimization and what kind of organisms to expect. Soil samples were collected from different locations. Culture-independent molecular analyses directed at ribosomal RNA genes revealed the presence of all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya), but these were not detected in all samples. Spiking experiments revealed that this appears to relate to low DNA recovery, due to adsorption or degradation. Bacteria were most frequently detected and showed high alpha- and beta-diversity. Members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes phyla were found in the majority of samples. Archaea alpha- and beta-diversity was very low. For Eukarya, a diverse range of organisms was identified, such as fungi, green algae and several phyla of Protozoa. Phylogenetic analysis revealed an extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles, mainly Bacteria but also Archaea and Eukarya. These comprised radioresistant, endolithic, chasmolithic, xerophilic, hypolithic, thermophilic, thermoacidophilic, psychrophilic, halophilic, haloalkaliphilic and alkaliphilic micro-organisms. Overall, our data revealed large difference in occurrence and diversity over short distances, indicating the need for high-sampling frequency at similar sites. DNA extraction methods need to be optimized to improve extraction efficiencies.

  8. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak; Projeto e analise dos circuitos de producao de campo magnetico toroidal e de formacao do plasma do Tokamak ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Jeong, S. H.; Yoony, J. S.; Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Ju, M. H

    1998-05-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs.

  10. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs

  11. Assembly of Aditya upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing Aditya tokamak, a medium sized tokamak with limiter configuration is being upgraded to a tokamak with divertor configuration. At present the existing ADITYA tokamak has been dismantled up to bottom plinth on which the whole assembly of toroidal field (TF) coils and vacuum vessel rested. The major components of ADITYA machine includes 20 TF coils and its structural components, 9 Ohmic coils and its clamps, 4 BV coils and its clamps as well as their busbar connections, vacuum vessel and its supports and buckling cylinder, which are all being dismantled. The re-assembly of the ADITYA Upgrade tokamak started with installation and positioning of new buckling cylinder and central solenoid (TR1) coil. After that the inner sections of TF coils are placed following which in-situ winding, installation, positioning and support mounting of two pairs of new inner divertor coils have been carried out. After securing the TF coils with top I-beams the new torus shaped vacuum vessel with circular cross-section in 2 halves have been installed. The assembly of TF structural components such as top and bottom guiding wedges, driving wedges, top and bottom compression ring, inner and outer fish plates and top inverted triangle has been carried out in an appropriate sequence. The assembly of outer sections of TF coils along with the proper placements of top auxiliary TR and vertical field coils with proper alignment and positioning with the optical metrology instrument mainly completes the reassembly. Detailed re-assembly steps and challenges faced during re-assembly will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  12. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak reactor using resistive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of resistive magnet tokamaks as commercial electricity producing power plants is investigated. Parametric studies indicate that attractive design space exists for these reactors at relatively low field (2.5 to 4.5 T), moderate wall loading (3 to 4 MW/m2) and medium to large net electric outputs (>600 MW/sub e/). High toroidal beta (20 to 25%) possible in the second regime of plasma stability may provide advantages of reduced recirculating power and plasma current but moderate beta reactors (6 to 10%) remain attractive. A conceptual design for the Resistive magnet Commercial Tokamak Reactor (RCTR) is presented. The layout of the nuclear island is driven by compatibility requirements of the demounting capability with structural and blanket design considerations. The nuclear island is fully demountable with access to all components within the toroidal field coils possible via simple vertical lifts. The blanket system, segmented for vertical removal, uses a self-cooled liquid lithium breeder/coolant with vanadium structure and an HT-9 reflector. The first wall is also lithium cooled with a vanadium structure but is constructed in a single, pre-tested unit for assembly and periodic replacement. Ohmic and equilibrium field-coils are located within the bore of the toroidal field coil for improved performance

  13. Second regime tokamak operation at large aspect ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium, stability, and transport properties of large aspect ratio tokamaks operating at the second stability regime are described theoretically using numerical and analytical techniques. It has been shown that, at large aspect ratio, significant current profile control is possible with relatively modest amounts of neutral beam current drive, and the power needed to access and maintain the second regime operation is calculated to be about 3 MW using the results of an integrated 1.5D transport and stability code. An example second regime experiment has been described and the results are presented of extensive calculations illustrating several possible operating scenarios, external and internal model stability boundaries, and the experimental features needed to evaluate and test the high beta tokamak theories. The theory which describes the stabilizing effect of energetic particles during high beta operation was extended to finite aspect ratio. A key technical problem for application of this technique appears to be caused by ripple transport. Plasma rotation effects are found to be generally destabilizing and several other schemes for improved access to the second stability regime are discussed including ponderomotive stabilization of the plasma edge region and active feedback control

  14. Conceptual design of Remote Control System for EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new design conception for remote control for EAST tokamak is proposed. • Rich Internet application (RIA) was selected to implement the user interface. • Some security mechanism was used to fulfill security requirement. - Abstract: The international collaboration becomes popular in tokamak research like in many other fields of science, because the experiment facilities become larger and more expensive. The traditional On-site collaboration Model that has to spend much money and time on international travel is not fit for the more frequent international collaboration. The Remote Control System (RCS), as an extension of the Central Control System for the EAST tokamak, is designed to provide an efficient and economical way to international collaboration. As a remote user interface, the RCS must integrate with the Central Control System for EAST tokamak to perform discharge control function. This paper presents a design concept delineating a few key technical issues and addressing all significant details in the system architecture design. With the aim of satisfying system requirements, the RCS will select rich Internet application (RIA) as a user interface, Java as a back-end service and Secure Socket Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) for securable Internet communication

  15. Neutronics design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A swimming pool type tokamak reactor (SPTR) has been proposed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as a candidate for the next generation tokamak reactor after the JT-60. The concept of the SPTR evolved from an incentive to relieve the difficulties of repair and maintenance procedures of a tokamak reactor. After about two years of the reactor design studies, several advantages of the SPTR over the conventional tokamak reactors such as the ease of penetration shielding, reduction in solid radwaste have been shown. On the other hand, some drawbacks and uncertainties of the SPTR have also been pointed out but so far no serious defect negating the concept has been found. This paper describes the neutronics aspect of the SPTR based mostly on the result of one dimensional calculations. At first, the radiation shielding capability of water is compared with those of other candidate materials used in the blanket and shield of fusion reactors. Based on the result of the comparison and other requirements such as tritium breeding, thermal mechanical design, repair and maintenance procedures, the material arrangements of the blanket and shield are determined. The result of the blanket neutronics calculations, the radiation shielding calculations for the superconducting magnets, shutdown dose calculations are given together with major penetration shielding considerations. (author)

  16. Conceptual design of Remote Control System for EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.Y., E-mail: xysun@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • A new design conception for remote control for EAST tokamak is proposed. • Rich Internet application (RIA) was selected to implement the user interface. • Some security mechanism was used to fulfill security requirement. - Abstract: The international collaboration becomes popular in tokamak research like in many other fields of science, because the experiment facilities become larger and more expensive. The traditional On-site collaboration Model that has to spend much money and time on international travel is not fit for the more frequent international collaboration. The Remote Control System (RCS), as an extension of the Central Control System for the EAST tokamak, is designed to provide an efficient and economical way to international collaboration. As a remote user interface, the RCS must integrate with the Central Control System for EAST tokamak to perform discharge control function. This paper presents a design concept delineating a few key technical issues and addressing all significant details in the system architecture design. With the aim of satisfying system requirements, the RCS will select rich Internet application (RIA) as a user interface, Java as a back-end service and Secure Socket Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) for securable Internet communication.

  17. Implications of rf current drive theory for next step steady-state tokamak design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two missions have been identified for a next-step tokamak experiment in the United States. The more ambitious Mission II device would be a superconducting tokamak, capable of doing long-pulse ignition demonstrations, and hopefully capable of also being able to achieve steady-state burn. A few interesting lines of approach have been identified, using a combination of logical design criteria and parametric system scans [SC85]. These include: (1) TIBER: A point-design suggested by Lawrence Livermore, that proposes a machine with the capability of demonstrating ignition, high beta (10%) and high Q (=10), using high frequency, fast-wave current drive. The TIBER topology uses moderate aspect ratio and high triangularity to achieve high beta. (2) JET Scale-up. (3) Magic5: It is argued here that an aspect ratio of 5 is a magic number for a good steady-state current drive experiment. A moderately-sized machine that achieves ignition and is capable of high Q, using either fast wave or slow wave current drive is described. (4) ET-II: The concept of a highly elongated tokamak (ET) was first proposed as a low-cost approach to Mission I, because of the possibility of achieving ohmic ignition with low-stress copper magnets. We propose that its best application is really for commercial tokamaks, using fast-wave current drive, and suggest a Mission II experiment that would be prototypical of such a reactor

  18. Plasma transport in a Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nominal predicted plasma conditions in a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) are illustrated by transport simulations using experimentally calibrated plasma transport models. The range of uncertainty in these predictions is explored by using various models that have given almost equally good fits to experimental data. Using a transport model that best fits the data, thermonuclear ignition occurs in a CIT design with a major radius of 1.32 m, plasma half-width of 0.43 mn, elongation of 2.0, and toroidal field and plasma current ramped in 6 s from 1.7 to 10.4 T and 0.7 to 10 MA, respectively. Ignition is facilitated by 20 MW of heating deposited off the magnetic axis near the /sup 3/He minority cyclotron resonance layer. Under these conditions, sawtooth oscillations are small and have little impact on ignition. Tritium inventory is minimized by preconditioning most discharges with deuterium. Tritium is injected, in large frozen pellets, only after minority resonance preheating. Variations of the transport model, impurity influx, heating profile, and pellet ablation rates have a large effect on ignition and on the maximum beta that can be achieved

  19. Physics aspects of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve nτE ≅ 2 x 1020 s/m3 required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which provides a high level of ohmic heating, improves the energy confinement, and allows a relatively high beta (≅ 6%). The present CIT design also has a high degree of elongation (κ ≅ 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and pellet injection are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, and 10-20 MW of ICRF is to be provided. (orig.)

  20. Progress Toward Steady State Tokamak Operation Exploiting the high bootstrap current fraction regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Q.

    2015-11-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have advanced the normalized fusion performance of the high bootstrap current fraction tokamak regime toward reactor-relevant steady state operation. The experiments, conducted by a joint team of researchers from the DIII-D and EAST tokamaks, developed a fully noninductive scenario that could be extended on EAST to a demonstration of long pulse steady-state tokamak operation. Fully noninductive plasmas with extremely high values of the poloidal beta, βp >= 4 , have been sustained at βT >= 2 % for long durations with excellent energy confinement quality (H98y,2 >= 1 . 5) and internal transport barriers (ITBs) generated at large minor radius (>= 0 . 6) in all channels (Te, Ti, ne, VTf). Large bootstrap fraction (fBS ~ 80 %) has been obtained with high βp. ITBs have been shown to be compatible with steady state operation. Because of the unusually large ITB radius, normalized pressure is not limited to low βN values by internal ITB-driven modes. βN up to ~4.3 has been obtained by optimizing the plasma-wall distance. The scenario is robust against several variations, including replacing some on-axis with off-axis neutral beam injection (NBI), adding electron cyclotron (EC) heating, and reducing the NBI torque by a factor of 2. This latter observation is particularly promising for extension of the scenario to EAST, where maximum power is obtained with balanced NBI injection, and to a reactor, expected to have low rotation. However, modeling of this regime has provided new challenges to state-of-the-art modeling capabilities: quasilinear models can dramatically underpredict the electron transport, and the Sauter bootstrap current can be insufficient. The analysis shows first-principle NEO is in good agreement with experiments for the bootstrap current calculation and ETG modes with a larger saturated amplitude or EM modes may provide the missing electron transport. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC52-07NA

  1. Absolute measurement of {beta} {sub eff} based on Feynman-{alpha} experiments and the two-region model in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Renato Y.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Pinheiros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Adimir dos [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Pinheiros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: asantos@ipen.br; Jerez, Rogerio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Pinheiros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Pinheiros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    A new methodology for absolute measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta} {sub eff} based on Feynman-{alpha} experiments and the two-region model was developed. This method made use of Feynman-{alpha} experiments and the two-region model. To examine the present methodology, a series of Feynman-{alpha} experiments were conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. In contrast with other techniques like the slope method, Nelson-number method and {sup 252}Cf-source method, the main advantage of this new methodology is to obtain {beta} {sub eff} with the required accuracy and without knowledge of any other parameter. By adopting the present approach, {beta} {sub eff} was measured with a 0.67% uncertainty. In addition, the prompt neutron generation time, {lambda}, and other parameters, was also obtained in an absolute experimental way. In general, the measured parameters are in good agreement with the values found from frequency analysis experiments. The theory-experiment comparison for the {beta} {sub eff} measured in this work shows that JENDL3.3 presented the best agreement (within 1%). The reduction of the {sup 235}U thermal yield as proposed by Okajima and Sakurai is completely justified according to the {beta} {sub eff} measurements performed in this work.

  2. Absolute measurement of {beta}{sub eff} based on Feynman-{alpha} experiments and the two-region model in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Renato Yoichi Ribeiro; Santos, Adimir dos; Jerez, Rogerio; Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: ryrkuram@ipen.br; asantos@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    A new methodology for absolute measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}{sub eff} based on Feynman-alpha experiments and the two-region model was developed. This method made use of Feynman-{alpha} experiments and the two-region model. To examine the present methodology, a series of Feynman-{alpha} experiments were conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. In contrast with other techniques like the slope method, Nelson-number method and 252Cf-source method, the main advantage of this new methodology is to obtain {beta}{sub eff} with the required accuracy and without knowledge of any other parameter. By adopting the present approach, {beta}{sub eff} was measured with a 0.67% uncertainty. In addition, the prompt neutron generation time, {lambda}, and other parameters, was also obtained in an absolute experimental way. In general, the measured parameters are in good agreement with the values found from frequency analysis experiments. The theory-experiment comparison for the {beta}{sub eff} measured in this work shows that JENDL3.3 presented the best agreement (within 1%). The reduction of the {sup 235}U thermal yield as proposed by Okajima and Sakurai is completely justified according to the {beta}{sub eff} measurements performed in this work. (author)

  3. Transport of Dust Particles in Tokamak Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R D; Krasheninnikov, S I; Rognlien, T D; Rozenberg, M

    2006-06-06

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  4. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, J. E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, T.; Dix, D.; El-Guebaly, L.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G. H.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2011-10-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  5. Bootstrap Current in Spherical Tokamaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王中天; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    Variational principle for the neoclassical theory has been developed by including amomentum restoring term in the electron-electron collisional operator, which gives an additionalfree parameter maximizing the heat production rate. All transport coefficients are obtained in-cluding the bootstrap current. The essential feature of the study is that the aspect ratio affects thefunction of the electron-electron collision operator through a geometrical factor. When the aspectratio approaches to unity, the fraction of circulating particles goes to zero and the contribution toparticle flux from the electron-electron collision vanishes. The resulting diffusion coefficient is inrough agreement with Hazeltine. When the aspect ratio approaches to infinity, the results are inagreement with Rosenbluth. The formalism gives the two extreme cases a connection. The theoryis particularly important for the calculation of bootstrap current in spherical tokamaks and thepresent tokamaks, in which the square root of the inverse aspect ratio, in general, is not small.

  6. A compact Tokamak transmutation reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuLi-Jian; XiaoBing-Jia

    1997-01-01

    The low aspect ration tokamak is proposed for the driver of a transmutation reactor.The main parameters of the reactor core,neutronic analysis of the blanket are given>the neutron wall loading can be lowered from the magnitude order of 1 MW/m2 to 0.5MW/m2 which is much easier to reach in the near future,and the transmutation efficiency (fission/absorption ratio)is raised further.The blanket power density is about 200MW/m3 which is not difficult to deal with.The key components such as diverter and center conductor post are also designed and compared with conventional TOkamak,Finally,by comparison with the other drivers such as FBR,PWR and accelerator,it can be anticipated that the low aspect ratio transmutation reactor would be one way of fusion energy applications in the near future.

  7. Transport and effects of high-energy charged fusion-products in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An explicit expression that describes the guiding-center motion of a high-energy charged particle in a lossless, axisymmetric, low-beta (β less than or equal to 0.1) tokamak has been derived. The expression is valid in any type of toroidal and poloidal field configurations as long as the poloidal flux surfaces, specified by psi (r), are circular. A similar explicit expression is obtained for fields having a vertical stabilizing component, B/sub v/

  8. Equilibrium Reconstruction in EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Jinping; WAN Baonian; L. L. LAO; SHEN Biao; S. A. SABBAGH; SUN Youwen; LIU Dongmei; XIAO Singjia; REN Qilong; GONG Xianzu; LI Jiangang

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of experimental axisymmetric equilibria is an important part of toka-mak data analysis. Fourier expansion is applied to reconstruct the vessel current distribution in EFIT code. Benchmarking and testing calculations are performed to evaluate and validate this algorithm. Two cases for circular and non-circular plasma discharges are presented. Fourier ex-pansion used to fit the eddy current is a robust method and the real time EFIT can be introduced to the plasma control system in the coming campaign.

  9. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  10. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM`y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nT{tau}`s {approximately} 2.5x greater than ELM`ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices.

  11. Analysis on the severe accidents in KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Jae; Cheong, Y. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Cheon, E. J. [PlaGen, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-15

    The establishment of regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been demanded as the facility is targeted to be completed in the year of 2005. Such establishment can be achieved by performing adequate and in-depth analyses on safety issues covering radiological and chemical hazard materials, radiation protection, high vacuum, very low temperature, etc. The loss of coolant accidents and the loss of vacuum accident in fusion facilities have been introduced with summary of simulation results that were previously reported for ITER and JET. Computer codes that are actively used for accident simulation research are examined and their main features are briefly described. It can be stated that the safety analysis is indispensable to secure the safety of workers and individual members of the public as well as to establish the regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR tokamak.

  12. Instrumentation and controls of an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and controls (I and C) of an ignited plasma magnetically confined in a tokamak configuration needs increased emphasis in the following areas: (1) physics implications for control; (2) plasma shaping/position control; and (3) control to prevent disruptive instabilities. This document reports on the FY 1979 efforts in these and other areas. Also presented are discusssions in the areas of: (1) diagnostics suitable for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF); and (2) future research and development (R and D) needs. The appendices focus attention on some preliminary ideas about the measurement of the deuteron-triton (D-T) ratio in the plasma, synchrotron radiation, and divertor control. Finally, an appendix documenting the thermal consequences to the first wall of a MPD is presented

  13. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  14. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies

  15. Results and Future Plan of JT-60U towards Steady-State Tokamak Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Sakurai; the JT-60 Team

    2004-01-01

    Recent results of JT-60U towards establishment of physics basis for ITER and advanced tokamak operation are presented. Progress in high integrated performance is achieved with improvement of N-NB and ECRF heating systems. In the next experimental campaign 2003~2004, discharge duration with 17 MW heating will be extended up to 30 s for sustaining high-beta plasma longer than the current diffusion time. Superconducting modification of JT-60is planned to demonstrate high-beta plasma sustainment exceeding ideal MHD instability limit without wall stabilization.

  16. Stable bootstrap-current driven equilibria for low aspect ratio tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Turnbull, A.D.; Chan, V.S. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Pearlstein, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sauter, O.; Villard, L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    Low aspect ratio tokamaks can potentially provide a high ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure {beta} and high plasma current I at a modest size, ultimately leading to a high power density compact fusion power plant. For the concept to be economically feasible, bootstrap current must be a major component of the plasma. A high value of the Troyon factor {beta}{sub N} and strong shaping are required to allow simultaneous operation at high {beta} and high bootstrap current fraction. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of a range of equilibria at aspect 1.4 is systematically explored by varying the pressure profile and shape. The pressure and current profiles are constrained in such a way as to assure complete bootstrap current alignment. Both {beta}{sub N} and {beta} are defined in terms of the vacuum toroidal field. Equilibria with {beta} {sub N}{>=}8 and {beta} {approx_equal}35% to 55% exist which are stable to n = {infinity} ballooning modes, and stable to n = 0,1,2,3 kink modes with a conducting wall. The dependence of {beta} and {beta}{sub N} with respect to aspect ratio is also considered. (author) 9 figs., 14 refs.

  17. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an overview of the Aries-I tokamak reactor study. The following topics are discussed on this tokamak: Systems studies; equilibrium, stability, and transport; summary and conclusions; current drive; impurity control system; tritium systems; magnet engineering; fusion-power-core engineering; power conversion; Aries-I safety design and analysis; design layout and maintenance; and start-up and operations

  18. Tokamak plasma position dynamics and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form

  19. Economic evaluation of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  20. The disruptive instability in Tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salzedas, F.J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Studies performed in RTP (Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project) of the most violent and dangerous instability in tokamak plasmas, the major disruption, are presented. A particular class of disruptions is analyzed, namely the density limit disruption, which occur in high density plasmas. The radiative te

  1. The role of limiter in Egyptor Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Ei-Sisi, A B

    2002-01-01

    In Egyptor Tokamak, the limiter is used for separation of the plasma from the vessel. In this work an overview of limiter types, and construction of limiter in Egyptor Tokamak is discussed. Also simulation results of the radial electron density distribution in case of limiter are presented. The results of the simulation are in agreement with the experimental and analytical results.

  2. KTM Tokamak is prototype of X XI century reactor. Future International laboratory of thermonuclear materials testing and power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 29-31 May of 2000 the presentation of the joint Kazakhstan-Russian draft of Kazakhstan material-testing tokamak (KTM) was carried out. KTM tokamak is implementing by decision of the President and Government of Republic of Kazakhstan for supporting of the Kazakhstan participation in development of draft within framework of ITER fusion reactor construction. Scientific head of the project is Russian academician - Velikhov V. and Russian Research Center 'Kurchatovskij Institute' , General designers - Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Equipment after D. V. Efremov (Russian Federation) and Kazakh Research Inst. for Energy Industry (KazNIIEhnergoprom). Scientific part of the project is working out in National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan and Scientific Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics. KTM tokamak is experimental fusion device for materials testing study, as well as for designing of methods for protection of the reactor first wall, in-chamber elements and divertor planes, high frequency heat of antennas in energetic load regimes close to both the ITER and the future fusion energy reactors. KTM by it design presents spheric tokamak, which successfully combining advantages of the spheromaks (compactness) and the tokamaks (high plasma density). Now in the world there are similar operating spheric tokamaks: NSTX (USA), MAST (Great Britain), GLOBUS-M (Russian Federation). Principal peculiarity of KTM tokamak is existence of moving divertor device, which with help of manipulator allows to changing of examining samples without high vacuum disruption. Values of the thermal loads and fluences in the KTM are equal or higher than loads in operating tokamaks and correspond with ITER reactor loads. KTM tokamak will be the only mega-ampere device in the world with the aspect ratio A=2

  3. Theory and calculation of finite beta drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using numerical techniques, we calculate eigenmodes of the nonlinear universal mode with finite beta in order to determine the scaling of the saturation level of the instability with beta. We use two different renormalizations in the calculations and find that using the appropriate renormalization, we are able to recover Alcator density scaling, as originally found in analytic work by Molvig and Hirshman. We also find that the universal mode should be stable in ohmically heated tokamaks above a critical beta on the order of 0.02

  4. Results from the DIII-D scientific research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.S.; Burrell, K.H.; Baker, D.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-11-01

    The DIII-D research program is aimed at developing the scientific basis for advanced modes of operation which can enhance the commercial attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Features that improve the attractiveness of the tokamak as a fusion power plant include: high power density (which demands high {beta}), high ignition margin (high energy confinement time), and steady state operation with low recirculating power (high bootstrap fraction), as well as adequate divertor heat removal, particle and impurity control. This set of requirements emphasizes that the approach to improved performance must be an integrated approach, optimizing the plasma from the core, through the plasma edge and into the divertor. The authors have produced high performance ELMing H-mode plasmas with {beta}{sub N} H{sub 98y} {approximately} 6 for 5 {tau}{sub E} ({approximately}1 s) and demonstrated that core transport barriers can be sustained for the length of the 5-s neutral beam pulse in L-mode plasmas. They have demonstrated off-axis electron cyclotron current drive for the first time in a tokamak, discovering an efficiency above theoretical expectations. Edge stability studies have shown that the H-mode edge pressure gradient is not limited by ballooning modes; the self-consistent bootstrap provides second stable regime access. Divertor experiments have provided a new understanding of convection and recombination in radiative divertors and have produced enhanced divertor radiation with scrape off layer plasma flows and impurity enrichment.

  5. Instrumentation for plasma diagnosis in TN (Novillo Tokamak)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Plasma Physics Laboratory of National Institute of Nuclear Research it has been utilized different devices for to determine electromagnetic parameters of Novillo Tokamak such as: magnetic fields, plasma currents, plasma column position and hoop voltage. For these measurements it was designed, constructed and calibrated magnetic soundings such as: magnetic field soundings, Rogowsky coil, coils of the type called sine/cosine and spires type riding saddle; as well as the electronic instrumentation associated with these devices. This electronics to be clear of instrumentation amplifiers for the detection of the soundings signals and differentiators utilized for the elimination of spurious induced currents in the soundings by the different Novillo electromagnetic fields. In this work is presented the methodology for the construction of this instruments, as well as the results of measurements effectuated in the two operation regimens of Tokamak: Cleaning discharge and Main discharge. (Author)

  6. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges

  7. Draft program plant for TNS: The Next Step after the tokamak fusion test reactor. Part III. Project specific RD and D needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-01

    Research and development needs for the TNS systems are described according to the following chapters: (1) tokamak system, (2) electrical power systems, (3) plasma heating systems, (4) tokamak support systems, (5) instrumentation, control, and data systems, and (6) program recommendations. (MOW)

  8. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades......, but the mechanisms involved are still not clarified. In this review the information obtained in previous studies is recapitulated together with some of the current attempts to resolve the controversy in the field: identification of the putative progenitor cells, identification of the factors involved...

  9. Analysis of fast ion induced instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, László

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices like tokamaks, it is crucial to confine the high energy fusion-born helium nuclei ($\\alpha$-particles) to maintain the energy equilibrium of the plasma. However, energetic ions can excite various instabilities which can lead to their enhanced radial transport. Consequently, these instabilities may degrade the heating efficiency and they can also cause harmful power loads on the plasma-facing components of the device. Therefore, the understanding of these modes is a key issue regarding future burning plasma experiments. One of the main open questions concerning energetic particle (EP) driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. In this thesis, I present my results on the investigation of $\\beta$-induced Alfv\\'{e}n eigenmodes (BAEs) and EP-driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. These modes were well visible on several line-of-sights (LOSs) of the soft X-ra...

  10. Magnet systems for ''Bean-Shaped'' tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean-shaping of tokamak plasmas offers a method of reaching stable operation at (beta) > 10%. In order to establish the indentation of the ''bean'', a set of high- current ''pushing coils'' (> 5 MA in a reactor) must be located at the midplane as close as possible to the inboard edge of the plasma. If located in the bore of the TF coils, then maintenance of the pushing coils may be impossible, and the interlocking coils may prevent reactor modularity. If located outside, the required pushing-coil current may be unacceptably large. This dilemma is overcome with a unique TF coil design in which the inboard leg is bent outward in the form of an arc. The pushing coils are housed in the midplane indentation of this arc, just outside the TF coils but adequately close to the plasma. The arched coil transfers forces to the top and bottom legs, where it can be reacted by a clamp structure if necessary. This technique would allow demountable joints to be placed near the inoard leg (for copper TF coils). Another design approach to the pushing coils is to use liquid Li or Na as the conductor and coolant. The liquid metal ''coils'' can be placed immediately adjacent to the plasma, giving optimal control of the plasma shape with minimal coil current, although modularity of the reactor may have to be surrendered. Conceptual designs are presented of PF and TF coil systems for an ignition test reactor with about 14% and for a full-scale demonstration reactor with about 20%, both using copper TF coils

  11. Annual report of the Fusion Research Center for the period of April 1, 1983 to March 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research Center (Department of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Department of Large Tokamak Development) from April 1983 to March 1984 are described. Installation and commissioning of the new tokamak JFT-2M had been completed. The 2nd ICRF heating experiment and LH current drive experiment were started. In the field of plasma theory, the scaling law of the critical beta in a tokamak was obtained and the ICRF heating was analyzed in detail. The first phase of the cooperation of Doublet III will be finished in Sept. 1984. The JT-60 program progressed as scheduled. Installation of the tokamak machine, initiated in Feb. 1983, will be finished in Sept. 1984. The tests of power supply and control system on site and the fabrication of the neutral beam injectors in factory proceeded successfully. Performance tests of prototype injector unit for JT-60 NBI progressed as scheduled. A new advanced source plasma generator was developed to provide a high proton ratio exceeding 90%. Klystrons for JT-60 LH heating achieved the output power of 1 MW for 10 sec. Performance tests of titanium evaporators for JT-60 were completed. The Japanese coil for IEA Large Coil Task was installed in a test facility at ORNL and the partial cool-down was carried out. Construction of the Tritium Process Laboratory was completed. Design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) and INTOR proceeded. (author)

  12. Electromagnetic microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas using a global spectral approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falchetto, G. L

    2002-03-01

    Electromagnetic microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas are studied by means of a linear global eigenvalue numerical code. The code is the electromagnetic extension of an existing electrostatic global gyrokinetic spectral toroidal code, called GLOGYSTO. Ion dynamics is described by the gyrokinetic equation, so that ion finite Larmor radius effects are taken into account to all orders. Non adiabatic electrons are included in the model, with passing particles described by the drift-kinetic equation and trapped particles through the bounce averaged drift-kinetic equation. A low frequency electromagnetic perturbation is applied to a low -but finite- {beta}plasma (where the parameter {beta} identifies the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure); thus, the parallel perturbations of the magnetic field are neglected. The system is closed by the quasi-neutrality equation and the parallel component of Ampere's law. The formulation is applied to a large aspect ratio toroidal configuration, with circular shifted surfaces. Such a simple configuration enables one to derive analytically the gyrocenter trajectories. The system is solved in Fourier space, taking advantage of a decomposition adapted to the toroidal geometry. The major contributions of this thesis are as follows. The electromagnetic effects on toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient driven (ITG) modes are studied. The stabilization of these modes with increasing {beta}, as predicted in previous work, is confirmed. The inclusion of trapped electron dynamics enables the study of its coupling to the ITG modes and of Trapped Electron Modes (TEM) .The effects of finite {beta} are considered together with those of different magnetic shear profiles and of the Shafranov shift. The threshold for the destabilization of an electromagnetic mode is identified. Moreover, the global formulation yields for the first time the radial structure of this so-called Alfvenic Ion Temperature Gradient (AITG) mode. The stability of the

  13. DIII-D research operations. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R&D; and collaborative efforts.

  14. Trade studies of plasma elongation for next-step tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, J.D.; Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of elongation on minimum-cost devices is investigated for elongations ranging from 2 to 3. The analysis, carried out with the TETRA tokamak systems code, includes the effects of elongation on both physics (plasma beta limit) and engineering (poloidal field coil currents) issues. When ignition is required, the minimum cost occurs for elongations from 2.3 to 2.9, depending on the plasma energy confinement scaling used. Scalings that include favorable plasma current dependence and/or degradation with fusion power tend to have minimum cost at higher elongation (2.5-2.9); scalings that depend primarily on size result in lower elongation (/approximately/2.3) for minimum cost. For design concepts that include steady-state current-driven operation, minimum cost occurs at an elongation of 2.3. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Charge exchange measurements of ion behavior in the ISX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of charge exchange neutrals is the standard method for measuring ion behavior in tokamak plasmas. Limitations of this technique, which arise in dense and neutral-beam-heated plasmas, are discussed. Two refinements that address these limitations are described: a neutral particle analyzer, which incorporates both mass and energy resolution to distinguish different ion components such as the fast and thermal ions in beam-heated plasmas, and an improved data analysis procedure, which accounts for the effects of profiles and neutral attenuation in dense plasmas. A simple two-dimensional Monte Carlo neutral transport code was developed and used to investigate the effects of toroidally asymmetric neutral density profiles. Applications of these methods to experiments in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) are discussed; they include energy confinement studies on ISX-A, natural beam heating and high beta studies on ISX-B, and pellet fueling studies on ISX-B

  16. Effects of suprathermal fusion particles in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Several crucial properties of suprathermal (> 500 keV) fusion-products are explored, both in their initial phase and during their slowing-down period. A guiding center drift theory, which predicts the effect of energy loss on the motion of these suprathermals, is derived for a low-..beta.., symmetric (non-ripple) tokamak. Velocity-space scattering is ignored. Among the important implications of this theory are: (1) the net inward drift of fusion particles during their slow-down phase and (2) the importance of the plasma density and temperature in determining this drift. The effect the inward drifting has on the spatial profile for the suprathermals approaching thermal energies, on the energy distribution, and on the plasma heating profile is demonstrated for five reactor cases, ranging from near-term low-current devices to conceptual power reactors.

  17. Rossi-{alpha} experiment in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor: Validation of two-region model and absolute measurement of {beta}{sub eff} and {Lambda}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, R.; Dos Santos, A.; Jerez, R.; Diniz, R.; Bitelli, U. D.; Madi Filho, T.; Veneziani, C. L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Cidade Universitaria, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Pinheiros Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    A new method for absolute measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction, {beta}{sub eff}, and the prompt neutron generation time, {Lambda}, based on Rossi-{alpha} experiments and the Two-Region Model was developed at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor facility. In contrast with other techniques like the Slope Method, Nelson-Number Method and {sup 252}Cf- Source Method, the main advantage of this new methodology is to obtain the parameters in a purely experimental way, eliminating all parameters that are difficult to measure or calculate. In this way, Rossi-{alpha} experiments for validation of this method were performed at the IPEN/MB-01 facility. The final results agree well with values from frequency analysis experiments and show uncertainties of 1.46% and 0.97% for {beta}{sub eff}, and {Lambda} respectively. This work supports the reduction of the {sup 235}U thermal yield as proposed by Okajima and Sakurai. (authors)

  18. Heart rate distribution and predictors of resting heart rate after initiation of beta-blocker treatment in patients with coronary artery disease: REsults of Sympathetic Evaluation And Research of China(RESEARCH) study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-xin; LI Yue-ping; GAO Fei; MA Han-ying; WANG Zhi-jian; HAN Hong-ya; SHEN Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of heart rate as secondary prevention strategies for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is emphasized by multiple guidelines.However,limited information is available on the heart rate distribution and the change patterns of resting heart rate when initiating beta-blocker therapy among Chinese patients with CAD.Methods The REsults of Sympathetic Evaluation And Research of China (RESEARCH) study is a multi-centre,prospective,observational study involving 147 centers in 23 cities across China.All eligible beta-blocker naive patients were prescribed with metroprolol succinate.Initial dosage and target heart rate were selected at the discretion of their physicians in charge according to their usual institutional practice.The heart rate distribution and the change patterns of resting heart rate after initiation of beta-blocker therapy were observed.Results The majority of patients (63.6%) were prescribed with 47.5 mg metroprolol succinate.At baseline,there were only 17.4% of patients whose heart rate was less than 70 beats per minute,and the proportion reached 42.5% and 79.1%,one month and two months after initiation of beta-blockers,respectively.Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that baseline heart rate (B=0.900,SE=0.006,t=141.787,P<0.0001) and the dosage (B=-0.007,SE=0.002,t=-3.242,P=0.001) were independent predictors of resting heart rate 2 months after beta-blocker therapy.Conclusions Resting heart rate is not optimally controlled in a broadly representative cohort of Chinese outpatients with CAD even after initiation of β-blocker therapy,and baseline heart rate and the dosage of beta-blocker are both independent predictors of resting heart rate after β-blocker therapy.

  19. Atomic physics in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak discharges produce hydrogen-isotope plasmas in a quasi-steady state, with radial electron temperature, Tsub(e)(r), and density nsub(e)(r), distribution usually centrally peaked, with typical values Tsub(e)(0) approx.= 1 - 3 keV, nsub(e)(r) approx.= 1014 cm-3. Besides hydrogen, the plasma contains small quantities of carbon, oxygen, various construction or wall-conditioning materials such as Fe, Cr, Ni, Ti, Zr, Mo, and perhaps elements added for special diagnostic purposes, e.g., Si, Sc, Al, or noble gases. These elements are spatially fairly homogeneously distributed, with the different ionization states occurring near radial locations where Tsub(e)(r) approx.= Esub(i), the ionization potential. Thus, spectroscopic measurements of various plasma properties, such as ion temperatures, plasma motions or oscillations, radial transport rates, etc. are automatically endowed with spatial resolution. Furthermore the emitted spectra, even of heavier elements such as Fe or Ni, are fairly simple because only the ground levels are appreciably populated under the prevailing plasma conditions. Identification of near-ground transitions, including particularly magnetic dipole and intercombination transitions of ions with ionization potentials in the several keV range, and determination of their collisional and radiative transition probabilities will be required for development of appropriate diagnostics of tokamak-type plasma approaching the prospective fusion reactor conditions. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of neutral hydrogenic emission spectra in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Balmer-α radiation by the excitation of thermal and fast neutral hydrogenic particles has been investigated in a magnetically confined fusion device, or tokamak, from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). From the diagnostic point of view, the emission from thermal neutrals is associated with passive spectroscopy and that from energetic neutrals that are usually injected from the outside of the tokamak to the active spectroscopy. The passive spectroscopic measurement for the thermal Balmer-α emission from deuterium and hydrogen estimates the relative concentration of hydrogen in a deuterium-fueled plasma and therefore, makes a useful tool to monitor the vacuum wall condition. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium obtained from this measurement qualitatively correlates with the energy confinement of the plasma. The Doppler-shifted Balmer-α components from the fast neutrals features the spectrum of the motional Stark effect (MSE) which is an essential principle for the measurement of the magnetic pitch angle profile. Characterization of this active MSE spectra, especially with multiple neutral beam lines crossing along the observation line of sight, has been done for the guideline of the multi-ion-source heating beam operation and for the optimization of the narrow bandpass filters that are required for the polarimeter-based MSE diagnostic system under construction at KSTAR.

  1. Interactive exploration of tokamak turbulence simulations in virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an immersive visualization system designed for interactive data exploration as an integral part of our computing environment for studying tokamak turbulence. This system of codes can reproduce the results of simulations visually for scrutiny in real time, interactively and with more realism than ever before. At peak performance, the VR system can present for view some 400 coordinated images per second. The long term vision this approach targets is a open-quote holodeck-like close-quote virtual-reality environment in which one can explore gyrofluid or gyrokinetic plasma simulations interactively and in real time, visually, with concurrent simulations of experimental diagnostic devices. In principle, such a open-quote virtual tokamak close-quote computed environment could be as all encompassing or as focussed as one likes, in terms of the physics involved. The computing framework in one within which a group of researchers can work together to produce a real and identifiable product with easy access to all contributions. This could be our version of NASA's next generation Numerical Wind Tunnel. The principal purpose of this VR capability for Numerical Tokamak simulation is to provide interactive visual experience to help create new ways of understanding aspects of the convective transport processes operating in tokamak fusion experiments. The effectiveness of the visualization method is strongly dependent on the density of frame-to-frame correlation. Below a threshold of this quantity, short term visual memory does not bridge the gap between frames well enough for there to exist a strong visual connection. Above the threshold, evolving structures appear clearly. The visualizations show the 3D structure of vortex evolution and the gyrofluid motion associated with it. We discovered that it was very helpful for visualizing the cross field flows to compress the virtual world in the toroidal angle

  2. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost.

  3. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost

  4. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Raju; R Jha; P K Kaw; S K Mattoo; Y C Saxena; Aditya Team

    2000-11-01

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as the discharge progresses. It is observed that during the current rise phase, current perturbation undergoes transition from = 5 poloidal structure to = 4 and then to = 3. At the time of current termination, = 2 perturbation is observed. It is observed that the mode frequency remains nearly constant (≈10 kHz) when poloidal mode structure changes from = 4 to = 2. This may be either an indication of mode coupling or a consequences of changes in the plasma electron temperature and density scale length.

  5. Interleukin 1-beta and the research process of periodontal disease%白细胞介素1-β与牙周炎的研究进程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾毅

    2013-01-01

    1-βinterleukin (IL-1 beta) is a kind of important immune cellfactors in the main genetic interleukin 1 of the members of the family. In recent years, study found that IL-1 beta can be immune to gum disease occurrence, development plays an important role, and found that IL-1βgene polymorphism and on the type of periodontal disease, the in-depth study of the IL-1 beta, and the relationship between periodontal disease, the cause of periodontal disease research, prevention, treatment and prognosis judgment have far-reaching significance.%白细胞介素1-β(IL-1β)是一类重要的免疫细胞因子白细胞介素1的主要基因家族成员之一,近年来研究发现IL-1β在牙周病的免疫发生、发展中发挥着重要的作用,并且发现IL-1β基因多态性与牙周炎的类型有关,深入研究IL-1β和牙周炎的关系,对牙周炎的病因研究、预防、治疗以及预后判断有深远意义。

  6. Absolute measurement of {beta}{sub eff} based on Rossi-{alpha} experiments and two-region model in IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Renato Yoichi Ribeiro; Santos, Adimir dos; Jerez, Rogerio; Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mails: ryrkuram@ipen.br; asantos@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    A new method for absolute measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction, {beta}{sub eff}, based on Rossi-{alpha} experiments and the Two-Region Model was developed at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor facility. In contrast with other techniques like the Slope Method, Nelson-Number Method and {sup 252}Cf-Source Method, the main advantage of this new methodology is to obtain the effective delayed neutron parameters in a purely experimental way, eliminating all parameters that are difficult to measure or calculate. In this way, Rossi-alpha experiments for validation of this method were performed at the IPEN/MB-01 facility, and adopting the present approach, {beta}{sub eff} was measured with a 1.46% uncertainty. In addition, the prompt neutron generation time, LAMBDA and other parameters, was also obtained in an absolute experimental way. In general, the final results agree well with values from frequency analysis experiments. The theory-experiment comparison reveals that JENDL-3.3 shows deviation for {beta}{sub eff} lower than 1% which meets the desired accuracy for the theoretical determination of this parameter. This work supports the reduction of the {sup 235U} thermal yield as proposed by Okajima and Sakurai. (author)

  7. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  8. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the Aries-I Tokamak: Design description; systems studies and economics; reactor plasma physics; magnet engineering; fusion-power-ore engineering; and environmental and safety features

  9. D-D tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tokamak D-D reactor design, utilizing the advantages of a deuterium-fueled reactor but with parameters not unnecessarily extended from existing D-T designs, is presented. Studies leading to the choice of a design and initial studies of the design are described. The studies are in the areas of plasma engineering, first-wall/blanket/shield design, magnet design, and tritium/fuel/vacuum requirements. Conclusions concerning D-D tokamak reactors are stated

  10. Resistive wall mode and neoclassical tearing mode coupling in rotating tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    McAdams, Rachel; Chapman, I T

    2013-01-01

    A model system of equations has been derived to describe a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma, unstable to Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) and metastable to Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs), using a linear RWM model and a nonlinear NTM model. If no wall is present, the NTM growth shows the typical threshold/saturation island widths, whereas a linearly unstable kink mode grows exponentially in this model plasma system. When a resistive wall is present, the growth of the linearly unstable RWM is accelerated by an unstable island: a form of coupled RWM-NTM mode. Crucially, this coupled system has no threshold island width, giving the impression of a triggerless NTM, observed in high beta tokamak discharges. In addition, increasing plasma rotation at the island location can mitigate its growth, but does not restore the threshold width.

  11. Active control of edge localized modes with a low n perturbation fields in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Y., E-mail: y.liang@fz-juelich.d [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Koninklijke Militaire School - Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Koslowski, H.R. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Nardon, E. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Alfier, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Consorzio RFX Padova (Italy); Baranov, Y. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); De La Luna, E. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vries, P. de [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Eich, T. [Association EURATOM-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Esser, H.G.; Harting, D. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Kiptily, V. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Kreter, A. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gerasimov, S.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Howell, D. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Sergienko, G. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Active control of edge localized modes (ELMs) by using static external magnetic perturbation fields with low toroidal mode number, n, has been demonstrated for both, ITER baseline (q{sub 95}approx3) and high beta advanced tokamak scenarios at the JET tokamak. During the application of the low n field the ELM frequency increased by a factor up to approx4-5. Reduction in carbon erosion and ELM peak heat fluxes on the divertor target by roughly the same factor as the increase of the ELM frequency has been observed. The frequency of the mitigated ELMs using a low n field is found to increase proportional to the total input heating power. Compensation of the density pump-out effect observed when the external low n field is applied has been achieved by gas fueling in low triangularity plasmas.

  12. Tokamak plasma interaction with limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of plasma purity is first discussed in terms of the general requirements of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The tokamak approach to fusion and its inherent problem of plasma contamination are introduced. A main source of impurities is due to the bombardment of the limiter by energetic particles and thus the three main aspects of the plasma-limiter interaction are reviewed, boundary plasma conditions, fuelling/recycling and impurity production. The experiments, carried out on the DITE tokamak at Culham Laboratory, UK, investigated these three topics and the results are compared with predicted behaviour; new physical phenomena are presented in all three areas. Simple one-dimensional fluid equations are found to adequately describe the SOL plasma, except in regard to the pre-sheath electric field and ambipolarity; that is, the electric field adjacent to the limiter surface appears to be weak and the associated plasma flow can be non-ambipolar. Recycling of fuel particles from the limiter is observed to be near unity at all times. The break-up behaviour of recycled and gas puffed D2 molecules is dependent on the electron temperature, as expected. Impurity production at the limiter is chemical erosion of graphite being negligible. Deposition of limiter and wall-produced impurities is found on the limiter. The spatial distributions of impurities released from the limiter are observed and are in good agreement with a sputtered atom transport code. Finally, preliminary experiments on the transport of impurity ions along field lines away from the limiter have been performed and compared with simple analytic theory. The results suggest that the pre-sheath electric field in the SOL is much weaker than the simple fluid model would predict

  13. LONG-PULSE, HIGH-PERFORMANCE DISCHARGES IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. LUCE; M.R. WADE; P.A. POLITZER; S.L. ALLEN; M E. AUSTIN; D.R. BAKER; B.D. BRAY; D.P. BRENNAN; K.H. BURRELL; T.A. CASPER; M.S. CHU; J.D. De BOO; E.J. DOYLE; J.R. FERRON; A.M. GAROFALO; P.GOHIL; I.A. GORELOV; C.M. GREENFIELD; R.J. GROEBNER; W.W. HEIBRINK; C.-L. HSIEH; A.W. HYATT; R.JAYAKUMAR; J.E.KINSEY; R.J. LA HAYE; L.L.LAO; C.J.LASNIER; E.A. LAZARUS; A.W. LEONARD; Y.R.LIN-LIU; J.LOHR; M.A. MAKOWSKI; M.MURAKAMI; C.C.PETTY; R.I. PINSKER; R.PRATER; C.L. RETTIG; T.L. RHODES; B.W. RICE; E.J. STRAIT; T.S. TAYLOR; D.M. THOMAS; A.D. TURNBULL; J.G. WATKINS; W.P.WEST; K.-L. WONG

    2000-10-01

    Significant progress in obtaining high performance discharges for many energy confinement times in the DIII-D tokamak has been realized since the previous IAEA meeting. In relation to previous discharges, normalized performance {approx}10 has been sustained for >5 {tau}{sub E} with q{sub min} >1.5. (The normalized performance is measured by the product {beta}{sub N} H{sub 89} indicating the proximity to the conventional {beta} limits and energy confinement quality, respectively.) These H-mode discharges have an ELMing edge and {beta} {approx}{le} 5%. The limit to increasing {beta} is a resistive wall mode, rather than the tearing modes previously observed. Confinement remains good despite the increase in q. The global parameters were chosen to optimize the potential for fully non-inductive current sustainment at high performance, which is a key program goal for the DIII-D facility in the next two years. Measurement of the current density and loop voltage profiles indicate {approx}75% of the current in the present discharges is sustained non-inductively. The remaining ohmic current is localized near the half radius. The electron cyclotron heating system is being upgraded to replace this remaining current with ECCD. Density and {beta} control, which are essential for operating advanced tokamak discharges, were demonstrated in ELMing H-mode discharges with {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {approx} 7 for up to 6.3 s or {approx} 34 {tau}{sub E}. These discharges appear to be in resistive equilibrium with q{sub min} {approx} 1.05, in agreement with the current profile relaxation time of 1.8 s.

  14. Annual progress report on fusion plasma theory task III: auxiliary heating in tokamaks and tandem mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research we have accomplished during the past year has focussed on ICRF coupling, heating and breakeven studies for tokamaks and ECRF fundamental second harmonic heating in tandem mirrors. The studies have included ICRF Fokker-Planck heating and breakeven studies for large tokamaks such as JET, fundamental work on a new wave power absorption and conservation relation for ICRF in inhomogeneous plasmas, a formulation and code development for ICRF waveguide coupling in tokamak edge regions. ECRF ray tracing studies have been carried out for fundamental and second harmonic propagation, absorption and whistler microinstabilities in tandem mirror plug and barrier regions of Phaedrus, TMX-U and TASKA. The two-dimensional velocity space, time dependent Fokker-Planck heating studies have concentrated on D-T breakeven scenarios for fundamental minority deuterium and second harmonic tritium regimes

  15. Importance of the fine structure in a tokamak for the abnormal transport and the internal disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of energy transport in a Tokamak, in presence of magnetic islets, has been treated by decomposing this problem in different bricks. To assembly the different bricks the model of dynamic percolation, which couples by the intermediate of scattering coefficient, the activity of transport sites (islets size) to the profile of transported quantity (temperature profile) has been chosen. The results, got with this model, results connected to the hypothesis of a limited number of islets, agree with the different observations. A possible application of this model could be the exploration of different operating conditions of Tokamak and a research of improved confinement running. (N.C.). 149 refs., 85 figs

  16. Potential commercial reactor based on a small tokamak hybrid design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ignition tokamak reactor design has been obtained which represents a starting point for the conceptual design of a 1000 MW/sub e/ commercial system. The design includes Nb3Sn superconducting coils (TF, OH, and SF), water-cooled fissile blanket (e.g., uranium oxide), positive-ion based neutral beams with no direct energy recovery, and an ignited plasma with a = 0.9 m and an aspect ratio A = 4.0. The TF coil bore has a vertical bore of 7 m and a horizontal bore of 5 m both of which are a factor of two larger than the corresponding bore dimensions of the LCP (Large Coil Project) TF coil. The plasma is characterized as follows: stability factor q = 2.5, Z/sub eff/ approx. 1, poloidal beta β/sub p/ less than or equal to A, a elongation delta in the range between 1.6 and 1.7. A number of potential operating conditions for the plasma and device have been identified for which the plasma beta β lies within the range from 6.5% to 7.3%, and the plasma temperature has an average value between 11 keV and 12.5 keV. The design was obtained using the computer code COAST and represents a self-consistent sizing and costing result

  17. First dedicated observations of runaway electrons in the COMPASS tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlainić Miloš

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Runaway electrons present an important part of the present efforts in nuclear fusion research with respect to the potential damage of the in-vessel components. The COMPASS tokamak a suitable tool for the studies of runaway electrons, due to its relatively low vacuum safety constraints, high experimental flexibility and the possibility of reaching the H-mode D-shaped plasmas. In this work, results from the first experimental COMPASS campaign dedicated to runaway electrons are presented and discussed in preliminary way. In particular, the first observation of synchrotron radiation and rather interesting raw magnetic data are shown.

  18. A design retrospective of the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxon, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak evolved from the earlier Doublet III device in 1986. Since then, the facility has undergone a number of changes including the installation of divertor baffles and pumping chambers in the vacuum vessel, the addition of a radiation shield, the development of extensive neutral beam and RF heating systems, and the addition of a comprehensive plasma control system. The facility has become the focus of a broad fusion plasma science research programme. An integrated picture of the facility and its capabilities is presented.

  19. The JT-60 tokamak machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JT-60 is a large tokamak experimental device under construction at JAERI with main device parameters of R=3.0m, a=0.95m, Bsub(t)=45kG, and Isub(p)=2.7Ma. Its basic aim is to produce and confine hydrogen plasmas of temperatures in a multi-keV range and of confinement times comparable to a second, and to study its plasma-physics properties as well as engineering problems associated with them. The JT-60 tokamak machine is mainly composed of a vacuum vessel, toroidal field (TF) coils, poloidal field (PF) coils, and support structures. The vacuum vessel is a high toroidal chamber with an egg-shaped crossection, consisting of sectorial rigid rings and parallel bellows made from Inconel 625. It is baked out at a maximum temperature up to 5000C. Several kinds of first walls made from molybdenum are bolt-jointed to the vacuum vessel for its protection. The vacuum vessel is almost completely finished with design and is deeply into manufacturing. The TF system consists of 18 unit coils located around a torus axis at regular intervals. The unit coil composed of two pancakes are wedge-shaped at the section close to a torus axis and encased in a high-manganese non-magnetic steel case. Fabrication of the TF coils will be finished in May 1981. The PF coils are composed of ohmic heating coils, vertical field coils, horizontal field coils, and quadrupole field coils located inside the TF coil bore and outside the vacuum vessel, and magnetic limiter coils placed in the vacuum vessel. Its mechanical and thermal design is almost completed are composed of the upper and lower support structures, support comuns of the vacuum vessel, and central column made from high-manganese non-magnetic steel. The structural analysis was completed including a seismic analysis and the fabrication is now in progress. The first plasma is expected to be produced in October 1984. (orig.)

  20. Characteristics of Plasma Turbulence in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Ghim, Young-chul

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is a major factor limiting the achievement of better tokamak performance as it enhances the transport of particles, momentum and heat which hinders the foremost objective of tokamaks. Hence, understanding and possibly being able to control turbulence in tokamaks is of paramount importance, not to mention our intellectual curiosity of it.

  1. PROGRESS TOWARD SUSTAINED HIGH-PERFORMANCE ADVANCED TOKAMAK DISCHARGES IN DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.R. FERRON; D.P. BREEAN; T.A. CASPER; A.M. GAROFALO; C.M. GREENFIELD; A.W. HYATT; R.J. JAYAKUMAR; L.C. JOHNSON; J.E. KINSEY; R.J. LaHAYE; L.L. LAO; E.A. LAZARUS; J. LOHR; T.C. LUCE; M. MURAKAMI; M. OKABAYASHI; C.C. PETTY; P.A. POLITZER; R. PRATER; H. REIMERDES; E.J. STRAIT; T.S. TAYLOR; A.D. TURNBULL; J.G. WATKINS; M.R. WADE; W.P. WEST

    2002-07-01

    Key elements of a sustained advanced tokamak discharge in DIII-D are a large fraction of the total current from bootstrap current (f{sub BS}) and parameters that optimize the capability to use electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at {rho} {approx} 0.5 to maintain the desired current profile [1-4]. Increased f{sub BS} results from increasing both the normalized beta ({beta}{sub N}) and the minimum value of the safety factor (q{sub min}). Off-axis ECCD is, for the available gyrotron power, optimized at high {beta}{sub N}, high electron temperature (T{sub e}) and low electron density (n{sub e}). As previously reported [2-4], these required elements have been separately demonstrated: density control at high {beta}{sub N} with n{sub e} {le} 5 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} using divertor-region pumping, stability at high {beta}, and off-axis ECCD at the theoretically predicted efficiency. This report summarizes recent work on optimizing and integrating these results through evaluation of the dependence of the beta limit on q{sub min} and q{sub 95}, exploration of discharges with relatively high q{sub min}, testing of feedback control of T{sub e} for control of the q profile evolution, and modification of the current profile time evolution when ECCD is applied.

  2. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  3. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (108 K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called 'tokamak' this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high 'fusion' temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This 'anomalous transport' of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL)

  4. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this report present the progress achieved to date on the Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project. This effort is an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique (CCFM). The overall objective of the effort is to develop and apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was established to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present the project is in the middle of its second budget period with the instrumentation on-site at TdeV. The first half of this budget period was used to complete total system tests at InterScience, Inc., dismantle and ship the hardware to TdeV, re-assemble and install the HNBP on the tokamak. Integration of the diagnostic into the TdeV facility has progressed to the point of first beam production and measurement on the plasma. At this time, the HNBP system is undergoing final de-bugging prior to re-start of machine operation in early Fall of this year

  5. Simulation of burning tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To simulate dynamical behaviour of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional time-dependent particle and power balance code has been developed. The zero-dimensional plasma model is based on particle and power balance equations that have been integrated over the plasma volume using prescribed profiles for plasma parameters. Therefore, the zero-dimensional model describes the global dynamics of a fusion reactor. The zero-dimensional model has been applied to study reactor start-up, and plasma responses to changes in the plasma confinement, fuelling rate, and impurity concentration, as well as to study burn control via fuelling modulation. Predictions from the zero-dimensional code have been compared with experimental data and with transport calculations of a higher dimensionality. In all cases, a good agreement was found. The advantage of the zero-dimensional code, as compared to higher-dimensional transport codes, is the possibility to quickly scan the interdependencies between reactor parameters. (88 refs., 58 figs., 6 tabs.)

  6. Microtearing modes in tokamak discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, T.; Weiland, J.; Kritz, A. H.; Luo, L.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to describe the evolution of these discharges, it is necessary to improve the prediction of electron thermal transport. This can be accomplished by utilizing a model for transport driven by MTMs in whole device predictive modeling codes. The objective of this paper is to develop the dispersion relation that governs the MTM driven transport. A unified fluid/kinetic approach is used in the development of a nonlinear dispersion relation for MTMs. The derivation includes the effects of electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations, arbitrary electron-ion collisionality, electron temperature and density gradients, magnetic curvature, and the effects associated with the parallel propagation vector. An iterative nonlinear approach is used to calculate the distribution function employed in obtaining the nonlinear parallel current and the nonlinear dispersion relation. The third order nonlinear effects in magnetic fluctuations are included, and the influence of third order effects on a multi-wave system is considered. An envelope equation for the nonlinear microtearing modes in the collision dominant limit is introduced in order to obtain the saturation level. In the limit that the mode amplitude does not vary along the field line, slab geometry, and strong collisionality, the fluid dispersion relation for nonlinear microtearing modes is found to agree with the kinetic dispersion relation.

  7. Engineering overview of the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, J.H.; Fan, H.M.; Heitzenroeder, P.J.; Ono, M.; Robinson, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is an ultra low aspect ratio device designed for a plasma current of 1 MA. It features auxiliary heating and current drive and a close-fitting conducting shell to maximize plasma pressure. NSTX is designed for a 5 sec. experimental pulse to demonstrate quasi-steady state non-inductively driven advanced tokamak operation. The device will be sited in the former Princeton Large Torus (PLT) test cell and will utilize the PLT radiation shielding, base structure, and cell utilities. NSTX will utilize the S-1 Spheromak vacuum vessel, poloidal field coils, and capacitor banks (for helicity injection). The poloidal Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M) power supplies will be shared to power the PF and TF coil systems. Existing RF hardware and infrastructure will be used for heating systems. TFTR data acquisition and diagnostics resources are planned to be used. In total, NSTX will utilize site credits with a value of {approximately}$50 M, reducing base construction cost of the device to $18.6 M. Twelve water-cooled copper demountable toroidal field (TF) coils provide the 5.4 kg (pulsed) and 3.5 kg (long pulse > 5 sec) toroidal field at the plasma center. Poloidal fields are generated by windings contained in the center column and four pairs water-cooled copper coils supported directly on the vacuum vessel. One of the most critical components of the device is the center stack, which consists of the inner legs of the TF coils overwrapped with ohmic heating and poloidal field windings. The ohmic heating coil windings are designed to optimize the V-s and together with the PF coils, produce a flux swing of 1 V-s.

  8. Advanced tokamak physics experiments on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.S. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy confinement time ({tau}{sub E}) and the plasma pressure (or beta {beta}{sub T} = 2 {mu}{sub 0} < p > /B{sub T}{sup 2}) can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self driven bootstrap current fraction. In addition, effective power exhaust and impurity and particle control is required. Significant progress has been made in experimentally achieving regimes having the required performance in all of these aspects as well as in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. The authors have extended the duration of high performance ELMing H-mode plasmas with {beta}{sub N} H{sub iop} {approximately} 10 for 5 {tau}{sub E} ({approximately}1 s) and have demonstrated that core transport barriers can be sustained for the entire 5-s neutral beam duration in L-mode plasmas. Recent DIII-D work has advanced the understanding of improved confinement and internal transport barriers in terms of E x B shear stabilization of micro turbulence. With the aim of current profile control in discharges with negative central magnetic shear, they have demonstrated off-axis electron cyclotron current drive for the first time in a tokamak, finding an efficiency above theoretical expectations. MHD stability has been improved through shape optimization, wall stabilization, and modification of the pressure and current density profiles. Heat flux reduction and improved impurity and particle control have been realized through edge/divertor radiation and understanding and utilization of forced scrape off layer flow and divertor baffling.

  9. Effect of impurity radiation on tokamak equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to the radiation from impurities is of great importance in the overall energy balance. Taking the temperature dependence of this loss for two impurities characteristic of those present in existing tokamak plasmas, the condition for radial power balance is derived. For the impurities considered (oxygen and iron) it is found that the radiation losses are concentrated in a thin outer layer of the plasma and the equilibrium condition places an upper limit on the plasma paraticle number density in this region. This limiting density scales with mean current density in the same manner as is experimentally observed for the peak number density of tokamak plasmas. The stability of such equilibria is also discussed. (author)

  10. Mass spectrometry instrumentation in TN (Novillo Tokamak)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass spectrophotometry in the residual gases analysis in high vacuum systems, in particular in the Novillo Tokamak (TN), where pressures are required to be of the order 10-7 Torr, is carried out through an instrumental support with infrastructure configured in parallel to the experimental planning in this device. In the Novillo as well as other Tokamaks, it is necessary to condition the vacuum chamber for improving the main discharge parameters. At the present time, in this Tokamak the conditioning quality is presented determined by means of a mass spectrophotometer. A general instrumental description is presented associated with the Novillo conditioning, as well as the spectras obtained before and after operation. (Author)

  11. Extremely shaped plasmas to improve the Tokamak concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    experimental activity of the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) mainly focuses on the research of optimized plasma shapes capable of improving the global performance and solve the technological challenges of a tokamak reactor. Several theoretical and experimental results show the importance of the plasma shape in tokamaks. The maximum value of β (an indicator of the confinement efficiency) is for example related to the ratio between the height and the width of the plasma. The plasma shape can also affect the power necessary to access improved confinement regimes, as well as the plasma stability. This thesis reports on a contribution towards the optimization of the tokamak plasma shape. In particular, it describes the theoretical and experimental studies carried out in the TCV tokamak on two innovative plasma shapes: the doublet shaped plasma and the snowflake divertor. Doublet shaped plasmas have been studied in the past by the General Atomics group. Since then, the development of new plasma diagnostics and the discovery of new confinement regimes have given new reasons for interest in this unusual configuration. TCV is the only tokamak worldwide theoretically able to establish and control this configuration. This thesis illustrates new motivations for creating doublet plasmas. The vertical stability of the configuration is studied using a rigid model and the results are compared with those obtained with the KINX MHD stability code. The best strategy for controlling a doublet on TCV is also investigated, and a possible setup of the TCV control system is suggested for the doublet configuration. Analyzing the possible scenarios for doublet creation, the most promising scenario consists of the creation of two independent plasmas, which are subsequently merged to establish a doublet. For this reason, particular attention needs to be devoted to the problem of the plasma start-up. In this thesis, a general analysis of the TCV ohmic and assisted with ECH plasma start-up is

  12. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  13. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, C.; Salvador, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Munoz, O.; Tapia, A.; Arredondo, V.; Chavez, R.; Nieto, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Garza, A.; Estrada, I.; Jasso, E.; Acosta, C.; Briones, C.; Cavazos, G.; Martinez, J.; Morones, J.; Almaguer, J.; Fonck, R.

    2011-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R Mexican Fusion Network. Strong liaison within national and international plasma physics communities is expected. New activities on plasma & engineering modeling are expected to be developed in parallel by using the existing facilities such as a multi-platform computer (Silicon Graphics Altix XE250, 128G RAM, 3.7TB HD, 2.7GHz, quad-core processor), ancillary graph system (NVIDIA Quadro FE 2000/1GB GDDR-5 PCI X16 128, 3.2GHz), and COMSOL Multiphysics-Solid Works programs.

  14. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    The Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS) at ANL in FY-1985 were devoted to exploring innovative design concepts which have the potential for making substantial improvements in the tokamak as a commercial power reactor. Major objectives of this work included improved reactor economics, improved environmental and safety features, and the exploration of a wide range of reactor plant outputs with emphasis on reduced plant sizes compared to STARFIRE. The activities concentrated on three areas: plasma engineering, impurity control, and blanket/first wall/shield technology. 205 refs., 125 figs., 107 tabs.

  15. A method for tokamak neutronics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method for neutron transport calculation in tokamak fusion reactors. The computational procedure is based on the solution of the even-parity transport equation in a toroidal geometry. The angular neutron distribution is treated by even-parity spherical harmonic expansion, while the spatial dependence is approximated by using R-function finite elements that are defined for regions of arbitrary geometric shape. In order to test the method, calculation of a simplified tokamak model is carried out. The results are compared with the results from the literature and for the same order of accuracy a reduction of the number of spatial unknowns is shown. (author)

  16. Radial electric fields for improved tokamak performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of externally-imposed radial electric fields on the fusion energy output, energy multiplication, and alpha-particle ash build-up in a TFTR-sized, fusing tokamak plasma is explored. In an idealized tokamak plasma, an externally-imposed radial electric field leads to plasma rotation, but no charge current flows across the magnetic fields. However, a realistically-low neutral density profile generates a non-zero cross-field conductivity and the species dependence of this conductivity allows the electric field to selectively alter radial particle transport

  17. Multichannel submillimeter interferometer for tokamak density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-channel, submillimeter (SMM) laser, electron-density interferometer has been operated successfully on the ISX tokamak. The interferometer is the first phase of a diagnostic system to measure the tokamak plasma current density using the Faraday rotation of the polarization vector of SMM laser beams. Deuterated formic acid lasers (lambda = 0.381 mm) have produced cw power of 10 mW. The interferometer has performed successfully for line-averaged electron densities as high as 8 x 1013 cm-3

  18. Can better modelling improve tokamak control?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of present day tokamaks usually relies upon primitive modelling and TCV is used to illustrate this. A counter example is provided by the successful implementation of high order SISO controllers on COMPASS-D. Suitable models of tokamaks are required to exploit the potential of modern control techniques. A physics based MIMO model of TCV is presented and validated with experimental closed loop responses. A system identified open loop model is also presented. An enhanced controller based on these models is designed and the performance improvements discussed. (author) 5 figs., 9 refs

  19. Electronic system of TBR tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronics developed as a part of the TBR project, which involves the construction of a small tokamak at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo, is described. On the basis of tokamak parameter values, the electronics for the toroidal field, ohmic/heating and vertical field systems is presented, including capacitors bank, switches, triggering circuits and power supplies. A controlled power oscilator used in discharge cleaning and pre-ionization is also described. The performance of the system as a function of the desired plasma parameters is discussed. (Author)

  20. Dynamics and Feedback Control of Plasma Equilibrium Position in a Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenko, Oleg

    A brief history of the beginnings of nuclear fusion research involving toroidal closed-system magnetic plasma containment is presented. A tokamak machine is defined mathematically for the purposes of plasma equilibrium position perturbation analysis. The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form. This symbolic form of the dynamics transfer function makes it possible to study the stability of a tokamak's plasma equilibrium position. Knowledge of the dynamics transfer function permits systematic syntheses of the required plasma displacement feedback control systems. The major parameters governing the plasma equilibrium position stability of a tokamak are shown to be (1) external magnetic field decay index, (2) transformer iron core effect, (3) plasma current, (4) radial rate-of-change inductance parameter, (5) vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and (6) vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant. An important and unique result is derived, showing that for a vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant exceeding a certain value the vertical plasma equilibrium position is stable, in spite of an intentional vertical instability design represented by a negative decay index. It is shown that a tokamak design having a theoretical set of positive decay index, negative radical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and positive vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter is expected to have a better plasma equilibrium position stability tolerance than a tokamak design having the same set with the signs reversed. The results of an actual hardware ISX-A tokamak plasma displacement feed-back control system design are presented. It is shown that a theoretical design computer

  1. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment

  2. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Advanced tokamak concepts and reactor designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described, some examples

  4. Tokamak fusion test reactor. Final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed data are given for each of the following areas: (1) system requirements, (2) the tokamak system, (3) electrical power systems, (4) experimental area systems, (5) experimental complex, (6) neutral beam injection system, (7) diagnostic system, and (8) central instrumentation control and data acquisition system

  5. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated

  6. Tokamak Transport Studies Using Perturbation Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.; Dehaas, J. C. M.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Orourke, J.; Sips, A.C.C.; Tubbing, B. J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of the transport properties of tokamak plasmas using perturbation analysis are discussed. The focus is on experiments with not too large perturbations, such as sawtooth induced heat and density pulse propagation, power modulation and oscillatory gas-puff experiments. The approximations made

  7. Unified Ideal Stability Limits for Advanced Tokamak and Spherical Torus Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability limits of shaped tokamak plasmas with high bootstrap fraction are systematically determined as a function of plasma aspect ratio. For plasmas with and without wall stabilization of external kink modes, the computed limits are well described by distinct and nearly invariant values of a normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. Stability limit data from the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment is compared to these theoretical limits and indicates that ideal nonrotating plasma no-wall beta limits have been exceeded in regimes with sufficiently high cylindrical safety factor. These results could impact the choice of aspect ratio in future fusion power plants

  8. Plasma equilibrium and field diffusion during current rise phase of STP-2 screw pinch tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma equilibrium and field diffusion during the current rise phase of the discharge have been investigated in STP-2 screw pinch tokamak. The plasma with maximum poloidal beta value βsub(p) of 3.0 has been obtained by compression and joule heating. However the maximum βsub(p) value without strong wall contacts was about 1.3. We observed that force-free current is formed in the periphery of the plasma and the penetration rate of the poloidal magnetic field is much faster than the penetration rate calculated from the classical resistivity. To understand the high-beta plasma equilibrium and the mechanism of fast penetration rate observed in STP-2 plasmas we have performed a numerical simulation using a 2-D MHD pinch code ''TOPICS''. It is demonstrated that the fast penetration rate can be explained by introducing the influx of neutral particles and the ion acoustic type anomalous resistivity. (author)

  9. Ideal and resistive MHD stability of one-dimensional tokamak equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MHD equilibrium and stability of a vertically elongated tokamak configuration are analyzed in the one-dimensional limit corresponding to infinite elongation. Stability against all ideal MHD modes can be obtained for beta-values arbitrarily close to unity. In the finite-resistivity stability analysis, axisymmetric (m = 0) tearing modes, centered on the null trace of the poloidal field, can be stabilized by a loosely fitting conducting shell. The presence of the toroidal field component, however, introduces the possibility of nonsymmetric tearing modes (m not equal to 0), centered away from the null trace. These modes can be stabilized only by a more tightly-fitting shell, plus reliance on finite-pressure effects on the small-major-radius side of the plasma profile. Under these conditions, stable configurations with peak beta values approaching unity are readily found

  10. Atomic data for integrated tokamak modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Moreover we present elastic cross sections of fusion related materials. We present total and angular differential elastic cross sections of hydrogen atoms for a wide range of incident electron energy. One of the convenient ways of representation of these data is analytical fit functions, which can be easily applied in various fields of sciences. The aim of work is to develop a universal functional formula of elastic cross sections for the case of hydrogen target. We consider the angular differential electron elastic cross sections for a wide range of incident electron energy and in the entire angular range. The differential cross-sections were calculated using the partial expansion method. The fitted curves are in excellent agreement with the calculated ones within less than 1% accuracy in the energy range between 1 eV and 100 keV. Our analytical formula may show the main virtues in various Monte Carlo simulations reducing drastically the computation time, when it requires to calculate the elastic cross sections many times. The applied fitting technique can be used for other data. Acknowledgement: This work, supported by the European Communities under the contract of Association between EURATOMHAS, was carried out within the framework of the Task Force on Integrated Tokamak Modeling of the European Fusion Development Agreement. The work was also supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA No. NN103279. (author)

  11. A Web-Based System for Remote Data Browsing in HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Ting; Luo Jiarong; Meng Yuedong; Wang Huazhong

    2005-01-01

    HT-7 is the first superconducting tokamak device for fusion research in China. Many experiments have been performed on the HT-7 tokamak since 1994 with numerous satisfactory results achieved in the fusion research field. As more and better communication is required with other fusion research laboratories, remote access to experimental data is becoming increasingly important in order to raise the degree of openness of experiments and to expand research results.The web-based remote data browsing system enables authorized users in geographically different locations to view and search for experimental data without having to install any utility software at their terminals. The three-tier software architecture and thin client technology are used to operate the system effectively. This paper describes the structure of the system and the realization of its functions, focusing on three main points: the communication between the participating tiers, the data structure of the system and the visualization of the raw data on web pages.

  12. The vacuum vessel thermal shield of the KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, B.J. E-mail: bjyoon@kaeri.re.kr; In, S.R.; Cho, S.Y

    2003-09-01

    The Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) tokamak has an all-superconductor magnet system and needs a thermal shield to cut off thermal radiation from the components of room temperature. The vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) cooled to 70 K is placed in the narrow gap between the 5 K TF magnets and the 300 K vacuum vessel (VV). The VVTS is designed to be divided into 16 assembly modules of 22.5 deg. sector, each unit has an electrical insulation along the center line in the toroidal direction and four insulations in the poloidal direction to reduce eddy currents induced during plasma operations. All connections are bolted. The VVTS becomes consequently a rigid torus composed of 64 electrically insulated pieces. A key point of designing the VVTS is that supports of the VVTS are to be flexible enough to allow thermal constriction during cooling down to 70 K as well as sufficiently strong to withstand electromagnetic (EM) forces exerted on the VVTS during plasma disruptions. Leaf spring type supports devised to satisfy these requirements are to be installed along the mid plane of the VVTS. The cryopanel of the VVTS is of quilted plate type whose total thickness is 12 mm, cooled by 60 K, 20 bar GHe.

  13. Recent results from DIII-D and their implications for next generation tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxon, J.L.; Bramson, G.; Burrell, K.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Callis, R.W.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chu, M.S.; Colleraine, A.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Freeman, R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hong, R.; Howl, W.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Jensen, T.; Kellman, A.G.; Kim, J.; Lao, L.L.; La Haye, R.; Leikind, B.; Lippmann, S.I.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Mayberry, M.; Moeller, C.P.; Osborne, T.H.; Overskei, D.O

    1990-07-01

    Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak have provided significant contributions to the understanding of many of the elements of tokamak physics and the application of this understanding to the design of next generation devices including ITER and CIT. The limitations of magnetohydrodynamics stability on the values of plasma beta (the ratio of kinetic pressure to the containing pressure of the magnetic field) that can be attained has been experimentally demonstrated and found to be described by existing theory. Values of beta (10.7%) well in excess of those required for proposed devices (ITER and CIT) have been demonstrated. Regimes of confinement (H-mode) have been established that scale favorably to proposed next generation devices, and experiments demonstrating the dependence of the energy confinement on plasma size have been completed. Understanding of confinement is rapidly developing especially in the areas of bulk transport and the role of turbulence in the plasma edge. Key experimental results in areas of plasma transport and edge plasma phenomena are found to be in agreement with theories based on short wavelength turbulence. Control of the divertor heat loads and impurity influx has been demonstrated, and new progress has been made in the understanding of plasma edge phenomena. Experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating have not found regimes in which these waves can produce effective central ion heating. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments have demonstrated 70 kA of driven current in 400 kA discharges.

  14. Alpha particle effects on global MHD modes, and alpha particle transport in ignited tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable primarily by the circulating α-particles through wave-particle resonances. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the α-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the α-particles and the core electrons and ions, as well as Alfven continuum damping. Stability criteria are presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks in terms of the α-particle beta βα, the α-particle pressure gradient parameter (ω*/ωA), where ω* is the α-particle diamagnetic drift frequency, and the α-particle velocity (vα/vA) parameter. Typically the volume averaged α-particle beta threshold is on the order of 10-4. Rough estimates of the TAE mode saturation level give δBr/B ∼ 10-3 for typical D-T tokamak operations. Significant α-particle losses are found when the amplitude of the global MHD modes is large, on the order of (δBr/B) ≥ 10-4. For (δBr/B) = 5 x 10-4, the α-particle loss time is appreciably shorter than the α-particle slowing-down time. 13 refs., 1 fig

  15. On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The energy confinement time of tokamak plasmas scales positively with plasma size and so it is generally expected that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, will also increase with size, and this has been part of the motivation for building devices of increasing size including ITER. Here n, T, and τ E are the ion density, ion temperature and energy confinement time respectively. However, tokamak plasmas are subject to operational limits and two important limits are a density limit and a beta limit. We show that when these limits are taken into account, nTτ E becomes almost independent of size; rather it depends mainly on the fusion power, P fus. In consequence, the fusion power gain, Q fus, a parameter closely linked to nTτ E is also independent of size. Hence, P fus and Q fus, two parameters of critical importance in reactor design, are actually tightly coupled. Further, we find that nTτ E is inversely dependent on the normalised beta, β N; an unexpected result that tends to favour lower power reactors. Our findings imply that the minimum power to achieve fusion reactor conditions is driven mainly by physics considerations, especially energy confinement, while the minimum device size is driven by technology and engineering considerations. Through dedicated R&D and parallel developments in other fields, the technology and engineering aspects are evolving in a direction to make smaller devices feasible.

  16. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  17. D-T burning plasma characteristics in an A=2 tokamak reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秉仁

    2005-01-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning plasma characteristic in an aspect ratio A=2 tokamak reactor is studied based on a simple equilibrium configuration, the Soloviev-type configuration. Operation limits for the Troyon beta value and for the Greenwald density value as well as for the ITER H-mode confinement scaling are used as the benchmark.It is found that in addition to suitable elongation, large triangularity has advantage for arriving at high beta value and obtaining high fusion power output. Compared to the present ITER design, the A=2 system can have very good merit for the avoidance of disruptions by setting rather high edge q value while keeping relatively large total toroidal current.The main disadvantage of decreasing the aspect ratio is due to the loss of more useful space in the inward region that leads to the decrease of toroidal magnetic field in the plasma region, then worsening the fusion merit. Our analysis and calculation also present a trade-off in this respect. Due to simple equilibrium configuration assumed, some other important issues such as the bootstrap current alignment cannot be optimized. However, the present analysis can offer an insight into the advantages of the medium aspect ratio reactor system that is a blank in present-day tokamak study.

  18. Sensitivity of magnetic field-line pitch angle measurements to sawtooth events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.

    2016-11-01

    The sensitivity of the pitch angle profiles measured by the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic to the evolution of the safety factor, q, profiles during the tokamak sawtooth events has been investigated for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). An analytic relation between the tokamak pitch angle, γ, and q estimates that Δγ ˜ 0.1° is required for detecting Δq ˜ 0.05 near the magnetic axis (not at the magnetic axis, though). The pitch angle becomes less sensitive to the same Δq for the middle and outer regions of the plasma (Δγ ˜ 0.5°). At the magnetic axis, it is not straightforward to directly relate the γ sensitivity to Δq since the gradient of γ(R), where R is the major radius of the tokamak, is involved. Many of the MSE data obtained from the 2015 KSTAR campaign, when calibrated carefully, can meet these requirements with the time integration down to 10 ms. The analysis with the measured data shows that the pitch angle profiles and their gradients near the magnetic axis can resolve the change of the q profiles including the central safety factor, q0, during the sawtooth events.

  19. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies.

  20. Equilibrium system analysis in a tokamak ignition experiment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, R.; Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the IGNITEX Project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. The original concept was proposed by both physics and engineering researchers along the following line of thought. Question: Is there any theoretically simple, compact and reliable way of achieving fusion ignition according to the results of the fusion research program for the last decades? Answer: Yes. An experiment to be carried out in an ohmically heated compact tokamak device with 20 T field on plasma axis. Question: Is there any practical way to carry out that experiment at low cost in the near term? Answer: Yes. Using a single-turn coil magnet system with homopolar power supplies.

  1. A conceptual design of superconducting spherical tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a fusion reactor concept named 'JUST (Japanese Universities' Super Tokamak reactor)'. From the plasma confinement system to the power generation system is evaluated in this work. JUST design has features as follows: the superconducting magnet, the steady state operation with high bootstrap current fraction, the easy replacement of neutron damaged first wall, the high heat flux in the divertor, and the low cost (or high β). By winding the OH solenoid over the center stack of toroidal field coil, we have the low aspect ratio and the 80cm thick neutron shield to protect the superconducting center stack. JUST is designed by using the 0-D transport code under the assumption that the energy confinement time is 1.8 times of the IPB98(y,2) scaling. Main parameters are as follows: the major radius of 4.5m, the aspect ratio of 1.8, the elongation ratio of 2.5, the toroidal field of 2.36T, the plasma current of 18MA, the toroidal beta of 22%, the central electron and ion temperature of 15keV and the fusion thermal power of 2.4GW. By using the mercury heat exchanger and the steam turbine, the heat efficiency is 33% and the electric power is 0.74GW. (author)

  2. In situ ``artificial plasma'' calibration of tokamak magnetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, D.; Levesque, J. P.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; DeBono, B. A.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Rath, N.

    2013-06-01

    A unique in situ calibration technique has been used to spatially calibrate and characterize the extensive new magnetic diagnostic set and close-fitting conducting wall of the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) experiment. A new set of 216 Mirnov coils has recently been installed inside the vacuum chamber of the device for high-resolution measurements of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena including the effects of eddy currents in the nearby conducting wall. The spatial positions of these sensors are calibrated by energizing several large in situ calibration coils in turn, and using measurements of the magnetic fields produced by the various coils to solve for each sensor's position. Since the calibration coils are built near the nominal location of the plasma current centroid, the technique is referred to as an "artificial plasma" calibration. The fitting procedure for the sensor positions is described, and results of the spatial calibration are compared with those based on metrology. The time response of the sensors is compared with the evolution of the artificial plasma current to deduce the eddy current contribution to each signal. This is compared with simulations using the VALEN electromagnetic code, and the modeled copper thickness profiles of the HBT-EP conducting wall are adjusted to better match experimental measurements of the eddy current decay. Finally, the multiple coils of the artificial plasma system are also used to directly calibrate a non-uniformly wound Fourier Rogowski coil on HBT-EP.

  3. Characterization of the Tokamak Novillo in cleaning regime; Caracterizacion del Tokamak Novillo en regimen de limpieza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez C, R.; Melendez L, L.; Valencia A, R.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-02-15

    In this work the obtained results of the investigation about the experimental characterization of those low energy pulsed discharges of the Tokamak Novillo are reported. With this it is possible to fix the one operation point but appropriate of the Tokamak to condition the chamber in the smallest possible time for the cleaning discharges regime before beginning the main discharge. The characterization of the cleaning discharges in those Tokamaks is an unique process and characteristic of each device, since the good points of operation are consequence of those particularities of the design of the machine. In the case of the Tokamak Novillo, besides characterizing it a contribution is made to the cleaning discharges regime which consists on the one product of the current peak to peak of plasma by the duration of the discharge Ip{sub t} like reference parameter for the optimization of the operation of the device in the cleaning discharge regime. The maximum value of the parameter I{sub (p)}t, under different work conditions, allowed to find the good operation point to condition the discharges chamber of the Tokamak Novillo in short time and to arrive to a regime in which is not necessary the preionization for the obtaining of the cleaning discharges. (Author)

  4. First experiments on the TO-2 tokamak with a divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long stable discharges have been obtained in a recetrack tokamak with toroidal divertors in low plasma density regime. Divertors sharply limit plasma filament cross section, plasma density decreasing by an order at 1 cm length near the separatrix. 8 mm thick well formed flux of plasma appears at the divertor plate. Divertor power efficiency at different modes of operation is 50- 70 %. As compared to the TO-1 nondivertor tokamak some plasma filament hot zone expansion is recorded in the TO-2 tokamak

  5. Banana orbits in elliptic tokamaks with hole currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2015-03-01

    Ware Pinch is a consequence of breaking of up-down symmetry due to the inductive electric field. This symmetry breaking happens, though up-down symmetry for magnetic surface is assumed. In previous work Ware Pinch and banana orbits were studied for tokamak magnetic surface with ellipticity and triangularity, but up-down symmetry. Hole currents appear in large tokamaks and their influence in Ware Pinch and banana orbits are now considered here for tokamaks magnetic surfaces with ellipticity and triangularity.

  6. Systems studies of high-field tokamak ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the interaction between the physics of ignition and the engineering constraints in the design of compact, high-field tokamak ignition demonstration devices is presented. The studies investigate the effects the various electron and ion thermal diffusivities, which result from the many tokamak scaling laws, have on the design parameters of an ignition device and show the feasibility of building and igniting a compact tokamak (R<1m). The relevant machine technology is discussed

  7. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  8. Numerical studies of edge localized instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new computational tool, edge localized instabilities in tokamaks equilibria (ELITE), has been developed to help our understanding of short wavelength instabilities close to the edge of tokamak plasmas. Such instabilities may be responsible for the edge localized modes observed in high confinement H-mode regimes, which are a serious concern for next step tokamaks because of the high transient power loads which they can impose on divertor target plates. ELITE uses physical insight gained from analytic studies of peeling and ballooning modes to provide an efficient way of calculating the edge ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability properties of tokamaks. This paper describes the theoretical formalism which forms the basis for the code

  9. The role of the neutral beam fueling profile in the performance of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and other tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalings for the stored energy and neutron yield, determined from experimental data are applied to both deuterium-only and deuterium-tritium plasmas in different neutral beam heated operational domains in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The domain of the data considered includes the Supershot, High poloidal beta, Low-mode, and limiter High-mode operational regimes, as well as discharges with a reversed magnetic shear configuration. The new important parameter in the present scaling is the peakedness of the heating beam fueling profile shape. Ion energy confinement and neutron production are relatively insensitive to other plasma parameters compared to the beam fueling peakedness parameter and the heating beam power when considering plasmas that are stable to magnetohydrodynamic modes. However, the stored energy of the electrons is independent of the beam fueling peakedness. The implication of the scalings based on this parameter is related to theoretical transport models such as radial electric field shear and Ion Temperature Gradient marginality models. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks

  10. Importance of the fine structure in a tokamak for the abnormal transport and the internal disruptions; Importance de la structure magnetique fine dans un Tokamak pour le transport anormal et les disruptions internes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabot, R.

    1996-02-28

    The problem of energy transport in a Tokamak, in presence of magnetic islets, has been treated by decomposing this problem in different bricks. To assembly the different bricks the model of dynamic percolation, which couples by the intermediate of scattering coefficient, the activity of transport sites (islets size) to the profile of transported quantity (temperature profile) has been chosen. The results, got with this model, results connected to the hypothesis of a limited number of islets, agree with the different observations. A possible application of this model could be the exploration of different operating conditions of Tokamak and a research of improved confinement running. (N.C.). 149 refs., 85 figs.

  11. KTM Tokamak operation scenarios software infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, V.; Baystrukov, K.; Golobkov, YU.; Ovchinnikov, A.; Meaentsev, A.; Merkulov, S.; Lee, A. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tazhibayeva, I.; Shapovalov, G. [National Nuclear Center (NNC), Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    2014-10-15

    One of the largest problems for tokamak devices such as Kazakhstan Tokamak for Material Testing (KTM) is the operation scenarios' development and execution. Operation scenarios may be varied often, so a convenient hardware and software solution is required for scenario management and execution. Dozens of diagnostic and control subsystems with numerous configuration settings may be used in an experiment, so it is required to automate the subsystem configuration process to coordinate changes of the related settings and to prevent errors. Most of the diagnostic and control subsystems software at KTM was unified using an extra software layer, describing the hardware abstraction interface. The experiment sequence was described using a command language. The whole infrastructure was brought together by a universal communication protocol supporting various media, including Ethernet and serial links. The operation sequence execution infrastructure was used at KTM to carry out plasma experiments.

  12. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  13. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  14. The Spherical Tokamak MEDUSA for Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Celso; Vargas, Ivan; Guadamuz, Saul; Mora, Jaime; Ansejo, Jose; Zamora, Esteban; Herrera, Julio; Chaves, Esteban; Romero, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak (ST) MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R>=3.6, under design[2]) and also the ongoing activities in low temperature plasmas. Courses in plasma physics at undergraduate and post-graduate joint programme levels are regularly conducted. The scientific programme is intend to clarify several issues in relevant physics for conventional and mainly STs, including transport, heating and current drive via Alfv'en wave, and natural divertor STs with ergodic magnetic limiter[3,4]. [1] G.D.Garstka, PhD thesis, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1997 [2] L.Barillas et al., Proc. 19^th Int. Conf. Nucl. Eng., Japan, 2011 [3] C.Ribeiro et al., IEEJ Trans. Electrical and Electronic Eng., 2012(accepted) [4] C.Ribeiro et al., Proc. 39^th EPS Conf. Contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Sweden, 2012

  15. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  16. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ∼10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  17. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  18. EU Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) Task Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Becoulet

    2007-01-01

    @@ At the end of 2003, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) structure set-up a long-term European task force (TF) in charge of "co-ordinating the development of a coherent set of validated simulation tools for the purpose of benchmarking on existing tokamak experiments, with the ultimate aim of providing a comprehensive simulation package for ITER plasmas" [http://www.efda-taskforce-itm.org/].

  19. Smaller coil systems for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripple reduction by ferro-magnetic iron shielding is used to reduce the size of the toroidal field coils down to 7.8 by 10.4 m bore for a commercial tokamak reactor design with plasma parameters similar to STARFIRE. For maximum effectiveness, it is found that the blocks of ferromagnetic iron shielding should have triangular cross section and should be placed as close to the plasma as possible

  20. Tore Supra. Basic design Tokamak system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the basic design for the main components of the Tokamak system of Tora Supra. As such, it focuses on the engineering problems, and refers to last year report on Tora Supra (EUR-CEA-1021) for objectives and experimental programme of the apparatus on one hand, and for qualifying tests of the main technical solutions on the other hand. Superconducting toroidal field coil system, vacuum vessels and radiation shields, poloidal field system and cryogenic system are described

  1. Self-Organized Stationary States of Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Krebs, I. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Max-Plank-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that in a 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation, for some parameters it is possible to form a stationary state in a tokamak where a saturated interchange mode in the center of the discharge drives a near helical flow pattern that acts to nonlinearly sustain the configuration by adjusting the central loop voltage through a dynamo action. This could explain the physical mechanism for maintaining stationary nonsawtoothing "hybrid" discharges, often referred to as "flux pumping."

  2. Self-Organized Stationary States of Tokamaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, S C; Ferraro, N; Krebs, I

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate that in a 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation, for some parameters it is possible to form a stationary state in a tokamak where a saturated interchange mode in the center of the discharge drives a near helical flow pattern that acts to nonlinearly sustain the configuration by adjusting the central loop voltage through a dynamo action. This could explain the physical mechanism for maintaining stationary nonsawtoothing "hybrid" discharges, often referred to as "flux pumping."

  3. Microtearing modes and anomalous transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, J.F.; Gladd, N.T.; Liu, C.S.; Chang, C.L.

    1980-04-14

    Microtearing (high-m) modes driven by the electron temperature gradient are found to be unstable for present tokamak parameters. A self-consistent calculation of the nonlinear saturation of this instability yields magnetic fluctuations vertical-barBvertical-bar/B approx. = rho/sub e//L/sub T/. The associated crossfield electron thermal conductivity is shown to be inversely proportional to density, consistent with Alcator scaling, and comparable in magnitude with that inferred from experiments.

  4. ECH on the MTX [Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is investigating the heating of high density Tokamak plasmas using an intense pulse FEL. Our first experiments, now beginning, will study the absorption and plasma heating of single FEL pulses (20 ns pulse length and peak power up to 2 GW) at a frequency of 140 GHz. A later phase of experiments also at 140 GHz will study FEL heating at 5 kHz rate for a pulse train up to 50 pulses (35 ns pulse length and peak power up to 4 GW). Future operations are planned at 250 GHz with an average power of 2 MW for a pulse train of 0.5 s. The microwave output of the FEL is transported quasi-optically to the tokamak through a window-less, evacuated pipe of 20 in. diameter, using a six mirror system. Computational modelling of the non-linear absorption for the MTX geometry predicts single-pass absorption of 40% at a density and temperature of 1.8 /times/ 1020m/sup /minus/3/ and 1 keV, respectively. To measure plasma microwave absorption and backscatter, diagnostics are available to measure forward and reflected power (parallel wire grid beam-splitter and mirror directional couplers) and power transmitted through the plasma (segmented calorimeter and waveguide detector). Other fast diagnostics include ECE, Thompson scattering, soft x-rays, and fast magnetic probes. 8 refs., 2 figs

  5. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  6. Upgrade of plasma density feedback control system in HT-7 tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Da-Zheng; LUO Jia-Rong; LI Gang; JI Zhen-Shan; WANG Feng

    2004-01-01

    The HT-7 is a superconducting tokamak in China used to make researches on the controlled nuclear fusion as a national project for the fusion research. The plasma density feedback control subsystem is the one of the subsystems of the distributed control system in HT-7 tokamak (HT7DCS). The main function of the subsystem is to control the plasma density on real-time. For this reason, the real-time capability and good stability are the most significant factors, which will influence the control results. Since the former plasma density feedback control system (FPDFCS) based on Windows operation system could not fulfill such requirements well, a new subsystem has to be developed. The paper describes the upgrade of the plasma density feedback control system (UPDFCS), based on the dual operation system (Windows and Linux), in detail.

  7. Conditioning of the vacuum chamber of the Tokamak Novillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The obtained experimental results of the implementation of two techniques of present time for the conditioning of the internal wall of the chamber of discharges of the Tokamak Novillo are presented, which has been designed, built and put in operation in the Laboratory of Plasma Physics of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). These techniques are: the vacuum baking and the low energy pulsed discharges, which were applied after having reached an initial pressure of the order of 10-7 Torr. with a system of turbomolecular pumping previous preparation of surfaces and vacuum seals. The analysis of residual gases was carried out with a mass spectrometer before and after conditioning. The obtained results show that the vacuum baking it was of great effectiveness to reduce the value of the initial pressure in short time, in more of a magnitude order and the low energy discharges reduced the oxygen at worthless levels with regard to the initial values. (Author)

  8. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The DIII-D research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is aimed at developing the knowledge base for an economically and environmentally attractive energy source for the nation and the world. The DIII-D program mission is to advance fusion energy science understanding and predictive capability and improve the tokamak concept. The DIII-D scientific objectives are: (1) Advance understanding of fusion plasma physics and contribute to the physics base of ITER through extensive experiment and theory iteration in the following areas of fusion science - Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability - Plasma turbulence and transport - Wave-particle interactions - Boundary physics plasma neutral interaction (2) Utilize scientific understanding in an integrated manner to show the tokamak potential to be - More compact by increasing plasma stability and confinement to increase the fusion power density ({Beta}{tau}) - Steady-state through disruption control, handling of divertor heat and particle loads and current drive (3) Acquire understanding and experience with environmentally attractive low activation material in an operating tokamak. This report contains the research conducted over the past year in search of these scientific objectives.

  9. Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, P.I.

    1998-02-01

    The DIII-D national fusion research program focuses on establishing the scientific basis for optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production. The symbiotic development of research, theory, and hardware continues to fuel the success of the DIII-D program. During the last year, a radiative divertor and a second cryopump were installed in the DIII-D vacuum vessel, an array of central and boundary diagnostics were added, and more sophisticated computer models were developed. These new tools have led to substantial progress in the understanding of the plasma. The authors now have a better understanding of the divertor as a means to manage the heat, particle, and impurity transport pumping of the plasma edge using the in situ divertor cryopumps effectively controls the plasma density. The evolution of diagnostics that probe the interior of the plasma, particularly the motional Stark effect diagnostic, has led to a better understanding of the core of the plasma. This understanding, together with tools to control the profiles, including electron cyclotron waves, pellet injection, and neutral beam injection, has allowed them to progress in making plasma configurations that give rise to both low energy transport and improved stability. Most significant here is the use of transport barriers to improve ion confinement to neoclassical values. Commissioning of the first high power (890 kW) 110 GHz gyrotron validates an important tool for managing the plasma current profile, key to maintaining the transport barriers. An upgraded plasma control system, ``isoflux control,`` which exploits real time MHD equilibrium calculations to determine magnetic flux at specified locations within the tokamak vessel and provides the means for precisely controlling the plasma shape and, in conjunction with other heating and fueling systems, internal profiles.

  10. Deposit of thin films for Tokamaks conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a main objective of this work, we present some experimental results obtained from studying the process of extracting those impurities created by the interaction plasma with its vessel wall in the case of Novillo tokamak. Likewise, we describe the main cleaning and conditioning techniques applied to it, fundamentally that of glow discharge cleaning at a low electron temperature (-6 to 4.5 x 10-6 Ω-m, thus taking the Zef value from 3.46 to 2.07 which considerably improved the operational parameters of the machine. With a view to justifying the fact that controlled nuclear fusion is a feasible alternative for the energy demand that humanity will face in the future, we review in Chapter 1 some fundamentals of the energy production by nuclear fusion reactions while, in Chapter 2, we examine two relevant plasma wall interaction processes. Our experimental array used to produce both cleaning and intense plasma discharges is described in Chapter 3 along with the associated diagnostics equipment. Chapter 4 contains a description of the vessel conditioning techniques followed in the process. Finally, we report our results in Chapter 5 while, in Chapter 6, some conclusions and remarks are presented. It is widely known that tokamak impurities are generated mainly by the plasma-wall interaction, particularly in the presence of high potentials between the plasma sheath and the limiter or wall. Given that impurities affect most adversely the plasma behaviour, understanding and controlling the impurity extraction mechanisms is crucial for optimizing the cleaning and wall conditioning discharge processes. Our study of one impurity extraction mechanism for both low and high Z in Novillo tokamak was carried out though mass spectrometry, optical emission spectroscopy and plasma resistivity measurement. Such mechanism depends fundamentally on the mass of the ions that interact with the wall during the plasma current formation phase. The reaction products generated by the glow

  11. Conditioning of the vacuum chamber of the Tokamak Novillo; Acondicionamiento de la camara de vacio del Tokamak Novillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    The obtained experimental results of the implementation of two techniques of present time for the conditioning of the internal wall of the chamber of discharges of the Tokamak Novillo are presented, which has been designed, built and put in operation in the Laboratory of Plasma Physics of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). These techniques are: the vacuum baking and the low energy pulsed discharges, which were applied after having reached an initial pressure of the order of 10{sup -7} Torr. with a system of turbomolecular pumping previous preparation of surfaces and vacuum seals. The analysis of residual gases was carried out with a mass spectrometer before and after conditioning. The obtained results show that the vacuum baking it was of great effectiveness to reduce the value of the initial pressure in short time, in more of a magnitude order and the low energy discharges reduced the oxygen at worthless levels with regard to the initial values. (Author)

  12. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, WA.; Van Beveren, V.; Thoen, D.J.; Nuij, P.J.W.M.; De Baar, M.R.; Donné, A.J.H.; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A.P.H.; Krijger, B.; Van den Berg, M.A.; Kantor, M.; Graswinckel, M.F.; Hennen, B.A.; Schüller, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100–200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the f

  13. Turbulence, transport and confinement: from tokamaks to star magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is part of the general study of self-organization in hot and magnetized plasmas. We focus our work on two specific objects: stars and tokamaks. We use first principle numerical simulations to study turbulence, transport and confinement in these plasmas. The first part of this thesis introduces the main characteristics of stellar and tokamak plasmas. The reasons for studying them together are properly detailed. The second part is focused on stellar aspects. We study the interactions between the 3D turbulent motions in the solar convection zone with an internal magnetic field in the tachocline (the transition region between the instable and stable zones in the Sun). The tachocline is a very thin layer (less than five percent of the solar radius) that acts as a transport barrier of angular momentum. We show that such an internal magnetic field is not likely to explain the observed thickness of the tachocline and we give some insights on how to find alternative mechanisms to constrain it. We also explore the effect of the environment of star on its structure. We develop a methodology to study the influence of stellar wind and of the magnetic coupling of a star with its orbiting planets. We use the same methodology to analyse the magnetic interaction between a stellar wind and a planetary magnetosphere that acts as a transport barrier of matter. Then, the third part is dedicated to fusion oriented research. We present a numerical investigation on the experimental mechanisms that lead to the development of transport barriers in the plasma. These barriers are particularly important for the design of high performance fusion devices. The creation of transport barriers is obtained in turbulent first principle simulations for the very first time. The collaboration between the two scientific teams lead to the results presented in the fourth part of this thesis. An original spectral method is developed to analyse the saturation of stellar convective dynamos and of

  14. Annual report of the Fusion Research and Development Center for the period of April 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities of the Fusion Research and Development Center (Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Division of Large Tokamak Development) from April 1980 to 1981 are described. In plasma physics research, 1.5 MW NBI heating experiments were successfully made on JFT-2 to yield an average beta value of 2.5% without any deleterious effect on plasma confinement. Joint JAERI-US/DOE ECRH experiments revealed detailed physics of plasma heating. Installation of a 1 MW ICRF system was completed. In the Doublet-III experiment, a JAERI-US/DOE cooperation program, extensive studies were made on Joule heated dee-shaped Plasmas. In theory and computation emphasis was placed on beta optimization of tokamaks. Construction of JT-60 was continued as planned. Manufacturing of the major components and facilities was advanced well, e.g. 14 out of the 19 toroidal field coils were completed. Construction of the buildings was continued at the Naka site. In plasma heating technology, construction of the JT-60 prototype NBI unit was in progress, and development works on ion sources and beam line components as well. Trial fabrication of high power klystrons for JT-60 RF heating was started. In superconducting magnet technology, cool-down tests of cluster coils were successfully made. Manufacturing of the Japanese coil for the Large Coil Task under the auspiece of IEA, and of a Nb3Sn test module coil was continued. A test facility for the LCT coil was completed. Basic studies on key processes of tritium technology were continued using hydrogen and deuterium. Design of the Tritium Process Laboratory was continued. Development of first wall materials for JT-60 was advanced. Extensive tests were made on a number of low-Z coatings. Design studies of INTOR, a cooperative work in IAEA, were continued. In addition, design of the Fusion Experimental Reactor was started on a conventional type tokamak reactor and swimming pool type one. (author)

  15. Soft-X-Ray Tomography Diagnostic at the Rtp Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    An 80-channel soft x-ray tomography system has been constructed for diagnosing the RTP (Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project) tokamak plasma. Five pinhole cameras, each with arrays of 16 detectors are distributed more or less homogeneously around a poloidal plasma cross section. The cameras are positioned clo

  16. Commercial feasibility of fusion power based on the tokamak concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants is determined. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  17. Fokker-Planck/Transport model for neutral beam driven tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of nonlinear Fokker-Planck models to the study of beam-driven plasmas is briefly reviewed. This evolution of models has led to a Fokker-Planck/Transport (FPT) model for neutral-beam-driven Tokamaks, which is described in detail. The FPT code has been applied to the PLT, PDX, and TFTR Tokamaks, and some representative results are presented

  18. Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve controlled nuclear fusion for the commercial production of energy is the tokamak design. In such a device, a hot plasma is confined in a toroidal geometry using magnetic fields. The present generation of tokamaks shows significant plasma rotation, primarily

  20. Experimental studies of tokamak plasma in IPP Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short survey is given of the experimental activities at the small Prague tokamak CASTOR during recent years. At present, investigation is primarily aimed at the anomalous transport and plasma-wall interaction in the tokamak under conditions of combined OH/LHCD regimes. Moreover, some New diagnostic methods were also developed and certain improvements in the CASTOR performance were achieved. (author). 41 refs

  1. Lower hybrid heating experiments in tokamaks: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower hybrid wave propagation theory relevant to heating fusion grade plasmas (tokamaks) is reviewed. A brief discussion of accessibility, absorption, and toroidal ray propagation is given. The main part of the paper reviews recent results in heating experiments on tokamaks. Both electron and ion heating regimes will be discussed. The prospects of heating to high temperatures in reactor grade plasmas will be evaluated

  2. A simulation study of a controlled tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, N.; Niwa, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A tokamak circuit theory, including results of numerical simulation studies, is applied to a control system synthesized for a Joule heated tokamak plasma. The treatment is similar to that of Ogata and Ninomiya (1979) except that in this case a quadrupole field coil current is considered coexisting with image induced on a vacuum chamber.

  3. Tokamak plasma self-organization-synergetics of magnetic trap plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Eliseev, L. G.; Kislov, A. Y.; La Haye, R. J.; Lysenko, S. E.; Melnikov, A. V.; Notkin, G. E.; Pavlov, Y. D.; Kantor, M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of a wide range of experimental results in plasma magnetic confinement investigations shows that in most cases, plasmas are self-organized. In the tokamak case, it is realized in the self-consistent pressure profile, which permits the tokamak plasma to be macroscopically MHD stable. Existin

  4. Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignat, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule.

  5. Experimental data base of Tokamak KTM physical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of software creation of experimental data storage of Tokamak KTM physical diagnostics based on analysis of storage methods of operating Tokamaks data is considered. Task of specific kinds of information storage is solved; experimental data base that is thr part of system providing information analysis performance in the post-start period is developed.(author)

  6. Desirable engineering features of the next-generation tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent scoping studies examined a series of superconducting, long-pulse Driven Current Tokamak (DCT) devices. One class of options is an ignited, D-T burning device designated DCT-8. It was concluded that the DCT-8 is a most attracttive engineering option to adequately bridge the gap between the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Engineering Test Reactor

  7. Tokamak Plasmas : Measurement of temperature fluctuations and anomalous transport in the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Kumar; S K Saha

    2000-11-01

    Temperature fluctuations have been measured in the edge region of the SINP tokamak. We find that these fluctuations have a comparatively high level (30–40%) and a broad spectrum. The temperature fluctuations show a quite high coherence with density and potential fluctuations and contribute considerably to the anomalous particle flux.

  8. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; K. Rule; M. Viola; M. Williams; R. Strykowsky

    1999-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling.

  9. Two-fluid simulations of driven reconnection in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanier, A.; Browning, P.; Gordovskyy, M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McClements, K. G.; Gryaznevich, M. P. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lukin, V. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In the merging-compression method of plasma start-up, two flux-ropes with parallel toroidal current are formed around in-vessel poloidal field coils, before merging to form a spherical tokamak plasma. This start-up method, used in the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST), is studied as a high Lundquist number and low plasma-beta magnetic reconnection experiment. In this paper, 2D fluid simulations are presented of this merging process in order to understand the underlying physics, and better interpret the experimental data. These simulations examine the individual and combined effects of tight-aspect ratio geometry and two-fluid physics on the merging. The ideal self-driven flux-rope dynamics are coupled to the diffusion layer physics, resulting in a large range of phenomena. For resistive MHD simulations, the flux-ropes enter the sloshing regime for normalised resistivity η≲10{sup −5}. In Hall-MHD, three regimes are found for the qualitative behaviour of the current sheet, depending on the ratio of the current sheet width to the ion-sound radius. These are a stable collisional regime, an open X-point regime, and an intermediate regime that is highly unstable to tearing-type instabilities. In toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the final state after merging is a MAST-like spherical tokamak with nested flux-surfaces. It is also shown that the evolution of simulated 1D radial density profiles closely resembles the Thomson scattering electron density measurements in MAST. An intuitive explanation for the origin of the measured density structures is proposed, based upon the results of the toroidal Hall-MHD simulations.

  10. A new method for absolute measurement of {beta}eff based on Microscopic Noise Experiments and the Two-Region model in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, A.; Kuramoto, R.Y.R.; Jerez, R.; Diniz, R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A new method for absolute measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction, {beta}eff, based on Microscopic Noise Experiments and the Two-Region Model was developed at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor. In contrast with other techniques, the main advantage of this new methodology is to obtain the parameters in a purely experimental way, eliminating all parameters that are difficult to measure or calculate. Consequently, the uncertainties associated to these parameters are eliminated and the accuracy in {beta}eff is improved. Experimentally, several Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} measurements were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 in a large subcritical interval. By adopting the present approach, the final results show that uncertainties of 0.67 % and 0.97 % on {beta}eff and {lambda} (the prompt neutron generation time) respectively, are achievable. The theory/experiment comparison of {beta}eff shows that among the available nuclear data libraries JENDL3.3 has the best performance. (authors)

  11. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T modifications and operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, in support of the Department of Energy's proposal for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) D-T program. The objective of the proposed D-T program is to take the initial step in studying the effects of alpha particle heating and transport in a magnetic fusion device. These studies would enable the successful completion of the original TFTR program objectives, and would support the research and development needs of the Burning Plasma Experiment, BPX (formerly the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in the areas of alpha particle physics, tritium retention, alpha particle diagnostic development, and tritium handling

  12. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Fusion plasma theory. Task III. Auxiliary heating in tokamaks and tandem mirrors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research we have accomplished with this contract has focused on ICRF coupling, heating and breakeven studies for tokamaks and ECRF fundamental and second harmonic heating in tandem mirrors. The highlights include reviewed publication of ICRF Fokker-Planck heating and breakeven studies with international collaboration with the JET group, fundamental work on a differential equation for wave fields and a new wave power absorption and conservation relation for ICRF in inhomogeneous plasmas and a formulation and code development of slab matrix and differential equation solutions for ICRF waveguide coupling in tokamak edge regions. ECRF ray tracing studies have been carried out, and a reviewed paper published for fundamental and second harmonic propagation, absorption and whistler microinstabilities in tandem mirror plug and barrier regions of Phaedrus, TMX-U and TASKA

  14. Visible wide angle view imaging system of KTM tokamak based on multielement image fiber bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chektybayev, B., E-mail: Chektybaev@nnc.kz; Shapovalov, G.; Kolodeshnikov, A. [Institute of Atomic Energy Branch of National Nuclear Center, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    2015-05-15

    In the paper, new visible wide angle view imaging system of KTM tokamak is described. The system has been designed to observe processes inside of plasma and the processes occurring due to plasma-wall interactions through the long equatorial port. Imaging system is designed based on special image fiber bundle and entrance wide angle lens, which provide image of large section of the vacuum chamber, both poloidal half-section and divertor through the sufficiently long equatorial port. The system also consists of two video cameras: slow and fast with image intensifier. Commercial equipment had been used in design of the system that allowed reducing the cost and time for research and development. The paper also discusses advantages and disadvantages of the system in comparison with conventional endoscopes based on a lens system and considers its promising utilization in future tokamaks and future steady state fusion reactors.

  15. Observation of ICRF [ion cyclotron range of frequencies] wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental observation of ICRF wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma is reported. Studies were carried out in the Caltech Research Tokamak in a pure hydrogen plasma and in a regime where fast-wave damping was sufficiently small to permit multiple toroidal transits of the wave-packet. Waves were launched by exciting a small loop antenna with a short burst of rf current and were detected with shielded magnetic probes. Probe scans revealed a large increase in wave-packet amplitude at smaller minor radii, and the packet velocity was found to be independent of radial position. Measurement of the packet transit time yielded direct information about the wave group velocity. Packet velocity was investigated as a function of the fundamental excitation frequency, plasma density, and toroidal magnetic field. Results are compared with the predictions of a cold plasma model which includes a vacuum layer at the edge. 24 refs., 8 figs

  16. MHD stability of advanced tokamak scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak plasmas with a non-monotonic q-profile (current profile) and negative shear in the plasma centre have been associated with improved confinement and large pressure gradients in the region of negative shear. In JET, this regime, has been obtained with pellet injection (the PEP mode) and in DIII-D by ramping the plasma elongation. In JET, the phase of improved confinement is transient and usually ends in a collapse due to an MHD instability which leads to a redistribution of the current and a monotonic q-profile. The infernal mode, which is driven by a large pressure gradient in the region of low shear near the minimum in the q-profile, is the most likely candidate for the observed instability. To extend the transient phase to steady state, control of the shape of the current density profile is essential. The modelling of these advanced tokamak scenarios with a non-monotonic q-profile using non-inductive current drive of lower hybrid waves, fast waves, and neutral beams is discussed elsewhere. The aim is to find suitable initial states and to maintain MHD stability when the plasma β is built up. For this purpose, the robustness of the MHD stability of these configurations is studied with respect to changes in the position and in the depth of the minimum in q, and in the shape of the q and pressure profile. The classes of equilibria chosen for the analysis are based on the modelling of the current-drive schemes for advanced tokamak scenarios in JET. The toroidal ideal and resistive MHD stability code CASTOR is used for the stability calculations. (author) 7 refs., 4 figs

  17. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The D III-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, we have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: 1) We have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; 2) Using this rotational stabilization, we have achieved βNH89 ≥ 10 for 4 τE limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; 3) Using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, we have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased βT by 60%; 4) We have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; 5) We have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; 6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and 7) We have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 τE) at the same fusion gain parameter of βNH89/q952 ≅ 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q95 = 4.2. We have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: 1) We have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 τE) with constant density and constant radiated power; 2) We have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; 3) We have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. (author)

  18. Differential and Integral Models of TOKAMAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Dolezel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of 3D electromagnetic phenomena in TOKAMAK with typically distributed main and additional coils is not an easy business. Evaluated must be not only distribution of the magnetic field, but also forces acting in particular coils. Use of differential methods (such as FDM or FEM for this purpose may be complicated because of geometrical incommensurability of particular subregions in the investigated area or problems with the boundary conditions. That is why integral formulation of the problem may sometimes be an advantages. The theoretical analysis is illustrated on an example processed by both methods, whose results are compared and discussed.

  19. Scaling studies of beam-heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric scaling of neutral beam-heated tokamaks is examined to determine the trade-off between beam energy and power. It is shown that over a wide range of plasma parameters and assumed transport properties, the center mean plasma temperature is a function of P/sub A/E/sub B//sup delta/, where E/sub B/ and P/sub A/ are the beam energy and power per unit area, respectively, and delta is a calculable constant of order unity

  20. Iron forbidden lines in tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several spectrum lines from forbidden transitions in the ground configurations of highly ionized atoms have been observed in the PLT tokamak discharges. Such lines allow localized observations, in the high-temperature regions of the plasma, of ion-temperatures, plasma motions, and spatial distributions of ions. Measured absolute intensities of the forbidden lines have been compared with simultaneous observations of the ion resonance lines and with model calculations in order to deduce the mechanism of level populaions by means of electron collisions and radiative transitions

  1. Profile control for an alternative spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetically driven plasma guns that are inserted around a flux conserver at definite angular intervals are considered. The creation and the control of plasma channels are examined. By means of the hybrid model developed, both a system analysis of the Alternative Spherical Tokamak (AST) and relevant computational experiments have been carried out. In addition, by using the results obtained from the numerical scheme, the complex non-inductive current drive mechanisms of bootstrap and helicity injection in the AST system are discussed in detail. (author). 2 refs, 2 figs

  2. Bolometer measurement on HT-6B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discribes the structure, methods of calibration and measurement system of a metal foil resistor bolometer which is developed for measuring the radiation power of high temperature plasmas. The radiation loss and neutral flux loss in HT-6B tokamak have been measured by using the bolometer. The following results were obtained: (1) A large, nearly constant fraction (∼50%) of the input power was lost to the wall by radiation and energetic neutrals during the quasisteady phase of a normal discharges; (2) The power loss linearly increased with the discharge current Ip; (3) During disruption, most of the plasma energy was lost by radiation and neutrals

  3. Digital controlled pulsed electric system of the ETE tokamak. First report; Sistema eletrico pulsado com controle digital do Tokamak ETE (experimento Tokamak esferico). Primeiro relatorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Felipe de F.P.W.; Del Bosco, Edson

    1997-12-31

    This reports presents a summary on the thermonuclear fusion and application for energy supply purposes. The tokamak device operation and the magnetic field production systems are described. The ETE tokamak is a small aspect ratio device designed for plasma physics and thermonuclear fusion studies, which presently is under construction at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) - S.J. dos Campos - S. Paulo. (author) 55 refs., 40 figs.

  4. Minimum dimension of an ITER like Tokamak with a given Q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johner, J

    2004-07-01

    The minimum dimension of an ITER like tokamak with a given amplification factor Q is calculated for two values of the maximum magnetic field in the superconducting toroidal field coils. For ITERH-98P(y,2) scaling of the energy confinement time, it is shown that for a sufficiently large tokamak, the maximum Q is obtained for the operating point situated both at the maximum density and at the minimum margin with respect to the H-L transition. We have shown that increasing the maximum magnetic field in the toroidal field coils from the present 11.8 T to 16 T would result in a strong reduction of the machine size but has practically no effect on the fusion power. Values obtained for {beta}{sub N} are found to be below 2. Peak fluxes on the divertor plates with an ITER like divertor and a multi-machine expression for the power radiated in the plasma mantle, are below 10 MW/m{sup 2}.

  5. Equilibrium and ballooning mode stability of an axisymmetric tensor pressure tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A force balance relation, a representation for the poloidal beta (β/sub p/), and expressions for the current densities are derived from the MHD equilibrium relations for an axisymmetric tensor pressure tokamak. Perpendicular and parallel beam pressure components are evaluated from a distribution function that models high energy neutral particle injection. A double adiabatic energy principle is derived from that of Kruskal and Oberman, with correction terms added. The energy principle is then applied to an arbitrary cross-section axisymmetric tokamak to examine ballooning instabilities of large toroidal mode number. The resulting Euler equation is remarkably similar to that of ideal MHD. Although the field-bending term is virtually unaltered, the driving term is modified because the pressures are no longer constant on a flux surface. Either a necessary or a sufficient marginal stability criterion for a guiding center plasma can be derived from this equation whenever an additional stabilizing element unique to the double adiabatic theory is either kept or neglected, respectively

  6. A survey of electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive potential for spherical tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, Jakub; Peysson, Yves; Preinhaelter, Josef; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2011-01-01

    The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) is typically the only wave in the electron cyclotron (EC) range that can be applied in spherical tokamaks for heating and current drive (H&CD). Spherical tokamaks (STs), which feature relatively high neutron flux and good economy, operate generally in high-beta regimes, in which the usual EC O- and X- modes are cut-off. In this case, EBWs seem to be the only option that can provide features similar to the EC waves---controllable localized H&CD that can be utilized for core plasma heating as well as for accurate plasma stabilization. The EBW is a quasi-electrostatic wave that can be excited by mode conversion from a suitably launched O- or X-mode; its propagation further inside the plasma is strongly influenced by the plasma parameters. These rather awkward properties make its application somewhat more difficult. In this paper we perform an extensive numerical study of EBW H&CD performance in four typical ST plasmas (NSTX L- and H-mode, MAST Upgrade, NHTX). Coupled...

  7. Turbulent ion heating in TCV Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak à configuration variable (TCV) features the highest electron cyclotron wave power density available to resonantly heat (ECRH) the electrons and to drive noninductive currents in a fusion grade plasma (ECCD). In more than 15 years of exploitation, much effort has been expended on real and velocity space engineering of the plasma electron energy distribution function and thus making electron physics a major research contribution of TCV. When a plasma was first subjected to ECCD, a surprising energisation of the ions, perpendicular to the confining magnetic field, was observed on the charge exchange spectrum measured with the vertical neutral particle analyser (VNPA). It was soon concluded that the ion acceleration was not due to power equipartition between electrons and ions, which, due to the absence of direct ion heating on TCV, has thus far been considered as the only mechanism heating the ions. However, although observed for more than ten years, little attention was paid to this phenomenon, whose cause has remained unexplained to date. The key subject of this thesis is the experimental study of this anomalous ion acceleration, the characterisation in terms of relevant parameters and the presentation of a model simulation of the potential process responsible for the appearance of fast ions. The installation of a new compact neutral particle analyser (CNPA) with an extended high energy range (≥ 50 keV) greatly improved the fast ion properties diagnosis. The CNPA was commissioned and the information derived from its measurement (ion temperature and density, isotopic plasma composition) was validated against other ion diagnostics, namely the active carbon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system (CXRS) and a neutron counter. In ohmic plasmas, where the ion heating agrees with classical theory, the radial ion temperature profile was successfully reconstructed by vertically displacing the plasma across the horizontal CNPA line of sight. Active

  8. Effect of a static external magnetic perturbation on resistive mode stability in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Hender, T.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-03-01

    The influence of a general static external magnetic perturbation on the stability of resistive modes in a tokamak plasma is examined. There are three main parts to this investigation. Firstly, the vacuum perturbation is expanded as a set of well-behaved toroidal ring functions and is, thereafter, specified by the coefficients of this expansion. Secondly, a dispersion relation is derived for resistive plasma instabilities in the presence of a general external perturbation and finally, this dispersion relation is solved for the amplitudes of the tearing and twisting modes driven in the plasma by a specific perturbation. It is found that the amplitudes of driven tearing and twisting modes are negligible until a certain critical perturbation strength is exceeded. Only tearing modes are driven in low-{beta} plasmas with {epsilon}{beta}{sub p} << 1. However, twisting modes may also be driven if {epsilon}{beta}{sub p}{approx}>1. For error-field perturbations made up of a large number of different poloidal and toroidal harmonics the critical strength to drive locked modes has a {open_quote}staircase{close_quote} variation with edge-q, characterized by strong discontinuities as coupled rational surfaces enter or leave the plasma. For single harmonic perturbations the variation with edge-q is far smoother. Both types of behaviour have been observed experimentally. The critical perturbation strength is found to decrease strongly close to an ideal external kink stability boundary. This is also in agreement with experimental observations.

  9. Calculation of absorbed dose for skin contamination imparted by beta radiation through the VARSKIN modified code for 122 interesting isotopes for nuclear medicine, nuclear power plants and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the implementation of a modification of the VARSKIN code for calculation of absorbed dose for contamination in skin imparted by external radiation fields generated by Beta emitting is presented. The modification consists on the inclusion of 47 isotopes of interest even Nuclear Plants for the dose evaluation in skin generated by 'hot particles'. The approach for to add these isotopes is the correlation parameter F and the average energy of the Beta particle, with relationship to those 75 isotopes of the original code. The methodology of the dose calculation of the VARSKIN code is based on the interpolation, (and integration of the interest geometries: punctual or plane sources), of the distribution functions scaled doses in water for beta and electrons punctual sources, tabulated by Berger. Finally a brief discussion of the results for their interpretation and use with purposes of radiological protection (dose insurance in relation to the considered biological effects) is presented

  10. Maryland controlled fusion research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of microturbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash

  11. Maryland controlled fusion research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griem, H.R.; Liu, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of microturbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash.

  12. Edge localized mode physics and operational aspects in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becoulet, M [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Huysmans, G [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sarazin, Y [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rimini, F [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Litaudon, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ane, J-M [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Thomas, P [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Grosman, A [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Parail, V [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Wilson, H [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Lomas, P [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Vries, P de[Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Zastrow, K-D [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Matthews, G F [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Lonnroth, J [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Gerasimov, S [Euratom/UKAEA Association, Fusion Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3EA (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2003-12-01

    Recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies of edge localized mode (ELM) physics is reviewed for the reactor relevant plasma regimes, namely the high confinement regimes, that is, H-modes and advanced scenarios. Theoretical approaches to ELM physics, from a linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis to non-linear transport models with ELMs are discussed with respect to experimental observations, in particular the fast collapse of pedestal pressure profiles, magnetic measurements and scrape-off layer transport during ELMs. High confinement regimes with different types of ELMs are addressed in this paper in the context of development of operational scenarios for ITER. The key parameters that have been identified at present to reduce the energy losses in Type I ELMs are operation at high density, high edge magnetic shear and high triangularity. However, according to the present experimental scaling for the energy losses in Type I ELMs, the extrapolation of such regimes for ITER leads to unacceptably large heat loads on the divertor target plates exceeding the material limits. High confinement H-mode scenarios at high triangularity and high density with small ELMs (Type II), mixed regimes (Type II and Type I) and combined advanced regimes at high beta{sub p} are discussed for present-day tokamaks. The optimum combination of high confinement and small MHD activity at the edge in Type II ELM scenarios is of interest to ITER. However, to date, these regimes have been achieved in a rather narrow operational window and far from ITER parameters in terms of collisionality, edge safety factor and beta{sub p}. The compatibility of the alternative internal transport barrier (ITB) scenario with edge pedestal formation and ELMs is also addressed. Edge physics issues related to the possible combination of small benign ELMs (Type III, Type II ELMs, quiescent double barrier) and high performance ITBs are discussed for present-day experiments (JET, JT-60U

  13. Quantifying ETG transport in spherical tokamaks with ExB shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this paper we pursue a quantitative description of ETG transport relevant to present day spherical tokamaks such as MAST and NSTX. To accomplish this we have utilized the gyrokinetic continuum code GYRO with low aspect ratio, shaped flux surfaces, and a gyrokinetic treatment for both electrons and ions at full mass ratio (mi/me=3600). The simulations have been run using ExB shear rates consistent with experimental observations (γE∼1.0 cs/a) which are sufficient to suppress ITG transport at kθρi≤1 scales. The strong ExB shear also provides a long wavelength cutoff and physical saturation mechanism for the ETG turbulence. Combined with the gyrokinetic ion model, the numerical saturation problem observed using the adiabatic ion model at large values of magnetic shear (s-circumflex > 0.4) is avoided. Considerable attention has been given to demonstrating quantitative convergence with variation in grid resolution (Lx=Ly=4-16ρi, kρe,max =0.75-1.5) and radial boundary conditions. Resulting turbulent eddy structures are tilted in the sheared flow field, but on average remain elongated radially (Lr ∼26ρe∼3.Lperpendicular). In contrast to simulations without ExB shear, spectra remain anisotropic at high |kρe|>0.2. Transport is predicted to be experimentally relevant (χe ∼ 10ρe2vTe/Lte) for modest values of magnetic shear (s-circumflex∼1) and plasma beta (β∼few percent). At more extreme values transport is reduced, consistent with previous descriptions. The derived quantitative dependencies indicate that the ETG instability provides experimentally relevant transport in MAST discharges near the mid- radius, where these conditions are satisfied. Towards the edge, larger magnetic shear reduces the expected ETG transport. [Calculations were performed at the University of Warwick Centre for Scientific Computing, NERSC and ORNL. This work was partly funded by the United Kingdom Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, United States

  14. Radial Movement of Pellet Ablation Material in Tokamaks Due to the Grad-B Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, P. B.; Sessions, W.; Ventrice, C. A.; Baylor, L. R.

    1998-11-01

    The mass source from a pellet represents a significant disturbance to the plasma. Initially the ablated substance is a highly localized, high-beta (>1) plasmoid, which will polarize and drift towards the low field side of the tokamak. Propagation of shear Alfvén waves brakes the outward motion,(P.B. Parks, Nucl. Fusion 32), 2137 (1992). much like its role as a restoring force in the ballooning mode. The grad-B drift drive will weaken because of pressure relaxation as the ablated substance spreads out along the field lines. The ablation blob will stop before it becomes assimilated into the plasma. An analytic model was developed to predict the stopping distance, i.e., the outward large-R shift for radial, vertical, and inside launch locations. Comparison of the model with experiments on TFTR, JET, DIII--D, and a 3D MHD simulation(H. Strauss, Int. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf. 1998.) will be presented.

  15. Projections for a steady-state tokamak reactor based on the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, R.S.; Barr, W.L.; Bulmer, R.H.; Campbell, R.B.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Lee, J.D.; Logan, B.G.; Miller, J.R.; Reginato, L.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US))

    1991-03-01

    This paper examines the extensions of the physics and engineering guidelines for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device needed for acceptable operating points for a steady-state tokamak power reactor. Noninductive current drive is provided in steady state by high-energy neutral beam injection in the plasma core, lower hybrid slow waves in the outer regions of the plasma, and bootstrap current. Three different levels of extension of the ITER physics/engineering guidelines, with differing assumptions on the possible plasma beta, elongation, and aspect ratio, are considered for power reactor applications. Plasma gain Q = fusion power/input power in excess of 20 and average neutron wall fluxes from 2.3 to 3.6 MW/m{sup 2} are predicted in devices with major radii varying from 7.0 to 6.0 m and aspect ratios from 2.9 to 4.3.

  16. A Proposed Experiment to Study Relaxation Formation of a Spherical Tokamak with a Plasma Center Column

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C

    2006-01-01

    A spherical tokamak (ST) with a plasma center column (PCC) can be formed via driven magnetic relaxation of a screw pinch plasma. An ST-PCC could in principle eliminate many problems associated with a material center column, a key weakness of the ST reactor concept. This work summarizes the design space for an ST-PCC in terms of flux amplification, aspect ratio, and elongation, based on the zero-beta Taylor-relaxed analysis of Tang & Boozer [Phys. Plasmas 13, 042514 (2006)]. The paper will discuss (1) equilibrium and stability properties of the ST-PCC, (2) issues for an engineering design, and (3) key differences between the proposed ST-PCC and the ongoing Proto-Sphera effort in Italy.

  17. Control of the Resistive Wall Mode in Advanced Tokamak Plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistive wall mode (RWM) instabilities are found to be a limiting factor in advanced tokamak (AT) regimes with low internal inductance. Even small amplitude modes can affect the rotation profile and the performance of these ELMing H-mode discharges. Although complete stabilization of the RWM by plasma rotation has not yet been observed, several discharges with increased beam momentum and power injection sustained good steady-state performance for record time extents. The first investigation of active feedback control of the RWM has shown promising results: the leakage of the radial magnetic flux through the resistive wall can be successfully controlled, and the duration of the high beta phase can be prolonged. The results provide a comparative test of several approaches to active feedback control, and are being used to benchmark the analysis and computational models of active control

  18. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  19. Tokamak advanced pump limiter experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments with pump limiter modules on several operating tokamaks establish such limiters as efficient collectors of particles and has demonstrated the importance of ballistic scattering as predicted theoretically. Plasma interaction with recycling neutral gas appears to become important as the plasma density increases and the effective ionization mean free path within the module decreases. In limiters with particle collection but without active internal pumping, the neutral gas pressure is found to vary nonlinearly with the edge plasma density at the highest densities studies. Both experiments and theory indicate that the energy spectrum of gas atoms in the pump ducting is non-thermal, consistent with the results of Monte Carlo neutral atom transport calculations. The distribution of plasma power over the front surface of such modules has been measured and appears to be consistent with the predictions of simple theory. Initial results from the latest experiment on the ISX-B tokamak with an actively pumped limiter module demonstrates that the core plasma density can be controlled with a pump limiter and that the scrape-off layer plasma can partially screen the core plasma from gas injection. The results from module pump limiter experiments and from the theory and design analysis of advanced pump limiters for reactors are used to suggest the major features of a definitive, axisymmetric, toroidal belt pump limiter experiment

  20. Magnetic diagnostics for the lithium tokamak experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzak, L; Kaita, R; Kozub, T; Majeski, R; Zakharov, L

    2008-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R(0)=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, B(TF) approximately 3.4 kG, I(P) approximately 400 kA, and pulse length approximately 0.25 s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions. PMID:19044600

  1. Compact ignition tokamak physics and engineering basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a high-field, compact tokamak design whose objective is the study of physics issues associated with burning plasmas. The toroidal and poloidal field coils employ a copper-steel laminate, manufactured by explosive-bonding techniques, to support the forces generated by the design fields: 10 T toroidal field at the plasma center; 21 T in the OH solenoid. A combination of internal and external PF coils provides control of the equilibrium and the ability to sweep the magnetic separatrix across the divertor plates during a pulse. At temperatures and βα levels characteristic of ITER designs, the fusion power in CIT approaches 800 MW and can be the limiting factor in the pulse length. Ignition requires that the confinement time exceed present L-mode scalings by about a factor of two, which is anticipated to occur as a result of the operational flexibility incorporated into the design. Conventional operating limits given by 20 e and qψ ≤ 3.2 have been chosen and, in the case of MHD limits, have been justified by ideal stability analysis. The power required for CIT ignition ranges from 10 MW to 40 MW or more, depending on confinement assumptions, and either ICRF or ECRF heating, or both, will be used. (author). 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  2. Conceptual tokamak design at high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the future fusion reactor, it is important to design an experimental device that can be performed testing in-vessel components including tritium breeding modules relevant to the future fusion reactor with high neutron fluence. To realize this requirement, a conceptual tokamak design has been performed in accordance with plasma performance and shape at quasi-steady-state operation. One of the promising scenarios for this purpose is proposed to produce the plasma at the outward shifted radial position with a small minor radius for reasonable plasma parameters. From the analytical results, an appropriate space can be found for neutron shielding so that additional neutron shielding can be installed to protect the tokamak components from any neutron damages under the neutron fluence of 1 MWa m-2. Based on the structural analyses, a two-stage blanket module concept is proposed, i.e. one shielding block with the first wall assembly during high Q operation and two shielding blocks or additional tritium breeding modules during quasi-steady state operation

  3. Electromagnetic simulations of tokamaks and stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Michael; Mishchenko, Alexey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A practical fusion reactor will require a plasma β of around 5%. In this range Alfvenic effects become important. Since a practical reactor will also produce energetic alpha particles, the interaction between Alfvenic instabilities and fast ions is of particular interest. We have developed a fluid electron, kinetic ion hybrid model that can be used to study this problem. Compared to fully gyrokinetic electromagnetic codes, hybrid codes offer faster running times and greater flexibility, at the cost of reduced completeness. The model has been successfully verified against the worldwide ITPA Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) benchmark, and the ideal MHD code CKA for the internal kink mode in a tokamak. Use of the model can now be turned toward cases of practical relevance. Current work focuses on simulating fishbones in a tokamak geometry, which may be of relevance to ITER, and producing the first non-perturbative self-consistent simulations of TAE in a stellarator, which may be of relevance both to Wendelstein 7-X and any future stellarator reactor. Preliminary results of these studies are presented.

  4. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Tokamak Systems Code, used to investigate Compact Ignition Tokamaks (CITs), can simultaneously vary many parameters, satisfy many constraints, and minimize or maximize a figure of merit. It is useful in comparing different CIT design configurations over wide regions of parameter space and determining a desired design point for more detailed physics and engineering analysis, as well as for performing sensitivity studies for physics or engineering issues. Operational windows in major radius (R) and toroidal field (B) space for fixed ignition margin are calculated for the Ignifed and Inconel candidate CITs. The minimum R bounds are predominantly physics limited, and the maximum R portions of the windows are engineering limited. For a modified Kaye-Goldston plasma-energy-confinement scaling, the minimum size is 1.15 m for the Ignifed device and 1.25 m for the Inconel device. With the Ignition Technical Oversight Committee (ITOC) physics guidance of B2a/q and I/sub p/ >10 MA, the Ignifed and Base-line Inconel devices have a minimum size of 1.2 and 1.25 m and a toroidal field of 11 and 10.4 T, respectively. Sensitivity studies show Ignifed to be more sensitive to coil temperature changes than the Inconel device, whereas the Inconel device is more sensitive to stress perturbations

  5. Boronization of Russian tokamaks from carborane precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new and cheap boronization technique using the nontoxic and nonexplosive solid substance carborane has been developed and successfully applied to the Russian tokamaks T-11M, T-3M, T-10 and TUMAN-3. The glow discharge in a mixture of He and carborane vapor produced the amorphous B/C coating with the B/C ratio varied from 2.0-3.7. The deposition rate was about 150 nm/h. The primary effect of boronization was a significant reduction of the impurity influx and the plasma impurity contamination, a sharp decrease of the plasma radiated power, and a decrease of the effective charge. Boronization strongly suppressed the impurity influx caused by additional plasma heating. ECR- and ICR-heating as well as ECR current drive were more effective in boronized vessels. Boronization resulted in a significant extension of the Ne- and q-region of stable tokamak operation. The density limit rose strongly. In Ohmic H-mode energy confinement time increased significantly (by a factor of 2) after boronization. It rose linearly with plasma current Ip and was 10 times higher than Neo-Alcator time at maximum current. ((orig.))

  6. Thomson scattering on the PRETEXT Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby laser Thomson scattering was performed on the PRETEXT tokamak. A 10 Joule Q-switched laser and a 1 meter 10 channel polychromator were used to diagnose the electron temperature and density profiles in the PRETEXT plasma. These parameters were measured as a function of time and radial position on a shot to shot basis. The density measurement was calibrated by Rayleigh and Raman scattering and by comparison with data from a 4 mm microwave interferometer. Electron densities ranging from 1 x 1012 cm-3 to 2 x 1013 cm-3 and temperatures ranging from 3 eV to 400 eV were observed. Detailed measurements were made throughout the 40 ms discharge with particular emphasis on the current rise phase. The Thomson scattering data was used as input to a one dimensional magnetic diffusion code. This code modelled the evolution of the current density and safety factor profiles. The results of this analysis were compared with existing theories of tokamak current penetration. The growth of resitive MHD tearing modes was proposed as a likely explanation for the anomalously rapid current penetration observed in PRETEXT

  7. Sawtooth driven particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial transport of particles in tokamaks is one of the most stringent issues faced by the magnetic confinement fusion community, because the fusion power is proportional to the square of the pressure, and also because accumulation of heavy impurities in the core leads to important power losses which can lead to a 'radiative collapse'. Sawteeth and the associated periodic redistribution of the core quantities can significantly impact the radial transport of electrons and impurities. In this thesis, we perform numerical simulations of sawteeth using a nonlinear tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic code called XTOR-2F to study the particle transport induced by sawtooth crashes. We show that the code recovers, after the crash, the fine structures of electron density that are observed with fast-sweeping reflectometry on the JET and TS tokamaks. The presence of these structure may indicate a low efficiency of the sawtooth in expelling the impurities from the core. However, applying the same code to impurity profiles, we show that the redistribution is quantitatively similar to that predicted by Kadomtsev's model, which could not be predicted a priori. Hence finally the sawtooth flushing is efficient in expelling impurities from the core. (author)

  8. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, J.D.; Blackfield, D.T.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Selcow, E.

    1987-08-01

    The new Tokamak Systems Code, used to investigate Compact Ignition Tokamaks (CITs), can simultaneously vary many parameters, satisfy many constraints, and minimize or maximize a figure of merit. It is useful in comparing different CIT design configurations over wide regions of parameter space and determining a desired design point for more detailed physics and engineering analysis, as well as for performing sensitivity studies for physics or engineering issues. Operational windows in major radius (R) and toroidal field (B) space for fixed ignition margin are calculated for the Ignifed and Inconel candidate CITs. The minimum R bounds are predominantly physics limited, and the maximum R portions of the windows are engineering limited. For a modified Kaye-Goldston plasma-energy-confinement scaling, the minimum size is 1.15 m for the Ignifed device and 1.25 m for the Inconel device. With the Ignition Technical Oversight Committee (ITOC) physics guidance of B/sup 2/a/q and I/sub p/ >10 MA, the Ignifed and Base-line Inconel devices have a minimum size of 1.2 and 1.25 m and a toroidal field of 11 and 10.4 T, respectively. Sensitivity studies show Ignifed to be more sensitive to coil temperature changes than the Inconel device, whereas the Inconel device is more sensitive to stress perturbations.

  9. Alfven wave studies on a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuum modes of the shear Alfven resonance are studied on the Tokapole II device, a small tokamak operated in a four node poloidal divertor configuration. A variety of antenna designs and the efficiency with which they deliver energy to the resonant layer are discussed. The spatial structure of the driven waves is studied by means of magnetic probes inserted into the current channel. In an attempt to optimize the coupling of energy in to the resonant layer, the angle of antenna currents with respect to the equilibrium field, antenna size, and plasma-to-antenna distance are varied. The usefulness of Faraday shields, particle shields, and local limiters are investigated. Antennas should be well shielded, either a dense Faraday shield or particle shield being satisfactory. The antenna should be large and very near to the plasma. The wave magnetic fields measured show a spatial resonance, the position of which varies with the value of the equilibrium field and mass density. They are polarized perpendicular to the equilibrium field. A wave propagates radially in to the resonant surface where it is converted to the shear Alfven wave. The signal has a short risetime and does not propagate far toroidally. These points are all consistent with a strongly damped shear Alfven wave. Comparisons of this work to theoretical predictions and results from other tokamaks are made

  10. Anomalous transport in the tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tokamak edge has been studied with arrays of Langmuir and magnetic probes on the DITE and COMPASS-C devices. Measurements of plasma parameters such as density, temperature and radial magnetic field were taken in order to elucidate the character, effect on transport and origin of edge fluctuations. The tokamak edge is a strongly-turbulent environment, with large electrostatic fluctuation levels and broad spectra. The observations, including direct correlation measurements, are consistent with a picture in which the observed magnetic field fluctuations are driven by the perturbations in electrostatic parameters. The propagation characteristics of the turbulence, investigated using digital spectral techniques, appear to be dominated by the variation of the radial electric field, both in limiter and divertor plasmas. A shear layer is formed, associated in each case with the last closed flux surface. In the shear layer, the electrostatic wavenumber spectra are significantly broader. The predictions of a drift wave model (DDGDT) and of a family of models evolving from the rippling mode (RGDT group), are compared with experimental results. RGDT, augmented by impurity radiation effects, is shown to be the most reasonable candidate to explain the nature of the edge turbulence, only failing in its estimate of the wavenumber range. (Author)

  11. Equilibrium reconstruction in the START tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, L. C.; Bevir, M. K.; Walsh, M. J.

    2001-02-01

    The computation of magnetic equilibria in the START spherical tokamak is more difficult than those in more conventional large aspect ratio tokamaks. This difficulty arises partly as a result of the use of induction compression to generate high current plasma, as this precludes the positioning of magnetic diagnostics close to the outboard side of the plasma. In addition, the effect of a conducting wall with a high, but finite, conductivity must be included. A method is presented for obtaining plasma equilibrium reconstructions based on the EFIT code. New constraints are used to relate isoflux surface locations deduced from radial profile measurements of electron temperature. A model of flux diffusion through the vessel wall is developed. It is shown that neglecting flux diffusion in the vessel wall can lead to a significant underestimate in the calculation of the plasma βt. Using a relatively sparse set of magnetic signals, βt can be obtained to within a fractional error of +/-10%. Using constraints to relate isoflux surface locations, the principle involved in determining the internal q profile is demonstrated.

  12. Scintillator based beta batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  13. Realized Beta GARCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger; Voev, Valeri Radkov

    2014-01-01

    as the beta. We apply the model to a large set of assets and find the conditional betas to be far more variable than usually found with rolling-window regressions based exclusively on daily returns. In the empirical part of the paper, we examine the cross-sectional as well as the time variation...... of the conditional beta series during the financial crises....

  14. Research Advances on Acupuncture-moxibustion for Improving Pancreatic Beta-cell Function%针灸改善胰岛β细胞功能研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞晓英; 孙志

    2014-01-01

    2型糖尿病( T2DM)是临床常见多发病,严重危害人们的身体健康。胰岛β细胞功能障碍是T2 DM发生发展的中心环节。针灸治疗T2 DM有较好疗效,可以有效改善胰岛β细胞功能。笔者查阅了近15年针灸治疗糖尿病的相关文献资料,从实验研究和临床研究两方面对针灸改善胰岛β细胞功能的研究进行综述。%The type 2 diabetes mellitus ( T2DM) is a clinical common and frequently -occurring disease .It is seriously detrimental to people ’ s health.The dysfunction of pancreatic beta -cells is central to the occurrence and development of T2DM.Acupuncture -moxibustion treatment for T2DM obtains an curative effect.It can effectively protect the pancreatic beta -cells.We have consulted pertinent literatures of last 15 years, and will review researches on acupuncture -moxibustion for improving pancreatic beta -cell function from two sides of experimental and clinical researches .

  15. Research Progress on Oxidative Stress of Islet Beta Cells in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus%2型糖尿病胰岛β细胞氧化应激的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴晓艳; 张晓梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the research advancement on oxidative stress of islet beta cells in type 2 diabetes Mellitus (T2 DM).Methods:To explore the research progress on oxidative stress of islet beta cells in T2 DM from the concept of oxidative stress, the oxidative stress factors of islet beta cells and the mechanism of oxidative stress damage in islet beta cells.Results: Because of lower level of antioxidant system in beta cells of islet in T2 DM, oxidative stress will easily occur during metabolic process of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipemia.Oxidative stress impairs β - cell function through many approaches, decreases insulin synthesis and secretion, aggravates T2 DM.Conclusions: Oxidative stress will easily occur in beta cells and it is a complex progress as a result of many factors and pathways.Antioxidant application can protect β - cell function, prevent and treat the incidence and growth of T2 DM.%目的:探讨2型糖尿病(T2DM)胰岛β细胞氧化应激的研究进展.方法:从氧化应激的概念、胰岛β细胞发生氧化应激的因素、氧化应激损伤胰岛β细胞的机制三方面来探讨T2DM胰岛β细胞氧化应激的研究进展.结果:T2DM胰岛β细胞内含有较低水平的抗氧化系统, 在高糖、高脂等作用下,容易发生氧化应激反应, 氧化应激通过多种途径损伤胰岛β细胞, 使胰岛素合成分泌减少,加重T2DM.结论:T2DM胰岛β细胞容易发生氧化应激是多因素多途径共同作用的复杂过程,积极应用抗氧化剂治疗,能保护胰岛β细胞功能,预防和治疗T2DM的发生与发展.

  16. A guide to 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, J; Jakob, F J

    2001-01-22

    17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSD) are pivotal in controlling the biological potency of steroid hormones by catalyzing oxidation or reduction at position 17. Several 17beta-HSDs may as well metabolize further substrates including alcohols, bile acids, fatty acids and retinols. This review summarizes recent progress in the field of 17beta-HSD research provides an update of nomenclature. PMID:11165003

  17. Soft x-ray tomography on tokamaks using flux coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of inverting line integrated data using coordinates, which are adapted to problems arising from Hamiltonian flows, are presented. They are exemplified for measurements of soft x-rays on tokamaks with widely arbitrary poloidal cross section. Boundary conditions can be met and cause fewer 'ghosts' for most of the present day tokamaks. The soft x-ray measurements are then used to improve the flux function Ψ as obtained from codes using magnetic measurements as input. We investigate oscillatory phenomena such as sawtooth crash precursors on tokamaks by decomposing the profiles into space-like eigenfunctions and their time dependencies. (author)

  18. Ions Measurement at the Edge of HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Bili; Wang Enyao; Gao wei; Wan Baonian; Li Jiangang

    2005-01-01

    A reliable method of measuring ions and ion temperature in tokamak plasma is necessary, for which an omegatron-like instrument has been developed on the HT-7 tokamak. The basic layout of the omegatron-like instrument is shown in this article. The measurement of working gas ion has been performed in the last experimental campaign on HT-7 tokamak. The relations among ion current, the electron repeller voltage and trap voltage have been investigated. This omegatron-like instrument has also provided the edge-plasma ion temperature.

  19. A systems assessment of the five Starlite tokamak power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, C.G.

    1996-07-01

    The ARIES team has assessed the power-plant attractiveness of the following five tokamak physics regimes: (1) steady state, first stability regime; (2) pulsed, first stability regime; (3) steady state, second stability regime; (4) steady state, reversed shear; and (5) steady state, low aspect ratio. Cost-based systems analysis of these five tokamak physics regimes suggests that an electric power plant based upon a reversed-shear tokamak is significantly more economical than one based on any of the other four physics regimes. Details of this comparative systems analysis are described herein.

  20. Nonneutralized charge effects on tokamak edge magnetohydrodynamic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin; Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Shi, T. H.; Wang, H. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the large ion orbits, excessive electrons can accumulate at tokamak edge. We find that the nonneutralized electrons at tokamak edge can contribute an electric compressive stress in the direction parallel to magnetic field by their mutual repulsive force. By extending the Chew-Goldburger-Low theory (Chew et al., 1956 [13]), it is shown that this newly recognized compressive stress can significantly change the plasma average magnetic well, so that a stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes in the pedestal can result. This linear stability regime helps to explain why in certain parameter regimes the tokamak high confinement can be rather quiet as observed experimentally.

  1. Quantitative analysis of economy and environmental compatibility of tokamak fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current worth of the economy, energy gain, carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, and waste disposal of tokamak fusion power reactors are quantitatively evaluated compared with other current Japanese energy sources. The following results were obtained : (1) CO2 emission intensity (i.e., CO2 emission per unit kWh) from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Engineering Design Activity (ITER-EDA) scale power reactor (referred to here as the ITER-like reactor), whose physics performance is conventional, can be 25% lower than that of a common household photovoltaic. The energy gain of the ITER-like reactor is comparable to that of a coalfired power plant. The cost is four times higher than that of a fission reactor; however, note that this cost evaluation is based upon FOAK (first-of-a-kind) cost evaluation. (2) The CO2 emission intensities and energy gains of RS and ST reactors are comparable to those of fission reactors. (3) Radioactive waste disposal volume for the ITER-like reactor is similar to that for a fission reactor. We believe that continuing tokamak fusion research and development is worthy, since tokamak fusion is an environmentally compatible future technology. (author)

  2. Progress toward steady-state tokamak operation exploiting the high bootstrap current fraction regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Q. L.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gong, X. Z.; Holcomb, C. T.; Lao, L. L.; McKee, G. R.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Qian, J. P.; Solomon, W. M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Holland, C.; Guo, W. F.; Ding, S. Y.; Pan, C. K.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have increased the normalized fusion performance of the high bootstrap current fraction tokamak regime toward reactor-relevant steady state operation. The experiments, conducted by a joint team of researchers from the DIII-D and EAST tokamaks, developed a fully noninductive scenario that could be extended on EAST to a demonstration of long pulse steady-state tokamak operation. Improved understanding of scenario stability has led to the achievement of very high values of βp and βN , despite strong internal transport barriers. Good confinement has been achieved with reduced toroidal rotation. These high βp plasmas challenge the energy transport understanding, especially in the electron energy channel. A new turbulent transport model, named TGLF-SAT1, has been developed which improves the transport prediction. Experiments extending results to long pulse on EAST, based on the physics basis developed at DIII-D, have been conducted. More investigations will be carried out on EAST with more additional auxiliary power to come online in the near term.

  3. Advanced Tokamak Regimes in Alcator C-Mod with Lower Hybrid Current Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R.; Bonoli, P.; Gwinn, D.; Hutchinson, I.; Porkolab, M.; Ramos, J.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.; Wilson, R.

    1999-11-01

    Alcator C-Mod has been proposed as a test-bed for developing advanced tokamak scenarios owing to its strong shaping, relatively long pulse length capability at moderate field, e.g. t ~ L/R at B = 5T and T_eo ~ 7keV, and the availability of strong ICRF heating. We plan to exploit this capability by installing up to 4 MW RF power at 4.6 GHz for efficient off-axis current drive by lower hybrid waves. By launching LH waves with a grill whose n_xx spectrum can be dynamically controlled over the range 2 2. Such reversed or nearly zero shear regimes have already been proposed as the basis of an advanced tokamak burning-plasma experiment-ATBX (M. Porkolab et al, IAEA-CN-69/FTP/13, IAEA,Yokohama 1998.), and could provide the basis for a demonstration power reactor. Theoretical and experimental basis for this advanced tokamak research program on C-Mod, including design of the lower hybrid coupler, its spectrum and current drive capabilities will be presented.

  4. Plasma diagnostics at Aditya Tokamak by two views visible light tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, Mayank, E-mail: mggm1982@gmail.com [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Programme, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Munshi, Prabhat [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Programme, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Saxena, Anupam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research (India)

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved algorithm works equally well for central as well as for peripherical plasma regions. • Entropy optimized smoothening parameters eliminate user dependencies. • Real time fusion grade plasma diagnostics images. - Abstract: This visible light computerized tomography exercise is a part of a project to establish an auxiliary imaging method to assist other imaging facilities at the Institute of Plasma Research (IPR), India. Space constraints around Aditya Tokamak allow only two orthogonal ports. Each port has one detector array (64 sensors) sensitive to the visual spectrum emitted by H{sub α} emission. The objective here is to report the developments on limited view tomography for hot plasma imaging. Spatially filtered entropy maximization algorithm with non-uniform discretization grids is employed. Estimation of unique kernel smoothening parameters (mask size and exponent factor) depends on entropy function and projection data. It removes requirement of any arbitrary/user-based decision for choosing a regularization factor thus minimizes the chance for biasedness or errors. Synthetic projection data is used to analyse the performance of this modification. The error band in the process of recovery remains under acceptable level (less than 15%) irrespective of the origin of the emissions from the core. Reconstructed hot plasma images/profiles from Aditya Tokamak are shown. These profiles may improve the current understanding about (a) plasma–wall interaction or edge plasma turbulence, (b) control and generation of plasma and (c) correlations between theoretical and engineering advancements in Tokamak reactors.

  5. Research on beta-sitosterol' s anti-tumor effect%β-谷甾醇抗肿瘤作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 归绥琪

    2009-01-01

    Beta-sitoeterol have been proposed to offer protection against cancer. Beta-sitosterol could inhibit cancer initiation, progression and induce differentiation. Beta-sitostorol could inhibit tumor growth through stimulating sphingolipid cycle, promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, antioxidant capacity and mod-ulating immune system. Beta-sitosterol could be a potential chemopreventive agent for cancer.%β-谷甾醇对肿瘤的发生发展有防治作用,可抑制肿瘤的发生、发展并诱导肿瘤细胞的分化,对肿瘤细胞的抗增殖活性与激活鞘磷脂循环、细胞周期阻滞、刺激肿瘤细胞凋亡、抗氧化活性和免疫功能的调节等相关,β-谷甾醇可作为有效的化学预防药物治疗肿瘤.

  6. Tokamak Plasmas : Internal magnetic field measurement in tokamak plasmas using a Zeeman polarimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Jagadeeshwari; J Govindarajan

    2000-11-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the poloidal magnetic field profile closely depends on the current density profile. We can deduce the internal magnetic field from the analysis of circular polarization of the spectral lines emitted by the plasma. The theory of the measurement and a detailed design of the Zeeman polarimeter constructed to measure the poloidal field profile in the ADITYA tokamak are presented. The Fabry-Perot which we have employed in our design, with photodiode arrays followed by lock-in detection of the polarization signal, allows the measurement of the fractional circular polarization. In this system He-II line with wavelength 4686 Å is adopted as the monitoring spectral line. The line emission used in the present measurement is not well localized in the plasma, necessiating the use of a spatial inversion procedure to obtain the local values of the field.

  7. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  8. Tokamak Plasmas : Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya; N R Ray

    2000-11-01

    Edge plasma properties in a tokamak is an interesting subject of study from the view point of confinement and stability of tokamak plasma. The edge plasma of SINP-tokamak has been investigated using specially designed Langmuir probes. We have observed a poloidal asymmetry of floating potentials, particularly the top-bottom floating potential differences are quite noticeable, which in turn produces a vertical electric field (v). This v remains throughout the discharge but changes its direction at certain point of time which seems to depend on applied vertical magnetic field v).

  9. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak; Reconstrucao do equilibrio no tokamak TCA/BR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-12-31

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author) 68 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Systematic Risk on Istanbul Stock Exchange: Traditional Beta Coefficient Versus Downside Beta Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülfen TUNA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test the validity of Downside Capital Asset Pricing Model (D-CAPM on the ISE. At the same time, the explanatory power of CAPM's traditional beta and D-CAPM's downside beta on the changes in the average return values are examined comparatively. In this context, the monthly data for seventy three stocks that are continuously traded on the ISE for the period 1991-2009 is used. Regression analysis is applied in this study. The research results have shown that D-CAPM is valid on the ISE. In addition, it is obtained that the power of downside beta coefficient is higher than traditional beta coefficient on explaining the return changes. Therefore, it can be said that the downside beta is superior to traditional beta in the ISE for chosen period.

  11. Development of tokamak reactor system analysis code NEW-TORSAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Masao; Ida, Toshio; Nishikawa, Masana; Kameari, Akihisa; Nishio, Satoshi; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1987-07-01

    A systems analysis code named NEW-TORSAC (TOkamak Reactor Systems Analysis Code) has been developed by modifying the TORSAC which had been already developed by us. The NEW-TORSAC is available for tokamak reactor designs and evaluations from experimental machines to commercial reactor plants. It has functions to design tokamaks automatically from plasma parameter setting to determining configurations of reactor equipments and calculating main characteristics parameters of auxiliary systems and the capital costs. In the case of analyzing tokamak reactor plants, the code can calculate busbar energy costs. In addition to numerical output, some output of this code such as a reactor configuration, plasma equilibrium, electro-magnetic forces, etc., are graphically displayed. The code has been successfully applied to the scoping studies of the next generation machines and commercial reactor plants.

  12. Engineering development aspects of the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HL-2A tokamak (design values: major radius 1.65 m, minor radius 0.4 m, plasma current 0.48 MA and toroidal field 2.8 T) is the first tokamak with an operating divertor in China. It is characterized by a large closed divertor chamber. This unique feature will make significant contributions to enhance our understanding of complex divertor plasma physics and to help validating divertor physics modelings. The engineering design, development, testing and commissioning of the HL-2A tokamak are described in this paper. Preliminary results show that the HL-2A tokamak has been successfully operated in the divertor configuration. The major parameters: plasma current Ip=168 kA, toroidal field BT=1.4 T, plasma line average density ne=1.7 x 1019 m-3, limiting vacuum pv=4.6 x 10-6 Pa, were achieved at the end of 2003. (authors)

  13. HYFIRE: a tokamak- high-temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in a conceptual design study of a commercial nuclear power system which utilizes high-temperature electrolysis to produce synthetic fuels. The system is called HYFIRE. It includes a tokamak fusion power reactor supplying electrical and thermal energy to an array of electrolytes. The electrolytes produce hydrogen which can be used either directly as a fuel or in the production of hydrocarbons. The purpose of the study is to provide a mechanism for DOE to further assess the commercial potential of fusion using a tokamak reactor to produce synthetic fuel. The HYFIRE design is based on the tokamak commercial power reactor, STARFIRE. STARFIRE uses the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The HYFIRE study assumes the plasma shape and characteristics of STARFIRE study but uses a different blanket design. This study is particularly interested in the possibility of using the STARFIRE tokamak in the production of synthetic fuels

  14. Toroidicity Dependence of Tokamak Edge Safety Factor and Shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    In large tokamak device and reactor designs, the relationship between the toroidal current and the edge safety factor is very important because this will determine the eventual device or reactor size according to MHD stability requirements. In many preliminary

  15. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: status of FEDC studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program comprise the report. The technical areas discussed are the mechanical configuration status, magnet analysis, stress analysis, cooling between burns, TF coil joint, and facility/device layout options. (WRF)

  16. First Trial of Real-time Poloidal Beta Control in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyunsun; Hahn, S. H.; Bak, J. G.; Walker, M. L.; Woo, M. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Bae, Y. S.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Sustaining the plasma in a stable and a high performance condition is one of the important control issues for future steady state tokamaks. In the 2014 KSTAR campaign, we have developed a real-time poloidal beta (βp) control technique and carried out preliminary experiments to identify its feasibility. In the control system, the βp is calculated in real time using the measured diamagnetic loop signal (DLM03) with coil pickup corrections, and compared with the target value leading to the change of the neutral beam (NB) heating power using a feedback PID control algorithm. To match the required power of NB which is operated with constant voltage, the duty cycles of the modulation were adjusted as the ratio of the required power to the maximum achievable one. This paper will present the overall procedures of the βp control, the βp estimation process implemented in the plasma control system, and the analysis on the preliminary experimental results. This work is supported by the KSTAR research project funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning of Korea.

  17. NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT IN A TOKAMAK WITH ELECTRIC SHEAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Neoclassical transport theory for a tokamak in the presence of a large radial electric field with shear is developed using Hamiltonian formalism. Diffusion coefficients are derived in both the plateau and banana regimes where the squeezing factor in coefficients can greatly affect diffusion at the plasma edge. Rotation speeds are calculated in the scrape-off region. They are in good agreement with the measurements on the TdeV tokamak.

  18. An emerging understanding of H-mode discharges in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groebner, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    A remarkable degree of consistency of experimental results from tokamaks throughout the world has developed with regard to the phenomenology of the transition from L-mode to H-mode confinement in tokamaks. The transition is initiated in a narrow layer at the plasma periphery where density fluctuations are suppressed and steep gradients of temperature and density form in a region with large first and second radial derivatives in the [upsilon][sub E][sup [yields

  19. Technique for plasma filament stabilization in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is related to the field of automatic control of thermonuclear device processes and can be used in control systems of plasma filament stabilization by large radius in tokamak type thermolnuclear devices. The economic effect of the suggested technique is caused by improvement of stabilization of optimum (from the viewpoint of the decrease of plasma energy losses) plasma filament position in the tokamak-reactor which results in the decrease of power of additional plasma heating systems

  20. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinak, M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA))

    1988-10-07

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs.

  1. Development of tokamak reactor systems analysis code 'TORSAC'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes Tokamak Reactor Systems Analysis Code ''TORSAC'' which has been developed in order to assess the impact of the design choises on reactor systems and to improve tokamak designs in wide parameter range. This computer code has following functions. (1) Systematic sensitivity analysis for a set of given design parameters, (2) Cost calculation of a new reactor concept designed automatically as a result of systematic sensitivity analysis. (author)

  2. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs

  3. Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) with the baseline liquid nitrogen cooling system was analyzed. On the basis of this analysis and present knowledge of the two-phase heat transfer, the current baseline CIT can be cooled down in about 1.5 h. An extensive heat transfer test program is recommended to reduce uncertainty in the heat transfer performance and to explore methods for minimizing the cooldown time. An alternate CIT cooldown system is described which uses a pressurized gaseous helium coolant in a closed-loop system. It is shown analytically that this system will cool down the CIT well within 1 h. Confidence in this analysis is sufficiently high that a heat transfer test program would not be necessary. The added cost of this alternate system is estimated to be about $5.3 million. This helium cooling system represents a reasonable backup approach to liquid nitrogen cooling of the CIT. 3 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Beam-induced tensor pressure tokamak equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D-shaped tensor pressure tokamak equilibria induced by neutral-beam injection are computed. The beam pressure components are evaluated from the moments of a distribution function that is a solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in which the pitch-angle scattering operator is ignored. The level-psub(perpendicular) contours undergo a significant shift away from the outer edge of the device with respect to the flux surfaces for perpendicular beam injection into broad-pressure-profile equilibria. The psub(parallel) contours undergo a somewhat smaller inward shift with respect to the flux surfaces for both parallel and perpendicular injection into broad-pressure-profile equilibria. For peaked-pressure-profile equilibria, the level pressure contours nearly co-incide with the flux surfaces. (author)

  5. Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeton, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) with the baseline liquid nitrogen cooling system was analyzed. On the basis of this analysis and present knowledge of the two-phase heat transfer, the current baseline CIT can be cooled down in about 1.5 h. An extensive heat transfer test program is recommended to reduce uncertainty in the heat transfer performance and to explore methods for minimizing the cooldown time. An alternate CIT cooldown system is described which uses a pressurized gaseous helium coolant in a closed-loop system. It is shown analytically that this system will cool down the CIT well within 1 h. Confidence in this analysis is sufficiently high that a heat transfer test program would not be necessary. The added cost of this alternate system is estimated to be about $5.3 million. This helium cooling system represents a reasonable backup approach to liquid nitrogen cooling of the CIT. 3 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Radiation power measurement on the ADITYA tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Jha, Ratneshwar; Gopalkrishana, M. V.; Doshi, Kalpesh; Rathod, Vipal; Hansalia, Chandresh; ADITYA Team

    2009-08-01

    The radiation power loss and its variation with plasma density and current are studied in the ADITYA tokamak. The radiation power loss varies from 20% to 40% of the input power for different discharges. The radiation fraction decreases with increasing plasma current but it increases with increasing line-averaged central density. The radiated power behavior has also been studied in discharges with short pulses of molecular beam injection (MBI) and gas puff (GP). The increase in radiation loss is limited to the edge chords in the case of GP, but it extends to the core region for MBI fueling. The MBI seems to indicate reduction in the edge recycling. It is observed that during the density limit disruption, the radiated power loss is more in the current quench phase as compared with the thermal quench phase and comes mainly from the plasma edge.

  7. Passive runaway electron suppression in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runaway electrons created in disruptions pose a serious problem for tokamaks with large current. It would be desirable to have a runaway electron suppression method which is passive, i.e., a method that does not rely on an uncertain disruption prediction system. One option is to let the large electric field inherent in the disruption drive helical currents in the wall. This would create ergodic regions in the plasma and increase the runaway losses. Whether these regions appear at a suitable time and place to affect the formation of the runaway beam depends on disruption parameters, such as electron temperature and density. We find that it is difficult to ergodize the central plasma before a beam of runaway current has formed. However, the ergodic outer region will make the Ohmic current profile contract, which can lead to instabilities that yield large runaway electron losses

  8. Ignition probabilities for Compact Ignition Tokamak designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global power balance code employing Monte Carlo techniques had been developed to study the ''probability of ignition'' and has been applied to several different configurations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Probability distributions for the critical physics parameters in the code were estimated using existing experimental data. This included a statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in extrapolating the energy confinement time. A substantial probability of ignition is predicted for CIT if peaked density profiles can be achieved or if one of the two higher plasma current configurations is employed. In other cases, values of the energy multiplication factor Q of order 10 are generally obtained. The Ignitor-U and ARIES designs are also examined briefly. Comparisons of our empirically based confinement assumptions with two theory-based transport models yield conflicting results. 41 refs., 11 figs

  9. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  10. Sliding Mode Control of a Tokamak Transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J. A.; Coda, S.; Felici, F.; Moret, J. M.; Paley, J.; Sevillano, G.; Garrido, I.; Le, H. B.

    2012-06-08

    A novel inductive control system for a tokamak transformer is described. The system uses the flux change provided by the transformer primary coil to control the electric current and the internal inductance of the secondary plasma circuit load. The internal inductance control is used to regulate the slow flux penetration in the highly conductive plasma due to the skin effect, providing first-order control over the shape of the plasma current density profile. Inferred loop voltages at specific locations inside the plasma are included in a state feedback structure to improve controller performance. Experimental tests have shown that the plasma internal inductance can be controlled inductively for a whole pulse starting just 30ms after plasma breakdown. The details of the control system design are presented, including the transformer model, observer algorithms and controller design. (Author) 67 refs.

  11. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed

  12. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  13. Safety factor profile control in a tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Bribiesca Argomedo, Federico; Prieur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak uses Lyapunov techniques to address a challenging problem for which even the simplest physically relevant models are represented by nonlinear, time-dependent, partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because of the  spatiotemporal dynamics of transport phenomena (magnetic flux, heat, densities, etc.) in the anisotropic plasma medium. Robustness considerations are ubiquitous in the analysis and control design since direct measurements on the magnetic flux are impossible (its estimation relies on virtual sensors) and large uncertainties remain in the coupling between the plasma particles and the radio-frequency waves (distributed inputs). The Brief begins with a presentation of the reference dynamical model and continues by developing a Lyapunov function for the discretized system (in a polytopic linear-parameter-varying formulation). The limitations of this finite-dimensional approach motivate new developments in the infinite-dimensional framework. The t...

  14. The Procedure for Assembling the EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Songtao

    2005-01-01

    Due to the complicated constitution and high precision requirements of the EAST superconducting tokamak, a meticulous assembling procedure and measurement scheme must be established. The big size and mass of the EAST machine's components and complicated configuration with tight installation tolerances call for a highly careful assembling procedure. The assembling procedure consists of three main sub-procedures for the assembling of the base, of the tori of the VV, the vacuum vessel TS and the TF, and of the peripheral parts respectively. Before the assembly, a reference framework has been set up by means of an industrial measurement system with reference fiducial targets fixed on the wall of the test hall. In this paper, the assembling procedure is described in detail, the survey control system of the assembly is discussed, and progress in the assembly work is also reported.

  15. Natural Fueling of a Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Perkins, Francis W

    2009-01-01

    A natural fueling mechanism that helps to maintain the main core deuterium and tritium (DT) density profiles in a tokamak fusion reactor is discussed. In H-mode plasmas dominated by ion- temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, cold DT ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. This mechanism is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of ITG turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. Fueling using shallow pellet injection or supersonic gas jets is augmented by an inward pinch of could DT fuel. The natural fueling mechanism is demonstrated using the three-dimensional toroidal electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM and is analyzed using quasilinear theory. Profiles similar to those used for conservative ITER transport modeling that have a completely flat density profile are examined and it is found that natural fueling actually reduces the linear growth rates and energy transport.

  16. Interactions of tokamak plasma with solid walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions of tokamak fusion plasmas with solid walls of the devices were investigated on special model systems. The elastic recoil detection method was used for the determination of absolute hydrogen concentration. For the calibration of the method the scattering cross sections were measured in large ranges of scattering angle and energy. The erosion and deformation of wall surfaces were investigated by reemission of accelerated He ions. Theoretical models were developed to describe the surface undulation discovered earlier, caused by large dose He irradiation. The surface sputtering and segregation were investigated by nuclear methods and the mechanism of sputtering was simulated by computer. The surface deformation and gas reemission of Al surfaces were analyzed by Ar implementation and heat treatment. (D.Gy.) 6 figs

  17. Real time analysis of tokamak discharge parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques used in implementing two applications of real time analysis of data from the DIII-D tokamak are described. These tasks, which are demanding in both the speed of data acquisition and the speed of computation, execute on hardware capable of acquiring 40 million data samples per second and executing 80 million floating point operations per second. In the first case, a feedback control algorithm executing at a 10 kHz cycle frequency is used to specify the current in the poloidal field coils in order to control the discharge shape. In the second, fast Fourier transforms of Mirnov probe data are used to find the amplitude and frequency of each of eight toroidal mode numbers as a function of time during the discharge. Data sampled continuously at 500 kHz are used to produce results at 2 msec intervals

  18. FRESCO: fusion reactor simulation code for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the dynamics of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion Reactor Simulation Code) has been developed at the Department of Technical Physics of Helsinki University of Technology. The FRESCO code is based on zero-dimensional particle and power balance equations averaged over prescribed plasma profiles. In the report the data structure of the FRESCO code is described, including the description of the COMMON statements, program input, and program output. The general structure of the code is described, including the description of subprograms and functions. The physical model used and examples of the code performance are also included in the report. (121 tabs.) (author)

  19. Pumped limiter results on TFR Tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pump limiter experiments are carried out in the TFR Tokamak. The pump limiter is located in the outer part of the torus, its double- throat head is made of graphite tiles and it is pumped by a 2000 ls-1 titanium sublimation pump. The first attempts showed that the exhaust efficiency of this pump limiter was low (ε = 1.5% of the total plasma particle efflux). To improve these results, a new limiter head with a single longer throat has been built; particles were better trapped and the pumping provided an important decrease of the recycling coefficient. Geometric features mainly explain the increase by a factor 3.5 of the exhaust efficiency (ε = 5.5%). Ion temperature of the order of a few eV has been deduced from Doppler broadening measurements at the neutralizer plate of the pump limiter

  20. Next tokamak design. Swimming pool type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to relieve the difficulties of repair and maintenance and to make the reactor size compact, a concept of swimming pool type reactor which is installed in a waterpool has been proposed. A design study of the concept as the Next Tokamak has been carried out with the following major parameters. The reactor has a double null poloidal divertor and blanket with tritium breeding ratio of >1.0, fusion power 420 MW, major radius 5.3 m, plasma radius 1.1 m, Bt on axis 5.2 T, plasma current 3.9 MA. The design study covers the reactor overall systems including reactor structure, reactor cooling system, repair and maintenance, reactor building, etc. As the result of this study the following conclusions were reached. The advantages over a conventional tokamak reactor are as follows: (1) The size of TF coil can be considerably reduced while retaining sufficient space for repair and maintenance because a solid shield is eliminated. (2) Since the distances between plasma and PF coils become small, the required capacity of electric power supply is reduced. (3) Technologies for the repair and maintenance are simplified and disassembling and reassembling of vacuum vessel can be done with realistic and credible remote handling technique. (4) The problem caused by radiation streaming can be considerably eased. (5) Radioactive waste disposal is reduced considerably because a solid shield is eliminated. (6) Because a vacuum vessel may be easily replaced in this concept, it will have a convenient flexibility for an experimental reactor. (7) Advantages of this concept can be also applied to a power reactor. Recently we started a new design of SPTR with slightly modified plasma parameters aiming for smaller-size reactor. In this paper the new design will be discussed briefly. (author)

  1. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of α(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, α particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. α particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central α density in a reactor. (author)

  2. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    The high confinement regime (H-mode) in a tokamak plasma displays a remarkable edge region. On a small spatial scale of 1-2 cm the properties of the plasma change significantly. Certain parameters vary 1-2 orders of magnitude in this region, called the pedestal. Currently, there is no complete understanding of how the pedestal forms or how it is sustained. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to the theoretical understanding of the pedestal and provide scalings towards larger machines, like ITER and DEMO. A pedestal database was built with data from different tokamaks: ASDEX Upgrade, DIIID and JET. The pedestal was characterized with the same method for all three machines. This gives the maximum value, gradient and width of the pedestal in n{sub e}, T{sub e} and T{sub i}. These quantities were analysed along with quantities derived from them, such as the pressure or the confinement time. For this purpose two parameter sets were used: normalized parameters (pressure {beta}, time {nu}{sub *}, length {rho}{sub *}, shape f{sub q}) and machine parameters (size a, magnetic field B{sub t}, plasma current I{sub p}, heating P). All results are dependent on the choice of the coordinate system: normalized poloidal flux {Psi}{sub N} and real space r/a. The most significant result, which was obtained with both parameter sets, shows a different scaling of the pedestal width for the electron temperature and the electron density. The presented scalings predict that in ITER and DEMO the temperature pedestal will be appreciably wider than the density pedestal. The pedestal top scaling for the pressure reveals differences between the electron and the ion pressure. In extrapolations this results in values for T{sub e,ped} of 4 keV (ITER) and 10 keV (DEMO), but significantly lower values for the ion temperature. A two-term method was applied to use the pedestal pressure to determine the pedestal contribution to the global confinement time {tau}{sub E}. The dependencies in the

  3. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

    2005-07-27

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

  4. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  5. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented

  6. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U.......S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  7. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically...... for US equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures. (2) A betting against beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low-beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns. (3) When funding constraints tighten......, the return of the BAB factor is low. (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one. (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  8. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross......-section of expected returns. Based on a novel highfrequency dataset of almost one-thousand individual stocks over two decades, we find that the two rough betas associated with intraday discontinuous and overnight returns entail significant risk premiums, while the intraday continuous beta is not priced in the cross......-section. An investment strategy that goes long stocks with high jump betas and short stocks with low jump betas produces significant average excess returns. These higher risk premiums for the discontinuous and overnight market betas remain significant after controlling for a long list of other firm characteristics...

  9. Study of heat fluxes on plasma facing components in a tokamak from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this thesis is the development of a method of computation of those heat loads from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography. The research was conducted on three issues arising in current tokamaks but also future ones like ITER: the measurement of temperature on reflecting walls, the determination of thermal properties for deposits observed on the surface of tokamak components and the development of a three-dimensional, non-linear computation of heat loads. A comparison of several means of pyrometry, monochromatic, bi-chromatic and photothermal, is performed on an experiment of temperature measurement. We show that this measurement is sensitive to temperature gradients on the observed area. Layers resulting from carbon deposition by the plasma on the surface of components are modeled through a field of equivalent thermal resistance, without thermal inertia. The field of this resistance is determined, for each measurement points, from a comparison of surface temperature from infrared thermographs with the result of a simulation, which is based on a mono-dimensional linear model of components. The spatial distribution of the deposit on the component surface is obtained. Finally, a three-dimensional and non-linear computation of fields of heat fluxes, based on a finite element method, is developed here. Exact geometries of the component are used. The sensitivity of the computed heat fluxes is discussed regarding the accuracy of the temperature measurements. This computation is applied to two-dimensional temperature measurements of the JET tokamak. Several components of this tokamak are modeled, such as tiles of the divertor, upper limiter and inner and outer poloidal limiters. The distribution of heat fluxes on the surface of these components is computed and studied along the two main tokamak directions, poloidal and toroidal. Toroidal symmetry of the heat loads from one tile to another is shown. The influence of measurements spatial resolution

  10. Diamagnetic measurements in the STOR-M tokamak by a flux loop system exterior to the vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembach, Dallas; Xiao Chijin; Dreval, Mykola; Hirose, Akira [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Diamagnetic measurements of poloidal beta have been performed in the STOR-M tokamak by a flux loop placed exterior to the vacuum chamber with compensation for the vacuum toroidal field using a nonenclosing coplanar coil, and vibrational compensation from auxiliary coils. It was found that in STOR-M conditions (20% toroidal magnetic field decay over discharge) there is significant influence on the diamagnetic flux measurements from strong residual signals, presumably from image currents being induced by the toroidal field coils, requiring further compensation. A blank (nonplasma) shot is used specifically to eliminate the residual component which is not proportional to the toroidal magnetic field. Data from normal Ohmic discharge operation is presented and calculations of poloidal beta from coil data ({beta}{sub {theta}}{approx}0.5) is found to be in reasonable agreement with the values of poloidal beta obtained from measurements of electron density and Spitzer temperature with neoclassical corrections for trapped electrons. Contributions present in the blank shot (residual) signal and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  11. Beta-lactamases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, C; Salvadó, M

    1997-09-01

    Re-emergence of infectious diseases caused by mycobacteria as well as the emergence of multiresistant strains of Mycobacterium has promoted the research on the use of beta-lactames in the treatment of such diseases. Mycobacteria produce beta-lactamases: M. tuberculosis produces a wide-spectrum beta-lactamase whose behaviour mimicks those of Gram-negative bacteria. M. kansasii produces also beta-lactamase which can be inhibited by clavulanic acid. An overview on beta-lactamases from both species is reported.

  12. Paradigm Changes in High Temperature Plasma Physics Research and Implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon K. Park

    2008-02-22

    Significant high temperature plasma research in both the magnetic and inertial confinement regimes led to the official launching of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project which is aimed at challenging controlled fusion power for human kind. In particular, such an endeavor originated from the fruitful research outcomes from the world wide magnetic confinement devices (primarily based on the Tokamak approach) mainly in advanced countries (US, EU, and Japan). In recent years, all new steady state capable Tokamak devices are operated and/or constructed in Asian countries and incidentally, the majority of the ITER consortium consists of Asian countries. This provides an opportunity to revisit the unresolved essential physics issues and/or extend the understanding of the transient physics to the required steady state operation so that ITER can benefit from these efforts. The core physics of a magnetically confined hot plasma has two essential components; plasma stability and cross-field energy transport physics. Complete understanding of these two areas is critical for the successful operation of ITER and perhaps, Demo reactor construction. In order to have stable high beta plasmas with a sufficiently long confinement time, the physics of an abrupt disruption and sudden deterioration of the energy transport must be understood and conquered. Physics issues associated with transient harmful MHD behavior and turbulence based energy transport are extremely complicated and theoretical understanding needs a clear validation and verification with a new research approach such as a multi-dimensional visualization.

  13. Remote maintenance concepts for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because deuterium-tritium fuel will be used in the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), remote handling technology is needed to carry out some maintenance operations on the machine. In keeping with the compact, low-cost nature of CIT, remote maintenance is provided only for systems with the highest probability of failure. Remote operations include removing, repairing (if feasible), and replacing such components as thermal protection tiles on the first wall, radio-frequency (rf) heating modules, and diagnostic modules. For maintenance inside the vacuum vessel, major pieces of equipment under development include an articulated boom manipulator with servomanipulators, an inspection manipulator, and special tooling. For maintenance outside the cryostat, remote equipment includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system, equipment for decontamination and hot cell activities, and for handling and packaging solid radioactive waste. The conceptual design phase of the CIT project is nearing completion; research and development activities in support of the project include demonstrations of remote maintenance operations on full-size partial mock-ups. 9 figs

  14. Upgraded data service system for HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Lian-Zheng; LUO Jia-Rong; WEI Pei-Jie; LI Gui-Ming; CHENG Ting; QI Na

    2005-01-01

    A data service system plays an indispensable role in HT-7 Tokamak experiment. Since the former system doesn't provide the function of timely data procession and analysis, and all client software are based on Windows, it can't fulfill virtual fusion laboratory for remote researchers. Therefore, a new system which is simplified by three kinds of data servers and one data analysis and visualization software tool has been developed. The data servers include a data acquisition server based on file system, an MDSplus server used as the central repository for analysis data, and a web server. Users who prefer the convenience of application that can be run in a Web Browser can easily access the experiment data without knowing X-Windows. In order to adjust instruments to control experiment the operators need to plot data duly as soon as they are gathered. To satisfy their requirement, an upgraded data analysis and visualization software GT-7 is developed. It not only makes 2D data visualization more efficient, but also it can be capable of processing, analyzing and displaying interactive 2D and 3D graph of raw, analyzed data by the format of ASCII, LZO and MDSplus.

  15. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study scoping report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-03-01

    This report presents the scoping studies performed as the initial part of the program to produce a conceptual design for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR). The EPR as considered in this study is to employ all systems necessary for significant electric power production at continuous high duty cycle operation; it is presently scheduled to be the final technological step before a Demonstration Reactor Plant (Demo). The scoping study tasks begin with an exploration and identification of principal problem areas and then concentrate on consideration and evaluation of alternate design choices for each of the following major systems: Plasma Engineering and Physics, Nuclear, Electromagnetics, Neutral Beam Injection, and Tritium Handling. In addition, consideration has been given to the integration of these systems and requirements arising out of their incorporation into an EPR. One intent of this study is to document the paths explored in search of the appropriate EPR characteristics. To satisfy this intent, the explorations are presented in chart form outlining possible options in key areas with extensive supporting footnotes. An important result of the scoping study has been the development and definition of an EPR reference design to serve as (1) a common focus for the continuing design study and (2) a guide for associated development programs. In addition, the study has identified research and development requirements essential to facilitate the successful conceptual design, construction, and operation of an EPR.

  16. Control of safety factor profile in infinite dimension tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing energy needs of the world population require the development, the control and the supply of new forms of energy. In this context, nuclear fusion is a track of extremely promising research. World project ITER is intended to prove the scientific and technical feasibility of nuclear fusion. One of the many key-goal is the control of the current profile spatial distribution in plasmas of tokamak, which is one of the main parameter for the stability and the performance of the experiments. The spatio-temporal evolution of this current is described by a set of nonlinear partial differential equations. In this document stabilization is proposed considering robust control of current profile spatial distribution in infinite dimension. Two approaches are proposed: the first one is based on sliding mode approach and the second one (of type proportional and proportional integral) is based on the Lyapunov functions in infinite dimension. The design of the control law is based on the 1D equation resistive diffusion of the magnetic flux. The control laws are calculated in infinite dimension without space discretization. (author)

  17. Polarimetric spectra analysis for tokamak pitch angle measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the internal magnetic field structures using conventional polarimetric approaches are considered extremely challenging in fusion-reactor environments whereas the information on current density profiles is essential to establish steady-state and advance operation scenarios in such reactor-relevant devices. Therefore, on ITER a hybrid system is proposed for the current density measurements that uses both polarimetry and spectral measurements. The spectrum-based approaches have been tested in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) during the past two plasma campaigns. As such, KSTAR is a test-bed for the proposed ITER hybrid system. Measurements in the plasma core are based on the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum of the neutral beam emission. For the edge profiles, the Zeeman effect (ZE) acting on the lithium emission spectrum of the newly installed (2013) Lithium-beam-diagnostic is exploited. The neutral beam emission spectra, complicated by the multi-ion-source beam injection, are successfully fitted making use of the data provided by the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) database package. This way pitch angle profiles could be retrieved from the beam emission spectra. With the same spectrometer/CCD hardware as on MSE, but with a different wavelength range and different lines of sight, the first ZE spectrum measurements have been made. The Zeeman splitting comparable to and greater than the instrumental broadening has been routinely detected at high toroidal field operations ( ∼ 3 Tesla)

  18. Real Time Equilibrium Reconstruction Algorithm in EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华忠; 罗家融; 黄勤超

    2004-01-01

    The EAST (HT-7U) superconducting tokamak is a national project of China on fusion research, with a capability of long-pulse (~ 1000 s) operation. In order to realize a longduration steady-state operation of EAST, some significant capability of real-time control is required. It would be very crucial to obtain the current profile parameters and the plasma shapes in real time by a flexible control system. As those discharge parameters cannot be directly measured,so a current profile consistent with the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium should be evaluated from external magnetic measurements, based on a linearized iterative least square method, which can meet the requirements of the measurements. The arithmetic that the EFIT (equilibrium fitting code) is used for reference will be given in this paper and the computational efforts are reduced by parametrizing the current profile linearly in terms of a number of physical parameters.In order to introduce this reconstruction algorithm clearly, the main hardware design will be listed also.

  19. Experimental studies of high energy X-ray emission and bootstrap current generation in high {beta}{sub p} lower hybrid driven plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.P.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Colborn, J.A.; Villasenor, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center]|[Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Research Lab. of Electronics

    1992-12-31

    High poloidal beta ({epsilon}{beta}{sub p}{approx}1) plasma equilibria have been produced by injecting lower-hybrid waves with both asymmetric (current drive) and symmetric (heating) spectra in the Versator II tokamak. At high {epsilon}{beta}{sub p} nearly the same plasma current was generated by the symmetric rf phasing as with the asymmetric phasing, with the loop voltage being zero in both cases. The current for symmetric injection could not be accounted for by either inductive or rf current drive, so we believe that bootstrap current generation is operative in the present experiment. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  1. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  2. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-22

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided.

  3. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  4. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    -looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  5. Importance of effects due to fusion α-particles for tokamak reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues related to the presence of fusion α-particles which are of importance for the design of a tokamak reactor are listed and shortly discussed. It is concluded that these issues, although to a large extent directly connected with the general problems of tokamak physics, require more attention to provide the information needed for designing a tokamak reactor. (orig.)

  6. Development of 3D ferromagnetic model of tokamak core with strong toroidal asymmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Ďuran, Ivan;

    2015-01-01

    Fully 3D model of strongly asymmetric tokamak core, based on boundary integral method approach (i.e. characterization of ferromagnet by its surface) is presented. The model is benchmarked on measurements on tokamak GOLEM, as well as compared to 2D axisymmetric core equivalent for this tokamak...

  7. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  8. Beta Beams for Precision Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Damjanovic, S; Payet, J; Chancé, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, V; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; Mezzetto, M; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Burt, G; Dexter, A; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Moro, R; De Rosa, G; Palladino, V

    2012-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have implications for the Standard Model of particle physics. The CERN Beta Beam has outstanding capabilities to contribute to precision measurements of the parameters governing neutrino oscillations. The FP7 collaboration EUROnu (2008-2012) is a design study that will review three facilities (Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make decisions on future European neutrino oscillation facilities. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron (anti)neutrinos by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a storage ring. Using existing machines and infrastructure is an advantage for the cost evaluation; however, this choice is also constraining the Beta Beams. Recent work to make the Beta Beam facility a solid option will be described: production of Beta Beam isotopes, the 60 GHz pulsed ECR source development, integratio...

  9. Fast bolometric measurements on the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Weisen, H.; Mlynar, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Llobet, X.; Marmillod, Ph.; Pochon, G. P.

    1999-12-01

    The design and first results are presented from a bolometric diagnostic with high temporal resolution recently installed on the TCV tokamak. The system consists of two pinhole cameras viewing the plasma from above and below at the same toroidal location. Each camera is equipped with an AXUV-16ELO linear array of 16 p-n junction photodiodes, characterized by a flat spectral sensitivity from ultraviolet to x-ray energies, a high temporal response (<0.5 μs), and insensitivity to low-energy neutral particles emitted by the plasma. This high temporal resolution allows the study of transient phenomena such as fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity hitherto inaccessible with standard bolometry. In the case of purely electromagnetic radiation, good agreement has been found when comparing results from the new diagnostic with those from a standard metal foil bolometer system. This comparison has also revealed that the contribution of neutrals to the foil bolometer measurements can be extremely important under certain operating conditions, precluding the application of tomographic techniques for reconstruction of the radiation distribution.

  10. Demonstration tokamak-power-plant study (DEMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of a Demonstration Tokamak Power Plant (DEMO) has been completed. The study's objective was to develop a conceptual design of a prototype reactor which would precede commercial units. Emphasis has been placed on defining and analyzing key design issues and R and D needs in five areas: noninductive current drivers, impurity control systems, tritium breeding blankets, radiation shielding, and reactor configuration and maintenance features. The noninductive current drive analysis surveyed a wide range of candidates and selected relativistic electron beams for the reference reactor. The impurity control analysis considered both a single-null poloidal divertor and a pumped limiter. A pumped limiter located at the outer midplane was selected for the reference design because of greater engineering simplicity. The blanket design activity focused on two concepts: a Li2O solid breeder with high pressure water cooling and a lead-rich Li-Pb eutectic liquid metal breeder (17Li-83Pb). The reference blanket concept is the Li2O option with a PCA structural material. The first wall concept is a beryllium-clad corrugated panel design. The radiation shielding effort concentrated on reducing the cost of bulk and penetration shielding; the relatively low-cost outborad shield is composed of concrete, B4C, lead, and FE 1422 structural material

  11. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The ofly potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting torgidal magnets. It is found that the two general classificatigls of protectign methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which aldow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed

  12. Diamagnetic measurements on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for determining the total thermal energy content of a magnetically confined plasma from a measurement of the plasma magnetization has been successfully implemented on the Alcator C tokamak. When a plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the kinetic pressure of the plasma is supported by an interaction between the confining magnetic field and drift currents which flow in the plasma. These drift currents induce an additional magnetic field which can be measured by means of appropriately positioned pickup coils. From a measurement of this magnetic field and of the confining magnetic field, one can calculate the spatially averaged plasma pressure, which is related to the thermal energy content of the plasma by the equation of state of the plasma. The theory on which this measurement is based is described in detail. The fields and currents which flow in the plasma are related to the confining magnetic field and the plasma pressure by requiring that the plasma be in equilibrium, i.e., by balancing the forces due to pressure gradients against those due to magnetic interactions. The apparatus used to make this measurement is described and some example data analyses are carried out

  13. Experimental results from the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments on TFTR have extended the operating regime of TFTR in both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2 T). Initial neutral-beam-heating experiments used up to 6.3 MW of deuterium beams. With the recent installation of two additional beamlines, the power has been increased up to 11 MW. A deuterium pellet injector was used to increase the central density to 2.5 x 1020 m-3 in high current discharges. At the opposite extreme, by operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ ∼ 0.8 MA) and low density (anti n/sub e/ ∼ 1 x 1019 m-3), high ion temperatures (9 +- 2 keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 105 m/s) have been achieved during injection. In addition, plasma compression experiments have demonstrated acceleration of beam ions from 82 keV to 150 keV, in accord with expectations. The wide operating range of TFTR, together with an extensive set of diagnostics and a flexible control system, has facilitated transport and scaling studies of both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The results of these confinement studies are presented

  14. Industry roles in the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is the first major fusion project opportunity in many years for US industry. Both the TPX management and the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy are committed to creating industry roles that are integrated throughout the project and that appropriately use the capabilities they offer. To address industry roles in TPX it is first appropriate to describe the collaborative national approach taken for this program. The Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) was asked by DOE to set up this national team structure, and the current senior management positions and delegated responsibilities reflect that approach. While reporting lines and delegated roles are clear in the organization chart for TPX, one way to view, it, different from that of the individuals responsible upward through this management structure for various elements of the project, is through institutional responsibilities to the senior management team. In this view the management team relies on several national laboratories, each using industry contracts for major sub-systems and components, to execute the project. These responsibilities for design and for contracting are listed, showing that all major contracts will come through three national laboratories, forming teams for their responsible activities

  15. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  16. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m2 and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m2. Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma

  17. Empirical particle transport model for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M.; Kuo-Petravic, G.

    1986-08-01

    A simple empirical particle transport model has been constructed with the purpose of gaining insight into the L- to H-mode transition in tokamaks. The aim was to construct the simplest possible model which would reproduce the measured density profiles in the L-regime, and also produce a qualitatively correct transition to the H-regime without having to assume a completely different transport mode for the bulk of the plasma. Rather than using completely ad hoc constructions for the particle diffusion coefficient, we assume D = 1/5 chi/sub total/, where chi/sub total/ approx. = chi/sub e/ is the thermal diffusivity, and then use the kappa/sub e/ = n/sub e/chi/sub e/ values derived from experiments. The observed temperature profiles are then automatically reproduced, but nontrivially, the correct density profiles are also obtained, for realistic fueling rates and profiles. Our conclusion is that it is sufficient to reduce the transport coefficients within a few centimeters of the surface to produce the H-mode behavior. An additional simple assumption, concerning the particle mean-free path, leads to a convective transport term which reverses sign a few centimeters inside the surface, as required by the H-mode density profiles.

  18. Physics aspects of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, D.; Bateman, G.; Houlberg, W.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.; Colestock, P.; Hughes, M.; Ignat, D.; Izzo, R.; Jardin, S.

    1986-11-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha-particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve the condition of ntau/sub E/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/ required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which improves the energy confinement, and provides a high level of ohmic heating. The present CIT design also has a gigh degree of elongation (k approx. 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and a pellet injector are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Since auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, 10 to 20 MW of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) is to be provided.

  19. Neoclassical transport of impurtities in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak plasmas are inherently comprised of multiple ion species. This is due to wall-bred impurities and, in future reactors, will result from fusion-born alpha particles. Relatively small concentrations of highly charged non-hydrogenic impurities can strongly influence plasma transport properties whenever n/sub I/e/sub I/2/n/sub H/e2 greater than or equal to (m/sub e//m/sub H/)/sup 1/2/. The determination of the complete neoclassical Onsager matrix for a toroidally confined multispecies plasma, which provides the linear relation between the surface averaged radial fluxes and the thermodynamic forces (i.e., gradients of density and temperature, and the parallel electric field), is reviewed. A closed set of one-dimensional moment equations is presented for the time evolution of thermodynamic and magnetic field quantities which results from collisional transport of the plasma and two dimensional motion of the magnetic flux surface geometry. The effects of neutral beam injection on the equilibrium and transport properties of a toroidal plasma are consistently included

  20. Control of the vertical instability in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of control of the vertical instability is formulated for a massless filamentary plasma. The massless approximation is justified by an examination of the role of inertia in the control problem. The system is solved using Laplace transform techniques. The linear system is studied to determine the stability boundaries. It is found that the system can be stabilized up to a critical decay index, which is predominantly a function of the geometry of the passive stabilizing shell. A second, smaller critical index, which is a function of the geometry of the control coils, determines the limit of stability in the absence of derivative gain in the control circuit. The system is also studied numerically in order to incorporate the non-linear effects of power supply dynamics. The power supply bandwidth requirement is determined by the open-loop growth rate of the instability. The system is studied for a number of control coil options which are available on the DIII-D tokamak. It is found that many of the coils will not provide adequate stabilization and that the use of inboard coils is advantageous in stabilizing the system up to the critical index. Experiments carried out on DIII-D confirm the appropriateness of the model. Using the results of the model study, we have stabilized DIII-D plasmas with decay indices up to 98% of the critical index. Measurement of the plasma vertical position is also discussed. (author) 27 figs., 6 refs

  1. Approximate Methods for Analyzing and Controlling Axisymmetric Instabilities of Elongated Tokamak Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Eric Randall

    Elongation and shaping of the tokamak plasma cross -section can allow increased beta and other favorable improvements. As the cross-section is made non-circular, however, the plasma can become unstable against axisymmetric motions, the most predominant one being a nearly uniform displacement in the direction of elongation. Without additional stabilizing mechanisms, this instability has growth rates typically (TURN)10('6)sec('-1). With passive and active feedback from external conductors, the plasma can be significantly slowed down and controlled. In this work, a mathematical formulism for analyzing the vertical instability is developed in which the external conductors are treated (or broken -up) as discrete coils. The circuit equations for the plasma induced currents can be included within the same mathematical framework. The plasma equation of motion and the circuit equations are combined and manipulated into a diagonalized form that can be graphically analyzed to determine the growth rate. An effective mode approximation (EMA) to the dispersion relation in introduced to simplify and approximate the growth rate of the more exact case. Controller voltage equations for active feedback are generalized to include position and velocity feedback and time delay. A position cut-off displacement is added to model finite spatial resolution of the position detectors or a dead-band voltage level. Stability criteria are studied for EMA and the more exact case. The time dependent responses for plasma position controller voltages, and currents are determined from the Laplace transformations. Slow responses are separated from the fast ones (dependent on plasma inertia) using a typical tokamak ordering approximation. The methods developed are applied in numerous examples for the machine geometry and plasma of TNS, an inside-D configuration plasma resembling JET, INTOR, or FED.

  2. TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) disruption scenarios and CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) vacuum vessel force evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, R.O.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code and the TWIR postprocessor code have been used to develop credible plasma disruption scenarios for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) in order to predict the evolution of forces on CIT conducting structures and to provide results required for detailed structural design analysis. The extreme values of net radial and vertical vacuum vessel (VV) forces were found to be F{sub R}={minus}12.0 MN/rad and F{sub Z}={minus}3.0 MN/rad, respectively, for the CIT 2.1-m, 11-MA design. Net VV force evolution was found to be altered significantly by two mechanisms not noted previously. The first, due to poloidal VV currents arising from increased plasma paramagnetism during thermal quench, reduces the magnitude of the extreme F{sub R} by 15-50{percent} and modifies the distribution of forces substantially. The second effect is that slower plasma current decay rates give more severe net vertical VV loads because the current decay occurs when the plasma has moved farther from midplane than is the case for faster decay rates. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. TSC [Tokamak Simulation Code] disruption scenarios and CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] vacuum vessel force evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Simulation Code and the TWIR postprocessor code have been used to develop credible plasma disruption scenarios for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) in order to predict the evolution of forces on CIT conducting structures and to provide results required for detailed structural design analysis. The extreme values of net radial and vertical vacuum vessel (VV) forces were found to be FR=-12.0 MN/rad and FZ=-3.0 MN/rad, respectively, for the CIT 2.1-m, 11-MA design. Net VV force evolution was found to be altered significantly by two mechanisms not noted previously. The first, due to poloidal VV currents arising from increased plasma paramagnetism during thermal quench, reduces the magnitude of the extreme FR by 15-50% and modifies the distribution of forces substantially. The second effect is that slower plasma current decay rates give more severe net vertical VV loads because the current decay occurs when the plasma has moved farther from midplane than is the case for faster decay rates. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Modelling and control of a tokamak plasma; Modelisation et commande d`un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremond, S.

    1995-10-18

    Vertically elongated tokamak plasmas, while attractive as regards Lawson criteria, are intrinsically instable. It is found that the open-loop instability dynamics is characterised by the relative value of two dimensionless parameters: the coefficient of inductive coupling between the vessel and the coils, and the coil damping efficiency on the plasma displacement relative to that of the vessel. Applications to Tore Supra -where the instability is due to the iron core attraction- and DIII-D are given. A counter-effect of the vessel, which temporarily reverses the effect of coil control on the plasma displacement, is seen when the inductive coupling is higher than the damping ratio. Precise control of the plasma boundary is necessary if plasma-wall interaction and/or coupling to heating antennas are to be monitored. A positional drift, of a few mm/s, which had been observed in the Tore Supra tokamak, is explained and corrected. A linear plasma shape response model is then derived from magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium calculation, and proved to be in good agreement with experimental data. An optimal control law is derived, which minimizes an integral quadratic criteria on tracking errors and energy expenditure. This scheme avoids compensating coil currents, and could render local plasma shaping more precise. (authors). 123 refs., 77 figs., 6 tabs., 4 annexes.

  5. Deposit of thin films for Tokamaks conditioning; Deposito de peliculas delgadas para acondicionar Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia A, R

    2006-07-01

    As a main objective of this work, we present some experimental results obtained from studying the process of extracting those impurities created by the interaction plasma with its vessel wall in the case of Novillo tokamak. Likewise, we describe the main cleaning and conditioning techniques applied to it, fundamentally that of glow discharge cleaning at a low electron temperature (<10 eV), both in noble and reactive gases, as well as the conditioning by thin film deposits of hydrogen rich amorphous carbon (carbonization) leading to a reduction in the plasma resistivity from 8.99 x 10{sup -6} to 4.5 x 10{sup -6} {omega}-m, thus taking the Z{sub ef} value from 3.46 to 2.07 which considerably improved the operational parameters of the machine. With a view to justifying the fact that controlled nuclear fusion is a feasible alternative for the energy demand that humanity will face in the future, we review in Chapter 1 some fundamentals of the energy production by nuclear fusion reactions while, in Chapter 2, we examine two relevant plasma wall interaction processes. Our experimental array used to produce both cleaning and intense plasma discharges is described in Chapter 3 along with the associated diagnostics equipment. Chapter 4 contains a description of the vessel conditioning techniques followed in the process. Finally, we report our results in Chapter 5 while, in Chapter 6, some conclusions and remarks are presented. It is widely known that tokamak impurities are generated mainly by the plasma-wall interaction, particularly in the presence of high potentials between the plasma sheath and the limiter or wall. Given that impurities affect most adversely the plasma behaviour, understanding and controlling the impurity extraction mechanisms is crucial for optimizing the cleaning and wall conditioning discharge processes. Our study of one impurity extraction mechanism for both low and high Z in Novillo tokamak was carried out though mass spectrometry, optical emission

  6. A control approach for plasma density in tokamak machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncagni, Luca, E-mail: luca.boncagni@enea.it [EURATOM – ENEA Fusion Association, Frascati Research Center, Division of Fusion Physics, Rome, Frascati (Italy); Pucci, Daniele; Piesco, F.; Zarfati, Emanuele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica, Automatica e Gestionale ' ' Antonio Ruberti' ' , Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Mazzitelli, G. [EURATOM – ENEA Fusion Association, Frascati Research Center, Division of Fusion Physics, Rome, Frascati (Italy); Monaco, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica, Automatica e Gestionale ' ' Antonio Ruberti' ' , Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We show a control approach for line plasma density in tokamak. •We show a control approach for pressure in a tokamak chamber. •We show experimental results using one valve. -- Abstract: In tokamak machines, chamber pre-fill is crucial to attain plasma breakdown, while plasma density control is instrumental for several tasks such as machine protection and achievement of desired plasma performances. This paper sets the principles of a new control strategy for attaining both chamber pre-fill and plasma density regulation. Assuming that the actuation mean is a piezoelectric valve driven by a varying voltage, the proposed control laws ensure convergence to reference values of chamber pressure during pre-fill, and of plasma density during plasma discharge. Experimental results at FTU are presented to discuss weaknesses and strengths of the proposed control strategy. The whole system has been implemented by using the MARTe framework [1].

  7. Hybrid Method for Tokamak MHD Equilibrium Configuration Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hong-Da; DONG Jia-Qi; ZHANG Jin-Hua; JIANG Hai-Bin

    2007-01-01

    A hybrid method for tokamak MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction is proposed and employed in the modified EFIT code. This method uses the free boundary tokamak equilibrium configuration reconstruction algorithm with one boundary point fixed. The results show that the position of the fixed point has explicit effects on the reconstructed divertor configurations. In particular, the separatrix of the reconstructed divertor configuration precisely passes the required position when the hybrid method is used in the reconstruction. The profiles of plasma parameters such as pressure and safety factor for reconstructed HL-2A tokamak configurations with the hybrid and the free boundary methods are compared. The possibility for applications of the method to swing the separatrix strike point on the divertor target plate is discussed.

  8. The Dynamic Mutation Characteristics of Thermonuclear Reaction in Tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability and bifurcations of multiple limit cycles for the physical model of thermonuclear reaction in Tokamak are investigated in this paper. The one-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau type perturbed diffusion equations for the density of the plasma and the radial electric field near the plasma edge in Tokamak are established. First, the equations are transformed to the average equations with the method of multiple scales and the average equations turn to be a Z2-symmetric perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. Then, with the bifurcations theory and method of detection function, the qualitative behavior of the unperturbed system and the number of the limit cycles of the perturbed system for certain groups of parameter are analyzed. At last, the stability of the limit cycles is studied and the physical meaning of Tokamak equations under these parameter groups is given.

  9. Material Surface Characteristics and Plasma Performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Matthew James

    The performance of a tokamak plasma and the characteristics of the surrounding plasma facing component (PFC) material surfaces strongly influence each other. Despite this relationship, tokamak plasma physics has historically been studied more thoroughly than PFC surface physics. The disparity is particularly evident in lithium PFC research: decades of experiments have examined the effect of lithium PFCs on plasma performance, but the understanding of the lithium surface itself is much less complete. This latter information is critical to identifying the mechanisms by which lithium PFCs affect plasma performance. This research focused on such plasma-surface interactions in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a spherical torus designed to accommodate solid or liquid lithium as the primary PFC. Surface analysis was accomplished via the novel Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic system. In a series of experiments on LTX, the MAPP x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) capabilities were used for in vacuo interrogation of PFC samples. This represented the first application of XPS and TDS for in situ surface analysis of tokamak PFCs. Surface analysis indicated that the thin (dLi ˜ 100nm) evaporative lithium PFC coatings in LTX were converted to Li2O due to oxidizing agents in both the residual vacuum and the PFC substrate. Conversion was rapid and nearly independent of PFC temperature, forming a majority Li2O surface within minutes and an entirely Li2O surface within hours. However, Li2O PFCs were still capable of retaining hydrogen and sequestering impurities until the Li2 O was further oxidized to LiOH, a process that took weeks. For hydrogen retention, Li2O PFCs retained H+ from LTX plasma discharges, but no LiH formation was observed. Instead, results implied that H+ was only weakly-bound, such that it almost completely outgassed as H 2 within minutes. For impurity sequestration, LTX plasma performance

  10. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the D3-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the D3-D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the heat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid . helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,000 1/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  11. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the DIII=D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the beat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,0001/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  12. Fractal structure of films deposited in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, V. P.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2007-04-01

    The surface of amorphous films deposited in the T-10 tokamak was studied in a scanning tunnel microscope. The surface relief on a scale from 10 nm to 100 μm showed a stochastic surface topography and revealed a hierarchy of grains. The observed variety of irregular structures of the films was studied within the framework of the concept of scale invariance using the methods of fractal geometry and statistical physics. The experimental probability density distribution functions of the surface height variations are close in shape to the Cauchy distribution. The stochastic surface topography of the films is characterized by a Hurst parameter of H = 0.68-0.85, which is evidence of a nontrivial self-similarity of the film structure. The fractal character and porous structure of deposited irregular films must be considered as an important issue related to the accumulation of tritium in the ITER project. The process of film growth on the surface of tokamak components exposed to plasma has been treated within the framework of the general concept of inhomogeneous surface growth. A strong turbulence of the edge plasma in tokamaks can give rise to fluctuations in the incident flux of particles, which leads to the growth of fractal films with grain dimensions ranging from nano-to micrometer scale. The shape of the surface of some films found in the T-10 tokamak has been interpreted using a model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The growth of films according to the discrete DLA model was simulated using statistics of fluctuations observed in a turbulent edge plasma of the T-10 tokamak. The modified DLA model reproduces well the main features of the surface of some films deposited in tokamaks.

  13. The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to short-range Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. State of the art and proposals for lines of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    dosimetry directly. The imperfections of the alternative approaches proposed so far should not discourage efforts. Protection against exposure to Auger and low-energy beta emitters would benefit from mechanistic studies, dedicated to the study of energy depositions of the radionuclides in various cellular structures, but also from radiotoxicological studies to define the relative biological effectiveness of the various Auger emitters used in medicine and of certain low-energy beta emitters, whose behaviour may depend greatly on their chemical form during intake. The scientific expertise, as well as the human and physical resources needed to conduct these studies, is available. They could be now mobilised into international low-dose research programmes, in order to ultimately improve the protection of people exposed to these specific radionuclides. (review)

  14. Simulation of EAST vertical displacement events by tokamak simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qinglai; Xiao, Bingjia; Guo, Yong; Liu, Lei; Xing, Zhe; Humphreys, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    Vertical instability is a potentially serious hazard for elongated plasma. In this paper, the tokamak simulation code (TSC) is used to simulate vertical displacement events (VDE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Key parameters from simulations, including plasma current, plasma shape and position, flux contours and magnetic measurements match experimental data well. The growth rates simulated by TSC are in good agreement with TokSys results. In addition to modeling the free drift, an EAST fast vertical control model enables TSC to simulate the course of VDE recovery. The trajectories of the plasma current center and control currents on internal coils (IC) fit experimental data well.

  15. Injection of intense ion beam into a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an experiment to investigate the direct injection of an intense ion beam into a tokamak by means of the polarization drift. Confinement of 100 keV ions in the UCI tokamak (r = 15 cm, R = 60 cm, B/sub T/ = 6 kG) requires operation with a plasma current of 56 kA corresponding to q (limiter) = 2. Trapped ions are to be detected by a charge-exchange analyzer. The present status of the experiment will be discussed

  16. Soft X-ray tomography on HT-6B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tomography method for deriving soft X-ray local emissivities on HT-6B tokamak, using one horizontal array of 23 soft X-ray detectors, is described. This method has been applied to study of sawtooth oscillation and large m = 1 oscillation on HT-6B tokamak. It has been found that the large m = 1 oscillation on soft X-ray signal is caused by the rotation of plasma column containing perturbation. The reconstructed images in the phase before a sawtooth crash have shown the hot plasma core move gradually toward one side, this is considered that as the increasing m=1 kink mode. (author). 5 refs, 7 figs

  17. Fusion-product transport in axisymmetric tokamaks: losses and thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy fusion-product losses from an axisymmetric tokamak plasma are studied. Prompt-escape loss fluxes (i.e. prior to slowing down) are calculated including the non-separable dependence of flux as a function of poloidal angle and local angle-of-incidence at the first wall. Fusion-product (fp) thermalization and heating are calculated assuming classical slowing down. The present analytical model describes fast ion orbits and their distribution function in realistic, high-β, non-circular tokamak equilibria. First-orbit losses, trapping effects, and slowing-down drifts are also treated

  18. Data processing system for spectroscopy at Novillo Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking as basis some proposed methodologies by software engineering it was designed and developed a data processing system coming from the diagnostic equipment by spectroscopy, for the study of plasma impurities, during the cleaning discharges. the data acquisition is realized through an electronic interface which communicates the computer with the spectroscopy system of Novillo Tokamak. The data were obtained starting from files type text and processed for their subsequently graphic presentation. For development of this system named PRODATN (Processing of Data for Spectroscopy in Novillo Tokamak) was used the LabVIEW graphic programming language. (Author)

  19. A CONCEPT FOR NEXT STEP ADVANCED TOKAMAK FUSION DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A concept is introduced for initiating the design study of a special class of tokamak,which has a magnetic confinement configuration intermediate between contemporary advanced tokamak and the recently established spherical torus (ST,also well known by the name "spherical tokamak").The leading design parameter in the present proposal is a dimensionless geometrical parameter, the machine aspect ratio A=R0/a0=2.0,where the parameters a0 and R0 denote,respectively,the plasma (equatorial) minor radius and the plasma major radius.The aim of this choice is to technologically and experimentally go beyond the aspect ratio frontier (R0/a0≈2.5) of present day tokamaks and enter a broad unexplored domain existing on the (a0,R0) parameter space in current international tokamak database,between the data region already moderately well covered by the advanced conventional tokamaks and the data region planned to be covered by STs.Plasma minor radius a0 has been chosen to be the second basic design parameter, and consequently,the plasma major radius R0 is regarded as a dependent design parameter.In the present concept,a nominal plasma minor radius a0=1.2m is adopted to be the principal design value,and smaller values of a0 can be used for auxiliary design purposes,to establish extensive database linkage with existing tokamaks.Plasma minor radius can also be adjusted by mechanical and/or electromagnetic means to smaller values during experiments,for making suitable data linkages to existing machines with higher aspect ratios and smaller plasma minor radii.The basic design parameters proposed enable the adaptation of several confinement techniques recently developed by STs,and thereby a specially arranged central-bore region inside the envisioned tokamak torus,with retrieved space in the direction of plasma minor radius,will be available for technological adjustments and maneuverings to facilitate implementation of engineering instrumentation and real time high

  20. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.