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Sample records for beta radiation part

  1. Nuclear energy - Reference beta-particle radiation - Part 2: Calibration fundamentals related to basic quantities characterizing the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISO 6980 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear energy - Reference beta-particle radiation: Part 1: Method of production; Part 2: Calibration fundamentals related to basic quantities characterizing the radiation field; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosimeters and determination of their response as a function of energy and angle of incidence. This part 2 of ISO 6980 specifies methods for the measurement of the directional absorbed-dose rate in a tissue-equivalent slab phantom in the ISO 6980 reference beta-particle radiation fields. The energy range of the beta-particle-emitting isotopes covered by these reference radiations is 0.066 to 3.54 MeV (maximum energy). Radiation energies outside this range are beyond the scope of this standard. While measurements in a reference geometry (depth of 0.07 mm at perpendicular incidence in a tissue-equivalent slab phantom) with a reference class extrapolation chamber are dealt with in detail, the use of other measurement systems and measurements in other geometries are also described, although in less detail. The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10) as used for area monitoring of strongly penetrating radiation, is not an appropriate quantity for any beta radiation, even for that penetrating a 10 mm thick layer of ICRU tissue (i.e. Emax > 2 MeV). If adequate protection is provided at 0.07 mm, only rarely will one be concerned with other depths, for example 3 mm. This document is geared towards organizations wishing to establish reference-class dosimetry capabilities for beta particles, and serves as a guide to the performance of dosimetry with the reference class extrapolation chamber for beta-particle dosimetry in other fields. Guidance is also provided on the statement of measurement uncertainties

  2. Records of Gamma Radiation from the Ground and Beta Radiation from Radioactive Debris in Sweden, 1950–1955. Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Sievert, Rolf M.

    2011-01-01

    The γ radiation of the ground from natural and artificial radioactivity, and the β radiation from radioactive debris in the atmosphere, have been recorded in Sweden since 1950. On several occasions increased radioactivity has been observed, sometimes producing effects by far exceeding the variations of the normal level. Observations are reported on the influence of rain and snowfall, with and without the effects caused by transportation of radioactive debris from nuclear explosions...

  3. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy {beta} radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were {beta} spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy {beta} radiation field a moderated spectrum from a {sup 14}C source (E{sub {beta}},{sub max} =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 {mu}m in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for {sup 147}Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for {beta} radiation from {sup 14}C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to {beta} radiation for radiation fields with maximum {beta} energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum {beta} energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a {beta} dose higher than about 10 {mu}Gy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the {beta}energy for E{sub {beta}},{sub max} values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs.

  4. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...

  5. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    , and 90Y, using data from a freely available database. Bremsstrahlung yields were calculated for 90Y shielded by lead, aluminium, or perspex. Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 90Y shielded by perspex was measured, and attenuation of spectrum by lead was calculated. Whole-body and finger doses to persons...... the outside of the primary shielding material. If suitable shielding is used and larger numbers of handlings are divided among several persons, then handling of beta emitters can be a safe procedure....

  6. 21 CFR 886.5100 - Ophthalmic beta radiation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic beta radiation source. 886.5100 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5100 Ophthalmic beta radiation source. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic beta radiation source is a device intended to apply...

  7. Angular dependence of thermoluminescent dosemeters for gamma and beta radiation in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma and beta radiation sources are widely used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Workers of these services receive dose of whole body and end due to the activities of the therapeutic dose preparation and testing, administration radiopharmaceuticals and obtention of image. Hands receive higher doses than other parts of the body. Currently the individual monitoring for the gamma radiation is already well established; However, the determination of the dose due to beta radiation still faces some difficulties. In this work it was studied the angular dependence of thermoluminescent dosemeters detectors in beams of gamma and beta radiation. Detectors of CaSO4:Dy + Teflon produced at IPEN - the Brazilian Institute for Nuclear and Energy Researches - were used. The angular dependence was studied varying the angle between 0 and 180 deg. The results obtained proved to be suitable for use in individual monitoring of workers exposed to beta and gamma radiation

  8. Measurement of dose equivalent with personal dosemeters and instrumentation of radiological protection in the new operative magnitudes ICRU, for external fields of radiation beta. Part IV. Survey of the angular response of instruments used in radiological protection in secondary patron fields of beta radiation (90Sr/90Y (1850 MBq and 74 MBq), 204TI (18.5 MBq) and 147Pm (518 MBq)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests type were made (type test) in the following commercial instrumentation commonly used in radiological protection: Geiger-Mueller Counters (FH40 FE), Plastic Scintillators (NE-BP/6/4A), Ionization Chambers (RO-5) and Proportional Counters (HP-100A; gas:P-10). With object of checking the possibility that these they can carry out the new operative unit ICRU, H' (0.07; α). The tests consisted on determining the energy and angular response of the detectors in secondary patron fields of beta radiation, for isotopes of 90Sr/90Y (1850 MBq and 74 MBq and 147Pm(518 MBq). The results show the inadequate of these commercial instruments for the realization of the H' operative unit (0.07; α) in beta external fields. Due to flaws in the design, construction and calibration of the instruments for this type of radiation fields (Author)

  9. Properties of a commercial extrapolation chamber in beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial extrapolation chamber (PTW, Germany) was tested in different beta radiation fields and its properties investigated. Its usefulness for beta radiation calibration and dosimetry was demonstrated. The Beta Secondary Standard setup of the IPEN calibration laboratory was utilized. This system, developed by the Physikalisch-Tecknische Bundesanstalt, Brunswick (Germany) and manufactured by Buchler and Co., consists of a source stand, a control unit with timer and four interchangeable beta sources: 90Sr-90Y (1850 and 74 MBq), 204Tl (18,5 MBq) ionization current detection. The variable volume ionization chamber of cylindrical form is provided with different collecting electrodes of tissue equivalent material and Mylar entrance windows of different thickesses

  10. T violation in radiative $\\beta$ decay and electric dipole moments

    CERN Document Server

    Dekens, W G

    2015-01-01

    In radiative $\\beta$ decay, $T$ violation can be studied through a spin-independent $T$-odd correlation. We consider contributions to this correlation by beyond the standard model (BSM) sources of $T$-violation, arising above the electroweak scale. At the same time such sources, parametrized by dimension-6 operators, can induce electric dipole moments (EDMs). As a consequence, the manifestations of the $T$-odd BSM physics in radiative $\\beta$ decay and EDMs are not independent. Here we exploit this connection to show that current EDM bounds already strongly constrain the spin-independent $T$-odd correlation in radiative $\\beta$ decay.

  11. History, biological effects, and dosimetry of beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a renewed interest in the dosimetry of beta radiation, particularly in the nuclear power industry. This interest is fueled by the current regulatory concern over exposure to hot particles. Hot particles are small, usually microscopic particles of fuel material or activated products produced as a result of neutron activation in a nuclear reactor. In addition, these particles are characterized as having very high specific activity and being composed primarily of beta-emitting radionuclides. Of primary interest in the dosimetry of hot particles is the absorbed dose and/or dose equivalent to the basal layer of the skin. Current federal regulations, as well as international and national radiation protection standards, do not address adequately the exposure of small areas of the skin from a single point source. In this paper, the history of beta dosimetry is reviewed with an emphasis on early beta-radiation exposures, such as those associated with fallout from nuclear weapons. Beta burns due to the black rain associated with the Japanese bombings and fallout studies at the Nevada test site and in the Pacific testing area provided much of the earliest data. Many survivors of the Japanese bombings were exposed to high-intensity beta radiation when they were caught in a rainout of material that had been sucked up into the fireball of the weapon

  12. Survey instrument response to beta radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available survey instruments do not have the beta measurement characteristics needed for accurate dose rate assessments. Such instruments have severe angular and energy dependence. In addition, beta measurements often require corrections for the source geometry response of the detector to permit accurate assessments. Studies were performed to characterize present instruments and to determine optimum characteristics for a field instrument. Results of the studies were used to specify and procure an instrument with improved characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of the studies and the design of the instrument

  13. Survey instrument response to beta radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available survey instruments do not have the beta measurement characteristics needed for accurate dose rate assessments. Such instruments have severe angular and energy dependence. In addition, beta measurements often require corrections for the source geometry response of the detector to permit accurate assessments. Studies were performed to characterize present instruments and to determine optimum characteristics for a field instrument. Results of the studies were used to specify and procure an instrument with improved characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of the studies and the design of the instrument. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted {beta}-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of {beta}/{gamma} radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  15. Eurados trial performance test for personal dosemeters for external beta radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.;

    2001-01-01

    On the initiative of the European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) action group 'Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation' a trial performance test for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters broadly representative of those in use in the EU was...... accomplished, This paper deals with the part of the performance test concerned with exposure to beta radiation. Fifteen dosimetric services participated with whole-body dosemeters intended to measure beta doses (H-p(0.07)) of which 13 used thermoluminescent (TL) detectors and two used photographic films. Eight...

  16. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams (37Cs and 60Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation (90Sr+9'0Y e 204Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  17. Regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) after ionizing radiation; Regulation der Glykogen Synthase Kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) nach ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, K.A.

    2006-12-15

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) phosphorylates the Mdm2 protein in the central domain. This phosphorylation is absolutely required for p53 degradation. Ionizing radiation inactivates GSK-3{beta} by phosphorylation at serine 9 and in consequence prevents Mdm2 mediated p53 degradation. During the work for my PhD I identified Akt/PKB as the kinase that phosphorylates GSK-3{beta} at serine 9 after ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation leads to phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at threonine 308 and serine 473. The PI3 Kinase inhibitor LY294002 completely abolished Akt/PKB serine 473 phosphorylation and prevented the induction of GSK-3{beta} serine 9 phosphorylation after ionizing radiation. Interestingly, the most significant activation of Akt/PKB after ionizing radiation occurred in the nucleus while cytoplasmic Akt/PKB was only weakly activated after radiation. By using siRNA, I showed that Akt1/PKBa, but not Akt2/PKB{beta}, is required for phosphorylation of GSK- 3{beta} at serine 9 after ionizing radiation. Phosphorylation and activation of Akt/PKB after ionizing radiation depends on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a member of the PI3 Kinase family, that is activated by free DNA ends. Both, in cells from SCID mice and after knockdown of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK by siRNA in osteosarcoma cells, phosphorylation of Akt/PKB at serine 473 and of GSK-3{beta} at serine 9 was completely abolished. Consistent with the principle that phosphorylation of GSK-3 at serine 9 contributes to p53 stabilization after radiation, the accumulation of p53 in response to ionizing radiation was largely prevented by downregulation of DNA-PK. From these results I conclude, that ionizing radiation induces a signaling cascade that leads to Akt1/PKBa activation mediated by DNA-PK dependent phosphorylation of serine 473. After activation Akt1/PKBa phosphorylates and inhibits GSK-3{beta} in the nucleus. The resulting hypophosphorylated form of Mdm2 protein is no longer

  18. Angular and energetic dependence of photographic dosemeters for beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photographic dosemeters (Agfa-Gevaert) used in personal monitoring at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil) are studied. The angular (between O and 1800) and energetic dependence in beta radiation exposures are discussed. The dosemeters are analysed with and without dosemeter - holder and retroscatter material. (M.A.C.)

  19. Ionization profile of beta radiation from radioactive cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for calculation of the ionization profile induced by beta radiation from a radioactive cloud is given. The procedure can be applied for high altitudes of the could (H 75 km) as well as for lower ones, when the thickness of the cloud must be taken into account. The final result is given in the analytical form. (author)

  20. Some methods for calibration and beta radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calibration of beta radiation was studied from the point of view of primary and secondary standardization, using extrapolation chambers and examining several effects. The properties of a commercial ionization chamber were investigated, and the possibility of its use in calibration and dosimetry of 90Sr- 90Y beta radiation was demonstrated . A secondary standard calibration facility was developed and the results obtained with this facility were compared with those obtained from a primary system directly or indirectly. Nearly energy independent response was obtained in.the range 60 keV to 0,8 MeV with this secondary standard. Two solid state techniques namely thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) were also used for beta dosimetry. Various characteristics like reproducibility, response with dose,energy dependence, etc. were studied for the materials: LiF, CaF2,Li2B4O7, Be O, CaSO4 and Al2O3. TL detectors of thickness 0,9 mm underestimate the dose 60 μm thick CaSO4:Tm embedded on a thin aluminium plate gave energy independent response behind skin layers of 7 mg/cm2. Mixed field of beta, X and gamma radiation was analysed using this detector. Quartz based Be O and graphite based alpha beta-Al2O3 were found to be good beta radiation detectors when the TSEE technique is used. Energy independent CaSO4:Tm TL dosimeters were used in international comparison for dose measurements and the results obtained were in agreement with the actual given doses within 10%. The TL detectors were also used for dose rate measurements from glazed painted tiles used in construction industry and a 85Kr source used in textile and metal industries. Results obtained in the later case were Q compared with those using the secondary standard facility. (author)

  1. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy β radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were β spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy β radiation field a moderated spectrum from a 14C source (Eβ,max =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 μm in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for 147Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for β radiation from 14C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to β radiation for radiation fields with maximum β energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum β energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a β dose higher than about 10 μGy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the βenergy for Eβ,max values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs

  2. Dosimetric methodology for extremities of individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation using the optically stimulated luminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dosimetric methodology was established for the determination of extremity doses of individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation, using Al2O3:C detectors and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) reader system microStar, Landauer. The main parts of the work were: characterization of the dosimetric material Al2O3:C using the OSL technique; establishment of the dose evaluation methodology; dose rate determination of beta radiation sources; application of the established method in a practical test with individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation during a calibration simulation of clinical applicators; validation of the methodology by the comparison between the dose results of the practical test using the OSL and the thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The results show that both the OSL Al-2O3:C detectors and the technique may be utilized for individual monitoring of extremities and beta radiation. (author)

  3. Mensuration of equivalent dose with personal dosemeters and instruments of radiological protection in the new operative quantities ICRU, for external fields of beta radiation. Part II. I study of the angular response of personal dosemeters TLD-100 in secondary patron fields of beta radiation (90Sr / 90Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to carry out one of the possible ones test type for personal dosemeters TLD, under the recomendations of the ICRU 39, ICRU 43 and the draft of the norm ISO 6980,(1992), with the purpose of verifying the capacity of these detectors to carry out the operative unit: H' (0.07;α). Since H' (O. 07;α) this defined one in an expanded field, one of these tests type consist on determining the angular response of these detectors. 20 personal dosemeters TLD-100 was used, (card marks: Harshaw, Model: G-1, with two glasses of TLD-100 absorbed in teflon; the portadosemeters has two windows, a free one and another with a filter of Pb of 171.0 mg cm-2); these dosemeters they were previously selected, [to see, Study of the Homogeneity of the response of Personal Dosemeters (Cards G-l, TLD-100) in Radiation of Countrysides of 60Co, J.T. Alvarez R. Technician Report GSR/IT/0001/94].The irradiations to effectued in secondary countryside of radiation beta of 90Sr/90Y. The study was undertaken by means of an experimental design of blocks random that contemplate the following variables: intensity of the radiation source, (1850 MBq and 74 MBq); position of irradiation, (four positions); incidence of angle of the radiation (0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 grades) and the absorbed dose in air, (0.005, 0.010, 0.020, 0.050 and 0.100 Gy). Then null hypothesis it was to suppose that there was not difference among the stockings of each treatment, to used the statistical of Duncan to carry out tests of stockings at a level of significance of 5%.These tests of stockings throw the following results in those variables of the experimental design: The irradiations carried out so much with the source pattern secondary of 90Sr/90Y of 1850 MBq and of 74 MBq, they are equivalent reason why they can be used indistinctly. The responses of each one of the glasses of the card are strongly anisotropic for each glass; four positions of irradiation is used: glass 1 (window of 171 mg cm-2

  4. Radiolytical oxidation of gaseous iodine by beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, Teemu; Auvinen, Ari; Kekki, Tommi; Kotiluoto, Petri; Lyyraenen, Jussi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Jokiniemi, Jorma [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Eastern Finland Univ., Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    Iodine is one of the most radiotoxic fission product released from fuel during a severe nuclear power plant accident. Within the containment building, iodine compounds can react e.g. on the painted surfaces and form gaseous organic iodides. In this study, it was found out that gaseous methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}I) is oxidised when exposed to beta radiation in an oxygen containing atmosphere. As a result, nucleation of aerosol particles takes place and the formation of iodine oxide particles is suggested. These particles are highly hygroscopic. They take up water from the air humidity and iodine oxides dissolve within the droplets. In order to mitigate the possible source term, it is of interest to understand the effect of beta radiation on the speciation of iodine.

  5. Characterization of beta radiation fields using radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to study the response of radiochromic films for beta radiation fields in terms of absorbed dose. The reliability of the EBT model Gafchromic radiochromic film was studied. A 9800 XL model Microtek, transmission scanner, a 369 model X-Rite optical densitometer and a Mini 1240 Shimadzu UV spectrophotometer were used for measurement comparisons. Calibration of the three systems was done with irradiated samples of radiochromic films with 0.1; 0.3; 0.5; 0.8; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5; 3.0; 3.5; 4.5 e 5.0 Gy in beta radiation field from a Sr-90/Y-90 source. Calibration was performed by establishing a correlation between the absorbed dose values and the corresponding radiochromic responses. Results showed significant differences in the absorbed dose values obtained with the three methods. Absorbed dose values showed errors from 0.6 to 4.4%, 0.3 to 31.8% and 0.2 to 47.3% for the Microtek scanner, the X-Rite Densitometer and the Shimadzu spectrophotometer, respectively. Due to the easy acquisition and use for absorbed dose measurements, the densitometer and the spectrophotometer showed to be suitable techniques to evaluate radiation dose in relatively homogeneous fields. In the case of inhomogeneous fields or for a two dimension mapping of radiation fields to identify anisotropies, the scanner technique is the most recommended. (author)

  6. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted β-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of β/γ radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  7. Therapeutic effect of beta radiation on onychomycosis: An innovative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Onychomycosis is the most frequent cause of nail disease and the most prevalent type of dermatophytosis in Bangladesh. The humid and warm climate of this tropical country is congenial for the growth of fungi. Therapeutic limitations of conventional antimycotic agents in respect of low cure rates, high relapse rate, inherent side effects, long duration of treatment and high cost in treating onychomycosis have provided clear incentives to explore alternative forms of treatment procedure. The objectives of the present thesis work were: (i) To use beta radiation as a curative therapy for Onychomycosis, optimisation of its dosages and to promote an innovative clinical development in the field of therapeutic application of nuclear medicine; (ii) To assess the efficacy of beta radiation either alone or in combination with conventional antifungal therapy; and (iii) To reduce the duration of drug exposure and cost of treatment for onychomycosis. This is a PhD research work under the University of Dhaka and was sponsored by the Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology, Government of the people's republic of Bangladesh. This study is an open, randomised and controlled trial to verify the efficacy of beta radiation in patients with onychomycosis. Using the appropriate statistical formula, sample size of the study population was determined and in each group 92 patients were assigned. With an assumption of patients drop out and for better statistical analysis, a total of 330 patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criterion having diagnosed to have onychomycosis clinically and mycological were randomly allocated to enter in therapeutic regimen. Study population was randomised in three groups. Group A (n =110) received griseofulvin orally 500 mg once daily for 12-16 weeks; Group B (n=110) received beta radiation, 500 rads bi-weekly for 3 weeks (total 2500 rads); and Group C (n=110) received combined beta radiation (total 2500 rads in 3 weeks) and

  8. Eurados trial performance test for personal dosemeters for external beta radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.; Bartlett, D.T.; Colgan, T.; Hyvonen, H.; Stadtmann, H.

    On the initiative of the European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) action group 'Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation' a trial performance test for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters broadly representative of those in use in the EU was...... accomplished, This paper deals with the part of the performance test concerned with exposure to beta radiation. Fifteen dosimetric services participated with whole-body dosemeters intended to measure beta doses (H-p(0.07)) of which 13 used thermoluminescent (TL) detectors and two used photographic films. Eight...... services participated with extremity dosemeters which all used TL detectors. A description is given of the irradiation set-up, the characteristics of the irradiation fields, the calibration quantity applied and the performance criteria used for the evaluation of the results. The paper discusses in detail...

  9. Manufacture of plastic parts by radiation molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin plastic parts which can have precise tolerances and can be of complex shape are prepared by casting a viscous radiation-curable composition onto a support, such as a moving web of polymeric material, in the shape of the desired part and then irradiating, for example with ultraviolet radiation or high energy electrons, to cause curing of the composition to a solid plastic. The radiation-curable composition is formulated with viscosity and flow characteristics it to be cast in the exact shape of the part desired yet retain this shape during curing while supported only by the surface on which it has been cast. Plastic parts made by this method can be formed entirely of the radiation-curable composition by casting onto a web having a release surface from which the part can be stripped subsequent to curing or can be formed partially from a web material and partially from the radiation-curable composition by casting onto a web to which the composition will bond and subsequently cutting the web into discrete portions which include the cured composition

  10. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    The extrapolation chamber measurement method is the basic method for the determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields and the method has been used for the establishment of beta calibration fields. The paper describes important details of the method and presents results from the measurement...... of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E(max) values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high...... sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value of the...

  11. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E(max) values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high...... sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value of the...

  12. Dosimetric methodology for extremities of individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation using the optically stimulated luminescence technique; Metodologia dosimetrica para extremidades em individuos ocupacionalmente expostos a radiacao beta por meio da tecnica de luminescencia opticamente estimulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Teresa Cristina Nathan Outeiro

    2010-07-01

    A dosimetric methodology was established for the determination of extremity doses of individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation, using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C detectors and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) reader system microStar, Landauer. The main parts of the work were: characterization of the dosimetric material Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C using the OSL technique; establishment of the dose evaluation methodology; dose rate determination of beta radiation sources; application of the established method in a practical test with individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation during a calibration simulation of clinical applicators; validation of the methodology by the comparison between the dose results of the practical test using the OSL and the thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The results show that both the OSL Al-2O{sub 3}:C detectors and the technique may be utilized for individual monitoring of extremities and beta radiation. (author)

  13. A new, passive dosemeter for gamma, beta and neutron radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) provides personal radiation dosimetry to the UK Ministry of Defence. Dstl has recently developed a dosemeter that is based on a combination of thermoluminescent and etched-track detectors. The Dstl Combined Dosemeter is capable of assessing doses due to photons, beta particles and neutrons. This paper presents the laboratory type testing results for the Combined Dosemeter, and also describes the procedure for calibrating the dosemeter for use in workplace neutron fields. The Combined Dosemeter meets the type test requirements that are relevant to its intended applications, and gives neutron doses that are within 50% of the true dose in the workplaces in which it is used, even when the wearer has the potential to be exposed to a variety of neutron spectra (e.g. on board nuclear-powered submarines).

  14. A new, passive dosemeter for gamma, beta and neutron radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L A; Stokes, R P

    2011-03-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) provides personal radiation dosimetry to the UK Ministry of Defence. Dstl has recently developed a dosemeter that is based on a combination of thermoluminescent and etched-track detectors. The Dstl Combined Dosemeter is capable of assessing doses due to photons, beta particles and neutrons. This paper presents the laboratory type testing results for the Combined Dosemeter, and also describes the procedure for calibrating the dosemeter for use in workplace neutron fields. The Combined Dosemeter meets the type test requirements that are relevant to its intended applications, and gives neutron doses that are within 50% of the true dose in the workplaces in which it is used, even when the wearer has the potential to be exposed to a variety of neutron spectra (e.g. on board nuclear-powered submarines). PMID:21346288

  15. Manufacture of plastic parts by radiation molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this process, a viscous radiation-curable composition is cast onto a support in the exact shape of the desired part and then irradiated, for example with ultraviolet radiation or high energy electrons, to cause curing of the composition, for example by polymerization and/or crosslinking. The support can be of a composition such that the cast material will bond to it or of a composition such that the cast material will not bond to it and can be stripped from the support after curing is effected

  16. High beta radiation exposure of medical staff measures for optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: New therapies applying beta radionuclides have been introduced in medicine in recent years, especially in nuclear medicine, e. g. radio-synoviorthesis, radioimmunotherapy and palliative pain therapy. The preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, their dispensary as well as injection require the handling of vials and syringes with high activities of beta emitters at small distances to the skin. Thus the medical staff may be exposed to a high level of beta radiation. Hence the local skin dose, Hp(0,07), was measured at these workplaces with thin-layer thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD (LiF:Mg,P,Cu) fixed to the tip of the fingers at both hands of the personnel. In addition, official beta/photon ring dosemeters were worn at the first knuckle of the index finger. Very high local skin doses were measured at the tip of index finger and thumb. The findings indicate that the exposure of the staff can exceed the annual dose limit for skin of 500 mSv when working at a low protection standard. By the use of appropriate shieldings and tools (e.g. tweezers or forceps) the exposure was reduced of more than one order of magnitude. The German dosimetry services provide official beta/photon ring dosemeters for routine monitoring of the extremity exposure of occupationally exposed persons. But even monitoring with these official dosemeters does not provide suitable results to control compliance with the dose limit in the majority of cases because they can mostly not be worn at the spot of highest beta exposure (finger tip). Therefore, a study was performed to identify the difference of readings of official ring dosemeters and the maximum local skin dose at the finger tips. At workplaces of radio-synoviorthesis a correction factor of 3 was determined provided that the staff worked at high radiation protection standard and the ring dosemeters were worn at the first knuckle of the index finger. The correction factor increases significantly when the radiation

  17. EURADOS trial performance test for personal dosemeters for external beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the initiative of the European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) action group 'Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation' a trial performance test for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters broadly representative of those in use in the EU was accomplished. This paper deals with the part of the performance test concerned with exposure to beta radiation. Fifteen dosimetric services participated with whole-body dosemeters intended to measure beta doses (Hp(0.07)) of which 13 used thermoluminescent (TL) detectors and two used photographic films. Eight services participated with extremity dosemeters which all used TL detectors. A description is given of the irradiation set-up, the characteristics of the irradiation fields, the calibration quantity applied and the performance criteria used for the evaluation of the results. The paper discussed in detail the results obtained from the exercise. In particular, based on the replies to a questionnaire issued to each participant, the results are analysed in relation to important design characteristics of the dosemeters taking part in the test. (author)

  18. Thermoluminescent dosimeter-direct reading dosimeter dose discrepancy: studies on the role of beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry studies pertaining to thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and direct reading dosimeter (DRD) have been performed for photons, beta fields and mixed field of photons and beta particles. In lab conditions, for pure photon radiation fields, the doses estimated using DRD and TLD match within the acceptable limits whereas in the mixed fields of photons and high energy beta particles, it has been found that the DRD doses are always higher than the corresponding whole body doses estimated by the TLD. This is due to the fact that DRD responds to high energy beta particles and the typical response of the DRD to high energy beta particles is observed to be in the range of 15-30%. This may lead to TLD-DRD dose discrepancy at workplaces where the skin doses received by the radiation workers from high energy beta sources in a given monitoring period are significant. The paper also provides a comparison of three different TLD-DRD discrepancy identification criteria available in literature for exposure conditions with a significant dose due to beta radiations. In addition, estimate of threshold beta dose which may lead to discrepancy as per the criteria have been studied. The results reported in this paper would be helpful in understanding the discrepancy arising out of variable response of DRD to beta radiations and will be useful in resolving the discrepancy in such cases. (author)

  19. Radiation synthesis of gelatin/CM-chitosan/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Ying [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu Ling, E-mail: lingxu@pku.edu.cn [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Xiangmei; Zhao Yinghui [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Shicheng, E-mail: sc-wei@pku.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhai Maolin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-05-01

    A series of biodegradable composite scaffolds was fabricated from an aqueous solution of gelatin, carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) by radiation-induced crosslinking at ambient temperature. Ultrasonic treatment on the polymer solutions significantly influenced the distribution of {beta}-TCP particles. An ultrasonic time of 20 min, followed by 30 kGy irradiation induced a crosslinked scaffold with homogeneous distribution of {beta}-TCP particles, interconnected porous structure, sound swelling capacity and mechanical strength. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis indicated that {beta}-TCP successfully incorporated with the network of gelatin and CM-chitosan. In vivo implantation of the scaffold into the mandible of beagle dog revealed that the scaffolds had excellent biocompatibility and the presence of {beta}-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration. The comprehensive results of this study paved way for the application of gelatin/CM-chitosan/{beta}-TCP composite scaffolds as candidate of bone tissue engineering material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation induced a crosslinked scaffold with interconnected porous structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasonic time of 20 min led to homogenerously distribution of {beta}-TCP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing amount of {beta}-TCP would restrict the swelling properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper fraction of {beta}-TCP will promote the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid of {beta}-TCP promoted the bone regeneration of the mandibles of beagle dogs.

  20. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    In 1962, several satellites were lost following high altitude nuclear tests by the United States and the Soviet Union. These satellite failures were caused by energetic electrons injected into the earth's radiation belts from the beta decay of bomb produced fission fragments and neutrons. It has been 40 years since the last high altitude nuclear test; there are now many more satellites in orbit, and it is important to understand their vulnerability to radiation belt pumping from nuclear explosions at high altitude or in space. This report presents the results of a calculation of the contribution of neutron beta decay to artificial belt pumping. For most high altitude nuclear explosions, neutrons are expected to make a smaller contribution than fission products to the total trapped electron inventory, and their contribution is usually neglected. However, the neutron contribution may dominate in cases where the fission product contribution is suppressed due to the altitude or geomagnetic latitude of the nuclear explosion, and for regions of the radiation belts with field lines far from the detonation point. In any case, an accurate model of belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions, and a self-consistent explanation of the 1962 data, require inclusion of the neutron contribution. One recent analysis of satellite measurements of electron flux from the 1962 tests found that a better fit to the data is obtained if the neutron contribution to the trapped electron inventory was larger than that of the fission products [l]. Belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions is a complicated process. Fission fragments are dispersed as part of the ionized bomb debris, which is constrained and guided by the earth's magnetic field. Those fission products that beta decay before being lost to the earth's atmosphere can contribute trapped energetic electrons to the earth's radiation belts. There has been a large effort to develop computer models for

  1. New analytical solution to calculate linear absorption coefficients of beta radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with an alternative model of beta radiation transmissions through attenuation layers and brings another analytical description of this phenomenon. The model is validated with a reliable data set and brings a possibility to calculate characteristic material parameters with low uncertainties. Using no correction factors, these calculations can be considered fundamental and inspiring for further research in the field. - Highlights: • New analytical model of beta radiation transmission curve in 2π geometry has been proposed. • Linear absorption coefficients in aluminum and Mylar were calculated for 19 radionuclides. • An empirical relationship between the calculated range parameter and average energy of beta radiation emitted by radionuclides was established

  2. Measurement of dose equivalent with personal dosemeters and instrumentation of radiological protection in the new operative magnitudes ICRU, for external fields of radiation beta. Part IV. Survey of the angular response of instruments used in radiological protection in secondary patron fields of beta radiation ({sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y (1850 MBq and 74 MBq), {sup 204}TI (18.5 MBq) and {sup 147}Pm (518 MBq)); Medicion de dosis equivalente con dosimetros personales e instrumentacion de proteccion radiologica en las nuevas magnitudes operativas ICRU, para campos de radiacion beta externos. Parte IV. Estudio de la respuesta angular de instrumentos empleados en proteccion radiologica en campos patrones secundarios de radiacion beta ({sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y (1850 MBq y 74 MBq), {sup 204}TI (18.5 MBq) y {sup 147}Pm(518 MBq))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1994-02-15

    Tests type were made (type test) in the following commercial instrumentation commonly used in radiological protection: Geiger-Mueller Counters (FH40 FE), Plastic Scintillators (NE-BP/6/4A), Ionization Chambers (RO-5) and Proportional Counters (HP-100A; gas:P-10). With object of checking the possibility that these they can carry out the new operative unit ICRU, H' (0.07; {alpha}). The tests consisted on determining the energy and angular response of the detectors in secondary patron fields of beta radiation, for isotopes of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y (1850 MBq and 74 MBq and {sup 147}Pm(518 MBq). The results show the inadequate of these commercial instruments for the realization of the H' operative unit (0.07; {alpha}) in beta external fields. Due to flaws in the design, construction and calibration of the instruments for this type of radiation fields (Author)

  3. Study of PIN diode based pocket dosimeter for gamma and beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pocket dosimeter, based on PN junction Si Semiconductor detector earlier was developed for the measurement of dose equivalent in the field of gamma and beta radiation. This dosemeter was insensitive to beta radiation which is primary requirement as a legal personal dosemeter from IEE standards. This dosemeter works on a high power 3V Li battery along with a micro power DC-DC converter to get 3.3V needed to power the circuit. It has a 6 digit LCD digital display along with battery low indication. It measures the dose range of 1- 99999 μSv. The photon energy dependence of the dosimeter from 60 keV to 1.2 MeV is ± 30% for gamma radiation and ± 40% for beta. Further work is in progress to bring beta response within acceptable limit and to display beta and gamma response separately as Hp (0.07) and Hp (10). (author)

  4. TGF beta-1 dependent fast stimulation of ATM and p53 phosphorylation following exposure to ionizing radiation does not involve TGF beta-receptor I signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Blaese, Marcet A.; Loeffler, Heidi; Coppes, Rob P.; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has been proposed that radiation induced stimulation of ATM and downstream components involves activation of TGF beta-1 and that this may be due to TGF beta-1-receptor I-Smad signalling. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify the distinct role of TGF beta-1-recept

  5. The effect of solar radiation on beta-carotene and other carotenoid content in carrot roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three following cultivars of carrot - Napoli F1, Fantazja, Kazan F1 - were grown in the years 1998-00. The seeds were sown in ridges from the end of April until the beginning of June. Throughout the growth period the total solar radiation was recorded by an automatic system. Every 2 weeks, the leaf area index and the amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were calculated. Correlation was found between solar radiation and beta-carotene as well as other carotenoid content in carrot roots. It was found that beta-carotene content depended mainly on the amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation by single carrot plants, and not by area unit. Differences in beta-carotene content in carrot cultivars were caused by the time of root formation, rate of beta-carotene production, and total absorbed PAR (PARa)

  6. beta1-integrin-mediated signaling essentially contributes to cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, N; Seidler, J; Durzok, R; Geinitz, H; Brakebusch, C

    2006-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins confers resistance to radiation- or drug-induced genotoxic injury. To analyse the underlying mechanisms specific for beta1-integrins, wild-type beta1A-integrin-expressing GD25beta1A cells were compared to GD25beta1B cells, which express...... findings in tumor cells, human A-172 glioma cells were examined under the same conditions after siRNA-mediated silencing of beta1-integrins. We found that beta1A-integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin, collagen-III or beta1-IgG was essential for cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury...... central role of beta1-integrins in Akt- and p130Cas/paxillin-mediated prosurvival signaling. These findings suggest beta1-integrins as critical regulators of cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury. Elucidation of the molecular circuitry of prosurvival beta1-integrin-mediated signaling in...

  7. Beta-blockers in the environment: part II. Ecotoxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maszkowska, Joanna; Stolte, Stefan; Kumirska, Jolanta; Łukaszewicz, Paulina; Mioduszewska, Katarzyna; Puckowski, Alan; Caban, Magda; Wagil, Marta; Stepnowski, Piotr; Białk-Bielińska, Anna

    2014-09-15

    The increasing consumption of beta-blockers (BB) has caused their presence in the environment to become more noticeable. Even though BB are safe for human and veterinary usage, ecosystems may be exposed to these substances. In this study, three selected BB: propranolol, metoprolol and nadolol were subjected to ecotoxicity study. Ecotoxicity evaluation was based on a flexible ecotoxicological test battery including organisms, representing different trophic levels and complexity: marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), soil/sediment bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). All the ecotoxicological studies were supported by instrumental analysis to measure deviation between nominal and real test concentrations. Based on toxicological data from the green algae test (S. vacuolatus) propranolol and metoprolol can be considered to be harmful to aquatic organisms. However, sorption explicitly inhibits the hazardous effects of BB, therefore the risks posed by these compounds for the environment are of minor importance. PMID:24975494

  8. Information as a part of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing range of application of ionizing radiation in many different areas requires the needs for further education and training. Unfortunately, some aspects of application of ionizing radiation are not planed and announced for all involved personnel-like in military conflicts, when radiation and radioactivity are used as a new kind of ammunition. In that situation there is no time for formal and planned education. During the NATO strikes on Serbia and Montenegro in 1999. depleted uranium (D.U.) ammunition was used. Before that, it was used in Gulf War in 1991. for the first time. Faced with the health consequences of Gulf War for the soldiers of both sides, which were mainly attributed to D.U., Military Medical Service in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro, prepared educational material for the soldiers who could be employed in the area of the D.U. contamination. Considering the information/knowledge as very important part of radiation protection, booklet was prepared and distributed before the NATO strikes on Serbia and Montenegro. In this paper we present the booklet prepared for the military personnel. In the simplified way the nature of D.U. is explained. Some practical aspects of protection and prevention in D.U. contaminated area-how to avoid and minimize radiological hazard of D.U. in the battlefield, as well as how to avoid long-term hazards of D.U., are presented. It is also explained when to ask for medical care and what kind of examination would be necessary in the case of D.U. contamination. 5AUTHORS

  9. Information as a part of radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurovic, B.; Misovic, M. [Military Medical Academy, Radiation Protection Dept., Belgrade Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia); Spasic-Jokic, V. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Lab. of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia)

    2006-07-01

    The increasing range of application of ionizing radiation in many different areas requires the needs for further education and training. Unfortunately, some aspects of application of ionizing radiation are not planed and announced for all involved personnel-like in military conflicts, when radiation and radioactivity are used as a new kind of ammunition. In that situation there is no time for formal and planned education. During the NATO strikes on Serbia and Montenegro in 1999. depleted uranium (D.U.) ammunition was used. Before that, it was used in Gulf War in 1991. for the first time. Faced with the health consequences of Gulf War for the soldiers of both sides, which were mainly attributed to D.U., Military Medical Service in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro, prepared educational material for the soldiers who could be employed in the area of the D.U. contamination. Considering the information/knowledge as very important part of radiation protection, booklet was prepared and distributed before the NATO strikes on Serbia and Montenegro. In this paper we present the booklet prepared for the military personnel. In the simplified way the nature of D.U. is explained. Some practical aspects of protection and prevention in D.U. contaminated area-how to avoid and minimize radiological hazard of D.U. in the battlefield, as well as how to avoid long-term hazards of D.U., are presented. It is also explained when to ask for medical care and what kind of examination would be necessary in the case of D.U. contamination. 5AUTHORS.

  10. Performance of a parallel plate ionization chamber in beta radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: patrilan@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A homemade parallel plate ionization chamber with graphite collecting electrode, and developed for use in mammography beams, was tested in relation to its usefulness in beta radiation dosimetry at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Characterization tests of this ionization chamber were performed, using the Sr-90 + Y-90, Kr-85 and Pm-147 sources of a beta secondary standard system. The results of saturation, leakage current, stabilization time, response stability, linearity, angular dependence, and calibration coefficients are within the recommended limits of international recommendations that indicate that this chamber may be used for beta radiation dosimetry. (author)

  11. BEGe detector response to alpha and beta-radiation near its p{sup +} electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Agostini, Matteo; Barnabe-Heider, Marik; Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    In Phase II of the GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge. The main feature of these detectors is their small p{sup +} electrode used for signal read-out. Due to the thin dead layer of the p{sup +} contact, surface events close to this electrode represent a potential background for the search of 0{nu}{beta}{beta}. A study was conducted to determine the response of the detector to alpha and beta-radiation using movable collimated sources within a custom-build cryostat. Preliminary results of this study and a possible method to discriminate these events will be presented.

  12. Ornithogalum virens as a plant assay for beta and gamma radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the monocotyledonous angiosperm, Ornithogalum virens (Quintanilha and Cabral, 1947), could be used in such a biological assay system. After exposing O. virens plants to acute (60Co) and chronic (137Cs) gamma radiation and internal beta radiation (32P), lethality (LD50, LD100), growth inhibition, and chromosome aberrations were investigated. The LD50 and LD100 for acute gamma radiation were estimated to be between 0.91 to 1.8 krad and less than 3.6 krad, respectively. Though growth inhibition and abnormal growth were observed in the acute and chronic gamma radiation studies, the changes in the growth of the plants were so variable that these parameters were found to be unreliable measures of radiation effects. Chromosome aberrations were a more reliable measure of radiation damage because linear relationships between total aberrations and dose were found for both gamma and beta radiation

  13. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynaldo, S. R. [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology, Posgraduate Course in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A., E-mail: sirr@cdtn.br [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 85}Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and -0.3% for the {sup 85}Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  14. Effect of the gamma radiation of cobalt 60 on the beta carotids present in the carrot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work it was investigated the effect of the gamma radiation of cobalt 60 on the beta carotid's in the carrot (daucus carota), using for it three different radiation dose (100, 150 and 200 kilo-rad) and analyzing them by means of the liquid chromatography technique of high resolution (HPLC)

  15. Testing a ring-shaped ionization chamber in standard beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ring-shaped ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, was tested in standard beta radiation fields. This ionization chamber was primarily developed to be used as a monitor chamber in X-ray diagnostic radiology beams. It has a large sensitive volume and parallel-plate aluminium electrode. Its entrance window is made of a thin aluminized polyester foil, which allows the collection of electrons. The ring-shaped monitor chamber was already tested in X radiation beams, showing a good performance. The aim of this work was to verify the applicability of the ionization chamber for beta radiation field dosimetry at calibration distances. (author)

  16. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one

  17. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one.

  18. Determination of transmission factors for beta radiation using Al 2O 3:C commercial OSL dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, T. N. O.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique has been used in personal dosimetry, and aluminum oxide (Al 2O 3:C) has become a very useful material for this technique. The objective of this work was the determination of the transmission factors for beta radiation using Al 2O 3:C commercial dosimeters and the OSL method. The obtained results were similar to the transmission factors reported in the beta source calibration certificates.

  19. Design and operation of dust measuring instrumentation based on the beta-radiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory, instrument design aspects and applications of beta-radiation attenuation for the measurement of mass concentration of airborne particulates are reviewed. Applicable methods of particle collection, beta sensing configurations, source and detector design criteria, and electronic signal processing are treated. Advantages, limitations, and error sources of beta-attenuation instrumentation are analysed. Applications to industrial dust measurements, source testing, ambient monitoring, and particle size analysis are the major areas of practical utilization of this technique, and its inherent capability for automated and unattended operation provides compatibility with process control surveillance and alarm, telemetry, and incorporation into pollution monitoring network sensing stations. (orig.)

  20. Application of whole-body personal TL dosemeters in mixed field beta-gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of whole-body personal TL dosemeters based on a high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) in mixed field beta-gamma radiation has been characterised. The measurements were carried out with 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr and 137Cs point sources to calculate the energy response and linearity of the TLD response in a dose range of 0.1-30 mSv. From the result, calibration curves were obtained, enabling the readout of individual dose equivalent Hp(10) from gamma radiation and Hp(0.07) from beta radiation in mixed field beta-gamma. Limitation of the methodology and its application are presented and discussed. (authors)

  1. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu [Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Scott and White Hospital, Molecular and Cellular Medicine Department, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas (United States); Boyer, Arthur [Department of Radiology, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas (United States); Liu, Fei, E-mail: fliu@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Scott and White Hospital, Molecular and Cellular Medicine Department, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  2. Reference beta radiations for calibrating dosemeters and dose ratemeters and for determining their response as a function of beta radiation energy. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This International Standard specifies the requirements for reference beta radiations produced by radionuclide sources to be used for the calibration of protection level dosemeters and dose ratemeters, and for the determination of their response as a function of beta energy. It gives the characteristics of radionuclides which have been used to produce reference beta radiations, gives examples of suitable source constructions and describes methods for the measurement of the residual maximum beta energy and the absorbed dose rate at a depth of 7 mg·cm-2 in a semi-infinite tissue-equivalent medium. The energy range involved lies between 66 keV and 3.6 MeV and the absorbed dose rates are in the range from about 10 μGy·h-1 (1 mrad·h-1) to at least 10 Gy·h-1 (103 rad·h-1). This International Standard proposes two series of beta reference radiations from which the radiation necessary for determining the characteristics (calibration and energy response) of an instrument shall be selected. Series 1 reference radiations are produced by radionuclide sources used with beam flattening filters designed to give uniform dose rates over a large area at a specific distance. The proposed sources of 90Sr+90Y, 204TI and 147Pm produce maximum dose rates of approximately 5mGy·h-1 (0.5 rad·h-1). Series 2 reference radiations are produced without the use of beam flattening filters which allows a range of source-to-calibration plane distances to be used. Close to the sources only relatively small areas of uniform dose rate are produced but this Series has the advantage of extending the energy and dose rate ranges beyond those of Series 1. The radionuclides used are those of Series 1 with the addition of the radionuclides 14C and 106Ru+106Rh; these sources produce dose rates of up to 10 Gy·h-1 (103 rad·h-1)

  3. Exoemissive properties of graphite. [Gamma, beta, X, aud UV, radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapraz, D.; Iacconi, P.; Keller, P. (Nice Univ., 06 (France). Lab. de Physique Experimentale); Barthe, J. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection)

    1983-01-01

    The exoemission of the commonly used graphite is far from negligible when the doses are higher than in the case of dosimetric applications. Some exoemissive experimental results for graphite, between room temperature and 710/sup 0/C, are given after various irradiations: UV (Hg - 253.7 nm), ..beta.. (/sup 90/Sr), X (W-target, 45 kV) or ..gamma.. (/sup 137/Cs). Mainly, six TSEE peaks located near 90, 160, 220, 300, 475 and 570/sup 0/C are observed. The origin of graphite exoemission is probably due to adsorption effects.

  4. Device for measuring the beta radiation of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The switching device for measuring radiaoactive rare gases has two large area counting tubes operated with argon methane gas. Two anti-coincidence stages are provided in the evaluation electronics to suppress the background gamma radiation. (DG)

  5. Principles of medical rehabilitation of survivors of acute radiation sickness induced by gamma and beta and gumma and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedejina, N.M.; Galstian, I.A.; Savitsky, A.A.; Sachkov, A.V.; Rtisheva, J.N.; Uvatcheva, I.V.; Filin, S.V. [State Research Center of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the principles of medical rehabilitation different degree acute radiation syndrome (ARS) survivors, who exposed {gamma}{beta}- and {gamma}{eta}-irradiation in different radiation accidents. The main reasons of working disability in the late consequences of ARS period are consequences of local radiation injures (LRI) and joining somatic diseases. Its revealing and treatment considerably improves quality of life of the patients. The heaviest consequence of LRI of a skin at {gamma}{beta}- radiation exposure is the development of late radiation ulcers and radiation fibrosis, which require repeated plastic surgery. LRI at {gamma}{eta}-radiation exposure differ by the greater depth of destruction of a underlying tissues and similar defects require the early amputations. Last 10 years microsurgery methods of plastic surgery allow to save more large segments of extremities and to decrease expression of the late consequences (radiation fibrosis and late radiation ulcers) LRI severe and extremely severe degrees. Medical rehabilitation of radiation cataract (development at doses more than 2.0 Gy) includes its extraction and artificial lens implantation, if acuity of vision is considerably decreased. Changes of peripheral blood, observed at the period of the long consequences, as a rule, different, moderate, transient and not requiring treatment. Only one ARS survivor dead from chronic myeloid leukemia. Thyroid nodes, not requiring operative intervention, are found out in Chernobyl survivors. Within the time course the concurrent somatic disease become the major importance for patients disability growth, which concurrent diseases seem to be unrelated to radiation dose and their structure does not differ from that found in general public of Russia. The rehabilitation of the persons who have transferred ARS as a result of radiating failure, should be directed on restoration of functions critical for ionizing of radiation of bodies and

  6. Characterization of OSL commercial dosimeters using a hand phantom, in standard beta radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a hand phantom was developed and tested with Al2O3:C detectors (nanodots, Landauer) and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique. This paper shows the results of a characterization study of Al2O3:C detectors at the hand phantom, to simulate operations at a nuclear medicine service. The OSL detectors were exposed to standard beta radiation beans of the beta secondary standard system of the Calibration Laboratory at IPEN, with 90Sr + 90Y, 85Kr and 147Pm sources. The detectors were optically treated prior each reutilization. The results obtained show that for monitoring of workers exposed to beta radiation, the technique and the material are useful, but the energy dependence of the OSL response of Al2O3: C has to be taken into consideration. (author)

  7. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC

  8. New analytical solution to calculate linear absorption coefficients of beta radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švec, Anton

    2015-08-01

    The paper deals with an alternative model of beta radiation transmissions through attenuation layers and brings another analytical description of this phenomenon. The model is validated with a reliable data set and brings a possibility to calculate characteristic material parameters with low uncertainties. Using no correction factors, these calculations can be considered fundamental and inspiring for further research in the field. PMID:25989183

  9. Angular dependence of OSL commercial detectors in standard beta radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a very successful dosimetry technique, in particular using the Al2O3:C crystals as dosimeter. This detector has become the main OSL material as a personal dosimeter. Commercial dosimeters of Al2O3:C have been developed and tested; however, most of the tests have been performed with gamma beams. Beta radiation dosimetry might be performed with Al2O3:C detectors, if the crystals are sufficient thin to avoid the radiation attenuation. The dosimeter thickness is also important to allow a satisfactory accuracy of the measured dose, despite the incidence radiation angle or the beta energy. Previous studies show that the Al2O3:C dosimeters present a very high energy dependence that can be minimized by using filters. This work aims to compare the angular dependence of commercial Al2O3:C dosimeters with and without the filters used to minimize the beta energy dependence of Al2O3:C, when the detectors were exposed to standard beta beams. The beta irradiations of the OSL detectors were performed using the beta secondary standard system of the Calibration Laboratory at IPEN, with 90Sr + 90Y, 85Kr and 147Pm sources, manufactured by Buchler GmbH and Co, Germany, calibrated by the primary standard laboratory Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. The OSL measurements were evaluated using a microStar reader and software of Landauer. The angular dependence was determined by using a goniometer. The incident radiation angle was varied from 0 deg to 180 deg. The results show that that the angular dependence curves present similar behavior, despite the use of filters

  10. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams; Estudo da resposta de monitores de radioprotecao em feixes padronizados de radiacao X, gama e beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-07-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ({sup 37}Cs and {sup 60}Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 9'}0Y e {sup 204}Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  11. Portable alpha, beta, gamma, x and neutron radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Here below there is short information about new instrument developed in SPE ATOMTEX, which will be produced at the close of the year. The instrument consists of the main unit, including built-in detector Nal (Tl) of diameter 25x40 mm and photomultiplier tube, analog devices (amplifier, multichannel pulse-height analyzer of 256 channels, high-voltage power supply, LED stabilization scheme of measuring path) and digital devices (microprocessor for data processing, control and storage, liquid crystal display, interface). The main unit operates also as processing and indication device of connected external detection units: α, β-radiation contamination scintillator detection unit; x, γ-radiation detection unit with silicon detector to measure equivalent dose and equivalent dose rate and n-radiation detection unit with proportional 3He-counters. Because of scintillator detector Nal (Tl), the main unit, operating in counting mode, searches and detects effectively x- and gamma-radiation sources with the energy from 30 keV to 3 MeV. The point source of 137Cs of 50 kBq is detected at the distance of 10 cm for 2s. Ambient equivalent dose and equivalent dose rate are measured with this detector using the method of instrumental spectrum transformation into dose. In this case the energy range is from 40 keV to 3 meV. Energy relationship of readings do not exceed ± 15% with respect to the energy of 0,662 MeV. The range of ambient equivalent dose rate measurement is from 0,05 μSv/h to 0,05 mSv/h, with response time of 20 s at background change from 0,05 μSv/h to 0,1 μSv/h. The main unit operates also as selective express-radiometer, which could evaluate sample activity by single gamma-line. Measurement geometry is Marinelly's vessel of 0,5 l. The lower limit of measuring activity is 300 Bq/l without lead shield and 20 Bq/l with it with measurement time of 10 min. The unit weighs not more than 0,9 kg. External detection units connect to interface socket by turns

  12. Beta Radiation exposure of medical personnel during vascular brachytherapy with Re-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracoronary radiation is currently considered a promising breakthrough approach for preventing restenosis after angioplasty and stenting in patients with severe coronary artery disease. For the therapy of in-stent-restenosis vascular irradiation using balloon catheters filled with liquid radioisotopes provide excellent homogeneity due to the artery stenosis morphology. The radionuclide normally used is a Re-188 solutions (Eβ,max=2,12 MeV). To achieve a sufficient dose in the stenosed artery wall (30 Gy in 0.5 mm wall depth) in a tolerable time-scale very high specific activities (>5-10 GBq/ml) of the isotope are necessary. During the preparation of the radioactive solution and the application at the patient very short distances between the source of the radiation and the skin of the doctors for cardiology / nuclear medicine are possible, especially when manipulations at the balloon catheter during the radiation are necessary. In addition, a severe risk of contamination exists. A further problem is that in hospitals often no or insufficient dosimeters for beta radiation are available. Occupational radiation exposure of the personnel was determined at the preparation of the Re-188 solution, the therapy itself and the waste management. The partial body exposure, i. e. the dose of the skin at the hands due to beta radiation, was determined with very sensitive thin-layer thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). During a preparation, intracoronary radiation and waste management of the Re-188-perrhenate solution using normal radiation shielding first measurements resulted din more than 500 mSv per working day at the fingertips. This extreme high radiation exposure of the personnel were mainly due to direct radiation by touching the evacuated balloon catheter (only residual radionuclides left). to reduced radiation we performed several additional radiation protection measures. The consequent use of plastic shielding of the source, the use of a semiautomatic preparation

  13. Conjunctival Autograft Alone or Combined With Adjuvant Beta-Radiation? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo, E-mail: gusviani@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carrara Fonseca, Ellen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Ophthalmology, Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Fendi, Ligia Issa [Department of Ophthalmology, Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melani Rocha, Eduardo [Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of postoperative low single-dose of beta-irradiation ({beta}-RT) in pterygium comparing conjunctival autograft (CAG) surgery with CAG plus adjuvant {beta}-RT in a randomized clinical trial. Methods: This trial was designed as a prospective, randomized, single-center study. Surgery was performed in all cases according to the CAG technique. One hundred and eight pterygia were postoperatively randomized to CAG + {beta}-RT or CAG alone. In the case of {beta}-RT, a (90) Sr eye applicator was used to deliver 10 Gy to the sclera surface at a dose rate of between 200 and 250 cGy/min. After treatment, both an ophthalmologist and a radiation oncologist performed the follow-up examinations. The accumulated data were analyzed using a group sequential test. Results: Between February 2008 and September 2008, 116 eyes with primary pterygium were operated on according to the trial protocol. Adjuvant treatment was performed within 24 h postoperatively. Eight patients were lost to follow-up, resulting in 108 patients who could be analyzed. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-33), in the 54 eyes randomized to receive CAG + {beta}-RT, 5 relapses occurred compared with 12 recurrences in the 54 eyes in CAG, for a crude control rate of 90.8 % vs. 78%; p = 0.032, respectively. The treatment complications as hyperemia, total dehiscence of the autograft and dellen were significantly more frequent in the CAG (p < 0.05). The arm of {beta}-RT resulted in better cosmetic results and improves of symptoms than CAG. Conclusions: A low single-dose of {beta}-RT of 10 Gy after CAG surgery was a simple, effective, and safe treatment that reduced the risk of primary pterygium recurrence, improved symptoms after surgery, resulting in a better cosmetic effect than only CAG.

  14. Ornithogalum virens as a plant assay for beta and gamma radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herron, V J

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the monocotyledonous angiosperm, Ornithogalum virens (Quintanilha and Cabral, 1947), could be used in such a biological assay system. After exposing O. virens plants to acute (/sup 60/Co) and chronic (/sup 137/Cs) gamma radiation and internal beta radiation (/sup 32/P), lethality (LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 100/), growth inhibition, and chromosome aberrations were investigated. The LD/sub 50/ and LD/sub 100/ for acute gamma radiation were estimated to be between 0.91 to 1.8 krad and less than 3.6 krad, respectively. Though growth inhibition and abnormal growth were observed in the acute and chronic gamma radiation studies, the changes in the growth of the plants were so variable that these parameters were found to be unreliable measures of radiation effects. Chromosome aberrations were a more reliable measure of radiation damage because linear relationships between total aberrations and dose were found for both gamma and beta radiation.

  15. TGF-beta and apoptosis - rat model of radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the involvement of bcl-2, apoptosis, TGF-β, number of neutrophils and other markers in the rat model of induced radiation pneumonitis. To describe sub-sequential changes in irradiated lung tissue. We proved TGF β 1 to be important marker of post-irradiation reaction. Besides, we suggest that TGF-β 3 expression might be closely related to the activity of neutrophils and activity of the process in irradiated lung tissue. We proved our recent findings of suppression of the anti-apoptotic activity after lung irradiation. (authors)

  16. The radiating part of circular sources

    OpenAIRE

    Carley, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An analysis is developed linking the form of the sound field from a circular source to the radial structure of the source, without recourse to far-field or other approximations. It is found that the information radiated into the field is limited, with the limit fixed by the wavenumber of source multiplied by the source radius (Helmholtz number). The acoustic field is found in terms of the elementary fields generated by a set of line sources whose form is given by Chebyshev polynomials of the ...

  17. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices

  18. Radiative Corrections to the Neutron Beta-decay within the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bunatian, G G

    2003-01-01

    Starting with the basic Lagrangian of the Standard Model, the radiative corrections to the neutron beta-decay are acquired. The electroweak interactions are consistently taken into consideration amenably to the Weinberg-Salam theory. The effect of the strong quark-quark interactions on the neutron beta-decay is parameterized by introducing the nucleon electromagnetic form factors and the nucleon weak transition current specified by the form factors g_V, g_A, ... The radiative corrections to the total decay probability W and to the asymmetry coefficient of the electron momentum distribution A obtained to constitute \\delta W = 8.7%, \\delta A = -2% . The contribution to the radiative corrections due to allowance for the nucleon form factors and the nucleon exited states amounts up to a few per cent to the whole value of the radiative corrections. The ambiguity in description of the nucleon compositeness is this surely what causes the uncertainties ~0.1% in evaluation of the neutron beta-decay characteristics. Fo...

  19. Video surveillance as an indispensable part of radiation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Increasing passenger and baggage traffic at customs passages makes video surveillance system an indispensable part of a set of radiation monitors. This report presents a design decision of software and apparatus complex, radiation monitor with video surveillance system. The optimality of decisions made is demonstrated

  20. High Energy/LET Radiation EEE Parts Certification Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Certifying electronic components is a very involved process. It includes pre-coordination with the radiation test facility for time, schedule and cost, as well as intimate work with designers to develop test procedures and hardware. It also involves work with radiation engineers to understand the effects of the radiation field on the test article/setup as well as the analysis and production of a test report. The technical content of traditional ionizing radiation testing protocol is in wide use and generally follows established standards (ref. Appendix C). This document is not intended to cover all these areas but to cover the methodology of using Variable Depth Bragg Peak (VDBP) to accomplish the goal of characterizing an electronic component. The Variable Depth Bragg Peak (VDBP) test method is primarily used for deep space applications of electronics. However, it can be used on any part for any radiation environment, especially those parts where the sensitive volume cannot be reached by the radiation beam. An example of this problem would be issues that arise in de-lidding of parts or in parts with flip-chip designs, etc. The VDBP method is ideally suited to test modern avionics designs which increasingly incorporate commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and units. Johnson Space Center (JSC) developed software provides assistance to users in developing the radiation characterization data from the raw test data.

  1. Glucose transport by radiation-induced insulinoma and clonal pancreatic beta-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugar uptake was measured in dispersed cells prepared from radiation-induced insulinomas transplantable in NEDH rats and in three clonal beta-cell lines maintained in continuous culture (RIN m5F, RIN 1046, HIT). Uptake of D-glucose and 3-O-methyl-D-glucose by insulinoma cells was rapid so that the intracellular concentration of D-hexoses approximated the concentration in the incubation medium by 15-30 s. L-Glucose was taken up only slowly. 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake by RIN m5F, RIN 1046, and HIT cells was slow; with 1 mM 3-O-methylglucose in the medium, equilibrium was attained at 20 min, but with 10 mM 3-O-methylglucose, equilibrium was not attained even at 20 min. In HIT cells incubated with D-glucose for 30 min, the intracellular concentration of glucose was less than the medium glucose concentration, indicating glucose transport is a nonequilibrium reaction in this cell line. These data indicate that radiation-induced insulinoma cells retain the capacity of normal beta-cells to transport sugar at high rates. RIN m5F, RIN 1046, and HIT cells transport sugar slowly, however, and thus differ from normal beta-cells. In RIN m5F, RIN 1046, and HIT cells, unlike in normal beta-cells, glucose transport may be the site regulating glucose metabolism

  2. Characterization of an extrapolation chamber in a 90Sr/90Y beta radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extrapolation chamber is a parallel plate chamber and variable volume based on the Bragg-Gray theory. It determines in absolute mode, with high accuracy the dose absorbed by the extrapolation of the ionization current measured for a null distance between the electrodes. This camera is used for dosimetry of external beta rays for radiation protection. This paper presents the characterization of an extrapolation chamber in a 90Sr/90Y beta radiation field. The absorbed dose rate to tissue at a depth of 0.07 mm was calculated and is (0.13206±0.0028) μGy. The extrapolation chamber null depth was determined and its value is 60 μm. The influence of temperature, pressure and humidity on the value of the corrected current was also evaluated. Temperature is the parameter that has more influence on this value and the influence of pressure and the humidity is not very significant. Extrapolation curves were obtained. (Author)

  3. Scintillation characteristics of phosphich-detector for detection of beta- and gamma-radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Ananenko, A A; Gavrilyuk, V

    2002-01-01

    The results of the study on the influence of individual peculiarities of the compound scintillation detector structure on the value and stability of the light yield by the gamma- and beta-radiation combined registration are presented. The phosphich detector is manufactured from the sodium iodide monocrystal, activated by thallium, and the scintillation plastic on the polystyrol basis. The comparison of the experimental results with the mathematical modeling data revealed certain regularities of the process of forming the phosphich detector light signal. The recommendations are worked out by means whereof the following characteristics of the scintillation unit: the light yield and its stability, amplitude resolution and the peak-to-valley ratio by the gamma- and beta-radiation registration were improved

  4. The modifying effect of beta-carotene on radiation and chemotherapy induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study of 20 patients with advanced squamous carcinoma of the mouth was to monitor the dose modifying effect of supplemental dietary beta-carotene on the progression of the oral mucosal reaction and treatment outcome during an intensive course of synchronous radiation and chemotherapy. Tumour response and long term normal tissue changes have been carefully recorded. Results and freedom from toxic side effects suggest further studies. (author)

  5. Characterization of commercial proton exchange membrane materials after exposure to beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) type electrolysis cells have a potential use for tritium removal and heavy water upgrading. AECL is currently exposing various commercial PEM materials to both gamma (Cobalt-60 source) and beta (tritiated water) radiation to study the effects of radiation on these materials. This paper summarizes the testing methods and results that have been collected to date. The PEM materials that are or have been exposed to radiation are: Nafion 112, 212, 117 and 1110. Membrane characterization pre- and post- exposure consists of non-destructive inspection (FTIR, SEM/XPS), mechanical (tensile strength, percentage elongation, and modulus), electrical (resistance), or chemical (ion-exchange capacity - IEC). It has appeared that the best characterization techniques to compare exposed versus unexposed membranes were IEC, ultimate tensile strength and percent elongation. These testing techniques are easy and cheap to perform. The non-destructive tests, such as SEM and FTIR did not provide particularly useful information on radiation-induced degradation. Where changes in material properties were measured after radiation exposure, they would be expected to result in poorer cell performance. However, for modest γ-radiation exposure, all membranes showed a slight decrease in cell voltage (better performance). In contrast, the one β-radiation exposed membrane did show the expected increase in cell voltage. The counterintuitive trend for γ-radiation exposed membranes is not yet understood. Based on these preliminary results, it appears that γ- and β-radiation exposures have different effects

  6. Real and virtual radiative processes in beta-decay of free neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigation of the yet unobserved radiative neutron decay was performed. Experimental search for this decay allows one to test directly the part of the radiative corrections whose contribution is presently estimated at 1.5% of total neutron β-decay probability. Descriptions of the neutron relative decay and nuclear radiative β-decay are compared. The results of the theoretical evaluations of the radiative corrections given in the literature are discussed

  7. A prototype of an extrapolation chamber for beta radiation beams of 90Sr+90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extrapolation chamber is the only primary standard dosimeter for beta radiation. With the aim to test new configurations and materials using easily-available and low-cost materials and fulfill the need of a chamber for scientific metrological purposes, in this paper the prototype of an extrapolation chamber has been built and its performance has been investigated in the beta radiation field of 90Sr+90Y. The main differences between the chamber and commercially available chambers are the geometry, constituent material and configuration. The obtained results were compared with those of the calibration certificate of the source and an agreement within 4 % was verified. The depth-dose curve was also obtained and compared with the curve published in ISO 6980, showing a good agreement. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulation was undertaken using MCNP4C code and the relative difference of 0.3 % was observed compared to the experiment. All of the results proved the suitability of the chamber in the beta radiation field of 90Sr+90Y. (author)

  8. Beta Radiation Exposure of Personnel in Radiosynovectomy and at the Production of Eye Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Beta radionuclides are increasingly used in nuclear medicine therapy. In a study of exposure at working places with supposed enhanced radiation risk the followings are monitored: 1. Production of eye applicators (106Ru/106Rh) for therapy of intraocular tumours. During the processes radionuclides are used in sealed and unsealed form. 2. Radiosynovectomy (RSO). This therapy is often used in treatment of inflammatory joint disease. The radionuclides 169Er, 186Re and 90Y are applied in form of radioactive solutions. A complex of problems has to be solved here: Handling of high activities (several GBq per day), very small distances between source and skin, high risk of skin contamination, unsatisfactory dose measurement techniques. In our investigations high sensitive thin thermoluminescence dosimeters (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) were used to determine the skin dose of the hands especially fingertips during preparation and application of the radioactive substances at several institutions. During production of eye applicators we found hand doses essentially below the annual limit. But direct radiation at RSO caused more than 100 mSv at the fingertips per working day in some cases. Even higher doses (more than 50% of the annual limit for skin during a working day) were caused by contamination of the hands. By use of manipulators, wearing of appropriate protection gloves and by improvement of directions for work, the radiation exposure could be reduced dramatically. Consequences for individual beta dosimetry and with respect to license of use of beta radionuclides are discussed. (author)

  9. Thermoluminescent characterization of thin films of aluminium oxide submitted to beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By mean of the laser ablation technique, thin films of aluminium oxide have been deposited on kapton substrates. These films present thermoluminescent response (Tl) when they are exposed to beta and gamma radiation. The brilliance curves show two peaks between 112 C and 180 C. A dose-response relationship study was realized and the Tl kinetic parameters were determined using the computerized deconvolution of the brilliance curve (CGCD). The thin films of aluminium oxide have potential applications as ultra.thin radiation dosemeters. (Author)

  10. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • It incorporates all suggestions by the reviewers. • Explanation to each new term is provided and suitable references are given. • Sample identities have been streamlined by revising the text and the tables. • Some figures have been redrawn. - Abstract: Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid–base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete’s tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry

  11. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S. Yu.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Shkuropatenko, V. A.; Tarasov, R. V.; Rybka, A. V.; Zakharchenko, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete's tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  12. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S., E-mail: asw@anl.gov [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sayenko, S.Yu.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Shkuropatenko, V.A.; Tarasov, R.V.; Rybka, A.V.; Zakharchenko, A.A. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • It incorporates all suggestions by the reviewers. • Explanation to each new term is provided and suitable references are given. • Sample identities have been streamlined by revising the text and the tables. • Some figures have been redrawn. - Abstract: Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid–base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete’s tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  13. Equipment for measuring radiation. Part 3. Technique of measuring radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanowski, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Difficulties are noted in measuring the effects of radiation because of the excessively low energy of the measured fields. In nature there are different magnetic-dynamic and magnetic-hydrodynamic generators which are sources of very low intensity which changes in time. The equipment of measurements is examined in the example of one of the generators, underground water current. The apparatus is described in detail for measuring the intensity of the electromagnetic SHF field. Under the underground water currents a change is observed in the intensity of the electromagnetic field. The possibilities are also examined of direct measurement of ultrasonic elastic fluctuations caused by the underground current, as well as the possibility of recording other physical fields (spontaneous polarization, soil temperature). A study was made of the effect of the underground water current on the occurrence of physical, chemical and biological processes: photochemical reactions, reactions of metal oxidation, Golomb effect (change in the rate of sedimentation of argillaceous particles in water under the influence of a biofield), change in air humidity and soil water content, change in intensity of the magnetic field, Hall effect, change in luminescence of certain organisms or the luminophore released by them. Basic plans are presented of certain measurement and recording devices.

  14. Radiogenic late effects in the eye after therapeutic application of beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta irradiation with 90Sr/90Y is used to treat epibulbar tumours (carcinoma, melanoma) and irradiation with 106Ru/106Rh is used to treat intra-ocular tumours (melanoma, retinoblastoma). Two studies have been carried out. Since 1960, 185 patients with epibulbar pigment tumours and 15 patients with conjunctiva carcinomas have been treated with 90Sr/90Y-applicators and observed for several years. The dose applied was 10,000 to 20,000 rads at the focus depending on the type and extent of the tumour. Apart from teleangiectasias of the conjunctiva, there were only a few cases of severe radio-induced complications such as keratopathies and secondary glaucoma, which were regarded as the lesser evil in comparison with the main disease. The radiation cataract after beta irradiation remains peripheral and does not impair vision. So far 39 patients with choroid melanomas and 22 children with retinoblastomas have been observed for more than 5 years after beta irradiation with 106Ru/106Rh. The dose applied at the sclera surface was 40,000 to 100,000 rads for 4 to 8 days. In 39 patients with successfully irradiated choroid melanomas, radio-induced late complications developed such as macula degeneration, opticus atrophy and retinal-vessel ablations, which may impair vision. In the 22 children irradiated, only 7 cases of late complications with impaired functions could be observed. Whereas radiation-induced late damage after beta irradiation of the front section of the eye is of small clinical importance, especially in older patients, intra-ocular tumours with radio-induced late damage in the retinal vessel and capillary system have to be expected after high-dose beta irradiation

  15. Procedure to carry out leakage test in beta radiation sealed sources emitters of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y; Procedimiento para realizar prueba de fuga en fuentes selladas de radiacion beta emisoras de {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In the alpha-beta room of the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration of the Metrology Department of Ionizing Radiations ophthalmic applicators are calibrated in absorbed dose terms in water D{sub w}; these applicators, basically are emitter sealed sources of pure beta radiation of {sup 90}Sr / {sup 90}Y. Concretely, the laboratory quality system indicates to use the established procedure for the calibration of these sources, which establishes the requirement of to carry out a leakage test, before to calibrate the source. However, in the Laboratory leakage test certificates sent by specialized companies in radiological protection services have been received, in which are used gamma spectrometry equipment s for beta radiation leakage tests, since it is not reliable to detect pure beta radiation with a scintillating detector with NaI crystal, (because it could detect the braking radiation produced in the detector). Therefore the Laboratory has had to verify the results of the tests with a correct technique, with the purpose of determining the presence of sources with their altered integrity and radioactive material leakage. The objective of this work is to describe a technique for beta activity measurement - of the standard ISO 7503, part 1 (1988) - and its application with a detector Gm plane (type pankage) in the realization of leakage tests in emitter sources of pure beta radiation, inside the mark of quality assurance indicated by the report ICRU 76. (Author)

  16. Correction factors for the ISO rod phantom, a cylinder phantom, and the ICRU sphere for reference beta radiation fields of the BSS 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) requires in its standard ISO 6980 that beta reference radiation fields for radiation protection be calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to tissue at a depth of 0.07 mm in a slab phantom (30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm). However, many beta dosemeters are ring dosemeters and are, therefore, irradiated on a rod phantom (1.9 cm in diameter and 30 cm long), or they are eye dosemeters possibly irradiated on a cylinder phantom (20 cm in diameter and 20 cm high), or area dosemeters irradiated free in air with the conventional quantity value (true value) being defined in a sphere (30 cm in diameter, made of ICRU tissue (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements)). Therefore, the correction factors for the conventional quantity value in the rod, the cylinder, and the sphere instead of the slab (all made of ICRU tissue) were calculated for the radiation fields of 147Pm, 85Kr, 90Sr/90Y, and, 106Ru/106Rh sources of the beta secondary standard BSS 2 developed at PTB. All correction factors were calculated for 0° up to 75° (in steps of 15°) radiation incidence. The results are ready for implementation in ISO 6980-3 and have recently been (partly) implemented in the software of the BSS 2

  17. Development of the 'Beta-Boy' radiation counter for public acceptance activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., which was established on July 1st, 1992 largely financed by Japan's electric power companies is presently developing four projects in the village of Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, roughly 700 km north of Tokyo: a uranium enrichment plant, which began operation in March, 1992; a reprocessing plant to begin construction in March, 1993; a high level radioactive waste storage facility for waste returned from overseas reprocessing, construction of which began in May, 1992; and a low level radioactive waste disposal center for waste generated in nuclear power plants, which began operation in December, 1992. Approval for the location of these facilities was obtained from the authorities in Aomori Prefecture and Rokkasho Village in 1985. However, following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, the nuclear fuel cycle project in Rokkasho as well as other nuclear facilities throughout the country were faced with very active opposition from the antinuclear movement. Through our efforts to obtain public acceptance by arranging site tours, lectures, public debates and so on, we realized that many of the people of Aomori Prefecture had doubts about the nuclear fuel cycle, and that more than 80% of those people held concerns about radiation. We also found that through the demonstration of measuring atmospheric radiation levels using a large conventional portable GM survey meter of the type used in nuclear facilities, we were able to obtain considerable understanding of the nature of radiation at our lectures. Realizing therefore the need to increase this effect, we decided to develop a simple radiation counter, which all the participants at our lectures could operate themselves to measure radiation. I will now explain the characteristics of 'Beta-Boy', new radiation counter, and the method to explain radiation by using 'Beta-Boy' in our public acceptance activities

  18. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of beta radiations of 90 Sr/ 90 Y using amorphous ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the results of studying the thermoluminescent properties (Tl) of the zirconium oxide in its amorphous state (ZrO2-a) before beta radiations of 90 Sr/ 90 Y are presented. The amorphous powders of the zirconium oxide were synthesized by means of the sol-gel technique. The sol-gel process using alkoxides like precursors, is an efficient method to prepare a matrix of zirconium oxide by hydrolysis - condensation of the precursor to form chains of Zr-H3 and Zr-O2. One of the advantages of this technique is the obtention of gels at low temperatures with very high purity and homogeneity. The powders were characterized by means of thermal analysis and by X-ray diffraction. The powders of ZrO2-a, previously irradiated with beta particles of 90 Sr/90 Y, presented a thermoluminescent curve with two peaks at 150 and 257 C. The dissipation of the information of the one ZrO2-a was of 40% the first 2 hours remaining constant the information for the following 30 days. The reproducibility of the information was of ± 2.5% in standard deviation. The studied characteristics allow to propose to the amorphous zirconium oxide as thermoluminescent dosemeter for the detection of beta radiation. (Author)

  19. Extremity dosimeters characterization and calibration for beta radiation fields to evaluate the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two extremity personal dosimeters were type tested and calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent, Hρ(d), at 0.07 mm depth, at beta particle fields from a 90 Sr+90 Y radiation source. One dosimeter is a graphite mixed CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescent (TL) detector in the Harshaw /Bicron Ext-Rad ring; the other is a LiF:Mg,Ti TL detector in a velcro ring. Type tests were carried out to verify the detection limit, linearity, and the angular dependence of both dosimeters. Dosimeters were used to evaluate the personal dose equivalent of operators who deal with 90 Sr+90 Y ophthalmic and dermatologic applicators at a beta therapy service. Results suggest that the CaSO4:Dy dosimeter is more reliable and adequate for measurements at beta radiation fields than the LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeter which shows a trend to subestimate the values of Hρ(0.07). Two extremity personal dosimeters were type tested. (author)

  20. Cerenkov radiation imaging as a method for quantitative measurements of beta particles in a microfluidic chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that microfluidic chips used for synthesizing 18F-labeled compounds demonstrate visible light emission without nearby scintillators or fluorescent materials. The origin of the light was investigated and found to be consistent with the emission characteristics from Cerenkov radiation. Since 18F decays through the emission of high-energy positrons, the energy threshold for beta particles, i.e. electrons or positrons, to generate Cerenkov radiation was calculated for water and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the most commonly used polymer-based material for microfluidic chips. Beta particles emitted from 18F have a continuous energy spectrum, with a maximum energy that exceeds this energy threshold for both water and PDMS. In addition, the spectral characteristics of the emitted light from 18F in distilled water were also measured, yielding a broad distribution from 300 nm to 700 nm, with higher intensity at shorter wavelengths. A photograph of the 18F solution showed a bluish-white light emitted from the solution, further suggesting Cerenkov radiation. In this study, the feasibility of using this Cerenkov light emission as a method for quantitative measurements of the radioactivity within the microfluidic chip in situ was evaluated. A detector previously developed for imaging microfluidic platforms was used. The detector consisted of a charge-coupled device (CCD) optically coupled to a lens. The system spatial resolution, minimum detectable activity and dynamic range were evaluated. In addition, the calibration of a Cerenkov signal versus activity concentration in the microfluidic chip was determined. This novel method of Cerenkov radiation measurements will provide researchers with a simple yet robust quantitative imaging tool for microfluidic applications utilizing beta particles.

  1. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  2. BEGe detector response to alpha and beta-radiation near its p+ electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Phase II of the GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of 76Ge. The main feature of these detectors is their small p+ electrode used for signal read-out. Due to the thin dead layer of the p+ contact, surface events close to this electrode represent a potential background for the search of 0νββ. A study was conducted to determine the response of the detector to alpha and beta-radiation using movable collimated sources within a custom-build cryostat. Preliminary results of this study and a possible method to discriminate these events will be presented.

  3. TL and LOE dosimetric evaluation of diamond films exposed to beta and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diamond possesses a privileged position regarding other materials of great technological importance. Their applications go from the optics, microelectronics, metals industry, medicine and of course as dosemeter, in the registration and detection of ionizing and non ionizing radiation. In this work the results of TL/LOE obtained in two samples of diamond of 10 μm thickness grown by the chemical vapor deposition method (CVD) assisted by microwave plasma. The films were deposited in a silicon substrate (001) starting from a mixture of gases composed of CH4/H2 and 750 ppm of molecular nitrogen as dopant. The samples were exposed to beta radiation (Sr90/ Y90) and ultraviolet, being stimulated later on thermal (TL) and optically (LOE) to evaluate their dosimetric properties. The sample without doping presented high response TL/LOE to the ultraviolet and beta radiation. The TL glow curve of the sample without doping showed two TL peaks with second order kinetics in the range of 520 to 550 K, besides a peak with first order kinetics of more intensity around 607 K. The TL efficiency of the non doped sample is bigger than the doped with nitrogen; however the LOE efficiency is similar in both samples. The results indicate that the CVD diamond possesses excellent perspectives for dosimetric applications, with special importance in radiotherapy due to it is biologically compatible with the human tissue. (Author)

  4. High LET Radiation Can Enhance TGF(Beta) Induced EMT and Cross-Talk with ATM Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Anderson, Janniffer; ONeill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The TGF(Beta) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation in mammary epithelial cells. We investigated possible interactions between the TGF(Beta) and ATM pathways following simulated space radiation using hTERT immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC-hTERT), mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1lu), and several human fibroblast cell lines. TGF(Beta) is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis. The implication of EMT by radiation also has several lines of developing evidence, however is poorly understood. The identification of TGF(Beta) induced EMT can be shown in changes to morphology, related gene over expression or down regulation, which can be detected by RT-PCR, and immunostaining and western blotting. In this study, we have observed morphologic and molecular alternations consistent with EMT after Mv1lu cells were treated with TGF(Beta) High LET radiation enhanced TGF(Beta) mediated EMT with a dose as low as 0.1Gy. In order to consider the TGF(Beta) interaction with ATM we used a potent ATM inhibitor Ku55933 and investigated gene expression changes and Smad signaling kinetics. Ku559933 was observed to reverse TGF(Beta) induced EMT, while this was not observed in dual treated cells (radiation+TGF(Beta)). In EPC-hTERT cells, TGF(Beta) alone was not able to induce EMT after 3 days of application. A combined treatment with high LET, however, significantly caused the alteration of EMT markers. To study the function of p53 in the process of EMT, we knocked down P53 through RNA interference. Morphology changes associated with EMT were observed in epithelial cells with silenced p53. Our study indicates: high LET radiation can enhance TGF(Beta) induced EMT; while ATM is triggering the process of TGF(Beta)-induced EMT, p53 might be an essential repressor for EMT phenotypes.

  5. Place and part of ICRU in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For soon seventy years, ICRU has played a determining part in the development of concepts, magnitudes and dosimetry units used in radiation protection. The actual system of units and magnitudes answers both scientific requirements and application flexibility to allow to measure the workers and public exposure in the majority of conditions met with practice. (N.C.)

  6. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations. Part 1: Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) calibration service for ionizing radiations has been active for 40 years in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory web. It has been the first center, in 1985, to be acknowledges by the Italian calibration service (SIT) for the two quantities for photons: exposure and air kerma. Since the Institute for the Radiation Protection of ENEA has moved to the new site in Montecuccolino (Bologna, Italy) in 1995, the whole laboratory has been renovated and all irradiation rooms together with radiation source and equipment have been reorganized according to the Χ, γ, β and neutron fields metrology requirements. The aim of this report, as the first part of a report describing all facilities available at the service, is to give a detailed description of all equipment s qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters

  7. Determination of the dose rapidity of a 90 Sr beta radiation source using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescent dosemeters developed in Mexico, have been used efficiently in environmental and personal dosimetry. When the dose rate of some source is not known can be estimated with the use of thermoluminescent dosemeters taking in account the geometrical array used in the irradiations for reproducibility of the results in posterior irradiations. In this work it was estimated the dose rate of a 90 Sr-90 Y beta radiation source which is property of the Nuclear Sciences Institute, UNAM, therefore it was l ended to the Metropolitan Autonomous University- Iztapalapa Unit for the characterization of new Tl materials, taking account of the institutional collaboration agreements. (Author)

  8. Design, construction and tests of well type ionization chamber for beta and gamma radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design, construction and tests of well type ionization chamber, with parallel plate electrodes, which is used in the measurements of radiopharmacous activities, by means of beta and/or gamma radiations detection. Its response was studied utilizing Tc-99, I-131, Co-60, Am-241 and Sr-90 sources. The results obtained show that, due to to the very low leakage current from the chamber and the linearity of response, its possible to measure activities in the range from 20KBq up to 10GBq, whith a precision better than 1%. (author)

  9. Mensuration of equivalent dose with personal dosemeters and instruments of radiological protection in the new operative magnitudes ICRU, for external fields of beta radiation. Part I. Study of the homogeneity of the response personal dosemeters leaves (cards G-1, TLD-100), in radiation fields of Co60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sample of 40 composed personal dosemeters by cards model: G-l, (each card is made up of two TLD-100 crystals encapsulated in teflon), Harshaw trademark; those personal dosemeters present a free window and another with a filter of A1 of 171.7 mg cm-2 of mass thickness.The objective of the work is to select of this sample of 40 personal dosemeters a population with the same stocking and standard deviation. The technique used is that of comparison of stockings, (ANOVA; Variance Analysis, when samples of the same one were had size; and/or GLM, Widespread Lineal Models, when the samples were of different size), by means of the use of those Duncan statistics, SNK, Tukey, Gabriel; the results are validated proving the kindness of adjustment of the experimental data to a Normal distribution by means of the Shapiro-Wilks statistics.The experimental design used consists on a test of two vias: a via is the variable card with two levels, (crystal 1 and 2), the other via is the variable irradiation position with four levels, (LS=left superior, SR= right superior, LI= left Inferior, IR = right inferior). The irradiations carried out in blocks of four personal dosemeters in a gamma radiation beam range of Cobalt 60; carrying out three repetitions of the design. With object of proving the homogeneity of the filter of A1 in those personal dosemeters the experimental design was executed for those cards without personal dosemeters.They were also carried out tests of stockings to the readings of bottom and sensibility of the reader equipment, (Harshaw, model marks 2271), certain that doesnt exist differences for sequence of reading, but if in the stockings of the sensibility, (they were 4 different populations). The responses of the dosemeters were corrected subtracting him the reading correspondence of bottom and by sensibility of the reader equipment before subjecting them to the tests of stockings mentioned. Of the results of the tests of stockings for the cards with and without

  10. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourguignon, Michel H. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, Paris Cedex 12 (France); CEA-DSV-DRM Hopital, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Saint Louis, Paris (France); Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria R.; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina di [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Laboratorio de Radiopatologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carosella, Edgardo D. [CEA-DSV-DRM Hopital, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Saint Louis, Paris (France)

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are ''hypersensitive'' to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. (orig.)

  11. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Michel H; Gisone, Pablo A; Perez, Maria R; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Giorgio, Marina Di; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are "hypersensitive" to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. PMID:15692806

  12. Genetic and epigenetic features in radiation sensitivity. Part II: implications for clinical practice and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress especially in the field of gene identification and expression has attracted greater attention to the genetic and epigenetic susceptibility to cancer, possibly enhanced by ionising radiation. This issue is especially important for radiation therapists since hypersensitive patients may suffer from adverse effects in normal tissues following standard radiation therapy, while normally sensitive patients could receive higher doses of radiation, offering a better likelihood of cure for malignant tumours. Although only a small percentage of individuals are ''hypersensitive'' to radiation effects, all medical specialists using ionising radiation should be aware of the aforementioned progress in medical knowledge. The present paper, the second of two parts, reviews human disorders known or strongly suspected to be associated with hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. The main tests capable of detecting such pathologies in advance are analysed, and ethical issues regarding genetic testing are considered. The implications for radiation protection of possible hypersensitivity to radiation in a part of the population are discussed, and some guidelines for nuclear medicine professionals are proposed. (orig.)

  13. Effects of beta radiation from organically bound tritium on cultured mouse embryonic mid brain cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bing [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)]|[Toho Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Keiko; Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Shima, Akihiro [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    Effects of beta radiation from four kinds of organically bound tritium compounds were investigated on cultured mouse embryonic mid brain cells, isolated form 11-d-old mouse embryos. The MBC showed a critical time when they were more radiosensitive. Although dose-dependent inhibition was found for both cellular proliferation and differentiation. the differential was more sensitive to radiation than proliferation when compared at ID50, the inhibitory dose that reduced assessment value by 50% of the control. Dose-dependent decrease of DNA and protein contents were also observed. The relative biological effectiveness values, ranging from 4.6 to 8.7, of beta ray from organically bound tritium compounds were obtained when compared with x irradiation at their ID50s on the inhibition of cell proliferation and differentiation, and on the decrease of DNA and protein contents of the cultures. Th mixed exposure to x ray and one kind of organically bound tritium compound or to any two kinds of organically bound tritium compound resulted in a more efficiently inhibitory effect on differentiation than the exposure to x ray or to any one kind of organically bound tritium compound d alone, especially when methyl-{sup 3}H-thymidine was used. Doses as low as 0.05 Gy (5 cGy) from a mixed exposure resulted in detectable inhibitory effects. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Thermoluminescence characterization of CVD diamond film exposed to UV and beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of diamond films grown by microwave and hot filament CVD techniques were studied. The main purpose of the present work was to characterize the thermoluminescence response of diamond films to ultraviolet and beta radiation. The thermoluminescence excitation spectrum exhibits maximum TL efficiency around 210-215 nm. All samples presented a glow curve composed of at least one TL peak and showed regions of linear as well as supralinear behavior as a function or irradiation dose. The linear dose dependence was found for up to sixteen minutes of monochromatic UV irradiation and 300 Gy for beta irradiated samples. The activation energy and the frequency factor were determined and found in the range of 0.33-1.7 eV and 5.44 x 102-5.67 x 1016 s-1, respectively. The observed TL performance is reasonable appropriate to justify further investigation of diamond films as radiation dosimeters keeping in mind that diamond is an ideal TL dosemeter since it is tissue-equivalent and biological compatible. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Beta radiation exposure of staff during and after therapies with 90Y-labelled substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-immuno-therapies (RITs) and peptide receptor radio-therapies (PRRTs) with 90Y-labelled compounds offer promising prospects for tumor treatment in nuclear medicine. However, when preparing and performing these therapies, which require manipulations of high activities of 90Y (>1 GBq), technicians and physicians may receive high exposures, mainly to the skin of the hands. Even non-occupationally exposed persons, such as caregivers and family members, receive external exposures in the initial period after therapy, arising from the 90Y in the patient. The local skin doses of the individual staff members, measured during RITs and PRRTs with thermoluminescence detectors fixed with tapes to the fingers, vary considerably. The exposure of staff can exceed the annual permissible dose limit of 500 mSv if radiation protection standards are low. Thus, adequate safety measures are needed. Measurements of the dose rate around patients, made using survey meters with sufficient response to beta particles, indicate that the exposure of caregivers and family members is considerably higher than previously assumed, and was dominated by primary beta radiation instead of Bremsstrahlung. Nevertheless, under normal circumstances, the annual dose limits for the public (effective dose: 1 mSv, skin dose: 50 mSv) will be complied with. (authors)

  16. Effects of beta radiation from organically bound tritium on cultured mouse embryonic mid brain cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of beta radiation from four kinds of organically bound tritium compounds were investigated on cultured mouse embryonic mid brain cells, isolated form 11-d-old mouse embryos. The MBC showed a critical time when they were more radiosensitive. Although dose-dependent inhibition was found for both cellular proliferation and differentiation. the differential was more sensitive to radiation than proliferation when compared at ID50, the inhibitory dose that reduced assessment value by 50% of the control. Dose-dependent decrease of DNA and protein contents were also observed. The relative biological effectiveness values, ranging from 4.6 to 8.7, of beta ray from organically bound tritium compounds were obtained when compared with x irradiation at their ID50s on the inhibition of cell proliferation and differentiation, and on the decrease of DNA and protein contents of the cultures. Th mixed exposure to x ray and one kind of organically bound tritium compound or to any two kinds of organically bound tritium compound resulted in a more efficiently inhibitory effect on differentiation than the exposure to x ray or to any one kind of organically bound tritium compound d alone, especially when methyl-3H-thymidine was used. Doses as low as 0.05 Gy (5 cGy) from a mixed exposure resulted in detectable inhibitory effects. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Classic and molecular cytogenetic analysis regarding human reactivity to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. One of the most important mutagen agents in developing different types of cancer is the action of ionizing radiation. The main events induced by irradiation are: chromosome breakage, chromosome rearrangements and genomic instability. The chromosomal aberrations are very useful biomarkers as intermediate end points in evaluating harmful biological effects of ionizing radiation. So, the main objectives of this work were: the study of human genome reactivity to beta radiation by classic microscopy; the study of the integrity/modification of the telomeres after irradiation and the analysis of the amplification of the RNA telomerase compound by FISH technique. Irradiations were performed at Electron Accelerators Laboratory, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele-Bucharest, Romania. The samples were irradiated using an ALIN 10 linear electron accelerator. ALIN 10 is a travelling wave type linac operating at 2.998 GHz, 6.5 MeV mean energy, with a 0.1 mm Al foil exit window. Improved Fricke, ferrous sulphate, cupric sulphate and sulphuric acid in triple distilled water dosimetry system has been used to perform preliminary dose measurements. The conventional Hungerford method on short-term cultures for 72 hrs was adapted for human chromosome investigation. The peripheral blood was collected from aged 27, healthy, non-smoker donor. The doses used to irradiate human blood cultures were: 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. The slides for optic microscopy were prepared by air-drying and stained with a 10% Giemsa solution. For FISH technique was used Chromosome In Situ Hybridization Kit. The probes were: one satellite probe - for revealing the telomere and the second one for the RNA telomerase compound. A large spectrum of chromosomal rearrangements was induced by beta irradiation in humans in vitro: complex chromosomal interchange involving at least two nonhomologous chromosomes, double minutes (DM), acentric fragments

  18. Radiation protection - Performance criteria for radiobioassay. Part 1: General principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Standard ISO 12790-1 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear energy, Subcommittee SC 2, Radiation protection. ISO 12790 consists of the following parts, under the general title Radiation protection - Performance criteria for radiobioassay: Part 1: General principles; and Part 2: Rationale and specific applications This part of ISO 12790 provides criteria for quality assurance and control, evaluation of performance and the accreditation of radiobioassay service laboratories. Criteria and guidance for direct radiobioassay ( in vivo) and indirect radiobioassay ( in vitro) are given in separate clauses of this part of ISO 12790. This part of ISO 12790 addresses: a) the accuracy of direct ( in vivo) measurements of activity and quantities of selected important radionuclides in test phantoms and indirect ( in vitro) measurements of activity and quantities of selected important radionuclides in test samples; b) methods for determining the minimum detectable amount; c) minimum testing levels and testing ranges; d) requirements for reporting radiobioassay results by service laboratories; e) quality assurance in service laboratories; f) quality control in service laboratories; g) protocol for reporting test evaluations by service laboratories to the testing laboratory; h) default procedures when the service laboratory customer does not specify the performance criteria. The scope of this part of ISO 12790 does not include: a) detailed radiochemical methods for separating radionuclides from biological samples; b) detailed procedures for in vivo and in vitro radioactivity measurements; c) metabolic data and mathematical models for converting radiobioassay results into absorbed dose and dose equivalent; d) procedures for the preparation and distribution of test samples and phantoms by the testing laboratories. Analytical methods for radiobioassay are not currently standardized, but are available in the literature. Guidance for converting

  19. Review of personal monitoring techniques for the measurement of absorbed dose from external beta and low energy photon radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul

    1986-01-01

    The techniques available at present for personal monitoring of doses from external beta and low energy photon radiation are reviewed. The performance of currently used dosimetry systems is compared with that recommended internationally, and developments for improving the actual performance are...... materials and detector/filter geometry. Improvements in the energy and angular response of dosemeters for the measurements of doses from beta and low energy photon radiation can be achieved essentially through two different approaches: either by using thin detectors or multi-element dosemeters. Their...

  20. Simultaneos determination of absorbed doses due to beta and gamma radiations with CaSO4: Dy produced at Ipen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the Goiania radiological accident, it was necessary to develop urgently a dosimeter in order to evaluate, simultaneously, beta and gamma absorbed doses, due to 137Cs radiations. Therefore, the Dosimetric Material Production Laboratory of IPEN developed a simple, practical, light and low cost badge using small thickness (0,20mm) thermoluminescent CaSO4: Dy pellets produced by the same laboratory. This pellets are adequate for beta radiation detection. These dosimeters were worn by some IPEN technicians who worked in Goiania city, and were used to evaluate the external and internal contaminations presented by the accident victims interned at the Hospital Naval Marcilio Dias. (author)

  1. NF ISO 15382. Nuclear energy - Radioprotection - Procedure of radioprotection dosimetry monitoring in nuclear facilities for the external exposure to weakly penetrant radiations, in particular the beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This international standard specifies a dosimetry monitoring procedure for the radiation protection inside nuclear facilities and concerns the external exposure to weakly penetrant radiations, i.e.: beta, beta +, conversion electrons, and photons with an energy < 15 keV. It describes the procedure of radioprotection organization and control, and the measurements and analyses to be implemented. It applies to the operations regularly performed in nuclear reactors, like maintenance, handling of wastes and dismantling activities. These recommendations can be transferred to other nuclear domains, including the fuel fabrication and reprocessing, the accelerators, and the nuclear medicine, biology and research facilities. (J.S.)

  2. Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yongchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Xu Yuqiao [Department of Pathology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Su Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Mei Shi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Guo Guozhen, E-mail: guozhenguo@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

  3. Measurement of dose speed absorbed in depth imparted by sources external secondary patterns of beta radiation. Part 1 Measurement of dose speed absorbed in the surface of soft fabric for isotopes of 90Sr/90Y, 147Pm and 204TI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose speed was measured absorbed for depth zero, (superficial) in soft equivalent fabric, for the secondary patterns four sources of beta radiation, (Nr. 86): 90Sr/90Y, (1850 MBq and 74 MBq respectively); 147Pm, (518 MBq) and 204TI, (18.5 MBq). The measurement is carried out to different distances of source-detecting separation, (11.0, 30.0 and 50.0 cm for the source of 1850 MBq, 30.0 cm for that of 74 MBq; 11.00 cm for the source of 147Pmand to contact for all the sources); maintaining the radiation sheaf aligned the one axis of symmetry of the detector, (α 0 degrees). The detector employed was a extrapolation chambers of variable electrodes and electrode fixed collector, (30 mm of diameter). In accordance with the principle of Bragg-Gray the volume of the chambers is varied and they register the variations of the current of collected ionization, correcting until for a maximum of thirteen correction factors that take into account the deviation to the suppositions that it establishes this principle. The certain values of the speed of superficial absorbed dose are in the following intervals: 90Sr/90Y, (1850 MBq, 0.0, 11.0, 30.0 and 50.0 cm): 43.164 mGy S-t, 0.544 mGy s-1 ,0.075 mGy s-1 and 0.027 mGy s-1, respectively, with a Global Analysis of the order of 1.17%, 1.17%, 1.14% and 1.66%, K J; 90Sr / 90Y, (74 MBq, 0.0 and 30 cm): 1.536 mGy s-1 and 0.002 mGy s-1, with Global Analysis of 1.19.0% and 5.22%, (K = 1) respectively, for the 147Pm, (0.0 and 11.0 in the interval of: 0.36 μGy s-1 and 0.43 μGy s-1, with one Global Analysis of 1 .42% and 4.28%, (K = 1), respectively; and finally for the 204TI, (0.0 cm) in the interval of 0.10 μGy s-1 with a Global Analysis of 1.27%. He calculates of the Global Analysis one carries out of agreement with those recommendations of the BIPM. In all the cases of source-detecting arrangement with separations different from zero, models of simple lineal regression were used. However for the case of the determination of the speed

  4. Cherenkov radiation imaging of beta emitters: in vitro and in vivo results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work was to investigate both in vitro and in vivo Cherenkov radiation (CR) emission coming from 18F and 32P. The main difference between 18F and 32P is mainly the number of the emitted light photons, more precisely the same activity of 32P emits more CR photons with respect to 18F. In vitro results obtained by comparing beta counter measurements with photons average radiance showed that Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) allows quantitative tracer activity measurements. In order to investigate in vivo the CLI approach, we studied an experimental xenograft tumor model of mammary carcinoma (BB1 tumor cells). Cherenkov in vivo dynamic whole body images of tumor bearing mice were acquired and the tumor tissue time activity curves reflected the well-known physiological accumulation of 18F-FDG in malignant tissues with respect to normal tissues. The results presented here show that it is possible to use conventional optical imaging devices for in vitro or in vivo study of beta emitters.

  5. First Ex-Vivo Validation of a Radioguided Surgery Technique with beta- Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Bocci, V; Carollo, A; Chiodi, G; Colandrea, M; Collamati, F; Cremonesi, M; Donnarumma, R; Ferrari, M E; Ferroli, P; Ghielmetti, F; Grana, C M; Marafini, M; Morganti, S; Terracciano, C Mancini; Patanè, M; Pedroli, G; Pollo, B; Recchia, L; Russomando, A; Toppi, M; Traini, G; Faccini, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A radio-guided surgery technique with beta- -emitting radio-tracers was suggested to overcome the effect of the large penetration of gamma radiation. The feasibility studies in the case of brain tumors and abdominal neuro-endocrine tumors were based on simulations starting from PET images with several underlying assumptions. This paper reports, as proof-of-principle of this technique, an ex-vivo test on a meningioma patient. This test allowed to validate the whole chain, from the evaluation of the SUV of the tumor, to the assumptions on the bio-distribution and the signal detection. Methods: A patient affected by meningioma was administered 300 MBq of 90Y-DOTATOC. Several samples extracted from the meningioma and the nearby Dura Mater were analyzed with a beta- probe designed specifically for this radio-guided surgery technique. The observed signals were compared both with the evaluation from the histology and with the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: we obtained a large signal on the bulk tumor (105...

  6. Reference neutron radiations. Part 2: Calibration fundamentals of radiation protection devices related to the basic quantities characterizing the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISO 8529 consists of the following parts, under the general title Reference neutron radiations: Part 1: Characteristics and methods of production; Part 2: Calibration fundamentals of radiation protection devices related to the basic quantities characterizing the radiation field; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosimeters and determination of response as a function of energy and angle of incidence. This Part 2. of ISO 8529 takes as its starting point the neutron sources described in ISO 8529-1. It specifies the procedures to be used for realizing the calibration conditions of radiation protection devices in neutron fields produced by these calibration sources, with particular emphasis on the corrections for extraneous effects (e.g., the neutrons scattered from the walls of the calibration room). In this part of ISO 8529, particular emphasis is placed on calibrations using radionuclide sources (clauses 4 to 6) due to their widespread application, with less details given on the use of accelerator and reactor sources (8.2 and 8.3). This part of ISO 8529 then leads to ISO 8529-3 which gives conversion coefficients and the general rules and procedures for calibration

  7. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry performance of natural Brazilian topaz exposed to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has become the technique of choice in many areas of dosimetry. Natural materials like topaz are available in large quantities in Brazil and other countries. They have been studied to investigate the possibility of use its thermoluminescence (TL) properties for dosimetric applications. In this work, we investigate the possibility of utilising the OSL properties of natural Brazilian topaz in dosimetry. Bulk topaz samples were exposed to doses up to 100 Gy of beta radiation and the integrated OSL as a function of the dose showed linear behaviour. The fading occurs in the first 20 min after irradiation but it is <6% of the integrated OSL measured shortly after exposure. We conclude that natural colourless topaz is a very suitable phosphor for OSL dosimetry. (authors)

  8. Radiolysis of D(+)-carnitine by /sup 60/Co-. gamma. -radiation and formation of L(+)-. beta. -methylcholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loester, Heinz; Strack, Erich; Seim, Hermann

    1986-06-01

    The radiolysis of D(+)-carnitine by /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-radiation was examined to obtain optically active ..beta..-methylcholine. It was found that the radiolysis leads to a number of trimethylammonium bases but to no other betaines. (+)-..beta..-Methylcholine and acetonyltrimethylammonium could be identified by means of common analytical methods. The amounts of methylamines formed by irradiation were very small. Racemization of the D(+)-carnitine did not occur during irradiation, L(-)-carnitine was not found when an enzymatical determination method was used. The fact that (+)-..beta..-methylcholine was formed from D(+)-carnitine is pharmacologically important, because acetyl-L(+)-..beta..-methylcholine has a strong interaction with muscarinic receptors.

  9. Study of the influence of Beta-radiation on the properties and mineralization of different starch-based biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, A. L.; Mano, J.F; San Román, J.; Reis, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the effects of beta-radiation are assessed, for the first time, on starch-based biodegradable polymers, with the aim of using it as an alternative sterilization process to the previously studied sterilization methods. Different doses of radiation were used in order to investigate the possibility of using this sterilization technique as a treatment to tailor the surface and bulk properties (namely mechanical) of these polymers. The as-treated substrates were characterized by wate...

  10. Characterization and calibration of extremity dosimeters for beta radiation field in terms of mass and metallurgic individual equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two extremity personal dosimeters were 'type tested' and calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), at 0.07 mm depth, at beta particle fields from a 90 Sr+90 Y radiation source. One dosimeter is a graphite mixed Ca SO4:Dy thermoluminescent (TL) detector in the Harshaw/Bicron Ext-Rad ring; the other is a LiF:Mg, Ti TL detector in a Velcro ring. The 'Type tests' were carried out to verify the detection limit, linearity, and angular dependence of both dosimeters. The calibrated dosimeters were used to evaluate the personal dose equivalent of operators who deal with 90 Sr + 90 Y ophthalmic and dermatological applicators at a beta therapy service. Results suggest that the Ca SO4:Dy dosimeter is more reliable and adequate for measurements at beta radiation fields than the LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeter which subestimates the values of Hp (0.07). (author)

  11. Review of personal monitoring techniques for the measurement of absorbed dose from external beta and low energy photon radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul

    1986-01-01

    The techniques available at present for personal monitoring of doses from external beta and low energy photon radiation are reviewed. The performance of currently used dosimetry systems is compared with that recommended internationally, and developments for improving the actual performance are...

  12. Radiation protection in inhomogeneous beta-gamma fields and modelling of hand phantoms with MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usage of beta-radiation sources in various nuclear medicine therapies is increasing. Consequently, enhanced radiation protection measures are required, as medical staff more frequently handle high-activity sources required for therapy. Inhomogeneous radiation fields make it difficult to determine absorbed dose reliably. Routine monitoring with dosemeters does not guarantee any accurate determination of the local skin dose (LSD). In general, correction factors are used to correct for the measured dose and the maximum absorbed dose received. However, strong underestimations of the maximum exposure are possible depending on the individual handling the process and the reliability of dose measurements. Simulations can be used as a tool for a better understanding of the maximum possible exposure depending on the individual-related handling. While measurements reveal the overall dose during the entire irradiation time of the dosemeter, simulations help to analyse sequences of action. Hence, simulations allow for tracking the points of highest absorbed dose received during the handling process. In this respect, simulations were performed using the MCNPX software. In order to investigate the LSD, two hand phantoms were used, a model based on geometrical elements and a voxel hand. A typical situation of radio-synoviorthesis, i.e. handling a syringe filled with 90Y, was simulated. The results of the simulations show that the annual dose limit may be exceeded within minutes at the position of maximum absorbed dose received and that finger-ring dosemeters measure significantly different doses depending on their wearing position. It is of essential importance to wear the dosemeter properly and to use suitable correction factors with respect to the individual. Simulations are a suitable tool for ensuring reliable dose determination and may help to derive recommendations regarding radiation protection measures. (authors)

  13. Interleukin 1 beta initially sensitizes and subsequently protects murine intestinal stem cells exposed to photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) has been shown to prevent early bone marrow-related death following total-body irradiation, by protecting hematopoietic stem cells and speeding marrow repopulation. This study assesses the effect of IL-1 on the radiation response of the intestinal mucosal stem cell, a nonhematopoietic normal cell relevant to clinical radiation therapy. As observed with bone marrow, administration of human recombinant IL-1 beta (4 micrograms/kg) to C3H/Km mice 20 h prior to total-body irradiation modestly protected duodenal crypt cells. In contrast to bone marrow, IL-1 given 4 or 8 h before radiation sensitized intestinal crypt cells. IL-1 exposure did not substantially alter the slope of the crypt cell survival curve but did affect the shoulder: the X-ray survival curve was offset to the right by 1.01 +/- 0.06 Gy when IL-1 was given 20 h earlier and by 1.28 +/- 0.08 Gy to the left at the 4-h interval. Protection was greatest when IL-1 was administered 20 h before irradiation, but minimal effects persisted as long as 7 days after a single injection. The magnitude of radioprotection at 20 h or of radiosensitization at 4 h increased rapidly as IL-1 dose increased from 0 to 4 micrograms/kg. However, doses ranging from 10 to 100 micrograms/kg produced no further difference in radiation response. Animals treated with saline or IL-1 had similar core temperatures from 4 to 24 h after administration, suggesting that thermal changes were not responsible for either sensitization or protection. Mice irradiated 20 h after IL-1 had significantly greater crypt cell survival than saline-treated irradiated controls at all assay times, which ranged from 54 to 126 h following irradiation. The intervals to maximum crypt depopulation and initiation of repopulation were identical in both saline- and IL-1-treated groups

  14. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Additional knowledge on the impact of various kinds of ionizing radiation in plants on individual, biochemical and molecular level is needed to unravel and compare the toxic mode of action. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied both in lab and field studies to derive the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. However, environmental relevant studies on chronic low-dose gamma exposures are scarce. The radio-ecologically relevant radionuclide 90Sr is a pure beta emitting isotope and originates from nuclear activities and accidents. Although this radionuclide is not essential for plant metabolism, it bears a chemical analogy with the essential plant macro-nutrient Ca2+ thereby taking advantage of Ca2+ transport systems to contaminate plant organs and tissues. Ones plants are exposed to radiation stress, ionization events can cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can induce damage to biological material like DNA, lipids and structural proteins. The following work aimed at evaluating individual, biochemical and molecular endpoints to understand and to compare the mode of action of gamma- and beta radiation stress in plants. Having an equal relative biological effectiveness to non-human biota, it is still not clear in how plants differ or overlap in sensing and interpreting highly penetrating electromagnetic radiation with short-range particle radiation. The floating plant Lemna minor was chosen as model system. Following the OECD guidelines Lemna plants were being exposed separately to an external gamma radiation source or to a 90Sr-contaminated growth medium to obtain single-dose response curves for each type of radiation. In order to acquire accurate dose rate quantifications for beta radiation exposures, 90Sr uptake and accumulation of root and frond have been implemented

  15. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, Arne [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny [University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Additional knowledge on the impact of various kinds of ionizing radiation in plants on individual, biochemical and molecular level is needed to unravel and compare the toxic mode of action. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied both in lab and field studies to derive the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. However, environmental relevant studies on chronic low-dose gamma exposures are scarce. The radio-ecologically relevant radionuclide {sup 90}Sr is a pure beta emitting isotope and originates from nuclear activities and accidents. Although this radionuclide is not essential for plant metabolism, it bears a chemical analogy with the essential plant macro-nutrient Ca{sup 2+} thereby taking advantage of Ca{sup 2+} transport systems to contaminate plant organs and tissues. Ones plants are exposed to radiation stress, ionization events can cause an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can induce damage to biological material like DNA, lipids and structural proteins. The following work aimed at evaluating individual, biochemical and molecular endpoints to understand and to compare the mode of action of gamma- and beta radiation stress in plants. Having an equal relative biological effectiveness to non-human biota, it is still not clear in how plants differ or overlap in sensing and interpreting highly penetrating electromagnetic radiation with short-range particle radiation. The floating plant Lemna minor was chosen as model system. Following the OECD guidelines Lemna plants were being exposed separately to an external gamma radiation source or to a {sup 90}Sr-contaminated growth medium to obtain single-dose response curves for each type of radiation. In order to acquire accurate dose rate quantifications for beta radiation exposures, {sup 90}Sr uptake and accumulation of root and

  16. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L. [Harbor Therapeutics, Inc, San Diego, California (United States); Wagemaker, Gerard, E-mail: g.wagemaker@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  17. Compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel (part 3) - radiation physics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors, the radiation physics calculations have been performed for the CANDU primary shielding system, thermal shield, radiation damage, transportation cask and storage. At first, the primary shield system was assessed for the DUPIC fuel core, which has shown that the dose rates and heat deposition rates through the primary shield of the DUPIC fuel core are not much different from those of natural uranium core because the power levels on the core periphery are similar for both cores. Secondly, the radiation effects on the critical components and the themal shields were assessed when the DUPIC fuel is loaded in CANDU reactors. Compared with the displacement per atom (DPA) of the critical component for natural uranium core, that for the DUPIC fuel core was increased by -30% for the innermost groove and the weld points and by -10% for the corner of the calandria subshells and annular plates in the calandria, respectivdely. Finally, the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel handling was performed, which has shown that all handling and inspection of the DUPIC fuel bundles be done remotely and behind a shielding wall. For the transportation of the DUPIC fuel, the preliminary study has shown that there shold be no technical problem th design a transportation cask for the fresh and spent DUPIC fuel bundles. For the storage of the fresh and spent DUPIC fuels, there is no the criticality safety problem unless the fuel bundle geometry is destroyed

  18. Characterisation of the radiation fields of beta secondary standards with extended area sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new irradiation facility including beta secondary standards 147Pm and 204Tl has been established at the CEA-Fontenay aux Roses (IPSN-DPHD-SDOS). According to the recommendations of the ISO Standard 6980, for Series II sources, the available radiation fields can be used with or without flattening filters. In the latter case, irradiation of dosemeters can be performed closer to the source in order to take advantage of higher dose rates, but the characteristics of the radiation fields have to be determined for several distances from the source. Using a computer controlled extrapolation chamber, calibrations in terms of the quantity Hs(0.07; α) have been performed. Furthermore the homogeneity of the field has been determined for several points of calibration. Procedures for deriving the value of the calibration quantity have been carefully considered and an extensive analysis of the uncertainties involved at the different steps of the data treatment has been performed. A first series of results are presented for 204Tl. Similar measurements for 147Pm are in progress, complemented by intercomparisons with reference sources of other laboratories. (author)

  19. Radiation monitoring at the borders - Important part of nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Three factors place Central Asia and Uzbekistan as its part in a key global non-proliferation position: the proximity of nuclear neighbours, the proximity of states and other groups seeking nuclear/radioactive material and know-how, and indigenous sources of nuclear/radioactive material. The nuclear threat is of special concern because of the proximity of major nuclear states such as Russia and China, states with nuclear ambitions such as Iran, and non-state actors potentially seeking nuclear and/or radioactive materials. In addition, Central Asia possesses currently functioning nuclear facilities widely using powerful radioactive sources from Soviet times and active uranium mines. The geographical location of Uzbekistan is convenient for illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. In conditions of increasing threat of nuclear terrorism, when extremist organizations arc threatening to mankind with terrorist attacks including the use of nuclear devices or radiological dispersal and exposure devices ('dirty' bomb), the problem to stop illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials is becoming the world one. In the frame of the Second Line of Defence (SLD) Core Program which is part of the Office of the Second Line of Defence, in the Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation of the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Uzbekistan borders were equipped with radiation control devices. The mission of the Core Program is to rapidly reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation and illicit trafficking of special nuclear and other radiological materials by cooperating with host countries to improve their detection and interdiction capabilities at strategic international border crossings, mid-sized seaports, and airports. To solve the problem of radiation monitoring in Uzbekistan was possible by installing stationary portal radiation monitors at main customs border crossings or entry points. Their high sensitivity

  20. Antimigratory effect of TK1-2 is mediated in part by interfering with integrin alpha2beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Oh, Dae-Shik; Lee, Sang-Bae; Ha, Jung-Min; Joe, Young Ae

    2008-07-01

    The recombinant two kringle domain of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (TK1-2) has been shown to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and tumor cell growth despite of sharing a low amino acid sequence homology with angiostatin. Here, we explored a possible inhibitory mechanism of action of TK1-2 by focusing on antimigratory effect. TK1-2 effectively inhibited endothelial cell migration induced by basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner and tube formation on Matrigel. It blocked basic fibroblast growth factor-induced or vascular endothelial growth factor-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and formation of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. Interestingly, TK1-2 alone induced the weak phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, whereas it inhibited focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation induced by growth factors. When immobilized, TK1-2 promoted adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells compared with bovine serum albumin. However, treatment with anti-alpha(2)beta(1) blocking antibody markedly diminished endothelial cell adhesion to immobilized TK1-2 compared with anti-alpha(v)beta(3) or anti-alpha(5)beta(1) antibody. Pretreatment of soluble TK1-2 also altered the binding level of anti-alpha(2)beta(1) antibody to endothelial cells in fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Indeed, a blocking antibody against integrin alpha(2)beta(1) or knocking down of integrin alpha(2) expression prevented the inhibitory effect of TK1-2 in cell migration. Therefore, these results suggest that TK1-2 inhibits endothelial cell migration through inhibition of signaling and cytoskeleton rearrangement in part by interfering with integrin alpha(2)beta(1). PMID:18645023

  1. US/French joint research program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the final account of a multiyear joint NRC/CEA cooperative research program to investigate the relative effectiveness of beta and gamma irradiations to produce in polymer base electrical insulation and jacket materials. During the program jointly executed by research laboratories in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie), a number of material and radiation parameters were investigated. Results obtained were reasonably independent of the radiation parameters and most material parameters investigated and would suggest that material damage resulting from electron beam and gamma ray irradiations can be correlated, within limits, on the basis of absorbed radiation dose. 7 refs., 26 figs., 13 tabs

  2. Absorbed dose measurements using TLDS in biological samples from beta radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Manzoli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of samples in peculiar experimental apparatus, subject to radiation spread, requires a special evaluation of absorbed dose implanted to the sample. Indirect calibration of the irradiation source, obtained in a different apparatus, and the spread, usually of very difficult theoretical evaluation, can cause very serious measurement errors, sometimes reaching 50%. In this work, the procedure for dose evaluation in an apparatus for beta irradiation of samples, usually biological ones,is presented, making use of calibration curves, obtained by irradiation in advance of thermoluminescent detectors in air, and so irradiating them in the same position of the sample. An application in blood sample irradiation is also presented.A irradiação de amostras em arranjos experimentais peculiares sujeitos a espalhamento necessita de uma determinação própria da dose absorvida que a amostra irá receber. A calibração indireta da fonte de irradiação, que ocorre em arranjo diferente, e o espalhamento, geralmente de difícil estimativa teórica, podem causar erros de medição muito elevados, não raro atingindo 50%. Neste trabalho é apresentado o procedimento para determinação da dose absorvida em um arranjo para irradiação beta de amostras, normalmente biológicas, utilizando curvas de calibração obtidas pela irradiação de dosímetros termoluminescentes no ar, e os irradiando na mesma posição das amostras. É apresentado um exemplo de aplicação para amostra irradiada de sangue.

  3. Beta Androstenediol Mitigates the Damage of 1 GeV/n Fe Ion Particle Radiation to the Hematopoietic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loria R.; Guida P.; Loria, R.; Beckman, M.; Contaifer, D.; Tamariz, F.; Gibb, D.; Thompson, L.; Guida, P.

    2010-09-07

    Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1-3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol ({Delta}(5) androsten-3{beta}, 17{beta}-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of 3 Gy whole-body high LET (56)Fe(26+) exposure. The findings show that postradiation AED treatment has an overall positive and significant beneficial effect to restore the levels of hematopoeitic elements (p < 0.001). Androstenediol treatment significantly increased monocyte levels at days 4, 7, and 14 and, similarly, increased red blood cell, hemoglobin, and platelet counts. Flow cytometry analysis 14 days after radiation and AED treatment demonstrated an increase (p < 0.05) in bone marrow cells counts. Ex vivo osteoclastogenesis studies show that AED treatment is necessary and advantageous for the development and restoration of osteoclastogenesis after radiation exposure. These findings clearly show that androstenediol functions as a countermeasure to remedy hematopoeitic injury mediated by high LET iron ion radiation. Presently, no other agent has been shown to have such properties.

  4. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  5. The influence of radiation sterilisation on some {beta}-blockers in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciniec, B. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 6 Gruwaldzka Str., 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Ogrodowczyk, M., E-mail: mogrodo@ump.edu.pl [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 6 Gruwaldzka Str., 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Czajka, B.; Hofman, M. [Department of Cooridinational Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-02-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Six {beta}-blockers (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol, propranolol) in solid phase were exposed to the ionising radiation by e-beam in doses from 25 to 400 kGy. {yields} To establish the effects of irradiation on their physico-chemical properties, the compounds were then analysed by DSC, SEM, XRD and FT-IR. {yields} For alprenolol, propranolol and metoprolol linear relations were found between the irradiation dose and the decrease in the melting point (r = 0.9446-0.9864). {yields} No changes were observed in the FT-IR spectra and in the SEM images of the compounds studied. - Abstract: Six derivatives of aryloxyalkylaminopropanol of known {beta}-adrenolytic activity (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol, propranolol) in solid phase were exposed to the ionising radiation generated by e-beam of high-energy electrons from an accelerator ({approx}10 MeV) in doses from 25 to 400 kGy. To establish the effects of irradiation on their physico-chemical properties, the compounds were then analysed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectrometry. The standard sterilisation dose (25 kGy) was found to cause no changes in only one derivative - acebutolol, whereas in the other derivatives the irradiation caused colour changes, differences in X-ray diffraction patterns and in the character of DSC curves, including a decrease in the melting point. For each derivative one clear peak corresponding to the process of melting was observed and its position shifted towards lower temperatures with increasing dose of irradiation. For all compounds studied the value of the shift was between 0.1 and 1.0 {sup o}C. For alprenolol, propranolol and metoprolol linear relations were found between the irradiation dose and the decrease in the melting point, described by the correlation coefficient (between 0.9446 and 0.9864). No changes were observed in

  6. RBE [relative biological effectiveness] of tritium beta radiation to gamma radiation and x-rays analyzed by both molecular and genetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta radiation to 60Co gamma radiation was determined using sex-linked recessive lethals (SLRL) induced in Drosophila melanogaster spermatozoa as the biological effect. The SLRL test, a measure of mutations induced in germ cells transmitted through successive generations, yields a linear dose-response curve in the range used in these experiments. From these ratios of the slopes of the 3H beta and the 60 Co gamma radiation linear dose response curves, an RBE of 2.7 is observed. When sources of error are considered, this observation suggests that the tritium beta particle is 2.7 ± 0.3 times more effective per unit of energy absorbed in inducing gene mutations transmitted to successive generation than 60Co gamma radiation. Ion tracks with a high density of ions (high LET) are more efficient than tracks with a low ion density (low LET) in inducing transmissible mutations, suggesting interaction among products of ionization. Molecular analysis of x-ray induced mutations shows that most mutations are deletions ranging from a few base pairs as determined from sequence data to multi locus deletions as determined from complementation tests and Southern blots. 14 refs., 1 fig

  7. Precision measurement of the radiative $\\beta$ decay of the free neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Bales, M J; Bass, C D; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Byrne, J; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Cooper, R L; Dewey, M S; Gardner, S; Gentile, T R; He, D; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B; Thompson, A K; Wietfeldt, F E

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Model predicts that, in addition to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, a continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the $\\beta$ decay of the free neutron. We report on the RDK II experiment which measured the photon spectrum using two different detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons from 14~keV to 782~keV. The spectral shape was consistent with theory, and we determined a branching ratio of 0.00335 $\\pm$ 0.00005 [stat] $\\pm$ 0.00015 [syst]. A second detector array of large area avalanche photodiodes directly detected photons from 0.4~keV to 14~keV. For this array, the spectral shape was consistent with theory, and the branching ratio was determined to be 0.00582 $\\pm$ 0.00023 [stat] $\\pm$ 0.00062 [syst]. We report the first precision test of the shape of the photon energy spectrum from neutron radiative decay and a substantially improved determination of the branching ratio over a broad range of photon energies.

  8. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations. Part 1: Photons; Il centro di taratura per la radiazioni ionizzanti di Bologna. Parte 1: Fotoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) calibration service for ionizing radiations has been active for 40 years in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory web. It has been the first center, in 1985, to be acknowledges by the Italian calibration service (SIT) for the two quantities for photons: exposure and air kerma. Since the Institute for the Radiation Protection of ENEA has moved to the new site in Montecuccolino (Bologna, Italy) in 1995, the whole laboratory has been renovated and all irradiation rooms together with radiation source and equipment have been reorganized according to the {chi}, {gamma}, {beta} and neutron fields metrology requirements. The aim of this report, as the first part of a report describing all facilities available at the service, is to give a detailed description of all equipment s qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters. [Italian] Il centro di taratura dell'ENEA di Bologna opera nel campo della metrologia secpndaria da quasi 40 anni ed e' stato il primo centro nel 1985 ad essere riconosciuto dal SIT (Servizio di Taratura in Italia) per le grandezze esposizione e Kerma in aria. Con l'insediamento di tutto l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione nella nuova sede di Montecuccolino sono state ricostruite e riorganizzate anche tutte le sale di irraggiamento e tutti gli impianti radiogeni a disposizione per la metrologia delle radiazioni X, gamma, beta e neutroni. Intenzione di questo primo rapporto e' descrivere le attrezzature qualificate per la metrologia fotonica, dei campioni di misura e delle procedure adottate per la taratura degli strumenti e dei dosimetri.

  9. Maintenance experiences with hand and foot monitor for monitoring alpha and beta radiation of personnel in NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NFC is producing natural uranium and enriched uranium fuels for various reactors including PHWR etc. Monitoring of α and β radiations in the active plants of NFC is very much essential in many aspects. The personnel who are handling radiation materials have to be monitored for α radiation of hands and cloths and β radiation of feet. So the Alpha and Beta Monitor became important monitoring equipment for monitoring α and β radiations of persons working in active plants of NFC. Many Alpha and Beta Monitors of make, ECIL, PLA, and Nucleonix etc. were being used in active plants in NFC. Basically α and β radiation monitors consists of four PMT (Photo Multiplier Tubes) for detection of radiation of hands and one PMT for monitoring clothes. The PMT use ZnS (Ag) as the scintillator for detection of α radiation. GM tubes are used to detect β radiation of feet. The latest Hand and Foot Monitors have been incorporated with PC based monitoring system along with software for making the monitoring process more efficient and user friendly. As an instrumentation maintenance team for these monitors, our experiences are varied. These monitors are to be periodically maintained and tested for its effective functioning in monitoring the nuclear radiation. The monitors procured from M/s. ECIL were being used since long time in these areas. The instrumentation maintenance had faced some problems with these monitors such as frequent failure of High Voltage cards, Amplifier and Counter PCB cards. Modifications were made in the circuits of High Voltage and Counter cards to minimize the failure rate and for loading of Display and Monitoring Software through Hard disk instead of from floppy disk. So the availability of monitors for monitoring radiation got improved. Later the introduction of more sophisticated α and β radiation monitors of M/s. PLA make in these areas further improved monitoring of radiation of personnel working in active areas. These monitors are more user

  10. Effect of gamma radiation on the content {beta}-carotene and volatile compounds of cantaloupe melon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Stefania P. de; Cardozo, Monique; Lima, Keila dos S.C.; Lima, Antonio L. dos S., E-mail: keila@ime.eb.br, E-mail: santoslima@ime.eb.br [Departamento de Quimica - IME - Instituto Militar de Engenharia, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Japanese melon or cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) is characterized by fruits with almost 1.0 Kg, pulp usually salmon and musky scent. The fruits when ripe are sensitive to post harvest handling. This low transport resistance and reduced shelf-life makes it necessary to delay the ripening of fruit. In this way the use of irradiation technique is a good choice. Irradiation is the process of exposing food to high doses of gamma rays. The processing of fruits and vegetables with ionizing radiation has as main purpose to ensure its preservation. However, like other forms of food processing, irradiation may cause changes in chemical composition and nutritional value. This study aims to assess possible changes in carotene content and volatile compounds caused by exposure of cantaloupe melon fruit to gamma irradiation. Irradiation of the samples occurred in Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (Guaratiba-RJ), using Gamma irradiator (Cs{sub 137} source, dose rate 1.8 kGy/h), being applied 0.5 and 1.0 kGy doses and separated a control group not irradiated. Carotenoids were extracted with acetone and then suffered partition to petroleum ether, solvent was removed under nitrogen flow and the remainder dissolved in acetone again. The chromatographic analysis was performed using a Shimadzu gas chromatograph, with C30 column. For volatile compounds, we used gas chromatography (GC) associated with mass (MS). As a result, it was verified in analysis of carotenoids that cantaloupe melon is rich in {beta}-carotene. Both total content of carotenoids and specific {beta}-carotene amount wasn't suffer significant reduction in irradiated fruits at two doses, demonstrating that the irradiation process under these conditions implies a small loss of nutrients. The major volatile compounds were: 2-methyl-1-butyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, n-hexyl acetate, benzyl acetate, 6-nonenyl acetate and {alpha} -terpinyl acetate. For all compounds we observed an increase in the volatile content in 0.5 k

  11. [Adhesion molecules in Wilm's tumor: expression and significance of beta-catenin (part II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta-Jovanović, Gordana; Radojević, Sanja; Djuricić, Slavisa; Savin, Marina; Skodrić, Stevo; Bunjevacki, Gordana; Hadzi-Djokić, Jovan; Nesić, Vida

    2003-01-01

    Beta-catenin is a glicoprotein which has an important role in cell-cell adhesion, as well as in cell signal transmission, in u regulation of gen expression and in interaction with axin and APC (adenomatous poliposis coli). Its oncogenic role in several types of carcinomas in human population is well known. It is very likely that beta-catenin as an protooncogen plays an important role in genesis of Wilms tumor. It is well known that in 15% Wilms tumors there are beta-catenin mutations, which indicates that there is a disorder in Wnt signal path that plays an important role in Wilms tumor genesis. The aim of our study was to investigate b-catenin expression in Wilms tumor, to compare it with the expression in normal renal tissue as well as to see if there is a positive correlation between b-catenin expression in Wilms tumor with tumor stage, histologic type and/or prognostic group. PMID:14608868

  12. National pattern for the realization of the unit of the dose speed absorbed in air for beta radiation. (Method: Ionometer, cavity of Bragg-Gray implemented in an extrapolation chamber with electrodes of variable separation, exposed to a field of beta radiation of 90Sr/90Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the year of 1987 the Department of Metrology of the ININ, in their Secondary Laboratory of Calibration Dosimetric, has a patron group of sources of radiation beta and an extrapolation chamber of electrodes of variable separation.Their objective is to carry out of the unit of the dose speed absorbed in air for radiation beta. It uses the ionometric method, cavity Bragg-Gray in the extrapolation chamber with which it counts. The services that offers are: i) it Calibration : Radioactive Fuentes of radiation beta, isotopes: 90Sr/90Y; Ophthalmic applicators 90Sr/90Y; Instruments for detection of beta radiation with to the radiological protection: Ionization chambers, Geiger-Muller, etc.; Personal Dosemeters. ii) Irradiation with beta radiation of materials to the investigation. (Author)

  13. Relative response of TL and component-resolved OSL to alpha and beta radiations in annealed sedimentary quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeris, George S., E-mail: polymers@auth.gr [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile 34980, Istanbul (Turkey); Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Raptis, Spyridoula [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Liritzis, Ioannis [Laboratory of Archaeometry, Dept. of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, 1 Demokratias Ave., 85100 Rhodes (Greece); Tsirliganis, Nestor C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' ATHENA' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, George [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    Knowledge of the relative luminescence response to alpha and beta radiation is very important in TL and OSL dating. In the present study the relative alpha to beta response is studied in a sedimentary quartz sample, previously fired at 900 deg. C for 1 h, in the dose region between 1 and 128 Gy, for both thermoluminescence (TL) and linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM - OSL). The LM - OSL measurements were performed at room temperature and at 125 deg. C. All OSL signals were deconvolved into their individual components. Comparison of OSL curves after alpha and beta irradiation strongly supports that quartz OSL components follow first order kinetics in both cases. In the case of TL, the relative alpha to beta response is found to be very different for each TL glow-peak, but it does not depend strongly on irradiation dose. In the case of LM - OSL measurements, it is found that the relative behaviour of the alpha to beta response is different for three distinct regions, namely the fast OSL component, the region of medium OSL component originating from the TL glow-peak at 110 deg. C when stimulation takes place at room temperature and finally the region of slow OSL component. Following stimulation at ambient temperature, the relative alpha to beta response of all components was not observed to depend significantly on dose, with the value of ratio being 0.03 and a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. However, in the case of measurements performed at 125 deg. C, the relative response of the fast components is much enhanced, and for the remaining components it increases with increasing dose. Special care must be taken to examine the relative alpha to beta response of the fast component at 125 deg. C which contrasts the relative response of the TL peak at ca. 325 deg. C. The implications for the dating of annealed quartz are also briefly discussed. - Highlights: > Relative alpha to beta response for TL and LM-OSL is studied in annealed sedimentary

  14. Radiation-induced ionization and excitation in liquid p-dioxane. [Beta particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ausloos, P.; Lutz, C.; Schwarz, F.; Lias, S.G. (National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC (USA). Center for Chemical Physics)

    1984-01-01

    The fluorescence of neat liquid p-dioxane and p-dioxane-water mixtures has been studied as a function of wavelength in the range 200 to 110 nm, and in the system under beta irradiation. It is seen that the quantum yield of fluorescence declines from the absorption threshold to the ionization onset (approx. 160 to 170 nm), because of the increasing importance of the competing decomposition processes. Above the ionization onset, there is a slight increase in the quantum yield of fluorescence as a result of the occurrence of 'recombination fluorescence'. However, it is estimated that in this region, neutralization does not always lead to a vibrationally equilibrated excited state. This explains in part why the G-value of thermally equilibrated S/sub 1/ states is considerably lower than G(ion)(approx. 5), under conditions that fluorescence originates mainly from charge recombination. Auxiliary experiments carried out in the gas phase, in an ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer, elucidated the reaction of p-C/sub 4/H/sub 8/O/sub 2//sup +/ ions with p-dioxane molecules. The results indicate that in the gas phase, proton transfer between these reactants is thermoneutral, and occurs with a lowered efficiency in contrast with m-dioxane for which the corresponding proton transfer reaction is highly exothermic and ksub(Rn) = ksub(Collision).

  15. Photochemistry and radiation chemistry of the. beta. -cyclodextrin-ZnTSPP inclusion complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosseri, S.; Mialocq, J.C. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Recherche Technologique et de Developpement Industriel (IRDI))

    1991-01-01

    Steady-state radiolysis, pulse radiolysis combined with both optical and conductimetric analysis and steady-state photolysis have been used to characterize the intermediates and the stable products formed upon oxidation of ZnTSPP in aqueous solution in the presence and in the absence of {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD). In the absence of {beta}-CD, its oxidation either by the OH{sup .} primary species of the radiolysis of water or photooxidation by O{sub 2} lead to mixtures of products (partially unidentified) which reflect the poor selectivity of the oxidizing species. In the present of {beta}-CD, a highly selective formation (99%) of the porphyrin dication is observed upon 422 nm photolysis of an aerated solution of ZnTSPP at pH = 12. The dramatic effect of the porphyrin complexation by {beta}-CD is emphasized. (author).

  16. Beta-carotene Antioxidant Use During Radiation Therapy and Prostate Cancer Outcome in the Physicians' Health Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The safety of antioxidant supplementation during radiation therapy (RT) for cancer is controversial. Antioxidants could potentially counteract the pro-oxidant effects of RT and compromise therapeutic efficacy. We performed a prospective study nested within the Physicians’ Health Study (PHS) randomized trial to determine if supplemental antioxidant use during RT for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death or metastases. Methods and Materials: PHS participants (383) received RT for prostate cancer while randomized to receive beta-carotene (50 mg on alternate days) or placebo. The primary endpoint was time from RT to lethal prostate cancer, defined as prostate cancer death or bone metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival probabilities and the log-rank test to compare groups. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the effect of beta-carotene compared with that of placebo during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there was no significant difference between risk of lethal prostate cancer with the use of beta-carotene during RT compared with that of placebo (hazard ratio = 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42–1.24; p = 0.24). After we adjusted for age at RT, prostate-specific antigen serum level, Gleason score, and clinical stage, the difference remained nonsignificant. The 10-year freedom from lethal prostate cancer was 92% (95% CI, 87–95%) in the beta-carotene group and 89% (95% CI, 84–93%) in the placebo group. Conclusion: The use of supplemental antioxidant beta-carotene during RT was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death or metastases. This study suggests a lack of harm from supplemental beta-carotene during RT for prostate cancer.

  17. Beta-carotene Antioxidant Use During Radiation Therapy and Prostate Cancer Outcome in the Physicians' Health Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalit, Danielle N., E-mail: dmargalit@lroc.harvard.edu [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kasperzyk, Julie L. [Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Martin, Neil E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sesso, Howard D. [Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gaziano, John Michael [Division of Aging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Veterans' Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ma, Jing [Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A. [Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The safety of antioxidant supplementation during radiation therapy (RT) for cancer is controversial. Antioxidants could potentially counteract the pro-oxidant effects of RT and compromise therapeutic efficacy. We performed a prospective study nested within the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) randomized trial to determine if supplemental antioxidant use during RT for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death or metastases. Methods and Materials: PHS participants (383) received RT for prostate cancer while randomized to receive beta-carotene (50 mg on alternate days) or placebo. The primary endpoint was time from RT to lethal prostate cancer, defined as prostate cancer death or bone metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival probabilities and the log-rank test to compare groups. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the effect of beta-carotene compared with that of placebo during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there was no significant difference between risk of lethal prostate cancer with the use of beta-carotene during RT compared with that of placebo (hazard ratio = 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42-1.24; p = 0.24). After we adjusted for age at RT, prostate-specific antigen serum level, Gleason score, and clinical stage, the difference remained nonsignificant. The 10-year freedom from lethal prostate cancer was 92% (95% CI, 87-95%) in the beta-carotene group and 89% (95% CI, 84-93%) in the placebo group. Conclusion: The use of supplemental antioxidant beta-carotene during RT was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death or metastases. This study suggests a lack of harm from supplemental beta-carotene during RT for prostate cancer.

  18. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  19. Characterization of an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films for verifying the metrological coherence among beta radiation fields; Caracterizacao de uma camara de extrapolacao e filmes radiocromicos para verificacao da coerencia metrologica entre campos padroes de radiacao beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Jhonny Antonio Benavente

    2011-07-01

    The metrological coherence among standard systems is a requirement for assuring the reliability of dosimetric quantities measurements in ionizing radiation field. Scientific and technologic improvements happened in beta radiation metrology with the installment of the new beta secondary standard BSS2 in Brazil and with the adoption of the internationally recommended beta reference radiations. The Dosimeter Calibration Laboratory of the Development Center for Nuclear Technology (LCD/CDTN), in Belo Horizonte, implemented the BSS2 and methodologies are investigated for characterizing the beta radiation fields by determining the field homogeneity, the accuracy and uncertainties in the absorbed dose in air measurements. In this work, a methodology to be used for verifying the metrological coherence among beta radiation fields in standard systems was investigated; an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films were used and measurements were done in terms of absorbed dose in air. The reliability of both the extrapolation chamber and the radiochromic film was confirmed and their calibrations were done in the LCD/CDTN in {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, {sup 85}Kr and {sup 147}Pm beta radiation fields. The angular coefficients of the extrapolation curves were determined with the chamber; the field mapping and homogeneity were obtained from dose profiles and isodose with the radiochromic films. A preliminary comparison between the LCD/CDTN and the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute / Sao Paulo (LCI/IPEN) was carried out. Results with the extrapolation chamber measurements showed in terms of absorbed dose in air rates showed differences between both laboratories up to de -I % e 3%, for {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, {sup 85}Kr and {sup 147}Pm beta radiation fields, respectively. Results with the EBT radiochromic films for 0.1, 0.3 and 0.15 Gy absorbed dose in air, for the same beta radiation fields, showed differences up to 3%, -9% and -53%. The beta

  20. Conjunctival Autograft Alone or Combined With Adjuvant Beta-Radiation? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of postoperative low single-dose of beta-irradiation (β-RT) in pterygium comparing conjunctival autograft (CAG) surgery with CAG plus adjuvant β-RT in a randomized clinical trial. Methods: This trial was designed as a prospective, randomized, single-center study. Surgery was performed in all cases according to the CAG technique. One hundred and eight pterygia were postoperatively randomized to CAG + β-RT or CAG alone. In the case of β-RT, a (90) Sr eye applicator was used to deliver 10 Gy to the sclera surface at a dose rate of between 200 and 250 cGy/min. After treatment, both an ophthalmologist and a radiation oncologist performed the follow-up examinations. The accumulated data were analyzed using a group sequential test. Results: Between February 2008 and September 2008, 116 eyes with primary pterygium were operated on according to the trial protocol. Adjuvant treatment was performed within 24 h postoperatively. Eight patients were lost to follow-up, resulting in 108 patients who could be analyzed. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range, 8–33), in the 54 eyes randomized to receive CAG + β-RT, 5 relapses occurred compared with 12 recurrences in the 54 eyes in CAG, for a crude control rate of 90.8 % vs. 78%; p = 0.032, respectively. The treatment complications as hyperemia, total dehiscence of the autograft and dellen were significantly more frequent in the CAG (p < 0.05). The arm of β-RT resulted in better cosmetic results and improves of symptoms than CAG. Conclusions: A low single-dose of β-RT of 10 Gy after CAG surgery was a simple, effective, and safe treatment that reduced the risk of primary pterygium recurrence, improved symptoms after surgery, resulting in a better cosmetic effect than only CAG.

  1. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of new phosphors of Zn O exposed to beta radiation; Dosimetria termoluminiscente de nuevos fosforos de ZnO expuestos a radiacion beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz V, C.; Burruel I, S.E.; Grijalva M, H. [UNISON, A.P. 130, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Barboza F, M.; Bernal, R. [CIF, UNISON, A.P. 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, we report the thermoluminescence dosimetry of a new Zn O phosphor obtained by annealing of Zn S powder precipitated when Zn S films were grown by employing a CBD method. The collected Zn S powder was pressed in a die to form pellets which were subjected to different thermal treatments under air atmosphere. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analyses confirmed the transformation of Zn S to Zn O. The phosphors thus obtained were exposed to high doses of beta radiation and their thermoluminescent dosimetry show that these new phosphors are materials suitable to be used in high dose thermoluminescence dosimetry. (Author)

  2. Adhesion molecules in Wilms tumor (part II) : beta-catenin expression and significance

    OpenAIRE

    Basta-Jovanović Gordana M.; Radojević Sanja M.; Đuričić Slaviša M.; Savin Marina; Škodrić Stevo; Bunjevački Gordana; Hadži-Đokić Jovan B.; Nešić Vidosava B.

    2003-01-01

    Beta-catenin is a glicoprotein which has an important role in cell-cell adhesion, as well as in cell signal transmition, in u regulation of gen expression and in interaction with axin and APC (adenomatous poliposis coli). Its oncogenic role in several types of carcinomas in human population is well known. It is very likely that b-catenin as an protooncogen plays an importante role in genesis of Wilms tumor. It is well known that in 15% Wilms tumors there are b-catenin mutations, which indicat...

  3. Adhesion molecules in Wilms tumor (part II : beta-catenin expression and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basta-Jovanović Gordana M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-catenin is a glicoprotein which has an important role in cell-cell adhesion, as well as in cell signal transmition, in u regulation of gen expression and in interaction with axin and APC (adenomatous poliposis coli. Its oncogenic role in several types of carcinomas in human population is well known. It is very likely that b-catenin as an protooncogen plays an importante role in genesis of Wilms tumor. It is well known that in 15% Wilms tumors there are b-catenin mutations, which indicates that there is a disorder in Wnt signal paththat plays an important role in Wilms tumor genesis. The aim of our study was to investigate b-catenin expression in Wilms tumor, to compaire it with the expression in normal renal tissue as well as to see if there is a positive correlation between b-catenin expression in Wilms tumor with tumor stage, histologic type and/ or prognostic group.

  4. Dosimetry as an integral part of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different connections between high-dose dosimetry and radiation processing are discussed. Radiation processing cannot be performed without proper dosimetry. Accurate high dose and high dose rate dosimetry exhibits several aspects: first of all it is the preservation of the quality of the product, then fulfillment of legal aspects and last but not the least the safety of processing. Further, seldom discussed topics are as follow: dosimetric problems occurring with double-side EB irradiations, discussed in connection with the deposition of electric charge during electron beam irradiation. Although dosimetry for basic research and for medical purposes are treated here only shortly, some conclusions reached from these fields are considered in dosimetry for radiation processing. High-dose dosimetry of radiation has become a separate field, with many papers published every year, but applied dosimetric projects are usually initiated by a necessity of particular application. (author)

  5. Peculiarities of the clinical course of radiation sickness and organizational decisions for radiation accidents with beta-gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of a number of recent large scale accidents involving beta-gamma sources in the last 40 years, such as those of the Marshall Islands (1954); Windscale, UK (1957); Chernobyl, USSR (1986) and Goiania, Brazil (1987) demonstrates the predominance and importance of health and social impacts. (author)

  6. On the excitation of Lyman beta and Balmer alpha radiation by electron-impact dissociation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlin, R. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    The cross sections for the excitation of Ly-beta and H-alpha when methane is dissociated by electron impact have values of 17.1 by 10 to the -19th power sq cm and 26.0 by 10 to the -19th power sq cm, respectively, at an electron impact energy of 100 eV. These results are in disagreement with the implications of recent polarization measurements of H-alpha radiation that suggest negligible H(3p) excitation in the dissociation of CH4 by electron impact.

  7. Principles of medical rehabilitation of survivors of acute radiation sickness induced by gamma and beta and gumma and neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the principles of medical rehabilitation different degree acute radiation syndrome (ARS) survivors, who exposed γβ- and γη-irradiation in different radiation accidents. The main reasons of working disability in the late consequences of ARS period are consequences of local radiation injures (LRI) and joining somatic diseases. Its revealing and treatment considerably improves quality of life of the patients. The heaviest consequence of LRI of a skin at γβ- radiation exposure is the development of late radiation ulcers and radiation fibrosis, which require repeated plastic surgery. LRI at γη-radiation exposure differ by the greater depth of destruction of a underlying tissues and similar defects require the early amputations. Last 10 years microsurgery methods of plastic surgery allow to save more large segments of extremities and to decrease expression of the late consequences (radiation fibrosis and late radiation ulcers) LRI severe and extremely severe degrees. Medical rehabilitation of radiation cataract (development at doses more than 2.0 Gy) includes its extraction and artificial lens implantation, if acuity of vision is considerably decreased. Changes of peripheral blood, observed at the period of the long consequences, as a rule, different, moderate, transient and not requiring treatment. Only one ARS survivor dead from chronic myeloid leukemia. Thyroid nodes, not requiring operative intervention, are found out in Chernobyl survivors. Within the time course the concurrent somatic disease become the major importance for patients disability growth, which concurrent diseases seem to be unrelated to radiation dose and their structure does not differ from that found in general public of Russia. The rehabilitation of the persons who have transferred ARS as a result of radiating failure, should be directed on restoration of functions critical for ionizing of radiation of bodies and systems causing reduction of a level of

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence response to Al2O3 to beta radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akselrod, A.; Akselrod, M.S.; Agersnap Larsen, N.;

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity dosemeters based on Al2O3:C have been prepared and tested for use as beta dosemeters using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Two types of sample were prepared and tested, namely unpolished thick, single crystal chips and thin powder layers on aluminium substrates. The samp......High sensitivity dosemeters based on Al2O3:C have been prepared and tested for use as beta dosemeters using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Two types of sample were prepared and tested, namely unpolished thick, single crystal chips and thin powder layers on aluminium substrates...

  9. National pattern for the realization of the unit of the dose speed absorbed in air for beta radiation. (Method: Ionometer, cavity of Bragg-Gray implemented in an extrapolation chamber with electrodes of variable separation, exposed to a field of beta radiation of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y); Patron Nacional para la realizacion de la unidad de la rapidez de dosis absorbida en aire para radiacion beta. (Metodo: Ionometrico, cavidad de Bragg-Gray implementada en una camara de extrapolacion con electrodos de separacion variable, expuesta a un campo de radiacion beta de {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, M. T.; Morales P, J. R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-01-15

    From the year of 1987 the Department of Metrology of the ININ, in their Secondary Laboratory of Calibration Dosimetric, has a patron group of sources of radiation beta and an extrapolation chamber of electrodes of variable separation.Their objective is to carry out of the unit of the dose speed absorbed in air for radiation beta. It uses the ionometric method, cavity Bragg-Gray in the extrapolation chamber with which it counts. The services that offers are: i) it Calibration : Radioactive Fuentes of radiation beta, isotopes: {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y; Ophthalmic applicators {sup 9}0{sup S}r/{sup 90}Y; Instruments for detection of beta radiation with to the radiological protection: Ionization chambers, Geiger-Muller, etc.; Personal Dosemeters. ii) Irradiation with beta radiation of materials to the investigation. (Author)

  10. Spectrometry and in core dosimetry of neutron radiation. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 8 invited papers discussing current problems of spectrometry and in core neutron dosimetry with regard to applications in nuclear power engineering. The papers deal with the following areas: reactor physics and in core dosimetry; calculations of the spatial and energy distribution of neutrons in the reactor core and shielding; proton-recoil neutron spectrometry; determining neutron spectra with activation detectors; assessment of measurement system used in core dosimetry; in core measurement and monitoring of the reactor radiation field; monitoring the radiation damage to reactor structural materials. (J.P.)

  11. Assessing exposure to granite countertops--Part 1: Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Theodore A; Allen, Joseph G; Minegishi, Taeko; McCarthy, William B; Stewart, James H; Macintosh, David L; McCarthy, John F

    2010-05-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Known sources include radon, soil, cosmic rays, medical treatment, food, and building products such as gypsum board and concrete. Little information exists about radiation emissions and associated doses from natural stone finish materials such as granite countertops in homes. To address this knowledge gap, gross radioactivity, gamma ray activity, and dose rate were determined for slabs of granite marketed for use as countertops. Annual effective radiation doses were estimated from measured dose rates and human activity patterns while accounting for the geometry of granite countertops in a model kitchen. Gross radioactivity, gamma activity, and dose rate varied significantly among and within slabs of granite with ranges for median levels at the slab surface of ND to 3000 cpm, ND to 98,000 cpm, and ND to 1.5E-4 mSv/h, respectively. The maximum activity concentrations of the (40)K, (232)Th, and (226)Ra series were 2715, 231, and 450 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated annual radiation dose from spending 4 h/day in a hypothetical kitchen ranged from 0.005 to 0.18 mSv/a depending on the type of granite. In summary, our results show that the types of granite characterized in this study contain varying levels of radioactive isotopes and that their observed emissions are consistent with those reported in the scientific literature. We also conclude from our analyses that these emissions are likely to be a minor source of external radiation dose when used as countertop material within the home and present a negligible risk to human health. PMID:19707248

  12. Modelling of hand phantoms and optimisation of dose measurements in inhomogeneous beta-photon radiation fields using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhomogeneous beta-photon radiation fields make a reliable dose difficult to determine. Routine monitoring with dosemeters does not guarantee any accurate determination of the local skin dose. In general, correction factors are used to correct for the measured dose and the maximum exposure. However, strong underestimations of the maximum exposure are possible, depending on the individual handling and the reliability of dose measurements. Simulations provide the possibility to track the points of highest exposure and the origin of the highest dose. In this connection, simulations are performed with MCNPX. In order to investigate the local skin dose, two hand phantoms are used, a model based on geometrical elements and a voxel hand. A typical case of radio synoviorthesis, handling of a syringe filled with 90Y, is simulated. Another simulation focuses on the selective internal radio therapy, revealing the origin of the main dose component in the mixed beta-photon radiation field of a 90Y vial in an opened transport container. (author)

  13. Changes in beta-lactoglobulin conformation at the oil/water interface of emulsions studied by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jiali; Miles, Andrew J; Pattenden, Leonard Keith; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Augustin, Mary Ann; Wallace, B A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Wooster, Tim J

    2010-08-01

    The structure of proteins at interfaces is a key factor determining the stability as well as organoleptic properties of food emulsions. While it is widely believed that proteins undergo conformational changes at interfaces, the measurement of these structural changes remains a significant challenge. In this study, the conformational changes of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) upon adsorption to the interface of hexadecane oil-in-water emulsions were investigated using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. Far-UV SRCD spectra showed that adsorption of beta-Lg to the O/W interface caused a significant increase in non-native alpha-helix structure, accompanied by a concomitant loss of beta-sheet structure. Near-UV SRCD spectra revealed that a considerable disruption of beta-Lg tertiary structure occurred upon adsorption. Moreover, heat-induced changes to the non-native beta-Lg conformation at the oil/water interface were very small compared to the dramatic loss of beta-Lg secondary structure that occurred during heating in solution, suggesting that the interface has a stabilizing effect on the structure of non-native beta-Lg. Overall, our findings provide insight into the conformational behavior of proteins at oil/water interfaces and demonstrate the applicability of SRCD spectroscopy for measuring the conformation of adsorbed proteins in optically turbid emulsions. PMID:20690721

  14. Estimation of the response of ion chamber detectors to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed to calculate the response of cylindrical ion chambers to large area beta sources. Beta particles were simulated as vectors originating from a point on a source plane. Response calculations were performed for various source-plane-to-detector distances. The data testified to the dependency of response on source position and size. The results were compared with measured data. The technique was then used to evaluate the response characteristics of two chamber designs. Results showed that a design with concentric dual chambers could provide a means to estimate source geometry and distance. In addition, a detector employing stacked thin chambers could directly measure the extent of non-uniform ionisation in the chamber. (author)

  15. Can {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene supplementation reduce adverse radiation effects on salivary glands?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funegaard, U.; Johansson, I.; Ericson, T. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cariology; Malmer, B.; Henriksson, R. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-31

    In this study, we evaluated whether supplementation with antioxidant vitamins can reduce the adverse effects of irradiation on the salivary glands in the rat. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given a basic diet providing 0.6 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and no {beta}-carotene per day. In two groups the basic diet was supplemented with 3.4 mg {alpha}-tocopherol and 6 mg {beta}-carotene per day from 14 days before irradiation until 12 days after complete irradiation. One group of rats given basic diet and one group given supplemented diet were irradiated with 7 Gy daily for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol and pilocarpine-stimulated whole saliva was collected from all rats 2, 4 and 26 weeks after irradiation. Vitamin-supplemented irradiated rats had higher secretion rates on all three occasions compared with those of irradiated rats given basic diet. The changes in saliva composition seen in irradiated rats were less accentuated in vitamin-supplemented, irradiated rats. The proportions of acinar cells were significantly decreased both in parotid and submandibular glands 26 weeks after irradiation. Supplementation with {alpha}-tocopherol and {beta}-carotene did not alter the morphology of the glands. (author).

  16. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of beta radiations of {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y using ZrO{sub 2}: Eu; Dosimetria termoluminiscente de radiaciones beta de {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y usando ZrO{sub 2}: Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera T, L.; Azorin N, J.; Barrera S, M.; Soto E, A.M. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [CICATA-IPN, Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work the results of studying the thermoluminescent properties (TL) of the doped zirconium oxide with europium (ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+}) before beta radiations of {sup 90}Sr/ {sup 90}Y are presented. The powders of ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+} were obtained by means of the sol-gel technique and they were characterized by means of thermal analysis and by X-ray diffraction. The powders of ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+}, previously irradiated with beta particles of {sup 90}Sr/ {sup 90}Y, presented a thermoluminescent curve with two peaks at 204 and 292 C respectively. The TL response of the ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+} as function of the absorbed dose was lineal from 2 Gy up to 90 Gy. The fading of the information of the ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+} was of 10% the first 2 hours remaining almost constant the information by the following 30 days. The ZrO{sub 2} doped with the (Eu{sup 3+}) ion it was found more sensitive to the beta radiation that the one of zirconium oxide without doping (ZrO{sub 2}) obtained by the same method. Those studied characteristics allow to propose to the doped zirconium oxide with europium like thermoluminescent dosemeter for the detection of the beta radiation. (Author)

  17. The Modifying Effect of Beta 1,3-D Glucan on Gamma Radiation Induced Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Male Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta 1,3-D glucan is a natural polysacharide dericed from the cell walls of baker's yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, with immunoenhancing capabilities. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of beta 1,3-D glucan on antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, SOD and catalase activities and the contents of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxides (TBARS) in liver and blood of male mice. In addition, cytogenetic end points (sister chromatid exchanges) were identified in bone marrow. Mice were exposed to whole body gamma radiation, delivered as 2 Gy every other day up to dose 8 Gy. Beta 1,3-D glucan was supplemented daily (65 mg/kg b wt/day) by gavage for 15 days before and during exposure to gamma irradiation. Experimental investigations were carried out 1, 7 and 14 days after exposure to the last radiation dose. The results obtained showed that beta 1,3-D glucan significantly minimized the radiation induced increase in the amount of TBARS in liver and blood of irradiated mice. Furthermore, significant amelioration in SOD and catalase activities was observed 7 and 14 days from the last irradiation fraction in liver and blood. The results obtained showed that the amelioration in the decrease of reduced glutatgione in liver was obvious 7 and 14 days after irradiation Supplementation of beta 1,3-D glucan was also effective in minimizing the radiation induced increase in sister chromatid exchanges throughout the experimental period. It could be concluded that intensifying antioxidant capability of irradiated mice by beta 1,3-D glucan administration, could ameliorate the genotoxicity signs that appears after radiation exposure

  18. Precision Measurement of the Radiative $\\Beta$ Decay of the Free Neutron

    OpenAIRE

    Bales, M. J.; Alarcon, R.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Byrne, J; Chupp, T. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Cooper, R. L.; Dewey, M. S.; Gardner, S.; Gentile, T. R.; He, D.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The standard model predicts that, in addition to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, a continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the $\\beta$ decay of the free neutron. We report on the RDK II experiment which measured the photon spectrum using two different detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons from 14 to 782~keV. The spectral shape was consistent with theory, and we determined a branching ratio of 0.00335 $\\pm$ 0.00005 [stat] $...

  19. Licenses for industrial radiography and radiation safety requirements for radiographic operation: CPR part 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This part describes the requirements for issuing of licenses for the use of sealed sources containing radioactive material in industrial radiography and radiation safety requirements for persons using such sealed sources in industrial radiography. The provisions and requirements of this part are in addition to, and not in substitution, for other applicable requirements of CPR (Code of PNRI Regulations) Part 2 and other parts of the code. (Author)

  20. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis.

  1. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis

  2. Direct ion storage dosimetry systems for photon, beta and neutron radiation with instant readout capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct ion storage (DIS) dosemeter is a new type of electronic dosemeter from which the dose information for both Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) can be obtained instantly at the workplace by using an electronic reader unit. The number of readouts is unlimited and the stored information is not affected by the readout procedure. The accumulated dose can also be electronically reset by authorised personnel. The DIS dosemeter represents a potential alternative for replacing the existing film and thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) used in occupational monitoring due to its ease of use and low operating costs. The standard version for normal photon and beta dosimetry, as well as a developmental version for neutron dosimetry, have been characterised in several field studies. Two new small size variations are also introduced including a contactless readout device and a militarised version optimised for field use. (author)

  3. Diagnosis of labor damages of the cervical part of vertebral column by radiation investigation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most often used method for the radiation diagnosis of labor traumas including traumas of the cervical part of vertebral column is roentgenography despite different current radiation diagnosis methods. The use of electroroentgenography and ultrasonic examination allows to reveal changes in osteal, dickoligamentous and soft tissue structures in traumas of the cervical part of vertebral column. The original models of the trauma allow to realize the traumas initiation mechanism of the cervical part of vertebral column in different stages of labor, in obstetrical supplies and provide their prevention

  4. On the theories of angular distribution and correlation of beta and gamma radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    In both phenomena of angular distribution and angular correlation, one has nuclear radiation from ensembles of nuclei with an unequal population of the magnetic sub-levels. This population is described by appropriate “orientation parameters”. On this basis the theories of the directional as well as

  5. Simulation of TGF-Beta Activation by Low-Dose HZE Radiation in a Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    High charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei comprised in the galactic cosmic rays are main contributors to space radiation risk. They induce many lesions in living matter such as non-specific oxidative damage and the double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered key precursors of early and late effects of radiation. There is increasing evidence that cells respond collectively rather than individually to radiation, suggesting the importance of cell signaling1. The transforming growth factor (TGF ) is a signaling peptide that is expressed in nearly all cell type and regulates a large array of cellular processes2. TGF have been shown to mediate cellular response to DNA damage3 and to induce apoptosis in non-irradiated cells cocultured with irradiated cells4. TFG molecules are secreted by cells in an inactive complex known as the latency-associated peptide (LAP). TGF is released from the LAP by a conformational change triggered by proteases, thrombospondin-1, integrins, acidic conditions and .OH radical5. TGF then binds to cells receptors and activates a cascade of events mediated by Smad proteins6, which might interfere with the repair of DNA. Meanwhile, increasingly sophisticated Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have appeared recently in the literature7 and can be applied to study the interaction of molecules with receptors. These BD computer models have contributed to the elucidation of signal transduction, ligand accumulation and autocrine loops in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EFGR) system8. To investigate the possible roles of TGF in an irradiated cell culture, our Monte-Carlo simulation codes of the radiation track structure9 will be used to calculate the activation of TFG triggered by .OH produced by low doses of HZE ions. The TGF molecules will then be followed by a BD algorithm in a medium representative of a cell culture to estimate the number of activated receptors.

  6. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage.

  7. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage

  8. Radiation Damage in Reactor Materials. Part of the Proceedings of the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage has presented a new design parameter for the selection of materials to be used in fuel and cladding elements, moderators, structural components and pressure vessels in nuclear reactors. The severe and novel requirements for certain optimum combinations of physical and nuclear properties have emphasized the need for a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of radiation damage. This knowledge is not only essential for progress in the field of nuclear energy, but has direct applications to space technology and semi-conductor research as well. The IAEA, as part of its programme of promoting nuclear technology, therefore convened the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials, 7-11 May 1962. At the invitation of, and with generous material assistance from, the Government of Italy, the Symposium was held at Venice. The Symposium was primarily concerned with the investigation of the fundamental processes of radiation that underlie the behaviour of metals, alloys and ceramics that are actually useful or potentially useful reactor materials. Two sessions were devoted to studies of irradiation effects on simple metals, as these effects are easiest to interpret. Other topics included general theory, alloys, fissionable and moderator materials and special experimental techniques for radiation damage studies. The properties influenced by irradiation which were of main concern were those of primary importance to the behaviour of solids as reactor materials (e. g. dimensional stability, phase transformation, radiation hardening, fracture, fission-gas escape from uranium and its compounds). Other properties, such as optical, electrical and magnetic properties, and effects on semiconductors, ionic and other non-metallic crystals are also of interest in that these studies can increase our knowledge of the mechanism of radiation damage in solids and provide a tool for investigation into the physics of the solid state by offering a means of

  9. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    heterogeneous eye model, indicating that the homogeneous water eye model is a reasonable one. The determined isodose curves give a good visualization of dose distributions inside the eye structures, pointing out their most exposed volume....................................................Cite this article as:Barbosa NA, da Rosa LAR, de Menezes AF, Reis JP, Facure A, Braz D. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:02038. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0203.8

  10. Material and cultural assets. Part of radiation protection of the environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since several years the protection of the environment has been discussed at various international levels as part of radiation protection. ICRP has published a number of recommendations which relate primarily to the evaluation of radiation exposures to non-human species. Nevertheless, not least because of the declaratory mention of the environment in national legislative documents, the question arises how the environment can be integrated into the radiation protection or whether the radiation protection must be even expanded to new fields. A less discussed aspect here covers material and cultural assets that are classified in environmental law as objects worthy of protection. The paper describes some issues that arise in this context and outlines a framework for the consideration of material assets in radiation protection.

  11. Proceedings of the Third international conference 'Interaction of radiation with solids'. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 128 collected papers form the Proceedings of the International Conference 'Interaction of Radiation with Solids'. This Conference is the third forum biennially gathering in Minsk the specialists from different countries. The scope of the problems considered at the Conference is widening steadily from year to year including the recent results and most advanced leads in the field of radiation physics of condensed matter. In the first part of the proceedings consideration is being given to 'Processes of ion interaction with solids', 'Plasma interaction with surface' and 'Radiation effects in solids'

  12. Damocles' sword: the history of radiation, radioactivity and radiation protection. Second part: the 1940s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main theme of this book is the Manhattan project, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the military and political background for the development of the nuclear weapons. These facts have been of great importance for the development of nuclear power and for the nuclear power debate, and also for the development of radiation protection, which is the head subject for this series of books

  13. Real-time, automated characterization of surfaces for alpha and beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new data collection system, called ABACUS trademark, has been developed that automates and expedites the collection, conversion, and reporting of radiological survey data of surfaces. Field testing of the system by Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Environmental Technology Section is currently underway. Preliminary results are presented. The system detects, discriminates, and separately displays the results for alpha and beta contamination scans on floors and walls with a single pass. Fixed-position static counting is also possible for quantitative measuring. The system is currently configured with five 100 cm2 dual-phosphor plastic scintillation detectors mounted in a lightweight aluminum fixture that holds the detectors in a fixed array. ABACUS trademark can be configured with other detectors if desired. Ratemeter/scalars traditionally coupled to individual detectors have been replaced by a single unit that houses the power supply and discriminator circuit boards to support up to five detectors. The system is designed to be used by a single operator. Each detector's position and data are transmitted once per second and recorded on a nearby laptop computer. The data are converted to appropriate units, color-coded, and mapped to display graphically the findings for each detector in real-time. Reports can be generated immediately following the survey. Survey data can be exported in a variety of formats. Benefits of ABACUS trademark are: (1) immediate feedback to decision makers using the observational approach to characterization or remediation, (2) thorough documentation of survey results, (3) increased statistical confidence in scans by recording counts every second, (4) reduced paperwork and elimination of transcription errors, and (5) time and cost savings for collection, conversion, mapping, evaluating, and reporting data over traditional methods

  14. LRAD, semiconductor, and other radiation detectors applied to environmental monitoring for alpha and beta contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very short range of alpha particles in air (typically 2 to 3 cm) has severely limited the use of traditional alpha monitors for detecting and identifying small amounts of alpha-producing contamination in soil, water, and other materials. Monitors based on the traditional alpha detector technology are often hard pressed to meet continually increasing sensitivity requirements. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) avoids the distance restriction by detecting the ions produced by the interaction of alpha particles with air, rather than the alpha particles directly. The ions are swept into an ion detector either by a moving air current (generated by a fan) or a weak electric field. The LRAD is limited by the distance the ions can travel in the ∼5-s ion lifetime (1 to 100 m), rather than by the several-centimeter range of the alpha particles. The LRAD can be used to perform sensitive (less than 10 disintegrations per minute per 100 cm2) field scans of large surface areas (ranging from hundreds of square meters of concrete floor to thousands of square meters of soil). Because the 'active' element in a LRAD is a solid-metal ion collection plate, the detector is relatively inexpensive, easy to service, and quite rugged. However, the LRAD cannot supply any spectroscopic information to help identify the contaminant. Semiconductor, ionization chamber, and other types of particle detector can generate clean spectra from small samples of material and can identify trace amounts of surface contamination. Furthermore, these detectors are rugged enough to use routinely in a mobile laboratory for isotope identification of 'hot spots' located by the LRAD system. The combination of the LRAD with either an alpha spectrometer or a mobile laboratory with other particle detectors has applications for field beta-particle monitoring (such as would result from tritium contamination) as well as alpha particle detection. (author)

  15. Rossby wave radiation by an eddy on a beta-plane: Experiments with laboratory altimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from the laboratory experiments on the evolution of vortices (eddies) generated in a rotating tank with topographic β-effect are presented. The focus of the experiments is on the far-field flow which contains Rossby waves emitted by travelling vortices. The surface elevation and velocity fields are measured by the altimetric imaging velocimetry. The experiments are supplemented by shallow water numerical simulations as well as a linear theory which describes the Rossby wave radiation by travelling vortices. The cyclonic vortices observed in the experiments travel to the northwest and continuously radiate Rossby waves. Measurements show that initially axisymmetric vortices develop a dipolar component which enables them to perform translational motion. A pattern of alternating zonal jets to the west of the vortex is created by Rossby waves with approximately zonal crests. Energy spectra of the flows in the wavenumber space indicate that a wavenumber similar to that introduced by Rhines for turbulent flows on the β-plane can be introduced here. The wavenumber is based on the translational speed of a vortex rather than on the root-mean-square velocity of a turbulent flow. The comparison between the experiments and numerical simulations demonstrates that evolving vortices also emit inertial waves. While these essentially three-dimensional non-hydrostatic waves can be observed in the altimetric data, they are not accounted for in the shallow water simulations

  16. Combination therapy with IFN-beta, ACNU and radiation (IAR) for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to analyze the efficacy of combination therapy with Hu-IFN-β, ACNU and radiation (IAR), nine patients with malignant glioma were treated as a control study. They received 100 x 104 IU Hu-IFN-β daily for seven days intravenously or intratumorally, 3 mg/kg ACNU on day 2 and 5,000 - 6,000 rads of radiation from day 3. Four out of nine patients showed complete response and one partial response with this IAR therapy. Case 1 was a 64-year-old man who had glioblastoma in the left frontal lobe. Postoperative residual tumors disappeared completely with this therapy. Case 3 was a 8-year-old girl who had an enhanced high-density lesion in the medulla oblongata and pons. After IAR therapy, the high-density lesion was completely vanished and her clinical manifestations of multiple cranial nerve palsy and pyramidal sign were improved remarkably. The major side effects of IAR therapy were mild or moderate myelosuppression, and some patients also showed hepatic dysfunction, mild fever and gastrointestinal toxicities. However, all these side effects were mild and transient and soon recovered to normal levels. These results suggest that IAR therapy is effective and will prolong the survival time of patients with malignant glioma. (author)

  17. Rossby wave radiation by an eddy on a beta-plane: Experiments with laboratory altimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Afanasyev, Y. D., E-mail: afanai@mun.ca [Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Results from the laboratory experiments on the evolution of vortices (eddies) generated in a rotating tank with topographic β-effect are presented. The focus of the experiments is on the far-field flow which contains Rossby waves emitted by travelling vortices. The surface elevation and velocity fields are measured by the altimetric imaging velocimetry. The experiments are supplemented by shallow water numerical simulations as well as a linear theory which describes the Rossby wave radiation by travelling vortices. The cyclonic vortices observed in the experiments travel to the northwest and continuously radiate Rossby waves. Measurements show that initially axisymmetric vortices develop a dipolar component which enables them to perform translational motion. A pattern of alternating zonal jets to the west of the vortex is created by Rossby waves with approximately zonal crests. Energy spectra of the flows in the wavenumber space indicate that a wavenumber similar to that introduced by Rhines for turbulent flows on the β-plane can be introduced here. The wavenumber is based on the translational speed of a vortex rather than on the root-mean-square velocity of a turbulent flow. The comparison between the experiments and numerical simulations demonstrates that evolving vortices also emit inertial waves. While these essentially three-dimensional non-hydrostatic waves can be observed in the altimetric data, they are not accounted for in the shallow water simulations.

  18. Recurrence rate and radiation cataract of pterygium eye after postoperative 90Sr beta-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recurrence rate of pterygium was studied in 99 eyes that underwent 90Sr β-ray irradiation after surgery and in 12 eyes that did not. The follow-up period was 1 to 7 years. The recurrence rate was 2.9% in the 69 eyes which had undergone irradiation from the third day after operation, and 13.3% in the 30 eyes which had undergone irradiation from the seventh day or later after operation. The recurrence rate was 75% in the eyes which had undergone no irradiation. In 62 cases of postoperative irradiation in one eye, the presence of radiation cataract was investigated using the other eye as a control. The follow-up period was one to seven years. No radiation cataract was detected. Postoperative 90Sr β-ray irradiation is an effective and safe method of preventing recurrence of pterygium when applied from the third day after operation, one 1000 rad dose every week, 4 times consecutively. (author)

  19. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of beta radiations of {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y using amorphous ZrO{sub 2}; Dosimetria termoluminiscente de radiaciones beta de {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y usando ZrO{sub 2} amorfo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T. [CICATA-Legaria, IPN, Legaria Num. 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Olvera T, L.; Azorin N, J.; Barrera R, M.; Soto E, A.M. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work the results of studying the thermoluminescent properties (Tl) of the zirconium oxide in its amorphous state (ZrO{sub 2}-a) before beta radiations of {sup 90} Sr/ {sup 90} Y are presented. The amorphous powders of the zirconium oxide were synthesized by means of the sol-gel technique. The sol-gel process using alkoxides like precursors, is an efficient method to prepare a matrix of zirconium oxide by hydrolysis - condensation of the precursor to form chains of Zr-H{sub 3} and Zr-O{sub 2}. One of the advantages of this technique is the obtention of gels at low temperatures with very high purity and homogeneity. The powders were characterized by means of thermal analysis and by X-ray diffraction. The powders of ZrO{sub 2}-a, previously irradiated with beta particles of {sup 90} Sr/{sup 90} Y, presented a thermoluminescent curve with two peaks at 150 and 257 C. The dissipation of the information of the one ZrO{sub 2}-a was of 40% the first 2 hours remaining constant the information for the following 30 days. The reproducibility of the information was of {+-} 2.5% in standard deviation. The studied characteristics allow to propose to the amorphous zirconium oxide as thermoluminescent dosemeter for the detection of beta radiation. (Author)

  20. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca;

    2009-01-01

    secretion was reduced by 37% in betaGlud1(-/-). Furthermore, isolated islets with either constitutive or acute adenovirus-mediated knock-out of GDH showed a 49 and 38% reduction in glucose-induced insulin release, respectively. Adenovirus-mediated re-expression of GDH in betaGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored......Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not been...... glucose-induced insulin release. Thus, GDH appears to account for about 40% of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and to lack redundant mechanisms. In betaGlud1(-/-) mice, the reduced secretory capacity resulted in lower plasma insulin levels in response to both feeding and glucose load, while body...

  1. Calculation of absorbed dose for skin contamination imparted by beta radiation through the VARSKIN modified code for 122 interesting isotopes for nuclear medicine, nuclear power plants and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the implementation of a modification of the VARSKIN code for calculation of absorbed dose for contamination in skin imparted by external radiation fields generated by Beta emitting is presented. The modification consists on the inclusion of 47 isotopes of interest even Nuclear Plants for the dose evaluation in skin generated by 'hot particles'. The approach for to add these isotopes is the correlation parameter F and the average energy of the Beta particle, with relationship to those 75 isotopes of the original code. The methodology of the dose calculation of the VARSKIN code is based on the interpolation, (and integration of the interest geometries: punctual or plane sources), of the distribution functions scaled doses in water for beta and electrons punctual sources, tabulated by Berger. Finally a brief discussion of the results for their interpretation and use with purposes of radiological protection (dose insurance in relation to the considered biological effects) is presented

  2. Properties of para-terphenyl as detector for alpha, beta and gamma radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Angelone, M; Bellini, F; Bocci, V; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Marafini, M; Materazzo, D; Mattei, I; Morganti, S; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Pillon, M; Recchia, L; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Voena, C

    2013-01-01

    Organic scintillators are often chosen as radiation detectors for their fast decay time and their low Z, while inorganic ones are used when high light ields are required. In this paper we show that a para-terphenyl based detector has a blend of properties of the two categories that can be optimal for energy and position measurements of low energy charged particles. On 0.1% diphenylbutadiene doped para-terphenyl samples we measure a light yield 3.5+-0.2 times larger than a typical organic scintillator (EJ-200), and a rejection power for 660 keV photons, with respect to electrons of the same energy, ranging between 3-11%, depending on the signal threshold. We also measure a light attenuation length = 4.73+-0.06 mm and we demonstrate that, with the measurements performed in this paper, a simulation based on FLUKA can properly reproduce the measured spectra.

  3. Scintillator based beta batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  4. Modulation of antioxidant and phosphatase enzymes by beta-carotene against gamma radiation induced testicular disorders in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-carotene is a group of plant compounds called carotenoids. It is a precursor for vitamin A and an important antioxidant. This study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy of β-carotene against gamma radiation induced disorders in the testis of male albino rats, it included 4 groups: control group, treated group; animals of this group received a daily oral dose of β-carotene (30 mg/kg body wt) for 1 week, irradiated group; animals of this group were subjected to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose level of 6 Gy, and treated-irradiated group; animals received a daily oral dose of β-carotene (30 mg/ kg body wt) for 1 week before exposure to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose level of 6 Gy. 6 animals of each group were autopsied at 1, 3 and 5 days after β-carotene treatment and/ or irradiation. All animals were subjected to the following investigations: acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase in testis homogenate. In irradiated animals there was a highly significant decrease in testis alkaline phosphatase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity. On the other hand, significant increase in acid phosphatase activity was observed. Treatment with β-carotene before irradiation causes significant increase in alkaline phosphatase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity and significant decrease in acid phosphatase activity compared to the irradiated group. The results of the present study indicated that β-carotene ameliorated oxidative stress and the loss of cellular antioxidants and suggest that β-carotene may reduce the radiation damage in testis of male albino rats

  5. Mass Spectrometry of 3D-printed plastic parts under plasma and radiative heat environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and preliminary results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of 3D-printed parts, developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A decrease in outgassing was observed when electroplated parts were inserted in the test chamber vs. non electroplated ones. Outgassing will also be tested under different environments such as plasma and radiative heat. Heat will be generated by a titanium getter pump placed inside a 90 degree elbow, such that titanium does not coat the part. A mirror inside the elbow will be used to throttle the heat arriving at the part. Plasma exposure of 3D printed parts will be achieved by placing the parts in a separate chamber connected to the spectrometer by a vacuum line that is differentially pumped. The signals from the mass spectrometer will be analyzed to see how the vacuum conditions fluctuate under different plasma discharges.

  6. Heat-induced gelation of globular proteins: part 3. Molecular studies on low pH beta-lactoglobulin gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, G M; Clark, A H; Ross-Murphy, S B

    2000-10-10

    Heat-set gels and aggregates from beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg), one of the major globular proteins from milk, have been studied on a molecular distance scale using negative-staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The microscopy showed long linear aggregates forming in solutions at pH 2 (and sometimes 2.5) after prolonged heating. While there appeared to be no differences in aggregates formed under these conditions in H(2)O as compared with D(2)O, at all other pH and pD values, and in the presence of added salt, much shorter linear aggregates were formed. These became slightly more extended the further the pH was removed from pI. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) showed a diffuse beta-sheet halo at 2θ=19 degrees in patterns for both dried native and aggregated protein (irrespective of pH) with only a small change (sharpening) of this feature on heat treatment. Solution FTIR spectra, measured at pD=2, 2.5, 3, and 7, during heating, indicated shoulder development at 1612 cm(-1) in the carbonyl-stretching Amide I region diagnostic of a modest increase in intermolecular beta-sheet. In terms of the shoulder size, no distinctions could be made between acid and neutral aggregate structures. At all pHs, beta-lactoglobulin showed only limited secondary and tertiary structural changes in aggregation, in contrast to previous studies of insulin aggregation, where highly ordered crystalline fibrils were indicated. The current work has implications both in structural studies of food biopolymers and in ongoing studies of pathological protein self-assembly in disease states, such as spongiform encephalopathies. PMID:11033176

  7. TL and LOE dosimetric evaluation of diamond films exposed to beta and ultraviolet radiation; Evaluacion dosimetrica TL y LOE de peliculas de diamante expuestas a radiacion beta y ultravioleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preciado F, S.; Melendrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M. [Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 13 y A.P. 5-088, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Schreck, M. [Universitaet Augsburg, Institut fuer Physik D-86135 (Germany); Cruz Z, E. [ICN, UNAM, 04500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The diamond possesses a privileged position regarding other materials of great technological importance. Their applications go from the optics, microelectronics, metals industry, medicine and of course as dosemeter, in the registration and detection of ionizing and non ionizing radiation. In this work the results of TL/LOE obtained in two samples of diamond of 10 {mu}m thickness grown by the chemical vapor deposition method (CVD) assisted by microwave plasma. The films were deposited in a silicon substrate (001) starting from a mixture of gases composed of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and 750 ppm of molecular nitrogen as dopant. The samples were exposed to beta radiation (Sr{sup 90}/ Y{sup 90}) and ultraviolet, being stimulated later on thermal (TL) and optically (LOE) to evaluate their dosimetric properties. The sample without doping presented high response TL/LOE to the ultraviolet and beta radiation. The TL glow curve of the sample without doping showed two TL peaks with second order kinetics in the range of 520 to 550 K, besides a peak with first order kinetics of more intensity around 607 K. The TL efficiency of the non doped sample is bigger than the doped with nitrogen; however the LOE efficiency is similar in both samples. The results indicate that the CVD diamond possesses excellent perspectives for dosimetric applications, with special importance in radiotherapy due to it is biologically compatible with the human tissue. (Author)

  8. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Beta vulgaris and Helianthus annuus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is believed that increased levels of ultraviolet B-radiation (UV-B;280-320 nm) will result in serious threat to plant. In the present study the effects of UV (particularly UV-B) were studied on chlorophyll fluorescence, ultraweak luminescence (UL) and plant growth. Parameters related to light emission were determined, and the effects of UV-B on hypocotyl elongation and levels of free IAA were examined. The plants were grown in greenhouse or in growth chambers and exposed to short or long term UV-B simulating different levels of ozone depletion. Short exposure of Hibiscus leaves to UV resulted in a gradual increase in both UL and peroxidase activity followed by a decline after 72 h and a decrease in variable chlorophyll fluorescence. The action of UV-B on sugar beet plants depended on light quality and irradiance and infection by Cercospora beticola Sacc. The interaction between UV-B and the disease resulted in a large reduction of dry weight and enhanced UL. The lowest Chl a and growth was found in plants grown under low irradiance and exposed to UV-B supplemented with UV-A (320-400 nm). UVB also inhibited photosystem II, increased UL and peroxidase activity. Under relatively high PAR, UV-B increased dry weight of laminae and UL but no effect on Chl content. Sugar beet plants grown with light depleted in the 320-400 nm region of the spectrum and exposed to UV-B died. Low levels of UV-B did neither affected hypocotyl elongation nor amounts of free IAA in sunflower plants grown under low (LL; 143 μmol m-2s-1) or high PAR (HL; 800 μmol m-2s-1). Three times more daily UV-B increased the amount of free IAA, but inhibited hypocotyl elongation. Higher Fv/Fmax and F690/F735, Chl a and carotenoids were found in plants exposed to low UV-B. Indeed, UV-B can be harmful but may also have enhancing effects on plants. (au) (114 refs.)

  9. Determination of the dose rapidity of a {sup 90} Sr beta radiation source using thermoluminescent dosemeters; Determinacion de la rapidez de dosis de una fuente de radiacion beta de {sup 90}Sr usando dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, P.R.; Azorin N, J.; Rivera M, T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The thermoluminescent dosemeters developed in Mexico, have been used efficiently in environmental and personal dosimetry. When the dose rate of some source is not known can be estimated with the use of thermoluminescent dosemeters taking in account the geometrical array used in the irradiations for reproducibility of the results in posterior irradiations. In this work it was estimated the dose rate of a {sup 90} Sr-{sup 90} Y beta radiation source which is property of the Nuclear Sciences Institute, UNAM, therefore it was l ended to the Metropolitan Autonomous University- Iztapalapa Unit for the characterization of new Tl materials, taking account of the institutional collaboration agreements. (Author)

  10. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants – Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Neutron and gamma rays fields in concrete biological shield are calculated. • An extensive database on irradiated concrete properties has been collected. • Concrete mechanical properties decrease beyond 1.0 × 1019 n/cm2 fluence. • Loss of properties appears correlated with radiation induced-aggregate swelling. • Commercial reactor bio-shield may experience long-term irradiation damage. - Abstract: A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation

  11. Proceedings of the Third international conference 'Interaction of radiation with solids'. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 128 collected papers form the Proceedings of the International Conference 'Interaction of Radiation with Solids'. This Conference is the third forum biennially gathering in Minsk the specialists from different countries. The scope of the problems considered at the Conference is widening steadily from year to year including the recent results and most advanced leads in the field of radiation physics of condensed matter. In the second part of the proceedings consideration is being given to 'Properties modification of materials ' and 'Equipment and technologies'

  12. A study on the efficacy and adverse effects of post-operative beta-radiation in the prevention of recurrence of Pterygium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta irradiation by Strontium (Sr-90) has been in use for about 20 years in Bangladesh. This retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate its efficacy and the risk and incidence of complications, both short-term and long-term. A retrospective analysis was done of all 417 patients receiving post-operative beta irradiation from January 2001 to January 2006.There were 303 males and 114 females, age ranged from 18 to 65 years with a mean of 38 years. Each patient received 2500cGy to the post-operative sclera surface in five fractions by hand held Sr-90 surface applicator from Amersham International. The patients were followed up at one week, one month, six months and one year after beta irradiation. All 417 cases reported for follow up at one week. But then gradually some patients did not turn up according to the schedule. The number of patients who reported for follow up at one month, 6 months and one year were 401, 325 and 288 respectively. Eighteen cases had recurrence within one year and received a second dose of beta radiation. Short-term complications included conjunctivitis, photophobia, watering of eyes etc. As for long term complications, two patients developed cataract and one patient developed ophthalmomalacia. The short-term complications were self limiting and had no serious effects. The two cases who developed cataracts were over 50 years old, so it could not be clearly understood whether the normal ageing process or the radiation contributed more in the development of the cataract. The rare ophthalmo-malacia developed in a case, which had simultaneous Graves' disease. All other patients in the study are doing well with significant improvement in visual acuity. The results of this retrospective study reveal that Sr- 90 beta irradiation is an effective and safe treatment option to prevent recurrence of Pterygium. (author)

  13. Koedam {beta} factors revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J.E. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doughty, D.A. [Perkin-Elmer Optoelectronics, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Lister, G.G. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., Beverly, MA (United States)

    2002-07-21

    A Koedam {beta} factor makes it possible to compute the total output power in line radiation from a positive column discharge using a single radiance measurement normal to an aperture in the wall. The results of analytic derivations of {beta} factors are presented for columns with uniform ({beta}=1.0) and parabolic ({beta}=0.75) excitation rates per unit volume and with negligible opacity. A Monte Carlo code for simulating radiation trapping with a spatially uniform density of absorbing atoms is then used to determine {beta} factors as a function of opacity. The code includes partial frequency redistribution and a Voigt line shape with radiative broadening, resonance collisional broadening, and Doppler broadening. The resulting {beta} factors are found to be nearly independent of opacity over a wide range of column radii for spectral line shapes dominated by Doppler broadening or by resonance collisional broadening. Additional Monte Carlo simulations are used to study {beta} factors as a function of a non-uniform density of absorbing atoms from radial cataphoresis with line shapes dominated by Doppler broadening, foreign gas broadening, and resonance collisional broadening. Radial cataphoresis is found to increase {beta} factors in all cases. Geometrical effects, refraction, and imperfect transmission at the glass wall are studied and found to decrease {beta} factors. (author)

  14. Fabrication of new phosphors of NaCl: Cu and their thermoluminescent characterization to be exposed to beta radiation; Fabricacion de nuevos fosforos de NaCl: Cu y su caracterizacion termoluminiscente al ser expuestos a radiacion beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, R.; Perez S, R.; Barboza F, M. [CIF, UNISON, A.P. 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Tostado G, W.C.; Cruz V, C. [UNISON, A.P. 130, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of new NaCl:Cu phosphors manufactured by following a previously reported sintering method. The samples were made from mixtures of commercially available Na CI and Cu Cl high purity powders. Tl glow curves obtained after exposing the samples to beta radiation exhibit two main intense peaks at 117 and 310 when a 2 C/s heating rate is used. These peaks positions differ from those reported for NaCl:Cu monocrystals. The first peak vanishes in ca. 3 h, while the high temperature one remains with no meaningful changes. The position, as well as the remarkable stability of the high temperature peak indicates that this new phosphors have better properties than the monocrystals present to be applied as detectors and dosimeters of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  15. Beta-carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and deterioration of the lining of the mouth (oral mucositis). Taking beta-carotene by mouth doesn’t appear to prevent the development of oral mucositis during radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Pancreatic cancer. Taking ...

  16. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  17. 213Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as 90Y/177Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with 213Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with 90Y/177Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of 213Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of 213Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of 213Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  18. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  19. The RBE of tritium-beta exposure for the induction of the adaptive response and apoptosis; cellular defense mechanisms against the biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaption to radiation is one of a few biological responses that has been demonstrated to occur in mammalian cells exposed to doses of ionizing radiation in the occupational exposure range. The adaptive response has been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although the doses required to induce the response are higher than in mammalian cells. When yeast cells are primed with sublethal doses of gamma-radiation, they subsequently undergo an adaptive response and develop resistance to radiation, heat the chemical mutagens in a time and dose dependent manner. We have used this model system to assess the relative ability of tritium-beta radiation to induce the adaptive response the examined tritium-induced radiation resistance, thermal tolerance and suppression of mutation. The results show that sublethal priming doses of tritium caused yeast cells to develop resistance to radiation, heat, and a chemical mutagen MNNG. The magnitude and kinetics of the response, per unit dose, were the same for tritium and gamma-radiation. Therefore, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium induction of the adaptive response was about 1.0. Apoptosis is a genetically programmed cell death or cell suicide. Cells damaged by radiation can be selectively removed from the population by apoptosis and therefore eliminated as a potential cancer risk to the organism. Since we have previously shown that apoptosis is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage in human lymphocytes exposed to low doses, we have used this endpoint to investigate the potency of tritium-beta radiation. Initially, tritium was compared to X-rays for relative effectiveness at inducing apoptosis. The results showed the lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with X-rays or tritium had similar levels of apoptosis per unit dose. Therefore the relative biology effectiveness of tritium for induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes was also about 1. In the work presented here, we have demonstrated that

  20. OSL and TL in LiF:Mg,Ti following alpha particle and beta ray irradiation: Application to mixed-field radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) following irradiation by beta and alpha particles was investigated by the measurement of the excitation and emission spectra of OSL and comparison with thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics. Measurements were also carried out on nominally pure LiF monocrystals. The preferential excitation of OSL compared to TL following high-ionisation density (HID) alpha irradiation is naturally explained via the identification of OSL with the 'two-hit' F2 or F3+ centre, whereas the major component of composite TL glow peak 5 is believed to arise from a 'one-hit' complex defect. This discovery allows near-total discrimination between HID radiation and low-ionisation density radiation and may have significant potential in mixed-field radiation dosimetry. (authors)

  1. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part IV: Long term risks - Carcinogenic, hereditary, and teratogenetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term risks induced by radiation are of much concern to patients and clinicians alike. As an example, perceived radiation risks are frequently cited in a woman's decision to choose a radical mastectomy over lumpectomy + radiation. In consequence, the actual radiation risks are often considerably overstated, or unreasonably downplayed. In this lecture we will discuss just what is known about the long term risks following radiotherapy, both from the human experience and from the laboratory. We will discuss risks both to the patient and to radiotherapy personnel. A good deal is known about the carcinogenic effects of high and low doses of radiation, in large part thanks to the careful study of the survivors of the atomic bombing in Japan, as well as studies of individuals exposed to medical x rays. It is possible to make an estimate, which is probably good to within a factor of, perhaps, three to five, of the cancer risks faced by a patient of a particular age and sex who is going to undergo a particular radiotherapeutic regimen. It is also possible to make an estimate of the risks faced by radiotherapy and nursing staff exposed to low doses. Brachytherapy related risk estimates are likely to be somewhat more uncertain, due to the poorly known sparing effects of the low dose rates used; for the radiotherapy personnel in brachytherapy, because of the doses which can be received, the risks can be quite significant. A recent complication in external-beam radiotherapy is the advent of high-energy linacs, which can produce a significant fast neutron dose which, dose for dose, may be ten to fifty times more carcinogenic than gamma rays. Data relating to the risks of hereditary effects of radiation come almost entirely from laboratory experiments in animals. Studies involving several million mice form the basis of most of our current understanding of hereditary effects. The results of these studies indicate that radiation is a relatively inefficient mutagen. The

  2. Australian radiation therapy – Part two: Reflections of the past, the present, the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Susan [Radiation Oncology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Curtin Health Innovative Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia); Halkett, Georgia [Curtin Health Innovative Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia); Sale, Charlotte [Radiation Oncology, Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Barwon Health, Geelong, Vic. (Australia); Radiation Oncology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Collaboration: Grad Cert Grief & Pall Care Counselling, MIR

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Documentation on the history of Australian radiotherapy is limited. This study provides radiation therapists' (RTs) perspectives of the people, workplace, and work practices in Australian radiotherapy centres from 1960 onwards. It provides a follow-up to our previous study: Australian radiation therapy: An overview – Part one, which outlines the history and development of radiotherapy from conception until present day. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted on separate occasions in 2010, one in South Australia and three in Victoria, Australia. Participants who worked in radiotherapy were purposively selected to ensure a range of experience, age, and years of work. Results: From a RT perspective, radiotherapy has evolved from a physically demanding ‘hands-on’ work environment, often with unpleasant sights and smells of disease, to a more technology-driven workplace. Conclusion: Understanding these changes and their subsequent effects on the role of Australian RTs will assist future directions in advanced role development.

  3. Australian radiation therapy – Part two: Reflections of the past, the present, the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Documentation on the history of Australian radiotherapy is limited. This study provides radiation therapists' (RTs) perspectives of the people, workplace, and work practices in Australian radiotherapy centres from 1960 onwards. It provides a follow-up to our previous study: Australian radiation therapy: An overview – Part one, which outlines the history and development of radiotherapy from conception until present day. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted on separate occasions in 2010, one in South Australia and three in Victoria, Australia. Participants who worked in radiotherapy were purposively selected to ensure a range of experience, age, and years of work. Results: From a RT perspective, radiotherapy has evolved from a physically demanding ‘hands-on’ work environment, often with unpleasant sights and smells of disease, to a more technology-driven workplace. Conclusion: Understanding these changes and their subsequent effects on the role of Australian RTs will assist future directions in advanced role development

  4. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin ... then there is a 25% chance with each pregnancy that their child will inherit two abnormal beta ...

  5. Fungicidal response of a novel natural photosensitizer (Beta vulgaris) on Candida albicans with low-power laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Subhangi; Roy, Sukhdev; Srivastava, J. N.

    2013-05-01

    We report the efficacy of an aqueous extract of Beta vulgaris as a novel, natural photosensitizer for use in photodynamic therapy against Candidiasis disease. This study evaluates the effect of different laser wavelengths (He-Ne: 633 nm, Nd-YAG: 532 nm), power (17, 27 mW) and duration of exposure (5, 10, 15 min) in combination with the Beta vulgaris natural photosensitizer on the viability of Candida albicans causing Candidiasis disease. Although inhibition was observed in all cases, a maximum of 51.91% inhibition takes place with the combination of Beta vulgaris exposed to 532 nm at 27 mW for 15 min by the Agar well diffusion method. The study is important in optimizing different parameters and designing a low-power, compact, non-invasive and portable device for treatment.

  6. Sensitivity studies of beta-radiation detector based on small-crystalline scintillator ZnSe(Te)

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrylyuk, V; Danshin, E

    2001-01-01

    A new large area beta-detector has been designed and studied.The design includes wedge-shaped light transducers.A composite material based on a small crystalline ZnSe(Te) was applied onto the wide surface of light transducer.This design ensures optimum light collection from the large sensitive surface onto the output window of a much smaller size.An experimental specimen has been prepared, which showed a beta-sensitivity C subbeta=5.5 cm sup 2. The spectrograms of a sup 9 sup 0 Sr sup + sup 9 sup 0 Y beta--source obtained with the specimen under study make it possible to evaluate the age of the source by the ratio of low-and high-energy regions of the spectrum. Other designs are proposed for application of large-area detectors possessing wedge-shaped light transducers as elements of assembled constructions for high efficiency detectors operating under flow conditions.

  7. Fungicidal response of a novel natural photosensitizer (Beta vulgaris) on Candida albicans with low-power laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the efficacy of an aqueous extract of Beta vulgaris as a novel, natural photosensitizer for use in photodynamic therapy against Candidiasis disease. This study evaluates the effect of different laser wavelengths (He–Ne: 633 nm, Nd-YAG: 532 nm), power (17, 27 mW) and duration of exposure (5, 10, 15 min) in combination with the Beta vulgaris natural photosensitizer on the viability of Candida albicans causing Candidiasis disease. Although inhibition was observed in all cases, a maximum of 51.91% inhibition takes place with the combination of Beta vulgaris exposed to 532 nm at 27 mW for 15 min by the Agar well diffusion method. The study is important in optimizing different parameters and designing a low-power, compact, non-invasive and portable device for treatment. (paper)

  8. X-ray tomography of powder injection moulded micro parts using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder injection moulding is one of the most promising replication methods for the mass production of metal and ceramic micro parts. The material for injection moulding, a so-called feedstock, consists of thermoplastic binder components and inorganic filler with approximately equal volume fractions. Injection moulding of the feedstock leads to a green part that can be processed to a dense metal or ceramic micro part by debinding and sintering. During the injection moulding process extremely high shear rates are applied. This promotes the separation of powder and binder leading to a particle density variation in the green part causing anisotropic shrinkage during post-processing. The knowledge of introducing density gradients and defects would consequently allow the optimization of the feedstock, the moulding parameters and the validation of a simulation tool based on the Dissipative Particle Dynamics which is currently under development, as well. To determine the particle density and defect distribution in micro parts synchrotron radiation tomography in absorption mode was used. Due to its parallel and monochromatic character a quantitative reconstruction, free of beam hardening artifacts, is possible. For the measurement, bending bars consisting of dispersed fused silica particles in a polymeric matrix were used. The presented results using this set-up show that crucial defects and density variations can be detected

  9. Post-processing of 3D-printed parts using femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Gehlich, Nils; Bonhoff, Tobias; Meiners, Wilhelm; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Biermann, Tim; Richardson, Martin C.

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, is a near-net shape manufacturing approach, delivering part geometry that can be considerably affected by various process conditions, heat-induced distortions, solidified melt droplets, partially fused powders, and surface modifications induced by the manufacturing tool motion and processing strategy. High-repetition rate femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. Different laser scanning approaches were utilized to increase the ablation efficiency and to reduce the surface roughness while preserving the initial part geometry. We studied post-processing of 3D-shaped parts made of Nickel- and Titanium-base alloys by utilizing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) as additive manufacturing techniques. Process parameters such as the pulse energy, the number of layers and their spatial separation were varied. Surface processing in several layers was necessary to remove the excessive material, such as individual powder particles, and to reduce the average surface roughness from asdeposited 22-45 μm to a few microns. Due to the ultrafast laser-processing regime and the small heat-affected zone induced in materials, this novel integrated manufacturing approach can be used to post-process parts made of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials, and to attain complex designed shapes with micrometer precision.

  10. Driving Parts Optimization Design for Radiation Shielding Doors of Proton Accelerator Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project) was Launched in 2002 as one of the 21st Century Frontier R and D Programs of MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology). Gyeongju city was selected as the project host site in March, 2006, where 'Proton Accelerator Research Center' was going to be constructed. After starting the design in 2005, the Architectural and Civil design work has been performed by 2010. Since the Earthwork was started in 2009, the Construction works of Accelerator Facilities has been going smoothly to complete by 2012. In this paper, we describe driving Parts optimization design for radiation shielding doors of Proton Accelerator Research Center

  11. Radiation therapy of the oral cavity: sequelae and management, part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beumer, J.; Curtis, T.; Harrison, R.E.

    This is the concluding portion of a two-part series dealing with the effects and manifestations in the oral cavity of radiation therapy of head and neck tumors. Preradiation and postradiation extractions in dentulous patients, as well as dental maintenance of such patients (including fluoride treatments follow-up, and restorative care), are discussed. Guidelines for the dental management of edentulous patients are also presented at length (this section covers risk of bone necrosis, soft liners, timing of denture placement, dentures and preexisting bone necrosis, soft-tissue necrosis and dentures, morbidity, and prosthodontic procedures). The article concludes with a brief discussion of osteoradionecrosis and soft-tissue necrosis.

  12. Radiation therapy of the oral cavity: sequelae and management, part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the concluding portion of a two-part series dealing with the effects and manifestations in the oral cavity of radiation therapy of head and neck tumors. Preradiation and postradiation extractions in dentulous patients, as well as dental maintenance of such patients (including fluoride treatments follow-up, and restorative care), are discussed. Guidelines for the dental management of edentulous patients are also presented at length (this section covers risk of bone necrosis, soft liners, timing of denture placement, dentures and preexisting bone necrosis, soft-tissue necrosis and dentures, morbidity, and prosthodontic procedures). The article concludes with a brief discussion of osteoradionecrosis and soft-tissue necrosis

  13. Dogmas y actualidades del uso de los beta-bloqueadores en prevención secundaria. Primera parte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Morales Salinas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Existe consenso con respecto a las directrices clínicas de que los betabloqueadores (BB aportan incuestionables beneficios en varios entornos de la prevención secundaria, como son la insuficiencia cardiaca y el infarto agudo de miocardio. Sin embargo, en la práctica son subutilizados en aquellos contextos donde no están contraindicados; tal es el caso de la insuficiencia cardiaca con fracción de eyección deprimida. En el presente artículo se analizan las evidencias disponibles acerca de la efectividad de los betabloqueadores en la insuficiencia cardiaca con fracción de eyección deprimida. Se concluye que son abrumadoras las evidencias a favor del uso de los beta-bloqueadores en la insuficiencia cardiaca crónica con fracción de eyección deprimida; mientras que en los episodios de descompensación aguda de la insuficiencia cardiaca debe evitarse la suspensión de los mismos siempre que sea posible.

  14. Use of low doses of cobalt 60 gamma radiation on beet (Beta vulgaris L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seed to stimulate increase yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research had the aim of evaluating the effects of low doses of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation on seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cultiva Champion, cultivars Nantes Forto (european origin) and Brasilia (Rio Grande do Sul origin) carrot (Daucus carota L. var. sativus (Hoffm.) Thell), and red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) cultivar Tall Top Early Wonder before sowing, its effects on plant growth, on the yield and roots storage of two tillages: with sowing in the same day of radiation and six days after radiation seeds. The data showed that the seeds radiation did not interfered negatively on plants growth, and the species presented differences as roots production and doses on both plantation: radish with 5,0 Gy and 2,5 Gy doses respectively to the first and the second sowings, Brasilia carrot with 2,5 Gy dose to both sowings. Nantes carrot with 2,5 Gy and 5,0 Gy respectively to the first and the second sowings, and beet with 7,5 Gy and 5,0 Gy respectively to the first and the second plantations. There is not statistics difference by Tukey test (5% and 1%) and none relation between seeds radiation and loss weight on roots storage. (author)

  15. Beta Androstenediol Mitigates the Damage of 1 GeV/n Fe Ion Particle Radiation to the Hematopoietic System

    OpenAIRE

    Loria, Roger; Beckman, Mathew; Contaifer, Daniel; Tamariz, Francisco; Gibb, David; Thompson, Laura; Guida, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1–3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol (Δ5 androsten-3β, 17β-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of...

  16. The case of treatment of recurrent cancer of skin of hairy part of the head complicated with radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a case of surgical treatment of recurrent cancer of skin of hairy part of the head in combination with late radiation skin necrosis, osteomyelitis of the parietooccipital cyst and radiation encephalopathy of the parasaggital region of the brain with lower paraparesis, that occurred after radiation therapy of fungi-shaped form of locally advanced cancer of skin of calvaria ( a short-focused x-ray therapy with a total dose of 60 Gy)

  17. A case study in the Chernobyl exclusion zone - Part 2: predicting radiation induced effects in biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years national and international programmes have proposed a number of frameworks and methodologies to assess the protection of wildlife from ionising radiations. Whilst some of these are now being used by national authorities there has been little attempt to rigorously test their predictions against available data. In part this is because there are few sites where radiation induced effects have been observed. The Chernobyl exclusion zone represents a site where assessment framework predictions from exposure through to effects can be thoroughly tested. In a separate paper, we have tested predictions of terrestrial radionuclide transfer models developed within the EC FP5 project FASSET against available radionuclide activity concentration database for terrestrial biota in the exclusion zone. In this paper we use the dose conversion factors developed within the FASSET project to estimate internal and external doses to biota within the exclusion zone. The estimated doses are then used to predict effects at different biological levels of organisation using the FASSET Radiation Effects Database (FRED); predicted effects are compared to observed effects within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. The observed effects data for the exclusion zone covers organisms from soil biota through to fish and mammals. Results of the comparison are used to make recommendations for future improvements to assessment frameworks. (author)

  18. {beta} -carotene effect the induction of the sister chromatid exchanges (ICH) by gamma radiation in mouse radiosensibilized osseous marrow cells In vivo; Efecto del {beta}- caroteno la induccion de intercambios en las cromatidas hermanas (ICH) por radiacion gamma en celulas radiosensibilizadas de la medula osea de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales R, P.; Cruz V, V.L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Dept. de Biologia

    1997-07-01

    The effect of {beta}- carotene over the ICH radioinduction in radiosensibilized with BrdU osseous marrow cells of mouse was determined In vivo. The treatment with 50 {mu}g {beta} carotene per se induces a significant increment in the ICH frequency and the pre or post-treatment with the same dose causes an additive effect in the ICH frequency produced by 0.62 Gy of gamma radiation. This implies that {beta}- carotene does not have radioprotective activity, under conditions which was developed this experiment. (Author)

  19. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part 11 of a database constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on authors, key words, title, year, journal name, or publication number. Photocopies of the publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by our publication acquisition numbers. This volume contains 1048 additional entries, which are listed in alphabetical order by author. The computer software used for the database is a simple but sophisticated relational database program that permits quick information access, high flexibility, and the creation of customized reports. This program is inexpensive and is commercially available for the Macintosh and the IBM PC. Although the database entries were made using a Macintosh computer, we have the capability to convert the files into the IBM PC version. As of this date, the database cites 2260 publications. Citations in the database are from 200 different scientific journals. There are also references to 80 books and published symposia, and 158 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed within the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly predominate. The journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, with a total of 242 citations in the database, and Mutation Research, with 185 citations. Other journals with over 100 citations in the database, are Radiation Research, with 136, and International Journal of Radiation Biology, with 132

  20. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Part 2. Physical radiations and biological significance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report comprises a teaching text, encompassing all physical radiations likely to be of biological interest, and the relevant biological effects and their significance. Topics include human radiobiology, delayed effects, radiation absorption in organisms, aqueous radiation chemistry, cell radiobiology, mutagenesis, and photobiology

  1. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1999, Part -2, Annex 1, Control of the working environment, dosimetry and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains data and analysis of the of measured sample results collected during radiation protection control in the working environment of the RA reactor. First part contains basic exposure values and statistical review of the the total number of radiation measurements. It includes contents of radioactive gasses and effluents in the air, as well as the level of surface contamination of clothes and uncovered parts of the personnel bodies. Second part deals with the analysis of personnel doses. Third part of this annex contains basic data about the quantity of collected radioactive waste, total quantity of contaminated and decontaminated surfaces. It is stated that there have been no accidents that could cause significant contamination of working surfaces and components nor radiation exposure of the personnel. Previously initiated actions concerning future decision on the status of the RA reactor were continued during 1999. The main objective of this activity was to complete the first phase of cleaning the spent fuel storage pool, removal of the slug from the bottom of the pool and transportation channels, as well as preparing the documentation for decision about the methods for improvement of storage pool conditions in future phases. Detailed analysis of procedures and planning of radiation safety and radiation protection methods was started. State of 30 aluminium barrels containing 4929 spent fuel elements stored in the storage pool was examined and demanded special radiation protection measures

  2. Dosemetry for exposures to cosmic radiation in civilian aircraft - Part 1: Conceptual basis for measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    altitude is complex, with many types of ionizing radiation present, with energies ranging up to many GeV. The determination of ambient dose equivalent for such a complex radiation field is difficult, and the purpose of this International Standard is to give the conceptual basis for performing such measurements and for the calibration of instruments used for this purpose. In many cases, the methods used for the determination of ambient dose equivalent in aircraft are similar to those used at high-energy accelerators in research laboratories. Therefore, it is possible to recommend dosemetric methods and methods for the calibration of dosemetric devices, as well as the techniques for maintaining the traceability of dosemetric measurements to national standards. dosemetric measurements taken to evaluate ambient dose equivalent must be performed using accurate and reliable methods that ensure the quality of readings provided to workers and regulatory authorities. The future Part 2 of ISO 20785 will give procedures for the characterization of the response of instruments for the determination of ambient dose equivalent in aircraft. Requirements for the determination and recording of the cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew have been introduced into the national legislation of EU Member States and other countries. Harmonization of methods used for determining ambient dose equivalent and for calibrating instruments is desirable to ensure the compatibility of measurements performed with such instruments. This International Standard is intended for the use of primary and secondary calibration laboratories for ionizing radiation, by radiation protection personnel employed by governmental agencies, and by industrial corporations concerned with the determination of ambient dose equivalent for aircraft crew

  3. Thermoluminescence response of new KClxBr1-x :EuCl3 sintered phosphors exposed to beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali halides crystals have been the subject of intense research for an understanding of their radiation-induced defects and luminescence properties. They exhibit noteworthy thermoluminescence (TL) properties when exposed to ionising radiation. Currently, these materials are grown employing expensive and rather complicated techniques. In this work, the results on the TL properties of new alkali halides phosphors fabricated by a simple and inexpensive procedure are presented. The samples were made by mixing KCl, KBr and EuCl3 salts, and compressing them at a pressure of 3.2 x 107 Pa during 3 min, followed by sintering at 700 deg. C during 24 h under air atmosphere. The dosimetric response of the samples showed an increase with radiation dose in the 1.5-20.0 Gy dose range for beta and gamma radiation. The TL glow curves in sintered samples presented significant differences in their peak structures compared with monocrystalline samples, indicating that the nature of the trapping states and the recombination mechanisms may be different. (authors)

  4. HPLC-MS(n) Identification of Betalain Profile of Different Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) Parts and Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatnar, Ana; Stampar, Franci; Veberic, Robert; Jakopic, Jerneja

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of betalains in peel, flesh, and petioles of yellow and red beetroot cultivars has been investigated using an High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system with electrospray mass spectrometry. Differences in the levels of betacyanins and betaxanthins between different colored cultivars were individually determined for 3 plant parts. The content of almost all analyzed compounds decreased in the following order: peel > flesh > petiole. Betanin/isobetanin pigments comprised a major portion of the relative peak area measured in red beetroot peel. Isobetanin relative peak areas were also high in leaf petioles (68.94% to 74.16%) of red colored cultivars. However, betacyanins were completely absent from the extracts of all analyzed parts of yellow beet. Glutamine-bx represented a very high relative peak area (59.54% to 64.18%) in flesh of red-colored cultivars analyzed in the study. Our results indicate that red beet cultivars can be utilized as a potential source of red and yellow natural colorants. However, differences in pigment composition among different beetroot parts must be considered and in order to maximize the pigment yields petioles can also be used as a source rich in specific betalain compounds. PMID:26243178

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence response to Al2O3 to beta radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akselrod, A.; Akselrod, M.S.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Banerjee, D.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Christensen, P.; Lucas, A.C.; McKeever, S.W.S.; Yoder, C.

    High sensitivity dosemeters based on Al2O3:C have been prepared and tested for use as beta dosemeters using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Two types of sample were prepared and tested, namely unpolished thick, single crystal chips and thin powder layers on aluminium substrates. The...... cover thicknesses. The response per unit H-p(0.07), normalised to Co-60, is compared for each dosemeter type and discussed within the framework of DOELAP and EU recommended limits....

  6. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part -2, Radioactivity control of working environment, dosimetry, Annex 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains data and analysis of the of measured sample results collected during radiation protection control in the working environment of the RA reactor. First part contains basic data about types of occupational radiation exposure and radiation monitoring methods. Typical points in the working environment where control of radioactive gasses and effluents in the air was done are shown in tables. Values of radiation dose equivalents are included, especially at typical points of the heavy water reactor system. The second part of this report includes basic data about the quantities of total collected radioactive waste, contaminated and decontaminated surfaces, and number of contaminated and decontaminated objects. It is stated that there have been no accidents that could cause significant contamination of working surfaces and components nor radiation exposure of the personnel

  7. High beta multipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multipoles are being employed as devices to study fusion issues and plasma phenomena at high values of beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) in a controlled manner. Due to their large volume, low magnetic field (low synchrotron radiation) region, they are also under consideration as potential steady state advanced fuel (low neutron yield) reactors. Present experiments are investigating neoclassical (bootstrap and Pfirsch-Schlueter) currents and plasma stability at extremely high beta

  8. A SMACK Model of Colliding Planetesimals and Dust in the $\\beta$ Pictoris Debris Disk: Thermal Radiation and Scattered Light

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvold, Erika R

    2015-01-01

    We present a new model of the $\\beta$ Pictoris disk-and-planet system that simulates both the planetesimal collisions and the dynamics of the resulting dust grains, allowing us to model features and asymmetries in both thermal and scattered light images of the disk. Given the observed inclination and eccentricity of the $\\beta$ Pictoris b planet, the model neatly ties together several features of the disk: the central hole in the submillimeter images, the two-disk "x"-pattern seen in scattered light, the "wing-tilt" asymmetry, and possibly even the clumpy gas seen by ALMA. We also find that most of the dust in the $\\beta$ Pictoris system is likely produced outside the ring at 60-100 AU. Instead of a birth ring, this disk has a "stirring ring" at 60-100 AU where the high-velocity collisions produced by the secular wave launched by the planet are concentrated. The two-disk x-pattern arises because collisions occur more frequently at the peaks and troughs of the secular wave. The perturbations of the disk in thi...

  9. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part II: Current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. The principles described in Part I are used to explain current practices in radiation oncology and as a basis for new initiatives. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing by x-rays. This led to the development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons were initially introduced, too, in an attempt to overcome the perceived problems of hypoxia, but clinical trials now are based on the premise

  10. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  11. Incidence of primary hypothyroidism in patients exposed to therapeutic external beam radiation, where radiation portals include a part or whole of the thyroid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Laway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypothyroidism is a known consequence of external-beam radiotherapy to the neck encompassing a part or whole of the thyroid gland. In this non-randomized prospective study, we have tried to evaluate the response of the thyroid gland to radiation by assessing thyroid function before irradiation and at regular intervals after irradiation. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study were to assess in the cancer patients, who were exposed to the therapeutic external beam radiation, where radiation portals include a part or whole of the thyroid gland: the incidence of primary hypothyroidism, the time required to become hypothyroid, any relation between the total dose for the development of hypothyroidism, and whether there are any patient or treatment-related factors that are predictive for the development of hypothyroidism, including the use of concurrent chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: This non-randomized, prospective study was conducted for a period of 2 years in which thyroid function was assessed in 59 patients (cases of head and neck cancer, breast cancer, lymphoma patients and other malignancies, who had received radiotherapy to the neck region. 59 euthyroid healthy patients (controls were also taken, who had not received the neck irradiation. These patients/controls were assessed periodically for 2 years. Results: The incidence of hypothyroidism after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT to neck where radiation portals include part or whole of the thyroid gland was 16.94%, seven cases had subclinical hypothyroidism (11.86% and three cases had clinical hypothyroidism (5.08%. Mean time for development of hypothyroidism was 4.5 months. There was no effect of age, gender, primary tumor site, radiation dose and chemotherapy, whether neoadjuvant or concurrent with the development of hypothyroidism. Conclusion: In summary, we found that thyroid dysfunction is a prevalent, yet easily treatable source of morbidity in patients

  12. Meeting the challenge of managed care - Part I: Radiation oncology as an important part of multi-modal care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Oncology is an important component in multi-modality cancer care. Managed care has defined a number of different ways that radiation oncologists can interact with the other members of the cancer team. This course will review those options. The change in health care delivery is forcing radiation oncologists to examine every aspect of how they organize themselves, deliver care, evaluate that care, and how they are reimbursed for this process. This course will attempt to examine how the pressures of the new paradigms of health care delivery; managed care and outcomes research are impacting upon radiation therapy practice, and what radiation oncologists can do to maintain patient care standards. I. Introduction: A. Managed Care: What it is and where it is going 1. PPO's 2. HMO's 3. POS plans 4. Carve-outs B. Outcomes Research: What it can and cannot do 1. Patterns of care and SEER 2. Rand 3. ''Surrogate outcomes:'' patient satisfaction, quality of life indicators II. Moving from QA and CQI and Benchmarking A. Radiation Oncologists cannot take anything for granted B. Using analytical tools to evaluate all aspects of the radiation oncology practice. 1. Capital Purchases 2. Operational Aspects III Evaluating Staffing Needs A. What traditional jobs in the department should stay? B. Is the cross-training seen in the rest of the hospital appropriate in radiation oncology C. Outsourcing and multi-department organization as ways to improve efficiency D. What about physician extenders? E. What residents, newly trained radiation oncologists, and physician-practice managers must acknowledge to each other IV. Evaluating Technology A. See second and third talks in this series B. Improving efficiency: how does this help when one is not at capacity C. Increasing throughput D. Decreasing cost V. Informatics A. See second and third talks in this series B. What should one expect the computer to do for you C. Some personal observations VI. Gains from Share Services A. Should

  13. Beta androstenediol mitigates the damage of 1 GeV/n Fe ion particle radiation to the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria, Roger; Beckman, Mathew; Contaifer, Daniel; Tamariz, Francisco; Gibb, David; Thompson, Laura; Guida, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1-3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol (Δ(5) androsten-3β, 17β-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of 3 Gy whole-body high LET (56)Fe(26+) exposure. The findings show that postradiation AED treatment has an overall positive and significant beneficial effect to restore the levels of hematopoeitic elements (pcell, hemoglobin, and platelet counts. Flow cytometry analysis 14 days after radiation and AED treatment demonstrated an increase (pcells counts. Ex vivo osteoclastogenesis studies show that AED treatment is necessary and advantageous for the development and restoration of osteoclastogenesis after radiation exposure. These findings clearly show that androstenediol functions as a countermeasure to remedy hematopoeitic injury mediated by high LET iron ion radiation. Presently, no other agent has been shown to have such properties. PMID:21790310

  14. Beta radiation effect on catalytic activity of BASF K-3-10 catalyst in low-temperature water vapour conversion of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CuO-ZnO-Cr2O3 based K-3-10 catalyst manufactured by BASF allows the conversion of CO with water vapour during the industrial production of hydrogen to be conducted at a relatively low temperature of 420 to 500 K. The effect of beta radiation on catalytic activity was studied in a troughflow tube reactor operating in integral mode. The effect of radiation was observed using the value of relative catalytic activity expressed as the ratio of reaction rate conctants during irradiation and without irradiation. Two cases were studied: a) preliminary irradiation of 8 samples of catalysts with a 90Sr-90Y source with doses of 1.7 to 3524 kGy, b) the incorporation of the 32P radionuclide in the catalytic bed of 6 samples such that the dose absorbed bz the catalyst during the experiment was 19.1 to 687.8 Gy. For preliminary irradiation, a non-monotonous increase was found in the catalytic activity amounting to 28 - 83 % (reaching maximum at a dose of 125.9 kGy.). Radioactive bed experiments showed a monotonous increase in catalytic activity with bed radioactivity; the highest achieved increase in activity was 72 %. Differences were found in the stability in time of radiation modified catalytic activity showing that effects induced by the two methods have a different character. A probable explanation of observed dependences is suggested. (A.K.)

  15. Improving diversity, inclusion, and representation in radiology and radiation oncology part 1: why these matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoote, Johnson B; Fielding, Julia R; Deville, Curtiland; Gunderman, Richard B; Morgan, Gail N; Pandharipande, Pari V; Duerinckx, Andre J; Wynn, Raymond B; Macura, Katarzyna J

    2014-07-01

    The ACR Commission for Women and General Diversity is committed to identifying barriers to a diverse physician workforce in radiology and radiation oncology (RRO), and to offering policy recommendations to overcome these barriers. In Part 1 of a 2-part position article from the commission, diversity as a concept and its dimensions of personality, character, ethnicity, biology, biography, and organization are introduced. Terms commonly used to describe diverse individuals and groups are reviewed. The history of diversity and inclusion in US society and health care are addressed. The post-Civil Rights Era evolution of diversity in medicine is delineated: Diversity 1.0, with basic awareness, nondiscrimination, and recruitment; Diversity 2.0, with appreciation of the value of diversity but inclusion as peripheral or in opposition to other goals; and Diversity 3.0, which integrates diversity and inclusion into core missions of organizations and their leadership, and leverages its potential for innovation and contribution. The current states of diversity and inclusion in RRO are reviewed in regard to gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender identity. The lack of representation and unchanged demographics in these fields relative to other medical specialties are explored. The business case for diversity is discussed, with examples of successful models and potential application to the health care industry in general and to RRO. The moral, ethical, and public health imperative for diversity is also highlighted. PMID:24993534

  16. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part] 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In India at present, the share of power generated from nuclear sources is just 3 per cent of the total power generated from all sources. It is planned to increase this share to 10 per cent by the turn of this century. To do this, the present capacity of 8 nuclear power reactors and 2 fuel reprocessing plants will have to be increased five fold. The necessary construction work involved in this project will require on an average 7600m3 of heavy density concrete for the next few years on the assumption that 15m3 of heavy density concrete is required per megawatt of newly installed capacity for power generation. The paper, presented in three parts, deals with various aspects of heavy density concrete. The first part gives the background information and effects of nuclear radiation. It also discusses factors to be considered in the selection of materials for a concrete shield. These factors are density, chemical composition, nuclear properties, purity and consistency, ease of processing, and placement and cost. Important minerals and other aggregates used in the manufacture of heavy density concrete are briefly described. Selection criteria for aggregates and aggregate production are discussed. (author)

  17. Sterilization of health care products - Radiation. Part 3: Guidance on dosemetric aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral part of radiation sterilization is the ability to measure dose. Dose is measured during all stages of development, validation and routine monitoring of the sterilization process. It has to be demonstrated that dose measurement is traceable to a national or International Standard, that the uncertainty of measurement is known, and that the influence of temperature, humidity and other environmental considerations on dosimeter response is known and taken into account. Process parameters are established and applied based on dose measurements. This part of ISO 11137 provides guidance on the application of dose measurements (dosimetry) during all stages of the sterilization process. ISO 11137-1 describes requirements that, if met, will provide a radiation sterilization process, intended to sterilize medical devices, which has appropriate microbiocidal activity. Furthermore, compliance with the requirements helps ensure that this activity is both reliable and reproducible so that predictions can be made, with reasonable confidence, that there is a low level of probability of there being a viable microorganism present on product after sterilization. Generic requirements of the quality management system for design and development, production, installation and servicing are given in ISO 9001 and particular requirements for quality management systems for medical device production are given in ISO 13485. The standards for quality management systems recognize that, for certain processes used in manufacturing or reprocessing, the effectiveness of the process cannot be fully verified by subsequent inspection and testing of the product. Sterilization is an example of such a process. For this reason, sterilization processes are validated for use, the performance of the sterilization process monitored routinely and the equipment maintained. Requirements in regard to dosimetry are given in ISO 11137-1 and ISO 11137-2. This part of ISO 11137 gives guidance to these

  18. Radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Safety Fundamentals cover the protection of human beings against ionizing radiation (gamma and X rays and alpha, beta and other particles that can induce ionization as they interact with biological materials), referred to herein subsequently as radiation, and the safety of sources that produce ionizing radiation. The Fundamentals do not apply to non-ionizing radiation such as microwave, ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiation. They do not apply either to the control of non-radiological aspects of health and safety. They are, however, part of the overall framework of health and safety

  19. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen–pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible. - Highlights: • Patient E estimations from CT part of SPECT/CT and PET/CT. • Phantom measurement on two High-end CTs and one CT from SPECT/CT. • Comparison of DT,R and HT

  20. Material and cultural assets. Part of radiation protection of the environment?; Sach- und Kulturgueter. Teil eines Strahlenschutzes der Umwelt?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellermann, R.G. [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Loebner, W.

    2015-07-01

    Since several years the protection of the environment has been discussed at various international levels as part of radiation protection. ICRP has published a number of recommendations which relate primarily to the evaluation of radiation exposures to non-human species. Nevertheless, not least because of the declaratory mention of the environment in national legislative documents, the question arises how the environment can be integrated into the radiation protection or whether the radiation protection must be even expanded to new fields. A less discussed aspect here covers material and cultural assets that are classified in environmental law as objects worthy of protection. The paper describes some issues that arise in this context and outlines a framework for the consideration of material assets in radiation protection.

  1. A localized navigation algorithm for radiation evasion for nuclear facilities: Optimizing the “Radiation Evasion” criterion: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A new navigation algorithm for radiation evasion around nuclear facilities. ► An optimization criteria minimized under algorithm operation. ► A man-borne device guiding the occupational worker towards paths that warrant least radiation × time products. ► Benefits of using localized navigation as opposed to global navigation schemas. ► A path discrimination function for finding the navigational paths exhibiting the least amounts of radiation. -- Abstract: In this paper, we introduce a navigation algorithm having general utility for occupational workers at nuclear facilities and places where radiation poses serious health hazards. This novel algorithm leverages the use of localized information for its operation. Therefore, the need for central processing and decision resources is avoided, since information processing and the ensuing decision-making are done aboard a man-borne device. To acquire the information needed for path planning in radiation avoidance, a well-designed and distributed wireless sensory infrastructure is needed. This will automatically benefit from the most recent trends in technology developments in both sensor networks and wireless communication. When used to navigate based on local radiation information, the algorithm will behave more reliably when accidents happen, since no long-haul communication links are required for information exchange. In essence, the proposed algorithm is designed to leverage nearest neighbor information coming in through the sensory network overhead, to compute successful navigational paths from one point to another. The proposed algorithm is tested under the “Radiation Evasion” criterion. It is also tested for the case when more information, beyond nearest neighbors, is made available; here, we test its operation for different numbers of step look-ahead. We verify algorithm performance by means of simulations, whereby navigational paths are calculated for different radiation fields

  2. Common Variants of GSTP1, GSTA1, and TGF{beta}1 are Associated With the Risk of Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrazzino, Salvatore [DiSCAFF and Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale di Farmacogenetica e Farmacogenomica, University of Piemonte Orientale ' Avogadro' , Novara (Italy); La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Masini, Laura; Franco, Pierfrancesco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Canonico, Pier Luigi; Genazzani, Armando A. [DiSCAFF and Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale di Farmacogenetica e Farmacogenomica, University of Piemonte Orientale ' Avogadro' , Novara (Italy); Krengli, Marco, E-mail: marco.krengli@med.unipmn.it [DMCS and BRMA, University of Piemonte Orientale ' Avogadro' , Novara (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To provide new insights into the genetic basis of normal tissue radiosensitivity, we evaluated the association between eight polymorphic variants located in six genes related to DNA repair mechanisms, oxidative stress, and fibroblast proliferation (XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, TP53 Arg72Pro, GSTP1 Ile105Val, GSTA1 C-69T, eNOS G894T, TGF{beta}1 C-509T, and TGF{beta}1 T869C) and the risk of subcutaneous fibrosis in a retrospective series of patients who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous fibrosis was scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissue-Subjective Objective Management Analytical scale in 257 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy. Genotyping was conducted by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood. The association between genetic variants and the risk of moderate to severe fibrosis was evaluated by binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Two hundred thirty-seven patients were available for the analysis. Among them, 41 patients (17.3%) developed moderate to severe fibrosis (Grade 2-3), and 196 (82.7%) patients displayed no or minimal fibrotic reactions (Grade 0-1). After adjustment of confounding factors, GSTP1 Ile105Val (odds ratio [OR] 2.756; 95% CI, 1.188-6.393; p = 0.018), GSTA1 C-69T (OR 3.223; 95% CI, 1.176-8.826; p = 0.022), and TGF{beta}1 T869C (OR 0.295; 95% CI, 0.090-0.964; p = 0.043) polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with the risk of Grade 2-3 radiation-induced fibrosis. In the combined analysis, carriers of three risk genotypes were found to be at higher odds for the development of Grade 2-3 fibrosis than were patients with two risk genotypes (OR 4.415; 95% CI, 1.553-12.551, p = 0.005) or with no or one risk genotype (OR 8.563; 95% CI, 2.671-27.447; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: These results suggest that functional variations in

  3. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2001-08-01

    In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment, the visible and infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Using {approx}860 h of combined ruby (0.694 {micro}m) lidar and midinfrared (9.5-11.5 {micro}m) radiometer data collected between 1992 and 1999 from visually identified cirrus clouds, the visible optical depths {tau} and infrared layer emittance epsilon of the varieties of midlatitude cirrus are characterized. The mean and median values for the cirrus sample are 0.75 {+-} 0.91 and 0.61 for {tau}, and 0.30 {+-} 0.22 and 0.25 for epsilon. Other scattering parameters studied are the visible extinction and infrared absorption coefficients, and their ratio, and the lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which has a mean value of 0.041 sr{sup -1}. Differences among cirrus clouds generated by general synoptic (e.g., jet stream), thunderstorm anvil, and orographic mechanisms are found, reflecting basic cloud microphysical effects. The authors draw parameterizations in terms of midcloud temperature T{sub m} and physical cloud thickness {Delta}z for epsilon and {tau}: both macrophysical variables are needed to adequately address the impact of the adiabatic process on ice cloud content, which modulates radiative transfer as a function of temperature. For the total cirrus dataset, the authors find epsilon = 1 -exp [-8.5 x 10{sup -5} (T{sub m} + 80 C) {Delta}z]. These parameterizations, based on a uniquely comprehensive dataset, hold the potential for improving weather and climate model predictions, and satellite cloud property retrieval methods.

  4. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  5. Effects of prenatal exposure to low dose beta radiation from tritiated water on postnatal growth and neurobehavior of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregnant adult C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to 4 groups and 3 of them were irradiated with beta-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by a single intraperitoneal injection on the 12.5 th day of gestation. Their offsprings received cumulative dose of 0.036, 0.071 and 0.213 Gy, respectively. Offspring of mice were observed for postnatal growth (body weight), the appearance of four physiologic makers (eye opening, pinna detachment, testes decent, vaginal opening), the age of acquisition of two reflexes (cloff avoidance, air righting) and sensuous functions (auditory startle, pain threshold), movement and coordination functions and activity (pivoting, foot splay, continuous corridor activity), and learning and memory (electric avoidance reflex in Y-maze, conditioning reflex). It was found that results for the parameters in 0.036 or 0.071 Gy group were differed significantly from those for the controls, and for most parameters, a dose dependent effect was found

  6. Radiative Corrections to Light Neutrino Masses in Low Scale Type I Seesaw Scenarios and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Pavon, J; Petcov, S T

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the one-loop corrections to the light neutrino mass matrix within low scale type I seesaw extensions of the Standard Model and their implications in experimental searches for neutrinoless double beta decay. We show that a sizable contribution to the effective Majorana neutrino mass from the exchange of heavy Majorana neutrinos is always possible, provided one requires a fine-tuned cancellation between the tree-level and one-loop contribution to the light neutrino masses. We quantify the level of fine-tuning as a function of the seesaw parameters and introduce a generalisation of the Casas-Ibarra parametrization of the neutrino Yukawa matrix, which easily allows to include the one-loop corrections to the light neutrino masses.

  7. Thermoluminescence characterization of LiMgF3:DyF3 phosphors exposed to beta radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, R.; Alday-Samaniego, K. R.; Furetta, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Kitis, G.; Brown, F.; Cruz-v&Ázquez, C.

    LiMgF3:DyF3 phosphors were obtained as polycrystalline solids from the melting of component salts, with two DyF3 concentrations, 2.02% mol and 4.04% mol. In order to guarantee the homogeneity of the composition, the samples were crushed and the resulting powder was pressed to form pellet-shaped phosphors, some of which were sintered at 700 °C for 5 h, under atmospheric air. Thermoluminescence measurements of beta irradiated samples show that these phosphors exhibit adequate properties to be considered for development of thermoluminescence dosimeters. Integrated thermoluminescence as a function of dose displays a linear dependence with dose for doses below 20.0 Gy.

  8. Thermoluminescence characterization of LiMgF{sub 3}: DyF{sub 3} phosphors exposed to beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, R.; Alday S, K.R.; Brown, F.; Cruz V, C. [Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Furetta, C.; Cruz Z, E. [ICN-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Kitis, G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    LiMgF{sub 3}: DyF{sub 3} phosphors were obtained as polycrystalline solids from the melting of component salts, with two DyF{sub 3} concentrations, 2.02 % mol, and 4.04 % mol. In order to guarantee the homogeneity of composition, the samples were crushed and the resulting powder was pressed to form pellet-shaped phosphors, some of which were sintered at 700 C for 5 h under air atmosphere. Thermoluminescence measurements of beta irradiated samples show that these phosphors exhibit adequate properties to be considered for development of thermoluminescence dosimeters. Integrated thermoluminescence as a function of dose displays a linear dependence with dose for doses below 20.0 Gy. (Author)

  9. Regional Radiation Pneumonitis After SIRT of a Subcapsular Liver Metastasis: What is the Effect of Direct Beta Irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrocky, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.dobrocky@insel.ch [University of Bern, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University Hospital (Switzerland); Fuerstner, Markus, E-mail: markus.fuerstner@insel.ch; Klaeser, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.klaeser@insel.ch [University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, University Hospital (Switzerland); Lopez-Benitez, Ruben, E-mail: ruben.lopez@insel.ch [University of Bern, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University Hospital (Switzerland); Wälti, Yara Banz, E-mail: yara.banz@pathology.unibe.ch [University of Bern, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital (Switzerland); Kara, Levent, E-mail: levent.kara@insel.ch [University of Bern, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University Hospital (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    We herein present a patient undergoing selective internal radiation therapy with an almost normal lung shunt fraction of 11.5 %, developing histologically proven radiation pneumonitis. Due to a predominance of pulmonary consolidations in the right lower lung and its proximity to a large liver metastases located in the dome of the right liver lobe a Monte Carlo simulation was performed to estimate the effect of direct irradiation of the lung parenchyma. According to our calculations direct irradiation seems negligible and RP is almost exclusively due to ectopic draining of radioactive spheres.

  10. A design of a personal dosimeter based on a new TL material CaSO4:Dy,P for use in photon-beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A personal dosimeter containing TL elements, KCT-300, based on a new TL material CaSO4:Dy,P was developed to be used in measurement of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) in photon-beta radiation fields. The performance requirements provided by ANSI were adopted as a design criteria. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized to obtain design parameters affecting dosimeter response and successfully functioned as a desk-top design tool predicting dosimeter responses upon change of parameters. The fundamental response functions of the new TL dosimeter were acquired from experiments in the reference radiation field established in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The personal dosimeter designed in this study, KCT-300PB3, consists of three areas: the window area, the energy information area and the energy compensation area. The energy compensation area was designed to give a measurement of deep dose Hp(10) incurred by Photons with energy ranging from 54 to 662 keV. The shallow dose Hp(0.07) was calculated by applying an average shallow dose conversion factor of those photons to the deep dose determined. Consequently it was not necessary to resolve quality of photon beyond 54keV. To compensate for overkill of low energy photons by the front filter, a hole of 1.3 mm in diameter was placed on the front primary filter. By tapering entrance of hole at 60 .deg. angle, response of the energy compensation area for photons ranging from 54 to 662 keV with incidence angles below 60 .deg. met the isodirectional criteria specified in the ANSI N13.11 within ±6%. The energy information area was designed to focus on low energy X-rays below 54keV which wee easy to be identified. As a consequence, chances of wrong identification of photon energy in either X-rays or X-rays/137Cs gamma mixed field followed by large deviations in the evaluated doses were inherently reduced. The energy compensation area and the energy information area were designed to shield at least 96% of 90Sr/90Y beta particles

  11. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Final report. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of research into the direct action of ionizing radiation, especially the effect of radiation temperature, primarily upon enzymes, into induced repair, and into S.O.S.-related phenomena, is presented

  12. Managing complications of radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients: Part I. Management of xerostomia

    OpenAIRE

    W. C. Ngeow; Chai, W. L.; Rahman, R.A.; Ramli, R

    2006-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is becoming a more recognizable pathology to the general population and dentists. The modes of treatment include surgery and/or radiation therapy. Where possible, pretreatment dental assessment shall be provided for these patients before they receive radiation therapy. There are occasions, however, whereby head and neck cancer patients are not prepared optimally for radiation therapy. Because of this, they succumb to complicated oral adverse effects after radiation therap...

  13. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Comprehensive progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1976. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Rat skin has been studied for a number of years as a model of radiation carcinogenesis in a solid tissue. Accessibility of the skin enables the tumors to be detected early so that growth rate, proliferation rate, and onset times can be established accurately and, of course, the superficial location permits an accurate assessment of doses and a localization of the radiation to the tissue of interest. We have been attempting to establish as accurately as possible the nature of the dose response curve, i.e., the rate of tumor occurrence as of function of radiation dose, and the importance of tumor induction of radiologic factors, such as dose rate, fractionation, dose localization, linear energy transfer and of biologic factors, such as the proliferative state of the hair follicles and epidermis at the time of and subsequent to irradiation. The interaction of radiation and other carcinogens, especially ultraviolet light, is under study because of epidemiologic evidence suggesting a potential synergism for induction of scalp tumors. Radiobiological recovery processes have been studied in tumor response experiments using split doses of radiation separated by various times. The recovery rate for electron induced tumors has been measured, and the oncogenic effects of high LET particles (proton, alpha, argon) are being investigated.

  14. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1985, Part -2, Annex 1, Radioactivity control of working environment, dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains data and analysis of the of measured sample results collected during radiation protection control in the working environment of the RA reactor. First part contains basic exposure values and statistical review of the the total number of radiation measurements. It includes contents of radioactive gasses and effluents in the air, as well as the level of surface contamination of clothes and uncovered parts of the personnel bodies. Second part deals with the analysis of personnel doses. It was found that the maximum individual dose from external irradiation amounted to 8.2 mSV during past 10 months. Individual exposures for 7/10 of the personnel were less than 1/10 of the annual permissible exposure. Data are compared to radiation doses for last year and previous five years. Third part of this annex contains basic data about the quantity of collected radioactive waste, total quantity of contaminated and decontaminated surfaces. The last part analyzes accidents occurred at the reactor during 1985. It was found that there have been no accidents that could cause significant contamination of working surfaces and components nor radiation exposure of the personnel

  15. Radiation Survey at Different Public and Private Hospitals in Kathmandu Valley and Different Parts of nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Nepal, diagnostic use of radiation has been practiced for a long time; however the therapeutic use of radiation is fairly recent. International commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is the body, which has been taking decisions and putting forward recommendations as regards radiation protection. the national and local bodies modify these recommendations to the extent needed as per their circumstances and make law or rules to get them implemented. In Nepal, we have no Regulatory board, which controls the Quality Assurance or radiation protection activities. Realizing this, Nepal should have established strict guidelines for medical use of radiation. Presently there is no specific regulation as well as any monitoring system for workers regarding radiation in Nepal. Consequently over 95% of medical radiation workers have never been monitored for their radiation exposure. Although some, only five or six hospitals are monitoring their radiation workers. The main emphasis of this paper is to make Nepal a member country of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and establishment of a Radiation Regulatory board or commission and radiation act for those who involved in the field od medical radiation. This in only the beginning of the quality control program in Nepal. (Author)

  16. Preparation of cobra (Naja naja) venom toxoid using gamma-radiations. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detoxification of venom by radiation was investigated. Two concentrations i.e. 0.01% of venom solution were irradiated with different doses of gamma-radiations from cobalt-60 source. The results obtained indicate that the toxicity of venom is markedly attenuated by gamma-radiation. (author)

  17. Radiation Survey at Different Public and Private Hospitals in Kathmandu Valley and Different Parts of nepal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, K. P.; Rawal, K. B.

    2007-07-01

    In Nepal, diagnostic use of radiation has been practiced for a long time; however the therapeutic use of radiation is fairly recent. International commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is the body, which has been taking decisions and putting forward recommendations as regards radiation protection. the national and local bodies modify these recommendations to the extent needed as per their circumstances and make law or rules to get them implemented. In Nepal, we have no Regulatory board, which controls the Quality Assurance or radiation protection activities. Realizing this, Nepal should have established strict guidelines for medical use of radiation. Presently there is no specific regulation as well as any monitoring system for workers regarding radiation in Nepal. Consequently over 95% of medical radiation workers have never been monitored for their radiation exposure. Although some, only five or six hospitals are monitoring their radiation workers. The main emphasis of this paper is to make Nepal a member country of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and establishment of a Radiation Regulatory board or commission and radiation act for those who involved in the field od medical radiation. This in only the beginning of the quality control program in Nepal. (Author)

  18. Practicing radiation oncology in the current health care environment - Part III: Information systems for radiation oncology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This course will review topics to be considered when defining an information systems plan for a department of radiation oncology. A survey of available systems will be presented. Computer information systems can play an important role in the effective administration and operation of a department of radiation oncology. Tasks such as 1) scheduling for physicians, patients, and rooms, 2) charge collection and billing, 3) administrative reporting, and 4) treatment verification can be carried out efficiently with the assistance of computer systems. Operating a department without a state of art computer system will become increasingly difficult as hospitals and healthcare buyers increasingly rely on computer information technology. Communication of the radiation oncology system with outside systems will thus further enhance the utility of the computer system. The steps for the selection and installation of an information system will be discussed: 1) defining the objectives, 2) selecting a suitable system, 3) determining costs, 4) setting up maintenance contracts, and 5) planning for future upgrades

  19. CdZnTe- and TlBr-detectors response simulation for registration of the mixed beta- and gamma-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrypnyk A. I.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches for reconstructing the spectra of the mixed beta- and gamma-radiation, produced by wide band-gap semiconductor detectors, and the subsequent identification of radionuclides that are comprised in the mixture composition is a method based on various methods of spectral deconvolution. The presence of the detector response functions for each individual source of radiation is a key point in the studying such techniques. The response of TlBr- and CdZnTe-detectors to gamma-rays from 90Sr and 137Cs was simulated by Monte-Carlo method via Geant4 package. The computer experiments were conducted with using a β-filter and without it. It was shown that optimal thickness of the Al β-filter required for complete suppressing the conversion electrons in the 137Cs spectrum is 0.5 mm. The modification of 661.7 keV photopeaks with a using β-filter was investigated.

  20. The X-ray response of InP: Part B, synchrotron radiation measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, A; Bavdaz, M; Brammertz, G; Dubecky, F; Gostilo, V; Gryaznov, D; Haack, N; Krumrey, M; Loupilov, A

    2002-01-01

    In this, the second part of a detailed study into the X-ray response of InP, we present results of a series of X-ray measurements on a 3.142 mm sup 2 x180 mu m thick semi-insulating InP detector at the BESSY II and HASYLAB synchrotron radiation research facilities. Photon metrology was carried out at energies ranging from 8 to 100 keV. Additional measurements were made using radioactive and fluorescent target sources. At -60 deg. C, under full-area illumination, the FWHM energy resolution was 2.4 keV at 5.9 keV rising to 8.5 keV at 59.54 keV. Under pencil-beam illumination, the measured resolutions were generally less, being 2 keV FWHM at 8 keV rising approximately linearly to 5 keV at 100 keV. Analysis of the energy resolution function indicates that poor charge transport presently limit the performance of InP detectors and specifically hole trapping. This is borne out by the observed low-energy tailing of the pulse height spectra at intermediate and high energies. At very low count rates, it was found that ...

  1. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    The carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation on rat skin was studied in an attempt to learn more about radiation carcinogenesis, especially how various parameters of the irradiation, such as dose distribution within the tissue and dose rate, affect the yield of tumors. It was found that when the dose was localized to a small region of skin, the tumor yield was reduced and the magnitude of the reduction indicated that the region of reduced response might extend about 150 ..mu.. into the irradiated zone. The proliferative state of the hair follicles at the time of irradiation had relatively little effect on tumor induction although old animals are less susceptible than young or newborn animals. The penetration requirement of at least 0.3 mm for producing tumors suggests that the hair follicle germ cells could be the oncogenic targets. The recovery rate for tumor induction measured by split-dose exposure protocols was 4 hours for electrons. Proton radiation exhibited nearly complete recovery at 24 hours PI. UVL promotion of electron induced tumors did not significantly alter tumor yields. Radioresistance to tumor induction appears to increase with age.

  2. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation on rat skin was studied in an attempt to learn more about radiation carcinogenesis, especially how various parameters of the irradiation, such as dose distribution within the tissue and dose rate, affect the yield of tumors. It was found that when the dose was localized to a small region of skin, the tumor yield was reduced and the magnitude of the reduction indicated that the region of reduced response might extend about 150 μ into the irradiated zone. The proliferative state of the hair follicles at the time of irradiation had relatively little effect on tumor induction although old animals are less susceptible than young or newborn animals. The penetration requirement of at least 0.3 mm for producing tumors suggests that the hair follicle germ cells could be the oncogenic targets. The recovery rate for tumor induction measured by split-dose exposure protocols was 4 hours for electrons. Proton radiation exhibited nearly complete recovery at 24 hours PI. UVL promotion of electron induced tumors did not significantly alter tumor yields. Radioresistance to tumor induction appears to increase with age

  3. On protection of freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, recent progress to better understand the environmental threat of micrometeoroid and space debris to the solar dynamic radiator for the Space Station Freedom power system is reported. The objective was to define a design which would perform to survivability requirements over the expected lifetime of the radiator. A previous paper described the approach developed to assess on-orbit survivability of the solar dynamic radiator due to micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Preliminary analyses were presented to quantify the solar dynamic radiator survivability. These included the type of particle and particle population expected to defeat the radiator bumpering. Results of preliminary hypervelocity impact (HVI) testing performed on radiator panel samples were also presented. This paper presents results of a more extensive test program undertaken to further define the response of the solar dynamic radiator to HVI. Tests were conducted on representative radiator panels (under ambient, nonoperating conditions) over a range of particle size, particle density, impact angle, and impact velocity. Target parameters were also varied. Data indicate that analytical penetration predictions are conservative (i.e., pessimistic) for the specific configuration of the solar dynamic radiator. Test results are used to define more rigorously the solar dynamic radiator reliability with respect to HVI. Test data, analyses, and survivability results are presented

  4. Analysis of drought-tolerant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) mutants induced with gamma radiation using SDS-PAGE and ISSR markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drought is one of the major environmental stresses which greatly affect the plant growth and productivity. In the present study, various doses (0–75 Gy) of gamma rays were applied to investigate the effect of radiation on shoot tip explants. It was observed that the regeneration rates and plant fresh weights decreased significantly with an increase in radiation dose. The optimal irradiation doses for mutation induction were determined at 15 and 20 Gy. Afterwards, the induction of somatic mutation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was investigated by irradiation of shoot tips with 15 and 20 Gy gamma rays. Irradiated shoot tips were sub-cultured and M1V1–M1V3 generations were obtained. Mutants tolerant to drought stress were selected on MS medium, supplemented with 10 and 20 gl−1 PEG6000. Of the M1V3 plantlets, drought-tolerant mutants were selected. Leaf soluble proteins obtained from the control and drought-tolerant mutants were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. A total of 22 protein bands were determined and 2 of them were observed to be drought-tolerant mutants except the control. Polymorphism was also detected among the control and drought-tolerant mutants by DNA fingerprinting using ISSR markers. A total of 106 PCR fragments were amplified with 19 ISSR primers and 91 of them were polymorphic. The dendrograms were separated into two main clusters. First cluster included M8 mutant plant, which was applied 20 Gy gamma radiation and regenerated on selective culture media containing 10 g l−1 PEG6000 concentration, and the second cluster was further divided into five sub-clusters.

  5. Analysis of drought-tolerant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) mutants induced with gamma radiation using SDS-PAGE and ISSR markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayse, E-mail: senayse@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34459 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Alikamanoglu, Sema [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 34459 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-10-15

    Drought is one of the major environmental stresses which greatly affect the plant growth and productivity. In the present study, various doses (0-75 Gy) of gamma rays were applied to investigate the effect of radiation on shoot tip explants. It was observed that the regeneration rates and plant fresh weights decreased significantly with an increase in radiation dose. The optimal irradiation doses for mutation induction were determined at 15 and 20 Gy. Afterwards, the induction of somatic mutation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was investigated by irradiation of shoot tips with 15 and 20 Gy gamma rays. Irradiated shoot tips were sub-cultured and M{sub 1}V{sub 1}-M{sub 1}V{sub 3} generations were obtained. Mutants tolerant to drought stress were selected on MS medium, supplemented with 10 and 20 gl{sup -1} PEG6000. Of the M{sub 1}V{sub 3} plantlets, drought-tolerant mutants were selected. Leaf soluble proteins obtained from the control and drought-tolerant mutants were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. A total of 22 protein bands were determined and 2 of them were observed to be drought-tolerant mutants except the control. Polymorphism was also detected among the control and drought-tolerant mutants by DNA fingerprinting using ISSR markers. A total of 106 PCR fragments were amplified with 19 ISSR primers and 91 of them were polymorphic. The dendrograms were separated into two main clusters. First cluster included M8 mutant plant, which was applied 20 Gy gamma radiation and regenerated on selective culture media containing 10 g l{sup -1} PEG6000 concentration, and the second cluster was further divided into five sub-clusters.

  6. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1988, Part -2, Annex 1, Radioactivity control of working environment, dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains data and analysis of the of measured sample results collected during radiation protection control in the working environment of the RA reactor. First part contains basic exposure values and statistical review of the the total number of radiation measurements. It includes contents of radioactive gasses and effluents in the air, as well as the level of surface contamination of clothes and uncovered parts of the personnel bodies. Second part deals with the analysis of personnel doses. It was found that the maximum individual dose from external irradiation amounted was less than 0.5 mSv during past 10 months. Individual exposures for 9/10 of the personnel were less than 1/10 of the annual permissible exposure. Data are compared to radiation doses for last year and previous five years. Third part of this annex contains basic data about the quantity of collected radioactive waste, total quantity of contaminated and decontaminated surfaces. During 1988 there have been no accidents that could cause significant contamination of working surfaces and components nor radiation exposure of the personnel

  7. Interactions of the integrin subunit beta1A with protein kinase B/Akt, p130Cas and paxillin contribute to regulation of radiation survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidler, Julia; Durzok, Rita; Brakebusch, Cord; Cordes, Nils

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance is a common phenomenon particularly relevant in tumor cells, which might hamper anticancer therapies. To analyze the role of adhesion-mediating beta1-integrins, stably transfected functional beta1A-integrin-expressing GD25beta1A and G...

  8. Hard gamma-radiation from the Galaxy central part and the diffusive background radiation based on ''Kosmos-561'' satellite data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma radiation from the Galaxy central region was researched. The experimental data were obtained during 1973 by means of the gamma telescope with acoustic spark chambers, installed aboard the ''Cosmos-561'' satellite. The flow of gamma quanta at E >= 100 MeV was determined in the band along the galactic equator equal to (1.77+-0.74)x10-4cm-2xs-1 rad-1. The gamma radiation spectrum of the Galaxy central region in the 100-700 MeV energy range was measured for the first time. The integral exponential spectrum index turned out to be 1.52+-0.49. The upper limit of the diffusion background was assessed as (7.1+-3.5)x10-5 cm-2xs-1xsr-1

  9. Radiation meters for civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical requirements for the radiation meters used in civil defence are specified in the guide. The aim of the requirements is to quarantee sufficient measurement accuracy and reliable operation even in extreme environmental conditions. The guide is based on the following standards: (1) IEC 846 'Beta, X and gamma radiation dose equivalent and dose equivalent rate meters for use in radiation protection', (2) IEC 1017-1 'Portable, transportable of installed X or gamma radiation ratemeters for environmental monitoring, part 1: Ratemeters', and (3) IEC 45 B (Secretariat) 104 'Direct reading, personnel dose equivalent and/or dose equivalent rate monitors for X, gamma and high energy beta radiation'. (12 refs., 5 tabs.)

  10. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  11. Radiation hazards in PF-1000 plasma generator fusion research (part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on radiation exposures to researchers and technicians involved in fusion research. It is the second article in the series on this topic. It discusses immediate exposures to the ionizing radiation that is generated immediately during fusion research performed on the PF-1000, a dense magnetized plasma generator that is the world's largest. (author)

  12. Lecture notes on the safety aspects in the industrial applications of radiation sources - Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report comprises the notes of the lectures delivered on the safety aspects in industrial applications of radiation sources. The notes are presented in 9 chapters. Basic mathematics relevant to the topic and basic concepts of nuclear physics are introduced in chapters I and II respectively. Various aspects of interaction of radiation with matter and living cells are discussed in chapters III and IV respectively. The biological effects of ionizing radiations are described in chapter V. Various commonly used units of measurement of radiation and radioactivity are defined and explained and measuring methods of radiation exposure are described in chapter VI. Chapter VII deals with the maximum permissible levels of radiation, both internal and external, for occupational workers as well as population. The same chapter also deals with ICRP recommendations in this connection. Commonly used radiation detectors and instruments with associated electronics are described in chapter VIII. Production of radioisotopes, radiation sources and labelled compounds is described in chapter IX. A table of useful radioisotopes is appended to this chapter. A bibliography in which references are arranged chapterwise is also given at the end. (M.G.B.)

  13. Radiation epidemiological analysis of late effects of population exposure at northern part of east ural radioactive trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, I.V.; Konshina, L.G.; Lezhnin, V.L.; Zhukovsky, M.V.; Pavlyuk, A.V. [V.N. Chukanov Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Population residing in the northern part of the Chelyabinsk oblast and the south eastern part of the Sverdlovsk oblast of Russia affected to accidental exposure since 1957. The territory (East Ural Radioactive Trace - EURT) was contaminated after explosion of container with highly radioactive wastes at the Mayak Production Association. Studies of health effects of exposure in the southern, head part of EURT are conducted in the Ural Research and Practical Center of Radiation Medicine (U.R.P.R.M.). In the 1990's U.R.P.C.R.M. formed a cohort of EURT within Chelyabinsk oblast (14,500 cases and 19,400 external controls). The cohort was followed in 1957-1987 and the results of the study are discussed by Crestinina et al. First results of study on exposure late health effects among rural population in the northern part of the EURT are presented in this paper. Firstly, or the period 1958-2000 a statistically significant increase in cancer mortality associated with accidental exposure at EURT area was observed in the critical group of population of the Kamensky district, Sverdlovsk Region (65 cancer deaths among 691 cases, 90% CI 18-144). The finding is in agreement with the results of a radiation epidemiological study in the southern head part of EURT and model radiation risk assessments. E.R.R. normalized to colon dose is 1.3 Gy-1 (90 % CI 0.36-2.9 Gy-1). Secondly, analysis of the age and temporal factors influence on solid cancers radiation risk allows conclusion on decline of radiation risk in time. At present considerable number of additional radiation-induced cancer deaths are unlikely to appear. Radiation risk of solid cancers realizes at most during 30 post-accident years. Radiation risk declines with age at first exposure and not appeared in the age group >60. Derived age and time dependencies generally agree with results of other radiation epidemiological studies. Thirdly, continuation and development of radiation epidemiological study of the population

  14. Radiation epidemiological analysis of late effects of population exposure at northern part of east ural radioactive trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population residing in the northern part of the Chelyabinsk oblast and the south eastern part of the Sverdlovsk oblast of Russia affected to accidental exposure since 1957. The territory (East Ural Radioactive Trace - EURT) was contaminated after explosion of container with highly radioactive wastes at the Mayak Production Association. Studies of health effects of exposure in the southern, head part of EURT are conducted in the Ural Research and Practical Center of Radiation Medicine (U.R.P.R.M.). In the 1990's U.R.P.C.R.M. formed a cohort of EURT within Chelyabinsk oblast (14,500 cases and 19,400 external controls). The cohort was followed in 1957-1987 and the results of the study are discussed by Crestinina et al. First results of study on exposure late health effects among rural population in the northern part of the EURT are presented in this paper. Firstly, or the period 1958-2000 a statistically significant increase in cancer mortality associated with accidental exposure at EURT area was observed in the critical group of population of the Kamensky district, Sverdlovsk Region (65 cancer deaths among 691 cases, 90% CI 18-144). The finding is in agreement with the results of a radiation epidemiological study in the southern head part of EURT and model radiation risk assessments. E.R.R. normalized to colon dose is 1.3 Gy-1 (90 % CI 0.36-2.9 Gy-1). Secondly, analysis of the age and temporal factors influence on solid cancers radiation risk allows conclusion on decline of radiation risk in time. At present considerable number of additional radiation-induced cancer deaths are unlikely to appear. Radiation risk of solid cancers realizes at most during 30 post-accident years. Radiation risk declines with age at first exposure and not appeared in the age group >60. Derived age and time dependencies generally agree with results of other radiation epidemiological studies. Thirdly, continuation and development of radiation epidemiological study of the population residing

  15. Integration of BETA with Eclipse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Enevoldsen, Mads Brøgger

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents language interoperability issues appearing in order to implement support for the BETA language in the Java-based Eclipse integrated development environment. One of the challenges is to implement plug-ins in BETA and be able to load them in Eclipse. In order to do this, some form...... of language interoperability between Java and BETA is required. The first approach is to use the Java Native Interface and use C to bridge between Java and BETA. This results in a workable, but complicated solution. The second approach is to let the BETA compiler generate Java class files. With this...... approach it is possible to implement plug-ins in BETA and even inherit from Java classes. In the paper the two approaches are described together with part of the mapping from BETA to Java class files. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/15710661...

  16. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.;

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions of...... differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears that the...

  17. Beta particle detection efficiency of the radiation sensor made from a mixture of polyaniline and titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, M.; Miyata, H.; Katsumata, M.; Matsuda, K.; Ueno, T.; Ito, D.; Suzuki, T.

    2016-08-01

    We developed a new real-time radiation sensor using an organic semiconductor and measured its β-particle detection sensitivity. This sensor is fabricated by simply combining a p-type semiconductor, polyaniline (Pani), with an n-type semiconductor, TiO2, and processing the compound. Since Pani and TiO2 are both inexpensive materials, the sensor can be fabricated at a lower cost than inorganic semiconductor sensors. The signal of each fabricated sensor was measured by a charge sensitive ADC for the irradiation of β-particles. The response signal data of the ADC for each irradiation was measured to calculate the detection efficiency of the detector. The maximum detection efficiency measured as β-particle sensitivity of the sensor was 1%. This β-particle sensitivity is higher than that reported of Pani sensors in the past.

  18. Beta particle monitor for surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beta radiation detector which is capable of reliably detecting beta radiation emitted from a surface. An electrically conductive signal collector is adjustably mounted inside an electrically conductive enclosure which may define a single large opening for placing against a surface. The adjustable mounting of the electrically conductive signal collector can be based on the distance from the surface or on the expected beta energy range. A voltage source is connected to the signal collector through an electrometer or other display means for creating an electric field between the signal collector and the enclosure. Air ions created by the beta radiation are collected and the current produced is indicated on the electrometer or other display means. 2 figs

  19. Synthesis and thermoluminescence of new Li2SO4:Eu and Li2SO4:Dy phosphors exposed to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Li2SO4 is systematically studied for the very first concerning their dosimetric capabilities. Pellet- shaped Eu and Dy doped Li2SO4 phosphors were synthesized by sintering. Some samples were exposed to beta particle irradiation in order to investigate their thermoluminescence (Tl) features. Glow curves were obtained for 80 mg mass samples, showing that both, Tl sensitivity as well as the temperature at which the Tl maximum is recorded, depends upon the sample dopant. The glow curves of Li2SO4:Eu exhibit two maxima, located at 433 and 573 K, when a 5 K/s heating rate was used, being the most intense emission that observed at 573 K. The integrated Tl increases as the radiation dose was increased in the 0.25 - 5 Gy range, with no shift of the Tl maxima being observed, meaning that first order kinetics processes are involved in the Tl emission. The normalized sensitivity recorded in ten consecutive irradiation-Tl readout cycles shows a good reusability with only 5 % variability. The integrated Tl fades as a function of the elapsed time between irradiation and the corresponding Tl readout of Eu and Dy doped Li2SO4 phosphors is obtained. From the obtained results, we conclude that Li2SO4 is a promising phosphor material to develop high performance Tl dosimeters, and a long term research work focused to understand and to improve their Tl features is absolutely justified. (Author)

  20. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, RA research reactor, Part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry and radiation protection at the RA reactor; (2) decontamination, collecting and treatment of fluid effluents and solid wastes; (3) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and (4)meteorology measurements; (3). Each of the category is described as a separate annex of this report

  1. Change in the radiation dose at a point where an inhomogeneity partly covers the radiation field from a 60Co-γ-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements and calculations have been made in order to study the change of the radiation dose in a point when an inhomogeneity covers parts of the radiation field from a Co 60-source. An ionization chamber, placed in a water phantom, was used for the measurements. As inhomogeneity an air cavity was used. The measuring point was placed on the central axis of the radiation field during the measurement. The air cavity was moved in front of the measuring point 0.5 - 1 cm by steps laterally, i.e. along a line perpendicular to the radiation direction. Measurements were made at different depths behind the air cavity. The air cavity was placed at different distances from the front plate of the water phantom. Measurements and calculations show that the change of the radiation dose, when the edge of the air cavity passes the measuring point, varies with the depth distance to the air cavity. The greatest deviation is near the air cavity and at a great distance behind this. The change of the radiation dose is less than 2 percent at distances greater than 2 cm from the edge of the air cavity laterally. This change is independent of the depth distance to the air cavity. The maximum deviation 1 cm from the edge of the air cavity is 5 percent independent of the distance tothe air cavity. Used methods of calculation can be extended to be used for irregular inhomogeneities but this requires knowledge of the three-dimensional extension of the inhomogeneity. (M.S.)

  2. A localized navigation algorithm for Radiation Evasion for nuclear facilities. Part II: Optimizing the “Nearest Exit” Criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A new navigation algorithm for Radiation Evasion around nuclear facilities. ► An optimization criteria minimized under algorithm operation. ► A man-borne device guiding the occupational worker towards paths that warrant least radiation × time products. ► Benefits of using localized navigation as opposed to global navigation schemas. ► A path discrimination function for finding the navigational paths exhibiting the least amounts of radiation. -- Abstract: In this extension from part I (Khasawneh et al., in press), we modify the navigation algorithm which was presented with the objective of optimizing the “Radiation Evasion” Criterion so that navigation would optimize the criterion of “Nearest Exit”. Under this modification, algorithm would yield navigation paths that would guide occupational workers towards Nearest Exit points. Again, under this optimization criterion, algorithm leverages the use of localized information acquired through a well designed and distributed wireless sensor network, as it averts the need for any long-haul communication links or centralized decision and monitoring facility thereby achieving a more reliable performance under dynamic environments. As was done in part I, the proposed algorithm under the “Nearest Exit” Criterion is designed to leverage nearest neighbor information coming in through the sensory network overhead, in computing successful navigational paths from one point to another. For comparison purposes, the proposed algorithm is tested under the two optimization criteria: “Radiation Evasion” and “Nearest Exit”, for different numbers of step look-ahead. We verify the performance of the algorithm by means of simulations, whereby navigational paths are calculated for different radiation fields. We, via simulations, also, verify the performance of the algorithm in comparison with a well-known global navigation algorithm upon which we draw our conclusions

  3. Electrical insulating materials - Determination of the effects of ionizing radiation - Part 5: Procedures for assessment of ageing in service

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Covers ageing assessment methods which can be applied to components based on polymeric materials (for example, cable insulation and jackets, elastomeric seals, polymeric coatings, gaiters) which are used in environments where they are exposed to radiation. The object of this part of IEC 60544 is to provide guidelines on the assessment of ageing in service. The approaches discussed cover ageing assessment programmes based on condition monitoring (CM), the use of equipment deposits in severe environments and sampling of real-time aged components.

  4. Variations of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1) during thoracic radiotherapy are predictive for radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vascular endothelial cells are important targets of radiotherapy, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis (RP). This study investigated the variations of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1) during three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and analyzed the correlation between these variations with the occurrence of RP. From November 2008 to November 2009, eighty-four consecutive patients receiving 3D-CRT for stage III disease were evaluated prospectively. Circulating EPCs and TGF-β1 levels were measured at baseline, every 2 weeks during, and at the end of treatment. RP was evaluated prospectively at 6 weeks after 3D-CRT. Thirty-eight patients (47.5%) experienced score 1 or more of RP. The baseline levels of EPCs and TGF-β1 were analyzed, no difference was found between patients with and without RP during and after 3D-CRT. By serial measurement of TGF-β1 and EPCs levels, we found that the mean levels of EPCs in the whole population remained stable during radiotherapy, but the mean levels of TGF-β1 increased slowly during radiotherapy. TGF-β1 and EPCs levels were all significantly higher at week 2, week 4 and week 6 in patients with RP than that in patients without RP, respectively. During the period of radiation treatment, TGF-β1 levels began to increase in the first 2 weeks and became significantly higher at week 6 (P < 0.01). EPCs levels also began to increase in the first 2 weeks and reached a peak at week 4. Using an ANOVA model for repeated-measures, we found significant associations between the levels of TGF-β1 and EPCs during the course of 3D-CRT and the risk of developing RP (P < 0.01). Most of the dosimetric factors showed a significant association with RP. Early variations of TGF-β1 and EPCs levels during 3D-CRT are significantly associated with the risk of RP. Variations of circulating TGF-β1

  5. The relevance of dose for low-energy beta emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific issues in risk assessment for low-energy beta emitters include specification of the radiation weighting factor, values of relative biological effectiveness for specific or accurate risk estimates, non-uniformities of dose within tissues and cells, and use of standard tissue weighting factors for non-uniform situations. Unusual features of low-energy beta emitters include: increased average ionisation density on subcellular (and cellular) scales; short ranges of the beta electrons; non-uniformity of the absorbed dose over subcellular, cellular, and tissue dimensions; reduced hit frequencies; nuclear transmutations; different chemical forms, influencing biokinetics and dose distributions; and large isotopic mass differences, particularly in the case of tritium and hydrogen. Many of these features are not included explicitly in conventional radiation protection dosimetry, although they may be partly included in experimental determinations of relative biological effectiveness. Theoretical and experimental studies have shown low-energy electrons to be particularly efficient in producing double-strand breaks in DNA, including complex double-strand breaks. Hence, on fundamental grounds, tritium beta particles should be expected to have greater biological effectiveness per unit absorbed dose than 60Co gamma-rays or orthovoltage x-rays. For practical purposes, and in view of the paucity of epidemiological estimates of risk from low-energy electrons, consideration should be given to applying a raised relative biological effectiveness, say of value 2, to all low-energy internal emitters, including beta particles and soft x-ray emissions.

  6. Surveillance of the Radiation Environment in the Russian part of the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benghin, Victor; Nechaev, Oleg; Nikolaev, Igor; Drobyshev, Sergey; Lishnevskii, Andrey; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Tsetlin, Vladimir; Bondarenko, Valentina; Lyagushin, Vladimir; Teltsov, Mikhail; Volkov, Alexey; Mitrikas, Victor

    The report presents the data measured with the radiation monitoring system (RMS) onboard “Zvezda” module of ISS. The dose rate data measured with R-16 and DB-8 dosimeters in undisturbed radiation environment as well as during solar proton events are presented. It was made separation of the Earth radiation belts, galactic and solar cosmic rays contributions to daily dose for the different shielding circumstances by the equipment of the station. It was shown that the galactic cosmic rays contribution to day's dose does not differentiate practically for the DB-8 detectors with the strongly differentiating shielding. The Earth radiation belts contribution to day's dose strongly depends on the DB-8 detectors shielding and have considerable variations in time. These variations caused, mainly, by the changes of the ISS height of flight. The absorbed doses measuring with PILLE devise for the inhabited compartments of the Russian segment of ISS are presented. It was shown that the ISS attitude has a considerable influence on radiation levels in the inhabited compartments. The dose rate measured by the DB-8 detectors in the South-Atlantic Anomaly, changes by factor of 2 under the typical changing of the ISS attitude relative to the orbit.

  7. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J. Diaz; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O׳Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Petersburg, R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, A.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radiopurity required for this rare decay search.

  8. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provide a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search

  9. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguayo, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F.T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barabash, A.S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Busch, M. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Byram, D. [Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Caldwell, A.S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Chan, Y-D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Christofferson, C.D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Combs, D.C. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J.A.; Doe, P.J. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Efremenko, Yu. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Ejiri, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics and Department of Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Elliott, S.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); and others

    2015-04-11

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provide a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  10. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Bertrand, F E; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J Diaz; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Petersburg, R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Soin, A; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Zhitnikov, I

    2015-01-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  11. Stress-induced sensitization of the limbic system in ovariectomized rats is partly restored by cyclic 17 beta-estradiol administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, M; Bakker, PL; Koch, T; Ter Horst, GJ

    2006-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurobiological alterations which have consequences for subsequent stress handling. In the current experiment, ovariectomized rats were subjected daily to a stressor for 21 days. Thereafter, the rats were treated for 21 days with 17 beta-estradiol benzoate (10 mu g/250 g, once

  12. Drying of Agricultural Products Using Long Wave Infrared Radiation(Part 2). Drying of Welsh Onion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation was carried out to clarify the intermittent drying characteristics for welsh onion use of long-wave infrared radiation. When compared with two other methods: use of air and vacuum freezing, this method showed significantly high rate of drying. The experiments were carried out analyzing the influence of different lengths of the welsh onion, different rate of radiation and different temperature of the airflow. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The rate of drying increases as the length of welsh onion decrease and the rate of radiation increase. 2. The airflow, temperature does not influence to the rate of drying. 3. The increasing of the drying time considerably aggravate the quality the dried welsh onion

  13. Radiation-curable impregnating agents for the conservation of archaeologic wooden objects. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a continuation of the work described in OEFZS Ber. No. 4165, impregnating agents curable by ionizing radiation, such as free radical polymerizable monomers or artificial resins, have been investigated. Specific weight and viscosity of the liquid mixtures have been as well determined as the specific weight and gel content of the gamma radiation-cured samples. Hardness and elastic behaviour have been estimated only. The shrinkage during hardening was found to be 5 to 12 % for low viscous mixtures (up to 600 mPa.s) and 3 to 8 % for higher viscous impregnating agents. The results are to be discussed. (Author)

  14. Radiation protection as part of a uranium mine pre-feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golder Associates Ltd. (Golder) has conducted a number of pre-feasibility studies for prospective uranium mining projects. This work has ranged from a preliminary scoping analysis of the viability of a particular project to a formal pre-feasibility study. This paper will address the radiation protection requirements for uranium mining and the impact of these radiation protection requirements on the feasibility of a uranium production project. As is discussed, the ore grades of an ore body will strongly influence the choice of mining methods that are available for any specific project. This in turn will affect the projected capital and operating costs for a prospective uranium production facility. (author)

  15. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part IV. Subtropical fruits: citrus, grapes, and avocados

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current information on the use of ionizing radiation for improving the storage of subtropical fruits like citrus, grapes, and avocados is reviewed. The feasibility of applying radiation either alone or in combination with other physical or chemical treatments for the control of postharvest fungal diseases is considered. Irradiation effects on the physiology of the fruits as related to respiration, ethylene evolution, changes in major chemical constituents, and quality are discussed. The recent trends in the possible use of irradiation as an alternative treatment to chemical fumigants for disinfestation of citrus and avocados and the prospects for the future application of irradiation for preservation of some of these fruits are outlined. 128 references

  16. Radiation injuries of the pelvis and proximal parts of the femur after irradiation of carcinoma of the cervix uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data relating to 244 patients with carcinoma of the cervix uteri treated by intensive radiotherapy are given. Radiation injury of bone was diagnosed in 12 cases (4.9 +/- 1.4 percent). After x-ray therapy alone they were found in five of 59 patients treated (8.5 +/- 3.6 percent), and after γ-ray therapy in one of 171 cases (0.6 +/- 0.6 percent). The minimal focal dose of x-ray therapy causing radiation injury to bone was 5,000 rads. With an increase in dose, the frequency of injuries also increased. Radiation injury was found after γ-ray therapy with an absorbed dose of 7,000 rads. The radiological features of radiation injury of bones after irradiation of malignant tumors of the pelvis are increasing osteoporosis and the appearance of foci of sclerosis and osteolysis. Necrotic areas of various sizes may be formed. A fracture of the neck of the femur may be prevented in some cases by taking precautionary measures. Healing of an injured part depends on the size of the dose given. Large doses completely suppressed the reparative powers of the bone. Unlike changes that are traumatic in nature, radiation fractures of the pelvic bones and the proximal part of the femur have a mild clinical course; sometimes the patients continue to use the lower limb, simply complaining of pain that may vary in severity. Metastasization of tumors of the uterus to the pelvic bones is possible but infrequent. Metastases are usually associated with increasing pain

  17. Radioactive PTT as part of screening protocol for prospecting radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (breast cancer)have been found to be associated with enhanced cellular radiosensitivity with impaired proliferative capacity after irradiation and could predispose increased risk of radiation-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis (1,2). Deficient repair mechanism exhibited by lymphocytes from breast cancer patients provides associated vulnerability to genotoxicity of ionizing radiation. Other genes ay also play a role in terms o clinical radiation hypersensitivity needed in predicting response to radiotherapy. However, relaxation of cell cycle checkpoints, production of micronuclei, and loss of proliferative capacity which have been exhibited by impairment of irradiated cells lacking functional BRCA1 and BRCA2, accentuate the notion that heterozygous women may respond differently to radiation. The radioactive protein truncation test (PTT), utilized as screening procedures to detect frameshift mutations, can be employed to clarify radiosensitivity of individuals carrying a mutated BRCA1 gene. It can therefore, be incorporated in the series of clinical assays used in standard screening protocols for prospective nuclear facility workers. (author)

  18. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part I. Model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared (IR) dry-peeling has emerged as an effective non-chemical alternative to conventional lye and steam methods of peeling tomatoes. Successful peel separation induced by IR radiation requires the delivery of a sufficient amount of thermal energy onto tomato surface in a very short duration. Th...

  19. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  20. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database

  1. On the radiative properties of soot aggregates part 1: Necking and overlapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a strong interest in accurately modelling the radiative properties of soot aggregates (also known as black carbon particles) emitted from combustion systems and fires to gain improved understanding of the role of black carbon to global warming. This study conducted a systematic investigation of the effects of overlapping and necking between neighbouring primary particles on the radiative properties of soot aggregates using the discrete dipole approximation. The degrees of overlapping and necking are quantified by the overlapping and necking parameters. Realistic soot aggregates were generated numerically by constructing overlapping and necking to fractal aggregates formed by point-touch primary particles simulated using a diffusion-limited cluster aggregation algorithm. Radiative properties (differential scattering, absorption, total scattering, specific extinction, asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo) were calculated using the experimentally measured soot refractive index over the spectral range of 266–1064 nm for 9 combinations of the overlapping and necking parameters. Overlapping and necking affect significantly the absorption and scattering properties of soot aggregates, especially in the near UV spectrum due to the enhanced multiple scattering effects within an aggregate. By using correctly modified aggregate properties (fractal dimension, prefactor, primary particle radius, and the number of primary particle) and by accounting for the effects of multiple scattering, the simple Rayleigh–Debye–Gans theory for fractal aggregates can reproduce reasonably accurate radiative properties of realistic soot aggregates. - Highlights: • We determine the radiative properties of realistic virtual soot aggregates. • We consider the primary sphere polydispersity, their necking and overlapping. • Scattering and absorption are decreased by considering these effects in the UV. • The single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor are also deeply

  2. Climate influence on the operation of refrigeration system using the effective radiation into space (Part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretically possible cooling capacity of an ideal refrigeration system using the effective radiation into space was calculated by two methods. The calculations were performed for the cities located from 43° to 59° north latitude: Almaty, Vladivostok, Ust Kamenogorsk, Petropavlovsk, Omsk, Kazan, Moscow and St. Petersburg. The graphs of the total amount of cold for the year and for some months depending on the temperature of the radiating surface are shown. It is found that the greatest amount of cold for the year can be produced in the climatic conditions of the city of Omsk, and the smallest in Almaty. A method for estimating the amount of heat withdrawn from the radiator due to convective heat transfer through the cooling degree hours is developed. The results of the calculation of the cooling degree hours for the year for all of the above cities are presented. Also graphs in the article are showing how many hours per year the temperature in each of the cities is below given temperature. With the help of these graphs it is expected to make an assessment of the working time of the refrigeration system during the year. In the summer period due to effective radiation the coolant temperature can become not lower than 15...20 °C. In the winter, it is impossible to use the effective radiation for stable cooling to a temperature below –10 °C in all reviewed cities. The data obtained can be used in the design of cooling systems of the considered type, as well as in the standard refrigeration systems that use natural cooling (Free cooling)

  3. Assessment of radiation risk as a part of ecological risk in the Republic of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -effect' can be used for correction of chemical substance limitations in the environment in case of increased radioactive background. It is first shown that mono-factor risk assessment can be used, when negative environmental factors act on the human body at a one time, only. The results (in its part dedicated to radioactive risks) were recommended by the IAEA courses committee (Course Code C7-RER9062-017 'Regional Post Graduate Training Course on Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources') as an introduction course for IAEA program participants, preliminary to their field experience in the Gomel region. Theoretical and experimental foundation for the necessity of integral ecological risk assessment is suggested. (author)

  4. Measurements of the Cosmic Radiation Doses at Board of Aircraft of Polish Airlines LOT. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses received by a group of 30 pilots of the Polish Airlines LOT were investigated between July and October 2000. The measurement of the low-LET component of the cosmic radiation, lasting in average 2 months, was performed with 7LiF:Mg,Ti and 7LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent detectors. The neutron component was measured with the thermoluminescent albedo cassettes. Additionally for all flights, records of altitude profiles were kept and effective doses were then calculated with the CARI-6 computer code. In total, about 560 flights were included in the calculations. The highest obtained dose was about 0.8 mSv in 2 months. Results of calculations are mostly consistent with the results of measurements. (author)

  5. Experimental delayed radiation necrosis of the brain. Part I. Effect of early dexamethasone treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have designed an experiment to detect interaction between high doses of the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, and brain irradiation. Eighteen juvenile male rhesus monkeys received 1800 rads to the whole brain. For 1 1/2 days before and 10 1/2 days after the irradiation, nine animals received dexamethasone intramuscularly in addition to irradition, while the remaining nine animals served as the control group and received saline. All animals eventually developed a progressive neurological syndrome, and died of delayed radiation necrosis of the brain. Large doses of dexamethasone did not alter the susceptibility of the primate brain to delayed radiation necrosis. Detailed morphological study of the radionecrotic lesions supports the hypothesis that most, if not all, of the lesions develop as the consequence of injury to blood vessels

  6. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are descri...

  7. RA Research nuclear reactor, Part II - radiation protection at the RA nuclear reactor in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry at the RA reactor; (2) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and meteorology measurements; (3) Collecting and treatment of fluid effluents; and (4) radioactive wastes, decontamination and actions. Each category is described as a separate annex of this report

  8. Can Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part I: Tuning

    OpenAIRE

    Simon F. B. Tett; Mineter, Michael J.; Cartis, Coralia; Rowlands, Daniel J.; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Perturbed physics configurations of version 3 of the Hadley Centre Atmosphere Model (HadAM3) driven with observed sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice were tuned to outgoing radiation observations using a Gauss-Newton line search optimization algorithm to adjust the model parameters. Four key parameters that previous research found affected climate sensitivity were adjusted to several different target values including two sets of observations. The observations used were the global avera...

  9. On protection of freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great deal of experimentation and analysis has been performed to quantify penetration thresholds of components which will experience orbital debris impacts. Penetration has been found to depend upon mission-specific parameters such as orbital altitude, inclination, and orientation of the component; and upon component specific parameters such as material, density, and the geometry particular to its shielding. Experimental results are highly dependent upon shield configuration and cannot be extrapolated with confidence to alternate shield configurations. Also, current experimental capabilities are limited to velocities which only approach the lower limit of predicted orbital debris velocities. Therefore, prediction of the penetrating particle size for a particular component having a complex geometry remains highly uncertain. This paper describes the approach developed to assess on-orbit survivability, and include the type of particle and particle population expected to defeat the radiator bumpering (i.e., penetrate a fluid flow tube). Results of preliminary hypervelocity impact testing performed on radiator panel samples (in the 6 to 7 km/sec velocity range) are also presented. Plans for further analyses and testing are discussed. These efforts are expected to lead to a radiator design which will perform to Space Station Freedom requirements over the expected lifetime

  10. Practicing radiation oncology today - Part I: Meeting the challenge of managed care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The change in health care delivery is forcing radiation oncologists to examine every aspect of how they organize themselves, deliver care, evaluate the quality of that care, and how they are reimbursed for this process. While managed care has been implicated as the new paradigm that will change the way that health care is delivered, the authors maintain that outcomes research may be just as important a stimulus for change. This course will attempt to examine how managed care and outcomes research are impacting upon radiation oncology practice, and what radiation oncologists can do to maintain patient care standards. This course will introduce certain concepts that will be discussed in subsequent courses on Informatics and Evaluating New Technology. Topics Covered: 1. The Managed Care Nomenclature Explained: HMO's, PPO's, POS's, Carve-Outs 2. Outcomes Research: What it can and cannot do 3. Moving from QA to CQI to Benchmarking 4. Using Analytical Tools to Evaluate Capital Purchases and Operational Requirements 5. Evaluating Staffing Needs: Traditional jobs, Cross-training, Outsourcing, Physician extenders 6. Introduction to Evaluation of Technology 7. Introduction to Evaluation of Informatics 8. Potential gains from Shared Services 9. Networking vs. Mergers vs. Oncology IPA's vs. MSO's 10. Evaluating Managed Care Strategies and Contracts

  11. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model for irradiated concrete is proposed. • Confrontation with literature data is successful. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • The nature of the aggregate alters the severity of damage to irradiated concrete. - Abstract: The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These data are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. The radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste

  12. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Y., E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov; Field, K.G.; Remec, I.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model for irradiated concrete is proposed. • Confrontation with literature data is successful. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • The nature of the aggregate alters the severity of damage to irradiated concrete. - Abstract: The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These data are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. The radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste.

  13. Effect of Radiation Processing as an Integral Part of Safe Recycling Kitchen Waste for Poultry Feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen wastes are relevant as a source of organic matter (i.e. protein, carbohydrate, minerals, and vitamins). Several microorganisms break down organic matter into methane, carbon dioxide, and other organic compounds containing sulfur and halogens. Kitchen wastes are valuable whereas they are too hazardous to be rejected into the environment without any attempt to recover and recycle them in a valuable form. Recycling kitchen waste as a feedstuff could have a considerable effect on reducing costs and solving some disposal problems. Treated such wastes with ionizing radiation can make an important contribution to minimize the risk of pathogens and the emission of greenhouse gases. The study was undertaken with two hundred and thirty kitchen waste samples collected from different restaurants in Cairo, Egypt. Effect of radiation treatment at 10 kGy on crude protein, amino acids profile, available lysine and the in-vitro digestibility of kitchen waste protein have been studied. The results suggest that radiation pasteurization of dried kitchen waste has a beneficial effect on recycling of such waste and permits waste to be included in poultry ration without any health hazard and nutritional problem. (author)

  14. Micro-battery Development using beta radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear battery which use the beta radiation sources emitting the low penetration radiation energy from radioisotope can be applied as the long term (more than 10 years) micro power source in MEMS and nano components. This report describes the basic concept and principles of nuclear micro-battery and its fabrication in space and military field. In particular direct conversion method is described by investigating the electron-hole generation and recombination in p-n junction of silicon betavoltaics with beta radiation

  15. Beta decay of 31Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete study of 31Ar beta decay has been made by high-resolution charged-particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Beta-delayed radiation was detected by an array of three charged-particle detectors and a large-volume germanium detector. Fifteen new energy levels were discovered in 31Cl. The beta-strength distribution, measured to 14.5 MeV, is compared with a shell-model calculation in the full sd space. The quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength and the isospin impurity of the IAS in 31Cl are discussed. (orig.)

  16. A semiconductor beta ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of energy spectra of beta particles emitted from nuclei in beta-decay processes provides information concerning the mass difference of these nuclei between initial and final state. Moreover, experimental beta spectra yield information on the feeding of the levels in the daughter nucleus. Such data are valuable in the construction and checking of the level schemes. This thesis describes the design, construction, testing and usage of a detector for the accurate measurement of the mentioned spectra. In ch. 2 the design and construction of the beta spectrometer, which uses a hyper-pure germanium crystal for energy determination, is described. A simple wire chamber is used to discriminate beta particles from gamma radiation. Disadvantages arise from the large amounts of scattered beta particles deforming the continua. A method is described to minimize the scattering. In ch. 3 some theoretical aspects of data analysis are described and the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of the summation of annihilation radiation are compared with experiments. Ch. 4 comprises the results of the measurements of the beta decay energies of 103-108In. 87 refs.; 34 figs.; 7 tabs

  17. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part I: Clinical significance, pathophysiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review to provide instead an overview of all the possible remedies available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled. The first part of this review outlines the clinical significance and pathophysiology of radiation-induced mucositis, and looks into some of the preventive approaches available.

  18. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy part II: current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. It includes the physics and chemistry of the absorption of radiation, a description of the biological systems used to obtain a quantitative relationship between dose and biological effect, as well as a review of the basic principles in radiation biology that have been established. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing x-rays. This led to development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons

  19. Spectra of radioactive nuclides radiation, measured with semiconductor detectors. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second part of the atlas 'Radiation spectra of radionuclides measured with semiconductor detectors' is presented including 259 spectra of 126 alpha, beta, gamma, and X ray emitters. Some spectra of the first part of the atlas are given at another scale and sometimes for other energy ranges. The total number of investigated radionuclides amounts to 261 of which 69 are new ones

  20. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 1: Gravitational deflection of polarized radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    The gravitational field is probed in a search for polarization dependence in the light bending. This involves searching for a splitting of a source image into orthogonal polarizations as the radiation passes through the solar gravitational field. This search was carried out using the techniques of very long and intermediate baseline interferometry, and by seeking a relative phase delay in orthogonal polarizations of microwaves passing through the solar gravitational field. In this last technique a change in the total polarization of the Helios 1 carrier wave was sought as the spacecraft passed behind the sun. No polarization splitting was detected.

  1. Radiation exposure of patients from paediatric cardiac catheterizations. Part 2. Results of patient related measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Age, entire exposure duration and dose-area products for pa and lat beam as well as the number of angiographies have been recorded for 2114 pediatric cardiac catheterizations within the time period 1982 to 1996. Furthermore, the average field dimensions and sizes at the patient entrance surface for pa and lat beams and the frequency distributions for dose-area product rates, the entire dose-area products and the effective doses, calculated by means of age class dependent conversion factors, are given for all patients. The effective doses for new-borns are higher by about a factor 2 (Q50=6.5 mSv compared to 3.0 mSv) compared to children of higher age class, despite of the quite smaller body dimensions and thus smaller dose-area product rates. Cancer risks by radiation exposure are significantly higher for new-borns than for elder children for the same effective dose. Although no age specific factor can be given it is possible to derive from literature data, that cardiac catheterizations cause radiation risks, which are larger at least by a factor 2 to 4 with decreasing age, especially for thyroid and breast cancer (the latter more for girls). (orig.)

  2. Shielding of radiation fields generated by 252Cf in a concrete maze. Part 1: Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concrete room with a single-legged maze was constructed in order to simulate a medical accelerator room. Gamma and neutron measurements were performed along the maze with (a) a 252Cf source and (b) a tungsten-moderated 252Cf source placed inside the room. The measurements were repeated after placing an inner borated polyethylene door of varying thickness (2.54--10.16 cm) at 2 different locations. Measurements were also performed after lining the inside of the maze with different neutron moderating materials. The following results are reported: (1) the variation and contributions of individual components of the radiation fields as a function of distance along the maze, (2) the attenuation of neutron dose equivalent and reduction of capture gamma rays as a function of borated polyethylene (BPE) inner door thickness and location of the inner door; and (3) the effect of lining the maze corner with different neutron moderating materials

  3. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions. Part A: Gas cell experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Valentin; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander;

    2011-01-01

    for the validation of new developed models. In part A of the series gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4–5.4μm of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 to 1500° C and at different concentrations were compared at a nominal resolution of 32cm−1 to line-by-line models...

  4. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  5. Beta Beams Implementation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Beta Beam,the concept of generating a pure and intense (anti) neutrino beam by letting accelerated radioactive ions beta decay in a storage ring, called Decay Ring (DR), is the base of one of the proposed next generation neutrino oscillation facilities, necessary for a complete study of the neutrino oscillation parameter space. Sensitivities of the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters depend on the Decay Ring's ion intensity and of it's duty factor (the filled ratio of the ring). Therefore efficient ion production, stripping, bunching, acceleration and storing are crucial sub-projects under study and development within the Beta Beam collaboration. Specifically the feasibility of these tasks as parts of a Beta Beam implementation at CERN will be discussed in this report. The positive impact of the large {\\theta}13 indications from T2K on the Beta Beam performance will also be discussed.

  6. Environmental radiation monitoring-airborne gamma ray spectrometry over parts of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) has been widely accepted as a technique with large applications not for Uranium exploration, geological mapping, mineral exploration, environmental monitoring. The interesting point of AGRS technique is that it provides information of the ground/soil (density 1.40-2.00 gm/cc) about a meter deep in soil and 33 cm in rock types (density 2.5-3.00gm/cc). This information can become quite important consideration for agriculture, environmental scientists and planners in decision making. Gamma ray surveys are broadly based on surface, subsurface and airborne radiometric measurements. Airborne gamma ray spectrometric surveys began in the developed countries and in India during the early 1950's. These methodologies have undergone a great evolution in the development of the system by way of Instrumentation, Calibration and survey techniques, digital signal data processing, interpretation and data management ever since the early 1950's. With proper instrumentation, calibration, airborne gamma ray spectrometers were capable of providing concentrations of naturally occurring radio nuclides such as potassium, uranium and thorium on the area flown. The exposure rates calculated using the radioelemental distributions over various parts of India. The exposure rates vary from 0.4 to 50 microR/hr. In addition to the above variation of the exposure rates, the cosmic background of 3.767 microR/h has also been taken into account while computing the total dose. These exposure rates are found to be well below the maximum permissible rates as approved by the ICRP. In the present paper the studies over the exposure rates (in micro Roentgen units) from various parts of Satpura basin (covering 7000 sq. km), parts of erstwhile Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh have been presented. (author)

  7. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt; Medicion de curvas de extrapolacion para el patron secundario de radiacion beta Nr. 86 calibrado en rapidez de dosis absorbida para tejido equivalente por el Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T

    1988-10-15

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  8. Calculation of the absorbed dose for contamination in skin imparted by beta radiation through the Varskin code modified for 122 isotopes of interest for nuclear medicine, nuclear plants and research; Calculo de dosis absorbida para contaminacion en piel impartida por radiacion beta mediante el codigo Varskin modificado para 122 isotopos de interes para medicina nuclear, plantas nucleares e investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T

    1992-06-15

    In this work the implementation of a modification of the Varskin code for calculation of absorbed dose by contamination in skin imparted by external radiation fields generated by beta emitting is presented. The necessary data for the execution of the code are: isotope, dose depth, isotope activity, geometry type, source radio and time of integration of the isotope, being able to execute combinations of up to five radionuclides. This program it was implemented in Fortran 5 by means of the FFSKIN source program and the executable one in binary language BFFSKIN being the maximum execution time of 5 minutes. (Author)

  9. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part 4: meteorology measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meteorology measurements are part of the control of Institute environment, and are performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. It is foreseen that these measurements should be automated, but up to this moment daily meteorology reports are completed by a computer but the data collection and input are still done manually. This Annex contains tables and diagrams of meteorology data collected at the special meteorology station located at the Vinca Institute. Computer codes for these data processing were developed by the meteorology staff in the Institute. Data are collected 24 times per day

  10. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1994. Part 2, Annex 4, meteorology measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meteorology measurements are part of the control of Institute environment, and are performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. It is foreseen that these measurements should be automated, but up to this moment daily meteorology reports are completed by a computer but the data collection and input are still done manually. This Annex contains tables and diagrams of meteorology data collected at the special meteorology station located at the Vinca Institute. Computer codes for these data processing were developed by the meteorology staff in the Institute. Data are collected 24 times per day

  11. Beta and muon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  12. Prey-predator dynamics driven by the solar radiation - Part 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sertorio, L. [Turin Univ., Turin (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; Tinetti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    In this paper is studied a model ecosystem represented by two components: prey and predator. The predator feeds only on the prey, the prey, in turn, feeds on the solar radiation. In this scheme the two-species dynamics is no longer independent of the external physical conditions. Such independence was instead postulated in the Lotka-Volterra scheme. In this paper is considered the growth of the prey not unbounded (exponential), but logistic, where the saturation factor is governed by the available solar flux, more precisely by the percent of the solar flux that contains the photon frequencies which can drive the photosynthesis. In this way the solar flux represents the driving term of the dynamics, as it is expected in general for a realistic ecosystem. The system is asymptotically stable. The equilibrium values of the prey and predator numbers depend on several parameters. The system contains two nonlinear coupling terms and two coupling parameters. The dependence of the equilibrium point on the coupling parameters is studied in detail. According to this model, it can be defined a predator efficiency and a global solar efficiency. It is discussed the relationship between these two functions of the coupling parameters and the maximum value that the predator population can reach.

  13. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an agent for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is responsible for maintenance of the Australian Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose. This standard of measurement has application in radiation therapy dosimetry, which is required for the treatment of cancer patients. This report is the first in a series of reports documenting the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. The Urquhart graphite micro-calorimeters, which is used for the determination of absorbed dose under high energy photon beams, has been now placed under computer control. Accordingly, a complete upgrade of the calorimeter systems was performed to allow operation in the hospital. In this report, control and monitoring techniques have been described, with an assessment of the performance achieved being given for 6 and 18 MeV bremsstrahlung beams. Random errors have been reduced to near negligible proportions, while systematic errors have been minimized by achieving true quasi-adiabatic operation. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs

  14. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1995, Part -2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1992 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers. During 1995 regular continuous control of absorbed doses is established by applying automated ionization chamber and self made TL dosemeters

  15. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1996, Part -2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1996 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers. During 1995 regular continuous control of absorbed doses is established by applying automated ionization chamber and self made TL dosemeters

  16. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1997, Part -2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1997 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers

  17. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1994. Part 2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1992 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. Due to lack of personnel, control of Danube river was limited only to one point, 1145 km, and the stream Mlaka flowing through the Institute into river Bolecica was controlled instead of the river itself. During the period from november 1990 - october 1991, the following samples were taken and analyzed: 720 air samples, 518 precipitation samples, and 24 monthly samples of the river water used for measuring the contamination level. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers. During 1994 regular continuous control of absorbed doses is established by applying automated ionization chamber and self made TL dosemeters

  18. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1991, Part 2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1992 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. Due to lack of personnel, control of Danube river was limited only to one point, 1145 km, and the stream Mlaka flowing through the Institute into river Bolecica was controlled instead of the river itself. During the period from november 1990 - october 1991, the following samples were taken and analyzed: 720 air samples, 518 precipitation samples, and 24 monthly samples of the river water used for measuring the contamination level. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers

  19. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part -3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1993 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. Due to lack of personnel, control of Danube river was limited only to one point, 1145 km, and the stream Mlaka flowing through the Institute into river Bolecica was controlled instead of the river itself. During the period from november 1992 - october 1993, the following samples were taken and analyzed: 532 air samples, 497 precipitation samples, and 24 monthly samples of the river water used for measuring the contamination level. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers

  20. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1992, Part -2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1992 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. Due to lack of personnel, control of Danube river was limited only to one point, 1145 km, and the stream Mlaka flowing through the Institute into river Bolecica was controlled instead of the river itself. During the period from november 1990 - october 1991, the following samples were taken and analyzed: 720 air samples, 518 precipitation samples, and 24 monthly samples of the river water used for measuring the contamination level. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers

  1. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1998, Part -2, Annex 3, Environmental radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1998 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. Due to lack of personnel, control of Danube river was limited only to one point, 1145 km, and the stream Mlaka flowing through the Institute into river Bolecica was controlled instead of the river itself. This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers. During 1998 regular continuous control of absorbed doses is established by applying automated ionization chamber and self made TL dosemeters

  2. Beta measurements at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a two-step process to characterize the current beta measurement practices at DOE facilities. PNL issued a survey questionnaire on beta measurement practices to DOE facilities and reported the results. PNL measured beta doses and spectra at seven selected DOE facilities and compared selected measurement techniques in the facility environment. This report documents the results of the radiation field measurements and the comparison of measurement techniques at the seven facilities. Data collected included beta dose and spectral measurements at seven DOE facilities that had high beta-to-gamma ratios (using a silicon surface barrier spectrometer, a plastic scintillator spectrometer, and a multielement beta dosimeter). Other dosimeters and survey meters representative of those used at DOE facilities or under development were also used for comparison. Field spectra were obtained under two distinct conditions. Silicon- and scintillation-based spectrometer systems were used under laboratory conditions where high beta-to-gamma dose ratios made the beta spectra easier to observe and analyze. In the second case, beta spectrometers were taken into actual production and maintenance areas of DOE facilities. Analyses of beta and gamma spectra showed that 234Th- /sup 234m/Pa, 231Th, 137Cs, and 90Sr/90Y were the major nuclides contributing to beta doses at the facilities visited. Beta doses from other fission products and 60Co were also measured, but the potential for exposure was less significant. 21 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs

  3. Calculation of the absorbed dose for contamination in skin imparted by beta radiation through the Varskin code modified for 122 isotopes of interest for nuclear medicine, nuclear plants and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the implementation of a modification of the Varskin code for calculation of absorbed dose by contamination in skin imparted by external radiation fields generated by beta emitting is presented. The necessary data for the execution of the code are: isotope, dose depth, isotope activity, geometry type, source radio and time of integration of the isotope, being able to execute combinations of up to five radionuclides. This program it was implemented in Fortran 5 by means of the FFSKIN source program and the executable one in binary language BFFSKIN being the maximum execution time of 5 minutes. (Author)

  4. Clinical and angiographic outcomes after use of 90Strontium/90Yttrium beta radiation for the treatment of in-stent restenosis: results from the Stents and Radiation Therapy 40 (START 40) registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    significantly reduced when compared to the placebo group (11% vs. 22.4% respectively, p=0.008). A similar reduction was seen in terms of target vessel revascularization (15.9% vs. 24.1%, p=0.03). The 8-month MLD was found to be significantly larger in the START 40 patients (1.85 mm vs. 1.47 mm, p90Strontium/90Yttrium source train in the management of patients with in-stent restenosis. Restenosis rates were lowered with the use of this longer source train when compared to the placebo arm of the START trial for lesions with a maximum vessel injury length of 20 mm. Angiographic analysis identified the importance of the accurate delineation of injury length and correct source positioning. These results support the continued use of beta radiation for the treatment of this disease process

  5. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1990, Part -2, Environmental radioactivity control Annex 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity control of Institute environment is performed according to the regulations about methods, scope and time-limits for measuring the radioactivity levels in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. During 1990 this control included contamination measurements of air, precipitation, fallout and water currents, Danube and Mlaka stream in the Institute. Air contamination control was measured at 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute. Control of atmospheric precipitations and fallout was done at two points one in the Institute and the other 2 km away from the Institute. Due to lack of personnel, control of Danube river was limited only to one point, 1145 km, and the stream Mlaka flowing through the Institute into river Bolecica was controlled instead of the river itself. During the period from november 1989 - october 1990, the following samples were taken and analyzed: 940 air samples, 425 precipitation samples, and 546 samples of the river water used for measuring the contamination level. At the beginning of 1990 a computerized system for alpha and gamma spectrometry was purchased, and will be used after proper calibration.This Annex includes the results of air activity measurements, β activity of precipitations and fallout, tritium content in the precipitations and rivers

  6. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 1. Potatoes and other tuber crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Part 1 of a planned series of articles on preservation of foods of plant origin by gamma irradiation, the current state of research on the technological, nutritional, and biochemical aspects of sprout inhibition of potatoes and other tuber crops are reviewed. These include varietal responses, dose effects, time of irradiation, pre- and postirradiation storage, and handling requirements; postirradiation changes in carbohydrates, ascorbic acid, amino acids, and other nutrients; respiration; biochemical mechanisms involved in sprout inhibition; wound healing and microbial infection during storage; formation of wound and light-induced glycoalkaloids and identification of irradiated potatoes. The culinary and processing qualities with particular reference to darkening of boiled and processed potatoes are discussed. The prospects of irradiation on an industrial scale as an alternative to chemical sprout inhibitors or mechanical refrigeration are considered

  7. Use of low doses of cobalt 60 gamma radiation on beet (Beta vulgaris L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seed to stimulate increase yield; Emprego da radiacao gama do cobalto 60 em sementes de beterraba (Beta vulgaris L.), cenoura (Daucus carota L.) e rabanete (Raphanus sativus L.) para estimular o aumento da producao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovi, Jose Eduardo

    2000-07-01

    The research had the aim of evaluating the effects of low doses of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation on seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cultiva Champion, cultivars Nantes Forto (european origin) and Brasilia (Rio Grande do Sul origin) carrot (Daucus carota L. var. sativus (Hoffm.) Thell), and red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) cultivar Tall Top Early Wonder before sowing, its effects on plant growth, on the yield and roots storage of two tillages: with sowing in the same day of radiation and six days after radiation seeds. The data showed that the seeds radiation did not interfered negatively on plants growth, and the species presented differences as roots production and doses on both plantation: radish with 5,0 Gy and 2,5 Gy doses respectively to the first and the second sowings, Brasilia carrot with 2,5 Gy dose to both sowings. Nantes carrot with 2,5 Gy and 5,0 Gy respectively to the first and the second sowings, and beet with 7,5 Gy and 5,0 Gy respectively to the first and the second plantations. There is not statistics difference by Tukey test (5% and 1%) and none relation between seeds radiation and loss weight on roots storage. (author)

  8. The Age of Beta Pic

    OpenAIRE

    Navascues, D. Barrado y; Stauffer, J. R.; Song, I.; Caillault, J-P.

    1999-01-01

    We have reanalyzed data for the proposed moving group associated with beta Pic in order to determine if the group (or part of it) is real, and, if so, to derive an improved age estimate for beta Pic. By using new, more accurate proper motions from PPM and Hipparcos and a few new radial velocities, we conclude that on kinematic grounds, two M dwarfs have space motions that coincide with that of beta Pic to within 1 km/s with small error bars. Based on a CM diagram derived from accurate photome...

  9. Fabrication of beta particles detector for RMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beta particles detector for RMS (radiation monitoring system) was fabricated to detect charged beta particles. The plastic scintillator was cutted, shaped, polished to make plastic disk for beta particles. The diameter of completed plastic scintillator disk is 40 mm and thickness is 1.5 mm. The mylar film and aluminium foil were used the front of plastic scintillator to intercept light and moisture. The completed plastic detector for RMS consist of the discriminator and counter were made by ULS (Co.). The absolute efficiency of plastic detector was 45.51% for beta particles (Sr/Y - 90)

  10. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  11. Simultaneous beta/gamma digital spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) built in our laboratory. The DPP board was designed to digitally capture the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfer valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimum crosstalk. The spectrometer proved to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  12. Avian serum. cap alpha. /sub 1/-glycoprotein, hemopexin, differing significantly in both amino acid and carbohydrate composition from mammalian (. beta. -glycoprotein) counter parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, V.; Trimble, R.B.; Falco, M.D.; Liem, H.H.; Metcalfe, S.A.; Wellner, D.; Muller-Eberhard, U.

    1986-10-21

    The physicochemical characteristics of chicken hemopexin, which can be isolated by heme-agarose affinity chromatography, is compared with representative mammalian hemopexins of rat, rabbit, and human. The avian polypeptide chain appears to be slightly longer (52 kDa) than the human, rat, or rabbit forms (49 kDa), and also the glycoprotein differs from the mammalian hemopexins in being an ..cap alpha../sub 1/-glycoprotein instead of a ..beta../sub 1/-glycoprotein. The distinct electrophoretic mobility probably arises from significant differences in the amino acid composition of the chicken form, which, although lower in serine and particularly in lysine, has a much higher glutamine/glutamate and agrinine content, and also a higher proline, glycine, and histidine content, than the mammalian hemopexins. Compositional analyses and /sup 125/I concanavalin A and /sup 125/I wheat germ agglutinin binding suggest that chicken hemopexin has a mixture of three fucose-free N-linked bi- and triantennary oligosaccharides. In contrast, human hemopexin has give N-linked oligosaccharides and an additional O-linked glycan blocking the N-terminal threonine residue, while the rabbit form has four N-linked oligosaccharides. In keeping with the finding of a simpler carbohydrate structure, the avian hemopexin shows only a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under both nondenaturing and denaturing conditions, whereas the hemopexins of the three mammalian species tested show several bands. In contrast, the isoelectric focusing pattern of chicken hemopexin is very complex, revealing at least nine bands between pH 4.0 and pH band 5.0, while the other hemopexins show a broad smear of multiple ill-defined bands in the same region.Results indicate the hemopexin of avians differs substantially from the hemopexins of mammals, which show a notable similarity with regard to carbohydrate structure and amino acid composition.

  13. Abstraction Mechanisms in the BETA Programming Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger;

    1983-01-01

    The BETA programming language is developed as part of the BETA project. The purpose of this project is to develop concepts, constructs and tools in the field of programming and programming languages. BETA has been developed from 1975 on and the various stages of the language are documented in [BETA...... a]. The application area of BETA is programming of embedded as well as distributed computing systems. For this reason a major goal has been to develop constructs that may be efficiently implemented. Furthermore the BETA language is intended to have a few number of basic but general constructs...... to SMALLTALK, BETA is a language in the ALGOL 60 ([ALGOL]) family. SIMULA 67 is a system description and a programming language. The DELTA language ([DELTA]) is a system description language only, allowing description of full concurrency, continuous change and component interaction, developed from a SIMULA...

  14. Characterization and radiative impact of dust aerosols over northwestern part of India: a case study during a severe dust storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Tiwari, Shani; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan; Tiwari, Suresh; Srivastava, Atul Kumar; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    The present study focused on examining the impact of a severe dust storm (DS) on aerosol properties over Patiala (30.33°N, 76.4°E), a site located in the northwestern part of India during 20th-23rd March, 2012. On 20th March, average PM10 mass concentration increased abruptly from 182 to 817 µg m-3 along with significant increase in the number density of coarser particles (diameter >0.45 µm). During DS, spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases significantly with more increase at longer wavelengths resulting in weak wavelength dependence (AOD at 380 nm increases by ~210 % and at 870 nm by ~270 % on 20th March). Significant decrease in Ångström exponent (AE; α 380-870) from 0.56 to 0.11 and fine-mode fraction (FMF; PM2.5/PM10) from 0.49 to 0.25 indicates dominance of coarser particles over the station. Net short wave (SW) radiation flux has been decreased by ~20 % and single scattering albedo (SSA675) has been increased from 0.86 (19th March) to 0.90 (20th March). This observation is attributed to additional loading of scattering type aerosols on arrival of DS. Wavelength dependence of SSA reverses during DS and it increases with wavelength due to dominance of coarse-mode particles. Atmospheric aerosol radiative forcing (ATM ARF) during DS ranged from +45 to +77 W m-2, consequently heating the lower atmosphere up to 2.2 K day-1. Significant atmospheric heating rate due to severe dust storm may affect the regional atmospheric dynamics and hence the climate system.

  15. Radiation Protection from a Radiobiological Perspective Safety Related Technological Profession in Need of a Better Scientific Foundation. Part A - Old and Simple Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of three papers (parts A, B and C) is meant primarily for non-radio biologists professionals working in the area of radiation protection. It aims at pointing out the less than sound scientific foundations of a human safety related profession and the need for a better scientific theory in this area. However, this by itself might not be enough to apply the relevant and much necessary changes and updates to methodologies for radiation risk assessment crucial for the radiation protection profession. Public responsibility and administrative courage to address the emerging new information is not less imperative

  16. Studies on assessment of health effects of radiation processed foods: Part 1. genetic toxicological evaluation in somatic and germ cells of laboratory animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies summarized in this report form a part of the program on the safety evaluation of radiation-processed foods, an important component of the development of radiation technology for food preservation from the public health point of view. These studies contributed significantly and critically to the acceptance of safety of radiation processed foods by regulatory agencies both at the national and international levels. This report contains only genetic studies, one aspect of this program, while the remaining studies will be summarized in a separate report

  17. Radiation effects on vitamin A and {beta}-carotene contents in bovine liver and swine pate de foie; Efeito da radiacao gama sobre a vitamina A e o {beta}-caroteno de figado bovino e suino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipina, Magda Sinigalia

    2001-07-01

    In this study, vitamin A and {beta}-carotene contents and the percent of activity retention were analyzed in 3 kGy and 30 kGy {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiated samples of bovine liver and swine liver pate. Six different lots of liver samples weighing 100 g obtained at the meat market were employed. Irradiation was performed with liver samples initially frozen (-15 deg C). Similarly, six different lots of swine liver pate samples weighing about 100 - 125 g , at temperature of 7 deg C were irradiated. Pre-treatments and analysis methods were those described in Instituto Adolfo Lutz Norms for food analyses. Two and five- gram samples in duplicates for bovine liver and five gram-samples for swine liver pate were used. The results showed that there were no losses of either vitamin A or provitamin A activities in the samples of bovine liver and swine liver pate irradiated with a dose of 3 kGy (retention about 100%). On the other hand, for swine liver pate samples of vitamin A were maintained after irradiation with 30 kGy. (author)

  18. Effects of {gamma} ({sup 60}Co) and {beta} ({sup 90}Sr) radiations in Chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO-K1): induction of micronuclei and cell death; Efeitos das radiacoes {gamma} ({sup 60}Co) e {beta} ({sup 90}Sr) em celulas de ovario de hamster chines (CHO-K1): inducao de micronucleos e morte celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Daniella

    2003-07-01

    Among various types of ionising radiation, the beta emitter radionuclides are involved in many sectors of human activity, such as nuclear medicine, nuclear industries and biomedicine, with a consequent increased risk of accidental, occupational or therapeutic exposure. Despite their recognized importance, there is little information about the effect of beta particles at the cellular level when compared to other types of ionizing radiation. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of {sup 90}Sr, a pure, highly energetic beta source, on CHO-K1 cells and to compare them with data obtained with {sup 60}Co. CHO-K1 cells irradiated with different doses (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 Gy) of {sup 60}Co (0.34 Gy.min{sup -1}) and {sup 90}Sr (0.23 Gy.min{sup -1}) were processed for analysis of clonogenic death, induction of micronuclei (MN) and necrotic and apoptotic death. The survival curves obtained for both types of radiation were better fitted by the linear-quadratic model and were similar. However, the cytogenetic results showed that both the proportion of micronucleated cells and the magnitude of radioinduced lesions demonstrated by the analysis of MN distribution were significantly higher in cells irradiated with {sup 60}Co than in cells irradiated with {sup 90}Sr, whereas {sup 90}Sr was more damaging than {sup 60}Co in terms of cell death induction. Necrosis was the major type of death observed in CHO-K1 cells. The data obtained suggest that the low incidence of micronucleated cells after exposure to {sup 90}Sr may be a consequence of selective elimination of severely damaged cells from the population by the necrotic process at a higher rate than observed with {sup 60}Co exposure. The data obtained also demonstrated the need to use several parameters for a better estimate of cellular sensitivity to the action of genotoxic agents, which would be important in terms of radiobiology, oncology and therapeutics. (author)

  19. The Benchmark Beta, CAPM, and Pricing Anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheol S. Eun

    1994-01-01

    Recognizing that a part of the unobservable market portfolio is certainly observable, the author first reformulate the capital asset pricing model so that asset returns can be related to the 'benchmark' beta computed against a set of observable assets as well as the 'latent' beta computed against the remaining unobservable assets, and then shows that when the pricing effect of the latent beta is ignored, assets would appear to be systematically mispriced even if the capital asset pricing mode...

  20. Energy and angular distribution of secondary particles in the detection media after the interaction of ionizing radiation. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the angular distribution of particles or radiation produced as a result of interaction processes of primary radiation with matter. Equally important as the angular distribution of the particles or radiation is their energy distribution and energy losses or the mean path in the matter. (author)

  1. Transforming growth factor-beta-1 is a serum biomarker of radiation-induced pneumonitis in esophageal cancer patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy: preliminary results of a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li JX

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jingxia Li,1,* Shuangfeng Mu,1,* Lixiang Mu,1 Xiaohui Zhang,1 Ranran Pang,1 Shegan Gao2 1Radiation Oncology Department, 2Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To examine the relationship between cytokine levels of transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE in the plasma of esophageal carcinoma patients and radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP. Materials and methods: Sixty-three patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT using the Elekta Precise treatment planning system with a prescribed dose of 50–70 Gy. Dose–volume histograms were collected from three-dimensional conformal RT to determine the volume percentage of the lung received V5, V10, V20, and the normal tissue complication probability. RP was diagnosed based on computed tomography imaging, respiratory symptoms, and signs. The severity of radiation-induced lung toxicity was determined using the Lent–Soma scale defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Plasma samples obtained before RT, during RT (at 40 Gy, and at 1 day, 1 month, and 3 months after RT were assayed for TGF-β1, IL-1β, and ACE levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: From the 63 patients, 17 (27% developed RP, and 13 (21% had RP of grade I and four (6% had grade II or higher. We found plasma TGF-β1 levels were elevated in the patients that had RP when compared with the other 46 patients who did not have RP. The plasma IL-1β levels were not changed. The ACE levels were significantly lower in the 17 patients with RP compared to the 46 patients without RP throughout the RT. As expected, RP is associated with a higher dose of irradiation (>60 Gy; no other factors, including dose–volume histogram, age, sex, smoking status

  2. Evaluating the design of satellite scanning radiometers for earth radiation budget measurements with system simulations. Part 1: Instantaneous estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Larry; Ardanuy, Philip; Hucek, Richard; Abel, Peter; Jacobowitz, Herbert

    1991-10-01

    A set of system simulations was performed to evaluate candidate scanner configurations to fly as a part of the Earth Radiation Budget Instrument (ERBI) on the polar platforms during the 1990's. The simulation is considered of instantaneous sampling (without diurnal averaging) of the longwave and shortwave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). After measurement and subsequent inversion to the TOA, the measured fluxes were compared to the reference fluxes for 2.5 deg lat/long resolution targets. The reference fluxes at this resolution are obtained by integrating over the 25 x 25 = 625 grid elements in each target. The differences between each of these two resultant spatially averaged sets of target measurements (errors) are taken and then statistically summarized. Five instruments are considered: (1) the Conically Scanning Radiometer (CSR); (2) the ERBE Cross Track Scanner; (3) the Nimbus-7 Biaxial Scanner; (4) the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument (CERES-1); and (5) the Active Cavity Array (ACA). Identical studies of instantaneous error were completed for many days, two seasons, and several satellite equator crossing longitudes. The longwave flux errors were found to have the same space and time characteristics as for the shortwave fluxes, but the errors are only about 25 pct. of the shortwave errors.

  3. Evaluación de la Enseñanza y Aprendizaje por Parte de Estudiantes de un Programa de Talentos Académicos (BETA-PUCV Frente a un Curso de Neuroanatomía Funcional Evaluation of Teaching and Learning by Gifted Students of an Enrichment Program (BETA-PUCV of a Functional Neuroanatomy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo José Lizana Arce

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El talento académico se presenta en aproximadamente un 6% de la población, y se caracteriza por un destacado desempeño intelectual en algún área específica del conocimiento o en áreas generales. Esta investigación explora la aplicación de un método de enseñanza activo-participativo en el área de la neuroanatomía funcional, a estudiantes con talento académico de cursos de Enseñanza media (n=27, que formaban parte de un programa de enriquecimiento curricular (Programa BETA-PUCV. Este método integra las clases interactivas, la realización de pasos prácticos que incluyen disecciones, la confección de modelos tridimensionales y la preparación de técnicas anatómicas, además de un refuerzo virtual a través del Aula Virtual de Anatomía Humana. Los estudiantes formaron parte de cursos impartidos durante el primer y segundo semestre 2008. Al fin del período, los estudiantes evalúan el curso mediante una encuesta que contiene preguntas en escala Likert y una sección cualitativa. Los resultados de la comparación de las evaluaciones realizadas por los estudiantes que participaron en dichos cursos versus estudiantes de otros cursos del área científica del programa BETA, demuestran que a través de las metodologías utilizadas, se han maximizando las posibilidades de aprendizaje de los estudiantes. Esto, se ha reflejado en diferencias significativas de nuestra propuesta versus el resto de los cursos. El talento académico que presenta este tipo de estudiantes sumado a la metodología de trabajo, permiten que cada estudiante avance a su propio ritmo y además descubra a través de la experiencia directa la morfología del sistema nervioso.Academic talent occurs in approximately 6% of the population and can be defined by a superior intellectual performance in specific or general academic fields. This research explores the application of an active and participative teaching model in the field of functional neuroanatomy to high

  4. Photon energy response of luminescence dosemeters and its impact on assessment of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) in mixed fields of varying energies of photons and beta radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, A S

    2002-01-01

    X and gamma rays continue to remain the main contributors to the dose to humans. As these photons of varying energies are encountered in various applications, the study of photon energy response of a dosemeter is an important aspect to ensure the accuracy in dose measurement. Responses of dosemeters have to be experimentally established because for luminescence dosemeters, they depend not only on the effective atomic number (ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients of dosemeter and tissue) of the detector, but also considerably on the luminescence efficiency and the material surrounding the dosemeters. Metal filters are generally used for the compensation of energy dependence below 200 keV and/or to provide photon energy discrimination. It is noted that the contribution to Hp(0.07) could be measured more accurately than Hp(10). For the dosemeters exhibiting high photon energy-dependent response, estimation of the beta component of Hp(0.07) becomes very difficult in the mixed field of beta radiation and photons of energy less than 100 keV. Recent studies have shown that the thickness and the atomic number of metal filters not only affect the response below 200 keV but also cause a significant over-response for high energy (>6 MeV) photons often encountered in the environments of pressurised heavy water reactors and accelerators. PMID:12382729

  5. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF sub 2 :Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Devol, T A; Fjeld, R A

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF sub 2 :Eu; CaF sub 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu (63-90 mu m) and ZnS:Ag (10 mu m), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover.

  6. Design of a Solar Greenhouse with Energy Delivery by the Conversion of Near Infrared Radiation - Part 1 Optics and PV-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, Piet; Swinkels, Gert-Jan; Bot, G.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for reflecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system is described. Especially the optical parts as the spectral selective film, the properties of the circular reflector and the e

  7. Design of a Solar Greenhouse with energy Delivery by the Conversion of Near Infrared Radiation. Part 1. Optics and PV-Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for reflecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system is described. Especially the optical parts as the spectral selective film, the properties of the circular reflector and the e

  8. Broad resonances and beta-decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, K.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hyldegaard, S.;

    2015-01-01

    Beta-decay into broad resonances gives a distorted lineshape in the observed energy spectrum. Part of the distortion arises from the phase space factor, but we show that the beta-decay matrix element may also contribute. Based on a schematic model for p-wave continuum neutron states it is argued...

  9. Problems at the Development of personal Beta-particle dosemeters-Beta Particle dosemeters-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workplaces at which beta radiation might significantly contribute to the doses to the extremities are increasingly found in radiation therapy, radiation source production and nuclear plants. for the measurement of the individual beta-particle dose, personal dosemeters for fingers, arms and legs are needed. Intercomparison measurements organised from 1996 by the PTB have shown that some dosemeter types based on TLD are suitable for this purpose and can be used as legal dosemeters for both photon and beta radiation. Also, some electronic personal photon dosemeters are investigated in beta radiation fields. it turned out that a few types are also sensitive to beta radiation and measure the personal dose equivalent rate to the skin with a low energy dependence. Only their wearing position is by far not optimal foe extremity dosimetry because they are worn on the chest. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The characterisation of workplaces is carried out by measuring dose profiles using area dosemeters. Investigations performed with several commercial types of these dosemeters furnish information about the selection of the suitable measuring device and its correct practical use. the development of improved dosemeters has to towards smaller detectors and higher sensitivity. Personal dosemeters have to be robust and acceptable to the user, which generally is not achieved for beta extremity dosemeters. It is an additional problem that even such dosemeters cannot always be worn in the appropriate place. (Author)

  10. Signatures of transition region explosive events in hydrogen Ly-beta profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, M.; Tian, H.; Chen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Transition-region (TR) explosive events (EEs) are small-scale dynamic phenomena often observed in the far and extreme ultraviolet (FUV/EUV) spectral lines formed in the solar transition region. In this contribution, we investigate the relationship between the peak emission of hydrogen Ly-beta profiles and the emission of C II (103.7nm) and O VI (103.2nm) lines to search for signatures of explosive events in Ly-beta profiles. Two rasters made by the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) instrument on board SOHO in a quiet-Sun region and an equatorial coronal hole were selected for our study. Explosive events were identified from profiles of C II and O VI, respectively. We compared Ly-beta profiles during EEs with those averaged in the entire quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. We find that the central part of Ly-beta profiles reverses more and the distance of the two peaks becomes larger during EEs, both in the coronal hole and in the quiet Sun. The average Ly-beta profile of the EEs detected by C II has an obviously stronger blue peak. During EEs, there is a clear correlation between the increased peak emission of Ly-beta profiles and the enhanced wing emission of the C II and O VI lines. The correlation is more pronounced for the Ly-beta peaks and C II wings, and less significant for the Ly-beta blue peak and O VI blue wing. We also find that the Ly-beta profiles are more reversed in the coronal hole than in the quiet Sun. We suggest that the jets produced by EEs emit Doppler-shifted Ly-beta photons, causing enhanced emission at positions of the peaks of Ly-beta profiles. The more-reversed Ly-beta profiles confirm the presence of a higher opacity in the coronal hole than in the quiet Sun. The finding that EEs modify the Ly-beta line profile in QS and CHs implies that one should be careful in the modeling and interpretation of relevant observational data.

  11. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  12. Trend of Gross Beta Radioactivity in Air Particles and Rainwater of around the Domestic Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Jungmin; Shin, Daeyewn; Kim, Soongpyung; Ju, Sundong [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); OH, Youngsoo; Kim, Byunggyu; Kim, Sunsik [Hanbit Nuclear Power Site, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Investigating items can be distinguished into two parts, regional radiation and concentrations of environmental radioactivity, and in environmental radioactivity, to access the internal exposure dose, gross beta-radioactivity of particles in air and rainwater specimen are being tested. Gross beta-radioactivity quickly shows whether radiation is unusual or no since most of nuclide released in radioactive emergency while operating an atomic energy facility emits beta rays, and the method used to test it is simple. Looking at the years of analyzed results of particles in air and rainwater around the facility for gross beta-radioactivity, they have a constant trend. The cause of the trend was investigated with a doubt that something else rather than operation of a nuclear power plant might have caused this trend. Due to high gross beta radioactivity concentration in winter, sometimes, radioactivity concentration five times higher than reported last five years average gross beta radioactivity concentration is detected. Looking at the contents investigated above, we can see nuclear power plants have correlation with surrounding gross beta radioactivity concentration. Precipitation has negative correlation, and the weight of air particles and concentration of component element have positive correlation. Our country is influenced by northwest wind in winter. China which is located northwest, has heavy air pollution and smog due to industrialization and there was a report saying it is affecting Korea. Therefore, not because of management of power plants but because of change in season, it can be misunderstood that operating power plants is causing the increased gross beta radioactivity concentration. Based on this investigation, more research to find various causes of gross beta radioactivity concentration in winter is necessary.

  13. Signatures of transition region explosive events in hydrogen Ly-beta profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, M; Tian, H; Chen, Y

    2010-01-01

    We search for signatures of transition region explosive events (EEs) in hydrogen Ly-beta profiles. Two rasters made by the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) instrument on board SOHO in a quiet-Sun region and an equatorial coronal hole are selected for our study. Transition region explosive events are identified from profiles of C II 1037 Angstrom and O VI 1032 Angstrom, respectively. We compare Ly-beta profiles during EEs with those averaged in the entire quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. The relationship between the peak emission of Ly-beta profiles and the wing emission of C II and O VI during EEs is investigated. We find that the central part of Ly-beta profiles becomes more reversed and the distance of the two peaks becomes larger during EEs, both in the coronal hole and in the quiet Sun. The average Ly-beta profile of the EEs detected by C II has an obvious stronger blue peak. During EEs, there is a clear correlation between the increased peak emission of Ly-beta profiles and ...

  14. Protection against the ionizing radiations coming from external sources used in medicine: Part 1. Radiodiagnosis in medicine and dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Venezuelan standard establishes the minimum requirements for the safety use of external sources of radiations in medical and dentistry radiodiagnosis. As a matter of fact, radiations produce noxious biological effects as: cancer, genetic damages, cataract and others. Those effects can be either avoided or limited, if we dose the exposure of radiation. The use of X-rays for diagnosis causes a massive exposure of population, that can be corrected by means of the application of rules settled down in this standard

  15. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  16. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, electron and alpha radiation in rat skin. Comprehensive progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skin has been studied for a number of years as a model of radiation carcinogenesis in a solid tissue. Accessibility of the skin enables the tumors to be detected early so that growth rate, proliferation rate, and onset times can be established accurately and, of course, the superficial location permits an accurate assessment of doses and a localization of the radiation to the tissue of interest. We have been attempting to establish as accurately as possible the nature of the dose response curve, i.e., the rate of tumor occurrence as of function of radiation dose, and the importance of tumor induction of radiologic factors, such as dose rate, fractionation, dose localization, linear energy transfer and of biologic factors, such as the proliferative state of the hair follicles and epidermis at the time of and subsequent to irradiation. The interaction of radiation and other carcinogens, especially ultraviolet light, is under study because of epidemiologic evidence suggesting a potential synergism for induction of scalp tumors. Radiobiological recovery processes have been studied in tumor response experiments using split doses of radiation separated by various times. The recovery rate for electron induced tumors has been measured, and the oncogenic effects of high LET particles (proton, alpha, argon) are being investigated

  17. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV radiation in an in vitro model: part I; UV-C radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluvia de Abril Alexandra Soriano-Melgar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultraviolet type C (UV-C radiation has higher energy than the UV-B radiation and has been less studied because it is completely absorbed by the ozone layer. However, artificial UV-C radiation can generate diverse modifications in the plants. Given that exposure to UV-C for short periods of time increases the antioxidant content, improving the appearance and shelf-life of products, its potential application in postharvest treatments to modify the antioxidant content of medicinal plants, such as damiana (Turnera diffusa, is novel and relevant. Objective: To determine the effects of UV-C radiation on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses, as well as oxidative damage levels, in damiana (Turnera diffusa plants in vitro. Results: UV-C radiation decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1 and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1 activities, the concentration of chlorophylls (a and b, carotenes, vitamin C, and total antioxidant capacity. UV-C radiation increased the phenolic compound levels in damiana. Loss of antioxidant defenses was higher in damiana plants exposed to higher UV-C doses and/or for longer periods. This study suggests that UV-C radiation induces oxidative stress, evidenced as increased protein carbonyls and phenolic compound content, in damiana (T. diffusa. Conclusion: Low dose, short exposure to UV-C stimulates phenolic compound content in damiana. Thus, controlled UV-C treatments could be used as postharvest treatment to increase phenolic compound content in damiana plants.

  18. Intercomparison of radiation protection protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silari, M.; Agosteo, S.; Beck, P.; Bedogni, R.; Cale, E.; Caresana, M.; Domingo, C.; Donadille, L.; Dubourg, N.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Fernández, F.; Ferrarini, M.; Fiechtner, A.; Fuchs, A.; García, M. J.; Golnik, N.; Gutermuth, F.; Khurana, S.; Klages, T.; Latocha, M.; Mares, V.; Mayer, S.; Radon, T.; Reithmeier, H.; Rollet, S.; Roos, H.; Rühm, W.; Sandri, S.; Schardt, D.; Simmer, G.; Spurný, František; Trompier, F.; Villa-Grasa, C.; Weitzenegger [, E.; Wiegel, B.; Wielunski, M.; Wissmann, F.; Zechner, A.; Zielczyński, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, 7-8 (2009), s. 673-691. ISSN 1350-4487 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100480902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiation protection devices * radiation field * detectors * dosemeters Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.973, year: 2009

  19. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M; Beck, P; Bedogni, R; Cale, E; Caresana, M; Domingo, C; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernández, F; Ferrarini, M; Fiechtner, A; Fuchs, A; García, M J; Golnik, N; Gutermuth, F; Khurana, S; Klages, Th; Latocha, M; Mares, V; Mayer, S; Radon, T; Reithmeier, H; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Rühm, W; Sandri, S; Schardt, D; Simmer, G; Spurný, F; Trompier, F; Villa-Grasa, C; Weitzenegger, E; Wiegel, B; Wielunski, M; Wissmann, F; Zechner, A; Zielczyński, M

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. Th...

  20. Practicing radiation oncology in the current health care environment - Part II: Designing a radiation oncology department and setting up a clinical practice program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Identify the business practices necessary to develop a successful radiation oncology department in the current health care environment. Course content will be of interest to new practitioners establishing first time programs or joining existing groups as well as experienced radiation oncologists who are challenged with redesigning programs to be competitive. Course Content: During this session, the following topics will be discussed: 1) Space planning and equipment selection 2) Personnel; creating efficiencies while promoting productivity 3) Professional and Technical Billing; establishing proper fee structures and coding procedures 4) Utilizing benchmarking as a tool to improve operations 5) Information technology in radiation oncology 6) Current and Future Trends: a) Oncology networks b) Reimbursement: managed care and capitation c) Downsizing d) Relative Value Units

  1. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV radiation in an in vitro model: part II; UV-B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluvia de Abril Alexandra Soriano-Melgar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultraviolet type B (UV-B radiation effects on medicinal plants have been recently investigated in the context of climate change, but the modifications generated by UV-B radiation might be used to increase the content of antioxidants, including phenolic compounds. Objective: To generate information on the effect of exposure to artificial UV-B radiation at different high-doses in the antioxidant content of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Methods: Damiana plantlets (tissue cultures in Murashige-Skoog medium were irradiated with artificial UV-B at 3 different doses (1 0.5 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 (high for 2 h daily, (2 1 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 (severe for 2 h daily, or (3 1 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 for 4 h daily during 3 weeks. The concentration of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids, vitamins (C and E and total phenolic compounds, the enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1 and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1, as well as total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified to assess the effect of high artificial UV-B radiation in the antioxidant content of in vitro damiana plants. Results: Severe and high doses of artificial UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content by increasing the content of vitamin C and decreased the phenolic compound content, as well as modified the oxidative damage of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Conclusion: UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content in damiana plants in an in vitro model, depending on the intensity and duration of the exposure.

  2. Radiation protection as part of occupational health and safety in the regulation of uranium mines in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is involved in the development of new uranium mines from the early planning stages through the development of the mine-mill facility. As a result, new facilities are designed and developed to a much higher standard of both conventional and radiation health and safety than previously. Radiation is not the most significant cause of injury to the uranium miner, and public attitudes toward radiation may result in overemphasizing these aspects to the detriment of conventional health and safety conditions in the mines. The AECB believes that one dead miner is one too many and bases its regulatory efforts on this belief

  3. Pitfalls and modelling inconsistencies in computational radiation dosimetry: Lessons learnt from the QUADOS intercomparison. Part II: Photons, electrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'QUADOS', a concerted action of the European Commission, has promoted an intercomparison aimed at evaluating the use of computational codes for dosimetry in radiation protection and medical physics. This intercomparison was open to all users of radiation transport codes. Eight problems were selected for their relevance to the radiation dosimetry community, five of which involved photon and proton transport. This paper focuses on a discussion of lessons learned from the participation in solving the photon and charged particle problems. The lessons learned from the participation in solving the neutron problems are presented in a companion paper (in this issue). (authors)

  4. Improvement of antifungal and antibacterial antibiotic producing strain of Bacillus subtilis AFCI-69 by radiation and chemical mutagens. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma radiation was used to select higher antibiotic yield mutants of Bacillus subtilis AECL 69. The test organisms were Aspergillus niger RAGENI 70 and Staphylococcus aureus 6571 (16) N.C.T.C. Searches for fermentation, purification and characterization of antibiotics of parent strain and its mutants were carried out

  5. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...—Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists A. Sponsorship 1... responsibilities shall include program development, organization, administration, evaluation, and revision. A..., administration, periodic review, continued development, and general effectiveness of the program. The...

  6. Calibration of beta dosimeter and personal dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces ISO standard ISO 6980 which prepared especially for the calibration of beta dosimeter and personal dosimeter. The standard has three aspects including method of production of reference beta particle radiations, calibration fundamentals related to basic quantities characterizing the radiation field, and calibration of area and personal dosemters and the determination of their response as a function of beta radiation energy and angle of incidence. Here particular emphasis is placed on the determination of basic quantity of tissue absorbed dose at a depth of 0.07 mm in the tissue slab phantom and calibration procedure by mean of the calibration quantity of directional dose equivalent H'(0.07, Ω) and personal dose equivalent Hp (0.07, Ω). Finally, combined standard uncertainty for the determination of absorbed dose rate and component uncertainties of calibration is given as examples. (authors)

  7. Amelioration of the established radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis by a soluble transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b) receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a major complication following chest irradiation for the treatment of many malignancies, such as lung cancer, breast cancer and malignant lymphoma. To date, however, few effective methods have been developed for the amelioration of the established radiation fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-b (TGF-b) has been considered a key molecule in establishment of injury-induced fibrosis in many vital organs. In this study, we investigated whether blockade of TGF-b signaling could improve the established radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. To specifically inhibit TGF-b in vivo, we used an adenoviral vector expressing a soluble TGF-b receptor (AdTb-ExR), which adsorbs TGF-b and may inhibit the function of the wild-type receptor as a dominant-negative mutant. Rats were received X-ray irradiation at a dose of 30 Gy in a single fraction to the right lung, then eight weeks later, intravenously injected with either AdTb-ExR or AdLacZ, a control adenovirus expressing bacterial b-galactosidase, or saline. Sixteen weeks after irradiation (eight weeks after intravenous injection), rats were sacrificed to extract the lungs and the lungs were histopathologically examined. Pulmonary fibrosis as well as TGF-b expression were markedly reduced in the AdTb-ExR-treated rats in comparison with the saline- or AdLacZ-infected rats. Our results indicate that TGF-b does play a critical role in radiation fibrosis, and that fibrotic tissue is not an irreversible dead tissue. They also suggest that the soluble TGF-b receptor may have potential for use in the amelioration of this intractable established fibrosis

  8. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha, and electron radiation on the rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1974--July 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation (α, β, electron, and protons) on rat skin were studied in an attempt to learn more about radiation carcinogenesis, especially how various parameters of the irradiation, such as dose distribution within the tissue and dose rate, affect the yield of tumors. It was found that when the dose was localized to a small region of skin, the tumor yield was reduced and the magnitude of the reduction indicated that the region of reduced response might extend about 150 μ into the irradiated zone. The proliferative state of the hair follicles at the time of irradiation had relatively little effect on tumor induction although old animals were less susceptible than young or newborn animals. The penetration requirement of at least 0.3 mm for producing tumors suggests that the hair follicle germ cells could be the oncogenic targets. Comprehensive experiments to measure the rate of recovery for tumor induction in split-dose exposure protocols indicated a recovery halftime of about 4 hrs for electrons and significant recovery for protons, which was used in a model to predict how recovery should affect the tumor response at low dose rates. Combinations of ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light were applied to rat skin to determine whether they are additive for producing tumors. (U.S.)

  9. Part one: application of averaging to spontaneous radiation processes for one- and two-atom systems. Part two: a theoretical investigation of vibrational energy relaxation in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (I) In an effort to place the Wigner-Weisskopf approximation on a firm mathematical basis, the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the fundamental problem of the radiative linewidth is solved by an approximation method for systems of integro-differential equations known as averaging. This method yields simply and rigorously the Dirac zeta function, which is vital to a proper description of the radiative damping of an atom. Moreover, the technique is readily extended to an N-atom system. In particular, the coherence effect brought about by the presence of a second atom is examined by averaging. (II) A quantum-mechanical model which accounts for the dynamical participation of orientational motions in vibrational energy relaxation of diatomic impurities isolated in rare-gas solids is developed. A simple closed expression for the VER rate constant is derived upon the following principal assumptions: the lattice is a rigid two-dimensional array, the diatomic, a plane vibrator; and participation of local translational modes is neglected. Results for the systems NH and ND in Ar, OH, and OD in Ne, HCl and DCl in Ar, and CO in Ar are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In particular, observed isotopic effects seem to be well described by the model. For the systems NH, ND/Kr and HCl, DCl/Ar there are a couple of discrepancies between calculated and observed vibrational energy relaxation rate constants. It is surmized that these discrepancies are due to features not included in the model, e.g., lattice imperfections, van der Waals molecule formation and/or rotational-translational coupling. A general theory for the participation of pseudo-local indes in vibrational energy relaxation of molecules in solids is developed. A closed expression for the relaxation rate at 00K is derived which includes details of proper lattice dynamics and depends only on the interaction potentials between the system constituents

  10. Radiation protection review in nuclear medicine and analysis of new medical techniques. ACDOS-5-P-3 project. Final report, part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) is a new application of ionizing radiation in the interventional cardiology and radioncology and medical physics field. The source is temporarily or permanently placed inside the vessel to prevent the restenosis. The restenosis is the re-narrowing of the lumen of the artery up to 50 % in the primary site of the treatment. Its incidence is 30 to 50 % following percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), and 20 % after stenting. The IVB is apply to prevent peripheric and coronary restenosis. The radiation is delivered through a catheter placed across the lesion, or by implanting a radioactive stent into a targeted lesion. Both beta and gamma radiation is used depending on the depth of penetration required. There isn't a definitive conclusion regarding the advantage of each one. The experience and the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiation reveals that the cells in high rate division are the main target. It determines the selection of this type of radiation to prevent and treat the main component of restenosis: the neo intimal hyperplasia. Recently, several clinical trials have been approved in multicenter studies to assess the effectiveness and safety of IVB in reducing the restenosis rate. During the year 2000, Cordis's Checkmate System and Novoste's Beth-Cath System received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to treat patients with in-stent restenosis. This approval marks a significant achievement for U.S. clinicians/researchers, who have devoted more than four years of clinical study to evaluate the effects and intricacies of vascular brachytherapy. The approval mechanism anticipates a follow up of the cases for an evaluation of the conditions of the definitive authorization. The IVB showed to be useful in the treatment of neo intimal hyperplasia post angioplasty injury and in-stent restenosis. Nevertheless there are uncertainties to be studied before the routine clinical application. These

  11. Efficient algorithms for mixed aleatory-epistemic uncertainty quantification with application to radiation-hardened electronics. Part I, algorithms and benchmark results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Eldred, Michael Scott

    2009-09-01

    This report documents the results of an FY09 ASC V&V Methods level 2 milestone demonstrating new algorithmic capabilities for mixed aleatory-epistemic uncertainty quantification. Through the combination of stochastic expansions for computing aleatory statistics and interval optimization for computing epistemic bounds, mixed uncertainty analysis studies are shown to be more accurate and efficient than previously achievable. Part I of the report describes the algorithms and presents benchmark performance results. Part II applies these new algorithms to UQ analysis of radiation effects in electronic devices and circuits for the QASPR program.

  12. Radiation Protection from a Radiobiological Perspective Safety-Related Technological Profession in Need of a Better Scientific Foundation. Part C - Fresh Concepts are Called for

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As was shown in part A and part B of this series of three papers, the current working model used by Radiation Protection (RP) professionals is based on a concept that can be conceptually represented by the expression: RISK = a * DAMAGE, with RISK being the stochastic risk from Ionizing Radiation (IR), DAMAGE being DNA damage and a being a real' positive and constant expression (part A). A list of well documented empirical phenomenology, mainly from the last two decades, was also brought (part B), that show that the natural reality has been, most likely much more complex to be described in a risk model such as the Linear Non Threshold (LNT) one. The discussion in this part will draw on this phenomenology in order to call for new and fresh design efforts of new risk estimation concepts that will describe the natural reality more accurately. It will reflect the notion that acquires more and more supporters as follows: The LNT guideline for risk estimates in RP is based on a too simplified model. It is based on a damage theory that does not take in consideration the biological inter and intra cellular complex damage response network and the complex carcinogenesis

  13. Damocles' sword: the history of radiation, radioactivity and radiation protection. Second part: the 1940s; Damokles svaerd: straalningens, radioaktivitetens och straalskyddets historia. Del 2: 1940-talet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, Bo

    1999-07-01

    The main theme of this book is the Manhattan project, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the military and political background for the development of the nuclear weapons. These facts have been of great importance for the development of nuclear power and for the nuclear power debate, and also for the development of radiation protection, which is the head subject for this series of books.

  14. Radiation disinfestation of local sundried fisher products. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation preservation of Asian fish and fishery products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma irradiation in controlling the flesh fly (Parasarcophaga rusicornis), the most predominating species of flies infesting fish during sun drying, and the Dermestes carnivorous, the most prominant insect in dried fish during storage, was carried out. Naked flesh fly larvae irradiated with 50krad had a 100% mortality within a period of 12 days. This dose also prevented the larvae from developing into pupae. A complete destruction of the larvae can be obtained within 5-6 hours after exposure with an irradiation dose of 200krad. A dose of 30krad caused a 100% destruction on the eggs of the beetle. Using the same dose on the larvae, a dose of 225krad is sufficient to cause a 100% mortality right after irradiation. Pupae appeared to be more resistant to radiation than the egg. A 100% mortality was obtained at 40 and 30krads, 3 and 8 days after emergence, respectively. A dose of 250krad killed the adults immediately after radiation while 225krad gave a complete destruction one day after irradiation. The same effect of radiation was obtained on the naked and inoculated samples. Based on the organoleptic assessment, no significant difference was found between samples of unirradiated salted and dried striped mackerel and those irradiated with 225krad

  15. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. The paper describes in detail the detectors employed in the experiment, followed by a discussion of the results. A comparison is also made with the H*(10) values predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations and those measured by the BSS systems.

  16. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha, and electron radiation on the rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1977--January 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial tumors are induced reproducibly in rat skin exposed to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For these carcinogens, the comparative risk of tumor formation is being examined for clues to the generality of action and the mode of interaction of diverse carcinogens. Molecular lesions, such as, pyrimidine dimers and single-strand breaks in DNA have been measured as a basis for assessment of cellular dose. Dose-response for single doses, time response for multiple doses, and repair or recovery of oncogenic damage are major areas of current interest

  17. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1977--January 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial tumors are induced reproducibly in rat skin exposed to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For these carcinogens, the comparative risk of tumor formation is being examined for clues to the generality of action and the mode of interaction of diverse carcinogens. Molecular lesions, such as, pyrimidine dimers and single-strand breaks in DNA have been measured as a basis for assessment of cellular dose. Dose-response for single doses, time-response for multiple doses, and repair or recovery of oncogenic damage are major areas of current interest.

  18. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha, and electron radiation on the rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1977--January 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Albert, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial tumors are induced reproducibly in rat skin exposed to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For these carcinogens, the comparative risk of tumor formation is being examined for clues to the generality of action and the mode of interaction of diverse carcinogens. Molecular lesions, such as, pyrimidine dimers and single-strand breaks in DNA have been measured as a basis for assessment of cellular dose. Dose-response for single doses, time response for multiple doses, and repair or recovery of oncogenic damage are major areas of current interest.

  19. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin. Progress report, August 1, 1977--January 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial tumors are induced reproducibly in rat skin exposed to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For these carcinogens, the comparative risk of tumor formation is being examined for clues to the generality of action and the mode of interaction of diverse carcinogens. Molecular lesions, such as, pyrimidine dimers and single-strand breaks in DNA have been measured as a basis for assessment of cellular dose. Dose-response for single doses, time-response for multiple doses, and repair or recovery of oncogenic damage are major areas of current interest

  20. Radiation protection as part of occupational health and safety in the regulation of uranium mines in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author establishes that radiation exposure is one of the health hazards of uranium mining and therefore has to be controlled. The jurisdictional framework for this is outlined and the role and functions of the Atomic Energy Control Board are detailed. The author then sets down seven objectives for radiation protection followed by an outline of the Canadian regulatory philosophy including an examination of two possible approaches to regulation of uranium mining and milling, and a sketch of pending new regulations. After setting down what he considers the main concerns of the AECB in mine regulation, the author details the Board's licensing process, compliance activities and relationship with workers. The conclusion includes a call for a more rational approach in considering and therefore dealing with radiation as a workplace hazard

  1. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations; Il centro di taratura per le radiazioni ionizzanti di Bologna. Parte 1: Fotoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The report describes all the facilities available at the the service of the ENEA Calibration Service for Ionising Radiations at Bologna (Italy). It gives a detailed description of all equipment qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters. [Italian] Il presente lavoro descrive i servizi e le attivita' del Centro di Taratura dell'ENEA di Bologna, in particolare delle attrezzature qualificate per la metrologia fotonica, dei campioni di misura e delle procedure adottate per la taratura degli strumenti e dei dosimetri.

  2. Laser heating of thermoluminescent films: Dose mapping applied to beta dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Setzkorn, R.; Prévost, H.; Gasiot, J.; Christensen, P.

    This work addresses radiation dose mapping based on scanning of laser heated thermoluminescent foils used for dose distribution analyses of beta radiation fields. Results are presented from dose homogeneity measurements, determination of depth-dose profile in tissue and studies of energy and...... suitable as extremity dosemeters for monitoring in beta radiation fields....

  3. Study of the capability for rapid warnings of solar flare radiation hazards to aircraft. Part I. Forecasts and warnings of solar flare radiation hazards. Part II. An FAA polar flight solar cosmic radiation forecast/warning communication system study. Technical memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the report provides background information on the occurrence of solar activity and the consequent sporadic production of electromagnetic and particle emissions from the sun. A summary is given of the current procedures for the forecasting of solar activity together with procedures used to verify these forecasts as currently available. A summary of current forecasting of radiation hazards as provided in support of the Concorde SST program is also given. The second part of the report describes a forecast message distribution system developed in conjunction with solar cosmic radiation forecasts and warnings of the Space Environment Laboratory of NOAA for the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Office of Aviation Medicine. The study analyzes the currently available and future aeronautical telecommunication system facilities to determine an optimum system to distribute forecasts to the preflight planning centers in the international flight service stations for polar-flying subsonic and supersonic transport (SST) type aircraft. Also recommended for the system are timely and reliable distribution of warnings to individual in-flight aircraft in polar areas by the responsible air traffic control authority

  4. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  5. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Mezzetto, M; Monrabal, F; Sorel, M

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has evolved from being almost a marginal activity in neutrino physics to one of the highest priorities for understanding neutrinos and the origin of mass. There are two main reasons for this paradigm shift: the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which clearly established the existence of massive neutrinos; and the existence of an unconfirmed, but not refuted, claim of evidence for neutrinoless double decay in 76Ge. As a consequence, a new generation of experiments, employing different detection techniques and {\\beta}{\\beta} isotopes, is being actively promoted by experimental groups across the world. In addition, nuclear theorists are making remarkable progress in the calculation of the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements, thus eliminating a substantial part of the theoretical uncertainties affecting the particle physics interpretation of this process. In this report, we review the main aspects of the double beta decay pro...

  6. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    .S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return of the...

  7. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    Few issues are more important for finance practice than the computation of market betas. Existing approaches compute market betas using historical data. While these approaches differ in terms of statistical sophistication and the modeling of the time-variation in the betas, they are all backward-...

  8. Climatic effects of 1950–2050 changes in US anthropogenic aerosols – Part 1: Aerosol trends and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Streets

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We calculate decadal aerosol direct and indirect (warm cloud radiative forcings from US anthropogenic sources over the 1950–2050 period. Past and future aerosol distributions are constructed using GEOS-Chem and historical emission inventories and future projections from the IPCC A1B scenario. Aerosol simulations are evaluated with observed spatial distributions and 1980–2010 trends of aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in the contiguous US. Direct and indirect radiative forcing is calculated using the GISS general circulation model and monthly mean aerosol distributions from GEOS-Chem. The radiative forcing from US anthropogenic aerosols is strongly localized over the eastern US. We find that its magnitude peaked in 1970–1990, with values over the eastern US (east of 100° W of −2.0 W m−2 for direct forcing including contributions from sulfate (−2.0 W m−2, nitrate (−0.2 W m−2, organic carbon (−0.2 W m−2, and black carbon (+0.4 W m−2. The uncertainties in radiative forcing due to aerosol radiative properties are estimated to be about 50%. The aerosol indirect effect is estimated to be of comparable magnitude to the direct forcing. We find that the magnitude of the forcing declined sharply from 1990 to 2010 (by 0.8 W m−2 direct and 1.0 W m−2 indirect, mainly reflecting decreases in SO2 emissions, and project that it will continue declining post-2010 but at a much slower rate since US SO2 emissions have already declined by almost 60% from their peak. This suggests that much of the warming effect of reducing US anthropogenic aerosol sources has already been realized. The small positive radiative forcing from US BC emissions (+0.3 W m−2 over the eastern US in 2010; 5% of the global forcing from anthropogenic BC emissions worldwide suggests that a US emission control strategy focused on BC would have only limited climate benefit.

  9. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters (like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. Under suitable conditions (controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The radiation scenario affects the radiance incident on the contrail layer and is characterised herein by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation, both via heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores (from former contrail ice crystals and homogeneous nucleation is investigated. It turned out that in our model the pure contrail dynamics (triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant mainly because the relative humidity does not exceed ice saturation substantially close to the contrail core. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail which implies that engine modifications that lead to lower soot emissions would lead to optically thinner and shorter living contrail-cirrus.

  10. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part V. Temperate fruits: pome fruits, stone fruits, and berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P

    1986-01-01

    The current status of research on the application of ionizing radiation for improving the storage of temperate fruits, i.e., apple, pear, peach, nectarine, apricot, cherry, plum, strawberry, bilberry, cranberry, raspberry, and black currant, is reviewed. Changes in fruit metabolism, chemical composition, texture, and organoleptic quality attributes are discussed with reference to the irradiation dose. The feasibility of using radiation either alone or in conjunction with heat treatment, refrigeration, and controlled atmospheres (CA) for the control of storage decay caused by fungal pathogens is considered. Areas of further research are suggested before irradiation could be considered for practical application in some of these temperate fruits. The recent trends in the possible use of irradiation for disinfestation of certain pome and stone fruits and the prospects for the commercial utilization of irradiation for improving the market life of strawberries are discussed. PMID:3536313

  11. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part VI. Mushrooms, tomatoes, minor fruits and vegetables, dried fruits, and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this concluding article in the series on the technological feasibility of ionizing radiation treatment for shelf life improvement of fruits and vegetables, the present status of research on several commodities that have not been dealt with earlier is discussed. The commodities include mushrooms, tomatoes, pineapples, lychees, longans, rambutans, mangostenes, guavas, sapotas, loquats, ber, soursops, passion fruits, persimmons, figs, melons, cucumbers, aubergines, globe artichokes, endives, lettuce, ginger, carrots, beet roots, turnips, olives, dates, chestnuts, almonds, pistachios, and other dried fruits and nuts. Changes induced by irradiation on metabolism, chemical constituents, and organoleptic qualities are considered while evaluating the shelf life. The commodities have been grouped into those showing potential benefits and those not showing any clear advantages from radiation treatment. Shelf life improvement of mushrooms and insect disinfestation in dried fruits, nuts, and certain fresh fruits appears to have immediate potential for commercial application. 194 references

  12. Radiation necrosis of the mandible: a 10 year study. Part I. Factors influencing the onset of necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 404 patients who were irradiated for cancer in the oral region between 1971 and 1975, 19.1% developed radiation necrosis of the mandible. Three main effects, anatomic tumor site, tumor dose, and dental status, were found to have a statistically significant effect on incidence of necrosis. Necrosis was also found to occur more frequently in association with an implant than with treatment administered by an external radiation source alone. The T-stage of the tumor did not appear to affect the incidence of necrosis. Necrosis incidence was also studied over the two time periods: 1966 to 1969 (study I) and 1971 to 1975 (study II). Differences between the two periods were found in the primary etiological groupings. Necrosis attributed to spontaneous or unknown cause increased in the second study, while that associated with dental extractions before irradiation decreased. Fewer teeth were extracted before radiation therapy in study II than in study I. Less necrosis followed mandibular surgery for recurrent disease in study II than study I

  13. Radiation necrosis of the mandible: a 10 year study. Part II. Dental factors; onset, duration and management of necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a review of patients receiving radiation for cancer in the oral region the rate of radiation necrosis of the mandible was found to be similar for patients who had dental extractions before radiation therapy and for the remainder of the dentate population. It was suggested that diseased teeth should be removed prior to irradiation and sufficient healing time should be allowed. Teeth should not be extracted after irradiation. Dental prostheses can be provided for most irradiated patients if adequate care is exercised. The probability of necrosis commencing was highest three to twelve months after the start of therapy; it diminished gradually after that period. The duration of necrosis was depicted as an exponential curve with a constant probability of necrosis termination at each time point after onset. In 46.8% of the patients in study II (1971-1975), the necrosis was healed by conservative means. This was a significant increase over study I (1966-1969), and a complementary reduction in the necessity for surgical intervention was also found

  14. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegel, B; Bedogni, R; Caresana, M; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Ferrarini, M; Hohmann, E; Hranitzky, C; Kasper, A; Khurana, S; Mares, V; Reginatto, M; Rollet, S; Rühm, W; Schardt, D; Silari, M; Simmer, G; Weitzenegger, E

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an int...

  15. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm2, of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A 90Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (μP) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined

  16. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, R.C.; Fullbright, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm/sup 2/, of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A /sup 90/Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (..mu..P) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined.

  17. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1986, Part -2, Annex 2c, Environmental Radioactivity control, meteorology measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1986, meteorology measurements were continued as a part of the environmental control of the Vinca Institute. This report covers the period from November 1984 - November 1985. Part of the meteorology measurements and data analysis is adapted to the needs of the Institute, i.e. RA reactor and some Laboratories. The objective of these activities is forming the data base for solving everyday and special problems related to control, protection and safety of Institute environment

  18. Radiation protection at the RA reactor in 1986, Part IIc: Radioactivity control of the environment - meteorology measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1987, meteorology measurements were continued as a part of the environmental control of the Vinca Institute. This report covers the period from November 1986 - November 1987. Part of the meteorology measurements and data analysis is adapted to the needs of the Institute, i.e. RA reactor and some Laboratories. The objective of these activities is forming the data base for solving everyday and special problems related to control, protection and safety of Institute environment

  19. Binding capacity of a barley beta-D-glucan to the beta-glucan recognition molecule dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Rui; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Tsubaki, Kazufumi; Ohno, Naohito

    2008-02-27

    To clarify whether barley beta-glucans exhibit their biological effects via binding to dectin-1, a pivotal receptor for beta-1,3-glucan, the structure of barley beta-glucan E70-S (BBG-70) was unambiguously investigated by NMR spectroscopy and studied for its binding capacity and specificity to dectin-1 by ELISA. NMR spectroscopy confirmed that BBG-70 contains two different linkage glucans, namely, alpha-glucan and beta-glucan, which are not covalently attached to one another. Beta-glucan within BBG-70 is a linear mixed-linkage beta-glucan composed of 1,3- and 1,4-beta-D-glucopyranose residues but does not contain the continuous 1,3-linkage. Competitive ELISA revealed that highly purified barley beta-glucan E70-S (pBBG-70) inhibits the binding of soluble dectin-1 to sonifilan (SPG), a beta-1,3-glucan, although at a concentration higher than that of SPG and laminarin. It was found that barley beta-glucan can be recognized by dectin-1, implying that barley beta-glucan might, at least in part, exhibit its biological effects via the recognition by dectin-1 of the ligand sugar structure, which may be formed by 1,3-beta- and 1,4-beta-glucosyl linkage. PMID:18205312

  20. Ionizing radiation induces a motile phenotype in human carcinoma cells in vitro through hyperactivation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Cedric; Flindt, Anne; Hartmann, Julian; Dahlke, Markus; Rades, Dirk; Dunst, Jürgen; Lehnert, Hendrik; Gieseler, Frank; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, a major treatment modality against cancer, can lead to secondary malignancies but it is uncertain as to whether tumor cells that survive ionizing radiation (IR) treatment undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and eventually become invasive or metastatic. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that the application of IR (10 MeV photon beams, 2-20 Gy) to lung and pancreatic carcinoma cells induces a migratory/invasive phenotype in these cells by hyperactivation of TGF-β and/or activin signaling. In accordance with this assumption, IR induced gene expression patterns and migratory responses consistent with an EMT phenotype. Moreover, in A549 cells, IR triggered the synthesis and secretion of both TGF-β1 and activin A as well as activation of intracellular TGF-β/activin signaling as evidenced by Smad phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of a TGF-β-responsive reporter gene. These responses were sensitive to SB431542, an inhibitor of type I receptors for TGF-β and activin. Likewise, specific antibody-mediated neutralization of soluble TGF-β, or dominant-negative inhibition of the TGF-β receptors, but not the activin type I receptor, alleviated IR-induced cell migration. Moreover, the TGF-β-specific approaches also blocked IR-dependent TGF-β1 secretion, Smad phosphorylation, and reporter gene activity, collectively indicating that autocrine production of TGF-β(s) and subsequent activation of TGF-β rather than activin signaling drives these changes. IR strongly sensitized cells to further increase their migration in response to recombinant TGF-β1 and this was accompanied by upregulation of TGF-β receptor expression. Our data raise the possibility that hyperactivation of TGF-β signaling during radiotherapy contributes to EMT-associated changes like metastasis, cancer stem cell formation and chemoresistance of tumor cells. PMID:26238393

  1. Use of ionizing radiation in the regulation of amino acid synthesis of micro organisms. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation microbiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiations on the production of glutamic acid (from glucose) by Corynebacterium glutamicum was investigated. Experiments were carried out with resting cell systems and with growing cultures of C. glutamicum. The growing cultures produced optimum yields of glutamic acid (25-30% of theoretical) in culture medium containing 1,0μg/l of biotin. The yield was virtually zero when 25μg/l of biotin was supplied. Resting cells from a medium containing growth-limiting concentrations of biotin (1μg/l) gave good yield of glutamic acid (approximately 27%), while cells harvested from a biotin-rich medium produced only traces of glutamate. Pre-irradiated cells of C. glutamicum produced less glutamic acid than unirradiated cells, and continuously irradiated (3,03 and 4,76 rad/h resting cells accumulated less glutamic acid than the corresponding unirradiated controls. Considerable increase in the glutamate produced by C. glutamicum during growth in the presence of 25μg/l of biotin was induced by continuously irradiating the cultures from the time of inoculation. The increases in the actual concentration of glutamate and in the precentage yield vary from approximately 2-fold to 4-fold. A dose rate of 4.0 krad/h was the most effective of the ones tested

  2. Radiation disinfestation of dried salted mackerel found on packaging, transporting and marketing. Part of a coordinated programme for radiation preservation of dried fish indigenous to Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were made on different types of packaging materials used for packing dried fish in the Philippines with a view to finding a suitable packaging material for irradiated dried fish. Among these packaging materials (polyethylene, cello/polyethylene, polyester/polyethylene, Kraft paper, polypropylene and interwoven polypropylene sacks), polyester/polyethylene laminate was the most resistant material against penetration by Dermestes carnivorous. No insect damage occurred on the dried fish packed in interwoven polypropylene lined with polyester/polyethylene laminate. The cost per sack of such packaging material having a capacity of 50-80 kg is US$ 0.50. The sack lined with polyester/polyethylene proved to be durable for surface transportation from Bacolod City to Manila (approx. 360 miles). Radiation treatment at 225 krad was effective against bacterial contamination but not effective in inhibiting mould growth. Raw fish soaked in 25% salt for 2 hours before drying obtained the highest scores in most of the organoleptic attributes. Dried fish which contains approx. 50% moisture and residual salt content of 6% would spoil within 2 weeks at ambient conditions. Treatment with 2% potassium sorbate and 225 krad showed that samples can be stored under commercial practice and at ambient conditions for up to 62 days

  3. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field, Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an internal quality assurance. The comparison of the neutron spectra measured by the different groups shows very good agreement. A detailed analysis presents some differences between the shapes of the spectra and possible sources of these differences are discussed. However, the ability of Bonner sphere spectrometers to provide reliable integral quantities like fluence and ambient dose equivalent is well demonstrated in this exercise. The fluence and dose results derived by the three groups agree very well within the given uncertainties, not only with respect to the total energy region present in this environment but also for selected energy regions which contribute in certain strength to the total values. In addition to the positions outside Cave A one spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectrum at one position in the entry maze of Cave A. In this case a comparison was possible to earlier measurements.

  4. Radiation diagnosis of the biliary system before laparascopic cholecystectomy (a review of literature). Part 2: Non-ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is defined as a review of literature on radiation diagnostic of biliary tract. High-quality intraoperative cholangiogramms securing is actual now. The role of selective cholangiography with laproscopic cholecystectomy, a review of 737 consecutive cases of intraoperative cholangiography in laproscopic cholecystectomy, the abilities of spiral computed tomographic cholangiography before laproscopic cholecystectomy are under consideration. Magneto-resonance cholangiopancreatography as a new method of diagnosis of biliary system diseases is analysed in certain papers. The problem of indications to conducting some diagnostic methods as well as sequences their use (algorithm) touches upon all scientific investigations devoted tactics of medical examinations of patients before laproscopic cholecystectomy

  5. Historical Evaluation of Film Badge Dosimetry Y-12 Plant: Part 2–Neutron Radiation ORAUT-OTIB-0045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr GD, Frome EL, Watkins JP, Tankersley WG

    2009-12-14

    A summary of the major neutron sources involved in radiation exposures to Y-12 workers is presented in this TIB. Graphical methods are used to evaluate available neutron dose data from quarterly exposures to Y-12 workers and to determine how the data could be used to derive neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for dose reconstruction purposes. This TIB provides estimates of neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for specific departments and a default value for the neutron-to-gamma dose ratio based on the pooled neutron dose data for all Y-12 departments.

  6. Pitfalls and modelling inconsistencies in computational radiation dosimetry: Lessons learnt from the QUADOS intercomparison. Part I: Neutrons and uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The QUADOS EU cost shared action conducted an intercomparison on the usage of numerical methods in radiation protection and dosimetry. The eight problems proposed were intended to test the usage of Monte Carlo and deterministic methods by assessing the accuracy with which the codes are applied and also the methods used to evaluate uncertainty in the answer gained through these methods. The overall objective was to spread good practice through the community and give users information on how to assess the uncertainties associated with their calculated results. (authors)

  7. Historical Evaluation of Film Badge Dosimetry Y-12 Plant: Part 2 - Neutron Radiation ORAUT-OTIB-0045

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the major neutron sources involved in radiation exposures to Y-12 workers is presented in this TIB. Graphical methods are used to evaluate available neutron dose data from quarterly exposures to Y-12 workers and to determine how the data could be used to derive neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for dose reconstruction purposes. This TIB provides estimates of neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for specific departments and a default value for the neutron-to-gamma dose ratio based on the pooled neutron dose data for all Y-12 departments.

  8. The effects of laser radiation on the residual stress levels of Single Point Incrementally Formed (SPIF) parts

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Amirahmad; Vanhove, Hans; VAN BAEL, Albert; Seefeldt, Marc; Duflou, Joost

    2014-01-01

    The present paper shows a new approach for stress relief annealing of SPIF formed parts using a defocused laser beam as a heating source. By offering a short-time heat treatment cycle, this process can be applied in the same set-up used for laser assisted single point incremental forming (LASPIF). A pyramid-shaped part has been selected as a case study and a proper power density and scanning velocity for the LASPIF process and the post heat treatment have been determined using ...

  9. Reflection of gamma radiation in a spherical steel-lined, concrete-walled room Part I: Overview and integral results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point kernel gamma ray transport codes may be used to calculate the response of an in-containment monitor to gamma rays from postaccident airborne radioactivity in a commercial nuclear power plant containment. While the point kernel code adequately calculates the direct radiation and accounts for the major structural features of the containment, it does not account for wall reflections. This paper reviews similar, previously published studies of wall reflection and presents new multigroup, discrete ordinates Sn method calculations of gamma radiation within a steel-lined, concrete-walled, air-filled, spherical source region. It was found that the point kernel code can estimate wall reflection if a term equal to 1+2 A/sub J/(E/sub o/) is included in the point kernel response function. The quantity A/sub J/(E/sub o/) is the total energy current albedo for gamma rays of energy E/sub o/ isotropically incident on a semi-infinite slab of iron. Finally, a post-LOCA time-dependent ''reflection'' fraction is calculated for a monitor site near the containment wall

  10. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Site. Part II; Cloud Fraction and Surface Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, B.; Minnis, P.

    2006-01-01

    Data collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (SCF) are analyzed to determine the monthly and hourly variations of cloud fraction and radiative forcing between January 1997 and December 2002. Cloud fractions are estimated for total cloud cover and for single-layered low (0-3 km), middle (3-6 km), and high clouds (more than 6 km) using ARM SCG ground-based paired lidar-radar measurements. Shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes are derived from up- and down-looking standard precision spectral pyranometers and precision infrared radiometer measurements with uncertainties of approximately 10 Wm(exp -2). The annual averages of total, and single-layered low, middle and high cloud fractions are 0.49, 0.11, 0.03, and 0.17, respectively. Both total and low cloud amounts peak during January and February and reach a minimum during July and August, high clouds occur more frequently than other types of clouds with a peak in summer. The average annual downwelling surface SW fluxes for total and low clouds (151 and 138 Wm(exp-2), respectively) are less than those under middle and high clouds (188 and 201 Wm(exp -2), respectively), but the downwelling LW fluxes (349 and 356 Wm(exp -2)) underneath total and low clouds are greater than those from middle and high clouds (337 and 333 Wm(exp -2)). Low clouds produce the largest LW warming (55 Wm(exp -2) and SW cooling (-91 Wm(exp -2)) effects with maximum and minimum absolute values in spring and summer, respectively. High clouds have the smallest LW warming (17 Wm(exp -2)) and SW cooling (-37 Wm(exp -2)) effects at the surface. All-sky SW CRF decreases and LW CRF increases with increasing cloud fraction with mean slopes of -0.984 and 0.616 Wm(exp -2)%(exp -1), respectively. Over the entire diurnal cycle, clouds deplete the amount of surface insolation more than they add to the downwelling LW flux. The calculated CRFs do not appear to be significantly

  11. BNAB-93 group data library Part 1: Nuclear data for the calculation of neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the first in a series of publications dedicated to the description of the new Russian multigroup data set BNAB-93. The first part of this series is devoted to the description of the neutron and photon data and their formats, and to their use in calculations. (author). 12 refs, 8 tabs

  12. Bremsstrahlung dose of therapeutic beta nuclides in bone and muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunatha, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    In the nuclear medicine, beta nuclides are released during the treatment. This beta interacts with bone and muscle and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. Present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence the Bremsstrahlung dose of therapeutic beta nuclides (Lu-177, Sr-90, Sm-153, I-153, Cs-137, Au-201, Dy-165, Mo-99, Sr-89, Fe-59, P-32, Ho-166, Sr-92, Re-188, Y-90, Pr-147, Co-60, K-42) in bone and muscle. The Bremsstrahlung yields of these beta nuclides ...

  13. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility. Part II; Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Data collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility are analyzed for determining the variability of cloud fraction and radiative forcing at several temporal scales between January 1997 and December 2002. Cloud fractions are estimated for total cloud cover and for single-layer low (0-3 km), middle (3-6 km), and high clouds (greater than 6 km) using ARM SGP ground-based paired lidar-radar measurements. Shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cloud radiative forcings (CRF) are derived from up- and down-looking standard precision spectral pyranometers and precision infrared radiometer measurements. The annual averages of total, and single-layer, nonoverlapped low, middle and high cloud fractions are 0.49, 0.11, 0.03, and 0.17, respectively. Total and low cloud amounts were greatest from December through March and least during July and August. The monthly variation of high cloud amount is relatively small with a broad maximum from May to August. During winter, total cloud cover varies diurnally with a small amplitude, mid-morning maximum and early evening minimum, and during summer it changes by more than 0.14 over the daily cycle with a pronounced early evening minimum. The diurnal variations of mean single-layer cloud cover change with season and cloud height. Annual averages of all-sky, total, and single-layer high, middle, and low LW CRFs are 21.4, 40.2, 16.7, 27.2, and 55.0 Wm(sup -2), respectively; and their SW CRFs are -41.5, -77.2, -37.0, -47.0, and -90.5 Wm(sup -2). Their net CRFs range from -20 to -37 Wm(sup -2). For all-sky, total, and low clouds, the maximum negative net CRFs of -40.1, -70, and -69.5 Wm(sup -2), occur during April; while the respective minimum values of -3.9, -5.7, and -4.6 Wm(sup -2), are found during December. July is the month having maximum negative net CRF of -46.2 Wm(sup -2) for middle clouds, and May has the maximum value of -45.9 Wm(sup -2) for high clouds. An

  14. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: supportive treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review instead, to provide an overview of all the remedies and pharmaceutical agents available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled.

  15. A map of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), showing the large-scale fluctuations (the quadrupole and octopole) isolated by an analysis done partly by theorists at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A recent analysis, in part by theorists working at CERN, suggests a new view of the cosmic microwave background radiation. It seems the solar system, rather than the universe, causes the radiation's large-scale fluctuations, similar to the bass in a song.

  16. Use of strontium-90 beta irradiation as an adjunctive therapy for the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To evaluate the effectiveness of strontium-90 beta irradiation in management of squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of 5 patients treated with strontium-90 beta irradiation was done. Squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva was histologically proved in all patients who had initial surgery to remove the major part of the lesion. This was followed by beta radiation within 48 hours with Sr -90 contact applicator obtained from Amersham International. The hand held Sr- 90 eye applicator was used after appropriately instilling the eyes with local anesthetics and a total of 5000cGy was delivered in seven fractions. Follow-up period was from 6 to 12 months. Clinical response and side effects to the therapy were used as outcome measurements. Three patients showed good response with no evidence of tumor within 6 to 12 months of the follow-up period. One patient was lost to follow-up and one patient showed local recurrence within 4 months. In this patient the tumor was more extensive involving the limbal conjunctiva and the cornea. The early side effects of beta radiation reported by all five patients were temporary local irritation of the eyes with additional mild chemosis in four patients. None of the other three potentially cured patients showed any long-term adverse reactions. There were no incidence of late radiation induced complications such as corneal ulcerations, damage to cornea, eye pain, cataract or any other serious effects in these patients within the follow-up period. In conclusion, beta irradiation is an effective post-surgical therapy for local control of superficial conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. The very low and minimum side -effects of Sr-90 irradiation is an advantage, which makes it a good alternative to external beam radiation, which has serious side effects. (author)

  17. A system for simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, A. T.; Hamby, D. M.

    2007-08-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for real-time and simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) designed and built in our laboratory. The DPP board digitally captures the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfers valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A resolving algorithm also was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events, and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimal crosstalk. The spectrometer has proven to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  18. Effects of the material composition in the TL curves of alkaline halides with Eu{sup 2+} exposed to {beta} radiation; Efectos de la composicion del material en las curvas de TL de halogenuros alcalinos con Eu{sup 2+} expuestos a radiacion {beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez S, R.; Piters, T.; Aceves, R.; Rodriguez M, R. [Dpto. de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The solid state dosemeters plays a very important paper in the growing use of the ionizing radiation. When being increased the use of the radioactive isotopes in the medicine and in the industry, the necessity to have materials but adapted in each case it has increased. To synthesize such materials, it is necessary to enlarge the knowledge on the paper that its play the physical characteristics of the crystals such as the crystalline structure, the lattice constant, imbibed nano structures, dislocations, ions size, electronic states of the ions, etc., on the effects of the ionizing radiation. In the past its have been carried out many studies approaching these problems in some materials, but we consider that its are insufficient before the challenges of the applications. To contribute to the understanding of these effects, we present a study focused to alkaline halide crystals impurified with Eu{sup 2+} ions, making an analysis on the paper that its play a) the ions concentration of Eu{sup 2+} in KBr: Eu{sup 2+}, b) the different sites of trapping of electrons and holes in KBr: Eu{sup 2+}, KCl: Eu{sup 2+}, RbBr:Eu{sup 2+}, RbCl: Eu{sup 2+} and c) the composition of the crystalline solid solutions KCl{sub x}Br{sub 1-X}: Eu{sup 2+} and RbCI{sub x}KBr{sub 1-x}: Eu{sup 2+} on the thermoluminescence curve when these materials are exposed to small dose of {beta} irradiation. The increase in the concentration of Eu{sup 2+} ions produces a smaller relative intensity of the emissions of high temperature for a given dose and it is found that in a RbCl{sub x}KBr{sub 1-x}: Eu{sup 2+} with the greater/smaller concentration of Cl{sup -} ions, the temperature of the characteristic emission is near to the 453/373 K. The composition x of halogenous ions and not the one of alkaline in the crystalline solid solution dominates the landslide of the temperature of the emission. (Author)

  19. Beta-energy averaging and beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple yet highly accurate method for approximately calculating spectrum-averaged beta energies and beta spectra for radioactive nuclei is presented. This method should prove useful for users who wish to obtain accurate answers without complicated calculations of Fermi functions, complex gamma functions, and time-consuming numerical integrations as required by the more exact theoretical expressions. Therefore, this method should be a good time-saving alternative for investigators who need to make calculations involving large numbers of nuclei (e.g., fission products) as well as for occasional users interested in restricted number of nuclides. The average beta-energy values calculated by this method differ from those calculated by ''exact'' methods by no more than 1 percent for nuclides with atomic numbers in the 20 to 100 range and which emit betas of energies up to approximately 8 MeV. These include all fission products and the actinides. The beta-energy spectra calculated by the present method are also of the same quality

  20. Synthesis and thermoluminescence of new Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Eu and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Dy phosphors exposed to beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia H, A. R.; Bustamante L, G. A.; Castro C, A. I. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Bernal H, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz V, C.; Burruel I, S. E. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castano M, V. M., E-mail: argh@gimmunison.com [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Apdo. Postal 1-1010, 76000 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is systematically studied for the very first concerning their dosimetric capabilities. Pellet- shaped Eu and Dy doped Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} phosphors were synthesized by sintering. Some samples were exposed to beta particle irradiation in order to investigate their thermoluminescence (Tl) features. Glow curves were obtained for 80 mg mass samples, showing that both, Tl sensitivity as well as the temperature at which the Tl maximum is recorded, depends upon the sample dopant. The glow curves of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Eu exhibit two maxima, located at 433 and 573 K, when a 5 K/s heating rate was used, being the most intense emission that observed at 573 K. The integrated Tl increases as the radiation dose was increased in the 0.25 - 5 Gy range, with no shift of the Tl maxima being observed, meaning that first order kinetics processes are involved in the Tl emission. The normalized sensitivity recorded in ten consecutive irradiation-Tl readout cycles shows a good reusability with only 5 % variability. The integrated Tl fades as a function of the elapsed time between irradiation and the corresponding Tl readout of Eu and Dy doped Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} phosphors is obtained. From the obtained results, we conclude that Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is a promising phosphor material to develop high performance Tl dosimeters, and a long term research work focused to understand and to improve their Tl features is absolutely justified. (Author)

  1. Current and future strategies in radiotherapy of childhood low-grade glioma of the brain. Part I. Treatment modalities of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    vision, respectively. More prospective studies are needed to address the impact of modern radiation therapy technologies (including intensity-modulated radiotherapy) on outcome especially in the very young and to define the role of radiation therapy as a part of a comprehensive treatment approach. The forthcoming prospective trial SIOP/GPOH LGG RT 2003 is addressing this issue. (orig.)

  2. Current and future strategies in radiotherapy of childhood low-grade glioma of the brain. Part I. Treatment modalities of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, R.D.; Timmermann, B.; Plasswilm, L.; Paulsen, F.; Jeremic, B.; Kay, S.; Bamberg, M. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Taylor, R.E. [Radiotherapy Dept., Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarzello, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Padua General Hospital (Italy); Gnekow, A.K. [Children' s Hospital, Augsburg (Germany); Dieckmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, General Hospital Vienna (Austria)

    2003-08-01

    and improvement and/or preservation of neurologic function or vision, respectively. More prospective studies are needed to address the impact of modern radiation therapy technologies (including intensity-modulated radiotherapy) on outcome especially in the very young and to define the role of radiation therapy as a part of a comprehensive treatment approach. The forthcoming prospective trial SIOP/GPOH LGG RT 2003 is addressing this issue. (orig.)

  3. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. We consider contrails in various radiation scenarios herein defined by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness which controls the radiance incident on the contrail layer. Under suitable conditions, controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification, radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation is investigated. We consider homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores released from sublimated contrail ice crystals. In our model the contrail dynamics triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Furthermore, our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail. A cut of the soot particle emission by two orders of magnitude can reduce the contrail timescale by one hour and the optical thickness by a factor of 5. Hence future engines with lower soot particle emissions could potentially lead to a reduction of the climate impact of aviation.

  4. Ionizing radiation effects on the matter and its applications in research and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510, D. F. (Mexico); Martinez B, G. [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Km. 12 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, San Cayetano 50200, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation as alpha and beta particles, electron accelerated, neutron particle, and X-rays and photons with relative high energy, as an useful radiation tool for many applications. the last two kind radiations are know as electromagnetic radiation. The radiation effects on the matter are well know that produces about fourteen processes during interaction with solids, aqueous solution and gases. In applications, commonly it depends of the nature and interest on the material samples that their characteristics can modify with the energy deposited on them. This part is devoted to more important effects produced by ionizing radiation with the matter and talk about the wide range applications recently; crystals radiation detectors and for application in medicine, detection of foodstuffs irradiated for preservation, and the application of ionizing radiation on polymeric materials. (Author)

  5. Clinical evaluation of the intraoral fluoride releasing system in radiation-induced xerostomic subjects. Part 2: Phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Mellberg, James R; Keene, Harris J; Bouwsma, Otis J; Garden, Adam S; Sipos, Tibor; Fleming, Terence J

    2006-10-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia can result in the rapid onset and progression of dental caries in head and neck cancer patients. Topically applied fluorides have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of dental caries in this population. However, because intensive daily self-application is required, compliance is an issue. The intraoral fluoride-releasing system (IFRS) containing a sodium fluoride core is a newly developed, sustained-release, passive drug delivery system that does not require patient involvement except for periodic replacement, thus reducing the effect of patient compliance on its effectiveness in dental caries prevention. Twenty-two head and neck cancer patients from U. T. M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, with radiation-induced xerostomia, were entered into a pilot study to contrast the daily home use of a 0.4% stannous fluoride-gel-containing tray (control group) to IFRS (study group) with respect to tolerability and adherence, and to obtain information on relative caries preventive efficacy. Participants were stratified on the basis of radiation exposure and randomly assigned to treatment with either IFRS or stannous fluoride gel. Patients in both groups were fitted with two IFRS retainers and also were instructed to use a 1100-ppm fluoride conventional sodium fluoride dentifrice twice daily. The study was conducted as a single-blinded, parallel-cell trial. Pre-existing carious lesions were restored prior to the beginning of the study. The efficacy variable was determined by the mean number of new or recurrent decayed surfaces. Patients were examined for caries 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks after initiation of treatment. Reports of adverse reactions were based on information volunteered by patients and that were elicited during interviews. At baseline, the resting and stimulated salivary flow rates (g/5min) were significantly greater in the control group than in the study group (pIFRS groups during the study period. The rate of new or

  6. RUNX1/AML1 point mutations take part in the pathogenesis of radiation-and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High frequency of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) has been reported in Hiroshima A-bomb exposed survivors, in resident around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Laboratory and in exposed people by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station Accident. MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is thought to be caused by mutation of runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) gene after a long time post exposure to relatively low dose radiation. In this study, participation of RUNX1/AML1 point mutations was examined in pathogenesis of the title neoplasms experienced in authors' facility. Subjects were 18/417 cases in whom myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) had switched to MDS or AML in the follow-up period of 1-25 years, and 11/124 cases in whom t-MN (therapy-related myeloid neoplasms) had developed during the remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in the 1-9.7 years follow up. Point mutations were analyzed by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) followed by base sequencing. In the former cases above, RUNX1 point mutation was found in 5/18 cases and in the latter, 4/11. When patients with persistent decrease of blood cells post therapy of APL were followed up for mutation, their RUNX1 point mutation was detected before they were diagnosed to be morbid of MDS/AML. The point mutation was thus a biomarker of myelo-hematogenic cancer, and was thought useful for early diagnosis of MDS and AML. (T.T.)

  7. Radiation effects on pregnant rats. part 1: Morphological changes during pregnancy in rats under effect of gamma rays. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following terms were performed to provide a rational systematic understanding of the radiation induced effects on the various stages of embryonic development. The doses delivered were 1, 2, 3, 4 Gy whole body irradiation of the pregnant rats, at specific time periods of gestation. The results obtained are detailed in the text, and supplemented by photographic presentations. Irradiation of pregnant rats on 9th day of gestation corresponding to placentation stage, and sacrificed on days 14, 18, 21, showed disintegration of embryonic and placental formation on the day 14 which appeared more advanced at higher doses. At later stages of gestation period at days 18 and 21 animals irradiated with low doses showed deformed fetal masses, incompatible with life. At high doses, there was total absence of embryonic and placental formations. Irradiation of pregnant rats on day 13 of gestation corresponding to stage of organogenesis, and sacrificed on days 18 and 21 showed major changes in fetal development. The results obtained are detailed in the text, and supplemented by photographic presentations. 10 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Evaluation of individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields (EVIDOS). Part I: Scope and methods of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supported by the European Commission, the EVIDOS project started in November 2001 with the broad goal of evaluating state of the art dosimetry techniques in representative workplaces of the nuclear industry. Seven European institutes joined efforts with end users at nuclear power plants, at fuel processing and reprocessing plants, and at transport and storage facilities. A comprehensive programme was devised to evaluate capabilities and limitations of standard and innovative personal dosemeters in relation to the mixed neutron-photon fields of concern to the nuclear industry. This paper describes the criteria behind the selection of dosimetry techniques and workplaces that were analysed, as well as the organisation of the measurement campaigns. Particular emphasis was placed on the evaluation of a variety of electronic personal dosemeters, either commercially available or previously developed by the partners. The estimates provided by these personal dosemeters were compared to reference values of dose equivalent quantities derived from spectrometry and fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Spectrometry was performed both with conventional multisphere and with some original instrumentation providing energy and direction resolution, based on silicon detectors and superheated drop detectors mounted on or in spherical moderators. The results were collected in a large, searchable database and are intended to be used in the harmonisation of dosimetric procedures for mixed radiation fields and for the approval of dosimetry services in Europe. (authors)

  9. Reduction of beta activity from depleted derbies, ingots and crucibles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of beta radiation on uranium ingot and crucible surfaces was demonstrated in the production casting operation by adding a mixture of slag liner material (MgF2) and calcium fluoride to the remelt charge. The beta emitters (234Th and 234Pa) are largely discharged with the fluorides into drums during a remote crucible burnout operation; thereby, reducing operator exposure to beta radiation. A production test showed that very low beta radiation from uranium flat castings can be achieved by using derbies recently prepared by reduction. Plant tests with fluoride addition indicate that pickling of derbies may not be necessary for casting uranium flats from a plasma sprayed (ZrO2) crucible. Also, ingots produced with fluoride additions had less pipe as compared to standard production technique. 2 references, 5 tables

  10. Transition zone dosimetry. Part of a coordinated programme on high-dose standardization and intercomparison for industrial radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Non-Destructive Assay system is described for the direct determination of fissile material in extended waste boxes and irradiated fuel elements. It is based on active neutron interrogation with an Sb-Be neutron source and attenuation of the source neutrons relative to the fission neutrons. The system is operating in a hot cell in the presence of some 100Ci of fission products. The count rate, obtained from source neutrons, was finally equivalent to 60 mg U-235. This value indicates the lower detection limit of the system. One part of the system (i) is intended for small samples mainly for calibration purposes. In the other part of the system (II) the samples are continuously moving during the measuring turn. For waste boxes of 16,5cm diameter and 25cm height, the relative counting efficiency in system II is 50% as compared to system I. Different packing positions change the result by 5%, the addition of 500g metal wool by 2% and the measurement of 8 subsamples as a whole by 4%. Performance is demonstrated with irradiated fuel elements of the AVR reactor at burn-up values between 0 and 170.000 MWd/t

  11. Microscopic calculations for rare beta decays

    OpenAIRE

    Mustonen, Mika

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis consisting of six publications and an overview part, three cases of rare beta decays are studied using microscopic nuclear models. Firstly, the half-lives and electron spectra of 113Cd and 115In fourth-forbidden nonunique ground-state-to-ground-state beta decays are studied using two closely related nuclear models: The microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model (MQPM) and the proton-neutron MQPM (pnMQPM), which has been developed as a part of this thesis work. Our...

  12. Double beta decay experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Barabash, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  13. Negative Beta Encoder

    CERN Document Server

    Kohda, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A new class of analog-digital (A/D), digital-analog (D/A) converters as an alternative to conventional ones, called $\\beta$-encoder, has been shown to have exponential accuracy in the bit rates while possessing self-correction property for fluctuations of amplifier factor $\\beta$ and quantizer threshold $\

  14. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for...

  15. Use of multi-element TL dosimeters for beta and mixed beta/gamma personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applied experience as well as theoretical considerations make it clear that traditional two-element TL dosimeters are not adequate for use in personnel dosimetry involving beta radiation fields. The principal shortcoming of such dosimeters is that the TL element measuring the beta dose normally under responds, and the readings of such elements must be multiplied by a correction factor, called the beta factor, to obtain the dose. The beta factor, however, is not a constant but varies with variations in the beta spectrum incident on the dosimeter. Experimental tests carried out using a number of multi-element TL dosimeter designs have shown that the element readouts can be used in conjunction with a suitable algorithm to determine a suitable beta factor for use under a variety of irradiation conditions. The precision attainable in calculating the beta factor in this manner depends on a number of dosimeter design parameters and is often quite poor unless special care is exercised both in the design of the dosimeter and also in the operation of the readout system

  16. The Technology and Applications of Large Fission Product Beta Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta emitters have not received consideration as large sources of radiation power because in the past, the radiation processes of interest have been based on particles with high penetration power; hence the great emphasis on gammas and artificially accelerated electrons. About four years ago, it became apparent that a broad field of potential applications involving surface radiation treatment was developing, e. g. surface modification of formed plastics by graft copolymerization and surface pasteurization of food. For these applications, penetration in depth is wasteful and potentially harmful. Also there are two other areas for which machine electrons were not well suited: radiation-induced chemical syntheses in pressure vessels, and certain types of free radical chain reactions for which the production rate per kilowatt decreases with the square root of the dose rate. Broad area beta sources showed obvious potential advantages in all these categories and, since they are available in good yield from the fission process, merited a careful re-appraisal. On the basics of these considerations an AEC sponsored study of the applications and technology of fission product beta sources was performed. The results indicate the following: 1. There are promising areas for commercial application of fission product beta emitters in the radiation processing field, particularly in the graft copolymerization modification of formed plastic surfaces and textiles. 2. Massive, rugged, inert, safe, inexpensive beta sources may be fabricated by suitable extensions of existing techniques. Source-bearing glass formulations show particular promise. 3. Beta absorption calculations indicate that extended sources can be designed with power utilization efficiencies as high as 20 per cent. Equations and curves describing dosage and beta utilization efficiency as a function of the geometry and composition of various source-target systems were developed. An experimental program is in progress to

  17. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. PMID:26318095

  18. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). PMID:27061883

  19. A beta and gamma radiation counter device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1988 and 1990, 1800 small Geiger-Mueller counters have been distributed in French high schools (caesium 137 as the radioactive source) for pupils' information about radioactivity (vocabulary, protection, ...). The INSTN (Institute for nuclear science and technology) has set up seminars for teachers' formation

  20. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  1. Calibration service of radiation detectors and dosemeters at IPEN/ Sao Paulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN, has already over 25 years been calibrating instruments used in radiation protection and therapy measurements and belonging to hospitals, industries, clinics and other users located in Sao Paulo and in other parts of Brazil. At the present time, the Calibration Laboratory is part of the Radiation Metrology Center and it acts in the Radiation Protection, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology areas, using special set-ups with gamma and beta radiation sealed sources, alpha and beta radiation plane sources and low and intermediate energies of X radiation. Moreover, it has reference instruments for each calibration area with traceability to the Brazilian National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (secondary standards) and international laboratories (primary standards). The number of tested instruments is increasing annually (from 170 in 1980 to 1871 in 2005), and for the development of new techniques and radiation detectors the continuous improvement of the existing calibration methods is necessary, as well as the establishment of new calibration services to be offered by the Calibration Laboratory for Brazilian and South American users. The objective of this study is to show the evolution of the calibration service developed at IPEN, describing the applied methods and the calibrated instruments types. The quality system implantation process following the basis of the NBR IEC/ISO 17025 standard is also presented with some tools used in the calibration procedures. (Author)

  2. Calibration service of radiation detectors and dosemeters at IPEN/ Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potiens, M.P.A.; Caldas, L.V.E. [IPEN, CNEN/SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN, has already over 25 years been calibrating instruments used in radiation protection and therapy measurements and belonging to hospitals, industries, clinics and other users located in Sao Paulo and in other parts of Brazil. At the present time, the Calibration Laboratory is part of the Radiation Metrology Center and it acts in the Radiation Protection, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology areas, using special set-ups with gamma and beta radiation sealed sources, alpha and beta radiation plane sources and low and intermediate energies of X radiation. Moreover, it has reference instruments for each calibration area with traceability to the Brazilian National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (secondary standards) and international laboratories (primary standards). The number of tested instruments is increasing annually (from 170 in 1980 to 1871 in 2005), and for the development of new techniques and radiation detectors the continuous improvement of the existing calibration methods is necessary, as well as the establishment of new calibration services to be offered by the Calibration Laboratory for Brazilian and South American users. The objective of this study is to show the evolution of the calibration service developed at IPEN, describing the applied methods and the calibrated instruments types. The quality system implantation process following the basis of the NBR IEC/ISO 17025 standard is also presented with some tools used in the calibration procedures. (Author)

  3. Radiation practices. Annual report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1791 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2011. 1702 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 575 inspections of licensed practices in 2011. 633 repair orders and recommendations were issued in the course of inspections. A total of nearly 11 700 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2011 and about 143 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 166 workplaces including a total of 288 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2011. Just over 3600 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK was involved in four ionizing radiation research projects, and also took part in an international expert group evaluation of STUK research activities. New alpha and beta sources were procured for metrological activities and a Co-60 irradiation device procured in 2010 was installed and taken into use. Calibration and testing services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2011 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Orders were issued to 5 responsible parties to discontinue the use of tattoo removal lasers. 7 sunbed facilities were inspected and 10 on-site laser display inspections were performed. Five mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. Non-ionizing radiation research activities were also subjected to the evaluation of STUK research activities

  4. Radiation practices. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. (ed.)

    2012-09-15

    1791 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2011. 1702 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 575 inspections of licensed practices in 2011. 633 repair orders and recommendations were issued in the course of inspections. A total of nearly 11 700 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2011 and about 143 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 166 workplaces including a total of 288 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2011. Just over 3600 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK was involved in four ionizing radiation research projects, and also took part in an international expert group evaluation of STUK research activities. New alpha and beta sources were procured for metrological activities and a Co-60 irradiation device procured in 2010 was installed and taken into use. Calibration and testing services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2011 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Orders were issued to 5 responsible parties to discontinue the use of tattoo removal lasers. 7 sunbed facilities were inspected and 10 on-site laser display inspections were performed. Five mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. Non-ionizing radiation research activities were also subjected to the evaluation of STUK research activities

  5. Electrolytic hydrogen in beta titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permeation of electrolytic hydrogen through beta titanium foils with palladium coated surfaces was studied using Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn. Ion bombardment etching followed by thin film vapor deposition of palladium were used to produce oxide-free titanium specimens for electrochemical hydrogen permeation and embrittlement studies. A thin metallic foil is cathodically charged with hydrogen on one side while the other side is maintained at a sufficiently anodic potential so that all the diffusing hydrogen is oxidized and turned into an equivalent current. The current is analyzed to determine diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen. X-ray diffraction was also used to determine the effects of hydrogen on the lattice parameter. Permeation experiments conducted with basic cyanide solutions exhibited simple diffusion behavior. The diffusivity at 210C for hydrogen through the beta alloy was 5.60 (+-1.92) x 10-7 cm2/s. Anomalous permeation occurred with hydrogen chemical potentials in acidic and basic solutions without cyanide during the later stages of the approach to steady state in the charging. This behavior is consistent with the trapping model of hydrogen in metals of McNabb and Foster. Plastic deformation and spontaneous cracking at the wetted portion of the specimen were observed under extreme conditions during this anomalous behavior. Part of the deformation is found to be reversible. In the mandrel bend experiments on the embrittlement phenomenon, the transgranular cleavage mode of fracture occurred. Interstitially dissolved hydrogen expanded the bcc lattice of the beta titanium with accompanying diffraction line broadening. The lattice contracted upon removal of the hydrogen. The satisfactory performance of the beta alloy Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn, in moderate electrochemical environments results principally from the protective oxide film

  6. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire’s theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • Range-energy relationship for the beta particles in yttrium-90 is calculated. • Formalism for the semi-analytical calculation of self-absorption coefficients. • Energy-dependent self-absorption coefficient calculated for yttrium-90. • Flux rate of beta particles from a self-attenuating radioactive sphere is shown. • The efficiency of beta particle emitting radioactive microspheres is calculated

  7. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire's theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer.

  8. On the Proton Spectrum in Free Neutron beta-decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bunatian, G G

    2000-01-01

    We consider the calculations which are appropriate to acquire with a high precision, of ~1% or better, the general characteristics of weak interactions from the experiments on the free neutron beta-decay; the principle emphasis is placed on the phenomena associated with the recoil of protons. The part played by electromagnetic interactions in beta-decay is visualized, with special attention drawn to the influence of the gamma-radiation on the momentum distribution of the particles in the final state. The effect of electromagnetic interactions on the proton recoil spectrum is studied, in the light of the experiments which are carried out and planned for now. The results of the calculations, which are to be confronted with the experimental data, are presented upright in terms of the effective Lagrangian underlying the inquiry. Owing to electromagnetic interactions, the corrections to the energy distribution of protons prove to amount to the value of a few per cent. Nowadays, this is substantial to obtain with a...

  9. Effect of low doses beta irradiation on micromechanical properties of surface layer of injection molded polypropylene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of beta radiation on the changes in the structure and selected properties (mechanical and thermal) was proved. Using low doses of beta radiation for 25% glass fiber filled polypropylene and its influence on the changes of micromechanical properties of surface layer has not been studied in detail so far. The specimens of 25% glass fiber filled PP were made by injection molding technology and irradiated by low doses of beta radiation (0, 15 and 33 kGy). The changes in the microstructure and micromechanical properties of surface layer were evaluated using FTIR, SEM, WAXS and instrumented microhardness test. The results of the measurements showed considerable increase in micromechanical properties (indentation hardness, indentation elastic modulus) when low doses of beta radiation are used. - Highlights: • Low doses of beta radiation significantly increase the hardness of surface layer. • Low doses of beta radiation significantly increase the stiffness surface layer. • Low doses of beta radiation significantly reduce creep of surface layer. • Beta radiation reduces the relative distribution of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. • Low doses of beta radiation reduce the crystallinity and crystal size

  10. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given. (author)

  11. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  12. [High beta tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our activities on High Beta Tokamak Research during the past 20 months of the present grant period can be divided into six areas: reconstruction and modeling of high beta equilibria in HBT; measurement and analysis of MHD instabilities observed in HBT; measurements of impurity transport; diagnostic development on HBT; numerical parameterization of the second stability regime; and conceptual design and assembly of HBT-EP. Each of these is described in some detail in the sections of this progress report

  13. Autoregressive conditional beta

    OpenAIRE

    Yunmi Kim

    2012-01-01

    The capital asset pricing model provides various predictions about equilibrium expected returns on risky assets. One key prediction is that the risk premium on a risky asset is proportional to the nondiversifiable market risk measured by the asset's beta coefficient. This paper proposes a new method for estimating and drawing inferences from a time-varying capital asset pricing model. The proposed method, which can be considered a vector autoregressive model for multiple beta coefficients, is...

  14. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 1. The primary structure of the beta 1 beta 1 isoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, J; Bühler, R; Kaiser, R; Holmquist, B; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    Determination of the amino acid sequence of the beta 1 subunit from the class I (pyrazole-sensitive) human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme beta 1 beta 1 revealed a 373-residue structure differing at 48 positions (including a gap) from that of the subunit of the well studied horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase EE isoenzyme. The structure deduced is compatible with known differences in composition, ultraviolet absorbance, electrophoretic mobility and catalytic properties between the horse and human enzymes. All zinc-liganding residues of the horse E subunit are strictly conserved in the human beta 1 subunit, despite an earlier report of a mutation involving Cys-46. This residue therefore remains conserved in all known alcohol dehydrogenase structures. However, the total cysteine content of the beta 1 structure is raised from 14 in the subunit of the horse enzyme to 15 by a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most exchanges are on the surface of the molecule and of a well conserved nature. Substitutions close to the catalytic centre are of interest to explain the altered substrate specificity and different catalytic activity of the beta 1 homodimer. Functionally, a Ser----Thr exchange at position 48 appears to be of special importance, since Thr-48 in beta 1 instead of Ser-48 in the horse enzyme can restrict available space. Four other substitutions also line the active-site pocket, and appear to constitute partly compensated exchanges. PMID:6391920

  15. Sterilization of health care products - Radiation. Part 1: Requirements for development, validation and routine control of a sterilization process for medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sterile medical device is one that is free of viable microorganisms. International Standards, which specify requirements for validation and routine control of sterilization processes, require, when it is necessary to supply a sterile medical device, that adventitious microbiological contamination of a medical device prior to sterilization be minimized. Even so, medical devices produced under standard manufacturing conditions in accordance with the requirements for quality management systems (see, for example, ISO 13485) may, prior to sterilization, have microorganisms on them, albeit in low numbers. Such medical devices are non-sterile. The purpose of sterilization is to inactivate the microbiological contaminants and thereby transform the nonsterile medical devices into sterile ones. The kinetics of inactivation of a pure culture of microorganisms by physical and/or chemical agents used to sterilize medical devices can generally best be described by an exponential relationship between the numbers of microorganisms surviving and the extent of treatment with the sterilizing agent; inevitably this means that there is always a finite probability that a microorganism may survive regardless of the extent of treatment applied. For a given treatment, the probability of survival is determined by the number and resistance of microorganisms and by the environment in which the organisms exist during treatment. It follows that the sterility of any one medical device in a population subjected to sterilization processing cannot be guaranteed and the sterility of a processed population is defined in terms of the probability of there being a viable microorganism present on a medical device. This part of ISO 11137 describes requirements that, if met, will provide a radiation sterilization process intended to sterilize medical devices, that has appropriate microbicidal activity. Furthermore, compliance with the requirements ensures that this activity is both reliable and

  16. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Site. Part I; Low-Level Cloud Macrophysical, Microphysical, and Radiative Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Minnis, Patrick; Xi, Baike

    2005-01-01

    . The low stratus cloud amount monotonically increases from midnight to early morning (0930 LT), and remains large until around local noon, then declines until 1930 LT when it levels off for the remainder of the night. In the morning, the stratus cloud layer is low, warm, and thick with less LWC, while in the afternoon it is high, cold, and thin with more LWC. Future parts of this series will consider other cloud types and cloud radiative forcing at the ARM SCF.

  17. 航行船舶噪声源辐射部位定位实验研究%Localization experiment research on moving ship's noise source radiation parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟春平; 张明伟; 刘雨东; 张宇

    2013-01-01

    为了有效解决运动船舶目标噪声源辐射部位定位问题,通过采用短时积分、分频段能量融合、噪声源相对位置分析等方法克服目标运动的不利因素,提出采用高频段精确定位的常规聚焦波束形成声图法与中低频段精确定位的频域MVDR(Minimum Variance Distortionless Response)波束形成声图法相结合的定位方法.通过海试数据处理验证了该方法可以有效实现目标噪声源辐射部位近场高分辨定位.在进行大型船海试数据处理时,采用分频段、分时间段,并与船体结构布局相结合的方法,分别给出了主要的噪声源辐射部位(螺旋桨、推进电机+柴油发电机、泵舱)的位置,验证了该实验数据处理方法的实用性.%In order to effectively resolve the localization of moving ship's noise source radiation parts, a combining method of the conventional underwater acoustic image measurement on high frequency band and frequency domain MVDR (Minimum Variance Distortionless Response) focused beam-forming measurement on low frequency band was proposed. To overcome disadvantage factor of target movement, short-time integral, dividing frequency band energy fuse and noise sources relative location analysis were adopted. The experimental results from sea trial proved that the combining method could effectively realize the underwater noise sources localization on near field with high resolution. In addition, noise source radiation parts (the place of propeller, impelling engine + diesel oil generator and pump cabin) of large-scale ship were given by the combining way of dividing frequency band, dividing time period and the ship configuration. This work has significant value for the concerned engineering applications.

  18. Exposure of bremsstrahlung from beta-emitting therapeutic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjunatha, H.C. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore-560056, Karnataka (India)], E-mail: manjunathhc@rediffmail.com; Rudraswamy, B. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore-560056, Karnataka (India)

    2009-02-15

    There has been an increased interest in beta therapeutic nuclear medicine, which emits relatively high-energy (>1 MeV) {beta}-rays and the production in vivo of Bremsstrahlung sufficient for external imaging, the produced Bremsstrahlung radiation hazard warrants evaluation. The Bremsstrahlung dose from patient administered {beta}-ray emitted radionuclide has been calculated by extending the national council on Radiation Protection and measurement model of a point source in air to account for biologic elimination of activity. We have estimated the probability of bremsstrahlung production, specific Bremsstrahlung constant (defined by Zanzonico et al.) and activity (A{sub release}) in bone cortical, bone compact, different regions of tooth enamel (enamel dentin junction (EDJ), enamel middle surface, enamel inner surface), different regions of dentin (outer surface, middle surface, enamel dentin junction (EDJ)), soft tissue, lungs and skeleton for different therapeutic beta-emitting radionuclide. In the present calculations we have used modified atomic number (Z{sub mod}) defined for bremsstrahlung process. Proper localization and quantification of incorporated beta emitters in bone and tooth are possible, because Bremsstrahlung production is greater in bone and tooth than soft tissue due to their high modified atomic number (Z{sub mod}). Radionuclide therapy with pure {beta}-ray emitters emitted in bone, tooth, soft tissue, lungs and skeleton does not require medical confinement of patients for radiation protection.

  19. Application of semiempirical expressions to the alpha and beta radiometry of environmental depositions samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Were applied two semiempirical equations exponential beta absorption and Bragg-Kleeman approximation complementary to experimental corrections for beta backscattering and auto absorption of beta and alpha radiations in measurements of environmental depositions samples In the first case was verified the validity of mentioned corrections with an application boundary to mass greater than 300 Pb-210 (0.015 mg/cm2) In the second case, the Bragg-Kleeman approximation combined with the experimental beta corrections, bring a judgment to determine the fundamental alpha and beta emisors samples which results the Pb-210 group

  20. Personnel monitoring and dosimetry (beta and gamma) - external

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personnel monitoring is the periodic measurement (monthly or quarterly service) of radiation doses received by radiation workers. The monitoring/service period for a given institution is mainly decided by the potential of receiving doses/exposures by occupational radiation workers. Ionizing radiations viz. neutrons, photons (X-rays and gamma) and beta particles are commonly encountered by radiation workers and contribute towards radiation doses. The main aim of personnel monitoring is to ensure that the dose limits as stipulated by the regulatory authorities are followed. It may also help in the segregation of various personnel as per dose received in case of emergency/radiation accidents. In addition, external monitoring provides information on the external radiation exposure of individuals working with radioactive materials and/or radiation producing devices and assist in work planning, allow control of doses at the workplace