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Sample records for beta peptide abeta

  1. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, Joanne M., E-mail: Jo.Caine@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bharadwaj, Prashant R. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer' s Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia (Australia); Sankovich, Sonia E. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D. [The Department of Pathology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  2. Ellagic acid promotes A{beta}42 fibrillization and inhibits A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ying [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun, Gui-yuan, E-mail: sungy2004@sohu.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Rui-tian, E-mail: rtliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of A{beta} oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against A{beta} neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on A{beta}42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted A{beta} fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited A{beta} aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in A{beta}42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic A{beta} aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  3. CD45RB is a novel molecular therapeutic target to inhibit Abeta peptide-induced microglial MAPK activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microglial activation, characterized by p38 MAPK or p44/42 MAPK pathway signal transduction, occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Our previous studies demonstrated CD45, a membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, opposed beta-amyloid (Abeta peptide-induced microglial activation via inhibition of p44/42 MAPK. Additionally we have shown agonism of the RB isoform of CD45 (CD45RB abrogates lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced microglial activation. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In this study, CD45RB modulation of Abeta peptide or LPS-activated primary cultured microglial cells was further investigated. Microglial cells were co-treated with "aged" FITC-Abeta(1-42 and multiple CD45 isoform agonist antibodies. Data revealed cross-linking of CD45, particularly the CD45RB isoform, enhances microglial phagocytosis of Abeta(1-42 peptide and inhibits LPS-induced activation of p44/42 and p38 pathways. Co-treatment of microglial cells with agonist CD45 antibodies results in significant inhibition of LPS-induced microglial TNF-alpha and IL-6 release through p44/42 and/or p38 pathways. Moreover, inhibition of either of these pathways augmented CD45RB cross-linking induced microglial phagocytosis of Abeta(1-42 peptide. To investigate the mechanism(s involved, microglial cells were co-treated with a PTP inhibitor (potassium bisperoxo [1,10-phenanthroline oxovanadate; Phen] and Abeta(1-42 peptides. Data showed synergistic induction of microglial activation as evidenced by TNF-alpha and IL-6 release; both of which are demonstrated to be dependent on increased p44/42 and/or p38 activation. Finally, it was observed that cross-linking of CD45RB in the presence of Abeta(1-42 peptide, inhibits co-localization of microglial MHC class II and Abeta peptide; suggesting CD45 activation inhibits the antigen presenting phenotype of microglial cells. CONCLUSION: In summary, p38 MAPK is another novel signaling pathway, besides p44/42, in which CD45RB cross

  4. Overcoming synthetic Abeta peptide aging: a new approach to an age-old problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Claudia; Colombo, Laura; Messa, Massimo; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Salmona, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of amyloidogenic diseases use synthetic peptides for cell-free and in vitro studies. However, amyloidogenic peptides often show intrinsic variability that markedly affects the reproducibility of experiments. Proof of physicochemical and biological variability with different batches of amyloidogenic peptides have been reported in literature. Here, we show that differences can be observed even within the same batch of Abeta1-42 peptide after storing lyophilised samples at -20 degrees C. This change (referred to as 'peptide aging') was reproduced with Abeta1-40 peptide samples by using a series of lyophilisation cycles, showing that lyophilisation, rather than preserving the physicochemical and biological features of Abeta peptides, introduces wide variability. To counteract synthetic peptide aging, we set up a procedure involving the sequential use of trifluoroacetic acid, formic acid and sodium hydroxide solutions that disaggregate preformed seeds and enriched Abeta peptide solutions into monomers and low-molecular-weight oligomers. This procedure enabled us to obtain reproducible physicochemical and biological features of Abeta peptides, irrespective of their age. PMID:20536398

  5. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R;

    2000-01-01

    -Abeta antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG2b classes, and mononuclear cells in the brain expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and tumor growth factor-beta. Our results demonstrate that chronic nasal administration of Abeta peptide can induce an immune response to Abeta that decreases...

  6. Key residues for the oligomerization of A{beta}42 protein in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Sam [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Guo, Zhefeng, E-mail: zhefeng@ucla.edu [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} oligomers are neurotoxins and likely the causing agents for Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein form globular oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein oligomers contain SDS-resistant tetramers and hexamers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cysteine substitutions at residues 31, 32, 34, 39-41 disrupt A{beta}42 oligomerization. -- Abstract: Deposition of amyloid fibrils consisting of amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) protein as senile plaques in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. However, a growing body of evidence shows that soluble A{beta} oligomers correlate better with dementia than fibrils, suggesting that A{beta} oligomers may be the primary toxic species. The structure and oligomerization mechanism of these A{beta} oligomers are crucial for developing effective therapeutics. Here we investigated the oligomerization of A{beta}42 in the context of a fusion protein containing GroES and ubiquitin fused to the N-terminus of A{beta} sequence. The presence of fusion protein partners, in combination with a denaturing buffer containing 8 M urea at pH 10, is unfavorable for A{beta}42 aggregation, thus allowing only the most stable structures to be observed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed globular oligomers, which bound weakly to thioflavin T and Congo red. SDS-PAGE shows that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed SDS-resistant hexamers and tetramers. In contrast, A{beta}40 fusion protein remained as monomers on SDS gel, suggesting that the oligomerization of A{beta}42 fusion protein is not due to the fusion protein partners. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis at 22 residue positions further revealed that single cysteine substitutions of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues (I31, I32, L34, V39, V40, and I41) led to disruption of hexamer and tetramer formation, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions

  7. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, CE; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that dena

  8. Modeling Amyloid Beta Peptide Insertion into Lipid Bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Maddox, M W; Longo, M J; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Maddox, Michael W.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recent suggestions that the Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide (A-beta), can insert into cell membranes and form harmful ion channels, we model insertion of the peptide into cell membranes using a Monte Carlo code which is specific at the amino acid level. We examine insertion of the regular A-beta peptide as well as mutants causing familial Alzheimer's disease. We present our results and develop the hypothesis that partial insertion into the membrane, leaving the peptide in one leaflet, increases the probability of harmful channel formation. This hypothesis can partly explain why these mutations are neurotoxic simply due to peptide insertion behavior, and also explains why, normally, A-beta 42 is more toxic to some cultured cells than A-beta 40, but the E22Q mutation reverses this effect. We further apply this model to various artificial A-beta mutants which have been examined experimentally, and offer testable experimental predictions contrasting the roles of aggregation and insertion with regard ...

  9. The amyloid beta-peptide is imported into mitochondria via the TOM import machinery and localized to mitochondrial cristae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson Petersen, Camilla A; Alikhani, Nyosha; Behbahani, Homira;

    2008-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) has been suggested to exert its toxicity intracellularly. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by Abeta and accumulation of Abeta has been detected in mitochondria. Because Abeta is not likely to be produced locally in mitochondria, we decided to...... investigate the mechanisms for mitochondrial Abeta uptake. Our results from rat mitochondria show that Abeta is transported into mitochondria via the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) machinery. The import was insensitive to valinomycin, indicating that it is independent of the mitochondrial membrane...... potential. Subfractionation studies following the import experiments revealed Abeta association with the inner membrane fraction, and immunoelectron microscopy after import showed localization of Abeta to mitochondrial cristae. A similar distribution pattern of Abeta in mitochondria was shown by...

  10. A[Beta] Deposits in Older Non-Demented Individuals with Cognitive Decline Are Indicative of Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemagne, V. L.; Pike, K. E.; Darby, D.; Maruff, P.; Savage, G.; Ng, S.; Ackermann, U.; Cowie, T. F.; Currie, J.; Chan, S. G.; Jones, G.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; O'Keefe, G.; Masters, C. L.; Rowe, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 30% of healthy persons aged over 75 years show A[beta] deposition at autopsy. It is postulated that this represents preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated the relationship between A[beta] burden as assessed by PiB PET and cognitive decline in a well-characterized, non-demented, elderly cohort. PiB PET studies and…

  11. Designed amyloid beta peptide fibril - a tool for high-throughput screening of fibril inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Gunnar T; Ouberai, Myriam; Dumy, Pascal; Garcia, Julian

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) fibril formation is widely believed to be the causative event of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Therapeutic approaches are therefore in development that target various sites in the production and aggregation of Abeta. Herein we present a high-throughput screening tool to generate novel hit compounds that block Abeta fibril formation. This tool is an application for our fibril model (Abeta(16-37)Y(20)K(22)K(24))(4), which is a covalent assembly of four Abeta fragments. With this tool, screening studies are complete within one hour, as opposed to days with native Abeta(1-40). A Z' factor of 0.84+/-0.03 was determined for fibril formation and inhibition, followed by the reporter molecule thioflavin T. Herein we also describe the analysis of a broad range of reported inhibitors and non-inhibitors of Abeta fibril formation to test the validity of the system. PMID:17876751

  12. Lower levels of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta (Abeta) in non-demented Indian controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sarada; Sandhyarani, Boya; Shree, A N Divya; Murthy, K Krishna; Kalyani, K; Kumar, S Praveen; Pradeep; Noone, Mohin Jeslie; Taly, A B

    2006-10-23

    Prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Indian population is lower than in developed countries. To determine whether limitation of amyloid beta (Abeta) concentration may be responsible for lower rate of incidence, we measured the levels of Abeta in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from 72 non-demented individuals ranging in the age from 20 years to 65 years. These samples were segregated into three groups ranging from 20-35 years, 36-50 years and 51-65 years of age. Levels of Abeta could be detected in all the age groups and they were much lower than the values reported in literature from the developed countries. No significant difference in the average level of Ass was observed with increase in age. PMID:16978775

  13. Abeta-induced meningoencephalitis is IFN-gamma-dependent and is associated with T cell-dependent clearance of Abeta in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monsonego, Alon; Imitola, Jaime; Petrovic, Sanja; Zota, Victor; Nemirovsky, Anna; Baron, Rona; Fisher, Yair; Owens, Trevor; Weiner, Howard L

    2006-01-01

    myelin basic protein (MBP) promoter. Furthermore, immune infiltrates were targeted primarily to sites of Abeta plaques in the brain and were associated with clearance of Abeta. Immune infiltrates were not targeted to the spinal cord, consistent with what was observed in AD patients vaccinated with Abeta......Vaccination against amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) has been shown to be successful in reducing Abeta burden and neurotoxicity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, although Abeta immunization did not show T cell infiltrates in the brain of these mice, an Abeta vaccination trial...... resulted in meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients with AD. Here, we explore the characteristics and specificity of Abeta-induced, T cell-mediated encephalitis in a mouse model of the disease. We demonstrate that a strong Abeta-specific T cell response is critically dependent on the immunizing T cell...

  14. The mechanism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor- related protein (LRP) in the production of amyloid-[Beta] peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Eunice Chungyu

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disorder affecting the elderly, presenting symptoms such as memory impairment and dementia. AD is pathologically characterized by the development of extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). The plaques are composed of amyloid-[Beta] peptide (A[Beta]) and the NFTs are composed of a hyperphosphorylated form of the tau protein. A[Beta] is formed by sequential proteolytic processing of the a...

  15. Stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid beta-protein aggregation with peptides containing alternating alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Marcus A; Aucoin, Jed P; Fu, Yanwen; McCarley, Robin L; Hammer, Robert P

    2006-03-22

    We have prepared two peptides based on the hydrophobic core (Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe) of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) that contain alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids at alternating positions, but differ in the positioning of the oligolysine chain (AMY-1, C-terminus; AMY-2, N-terminus). We have studied the effects of AMY-1 and AMY-2 on the aggregation of Abeta and find that, at stoichiometric concentrations, both peptides completely stop Abeta fibril growth. Equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta form only globular aggregates as imaged by scanning force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These samples show no signs of protofibrillar or fibrillar material even after prolonged periods of time (4.5 months). Also, 10 mol % of AMY-1 prevents Abeta self-assembly for long periods of time; aged samples (4.5 months) show only a few protofibrillar or fibrillar aggregates. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta show that the secondary structure of the mixture changes over time and progresses to a predominantly beta-sheet structure, which is consistent with the design of these inhibitors preferring a sheet-like conformation. Changing the position of the charged tail on the peptide, AMY-2 interacts with Abeta differently in that equimolar mixtures form large ( approximately 1 mum) globular aggregates which do not progress to fibrils, but precipitate out of solution. The differences in the aggregation mediated by the two peptides is discussed in terms of a model where the inhibitors act as cosurfactants that interfere with the native ability of Abeta to self-assemble by disrupting hydrophobic interactions either at the C-terminus or N-terminus of Abeta. PMID:16536517

  16. Involvement of oxidative stress in the enhancement of acetylcholinesterase activity induced by amyloid beta-peptide

    OpenAIRE

    de Melo, Joana Barbosa; Agostinho, Paula; Oliveira, Catarina Resende

    2003-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is increased within and around amyloid plaques, which are present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient's brain. In this study, using cultured retinal cells as a neuronal model, we analyzed the effect of the synthetic peptide A[beta]25-35 on the activity of AChE, the degradation enzyme of acetylcholine, as well as the involvement of oxidative stress in this process. The activity of AChE was increased when retinal cells were incubated with A[beta]25-35 (25 [m...

  17. DCP-LA neutralizes mutant amyloid beta peptide-induced impairment of long-term potentiation and spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tetsu; Tomiyama, Takami; Tominaga, Takemi; Mori, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) was monitored from the CA1 region of the intact rat hippocampus by delivering high frequency stimulation (HFS) to the Schaffer collateral commissural pathway. Intraventricular injection with mutant amyloid beta(1-42) peptide lacking glutamate-22 (Abeta(1-42)E22Delta), favoring oligomerization, 10 min prior to HFS, inhibited expression of LTP, with the potency more than wild-type amyloid beta(1-42) peptide. Intraperitoneal injection with the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) 70 min prior to HFS neutralized mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced LTP inhibition. In the water maze test, continuous intraventricular injection with mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide for 14 days prolonged the acquisition latency as compared with that for control, with the potency similar to wild-type Abeta(1-42) peptide, and intraperitoneal injection with DCP-LA shortened the prolonged latency to control levels. The results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA neutralizes mutant Abeta(1-42)E22Delta peptide-induced impairment of LTP and spatial learning. PMID:19716848

  18. Computational selection of inhibitors of Abeta aggregation and neuronal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Deliang; Martin, Zane S; Soto, Claudio; Schein, Catherine H

    2009-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cerebral accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid-beta protein (Abeta). Disease symptoms can be alleviated, in vitro and in vivo, by 'beta-sheet breaker' pentapeptides that reduce plaque load. However the peptide nature of these compounds, made them biologically unstable and unable to penetrate membranes with high efficiency. The main goal of this study was to use computational methods to identify small molecule mimetics with better drug-like properties. For this purpose, the docked conformations of the active peptides were used to identify compounds with similar activities. A series of related beta-sheet breaker peptides were docked to solid state NMR structures of a fibrillar form of Abeta. The lowest energy conformations of the active peptides were used to design three dimensional (3D)-pharmacophores, suitable for screening the NCI database with Unity. Small molecular weight compounds with physicochemical features and a conformation similar to the active peptides were selected, ranked by docking and biochemical parameters. Of 16 diverse compounds selected for experimental screening, 2 prevented and reversed Abeta aggregation at 2-3microM concentration, as measured by Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and ELISA assays. They also prevented the toxic effects of aggregated Abeta on neuroblastoma cells. Their low molecular weight and aqueous solubility makes them promising lead compounds for treating AD. PMID:19540126

  19. Transthyretin Val122Ile, accumulated Abeta, and inclusion-body myositis aspects in cultured muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; McFerrin, Janis; Vattemi, Gaetano

    2003-07-22

    Cultured muscle fibers (CMF) from a patient with inclusion-body myositis (IBM) and cardiac amyloidosis associated with the transthyretin (TTR) Val122Ile mutation contained aspects of the IBM phenotype: vacuolation, congophilic inclusions, and clusters of immunocolocalizing amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) and TTR accumulations. These abnormalities are never present in normal human CMF. These perturbations were greatly increased after Abeta precursor protein gene transfer. The TTR mutation may be a genetic predisposition factor for the patient's IBM. PMID:12874414

  20. A beta-induced meningoencephalitis is IFN-gammadependent and is associated with T cell-dependent clearance of A beta in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monsonego, Alon; Imitola, Jaime; Petrovic, Sanja; Zota, Victor; Nemirovsky, Anna; Baron, Rona; Fisher, Yair; Owens, Trevor; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    myelin basic protein (MBP) promoter. Furthermore, immune infiltrates were targeted primarily to sites of Abeta plaques in the brain and were associated with clearance of Abeta. Immune infiltrates were not targeted to the spinal cord, consistent with what was observed in AD patients vaccinated with Abeta......Vaccination against amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) has been shown to be successful in reducing Abeta burden and neurotoxicity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, although Abeta immunization did not show T cell infiltrates in the brain of these mice, an Abeta vaccination trial...... resulted in meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients with AD. Here, we explore the characteristics and specificity of Abeta-induced, T cell-mediated encephalitis in a mouse model of the disease. We demonstrate that a strong Abeta-specific T cell response is critically dependent on the immunizing T cell...

  1. In silico study of amyloid beta-protein folding relevant to Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam Ng, Alfonso Ramon

    Amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) folding is the initial step in the formation of the early toxic Abeta assemblies that are critically linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta exists in two main alloforms, Abeta40 and Abeta42, composed of 40 and 42 residues, respectively. Abeta42 aggregates faster, forms more toxic assemblies, and is linked more strongly to AD. Two amino acids of Abeta42, I41 and A42, profoundly affect the behavior of Abeta40 and Abeta42. To examine why this happens, I study Abeta40 and Abeta42 folding using discrete molecular dynamics and a four-bead protein model with backbone hydrogen bonding and residue-specific effective hydropathic and electrostatic interactions. In particular, I explore a range of values of the hydropathic (EHP) and electrostatic (ECH) potential energies. For each peptide, I create a hundred different initial conformations for each set of parameters (EHP,E CH). I investigate the Abeta40 and Abeta42 monomer folding in a wide temperature range and quantify the folded structures by calculating the secondary structure propensities and the intramolecular contact maps. For each set of parameters (EHP,ECH), I calculate an average beta-strand secondary structure propensity in the Abeta40 and Abeta42 monomers as a function of temperature. I compare these simulated results with experimental circular dichroism measurements and estimate the model physiological temperature and the model parameters (E HP,ECH) that best fit the experimental conditions. The results show that in the temperature range [278K,350K], the average beta-strand in Abeta42 is larger than that of Abeta40, which is in agreement with experiments. The model predicts that the average beta-strand propensity should decrease for T>350K. At low temperatures, both Abeta40 and Abeta42 adopt a predominantly collapsed-coil conformation with small amounts of an beta-helical secondary structure (<1%). At high temperatures, beta-strand rich structures are more prominent (19%). Also, the

  2. Critical role for sphingosine kinase-1 in regulating survival of neuroblastoma cells exposed to amyloid-beta peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Brouchet, Anne; Pchejetski, Dimitri; Brizuela, Leyre; Garcia, Virginie; Altié, Marie-Françoise; Maddelein, Marie-Lise; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    We examined the role of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a critical regulator of the ceramide/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) biostat, in the regulation of death and survival of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in response to amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide (25-35). Upon incubation with Abeta, SH-SY5Y cells displayed a marked down-regulation of SphK1 activity coupled with an increase in the ceramide/S1P ratio followed by cell death. This mechanism was redox-sensitive; N-acetylcysteine totally abrogated the down-regulation of SphK1 activity and strongly inhibited Abeta-induced cell death. SphK1 overexpression impaired the cytotoxicity of Abeta, whereas SphK1 silencing by RNA interference mimicked Abeta-induced cell death, thereby establishing a critical role for SphK1. We further demonstrated that SphK1 could mediate the well established cytoprotective action of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) against Abeta toxicity. A dominant-negative form of SphK1 or its pharmacological inhibition not only abrogated IGF-I-triggered stimulation of SphK1 but also hampered IGF-I protective effect. Similarly to IGF-I, the neuroprotective action of TGF-beta1 was also dependent on SphK1 activity; activation of SphK1 as well as cell survival were impeded by a dominant-negative form of SphK1. Taken together, these results provide the first illustration of SphK1 role as a critical regulator of death and survival of Abeta-treated cells. PMID:17522181

  3. A neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide reduces neuropathological signs and cognitive impairment induced by Abeta25-35

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, B; Novikova, T; Novitskaya, V;

    2007-01-01

    protein. Furthermore, quantitative immunohistochemistry demonstrated time-related statistically significant increases in amyloid immunoreactivity, tau phosphorylation, microglial activation, and astrocytosis, and stereological investigations demonstrated statistically significant increased neuronal cell...... intranasal and s.c. administration of the peptide. Furthermore, FGL-treatment was shown to inhibit the activity of GSK3beta, a kinase implicated in signaling regulating cell survival, tau phosphorylation and the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Thus, the peptide induced a statistically...

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  5. Disruption of corticocortical connections ameliorates amyloid burden in terminal fields in a transgenic model of Abeta amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jin G; Price, Donald L; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2002-11-15

    We demonstrated previously that amyloid precursor protein (APP) is anterogradely transported from the entorhinal cortex (ERC) to the dentate gyrus via axons of the perforant pathway. In the terminal fields of these inputs, APP undergoes proteolysis to generate C-terminal fragments containing the entire amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) domain. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that APP derived from ERC neurons is the source of the Abeta peptide deposited in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in transgenic mice with Abeta amyloidosis. We used mice harboring two familial AD-linked genes (human APP Swedish and presenilin1-DeltaE9), in which levels of Abeta (especially Abeta(42)) are elevated, leading to the formation of amyloid plaques, and lesioned the ERC to interrupt the transport of APP from ERC to hippocampus. Our results show that, on the side of ERC lesion, numbers of APP-immunoreactive dystrophic neurites and Abeta burden were significantly reduced by approximately 40 and 45%, respectively, in the dentate gyrus compared with the contralateral side. Reductions in APP and Abeta were more substantial in the molecular layer of the dentate, i.e., a region that contains the ERC terminals, and were associated with a parallel decrease in total APP and Abeta measured by Western blot and ProteinChip immunoassays. Silver and thioflavine staining confirmed the reduction of amyloid plaques on the side of deafferentation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that ERC may be the primary source of amyloidogenic Abeta in the dentate gyrus, and they suggest an important role of corticocortical and corticolimbic forward connections in determining patterns of amyloid deposition in AD. PMID:12427835

  6. Structures of A[beta]-Related Peptide−Monoclonal Antibody Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardberg, Anna; Dice, Lezlee; Pridgen, Kathleen; Ko, Jan; Patterson, Paul; Ou, Susan; Wetzel, Ronald; Dealwis, Chris; (Case Western); (CIT); (Tennessee-K)

    2009-06-15

    Passive immunotherapy (PI) is being explored as a potential therapeutic against Alzheimer's disease. The most promising antibodies (Abs) used in PI target the EFRH motif of the A{beta} N-terminus. The monoclonal anti-A{beta} Ab PFA1 recognizes the EFRH epitope of A{beta}. PFA1 has a high affinity for A{beta} fibrils and protofibrils (0.1 nM), as well as good affinity for A{beta} monomers (20 nM). However, PFA1 binds the toxic N-terminally modified pyroglutamate peptide pyro-Glu3-A{beta} with a 77-fold loss in affinity compared to the WT A{beta}(1-8). Furthermore, our earlier work illustrated PFA1's potential for cross-reactivity. The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2, which plays a role in skeletal and bone formation, possesses the EFRH sequence. PFA1 Fab binds the Ror2(518-525) peptide sequence REEFRHEA with a 3-fold enhancement over WT A{beta}(1-8). In this work, the crystal structures of the hybridoma-derived PFA1 Fab in complex with pyro-Glu3-A{beta} peptide and with a cross-reacting peptide from Ror2 have been determined at resolutions of 1.95 and 2.7 {angstrom}, respectively. As with wild-type A{beta}, these peptides bind to the Fab via a combination of charge- and shape-complementarity, hydrogen-bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. Comparison of the structures of the four peptides A{beta}(1-8), Grip1, pyro-Glu3-A{beta}(3-8), and Ror2 in complex with PFA1 shows that the greatest conformational flexibility occurs at residues 2 to 3 and 8 of the peptide. These structures provide a molecular basis of the specificity tolerance of PFA1 and its ability to recognize A{beta} N-terminal heterogeneity. The structures provide clues to improving mAb specificity and affinity for pyroglutamate A{beta}.

  7. Alzheimer's disease cybrids replicate beta-amyloid abnormalities through cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S M; Cassarino, D S; Abramova, N N; Keeney, P M; Borland, M K; Trimmer, P A; Krebs, C T; Bennett, J C; Parks, J K; Swerdlow, R H; Parker, W D; Bennett, J P

    2000-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition in brain of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, elevated brain caspase-3, and systemic deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase. Although increased Abeta deposition can result from mutations in amyloid precursor protein or presenilin genes, the cause of increased Abeta deposition in sporadic AD is unknown. Cytoplasmic hybrid ("cybrid") cells made from mitochondrial DNA of nonfamilial AD subjects show antioxidant-reversible lowering of mitochondrial membrane potential (delta(gYm), secrete twice as much Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42), have increased intracellular Abeta(1-40) (1.7-fold), and develop Congo red-positive Abeta deposits. Also elevated are cytoplasmic cytochrome c (threefold) and caspase-3 activity (twofold). Increased AD cybrid Abeta(1-40) secretion was normalized by inhibition of caspase-3 or secretase and reduced by treatment with the antioxidant S(-)pramipexole. Expression of AD mitochondrial genes in cybrid cells depresses cytochrome c oxidase activity and increases oxidative stress, which, in turn, lowers delta(psi)m. Under stress, cells with AD mitochondrial genes are more likely to activate cell death pathways, which drive caspase 3-mediated Abeta peptide secretion and may account for increased Abeta deposition in the AD brain. Therapeutic strategies for reducing neurodegeneration in sporadic AD can address restoration of delta(psi)m and reduction of elevated Abeta secretion. PMID:10939564

  8. Persistent amyloidosis following suppression of Abeta production in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proteases (secretases that cleave amyloid-beta (Abeta peptide from the amyloid precursor protein (APP have been the focus of considerable investigation in the development of treatments for Alzheimer disease. The prediction has been that reducing Abeta production in the brain, even after the onset of clinical symptoms and the development of associated pathology, will facilitate the repair of damaged tissue and removal of amyloid lesions. However, no long-term studies using animal models of amyloid pathology have yet been performed to test this hypothesis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have generated a transgenic mouse model that genetically mimics the arrest of Abeta production expected from treatment with secretase inhibitors. These mice overexpress mutant APP from a vector that can be regulated by doxycycline. Under normal conditions, high-level expression of APP quickly induces fulminant amyloid pathology. We show that doxycycline administration inhibits transgenic APP expression by greater than 95% and reduces Abeta production to levels found in nontransgenic mice. Suppression of transgenic Abeta synthesis in this model abruptly halts the progression of amyloid pathology. However, formation and disaggregation of amyloid deposits appear to be in disequilibrium as the plaques require far longer to disperse than to assemble. Mice in which APP synthesis was suppressed for as long as 6 mo after the formation of Abeta deposits retain a considerable amyloid load, with little sign of active clearance. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that amyloid lesions in transgenic mice are highly stable structures in vivo that are slow to disaggregate. Our findings suggest that arresting Abeta production in patients with Alzheimer disease should halt the progression of pathology, but that early treatment may be imperative, as it appears that amyloid deposits, once formed, will require additional intervention to clear.

  9. Abeta mediated diminution of MTT reduction--an artefact of single cell culture?

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    Raik Rönicke

    Full Text Available The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazoliumbromide (MTT reduction assay is a frequently used and easily reproducible method to measure beta-amyloid (Abeta toxicity in different types of single cell culture. To our knowledge, the influence of Abeta on MTT reduction has never been tested in more complex tissue. Initially, we reproduced the disturbed MTT reduction in neuron and astroglia primary cell cultures from rats as well as in the BV2 microglia cell line, utilizing four different Abeta species, namely freshly dissolved Abeta (25-35, fibrillar Abeta (1-40, oligomeric Abeta (1-42 and oligomeric Abeta (1-40. In contrast to the findings in single cell cultures, none of these Abeta species altered MTT reduction in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHC. Moreover, application of Abeta to acutely isolated hippocampal slices from adult rats and in vivo intracerebroventricular injection of Abeta also did not influence the MTT reduction in the respective tissue. Failure of Abeta penetration into the tissue cannot explain the differences between single cells and the more complex brain tissue. Thus electrophysiological investigations disclosed an impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from rat by application of oligomeric Abeta (1-40, but not by freshly dissolved Abeta (25-35 or fibrillar Abeta (1-40. In conclusion, the experiments revealed a glaring discrepancy between single cell cultures and complex brain tissue regarding the effect of different Abeta species on MTT reduction. Particularly, the differential effect of oligomeric versus other Abeta forms on LTP was not reflected in the MTT reduction assay. This may indicate that the Abeta oligomer effect on synaptic function reflected by LTP impairment precedes changes in formazane formation rate or that cells embedded in a more natural environment in the tissue are less susceptible to damage by Abeta, raising cautions against the

  10. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Related tests: Phosporylated ... should know? How is it used? Tests for Tau protein and Aß42 may be used as supplemental tests ...

  11. Mitochondrial mislocalization underlies Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Iijima-Ando

    Full Text Available The amyloid-beta 42 (Abeta42 is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Abeta42 induces neuronal dysfunction and degeneration remain elusive. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are implicated in AD brains. Whether mitochondrial dysfunctions are merely a consequence of AD pathology, or are early seminal events in AD pathogenesis remains to be determined. Here, we show that Abeta42 induces mitochondrial mislocalization, which contributes to Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction in a transgenic Drosophila model. In the Abeta42 fly brain, mitochondria were reduced in axons and dendrites, and accumulated in the somata without severe mitochondrial damage or neurodegeneration. In contrast, organization of microtubule or global axonal transport was not significantly altered at this stage. Abeta42-induced behavioral defects were exacerbated by genetic reductions in mitochondrial transport, and were modulated by cAMP levels and PKA activity. Levels of putative PKA substrate phosphoproteins were reduced in the Abeta42 fly brains. Importantly, perturbations in mitochondrial transport in neurons were sufficient to disrupt PKA signaling and induce late-onset behavioral deficits, suggesting a mechanism whereby mitochondrial mislocalization contributes to Abeta42-induced neuronal dysfunction. These results demonstrate that mislocalization of mitochondria underlies the pathogenic effects of Abeta42 in vivo.

  12. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  13. Plasma amyloid beta peptides and oligomers antibodies in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, L.; Chu, LW; Kwan, JSC; Ho, JWM; Lam, KSL; Ho, PWL; Chan, KH

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Various forms of amyloid beta (Aβ) including Aβ peptides, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils are thought to be pathogenic in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The exact pathophysiological role of endogenous Aβ autoantibodies (Ab) in healthy subjects and AD patients are uncertain. Potential protective role ...

  14. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. PMID:25459121

  15. Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta links lens and brain pathology in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet A Moncaster

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21 encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD amyloid precursor protein (APP. Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta, early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Abeta pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Abeta aggregates (approximately 5 to 50 nm identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Abeta in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Abeta with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Abeta

  16. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  17. Inhibition of GSK-3 ameliorates Abeta pathology in an adult-onset Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyinkan Sofola

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abeta peptide accumulation is thought to be the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, with downstream neurotoxic effects including the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 is increasingly implicated as playing a pivotal role in this amyloid cascade. We have developed an adult-onset Drosophila model of AD, using an inducible gene expression system to express Arctic mutant Abeta42 specifically in adult neurons, to avoid developmental effects. Abeta42 accumulated with age in these flies and they displayed increased mortality together with progressive neuronal dysfunction, but in the apparent absence of neuronal loss. This fly model can thus be used to examine the role of events during adulthood and early AD aetiology. Expression of Abeta42 in adult neurons increased GSK-3 activity, and inhibition of GSK-3 (either genetically or pharmacologically by lithium treatment rescued Abeta42 toxicity. Abeta42 pathogenesis was also reduced by removal of endogenous fly tau; but, within the limits of detection of available methods, tau phosphorylation did not appear to be altered in flies expressing Abeta42. The GSK-3-mediated effects on Abeta42 toxicity appear to be at least in part mediated by tau-independent mechanisms, because the protective effect of lithium alone was greater than that of the removal of tau alone. Finally, Abeta42 levels were reduced upon GSK-3 inhibition, pointing to a direct role of GSK-3 in the regulation of Abeta42 peptide level, in the absence of APP processing. Our study points to the need both to identify the mechanisms by which GSK-3 modulates Abeta42 levels in the fly and to determine if similar mechanisms are present in mammals, and it supports the potential therapeutic use of GSK-3 inhibitors in AD.

  18. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  19. Structure and dynamics of parallel beta-sheets, hydrophobic core, and loops in Alzheimer's A beta fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2007-05-01

    We explore the relative contributions of different structural elements to the stability of Abeta fibrils by molecular-dynamics simulations performed over a broad range of temperatures (298 K to 398 K). Our fibril structures are based on solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments of Abeta(1-40) peptides, with sheets of parallel beta-strands connected by loops and stabilized by interior salt bridges. We consider models with different interpeptide interfaces, and different staggering of the N- and C-terminal beta-strands along the fibril axis. Multiple 10-20 ns molecular-dynamics simulations show that fibril segments with 12 peptides are stable at ambient temperature. The different models converge toward an interdigitated side-chain packing, and present water channels solvating the interior D23/K28 salt bridges. At elevated temperatures, we observe the early phases of fibril dissociation as a loss of order in the hydrophilic loops connecting the two beta-strands, and in the solvent-exposed N-terminal beta-sheets. As the most dramatic structural change, we observe collective sliding of the N- and C-terminal beta-sheets on top of each other. The interior C-terminal beta-sheets in the hydrophobic core remain largely intact, indicating that their formation and stability is crucial to the dissociation/elongation and stability of Abeta fibrils. PMID:17293399

  20. Dynamics of Asp23-Lys28 salt-bridge formation in Abeta10-35 monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarus, Bogdan; Straub, John E; Thirumalai, D

    2006-12-20

    In the amyloid fibrils formed from long fragments of the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta-protein), the monomers are arranged in parallel and lie perpendicular to the fibril axis. The structure of the monomers satisfies the amyloid self-organization principle; namely, the low free energy state of the monomer maximizes the number of intra- and interpeptide contacts and salt bridges. The formation of the intramolecular salt bridge between Asp(D)23 and Lys(K)28 ensures that unpaired charges are not buried in the low-dielectric interior. We have investigated, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, whether the D23-K28 interaction forms spontaneously in the isolated Abeta10-35 monomer. To validate the simulation protocol, we show, using five independent trajectories spanning a total of 100 ns, that the pKa values of the titratable groups are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The computed free energy disconnectvity graph shows that broadly the ensemble of compact random coil conformations can be clustered into four basins that are separated by free energy barriers ranging from 0.3 to 2.7 kcal/mol. There is significant residual structure in the conformation of the peptide in each of the basins. Due to the desolvation penalty, the structural motif with a stable turn involving the residues VGSN and a preformed D23-K28 contact is a minor component of the simulated structures. The extent of solvation of the peptides in the four basins varies greatly, which underscores the dynamical fluctuations in the monomer. Our results suggest that the early event in the oligomerization process must be the expulsion of discrete water molecules that facilitates the formation of interpeptide-interaction-driven stable structures with an intramolecular D23-K28 salt bridge and an intact VGSN turn. PMID:17165769

  1. Sex differences between APPswePS1dE9 mice in A-beta accumulation and pancreatic islet function during the development of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Feng, Ying; Wu, Wei; Zhao, Jia; Fu, Chunmei; Li, Yang; Ding, Yangnan; Wu, Binghuo; Gong, Yanju; Yang, Guizhi; Zhou, Xue

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a type of neurodegenerative disease characterized by learning and memory impairment, is often associated with pathological features, such as amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation and insulin resistance. The transgenic mouse, APPswePS1dE9 (APP/PS1), is one of the most commonly used animal models in pathogenesis studies of AD. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sex differences between APP/PS1 mice in the pathogenesis of AD. The impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance was found to develop earlier in male APP/PS1 mice than in females. Plasma insulin levels were significantly decreased in male APP/PS1 mice, while total cholesterol levels in male APP/PS1 mice were higher than those in females. Triglyceride levels in male mice in both the wild-type (WT) and APP/PS1 groups were higher than in their female littermates. Soluble and insoluble Aβ levels in female APP/PS1 mouse brains were higher than those in males. And the learning and memorizing abilities of female APP/PS1 mice were poorer than those of males. Our results concluded that there were sex differences in Aβ formation, pancreatic islet function and insulin sensitivity between male and female APP/PS1 mice during the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:26519428

  2. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM. We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function.

  3. Beta-amyloid peptide blocks the fast-inactivating K+ current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Good, T A; Smith, D. O.; Murphy, R M

    1996-01-01

    Deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in senile plaques is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Chronic exposure of neuronal cultures to synthetic A beta is directly toxic, or enhances neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxins. Exposure to A beta may cause a loss of cellular calcium homeostasis, but the mechanism by which this occurs is uncertain. In this work, the acute response of rat hippocampal neurons to applications of synthetic A beta was measured using whole-cell voltag...

  4. PARP-1 modulates amyloid beta peptide-induced neuronal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Martire

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ causes neurodegeneration by several mechanisms including oxidative stress, which is known to induce DNA damage with the consequent activation of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1. To elucidate the role of PARP-1 in the neurodegenerative process, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were treated with Aβ25-35 fragment in the presence or absence of MC2050, a new PARP-1 inhibitor. Aβ25-35 induces an enhancement of PARP activity which is prevented by cell pre-treatment with MC2050. These data were confirmed by measuring PARP-1 activity in CHO cells transfected with amylod precursor protein and in vivo in brains specimens of TgCRND8 transgenic mice overproducing the amyloid peptide. Following Aβ25-35 exposure a significant increase in intracellular ROS was observed. These data were supported by the finding that Aβ25-35 induces DNA damage which in turn activates PARP-1. Challenge with Aβ25-35 is also able to activate NF-kB via PARP-1, as demonstrated by NF-kB impairment upon MC2050 treatment. Moreover, Aβ25-35 via PARP-1 induces a significant increase in the p53 protein level and a parallel decrease in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. These overall data support the hypothesis of PARP-1 involvment in cellular responses induced by Aβ and hence a possible rationale for the implication of PARP-1 in neurodegeneration is discussed.

  5. Identification of a Novel Parallel beta-Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai;

    2016-01-01

    . In this work, the early A beta(33-42) aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide A beta(33-42) consisting of novel parallel beta-strand-like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical...... spectroscopy technique with force controlled in pico-Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel beta-strand-like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel beta-strand structure of A beta(33-42) amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular...

  6. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderman, Andreas; Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that amyloid-beta1-42 (Abeta1-42) binds to the nicotinergic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) and that the application of Abeta1-42 to cells inhibits the function of the alpha7 nAChR. The in vivo consequences of the pharmacological activation of the alp...... that clinical trials testing alpha7 nAChR agonists should be related to the content of Abeta peptides in the patient's nervous system....... systemic administration of the alpha7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 (10 mg/kg) result in a significant increase in Fos protein levels in the shell of nucleus accumbens in wild-type mice, but has no effect in the transgene mice. There were fewer cell bodies expressing Fos in the prefrontal cortex of transgene...

  7. Computational identification of potential multitarget treatments for ameliorating the adverse effects of amyloid-beta on synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThomasJ.Anastasio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The leading hypothesis on Alzheimer Disease (AD is that it is caused by buildup of the peptide amyloid-beta (Abeta, which initially causes dysregulation of synaptic plasticity and eventually causes destruction of synapses and neurons. Pharmacological efforts to limit Abeta buildup have proven ineffective, and this raises the twin challenges of understanding the adverse effects of Abeta on synapses and of suggesting pharmacological means to prevent it. The purpose of this paper is to initiate a computational approach to understanding the dysregulation by Abeta of synaptic plasticity and to offer suggestions whereby combinations of various chemical compounds could be arrayed against it. This data-driven approach confronts the complexity of synaptic plasticity by representing findings from the literature in a course-grained manner, and focuses on understanding the aggregate behavior of many molecular interactions. The same set of interactions is modeled by two different computer programs, each written using a different programming modality: one imperative, the other declarative. Both programs compute the same results over an extensive test battery, providing an essential crosscheck. Then the imperative program is used for the computationally intensive purpose of determining the effects on the model of every combination of ten different compounds, while the declarative program is used to analyze model behavior using temporal logic. Together these two model implementations offer new insights into the mechanisms by which Abeta dysregulates synaptic plasticity and suggest many drug combinations that potentially may reduce or prevent it.

  8. Folding and Unfolding of Light-Triggered beta-Hairpin Model Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, Tobias E.; Cordes, Thorben; Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Koller, Florian O.; Dong, Shou-Liang; Moroder, Luis; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and mid-infrared is used to study the reaction dynamics of two light-triggered model peptides containing an azobenzene derivative as a switching element. One model peptide, the AzoTrpZip2, forms a beta-hairpin structure in the cis form of the chromophore. This p

  9. Characterization of the fine specificity of peptide antibodies to HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J S; Atar, D; Karlsen, Alan E;

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to produce epitope specific antisera which could distinguish two closely associated HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles, we immunized 20 rabbits with synthetic peptides representing sequences from the first domain of the HLA-DQw8 and -DQw7 beta-chain molecules, differing only by one amino acid...... in position 57. Several of the antisera in immunoblotting specifically recognized either the HLA-DQw7 or the HLA-DQw8 beta-chain allele as previously reported. The fine specificity of the antisera was tested in ELISA using synthetic peptides of varying length as solid phase antigen. Two out of the 20 antisera...... specifically recognized DQw7 beta peptides and two antisera bound only to DQw8 beta peptides from the region containing the amino acid in position 57. To analyze whether the antisera bound to native HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules, FACS analysis was carried out. Seven of the 20 antisera bound to intact EBV...

  10. Distinct cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta peptide signatures in sporadic and PSEN1 A431E-associated familial Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Portelius, Erik; Andreasson, Ulf; Ringman, John M.; Buerger, Katharina; Daborg, Jonny; Buchhave, Peder; Hansson, Oskar; Harmsen, Andreas; Gustavsson, Mikael K; Hanse, Eric; Galasko, Douglas; Hampel, Harald; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with deposition of amyloid beta (A beta) in the brain, which is reflected by low concentration of the A beta 1-42 peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). There are at least 15 additional A beta peptides in human CSF and their relative abundance pattern is thought to reflect the production and degradation of A beta. Here, we test the hypothesis that AD is characterized by a specific CSF A beta isoform pattern that is distinct when comparing ...

  11. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, an...

  12. Ultrafast Unzipping of a Beta-Hairpin Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinth, W.; Schrader, T.E.; Schreier, W.J.; Koller, F.O.; Cordes, T.; Babitzki, G.; Denschlag, R.; Tavan, P.; Löweneck, M.; Dong, Shou-Liang; Moroder, L.; Renner, C.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Light induced switching of a beta-hairpin structure is investigated by femtosecond IR spectroscopy. While the unzipping process comprises ultrafast kinetics and is finished within 1 ns, the folding into the hairpin structure is a much slower process.

  13. Antimicrobial beta-peptides and alpha-peptoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, Troels; Nilsson, Line L.; Petersen, Pernille D.;

    2011-01-01

    The field of drug discovery and development has seen tremendous activity over the past decade to better tackle the increasing occurrence of drugresistant bacterial infections and to alleviate some of the pressure we put on the last-resort drugs on the market. One of the new and promising drug...... candidates is derived from naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. However, despite promising results in early-stage clinical trials, these molecules have faced some difficulties securing FDA approval, which can be linked to their poor metabolic stability. Hence, mimetics of these antimicrobial peptides...... have been suggested as new templates for antibacterial compound design, because these mimetics are resistant against degradation by proteases. This review will discuss the structural features of two different types of mimetics, b-peptides and a-peptoids, in relation to their antibacterial activity and...

  14. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the...

  15. 670 nm laser light and EGCG complementarily reduce amyloid-{beta} aggregates in human neuroblastoma cells: basis for treatment of Alzheimer's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, A.P.; Bieschke, J.; Friedrich, R.P.; Zhu, D.; Wanker, E. E.; Fecht, H.J.; Mereles, D; Hunstein, W

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to present the results of in vitro experiments with possible relevance in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Background Data: Despite intensive research efforts, there is no treatment for AD. One root cause of AD is the extra- and intracellular deposition of amyloid-beta (A{beta}) fibrils in the brain. Recently, it was shown that extracellular A{beta} can enter brain cells, resulting in neurotoxicity. Methods: After internalization of A{beta}...

  16. Insulin Promotes Survival of Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Neuroblastoma Damaged Cells via Caspase 9 Inhibition and Hsp70 Upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes are connected in a way that is still not completely understood, but insulin resistance has been implicated as a risk factor for developing AD. Here we show an evidence that insulin is capable of reducing cytotoxicity induced by Amyloid-beta peptides (A-beta in its oligomeric form in a dose-dependent manner. By TUNEL and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the recovery of the cell viability is obtained by inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic program, triggered by A-beta and involving caspase 9 and 3 activation. A protective role of insulin on mitochondrial damage is also shown by using Mito-red vital dye. Furthermore, A-beta activates the stress inducible Hsp70 protein in LAN5 cells and an overexpression is detectable after the addition of insulin, suggesting that this major induction is the necessary condition to activate a cell survival program. Together, these results may provide opportunities for the design of preventive and therapeutic strategies against AD.

  17. Familial Alzheimer's disease-linked presenilin 1 variants elevate Abeta1-42/1-40 ratio in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchelt, D R; Thinakaran, G; Eckman, C B; Lee, M K; Davenport, F; Ratovitsky, T; Prada, C M; Kim, G; Seekins, S; Yager, D; Slunt, H H; Wang, R; Seeger, M; Levey, A I; Gandy, S E; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Price, D L; Younkin, S G; Sisodia, S S

    1996-11-01

    Mutations in the presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 genes cosegregate with the majority of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) pedigrees. We now document that the Abeta1-42(43)/Abeta1-40 ratio in the conditioned media of independent N2a cell lines expressing three FAD-linked PS1 variants is uniformly elevated relative to cells expressing similar levels of wild-type PS1. Similarly, the Abeta1-42(43)/Abeta1-40 ratio is elevated in the brains of young transgenic animals coexpressing a chimeric amyloid precursor protein (APP) and an FAD-linked PS1 variant compared with brains of transgenic mice expressing APP alone or transgenic mice coexpressing wild-type human PS1 and APP. These studies provide compelling support for the view that one mechanism by which these mutant PS1 cause AD is by increasing the extracellular concentration of Abeta peptides terminating at 42(43), species that foster Abeta deposition. PMID:8938131

  18. Designing biomaterials exploiting beta-sheet forming peptides self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiani, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    The use of non-covalent self-assembly to construct materials has become a prominent strategy in material science offering practical routes for the construction of increasingly functional materials for a variety of applications ranging from electronic to biotechnology. A variety of molecular building blocks can be used for this purpose, one such block that has attracted considerable attention are de-novo designed peptides. The library of 20 natural amino acids offers the ability to play with the intrinsic properties of the peptide such as structure, hydrophobicity, charge and functionality allowing the design of materials with a wide range of properties. The beta-sheet motif is of particular interest as short peptides can be designed to form beta-sheet rich fibres that entangle and consequently form hydrogels. These hydrogels can be further functionalised using specific biological signals or drugs by synthesising functionalised peptides that are incorporated into the hydrogel network during the self-assembling process. This functionalisation approach is very attractive has it does not require any chemistry avoiding therefore the use of additional potentially toxic chemicals. It also offers the possibility to introduce multiple functionalities in a straightforward fashion. The hydrogels can also be made responsive through the use of enzymatic catalysis and/or conjugation with responsive polymers. In this presentation we will discuss the design opportunities offered by these peptides to create new functional biomaterials.

  19. Bioinspired peptide nanotubes: Deposition technology and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shklovsky, J.; Beker, P. [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Amdursky, N. [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Gazit, E. [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Rosenman, G., E-mail: gilr@eng.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, the School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2010-05-25

    Proteins and peptides have the intrinsic ability to self-assemble into elongated solid nanofibrils, which give rise to amyloid progressive neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's, Parkinson, etc.). It has been found that of the core recognition motif of A{beta} peptide is the diphenylalanine element. The diphenylalanine peptide can self-assemble into well-ordered peptide nanotubes (PNT). In this paper we report on our newly developed process-vapor deposition of PNT and 'bottom-up' nanotechnological techniques of PNT patterning. Study of several physical properties of PNT such as optical and electrochemical are presented. The results may lead to the development of a new generation of PNT-based bioinspired functional nanodevices.

  20. Microwave-assisted click polymerization for the synthesis of Abeta(16-22) cyclic oligomers and their self-assembly into polymorphous aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgersma, Ronald C; van Dijk, Maarten; Dechesne, Annemarie C; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2009-11-01

    We report on the design, synthesis, and structural analysis of cyclic oligomers with an amyloidogenic peptide sequence as the repeating unit to obtain novel self-assembling bionanomaterials. The peptide was derived from the Alzheimer Abeta(16-22) sequence since its strong tendency to form antiparallel beta-sheets ensured the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bridges on which the supramolecular assembly of the individual cyclic oligomers was based. The synthesis of the cyclic oligomers was performed via a microwave-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azido-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-Ala-Glu-propargyl amide as the monomer. The formation of cyclic oligomers, up to pentamers (35 amino acid residues), was verified by MALDI-TOF analysis and the individual cyclic monomer and dimer could be isolated by HPLC. Gelation behavior and the self-assembly of the linear monomer and the cyclic monomer and dimer were studied by TEM, FTIR and CD. Significant differences were observed in the morphology of the supramolecular aggregates of these three peptides that could be explained by alterations of the hydrogen bond network. PMID:19830304

  1. Huperzine A protects isolated rat brain mitochondria against beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Zheng, Chun Yan; Yang, Ling; Tang, Xi Can; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2009-06-01

    Our previous work in cells and animals showed that mitochondria are involved in the neuroprotective effect of huperzine A (HupA). In this study, the effects of HupA on isolated rat brain mitochondria were investigated. In addition to inhibiting the Abeta(25-35) (40 microM)-induced decrease in mitochondrial respiration, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, enzyme activity, and transmembrane potential, HupA (0.01 or 0.1 microM) effectively prevented Abeta-induced mitochondrial swelling, reactive oxygen species increase, and cytochrome c release. More interestingly, administration of HupA to isolated mitochondria promoted the rate of ATP production and blocked mitochondrial swelling caused by normal osmosis. These results indicate that HupA protects mitochondria against Abeta at least in part by preserving membrane integrity and improving energy metabolism. These direct effects on mitochondria further extend the noncholinergic functions of HupA. PMID:19272446

  2. Seeded growth of beta-amyloid fibrils from Alzheimer's brain-derived fibrils produces a distinct fibril structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravastu, Anant K; Qahwash, Isam; Leapman, Richard D; Meredith, Stephen C; Tycko, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Studies by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of amyloid fibrils prepared in vitro from synthetic 40-residue beta-amyloid (Abeta(1-40)) peptides have shown that the molecular structure of Abeta(1-40) fibrils is not uniquely determined by amino acid sequence. Instead, the fibril structure depends on the precise details of growth conditions. The molecular structures of beta-amyloid fibrils that develop in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are therefore uncertain. We demonstrate through thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy that fibrils extracted from brain tissue of deceased AD patients can be used to seed the growth of synthetic Abeta(1-40) fibrils, allowing preparation of fibrils with isotopic labeling and in sufficient quantities for solid-state NMR and other measurements. Because amyloid structures propagate themselves in seeded growth, as shown in previous studies, the molecular structures of brain-seeded synthetic Abeta(1-40) fibrils most likely reflect structures that are present in AD brain. Solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of fibril samples seeded with brain material from two AD patients were found to be nearly identical, indicating the same molecular structures. Spectra of an unseeded control sample indicate greater structural heterogeneity. (13)C chemical shifts and other NMR data indicate that the predominant molecular structure in brain-seeded fibrils differs from the structures of purely synthetic Abeta(1-40) fibrils that have been characterized in detail previously. These results demonstrate a new approach to detailed structural characterization of amyloid fibrils that develop in human tissue, and to investigations of possible correlations between fibril structure and the degree of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:19376973

  3. Sex-dependent actions of amyloid beta peptides on hippocampal choline carriers of postnatal rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Říčný, Jan; Kozmiková, I.; Řípová, D.; Zach, P.; Klaschka, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2006), s. 351-360. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/03/1547 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : amyloid beta peptide * high affinity choline transport * rat hippocampus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2006

  4. A humanin derivative reduces amyloid beta accumulation and ameliorates memory deficit in triple transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Niikura

    Full Text Available Humanin (HN, a 24-residue peptide, was identified as a novel neuroprotective factor and shows anti-cell death activity against a wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD-related cytotoxicities, including exposure to amyloid beta (Abeta, in vitro. We previously demonstrated that the injection of S14G-HN, a highly potent HN derivative, into brain ameliorated memory loss in an Abeta-injection mouse model. To fully understand HN's functions under AD-associated pathological conditions, we examined the effect of S14G-HN on triple transgenic mice harboring APP(swe, tau(P310L, and PS-1(M146V that show the age-dependent development of multiple pathologies relating to AD. After 3 months of intranasal treatment, behavioral analyses showed that S14G-HN ameliorated cognitive impairment in male mice. Moreover, ELISA and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Abeta levels in brains were markedly lower in S14G-HN-treated male and female mice than in vehicle control mice. We also found the expression level of neprilysin, an Abeta degrading enzyme, in the outer molecular layer of hippocampal formation was increased in S14G-HN-treated mouse brains. NEP activity was also elevated by S14G-HN treatment in vitro. These findings suggest that decreased Abeta level in these mice is at least partly attributed to S14G-HN-induced increase of neprilysin level. Although HN was identified as an anti-neuronal death factor, these results indicate that HN may also have a therapeutic effect on amyloid accumulation in AD.

  5. Cross-beta order and diversity in nanocrystals of an amyloid-forming peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; Long, Chris; Fontano, Eric; Balbirnie, Melinda; Grothe, Robert; Eisenberg, David; Caspar, Donald L D

    2003-07-25

    The seven-residue peptide GNNQQNY from the N-terminal region of the yeast prion protein Sup35, which forms amyloid fibers, colloidal aggregates and highly ordered nanocrystals, provides a model system for characterizing the elusively protean cross-beta conformation. Depending on preparative conditions, orthorhombic and monoclinic crystals with similar lath-shaped morphology have been obtained. Ultra high-resolution (frames, have been mapped in reciprocal space. However, reliable integrated intensities cannot be obtained from these series, and dynamical electron diffraction effects present problems in data analysis. The diversity of ordered structures formed under similar conditions has made it difficult to obtain reproducible X-ray diffraction data from powder specimens; and overlapping Bragg reflections in the powder patterns preclude separated structure factor measurements for these data. Model protofilaments, consisting of tightly paired, half-staggered beta strands related by a screw axis, can be fit in the crystal lattices, but model refinement will require accurate structure factor measurements. Nearly anhydrous packing of this hydrophilic peptide can account for the insolubility of the crystals, since the activation energy for rehydration may be extremely high. Water-excluding packing of paired cross-beta peptide segments in thin protofilaments may be characteristic of the wide variety of anomalously stable amyloid aggregates. PMID:12860136

  6. Characterization of the conformational space of a triple-stranded beta-sheet forming peptide with molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto, P; Colombo, G

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on a series of mutants of the 20 amino acid peptide Betanova in order to critically assess the ability of MD simulations to reproduce the folding and stability of small beta-sheet-forming peptides on currently accessible timescales. Simulations

  7. Use of synthetic peptides to locate novel integrin alpha2beta1-binding motifs in human collagen III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Nicolas; Hamaia, Samir W; Siljander, Pia R-M; Maddox, Ben; Peachey, Anthony R; Fernandez, Rafael; Foley, Loraine J; Slatter, David A; Jarvis, Gavin E; Farndale, Richard W

    2006-02-17

    A set of 57 synthetic peptides encompassing the entire triplehelical domain of human collagen III was used to locate binding sites for the collagen-binding integrin alpha(2)beta(1). The capacity of the peptides to support Mg(2+)-dependent binding of several integrin preparations was examined. Wild-type integrins (recombinant alpha(2) I-domain, alpha(2)beta(1) purified from platelet membranes, and recombinant soluble alpha(2)beta(1) expressed as an alpha(2)-Fos/beta(1)-Jun heterodimer) bound well to only three peptides, two containing GXX'GER motifs (GROGER and GMOGER, where O is hydroxyproline) and one containing two adjacent GXX'GEN motifs (GLKGEN and GLOGEN). Two mutant alpha(2) I-domains were tested: the inactive T221A mutant, which recognized no peptides, and the constitutively active E318W mutant, which bound a larger subset of peptides. Adhesion of activated human platelets to GER-containing peptides was greater than that of resting platelets, and HT1080 cells bound well to more of the peptides compared with platelets. Binding of cells and recombinant proteins was abolished by anti-alpha(2) monoclonal antibody 6F1 and by chelation of Mg(2+). We describe two novel high affinity integrin-binding motifs in human collagen III (GROGER and GLOGEN) and a third motif (GLKGEN) that displays intermediate activity. Each motif was verified using shorter synthetic peptides. PMID:16326707

  8. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  9. Abeta(1-42) injection causes memory impairment, lowered cortical and serum BDNF levels, and decreased hippocampal 5-HT(2A) levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, R; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation of the beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is believed to be causally involved in a neurodegenerative cascade. In patients with AD, reduced levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding has recent...

  10. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.; (Guelph)

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  11. Ginkgo biloba extract ameliorates oxidative phosphorylation performance and rescues abeta-induced failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Rhein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Energy deficiency and mitochondrial failure have been recognized as a prominent, early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, we demonstrated that chronic exposure to amyloid-beta (Abeta in human neuroblastoma cells over-expressing human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP resulted in (i activity changes of complexes III and IV of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS and in (ii a drop of ATP levels which may finally instigate loss of synapses and neuronal cell death in AD. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether standardized Ginkgo biloba extract LI 1370 (GBE is able to rescue Abeta-induced defects in energy metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a high-resolution respiratory protocol to evaluate OXPHOS respiratory capacity under physiological condition in control (stably transfected with the empty vector and APP cells after treatment with GBE. In addition, oxygen consumption of isolated mitochondria, activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels as well as mitochondrial membrane mass and mitochondrial DNA content were determined. We observed a general antioxidant effect of GBE leading to an increase of the coupling state of mitochondria as well as energy homeostasis and a reduction of ROS levels in control cells and in APP cells. GBE effect on OXPHOS was even preserved in mitochondria after isolation from treated cells. Moreover, these functional data were paralleled by an up-regulation of mitochondrial DNA. Improvement of the OXPHOS efficiency was stronger in APP cells than in control cells. In APP cells, the GBE-induced amelioration of oxygen consumption most likely arose from the modulation and respective normalization of the Abeta-induced disturbance in the activity of mitochondrial complexes III and IV restoring impaired ATP levels possibly through decreasing Abeta and oxidative stress level. CONCLUSIONS

  12. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  13. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues...... changes associated with molecular aging also have significant long-term consequences for Abeta folding and turnover. New fast, reproducible and accurate methods for the screening of protein aging markers in biological samples may contribute to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in AD....

  14. Chronic exposure of NG108-15 cells to amyloid beta peptide (A beta(1-42)) abolishes calcium influx via N-type calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašparová, Jana; Lisá, Věra; Tuček, Stanislav; Doležal, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, 8-9 (2001), s. 1079-1084. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : amyloid beta peptide * Alzheimer's disease * calcium Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  15. Studies on the interactions between glycosylated beta3-peptides and the lectin Vicia villosa by saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszowska, Marta; Norgren, Anna S; Arvidson, Per I; Sandström, Corine

    2009-12-14

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of the lectin Vicia villosa (VVLB(4)) with alpha-D-GalNAc glycosylated beta(3)-peptides. The data were compared to those obtained with the monosaccharides D-Gal, D-GalNAc, and D-Glc as well as with those obtained with the Tn antigen alpha-glycopeptide (D-GalNAc-alpha-O-Ser/Thr), molecule naturally recognized by V. villosa. Evidence that the lectin also recognizes glycosylated beta(3)-peptides and has close contact with both the sugar and amino acid moieties was obtained. PMID:19863951

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of gene fragments from corynebacteriophage beta encoding enzymatically active peptides of diphtheria toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Tweten, R K; Collier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Two restriction fragments from corynebacteriophage beta vir tox+ that encode peptides similar to diphtheria toxin fragment A and the chain termination fragment, CRM45, have been cloned into Escherichia coli in plasmid pBR322. Clones containing the recombinant plasmids produced gene products that were active in catalyzing the ADP ribosylation of elongation factor 2 and were reactive with diphtheria toxin antiserum. Toxin-related peptides were found primarily in the periplasmic compartment and ...

  17. Design and synthesis of basic peptides having amphipathic beta-structure and their interaction with phospholipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, S; Lee, S; Mihara, H; Aoyagi, H; Kato, T; Yamasaki, N

    1990-02-28

    Basic amphipathic beta-structural peptides, Ac-(Ser-Val-Lys-Val)n-NHCH3 (1n, n = 1-3) and Ac-(Lys-Val)n-NHCH3 (2n, n = 2-4), were synthesized and their interaction with DPPC and DPPC-DPPG (3:1) bilayers was studied by CD, dye-leakage and fluorescence experiments. The CD data indicated that oligopeptides consisting of more than eight residues with alternating hydrophobic (Val) and hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Lys) were able to form an amphipathic beta-structure in acidic phospholipid bilayers, but not or weakly in aqueous solution and in neutral phospholipid bilayers. The dye-leakage experiment showed that the basic amphipathic beta-structural peptides interact with acidic phospholipid bilayers to perturb them, but less effectively compared with basic amphipathic alpha-helical peptides. Fluorescent spectroscopic data suggest that hydrophobic side of the amphipathic peptides may immerse into membrane without deep penetration. Based on these results, we postulate that the formation of the basic amphipathic beta-structure on acidic lipid bilayers may be due to the combined effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between basic peptides and acidic lipid bilayers. PMID:2306456

  18. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  19. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  20. Protein kinase C betaII peptide inhibitor exerts cardioprotective effects in rat cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omiyi, Didi; Brue, Richard J; Taormina, Philip; Harvey, Margaret; Atkinson, Norrell; Young, Lindon H

    2005-08-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) in the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in a marked cardiac contractile dysfunction. A cell-permeable protein kinase C (PKC) betaII peptide inhibitor was used to test the hypothesis that PKC betaII inhibition could attenuate PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction by suppression of superoxide production from PMNs and increase NO release from vascular endothelium. The effects of the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor were examined in isolated ischemic (20 min) and reperfused (45 min) rat hearts with PMNs. The PKC betaII inhibitor (10 microM; n = 7) significantly attenuated PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction compared with I/R hearts (n = 9) receiving PMNs alone in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP (+dP/dt(max)) cardiac function indices (p < 0.01). The PKC betaII inhibitor at 10 microM significantly increased endothelial NO release from a basal value of 1.85 +/- 0.18 pmol NO/mg tissue to 3.49 +/- 0.62 pmol NO/mg tissue from rat aorta. It also significantly inhibited superoxide release (i.e., absorbance) from N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated rat PMNs from 0.13 +/- 0.01 to 0.02 +/- 0.004 (p < 0.01) at 10 microM. Histological analysis of the left ventricle of representative rat hearts from each group showed that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor-treated hearts experienced a marked reduction in PMN vascular adherence and infiltration into the postreperfused cardiac tissue compared with I/R + PMN hearts (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor attenuates PMN-induced post-I/R cardiac contractile dysfunction by increasing endothelial NO release and by inhibiting superoxide release from PMNs. PMID:15878997

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of {beta}-sheet formation in self-assembled peptide amphiphile fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, One-Sun; Liu Yamei; Schatz, George C., E-mail: schatz@chem.northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The influence of amino acid sequence on the secondary structure of peptide amphiphile (PAs) cylindrical micelles and fibers that are self-assembled in solution is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations for two choices of PAs were performed, starting with structures that have the correct overall shape, but which restructure considerably during the simulation, with one fiber being composed of valine rich PAs and the other of alanine rich PAs. Self-assembly is similar in both simulations, with stable fibers (diameter is 7.7-8 nm) obtained after 40 ns. We find that the valine rich PA fiber has a higher {beta}-sheet population than the alanine rich fiber, and that the number of hydrogen bonds is higher. This behavior of the valine rich fiber is consistent with experimental measurements of higher stiffness, and it shows that stiffness can be varied while still maintaining self-assembly.

  2. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T; Wang, W; Steffansen, B; Frokjaer, S; Borchardt, R T

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective perm...

  3. PET imaging of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin expression in tumours with Ga-68-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Yim, Cheng-Bin; Franssen, Gerben M.; Schuit, Robert C.; Luurtsema, Gert; Liu, Shuang; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the restricted expression of alpha(v)beta(3) in tumours, alpha(v)beta(3) is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the alpha(v)beta(3)-binding characteristics of Ga-68-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD peptides were determined and compared with their I

  4. C-peptide reverses TGF-beta1-induced changes in renal proximal tubular cells: implications for treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Al-Rasheed, Nawal; Al-Rasheed, Nouf; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-03-01

    The crucial pathology underlying progressive chronic kidney disease in diabetes is tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Central to this process is epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) of proximal tubular epithelial cells driven by maladaptive transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) signaling. Novel signaling roles for C-peptide have recently been discovered with evidence emerging that C-peptide may mitigate microvascular complications of diabetes. We studied the potential for C-peptide to interrupt injurious TGF-beta1 signaling pathways and thus block development of EMT in HK2 human kidney proximal tubular cells. Cells were incubated with TGF-beta1 either alone or with C-peptide in low or high glucose. Changes in cell morphology, TGF-beta1 receptor expression, vimentin, E-cadherin, and phosphorylated Smads were assessed. Luciferase reporters were used to assess Smad activity. The cytoskeleton was visualized by TRITC-phalloidin staining. The typical TGF-beta1-stimulated, EMT-associated morphological alterations of proximal tubular cells, including increased vimentin expression, decreased E-cadherin expression, and cytoskeletal rearrangements, were prevented by C-peptide treatment. C-peptide also blocked TGF-beta1-induced upregulation of expression of both type I and type II TGF-beta1 receptors and attenuated TGF-beta1-mediated Smad phosphorylation and Smad transcriptional activity. These effects of C-peptide were inhibited by pertussis toxin. The results demonstrate that C-peptide almost completely reversed the morphological changes in PT cells induced by TGF-beta1 and suggest a role or C-peptide as a renoprotective agent in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:19091788

  5. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (1-36) Enhances Beta Cell Regeneration and Increases Beta Cell Mass in a Mouse Model of Partial Pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozar, Anaïs; Lin, Hugo; Williams, Katoura; Chin, Connie; Li, Rosemary; Kondegowda, Nagesha Guthalu; Stewart, Andrew F.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi Chhaya

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Finding ways to stimulate the regeneration of endogenous pancreatic beta cells is an important goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), the full-length (1–139) and amino-terminal (1–36) peptides, enhance beta cell function, proliferation, and survival. Therefore, we hypothesize that PTHrP(1–36) has the potential to regenerate endogenous beta cells. Methods The partial pancreatectomy (PPx) mouse model of beta cell injury was used to test this hypothesis. Male Balb/c mice underwent either sham-operation or PPx, and were subsequently injected with PTHrP(1–36) (160μg/kg) or vehicle (veh), for 7, 30, or 90 days. The four groups of mice, sham-veh, sham-PTHrP, PPx-veh, and PPx-PTHrP were assessed for PTHrP and receptor expression, and glucose and beta cell homeostasis. Results PTHrP-receptor, but not the ligand, was significantly up-regulated in islets from mice that underwent PPx compared to sham-operated mice. This suggests that exogenous PTHrP could further enhance beta cell regeneration after PPx. PTHrP did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, or insulin sensitivity, in either sham or PPx mice. Glucose tolerance improved in the PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice only in the early stages of treatment. As hypothesized, there was a significant increase in beta cell proliferation in PPx-PTHrP mice at days 7 and 30; however, this was normalized by day 90, compared to PPx-veh mice. Enhanced beta cell proliferation translated to a marked increase in beta cell mass at day 90, in PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice. Conclusions PTHrP(1–36) significantly enhances beta cell regeneration through increased beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass after PPx. Future studies will determine the potential of PTHrP to enhance functional beta cell mass in the setting of diabetes. PMID:27391423

  6. Targeted correction of a thalassemia-associated beta-globin mutation induced by pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kuan, Jean Y;

    2009-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures...... that provoke DNA repair. However, the use of these molecules for gene targeting requires homopurine tracts to facilitate triple helix formation. Alternatively, to achieve binding to mixed-sequence target sites for the induced gene correction, we have used pseudo-complementary PNAs (pcPNAs). Due to...

  7. Proinsulin C-peptide antagonizes the profibrotic effects of TGF-beta1 via up-regulation of retinoic acid and HGF-related signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2010-04-01

    Novel signaling roles for C-peptide have recently been discovered with evidence that it can ameliorate complications of type 1 diabetes. Here we sought to identify new pathways regulated by C-peptide of relevance to the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Microarray analysis was performed to identify genes regulated by either C-peptide and/or TGF-beta1 in a human proximal tubular cell line, HK-2. Expression of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII), vimentin, E-cadherin, Snail, and beta-catenin was assessed by immunoblotting. The cellular localization of vimentin and beta-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry. Changes in cell morphology were assessed by phase contrast microscopy. Gene expression profiling demonstrated differential expression of 953 and 1458 genes after C-peptide exposure for 18 h or 48 h, respectively. From these, members of the antifibrotic retinoic acid (RA)- and HGF-signaling pathways were selected. Immunoblotting demonstrated that C-peptide increased RARbeta, CRABPII, and HGF. We confirmed a role for RA in reversal of TGF-beta1-induced changes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including expression changes in Snail, E-cadherin, vimetin, and redistribution of beta-catenin. Importantly, these TGF-beta1-induced changes were inhibited by C-peptide. Further, effects of TGF-beta1 on Snail and E-cadherin expression were blocked by HGF, and inhibitory effects of C-peptide were removed by blockade of HGF activity. This study identifies a novel role for HGF as an effector of C-peptide, possibly via an RA-signaling pathway, highlighting C-peptide as a potential therapy for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:20197308

  8. Plasma beta-amyloid as potential biomarker of Alzheimer disease: possibility of diagnostic tool for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), which is characterized by progressive cognitive and behavioral deficit, is the most common form of dementia. The incidence of AD is increasing at an alarming rate, and has become a major public health concern in many countries. It is well known that the onset of AD is preceded by a long preclinical period. It is thus critical to establish diagnostic biomarkers that can predict the risk of developing AD prior to clinical manifestation of dementia, for effective prevention and early intervention. With the emergence of potential promising approaches to treat AD targeting the beta-amyloid (Abeta) pathway, such as gamma-secretase inhibitors and vaccine therapy, there is an urgent need for such diagnostic markers. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Abeta and tau protein levels are candidate biomarkers for AD, the invasive sampling procedure with associated complications limits their use in routine clinical practice. Plasma Abeta has been suggested as an inexpensive and non-invasive biomarker for AD. Although most previous cross-sectional studies on plasma Abeta level in humans failed to show a significant difference between individuals with AD compared to healthy older adults, many strategies are under investigation to improve the diagnostic potential of plasma Abeta. One promising approach is to modify the plasma Abeta level using some potential modulators. It is possible that a difference in plasma Abeta level might be unmasked by evaluating the response to stimulation by a modulator. Anti-Abeta antibody and Abeta binding proteins have been reported to be such modulators of plasma Abeta. In addition, the glucometabolic or hormonal status appears to modulate the plasma Abeta level. Our recent study has shown the possibility that glucose loading could be a novel simple strategy to modulate the plasma Abeta level, making it better suited for early diagnosis. This review summarizes the utility and limitations of current biomarkers of AD and

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin-Cu(II) and Curcumin-Zn(II) Complexes on Amyloid-Beta Peptide Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Rona Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear complexes of Curcumin with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and, characterized and their effects on the fibrillization and aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide have been studied. FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations demonstrate that the complexes can inhibit the transition from less structured oligomers to β-sheet rich protofibrils which act as seeding factors for further fibrillization. The metal complexes also impart more improved inhibitor...

  10. Nonstereogenic alpha-aminoisobutyryl-glycyl dipeptidyl unit nucleates type I' beta-turn in linear peptides in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Larry R; Etienne, Marcus A; Porcelli, Fernando; Barany, George; Hammer, Robert P; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2007-01-01

    The use of alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids represents a valuable strategy to exercise conformational control in peptides. Incorporation of the nonstereogenic alpha-aminoisobutyryl-glycyl (Aib-Gly) dipeptidyl sequence into i+1 and i+2 positions of an acyclic peptide sequence, originally designed and investigated by Gellman and coworkers, [H-Arg-Tyr-Val-Glu-Val-Yyy-Xxx-Orn-Lys-Ile-Leu-Gln-NH2] nucleates a stable [2:4] left-handed type I' beta-turn in water. NMR spectra show that this newly designed beta-hairpin does not aggregate in water up to a concentration of approximately 1 mM, and that its backbone conformation is superimposable on corresponding hairpins containing the DPro-Gly (literature) and Aib-DAla (this work) sequences. The Aib-Gly turn-inducer sequence eliminates complications because of cis-trans isomerization of Zzz-Pro bonds, and constitutes an attractive alternative to the proteogenic Asn-Gly and nonproteogenic DPro-Gly motifs previously suggested as turn-inducer sequences. These design principles could be exploited to prepare water-soluble beta-hairpin peptides with robust structures and novel function. PMID:17427180

  11. Improved targeting of the alpha(v)beta (3) integrin by multimerisation of RGD peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Kruijtzer, J.A.; Liu, S.; Soede, A.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Liskamp, R.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The integrin alpha(v)beta(3) is expressed on sprouting endothelial cells and on various tumour cell types. Due to the restricted expression of alpha(v)beta(3) in tumours, alpha(v)beta(3) is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the alpha(v)beta(3) binding charac

  12. How can a beta-sheet peptide be both a potent antimicrobial and harmfully toxic? Molecular dynamics simulations of protegrin-1 in micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, Allison A; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the naturally occurring beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1) is studied by molecular dynamics simulation in all-atom sodium dodecylsulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles. These simulations provide a high-resolution picture of the interactions between the peptide...

  13. An X11alpha/FSBP complex represses transcription of the GSK3beta gene promoter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2010-08-04

    X11alpha is a neuronal adaptor protein that interacts with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through a centrally located phosphotyrosine binding domain to inhibit the production of Abeta peptide that is deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. X11alpha also contains two C-terminal postsynaptic density-95, large discs, zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains, and we show here that through its PDZ domains, X11alpha interacts with a novel transcription factor, fibrinogen silencer binding protein. Moreover, we show that an X11alpha\\/fibrinogen silencer binding protein complex signals to the nucleus to repress glycogen synthase kinase-3beta promoter activity. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta is a favoured candidate kinase for phosphorylating tau in Alzheimer\\'s disease. Our findings show a new function for X11alpha that may impact on Alzheimer\\'s disease pathogenesis.

  14. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y.; Lonkar, Pallavi S.; Krause, Diane S.; Seidman, Michael M.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Nielsen, Peter E.; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the hu...

  15. The tumor suppressor PP2A Abeta regulates the RalA GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablina, Anna A; Chen, Wen; Arroyo, Jason D; Corral, Laura; Hector, Melissa; Bulmer, Sara E; DeCaprio, James A; Hahn, William C

    2007-06-01

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric enzyme family that regulates numerous signaling pathways. Biallelic mutations of the structural PP2A Abeta subunit occur in several types of human tumors; however, the functional consequences of these cancer-associated PP2A Abeta mutations in cell transformation remain undefined. Here we show that suppression of PP2A Abeta expression permits immortalized human cells to achieve a tumorigenic state. Cancer-associated Abeta mutants fail to reverse tumorigenic phenotype induced by PP2A Abeta suppression, indicating that these mutants function as null alleles. Wild-type PP2A Abeta but not cancer-derived Abeta mutants form a complex with the small GTPase RalA. PP2A Abeta-containing complexes dephosphorylate RalA at Ser183 and Ser194, inactivating RalA and abolishing its transforming function. These observations identify PP2A Abeta as a tumor suppressor gene that transforms immortalized human cells by regulating the function of RalA. PMID:17540176

  16. Analysis of the complex between amyloid beta peptides and mitochondrial enzyme 17beta-HSD in cerebrospinal fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Bocková, Markéta; Vaisocherová, Hana; Bartoš, A.; Říčný, J.; Řípová, D.; Homola, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 275, podzim (2008), s. 249-249. ISSN 1742-464X. [EUROPTRODE /9./. Dublin, 30.03.2008-02.04.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * alzheimer disease * 17beta-HSD10 Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.139, year: 2008

  17. Beta-Sheet-Forming, Self-Assembled Peptide Nanomaterials towards Optical, Energy, and Healthcare Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Kim, Jae Hong; Lee, Joon Seok; Park, Chan Beum

    2015-08-12

    Peptide self-assembly is an attractive route for the synthesis of intricate organic nanostructures that possess remarkable structural variety and biocompatibility. Recent studies on peptide-based, self-assembled materials have expanded beyond the construction of high-order architectures; they are now reporting new functional materials that have application in the emerging fields such as artificial photosynthesis and rechargeable batteries. Nevertheless, there have been few reviews particularly concentrating on such versatile, emerging applications. Herein, recent advances in the synthesis of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials (e.g., cross β-sheet-based amyloid nanostructures, peptide amphiphiles) are selectively reviewed and their new applications in diverse, interdisciplinary fields are described, ranging from optics and energy storage/conversion to healthcare. The applications of peptide-based self-assembled materials in unconventional fields are also highlighted, such as photoluminescent peptide nanostructures, artificial photosynthetic peptide nanomaterials, and lithium-ion battery components. The relation of such functional materials to the rapidly progressing biomedical applications of peptide self-assembly, which include biosensors/chips and regenerative medicine, are discussed. The combination of strategies shown in these applications would further promote the discovery of novel, functional, small materials. PMID:25929870

  18. X11beta rescues memory and long-term potentiation deficits in Alzheimer's disease APPswe Tg2576 mice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2009-12-01

    Increased production and deposition of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) are believed to be key pathogenic events in Alzheimer\\'s disease. As such, routes for lowering cerebral Abeta levels represent potential therapeutic targets for Alzheimer\\'s disease. X11beta is a neuronal adaptor protein that binds to the intracellular domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of X11beta inhibits Abeta production in a number of experimental systems. However, whether these changes to APP processing and Abeta production induced by X11beta overexpression also induce beneficial effects to memory and synaptic plasticity are not known. We report here that X11beta-mediated reduction in cerebral Abeta is associated with normalization of both cognition and in vivo long-term potentiation in aged APPswe Tg2576 transgenic mice that model the amyloid pathology of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Overexpression of X11beta itself has no detectable adverse effects upon mouse behaviour. These findings support the notion that modulation of X11beta function represents a therapeutic target for Abeta-mediated neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  19. Neuroprotective peptides as drug candidates against Alzheimer's diasease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patočka, J.; Slaninová, Jiřina; Kunešová, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2005), 67-73. ISSN 1214-021X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/03/1100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Alzheimers's disease * neuroprotective peptide * Abeta peptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. Hierarchical structures based on self-assembling beta-hairpin peptides and their application as biomaterials and hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbas, Aysegul

    Self-assembly represents a robust and powerful paradigm for the bottom-up construction of nanostructures. Self-assembled peptide hydrogels are emerging as promising routes to novel multifunctional materials. The 20 amino acid MAX1and MAX8 peptides self-assemble into a three dimensional network of entangled, branched fibrils rich in beta-sheet secondary structure with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. These hydrogels form self-supporting structures that shear thin upon application of shear and then immediately recover to a solid hydrogel upon cessation of shear which facilitates the local delivery of the hydrogel into a site in vivo. Templated condensation of silica precursors on self-assembled nanoscale peptide fibrils with various surface functionalities can be used to mimic biosilicification. This template-defined approach towards biomineralization was utilized for the controlled fabrication of 3D hybrid nanostructures. We report a study on the structure-property relationship of self-assembled peptide hydrogels where mineralization of individual fibrils through sol-gel chemistry was achieved. The nanostructure and consequent mechanical characteristics of these hybrid networks can be modulated by changing the stoichiometric parameters of the sol-gel process. Construction of such organic-inorganic hybrid networks by sol-gel processing of self-assembled peptide hydrogels has improved mechanical properties and resulted in materials with ˜ 3 orders of magnitude higher stiffness. The physical characterization of the hybrid networks via electron microscopy and small angle scattering is detailed and correlated with changes in the network mechanical behavior. The resultant high fidelity templating process suggests that the peptide substrate can be used to template the coating of other functional inorganic materials. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels encapsulating an anti-tumorigenic drug, curcumin, have been prepared and demonstrated to be

  1. Beta amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau deposits in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy, J.; Miller, L.; Qing, H.; Radenovic, A.; Kis, A.; Vileno, B.; Laszlo, F.; Martins, R.N.; Waeber, G.; Mooser, V.; Bosman, F.; Khalili, K.; Darbinian, N.; McGeer, P.L.

    2008-08-25

    Strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes. To determine if amyloid beta (A{beta}) and hyperphosphorylated tau occurs in type 2 diabetes, pancreas tissues from 21 autopsy cases (10 type 2 diabetes and 11 controls) were analyzed. APP and tau mRNAs were identified in human pancreas and in cultured insulinoma beta cells (INS-1) by RT-PCR. Prominent APP and tau bands were detected by Western blotting in pancreatic extracts. Aggregated A{beta}, hyperphosphorylated tau, ubiquitin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein(a), IB1/JIP-1 and JNK1 were detected in Langerhans islets in type 2 diabetic patients. A{beta} was co-localized with amylin in islet amyloid deposits. In situ beta sheet formation of islet amyloid deposits was shown by infrared microspectroscopy (SIRMS). LPS increased APP in non-neuronal cells as well. We conclude that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau are also associated with type 2 diabetes, highlighting common pathogenetic features in neurodegenerative disorders, including AD and type 2 diabetes and suggesting that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau may also occur in other organs than the brain.

  2. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  3. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  4. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Triggers Protective Pathways in Pancreatic Beta-Cells Exposed to Glycated Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Puddu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs might play a pathophysiological role in the development of diabetes and its complications. AGEs negatively affect pancreatic beta-cell function and the expression of transcriptional factors regulating insulin gene. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis, might counteract the harmful effects of AGEs on the beta cells in culture. The aim of this study was to identify the intracellular mechanisms underlying GLP-1-mediated protection from AGE-induced detrimental activities in pancreatic beta cells. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days with glycated serum (GS, consisting in a pool of AGEs, in the presence or absence of 10 nmol/L GLP-1. After evaluation of oxidative stress, we determined the expression and subcellular localization of proteins involved in maintaining redox balance and insulin gene expression, such as nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (Nrf2, glutathione reductase, PDX-1, and MafA. Then, we investigated proinsulin production. The results showed that GS increased oxidative stress, reduced protein expression of all investigated factors through proteasome activation, and decreased proinsulin content. Furthermore, GS reduced ability of PDX-1 and MafA to bind DNA. Coincubation with GLP-1 reversed these GS-mediated detrimental effects. In conclusion, GLP-1, protecting cells against oxidants, triggers protective intercellular pathways in HIT-T15 cells exposed to GS.

  5. Control of Alzheimer's amyloid beta toxicity by the high molecular weight immunophilin FKBP52 and copper homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Sanokawa-Akakura

    Full Text Available FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs, also called immunophilins, are prolyl-isomerases (PPIases that participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including hormone signaling and protein folding. Recent studies indicate that proteins that contain PPIase activity can also alter the processing of Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP. Originally identified in hematopoietic cells, FKBP52 is much more abundantly expressed in neurons, including the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and basal ganglia. Given the fact that the high molecular weight immunophilin FKBP52 is highly expressed in CNS regions susceptible to Alzheimer's, we investigated its role in Abeta toxicity. Towards this goal, we generated Abeta transgenic Drosophila that harbor gain of function or loss of function mutations of FKBP52. FKBP52 overexpression reduced the toxicity of Abeta and increased lifespan in Abeta flies, whereas loss of function of FKBP52 exacerbated these Abeta phenotypes. Interestingly, the Abeta pathology was enhanced by mutations in the copper transporters Atox1, which interacts with FKBP52, and Ctr1A and was suppressed in FKBP52 mutant flies raised on a copper chelator diet. Using mammalian cultures, we show that FKBP52 (-/- cells have increased intracellular copper and higher levels of Abeta. This effect is reversed by reconstitution of FKBP52. Finally, we also found that FKBP52 formed stable complexes with APP through its FK506 interacting domain. Taken together, these studies identify a novel role for FKBP52 in modulating toxicity of Abeta peptides.

  6. Immature transformed rat islet beta-cells differentially express C-peptides derived from the genes coding for insulin I and II as well as a transfected human insulin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Petersen, J S; Andersen, L C;

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing unique sequences in rat proinsulin C-peptide I and II were used to generate highly specific antisera, which, when applied on sections of normal rat pancreas, confirm a homogeneous coexpression of the two C-peptides in all islet beta-cells. Insulin gene expression is...... insulin-producing cells showed highly differential expression at the cellular level of the three proinsulin C-peptide immunoreactivities, as follows: C-peptide I greater than human C-peptide greater than C-peptide II. The fractions of cells expressing human C-peptide and C-peptide II decreased in time and...... species of proinsulin-C-peptide immunoreactivity but still at high levels. However, rat C-peptide II and human C-peptide were often colocalized, even in later passages. In situ hybridization studies combined with the immunocytochemical data suggest that the differential expression occurs at the level of...

  7. Is abeta a sufficient biomarker for monitoring anti-abeta clinical studies? A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Katharina Zimmermann Schindowski

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) appeared to be a promising target for disease-modifying therapeutic strategies like passive immunotherapy with anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biochemical markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) include alterations of Aβ that allow the diagnosis of AD. Biomarker strategies, such as the levels of Aβ in CSF and plasma, currently play an important role in early clinical trials for AD. Indeed, these strategies have a relevant impact on the outcome ...

  8. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals

  9. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  10. Novel pharmaceutical composition of bradykinin potentiating penta peptide with beta-cyclodextrin: physical-chemical characterization and anti-hypertensive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Angelo M L; Ianzer, Danielle; Alcântara, Antônio Flávio de C; Santoro, Marcelo M; Santos, Cynthia F F; Lula, Ivana Silva; de Camargo, Antônio C M; Faljoni-Alario, Adelaide; dos Santos, Robson A S; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2007-05-01

    This work describes chemical properties and anti-hypertensive activity of an oral pharmaceutical formulation obtained from the complexation of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with bradykinin potentiating penta peptide (BPP-5a) founded in the Bothrops jararaca poison. Physical chemistry characterizations were recorded in order to investigate the intermolecular interactions between species in complex. Circular dichroism data indicated conformational changes of BPP-5a upon complexation with beta-CD. ROESY and theoretical calculations showed a selective approximation of triptophan moiety into cavity of beta-CD. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicated an exothermic formation of the complex, which is accomplished by reduction of entropy. The anti-hypertensive activity of the BPP-5a/beta-CD complex has been evaluated in spontaneous hypertensive rats, showing better results than pure BPP-5a. PMID:17196774

  11. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S;

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian...... DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent...... cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor...

  12. The effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the beta cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina

    2009-01-01

    type 2 diabetes, as assessed by homoeostasis model assessment-B analysis and proinsulin : insulin ratio. Additionally, liraglutide and exenatide are able to enhance first- and second-phase insulin secretion and are able to restore beta-cell sensitivity to glucose. Preclinical studies have shown that...

  13. Peptide YY antagonizes beta-adrenergic-stimulated release of insulin in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are peptides of 36 amino acids that share structural homologies with pancreatic polypeptide (PP). PP is predominantly found in the endocrine pancreas. PYY is primarily found in mucosal endocrine cells of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum, whereas NPY is found in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Previous studies indicate that these peptides can interact with the autonomic nervous system. The objective of the present experiments was to study the effect of PYY on neurally stimulated insulin release in conscious dogs. Intravenous administration of PYY (100, 200, and 400 pmol·kg-1 ·h-1) reduced 2-DG-stimulated insulin release in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05) without affecting plasma glucose levels. Administration of NPY, but not PP, reduced 2-DG-stimulated release of insulin. The inhibitory action of PYY on 2-DG-stimulated insulin release persisted in the presence of atropine or phentolamine treatment; however, hexamethonium alone or phentolamine plus propranolol treatment blocked the inhibitory action of PYY. Release of insulin stimulated by the β-agonist isoproterenol was also inhibited by PYY. These results indicate that PYY can inhibit autonomic neurotransmission by a mechanism that may involve ganglionic or postganglionic inhibition of β-adrenergic stimulation. The findings suggest a role for PYY and NPY in the autonomic regulation of insulin release

  14. Is Abeta a sufficient Biomarker for monitoring anti-Abeta clinical studies? A critical review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Zimmermann Schindowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD appeared to be a promising target for disease-modifying therapeutic strategies like passive immunotherapy with anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Biochemical markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF include alterations of Aβ that allow the diagnosis of AD. Biomarker strategies, such as the levels of Aβ in CSF and plasma, currently play an important role in early clinical trials for AD. Indeed, these strategies have a relevant impact on the outcome of such studies, since the biomarkers are used to monitor the bioactivity of anti-Aβ mAbs. The clinical trials of Solanezumab were mainly based on the readout of Aβ levels in CSF and plasma, whereas those of Bapineuzumab were based on cognition; however, little is known about the mechanisms altering these biomarker levels, and no biomarker has yet been proven to be a successful predictor for AD therapy. In addition, the Aβ biomarkers allow for the determination of free and bound anti-Aβ mAb in order to monitor the available amount of bioactive drug and could give hints to the mechanism of action. In this review, we discuss clinical Aβ biomarker data and the latest regulatory strategies.

  15. Is abeta a sufficient biomarker for monitoring anti-abeta clinical studies? A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreth, Jens; Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Schindowski, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) appeared to be a promising target for disease-modifying therapeutic strategies like passive immunotherapy with anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biochemical markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) include alterations of Aβ that allow the diagnosis of AD. Biomarker strategies, such as the levels of Aβ in CSF and plasma, currently play an important role in early clinical trials for AD. Indeed, these strategies have a relevant impact on the outcome of such studies, since the biomarkers are used to monitor the bioactivity of anti-Aβ mAbs. The clinical trials of Solanezumab were mainly based on the readout of Aβ levels in CSF and plasma, whereas those of Bapineuzumab were based on cognition; however, little is known about the mechanisms altering these biomarker levels, and no biomarker has yet been proven to be a successful predictor for AD therapy. In addition, the Aβ biomarkers allow for the determination of free and bound anti-Aβ mAb in order to monitor the available amount of bioactive drug and could give hints to the mechanism of action. In this review, we discuss clinical Aβ biomarker data and the latest regulatory strategies. PMID:23847530

  16. Study of the BPP7a peptide and its {beta}-cyclodextrin complex: physicochemical characterization and complete sequence specific NMR assignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lula, Ivana; Sousa, Frederico B. de; Denadai, Angelo M.L.; Sinisterra, Ruben D.; Ianzer, Danielle; Santos, Robson A.S., E-mail: sinisterra@ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas and Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofisica, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, (Brazil); Camargo, Antonio C.M. de [Center for Applied Toxinology (CAT-CEPID), Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    The BPP7a heptapeptide, p-Glu1Asp2Gly3Pro4Ile5Pro6Pro7, forms an association complex with {beta}-cyclodextrin in a 1:1 molar ratio. The peptide and its complex were characterized by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), which showed a very weak interaction between the {beta}-cyclodextrin and the peptide. Assignments of all hydrogen resonances of the peptide alone and as a complex were made using {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at 400 and 600 MHz. High resolution diffusion ordered spectroscopy (HR-DOSY) experiments were carried out to establish the self-aggregation state of BPP7a. It was also shown that the {beta}-cyclodextrin breaks the molecular clusters leading to complex formation. In addition, the anti-hypertensive activity of the BPP7a/{beta}-cyclodextrin complex was evaluated in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), showing increased activity compared to that of pure BPP7a. (author)

  17. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Molecular simulations of beta-amyloid protein near hydrated lipids (PECASE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Han, Kunwoo (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Ford, David M. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2005-12-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta-amyloid (A{beta}) protein and A{beta} fragment(31-42) in bulk water and near hydrated lipids to study the mechanism of neurotoxicity associated with the aggregation of the protein. We constructed full atomistic models using Cerius2 and ran simulations using LAMMPS. MD simulations with different conformations and positions of the protein fragment were performed. Thermodynamic properties were compared with previous literature and the results were analyzed. Longer simulations and data analyses based on the free energy profiles along the distance between the protein and the interface are ongoing.

  19. Defective lysosomal proteolysis and axonal transport are early pathogenic events that worsen with age leading to increased APP metabolism and synaptic Abeta in transgenic APP/PS1 hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axonal pathology might constitute one of the earliest manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Axonal dystrophies were observed in Alzheimer’s patients and transgenic models at early ages. These axonal dystrophies could reflect the disruption of axonal transport and the accumulation of multiple vesicles at local points. It has been also proposed that dystrophies might interfere with normal intracellular proteolysis. In this work, we have investigated the progression of the hippocampal pathology and the possible implication in Abeta production in young (6 months and aged (18 months PS1(M146L/APP(751sl transgenic mice. Results Our data demonstrated the existence of a progressive, age-dependent, formation of axonal dystrophies, mainly located in contact with congophilic Abeta deposition, which exhibited tau and neurofilament hyperphosphorylation. This progressive pathology was paralleled with decreased expression of the motor proteins kinesin and dynein. Furthermore, we also observed an early decrease in the activity of cathepsins B and D, progressing to a deep inhibition of these lysosomal proteases at late ages. This lysosomal impairment could be responsible for the accumulation of LC3-II and ubiquitinated proteins within axonal dystrophies. We have also investigated the repercussion of these deficiencies on the APP metabolism. Our data demonstrated the existence of an increase in the amyloidogenic pathway, which was reflected by the accumulation of hAPPfl, C99 fragment, intracellular Abeta in parallel with an increase in BACE and gamma-secretase activities. In vitro experiments, using APPswe transfected N2a cells, demonstrated that any imbalance on the proteolytic systems reproduced the in vivo alterations in APP metabolism. Finally, our data also demonstrated that Abeta peptides were preferentially accumulated in isolated synaptosomes. Conclusion A progressive age-dependent cytoskeletal pathology along with a reduction of

  20. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Department of Biochemistry, Albany Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  1. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium

  2. Binding of peptides to HLA-DQ molecules: peptide binding properties of the disease-associated HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Buus, S; Vartdal, F;

    1994-01-01

    assay. The MB 65 kDa 243-255Y peptide bound to DQ2 in a strictly pH-dependent fashion, with optimal binding around pH 5 and only weak binding at pH 7.4. The association of the MB 65 kDa 243-255Y peptide to DQ2 was slow, but once formed, the peptide-HLA complexes were very stable. The binding of peptides...

  3. Probing the Orientation and Conformation of alpha-Helix and beta-Strand Model Peptides on Self-Assembled Monolayers Using Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, T.; Apte, J; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure and orientation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand model peptide films on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been studied with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer, and the {beta}-strand is a 15-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with hydrophobic periodicities of 3.5 and 2, respectively. These periodicities result in the leucine side chains located on one side of the peptides and the lysine side chains on the other side. The SAMs were prepared from the assembly of either carboxylic acid- or methyl-terminated alkyl thiols onto gold surfaces. For SFG studies, the deuterated analog of the methyl SAM was used. SFG vibrational spectra in the C-H region of air-dried peptides films on both SAMs exhibit strong peaks near 2965, 2940, and 2875 cm{sup -1} related to ordered leucine side chains. The orientation of the leucine side chains was determined from the phase of these features relative to the nonresonant gold background. The relative phase for both the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand peptides showed that the leucine side chains were oriented away from the carboxylic acid SAM surface and oriented toward the methyl SAM surface. Amide I peaks observed near 1656 cm{sup -1} for the {alpha}-helix peptide confirm that the secondary structure is preserved on both SAMs. Strong linear dichroism related to the amide {pi}* orbital at 400.8 eV was observed in the nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra for the adsorbed {beta}-strand peptides, suggesting that the peptide backbones are oriented parallel to the SAM surface with the side chains pointing toward or away from the interface. For the {alpha}-helix the dichroism of the amide {pi}* is significantly weaker, probably because of the broad distribution of amide bond orientations in the {alpha}-helix secondary structure.

  4. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga; Fastbom, J; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2004-01-01

    (beta-sAPP) in brain tissue sections from the frontal, temporal and occipital lobe. Strong granular beta-sAPP staining was found throughout the gray matter of all three areas, while white matter staining was considerably weaker. beta-sAPP was found to be localized in astrocytes and in axons. We found...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques and......beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...

  5. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  6. Characteristics of Amyloid-Related Oligomers Revealed by Crystal Structures of Macrocyclic [beta]-Sheet Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Nowick, James S.; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2011-09-20

    Protein amyloid oligomers have been strongly linked to amyloid diseases and can be intermediates to amyloid fibers. {beta}-Sheets have been identified in amyloid oligomers. However, because of their transient and highly polymorphic properties, the details of their self-association remain elusive. Here we explore oligomer structure using a model system: macrocyclic peptides. Key amyloidogenic sequences from A{beta} and tau were incorporated into macrocycles, thereby restraining them to {beta}-strands, but limiting the growth of the oligomers so they may crystallize and cannot fibrillate. We determined the atomic structures for four such oligomers, and all four reveal tetrameric interfaces in which {beta}-sheet dimers pair together by highly complementary, dry interfaces, analogous to steric zippers found in fibers, suggesting a common structure for amyloid oligomers and fibers. In amyloid fibers, the axes of the paired sheets are either parallel or antiparallel, whereas the oligomeric interfaces display a variety of sheet-to-sheet pairing angles, offering a structural explanation for the heterogeneity of amyloid oligomers.

  7. PET imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumours with {sup 68}Ga-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Franssen, Gerben M.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Yim, Cheng-Bin [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schuit, Robert C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Luurtsema, Gert [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Liu, Shuang [Purdue University, School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Due to the restricted expression of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} in tumours, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-binding characteristics of {sup 68}Ga-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD peptides were determined and compared with their {sup 111}In-labelled counterparts. A monomeric (E-c(RGDfK)), a dimeric (E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}) and a tetrameric (E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2}) RGD peptide were synthesised, conjugated with DOTA and radiolabelled with {sup 68}Ga. In vitro {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-binding characteristics were determined in a competitive binding assay. In vivo {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeting characteristics of the compounds were assessed in mice with subcutaneously growing SK-RC-52 xenografts. In addition, microPET images were acquired using a microPET/CT scanner. The IC{sub 50} values for the Ga(III)-labelled DOTA-E-c(RGDfK), DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} and DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2} were 23.9 {+-} 1.22, 8.99 {+-} 1.20 and 1.74 {+-} 1.18 nM, respectively, and were similar to those of the In(III)-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides (26.6 {+-} 1.15, 3.34 {+-} 1.16 and 1.80 {+-} 1.37 nM, respectively). At 2 h post-injection, tumour uptake of the {sup 68}Ga-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides (3.30 {+-} 0.30, 5.24 {+-} 0.27 and 7.11 {+-} 0.67%ID/g, respectively) was comparable to that of their {sup 111}In-labelled counterparts (2.70 {+-} 0.29, 5.61 {+-} 0.85 and 7.32 {+-} 2.45%ID/g, respectively). PET scans were in line with the biodistribution data. On all PET scans, the tumour could be clearly visualised. The integrin affinity and the tumour uptake followed the order of DOTA-tetramer > DOTA-dimer > DOTA-monomer. The {sup 68}Ga-labelled tetrameric RGD peptide has excellent characteristics for imaging of {alpha}{sub v} {beta}{sub 3} expression with PET. (orig.)

  8. Metabolic changes may precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of amyloid beta peptide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders; Crowther, Damian C

    2016-05-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibire(TS) flies that exhibit a temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotype as a reporter of proteostatic robustness. In this model, we found that increasing age but not Aβ expression lowered the flies' permissive temperature, suggesting that Aβ did not exert its lethal effects by proteostatic disruption. Instead, we observed that chemical challenges, in particular oxidative stressors, discriminated clearly between young (robust) and old (sensitive) flies. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis, we compared water-soluble metabolite profiles at various ages in flies expressing Aβ in their brains. We observed 2 genotype-linked metabolomic signals, the first reported the presence of any Aβ isoform and the second the effects of the lethal Arctic Aβ. Lethality was specifically associated with signs of oxidative respiration dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:27103517

  9. Tight beta-turns in peptides. DFT-based study of infrared absorption and vibrational circular dichroism for various conformers including solvent effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kim, J.; Kapitán, Josef; Lakhani, A.; Bouř, Petr; Keiderling, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 119, 1/3 (2008), s. 81-97. ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0420 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE03-16014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : peptide beta-turn * density functional theory * infrared absorption * vibrational circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.370, year: 2008

  10. Einfluß einer In-vitro- und In-vivo-Cholesterol-Modulation in Hirnmembranen auf die zellulären Effekte von Amyloid-beta-Peptid

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Die exzessive Bildung und Ablagerung von aggregiertem Amyloid beta-Peptid im Gehirn von Alzheimer Patienten wird allgemein als zentrales Ereignis im Rahmen des Neurodegenerationsprozesses der Alzheimer Demenz betrachtet. Der Amyloid-Stoffwechsel ist dabei in sehr vielfältiger Weise mit dem zellulären Cholesterol-Stoffwechsel verknüpft. Hohe Cholesterolspiegel in spezifischen Membrandomänen wie Lipid-Rafts forcieren sehr wahrscheinlich die zelluläre Produktion als auch die Fibrillogenese von A...

  11. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-Haagen, Bo; Biehl, Ralf; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Radulescu, Aurel; Richter, Dieter; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ) monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP) by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS). We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1–40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1–42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1–40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1–42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules. PMID:26919121

  12. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  13. Brain alterations and clinical symptoms of dementia in diabetes: Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes affects cognitive function and increases the incidence of dementia. However, the mechanisms by which diabetes modifies cognitive function still remains unclear. Morphologically, diabetes is associated with neuronal loss in the frontal and temporal lobes including the hippocampus, and aberrant functional connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and medial frontal/temporal gyrus. Clinically, diabetic patients show decreased executive function, information processing, planning, visuospatial construction, and visual memory. Therefore, in comparison with the characteristics of AD brain structure and cognition, diabetes seems to affect cognitive function through not only simple AD pathological feature-dependent mechanisms, but also independent mechanisms. As an Abeta/tau-independent mechanism, diabetes compromises cerebrovascular function, increases subcortical infarction and might alter the blood brain barrier (BBB. Diabetes also affects glucose metabolism, insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in the brain. Diabetes also modifies metabolism of Abeta and tau and causes Abeta/tau-dependent pathological changes. Moreover, there is evidence that suggests an interaction between Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms. Therefore, diabetes modifies cognitive function through Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms. Interaction between these two mechanisms forms a vicious cycle.

  14. Membrane-bound structure and alignment of the antimicrobial {beta}-sheet peptide gramicidin S derived from angular and distance constraints by solid state 19F-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Jesus; Grage, Stephan L. [University of Jena, Department of Molecular Biology (Germany); Kondejewski, Leslie H. [University of Alberta, Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada); Hodges, Robert S.; McElhaney, Ronald N. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada); Ulrich, Anne S. [University of Jena, Department of Molecular Biology (Germany)

    2001-11-15

    The antimicrobial properties of the cyclic {beta}-sheet peptide gramicidin S are attributed to its destabilizing effect on lipid membranes. Here we present the membrane-bound structure and alignment of a derivative of this peptide, based on angular and distance constraints. Solid-state {sup 19}F-NMR was used to study a {sup 19}F-labelled gramicidin S analogue in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers at a lipid:peptide ratio of 80:1 and above. Two equivalent leucine side chains were replaced by the non-natural amino acid 4F-phenylglycine, which serves as a highly sensitive reporter on the structure and dynamics of the peptide backbone. Using a modified CPMG multipulse sequence, the distance between the two {sup 19}F-labels was measured from their homonuclear dipolar coupling as 6 A, in good agreement with the known backbone structure of natural gramicidin S in solution. By analyzing the anisotropic chemical shift of the {sup 19}F-labels in macroscopically oriented membrane samples, we determined the alignment of the peptide in the bilayer and described its temperature-dependent mobility. In the gel phase, the {sup 19}F-labelled gramicidin S is aligned symmetrically with respect to the membrane normal, i.e., with its cyclic {beta}-sheet backbone lying flat in the plane of the bilayer, which is fully consistent with its amphiphilic character. Upon raising the temperature to the liquid crystalline state, a considerable narrowing of the {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shift dispersion is observed, which is attributed the onset of global rotation of the peptide and further wobbling motions. This study demonstrates the potential of the {sup 19}F nucleus to describe suitably labelled polypeptides in membranes, requiring only little material and short NMR acquisition times.

  15. Preparation of antioxidant enzymatic hydrolysates from alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin. Identification of active peptides by HPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; Dávalos, Alberto; Bartolomé, Begoña; Amigo, Lourdes

    2005-02-01

    We have investigated the antioxidant activity of hydrolysates from whey proteins bovine alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin A (beta-Lg A) by commercial proteases (pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, thermolysin, and Corolase PP). Corolase PP was the most appropriate enzyme to obtain antioxidant hydrolysates from alpha-La and beta-Lg A (ORAC-FL values of 2.315 and 2.151 micromol of Trolox equivalent/mg of protein, respectively). A total of 42 peptide fragments were identified by HPLC-MS/MS in the beta-Lg A hydrolysate by Corolase PP. One of the sequences (Trp-Tyr-Ser-Leu-Ala-Met-Ala-Ala-Ser-Asp-Ile) possessed radical scavenging (ORAC-FL value of 2.621 micromol of Trolox equivalent/micromol of peptide) higher than that of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). Our results suggest that whey protein hydrolysates could be suitable as natural ingredients in enhancing antioxidant properties of functional foods and in preventing oxidation reaction in food processing. PMID:15686406

  16. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known. METHODOLOGY: Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2

  17. Development and characterization of beta-secretase monolithic micro-immobilized enzyme reactor for on-line high-performance liquid chromatography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Francesca; Naldi, Marina; Cavrini, Vanni; Andrisano, Vincenza

    2007-12-21

    beta-Site APP cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE-1) is a transmembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP), which is abundant in neurons. BACE-1 is required for the generation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is widely believed that halting the production of Abeta peptide, by inhibition of BACE-1, is an attractive therapeutic modality for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. BACE-1 has never been immobilized before. In the present study, for the first time, human recombinant beta-secretase micro-immobilised enzyme reactor (hrBACE-1-micro-IMER) was prepared by using an in situ immobilisation procedure on an ethylendiamine monolithic convective interaction media (EDA-CIM) disk. The activity and kinetic parameters of the hrBACE-1-micro-IMER were investigated by insertion in a HPLC system with fluorescent and mass detection. The micro-IMER was characterized in terms of units of immobilised hrBACE-1 and best mobile phase conditions for activity, by using as substrate casein-FITC and JMV2236, a peptide mimicking the Swedish-mutated APP (amyloid precursor protein) sequence. The characterization of the hrBACE-1-micro-IMER in terms of number of enzymatic active units after covalent linking to the solid matrix was performed by using the JMV2236 peptide as substrate in a HPLC-MS system. JMV2236 was injected into the hrBACE-1-micro-IMER and enzymatically cleaved; the product of the enzymatic cleavage and the remaining non-cleaved substrate were collected on a C18 column trap and switched to the LC-electrospray ionization MS system for kinetic constants determination. Inhibition studies were carried out. The effect of donepezil and pepstatin A, as BACE-1 inhibitors, was evaluated by simultaneous injection of the compounds with the peptidic substrate. The relative IC(50) values were found in agreement with that derived by the conventional fluorescence method, confirming the applicability of

  18. Mapping binding sites for the PDE4D5 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase to the N- and C-domains of {beta}-arrestin using spot-immobilized peptide arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Baillie, G. S.; Adams, D. R.; Bhari, N.; Houslay, T.M.; Vadrevu, S.; Meng, D.; Li, X.; Dunlop, A.; Milligan, G.; Bolger, G.B.; Klussmann, E; Houslay, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Beta2-ARs (beta2-adrenoceptors) become desensitized rapidly upon recruitment of cytosolic beta-arrestin. PDE4D5 (family 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, subfamily D, isoform 5) can be recruited in complex with beta-arrestin, whereupon it regulates PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylation of the beta2-AR. In the present study, we have used novel technology, employing a library of overlapping peptides (25-mers) immobilized on cellulose membranes that scan the entire sequence of bet...

  19. Casein kinase 2 down-regulation and activation by polybasic peptides are mediated by acidic residues in the 55-64 region of the beta-subunit. A study with calmodulin as phosphorylatable substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G; Pińna, L A

    1994-01-01

    The noncatalytic beta-subunit is responsible for the latency of casein kinase 2 (CK2) activity toward calmodulin. Twenty-one mutants of the beta-subunit bearing either deletions or Ala substitutions for charged residues in the 5-6, 55-70, and 171-178 sequences have been assayed for their ability to...... substitute for wild-type beta-subunit as a suppressor of activity toward calmodulin. The only mutations that reduced the ability of the beta-subunit to suppress calmodulin phosphorylation activity, though being compatible with normal reconstitution of CK2 holoenzyme, were those affecting Asp55, Glu57 and the...... conversely ineffective. The latent "calmodulin kinase" activity of CK2 can also be specifically unmasked by a peptide (alpha[66-86]) reproducing a basic insert of the catalytic subunit. This effect is reversed by equimolar addition of a peptide (beta[55-71]) including the 55-64 acidic stretch of the beta...

  20. Expressions of Antimicrobial Peptides LL-37, Human Beta Defensin-2 and-3 in the Lesions of Cutaneous Tuberculosis and Tuberculids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhao; Zhang-Lei Mu; Xi-Wan Liu; Xiao-Jing Liu; Jun Jia; Lin Cai; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Antimicrobial peptides,including cathelicidin LL-37,human beta defensin (HBD)-2,and HBD-3,are important elements of the innate immune response and involved in modulation of the adaptive immunity,and they also play an important role in cutaneous defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Methods:The fresh skin tissues and paraffin-embedded biopsy samples from three cutaneous tuberculosis,two tuberculids,and ten healthy individuals were collected.The expressions of LL-37,HBD-2,and HBD-3 mRNA in the lesions of three cutaneous tuberculosis and two tuberculids were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction;the protein expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting methods.Results:The expressions of LL-37 mRNA and protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin.The expression of HBD-2 mRNA had an increasing trend in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids compared with that of normal skin;however,the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis had a decreasing trend compared with that of normal skin,and the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of tuberculids was similar to that of normal skin.The expressions of HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin.Conclusions:Our study indicated that the expression of HBD-2 and HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis may be not consistent with that oftuberculids.However,an inherent limitation of the present study was that the sample size was small,and the roles and regulation mechanisms ofLL-37,HBD-2,and HBD-3 in cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids need to be further investigated.

  1. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in myocytes and chromaffin cells of the heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T H; Helle, K B; Saetersdal, T

    1994-07-01

    The heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus, was examined for immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) as markers for hormone secreting myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively. Specific antibodies raised against rat alpha-ANP and rat D beta H were used for immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. D beta H-immunoreactive cells were restricted to subendocardial areas of the atrium whereas ANP immunoreactivity occurred throughout both the atrial and the ventricular myocardium, showing particularly strong staining intensity in the atrial myocytes. The granular ANP immunostaining in the atrial myocytes was frequently accumulated in the sarcoplasm. In the ventricular myocytes ANP immunoreactivity occurred as scattered granular staining throughout the sarcoplasm. ANP and D beta H immunofluorescence staining coincided with the presence of immunoreactive specific granules and secretory vesicles in the cardiac myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively, as revealed by electron microscopy. The number of ANP-containing specific granules was generally high in the atrial myocytes, and they were frequently observed in clusters in subsarcolemmal areas. Granular frequency was considerably lower and the mean granular diameter was smaller (0.142 +/- 0.045 micron versus 0.213 +/- 0.049 micron) in the ventricular than in the atrial myocytes. The present results indicate that ANP and D beta H are phylogenetically highly conserved proteins from the dipnoi to the rat. The large amounts of ANP and of specific granules are consistent with an endocrine myocardium in the Protopterus heart. The presence of D beta H and secretory vesicles in the subendocardial chromaffin cells of the atrium suggests a local production of catecholamines from dopamine in the heart of this dipnoan. PMID:7926645

  2. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protim Sarker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

  3. Evaluation of the amyloid beta-GFP fusion protein as a model of amyloid beta peptides-mediated aggregation: A study of DNAJB6 chaperone

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Mohamed Hussein; Rashed, Laila A

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation and aggregation of extracellular amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and intracellular aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein. Recent evidence indicates that accumulation and aggregation of intracellular amyloid β peptides may also play a role in disease pathogenesis. This would suggest that intracellular Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) that maintain cellular protein homeostasis might be candidates for dis...

  4. Study of angiotensin-(1-7) vasoactive peptide and its beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: complete sequence-specific NMR assignments and structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lula, Ivana; Denadai, Angelo L; Resende, Jarbas M; de Sousa, Frederico B; de Lima, Guilherme F; Pilo-Veloso, Dorila; Heine, Thomas; Duarte, Hélio A; Santos, Robson A S; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2007-11-01

    We report the complete sequence-specific hydrogen NMR assignments of vasoactive peptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)). Assignments of the majority of the resonances were accomplished by COSY, TOCSY, and ROESY peak coordinates at 400MHz and 600MHz. Long-side-chain amino acid spin system identification was facilitated by long-range coherence transfer experiments (TOCSY). Problems with overlapped resonance signals were solved by analysis of heteronuclear 2D experiments (HSQC and HMBC). Nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) results were used to probe peptide conformation. We show that the inclusion of the angiotensin-(1-7) tyrosine residue is favored in inclusion complexes with beta-cyclodextrin. QM/MM simulations at the DFTB/UFF level confirm the experimental NMR findings and provide detailed structural information on these compounds in aqueous solution. PMID:17904691

  5. Enhancement of Neurogenesis and Memory by a Neurotrophic Peptide in Mild to Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Bragina, Olga; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Statom, Gloria; Baazaoui, Narjes; Bragin, Denis; Iqbal, Khalid; Nemoto, Edwin; Yonas, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), a neurocognitive disorder with similar cellular abnormalities. We recently discovered a small molecule (Peptide 6) corresponding to an active region of human ciliary neurotrophic factor, with neurogenic and neurotrophic properties in mouse models of AD and Down syndrome. Objective To describe hippocampal abnormalities in a mouse model of mild to moderate TBI and their reversal by Peptide 6. Methods TBI was induced in adult C57Bl6 mice using controlled cortical impact (CCI) with 1.5 mm of cortical penetration. The animals were treated with 50 nmol/animal/day of Peptide 6 or saline for 30 days. Dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis, dendritic and synaptic density and AD biomarkers were quantitatively analyzed and behavioral tests were performed. Results Ipsilateral neuronal loss in CA1 and parietal cortex, and elevation of Alzheimer-type hyperphosphorylated tau and A-beta were seen in TBI-mice. When compared to saline, Peptide 6 treatment increased number of newborn neurons, but not uncommitted progenitors, in DG by 80%. Peptide 6 treatment also reversed TBI-induced dendritic and synaptic density loss while increasing activity in tri-synaptic hippocampal circuitry, ultimately leading to improvement in memory recall on behavioral testing. Conclusion Long-term treatment with Peptide 6 enhances the pool of newborn neurons in DG, prevents neuronal loss in CA1 and parietal cortex, preserves dendritic and synaptic architecture in the hippocampus, and improves performance on a hippocampus-dependent memory task in TBI mice. These findings necessitate further inquiry into therapeutic potential of small molecules based on neurotrophic factors. PMID:25255260

  6. Improving cognitive impairment by Tongxinluo via inhibiting expression of beta-secretase 1/beta-amyloid peptide in experimental vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Jia; Wenbin Zhu; Lihui Wang; Yun Xu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tongxinluo has been clinically proven to be effective in improving memory and cognitive function in patients with post-stroke vascular dementia. Is the mechanism related to the deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in hippocampus? OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of Tongxinluo on cognitive impairment in a mouse model with vascular dementia and the changes of Aβ deposition andβ-secretase 1 (BACE1) expression.DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology of Nanjing University and Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology of Nanjing University and Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School from March 2006 to January 2007. A total of 36 healthy Kunming mice, 18 of each gender, were chosen. The study was conducted in accordance with the National Regulations of Experimental Animal Administration, and all animal experiments were approved by the Committee of Experimental Animal Administration of Nanjing University. Tongxinluo was provided by Shijiazhuang Yiling Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.METHODS: All mice were randomly divided into 6 groups, including naive control (n=6), sham-operated control (n=6) and experimental groups treated with different doses of Tongxinluo (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 g/kg/d; n=6 for each group) or vehicle (n=6). Five groups were subjected to bilateral common carotid arteries (2-VO) occlusion to produce a vascular dementia model(noocclusion was performed in sham-operated group). The mice in the Tongxinluo treatment groups were intragastricly administered daily with a Tongxinluo suspension (40 g/L in distilled water) at doses of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.6 g/kg/d from day 1 to day 30 post-surgery. The animals in vehicle, sham-operated and naive groups were administered an equal volume of distilled water. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Escape latency time

  7. Injectable hydrogel as cell carriers: Mechanism of beta-hairpin peptide hydrogel shear thinning, immediate recovery and effects on encapsulated cell payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Congqi

    To facilitate future biomedical treatment with localized delivery and higher therapy efficacy, much research effort has been devoted recently to the development of hydrogel biomaterials to transport a therapy to in vivo target sites via simple syringe or catheter injection. Most injectable hydrogel materials are free flowing precursor solutions ex vivo that become crosslinked into hydrogels once injected in vivo in response to exposure to environmental stimuli. However, properties of the final hydrogel formed in vivo are unpredictable due to possible leakage, dilution or change of injected gel precursor solution. As an alternate, more recent strategy for injectable hydrogel therapies, beta-hairpin peptide-based hydrogels are a class of injectable hydrogel solids with significant potential use in injectable therapies. These physical hydrogels can shear-thin and consequently flow as a low-viscosity material under a sufficient shear stress but immediately recover back into a solid upon removal of the stress, allowing them to be injected as preformed gel solids. The shear-thinning and immediate self-healing properties of self-assembled beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels enable a direct delivery of gel-encapsulated cells via benign injection to tissue defect sites with well-defined final gel properties in vivo. In this dissertation, mechanisms of gel shear-thinning and immediate recovery were elucidated by investigating gel behavior during and after flow via mechanical and structural characterizations. All studied beta-hairpin hydrogels shear-thin during flow (gel network fracture into large hydrogel domains) and instantly recover after cessation of flow (gel domains are percolated which immediately reforms the solid hydrogel). Importantly, hydrogel flow behavior was further studied in a capillary geometry that mimicked the actual situation of syringe injection. It was observed that all beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels investigated displayed a promising flow profile for

  8. Distinct cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta peptide signatures in sporadic and PSEN1 A431E-associated familial Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Portelius, Erik; Andreasson, Ulf; Ringman, John M.; Buerger, Katharina; Daborg, Jonny; Buchhave, Peder; Hansson, Oskar; Harmsen, Andreas; Gustavsson, Mikael K; Hanse, Eric; Galasko, Douglas; Hampel, Harald; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain, which is reflected by low concentration of the Aβ1-42 peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). There are at least 15 additional Aβ peptides in human CSF and their relative abundance pattern is thought to reflect the production and degradation of Aβ. Here, we test the hypothesis that AD is characterized by a specific CSF Aβ isoform pattern that is ...

  9. Mapping binding sites for the PDE4D5 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase to the N- and C-domains of beta-arrestin using spot-immobilized peptide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, George S; Adams, David R; Bhari, Narinder; Houslay, Thomas M; Vadrevu, Suryakiran; Meng, Dong; Li, Xiang; Dunlop, Allan; Milligan, Graeme; Bolger, Graeme B; Klussmann, Enno; Houslay, Miles D

    2007-05-15

    Beta2-ARs (beta2-adrenoceptors) become desensitized rapidly upon recruitment of cytosolic beta-arrestin. PDE4D5 (family 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, subfamily D, isoform 5) can be recruited in complex with beta-arrestin, whereupon it regulates PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylation of the beta2-AR. In the present study, we have used novel technology, employing a library of overlapping peptides (25-mers) immobilized on cellulose membranes that scan the entire sequence of beta-arrestin 2, to define the interaction sites on beta-arrestin 2 for binding of PDE4D5 and the cognate long isoform, PDE4D3. We have identified a binding site in the beta-arrestin 2 N-domain for the common PDE4D catalytic unit and two regions in the beta-arrestin 2 C-domain that confer specificity for PDE4D5 binding. Alanine-scanning peptide array analysis of the N-domain binding region identified severely reduced interaction with PDE4D5 upon R26A substitution, and reduced interaction upon either K18A or T20A substitution. Similar analysis of the beta-arrestin 2 C-domain identified Arg286 and Asp291, together with the Leu215-His220 region, as being important for binding PDE4D5, but not PDE4D3. Transfection with wild-type beta-arrestin 2 profoundly decreased isoprenaline-stimulated PKA phosphorylation of the beta2-AR in MEFs (mouse embryo fibroblasts) lacking both beta-arrestin 1 and beta-arrestin 2. This effect was negated using either the R26A or the R286A mutant form of beta-arrestin 2 or a mutant with substitution of an alanine cassette for Leu215-His220, which showed little or no PDE4D5 binding, but was still recruited to the beta2-AR upon isoprenaline challenge. These data show that the interaction of PDE4D5 with both the N- and C-domains of beta-arrestin 2 are essential for beta2-AR regulation. PMID:17288540

  10. Oxidative stress induces macroautophagy of amyloid beta-protein and ensuing apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Kågedal, Katarina; Dehvari, Nodi; Benedikz, Eirikur; Cowburn, Richard; Marcusson, Jan; Terman, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the toxicity of intracellular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) to neurons and the involvement of lysosomes in this process in Alzheimer disease (AD). We have recently shown that oxidative stress, a recognized determinant of AD, enhances macroautophagy and leads to int...

  11. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    OpenAIRE

    GregoryAElder; MiguelA.Gama Sosa; RitaDe Gasperi; MichaelCShaughness; StevenTDeKosky; SamGandy; MadhusoodanaPNambiar; JohnWSteele

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in ...

  12. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    OpenAIRE

    De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Kim, Soong Ho; Steele, John W.; Shaughness, Michael C; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; McCarron, Richard M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gandy, Sam; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in exper...

  13. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  14. Inhibition of cytosolic Phospholipase A2 prevents prion peptide-induced neuronal damage and co-localisation with Beta III Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Victoria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and the subsequent metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA to prostaglandins have been shown to play an important role in neuronal death in neurodegenerative disease. Here we report the effects of the prion peptide fragment HuPrP106-126 on the PLA2 cascade in primary cortical neurons and translocation of cPLA2 to neurites. Results Exposure of primary cortical neurons to HuPrP106-126 increased the levels of phosphorylated cPLA2 and caused phosphorylated cPLA2 to relocate from the cell body to the cellular neurite in a PrP-dependent manner, a previously unreported observation. HuPrP106-126 also induced significant AA release, an indicator of cPLA2 activation; this preceded synapse damage and subsequent cellular death. The novel translocation of p-cPLA2 postulated the potential for exposure to HuPrP106-126 to result in a re-arrangement of the cellular cytoskeleton. However p-cPLA2 did not colocalise significantly with F-actin, intermediate filaments, or microtubule-associated proteins. Conversely, p-cPLA2 did significantly colocalise with the cytoskeletal protein beta III tubulin. Pre-treatment with the PLA2 inhibitor, palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3 reduced cPLA2 activation, AA release and damage to the neuronal synapse. Furthermore, PACOCF3 reduced expression of p-cPLA2 in neurites and inhibited colocalisation with beta III tubulin, resulting in protection against PrP-induced cell death. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest that cPLA2 plays a vital role in the action of HuPrP106-126 and that the colocalisation of p-cPLA2 with beta III tubulin could be central to the progress of neurodegeneration caused by prion peptides. Further work is needed to define exactly how PLA2 inhibitors protect neurons from peptide-induced toxicity and how this relates to intracellular structural changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  15. Expression of secreted human single-chain fragment variable antibody against human amyloid beta peptide in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiong Cai; Fang Li; Shizhen Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that monoclonal or polyclonal antibody injections ofamyloid β peptide arc effective in removing amyloid β peptide overload in the brain.OBJECTIVE: Based on successful screening of a human single-chain fragment variable antibody specific to amyloid β peptide, this paper aimed to express recombinant human single-chain variable antibody against amyloid β peptide.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A single sample experiment was performed at the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Hospital (Beijing, China) from January to July 2006.MATERIALS: Human single-chain fragment variable antibody gene against amyloid β peptide was screened from a human phage-display antibody library.METHODS: Human single-chain fragment variable antibody gene was mutated to eliminate a BamHI restriction site and cloned into a Teasy plasmid for pT-seFvAβ construction, which was identified by PCR amplification and endonuclease digestion. Plasmid pT-scFvA β was cut by EcoRl and Notl endonucleases, and the antibody gene was cloned into pPIC9K plasmid to construct pPIC9K-scFvA β expression vector, which was confirmed by gene sequencing. Linearized pPICgK-scFvA β was used to transform a Pichia pastoris GS115 cell line, and the recombinant was induced by 0.5 % methanol to express human single-chain fragment variable antibody specific to amyloid β peptide.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Protein electrophoresis was used to identify PCR products, gene sequencing was uscd to verify the pPIC9K-scFvA sequence, and SDS-PAGE was used to detect recombinant expression of human single-chain fragment variable antibody specific to amyloid β peptide in Pichia pastoris.RESULTS: Gene sequencing confirmed pPICgK-scFvA β orientation. Rccomhinants were obtained by lineadzed pPIC9K-scFvA β transformation. After induction with 0.5% methanol, the recombinant yeast cells secreted proteins of 33-ku size

  16. Protective effects of Lingguizhugan decoction on amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)-induced cell injury: Anti-inflammatory effects☆

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Feifei; Sang, Feng; Zhou, Chunxiang; Ling, Yun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) and BV-2 microglia were treated with amyloid-β peptide (25–35), as a model of Alzheimer’s disease, to evaluate the protective effects of 10-3–10-8 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction and to examine the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Lingguizhugan decoction significantly enhanced the viability of SH-SY5Y cells with amyloid-β peptide-induced injury, and lowered levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and ...

  17. Oxyntomodulin differentially affects glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor beta-arrestin recruitment and signaling through Galpha(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Kubale, Valentina; Vrecl, Milka;

    2007-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and there is great interest in characterizing the pharmacology of the GLP-1 receptor and its ligands. In the present report, we have applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer...

  18. Molecular Bases for the Recognition of Short Peptide Substrates and Cysteine-Directed Modifications of Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen (UC)

    2009-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid {beta} (A{beta}). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located 30 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K{sub m} values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  19. Sulphation heterogeneity in the trisaccharide (GalNAcSbeta1, 4GlcAbeta1,3GalNAcS) isolated from the non-reducing terminal of human aggrecan chondroitin sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L A; Roughley, P; Nelson, F R; Plaas, A H

    1999-08-15

    We report here the isolation and sulphation isomer analyses of trisaccharides GalNAcS(beta1,4)GlcA(beta1,3)GalNAcS (in which S indicates sulphate) derived from the non-reducing termini of aggrecan chondroitin sulphate. Rat chondrosarcoma and human aggrecans were digested for 1 h at 37 degrees C with 30 micro-units of endo-chondroitinase ABC per microgram of chondroitin sulphate, and trisaccharides were isolated from the digests by ToyoPearl HW40S gel-filtration chromatography. Four trisaccharide species were identified; their sulphation isomer compositions, as determined by digestion with chondroitinase ACII and fluorescence-based ion-exchange HPLC, were GalNAc4Sbeta1,4GlcAbeta1,3GalNAc4S, GalNAc4Sbeta1,4GlcAbeta1,3GalNAc6S, GalNAc4,6Sbeta1,4GlcAbeta1, 3GalNAc4S and GalNAc4,6Sbeta1,4GlcAbeta1,3GalNAc6S. The abundances of such sequences in chondroitin sulphate on aggrecan from normal (foetal to 72 years of age) and from osteoarthritic human knee cartilages were also established. The results showed that non-reducing terminal GalNAc4S or GalNAc4,6S can be linked to either a 4-sulphated or a 6-sulphated disaccharide, suggesting that the sulphation of the last disaccharide might not have a direct effect on the specificity of chondroitin sulphate terminal GalNAc sulphotransferases. Furthermore, for each aggrecan preparation examined, the 4S-to-6S ratio of all chain interior disaccharides was equivalent to that in the last repeating disaccharides at the non-reducing terminus, suggesting that neither chondroitin 4-sulphotransferase nor chondroitin 6-sulphotransferase shows preferential activity near the chain terminus. PMID:10432320

  20. Candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Jenkins, Edmund C; Luchsinger, José A; Zigman, Warren B; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H

    2015-10-01

    We examined the contribution of candidates genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to individual differences in levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrom, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30-78 years of age. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race and/or ethnicity, and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels, the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence amyloid precursor protein processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1). PMID:26166206

  1. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses the toxic effects of amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Kong; Maowen Ba; Hui Liang; Peng Shao; Tianxia Yu; Ying Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treated PC12 cells with 0-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) for 24 hours to induce cytotoxicity, and found that 5-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) decreased PC12 cell viability, but adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activator diazoxide suppressed the decrease reactive oxygen species levels. These protective effects were reversed by the selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate. An inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, also protected PC12 cells from intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. However, the H2O2-degrading enzyme catalase could that the increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species levels adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and nitric oxide. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses PC12 cell cytotoxicity induced by amyloid-β

  2. Structure, spectra and the effects of twisting of beta-sheet peptides. A density functional theory study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouř, Petr; Keiderling, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 675, - (2004), s. 95-105. ISSN 0166-1280 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055104; GA ČR GA203/01/0031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : vibrational circular dichroism * density functional theory * peptide secondary structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.007, year: 2004

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puddu, A., E-mail: alep100@hotmail.com [University of Genova, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Viale Benedetto XV, 16132 Genova (Italy); Storace, D.; Durante, A.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L. [University of Genova, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Viale Benedetto XV, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. {yields} GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. {yields} GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. {yields} GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. → GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. → GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. → GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. → GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  5. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GregoryAElder

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI. The β-amyloid (Aβ peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, BACE-1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain.

  6. Identification of a cell-penetrating peptide domain from human beta-defensin 3 and characterization of its anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jue Yeon Lee,1,* Jin Sook Suh,2,* Jung Min Kim,1 Jeong Hwa Kim,1 Hyun Jung Park,1 Yoon Jeong Park,1,2 Chong Pyoung Chung1 1Central Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC, Chungcheongbuk-do, Republic of Korea; 2Dental Regenerative Biotechnology, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Human beta-defensins (hBDs are crucial factors of intrinsic immunity that function in the immunologic response to a variety of invading enveloped viruses, bacteria, and fungi. hBDs can cause membrane depolarization and cell lysis due to their highly cationic nature. These molecules participate in antimicrobial defenses and the control of adaptive and innate immunity in every mammalian species and are produced by various cell types. The C-terminal 15-mer peptide within hBD3, designated as hBD3-3, was selected for study due to its cell- and skin-penetrating activity, which can induce anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. hBD3-3 penetrated both the outer membrane of the cells and mouse skin within a short treatment period. Two other peptide fragments showed poorer penetration activity compared to hBD3-3. hBD3-3 inhibited the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, and secretory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, hBD3-3 reduced the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. Further investigation also revealed that hBD3-3 downregulated nuclear factor kappa B-dependent inflammation by directly suppressing the degradation of phosphorylated-IκBα and by downregulating active nuclear factor kappa B p65. Our findings indicate that hBD3-3 may be conjugated with drugs of interest to ensure their proper translocation to

  7. Radioiodinated benzimidazole derivatives as single photon emission computed tomography probes for imaging of {beta}-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Mengchao [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ono, Masahiro, E-mail: ono@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Liu Boli [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Saji, Hideo, E-mail: hsaji@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Five iodinated 2-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potential probes for {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques. One of the compounds, 4-(6-iodo-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (12), showed excellent affinity for A{beta}{sub 1-42} aggregates (K{sub i}=9.8 nM). Autoradiography with sections of postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain revealed that a radioiodinated probe [{sup 125}I]12, labeled A{beta} plaques selectively with low nonspecific binding. Biodistribution experiments with normal mice injected intravenously with [{sup 125}I]12 showed high uptake [4.14 percent injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 2 min] into and rapid clearance (0.15% ID/g at 60 min) from the brain, which may bring about a good signal-to-noise ratio and therefore achieve highly sensitive detection of A{beta} plaques. In addition, [{sup 125}I]12 labeled amyloid plaques in vivo in an AD transgenic model. The preliminary results strongly suggest that [{sup 125}I]12 bears characteristics suitable for detecting amyloid plaques in vivo. When labeled with {sup 123}I, it may be a useful SPECT imaging agent for A{beta} plaques in the brain of living AD patients.

  8. Multiple mechanisms of iron-induced amyloid beta-peptide accumulation in SHSY5Y cells: protective action of negletein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Anand, Shruti; Ganguly, Anirban; Righi, Giuliana; Bovicelli, Paolo; Saso, Luciano; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2014-12-01

    The increased accumulation of iron in the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is well documented, and excess iron is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. The adverse effects of accumulated iron in AD brain may include the oxidative stress, altered amyloid beta-metabolism and the augmented toxicity of metal-bound amyloid beta 42. In this study, we have shown that exogenously added iron in the form of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) leads to considerable accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) without a corresponding change in the concerned gene expression in cultured SHSY5Y cells during exposure up to 48 h. This phenomenon is also associated with increased β-secretase activity and augmented release of amyloid beta 42 in the medium. Further, the increase in β-secretase activity, in SHSY5Y cells, upon exposure to iron apparently involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NF-κB activation. The synthetic flavone negletein (5,6-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone), which is a known chelator for iron, can significantly prevent the effects of FAC on APP metabolism in SHSY5Y cells. Further, this compound inhibits the iron-dependent formation of ROS and also blocks the iron-induced oligomerization of amyloid beta 42 in vitro. In concentrations used in this study, negletein alone appears to have only marginal toxic effects on cell viability, but, on the other hand, the drug is capable of ameliorating the iron-induced loss of cell viability considerably. Our results provide the initial evidence of potential therapeutic effects of negletein, which should be explored in suitable animal models of AD. PMID:25249289

  9. Amyloid beta protein and tau in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma as biomarkers for dementia: a review of recent literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankfort, S.V.; Tulner, L.R.; Campen, J.P. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Jansen, R.W.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    This review addresses recent developments in amyloid beta (Abeta), total tau (t-tau), and phosporylated tau (p-tau) protein analysis, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma as biomarkers for dementia. Recent research focused on the protection of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) into de

  10. microPET Imaging of Glioma Integrin (alpha-v, beta-3) Expression Using Cu-64-Labeled Tetrameric RGD Peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrins ?v?3 and ?v?5 play a critical role in tumor-induced angiogenesis and metastasis, and have become promising diagnostic indicators and therapeutic targets of tumors. Radiolabeled RGD peptides that are integrin-specific may be used for non-invasive imaging of integrin expression level as well as for integrin-targeted radionuclide therapy. We previously conjugated a series of mono- and dimeric RGD peptides with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N?,N??,N???-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled these with copper-64 for microPET imaging in various mouse xenograft models. The copper-64 tracers showed ?v?3-selective tumor uptake, but the magnitude of tumor uptake was relatively low, the tumor washout was rapid, and non-target organ/tissue retention was high. In this study we developed a tetrameric RGD peptide tracer 64Cu-DOTA-E{E[c(RGDfK)]2}2 for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of integrin ?v?3 expression in a subcutaneous U87MG glioma xenograft model in female athymic nude mice. The RGD tetramer showed significantly higher integrin binding affinity than the corresponding mono- and dimeric RGD analogs, most likely due to polyvalency effect. The radiolabeled peptide showed rapid blood clearance (0.61 - 0.01%ID/g at 30 min and 0.21 - 0.01 %ID/g at 4 h postinjection (p.i.), respectively) and predominantly renal excretion. Tumor uptake was rapid and high and the tumor washout was slow (9.93 - 1.05 %ID/g at 30 min p.i. and 4.56 - 0.51 %ID/g at 24 h post-injection). The metabolic stability of 64Cu-DOTA-E{E[c(RGDfK)]2}2 was determined in mouse blood, urine, and liver and kidney homogenates at different times after tracer injection. The average fractions of intact tracer in these organs at 1 h were approximately 70, 58, 51 and 26 percent, respectively. Non-invasive microPET imaging studies showed significant tumor uptake and good contrast in the subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice, which agreed well with the biodistribution results. Integrin ?v?3 specificity was

  11. microPET Imaging of Glioma Integrin (alpha-v, beta-3) Expression Using Cu-64-Labeled Tetrameric RGD Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun; Zhang, , Xianzhong; Xiong, , Zhengming; Cheng, Zhen; Fisher, Darrell R.; Liu, Shu-hong; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2005-10-01

    Integrins ?v?3 and ?v?5 play a critical role in tumor-induced angiogenesis and metastasis, and have become promising diagnostic indicators and therapeutic targets of tumors. Radiolabeled RGD peptides that are integrin-specific may be used for non-invasive imaging of integrin expression level as well as for integrin-targeted radionuclide therapy. We previously conjugated a series of mono- and dimeric RGD peptides with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N?,N??,N???-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled these with copper-64 for microPET imaging in various mouse xenograft models. The copper-64 tracers showed ?v?3-selective tumor uptake, but the magnitude of tumor uptake was relatively low, the tumor washout was rapid, and non-target organ/tissue retention was high. In this study we developed a tetrameric RGD peptide tracer 64Cu-DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]2{r_brace}2 for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of integrin ?v?3 expression in a subcutaneous U87MG glioma xenograft model in female athymic nude mice. The RGD tetramer showed significantly higher integrin binding affinity than the corresponding mono- and dimeric RGD analogs, most likely due to polyvalency effect. The radiolabeled peptide showed rapid blood clearance (0.61 ? 0.01%ID/g at 30 min and 0.21 ? 0.01 %ID/g at 4 h postinjection (p.i.), respectively) and predominantly renal excretion. Tumor uptake was rapid and high and the tumor washout was slow (9.93 ? 1.05 %ID/g at 30 min p.i. and 4.56 ? 0.51 %ID/g at 24 h post-injection). The metabolic stability of 64Cu-DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]2{r_brace}2 was determined in mouse blood, urine, and liver and kidney homogenates at different times after tracer injection. The average fractions of intact tracer in these organs at 1 h were approximately 70, 58, 51 and 26 percent, respectively. Non-invasive microPET imaging studies showed significant tumor uptake and good contrast in the subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice, which agreed well with the biodistribution results

  12. Peripheral inflammation facilitates Abeta fiber-mediated synaptic input to the substantia gelatinosa of the adult rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, H; Doubell, T P; Woolf, C J

    1999-01-15

    Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in thick adult rat transverse spinal cord slices with attached dorsal roots to study changes in fast synaptic transmission induced by peripheral inflammation. In slices from naive rats, primary afferent stimulation at Abeta fiber intensity elicited polysynaptic EPSCs in only 14 of 57 (25%) SG neurons. In contrast, Abeta fiber stimulation evoked polysynaptic EPSCs in 39 of 62 (63%) SG neurons recorded in slices from rats inflamed by an intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) 48 hr earlier (p < 0.001). Although the peripheral inflammation had no significant effect on the threshold and conduction velocities of Abeta, Adelta, and C fibers recorded in dorsal roots, the mean threshold intensity for eliciting EPSCs was significantly lower in cells recorded from rats with inflammation (naive: 33.2 +/- 15.1 microA, n = 57; inflamed: 22.8 +/- 11.3 microA, n = 62, p < 0.001), and the mean latency of EPSCs elicited by Abeta fiber stimulation in CFA-treated rats was significantly shorter than that recorded from naive rats (3.3 +/- 1.8 msec, n = 36 vs 6.0 +/- 3.5 msec, n = 12; p = 0.010). Abeta fiber stimulation evoked polysynaptic IPSCs in 4 of 25 (16%) cells recorded from naive rat preparations and 14 of 26 (54%) SG neurons from CFA-treated rats (p < 0.001). The mean threshold intensity for IPSCs was also significantly lower in CFA-treated rats (naive: 32.5 +/- 15.7 microA, n = 25; inflamed: 21. 9 +/- 9.9 microA, n = 26, p = 0.013). The facilitation of Abeta fiber-mediated input into the substantia gelatinosa after peripheral inflammation may contribute to altered sensory processing. PMID:9880605

  13. PPARgamma agonist curcumin reduces the amyloid-beta-stimulated inflammatory responses in primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Yan-Xin; Zhang, Shi; Liu, Gui-Dong; Kang, Wen-Yan; Tang, Hui-Dong; Ding, Jian-Qing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulating data indicate that astrocytes play an important role in the neuroinflammation related to the pathogenesis of AD. It has been shown that microglia and astrocytes are activated in AD brain and amyloid-beta (Abeta) can increase the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), interleukin-1, and interleukin-6. Suppressing the inflammatory response caused by activated astrocytes may help to inhibit the development of AD. Curcumin is a major constituent of the yellow curry spice turmeric and proved to be a potential anti-inflammatory drug in arthritis and colitis. There is a low age-adjusted prevalence of AD in India, a country where turmeric powder is commonly used as a culinary compound. Curcumin has been shown to suppress activated astroglia in amyloid-beta protein precursor transgenic mice. The real mechanism by which curcumin inhibits activated astroglia is poorly understood. Here we report that the expression of COX-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were enhanced and that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was decreased in Abeta(25-35)-treated astrocytes. In line with these results, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation was increased in the presence of Abeta. All these can be reversed by the pretreatment of curcumin. Furthermore, GW9662, a PPARgamma antagonist, can abolish the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin. These results show that curcumin might act as a PPARgamma agonist to inhibit the inflammation in Abeta-treated astrocytes. PMID:20413894

  14. Characterization of the pattern of alphas1- and beta-casein breakdown and release of a bioactive peptide by a cell envelope proteinase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Elvira María; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Raya, Raúl R; Savoy, Graciela; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinases (CEPs) of the lactobacilli have key roles in bacterial nutrition and contribute to the development of the organoleptic properties of fermented milk products as well, as they can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides from milk proteins. The influence of the peptide supply, carbohydrate source, and osmolites on the CEP activity of the cheese starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 was investigated. The CEP activity levels were controlled by the peptide content of the growth medium. The maximum activity was observed in a basal minimal defined medium, whereas in the presence of Casitone, Casamino Acids, or yeast extract, the synthesis of CEP was inhibited 99-, 70-, and 68-fold, respectively. The addition of specific di- or tripeptides containing branched-chain amino acids, such as leucylleucine, prolylleucine, leucylglycylglycine, or leucylproline, to the growth medium negatively affected CEP activity, whereas dipeptides without branched-chain amino acids had no effect on the enzyme's production. The carbon source and osmolites did not affect CEP activity. The CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 exhibited a mixed-type CEP(I/III) variant caseinolytic specificity. Mass-spectrometric screening of the main peptide peaks isolated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography allowed the identification of 33 and 32 peptides in the alpha(s1)- and beta-casein hydrolysates, respectively. By characterizing the peptide sequence in these hydrolysates, a pattern of alpha(s1)- and beta-casein breakdown was defined and is reported herein, this being the first report for a CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. In this pattern, a series of potentially bioactive peptides (antihypertensive and phosphopeptides) which are encrypted within the precursor protein could be visualized. PMID:18424544

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta inhibition reduces progression of early choroidal neovascularization lesions in rats: P17 and P144 peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Zarranz-Ventura

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β inhibitor peptides (P17 & P144 on early laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (LI-CNV lesions in rats, two weeks after laser CNV induction. Seventy-one Long Evans rats underwent diode laser application in an established LI-CNV model. Baseline fluorescein angiography (FA was performed 14 days following laser procedure, and treatments were administered 16 days post-laser application via different administration routes. Intravenous groups included control (IV-Control, P17 (IV-17, and P144 (IV-144 groups, whereas intravitreal groups included P17 (IVT-17, P144 (IVT-144, and a mixture of both peptides (IVT-17+144 (with fellow eyes receiving vehicle alone. CNV evolution was assessed using FA performed weekly for four weeks after treatment. Following sacrifice, VEGF, TGF-β, COX-2, IGF-1, PAI-1, IL-6, MMP-2, MMP-9, and TNF-α gene expression was assessed using RT-PCR. VEGF and p-SMAD2 protein levels were also assessed by western-blot, while MMP-2 activity was assessed with gelatin zymography. Regarding the FA analysis, the mean CNV area was lower from the 3(rd week in IVT-17 and IVT-144 groups, and also from the 2(nd week in IVT-17+144. Biochemical analysis revealed that gene expression was lower for VEGF and COX-2 genes in IV-17 and IV-144 groups, VEGF gene in IVT-17+144 group and MMP-2 gene in IVT-17 and IVT-144 groups. VEGF protein expression was also decreased in IV-17, IV-144, IVT-17 and IVT-144, whereas pSMAD-2 levels were lower in IV-17, IV-144 and IVT-17+144 groups. Zymogram analysis revealed decreased MMP-2 activity in IV-17, IV-144, IVT-17 and IVT-144 groups. These data suggest that the use of TGF-β inhibitor peptides (P17 & P144 decrease the development of early CNV lesions by targeting different mediators than those typically affected using current anti-angiogenic therapies. Its potential role in the treatment of early CNV appears promising

  16. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR attenuates the expression of LPS- and Aβ peptide-induced inflammatory mediators in astroglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Shailendra

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology shows characteristic 'plaques' rich in amyloid beta (Aβ peptide deposits. Inflammatory process-related proteins such as pro-inflammatory cytokines have been detected in AD brain suggesting that an inflammatory immune reaction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Glial cells in culture respond to LPS and Aβ stimuli by upregulating the expression of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and also the expression of proinflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2. We have earlier reported that LPS/Aβ stimulation-induced ceramide and ROS generation leads to iNOS expression and nitric oxide production in glial cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective function of AICAR (a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase in blocking the pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses induced in primary glial cultures treated with LPS and Aβ peptide. Methods To test the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant functions of AICAR, we tested its inhibitory potential in blocking the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS, expression of COX-2, generation of ROS, and associated signaling following treatment of glial cells with LPS and Aβ peptide. We also investigated the neuroprotective effects of AICAR against the effects of cytokines and inflammatory mediators (released by the glia, in blocking neurite outgrowth inhibition, and in nerve growth factor-(NGF induced neurite extension by PC-12 cells. Results AICAR blocked LPS/Aβ-induced inflammatory processes by blocking the expression of proinflammatory cytokine, iNOS, COX-2 and MnSOD genes, and by inhibition of ROS generation and depletion of glutathione in astroglial cells. AICAR also inhibited down-stream signaling leading to the regulation of transcriptional factors such as NFκB and C/EBP which are critical for the expression of iNOS, COX-2, MnSOD and cytokines (TNF-α/IL-1β and IL-6. AICAR promoted NGF-induced neurite growth

  17. Imaging integrin alpha-v-beta-3 expression in tumors with an 18F-labeled dimeric RGD peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Terry, Samantha; McBride, William J.; Goldenberg, David M.; Laverman, Peter; Franssen, Gerben M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 receptors are expressed on activated endothelial cells during neovascularization to maintain tumor growth. Many radiolabeled probes utilize the tight and specific association between the arginine-glycine-aspartatic acid (RGD) peptide and integrin αvβ3, but one main obstacle for any clinical application of these probes is the laborious multistep radiosynthesis of 18F. In this study, the dimeric RGD peptide, E-[c(RGDfK)]2, was conjugated with NODAGA and radiolabeled with 18F in a simple one-pot process with a radiolabeling yield of 20%; the whole process lasting only 45 min. NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 labeled with 18F at a specific activity of 1.8 MBq/nmol and a radiochemical purity of 100% could be achieved. Log P value of 18F-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 was −4.26 ± 0.02. In biodistribution studies, 18F-NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 cleared rapidly from the blood with 0.03 ± 0.01 %ID/g in the blood at 2 h p.i., mainly via the kidneys and showed good in vivo stability. Tumor uptake of 18F-NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 (3.44 ± 0.20 %ID/g, 2 h p.i.) was significantly lower than that of reference compounds 68Ga-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 (6.26 ± 0.76 %ID/g; P <0.001) and 111In-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 (4.99 ± 0.64 %ID/g; P < 0.01). Co-injection of an excess of unlabeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 along with 18F-NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 resulted in significantly reduced radioactivity concentrations in the tumor (0.85 ± 0.13 %ID/g). The αvβ3 integrin-expressing SK-RC-52 tumor could be successfully visualized by microPET with 18F-labeled NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2. In conclusion, NODAGA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 could be labeled rapidly with 18F using a direct aqueous, one-pot method and it accumulated specifically in αvβ3 integrin-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors, allowing for visualization by microPET. PMID:23606427

  18. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M;

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared the...... levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP, beta-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 13 sporadic AD patients and 13 healthy controls. Our findings show significant amounts of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP in CSF. There was no statistically significant difference in the...... levels of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP between AD patients and controls. The levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP were, however, found to be significantly lower in the AD patients than in the controls....

  19. Effects of Low-Dose Pioglitazone on Serum Levels of Adiponectin, Dehydroepiandrosterone, Amyloid Beta Peptide, and Lipid Profile in Elderly Japanese People with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Aoki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to see how pioglitazone at low doses could affect blood biomarkers related to atherosclerosis and aging. The effects of an add-on treatment with pioglitazone (15 mg for males and 7.5 mg for females for 6 months were assessed in 24 outpatients (12 males, 12 females with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 70 years. As doses of sulfonylurea were reduced in 10 patients, no significant differences in HbA1c and glucose levels were seen. After the treatment, serum levels of HDL cholesterol, arachidonic acid (predominant in males, and high-molecular-weight adiponectin significantly increased. The level of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate significantly decreased. No significant changes were seen in those of small dense LDL cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and amyloid beta peptides 1–40 and 1–42. There was a slight but significant increase in body weight, but apparent adverse effects were not observed. In conclusion, pioglitazone at low doses increased serum adiponectin, HDL cholesterol, and arachidonic acid levels but decreased serum dehydroepiandrosterone level, not associated with glycemia, in elderly Japanese people with type 2 diabetes. An optimal dose of pioglitazone should be sought for to minimize its adverse effects and to fully exert its pleiotropic effects such as antiatherosclerotic and antiaging effects.

  20. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance.

  1. Measurement of the Interaction Between Recombinant I-domain from Integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and a Triple Helical Collagen Peptide with the GFOGER Binding Motif Using Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Welland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the collagen-platelet interaction is of crucial importance to the haemostatic response during both injury and pathogenesis of the blood vessel wall. Of particular interest is the high affinity interaction of the platelet transmembrane receptor, alpha 2 beta 1, responsible for firm attachment of platelets to collagen at and around injury sites. We employ single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS using the atomic force microscope (AFM to study the interaction of the I-domain from integrin alpha 2 beta 1 with a synthetic collagen related triple-helical peptide containing the high-affinity integrin-binding GFOGER motif, and a control peptide lacking this sequence, referred to as GPP. By utilising synthetic peptides in this manner we are able to study at the molecular level subtleties that would otherwise be lost when considering cell-to-collagen matrix interactions using ensemble techniques. We demonstrate for the first time the complexity of this interaction as illustrated by the complex multi-peaked force spectra and confirm specificity using control blocking experiments. In addition we observe specific interaction of the GPP peptide sequence with the I-domain. We propose a model to explain these observations.

  2. Familial Danish dementia: a novel form of cerebral amyloidosis associated with deposition of both amyloid-Dan and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holton, J.L; Lashley, T.; Ghiso, J.;

    2002-01-01

    -fibrillary) lesions was found. A[beta] was also present in a proportion of both vascular and parenchymal lesions. There was severe neurofibrillary pathology, and tau immunoblotting revealed a triplet electrophoretic migration pattern comparable with PHF-tau. FDD is a novel form of CNS amyloidosis with extensive...

  3. A Rat Model of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Abeta42 and Pro-oxidative Substances Exhibits Cognitive Deficit and Alterations in Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Neurotransmitter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasek, Tomas; Skurlova, Martina; Maleninska, Kristyna; Vojtechova, Iveta; Kristofikova, Zdena; Matuskova, Hana; Sirova, Jana; Vales, Karel; Ripova, Daniela; Stuchlik, Ales

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most serious human, medical, and socioeconomic burdens. Here we tested the hypothesis that a rat model of AD (Samaritan; Taconic Pharmaceuticals, USA) based on the application of amyloid beta42 (Abeta42) and the pro-oxidative substances ferrous sulfate heptahydrate and L-buthionine-(S, R)-sulfoximine, will exhibit cognitive deficits and disruption of the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems in the brain. Behavioral methods included the Morris water maze (MWM; long-term memory version) and the active allothetic place avoidance (AAPA) task (acquisition and reversal), testing spatial memory and different aspects of hippocampal function. Neurochemical methods included testing of the NR1/NR2A/NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors in the frontal cortex and CHT1 transporters in the hippocampus, in both cases in the right and left hemisphere separately. Our results show that Samaritan rats™ exhibit marked impairment in both the MWM and active place avoidance tasks, suggesting a deficit of spatial learning and memory. Moreover, Samaritan rats exhibited significant changes in NR2A expression and CHT1 activity compared to controls rats, mimicking the situation in patients with early stage AD. Taken together, our results corroborate the hypothesis that Samaritan rats are a promising model of AD in its early stages.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits beta-amyloid peptide-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and the underlying mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuqin Chen; Jingtian Li; Jinhui Zou; Bailing Li; Meng Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels are 55% lower in brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients than in age-matched normal individuals, which suggests that H2S might be involved in some aspects of AD pathogenesis.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective mechanisms of varied concentrations of H2S against β -amyloid-peptide (A β) induced apoptosis in pheochromoytoma (PC12) cells, and to analyze the pathway of action.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A controlled, observational, in vitro experiment was performed at Nenrophysiology Laboratory in Zhougshan Medical School, Sun Yat-sen University between July 2006 and May 2007.MATERIALS: PC12 cells were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Medical School of Sun Yat-sen University. Glybenclamide, rhodamine123, and dihydrorhodamine123 were purchased from Sigma (USA).METHODS: PCI2 cells were incubated at 37℃ in a 5% CO2-enriched incubator with RPMI-1640 medium, supplemented with 5% horse-serum and 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells in logarithmic growth curves received different treatment: The PC12 cells were maintains at 37℃ with the original medium, then incubated in A β 25-35, sodium hydrosulfide (NariS), glybenclamide, NailS+ A β 25-35, or pretreated with glybenelamide 30 minutes prior to administration of and A β 25-35, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) The survival rate of PC12 cells was detected by MTT assay and Hoechst staining. (2) The apoptosis rate of PC12 cells was detected utilizing flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining, and morphological changes of apoptotic cells were observed. (3) The mitochondrial membrane potential was detected by Rhodamine 123-combined flow cytometry. (4) The intracellular reactive oxygen species content was detected by dihydrorhodamine123-combined flow cytometry. RESULTS: A β 25-35 induced significantly decreased viability and increased percentage of apoptosis in PC 12 cells, as well as dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential

  5. CD4+CD25- T cells that express latency-associated peptide on the surface suppress CD4+CD45RBhigh-induced colitis by a TGF-beta-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takatoku; Zhang, Xingmin; Goto, Masao; Hachimura, Satoshi; Totsuka, Mamoru; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Weiner, Howard L

    2003-03-01

    Murine CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory cells have been reported to express latency-associated peptide (LAP) and TGF-beta on the surface after activation, and exert regulatory function by the membrane-bound TGF-beta in vitro. We have now found that a small population of CD4(+) T cells, both CD25(+) and CD25(-), can be stained with a goat anti-LAP polyclonal Ab without being stimulated. Virtually all these LAP(+) cells are also positive for thrombospondin, which has the ability to convert latent TGF-beta to the active form. In the CD4(+)CD45RB(high)-induced colitis model of SCID mice, regulatory activity was exhibited not only by CD25(+)LAP(+) and CD25(+)LAP(-) cells, but also by CD25(-)LAP(+) cells. CD4(+)CD25(-)LAP(+) T cells were part of the CD45RB(low) cell fraction. CD4(+)CD25(-)LAP(-)CD45RB(low) cells had minimal, if any, regulatory activity in the colitis model. The regulatory function of CD25(-)LAP(+) cells was abrogated in vivo by anti-TGF-beta mAb. These results identify a new TGF-beta-dependent regulatory CD4(+) T cell phenotype that is CD25(-) and LAP(+). PMID:12594277

  6. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid beta-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Wasco, Wilma

    2009-04-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Abeta properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Abeta40 and Abeta42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Abeta42 to Abeta40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Abeta. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a gamma-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668. PMID:19154786

  7. Plaque deposition dependent decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 amyloid overexpressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B;

    2010-01-01

    -HT2A receptor regulation in double transgenic AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 mice which display excess production of Abeta and age-dependent increase in amyloid plaques. Three different age-groups, 4-month-old, 8- month-old, and 11-month-old were included in the study. [3H]-MDL100907, [3H]-escitalopram, and [11C...

  8. Peptide fine specificity of anti-glycoprotein 100 CTL is preserved following transfer of engineered TCR alpha beta genes into primary human T lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Schaft, Niels; Willemsen, Ralph; De Vries, Jolanda; Lankiewicz, Birgit; Essers, B.W.; Gratama, Jan-Willem; Figdor, C. G.; Bolhuis, Reinder

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTCR with known antitumor reactivity can be genetically introduced into primary human T lymphocytes and provide promising tools for immunogene therapy of tumors. We molecularly characterized two distinct TCRs specific for the same HLA-A2-restricted peptide derived from the melanocyte differentiation Ag gp100, yet exhibiting different stringencies in peptide requirements. The existence of these two distinct gp100-specific TCRs allowed us to study the preservation of peptide fine spe...

  9. Altered beta-endorphin, Met- and Leu-enkephalins, and enkephalin-containing peptides in pancreas and pituitary of genetically obese diabetic (db/db) mice during development of diabetic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, K; Voyles, N R; Zalenski, C; Wilkins, S; Recant, L

    1986-10-01

    We have recently shown that in addition to beta-endorphin the opioid peptides Met- and Leu-enkephalin and their apparent precursors are localized in islet endocrine cells of the rat pancreas. To begin evaluating a possible role for these pancreatic opiates in the pathophysiology of genetic diabetes in rodents, immunoreactive beta-endorphin and Met- and Leu-enkephalins were measured in acetic acid extracts of pancreas and pituitary of C57BL/KsJ db/db mice and their lean littermates. Groups of animals were studied during three phases of development of the diabetic syndrome in the mutant mice: at 4 (hyperinsulinemic and prediabetic); 6, 9, and 12 (frankly obese and diabetic); and 30 (hypoinsulinemic) wk of age. Elevations or decreases (P less than .05) were found in db/db mice (vs. lean littermates) as follows: pituitary content of Met-enkephalin was twofold higher at all ages studied; pituitary free Leu-enkephalin was lower at 4 wk and reversed to higher at 6-30 wk; pancreatic beta-endorphin was 30% lower at 4 wk and reversed to threefold higher at 6-12 wk; Met- and Leu-enkephalin-containing larger peptides were elevated at one or more points between 6 and 12 wk in both the pancreas and the pituitary. Thus, the onset of overt obesity between 4 and 6 wk of age was accompanied by a marked rise in both pancreatic beta-endorphin and pituitary Leu-enkephalin; similar elevations in these parameters have been reported previously in C57BL/6J ob/ob mice at approximately 12 wk of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2944783

  10. A synthetic peptide corresponding to human FSH. beta. -subunit 33-53 binds to FSH receptor, stimulates basal estradiol biosynthesis, and is a partial antagonist of FSH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Coloma, T.A.; Dattatreyamurty, B.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-02-06

    The authors have previously shown that hFSH-{beta} 34-37 (KTCT) and 49-52 (TRDL) inhibit binding of {sup 125}I-hFSH to FSH receptor in calf testis membranes and that hFSH-{beta} 33-53, which encompasses these tetrapeptides, inhibits binding with increased potency. hFSH-{beta} 33-53 rapidly dimerizes under conditions utilized in the receptor binding assay (pH 7.5) so that the binding inhibition reported earlier was due to the hFSH-{beta} 33-53 dimer rather than the monomer. At pH 6.5, conversion to dimer does not occur, and binding inhibition could be unequivocally attributed to the monomer. Radioiodinated and alkylated hFSH-{beta} 33-53 binds to the FSH receptor. The biological activity of hFSH-{beta} 33-53 was assessed by its ability to affect the conversion of androstenedione to estradiol in rat Sertoli cells cultures. This result demonstrates that the free R-SH group at Cys51 is not responsible for the inhibition. FSH-{beta} 33-53 also significantly stimulated basal levels of estradiol synthesis, but not to maximal levels observed with FSH (partial agonist). Neither the carbohydrate content of hFSH-{beta} nor the {alpha} subunit of FSH appears to be essential for signal transduction and expression of the hormone effect of FSH-{beta} 33-53.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide prevents Abeta-induced neuronal apoptosis by attenuating mitochondrial translocation of PTEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weigang; Zhang, Yinghua; Yang, Chenxi; Sun, Yiyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Songtao

    2016-06-14

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is an important pathological change in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is known to be a novel gaseous signaling molecule and a cytoprotectant in many diseases including AD. However, the molecular mechanism of the antiapoptosis activity of H(2)S in AD is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the inhibitory effects of H(2)S on Abeta (Aβ)-induced apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying primary neuron cells. Our results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H(2)S, significantly ameliorated Aβ-induced cell apoptosis. NaHS also reversed the Aβ-induced translocation of the phosphatase and tensin homologs deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) from the cytosol to the mitochondria. Furthermore, H(2)S increased the level of p-AKT/AKT significantly. Interestingly, the antiapoptosis effects of H(2)S were blocked down by specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor wortmannin. In conclusion, these data indicate that H(2)S inhibits Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by attenuating mitochondrial translocation of PTEN and that activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in H(2)S-mediated neuronal protection. Our findings provide a novel route into the molecular mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in AD. PMID:27026591

  12. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  13. A fluorimetric study on the interaction between a Trp-containing beta-strand peptide and amphiphilic polymer-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Zhong, Ruibo; Yun, Xiaoling; Hou, Jiahua; Du, Qiqige; Zhao, Guofen; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the inevitability of nanoparticles encountering proteins/peptides in current bio-nano-medicine development, it is important to know how they interact with each other in vitro before developing in vivo applications. To this end, a model de novo β-sheet-forming peptide and typical biocompatible nanoparticles were selected to study thermodynamic aspects of their interactions via a fluorescence quenching method. The results showed that Pep11 and AuNPs spontaneously formed conjugates, mainly driven by a coulombic interaction with a binding affinity of ~ 0.1 µM(-1); the physical adsorption process was cooperative. These results deepen our quantitative understanding of nanoparticle-peptide interactions. The results may also be helpful in further nanoparticle-peptide hybrid nanofabrication and also useful for the application of nanoparticles in the treatment of amyloid diseases. PMID:25920412

  14. Mutation-based structural modification and dynamics study of amyloid beta peptide (1–42: An in-silico-based analysis to cognize the mechanism of aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Kumar Panda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the prevalent cause of premature senility, a progressive mental disorder due to degeneration in brain and deposition of amyloid β peptide (1–42, a misfolded protein in the form of aggregation that prevails for a prolonged time and obstructs every aspect of life. One of the primary hallmarks of the neuropathological disease is the accretion of amyloid β peptide in the brain that leads to Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanism is still a mystery. Several investigations have shown that mutations at specific positions have a significant impact in stability of the peptide as predicted from aggregation profiles. Here in our study, we have analyzed the mutations by substituting residues at position A22G, E22G, E22K, E22Q, D23N, L34V and molecular dynamics have been performed to check the deviation in stability and conformation of the peptide. The results validated that the mutations at specific positions lead to instability and the proline substitution at E22P and L34P stalled the aggregation of the peptide.

  15. Total synthesis of human beta-lipotropin.

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, J; Li, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The total synthesis of human beta-lipotropin has been accomplished by the new segment-coupling method in aqueous solution. The peptides Ac-Arg-beta-lipotropin-(61-89) (I) and [GlyS60]-beta-lipotropin-(1-60) (II) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. Reaction of peptide I with citraconic anhydride followed by brief digestion with trypsin to remove the acetylarginyl group, gave Ia. Reaction of peptide II with citraconic anhydride gave the citraconyl peptide IIa. Ia and IIa were coupled to...

  16. Concordant association of insulin degrading enzyme gene (IDE variants with IDE mRNA, Abeta, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva M Carrasquillo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The insulin-degrading enzyme gene (IDE is a strong functional and positional candidate for late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined conserved regions of IDE and its 10 kb flanks in 269 AD cases and 252 controls thereby identifying 17 putative functional polymorphisms. These variants formed eleven haplotypes that were tagged with ten variants. Four of these showed significant association with IDE transcript levels in samples from 194 LOAD cerebella. The strongest, rs6583817, which has not previously been reported, showed unequivocal association (p = 1.5x10(-8, fold-increase = 2.12,; the eleven haplotypes were also significantly associated with transcript levels (global p = 0.003. Using an in vitro dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that rs6583817 increases reporter gene expression in Be(2-C (p = 0.006 and HepG2 (p = 0.02 cell lines. Furthermore, using data from a recent genome-wide association study of two Croatian isolated populations (n = 1,879, we identified a proxy for rs6583817 that associated significantly with decreased plasma Abeta40 levels (ss = -0.124, p = 0.011 and total measured plasma Abeta levels (b = -0.130, p = 0.009. Finally, rs6583817 was associated with decreased risk of LOAD in 3,891 AD cases and 3,605 controls. (OR = 0.87, p = 0.03, and the eleven IDE haplotypes (global p = 0.02 also showed significant association. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, a previously unreported variant unequivocally associated with increased IDE expression was also associated with reduced plasma Abeta40 and decreased LOAD susceptibility. Genetic association between LOAD and IDE has been difficult to replicate. Our findings suggest that targeted testing of expression SNPs (eSNPs strongly associated with altered transcript levels in autopsy brain samples may be a powerful way to identify genetic associations with LOAD that would otherwise be difficult to detect.

  17. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer’s beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Di Scala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells. Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study “Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides” [1].

  18. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer’s beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs) and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells). Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study “Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides” [1]. PMID:26909380

  19. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs) and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells). Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study "Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides" [1]. PMID:26909380

  20. Similar peptides from two beta cell autoantigens, proinsulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase, stimulate T cells of individuals at risk for insulin-dependent diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudy, G; N. Stone; Harrison, L C; Colman, P. G.; McNair, P; Brusic, V.; French, M. B.; Honeyman, M. C.; Tait, B.; Lew, A M

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin (1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) (2) are both autoantigens in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), but no molecular mechanism has been proposed for their association. We have identified a 13 amino acid peptide of proinsulin (amino acids 24-36) that bears marked similarity to a peptide of GAD65 (amino acids 506-518) (G. Rudy, unpublished). In order to test the hypothesis that this region of similarity is implicated in the pathogenesis of IDDM, we assayed T c...

  1. Fusion Antibody for Alzheimer’s Disease with Bi-Directional Transport Across the Blood-Brain Barrier and Abeta Fibril Disaggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Boado, Ruben J.; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-Fang; Pardridge, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibody therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier is an obstacle to the diagnosis or therapy of CNS disease with antibody drugs. The immune therapy of Alzheimer’s disease attempts to disaggregate the amyloid plaque of Alzheimer’s disease with an anti-Abeta monoclonal antibody. The present work is based on a 3-step model of immune therapy of Alzheimer’s disease: (1) influx of the anti-Abeta monoclonal antibody across the blood-brain barrier in the blood to brain direc...

  2. Monodisperse carboxyl-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-coated magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres: application to the immunocapture of .beta.-amyloid peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Daniel; Hlídková, Helena; Hiraoui, M.; Taverna, M.; Proks, Vladimír; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Smadja, C.; Kučerová, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 11 (2014), s. 1590-1599. ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12053 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 246513 - NADINE Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : β-amyloid peptides * CE-LIF detection * functionalization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.851, year: 2014

  3. Characterization of D-enantiomeric peptides binding to monomeric Amyloid beta (1-42) identified by a competitive mirror image phage display

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Stephan; Kutzsche, Janine; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Frenzel, Daniel; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prominent type of dementia in elderly people. Until now there is no curative therapy available.Amyloid beta (Aβ) is assumed to play a major role in the development and progression of the disease. Freely diffusible, toxic Aβ oligomers seem to have a major toxicological impact.

  4. Interaction of Beta-Sheets to Form Aggregates and Fibrils. Theoretical and Experimental Spectroscopic Studies of Peptide Ir and Vcd Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chi, H.; Welch, W. R. W.; Kubelka, J.; Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr; Kiederling, T. A.

    Elsevier. Roč. 106, č. 2 (2014), 685A. ISSN 0006-3495. [Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society /58./. 15.02.2014-19.02.2014, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : beta-sheet * VCD * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Study of Intermediate Products from the Cross-linking Reactions of Genipin with Beta-Lactoglobulin and Related Peptides by MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genipin, methyl-1R,2R,6S-2-hydroxy-9-(hydroxymethyl)-3-oxabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-4,8-diene-5-carboxylate, is an aglycone derivative from geniposide found in the Gardenia jasminoides fruits, obtained through enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucosidase. Genipin has been shown to be capable of cross-linking...

  6. Exploring Beta-Amyloid Protein Transmembrane Insertion Behavior and Residue-Specific Lipid Interactions in Lipid Bilayers Using Multiscale MD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) interactions with neurons are linked to Alzheimer's. Using a multiscale MD simulation strategy that combines the high efficiency of phase space sampling of coarse-grained MD (CGD) and the high spatial resolution of Atomistic MD (AMD) simulations, we studied the Abeta insertion dynamics in cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid bilayers that mimic the neuronal membranes domains. Forward (AMD-CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) mappings were used. At the atomistic level, cholesterol promoted insertion of Abeta with high (folded) or low (unfolded) helical contents of the lipid insertion domain (Lys28-Ala42), and the insertions were stabilized by the Lys28 snorkeling and Ala42-anchoring to the polar lipid groups of the bilayer up to 200ns. After the forward mapping, the folded inserted state switched to a new extended inserted state with the Lys28 descended to the middle of the bilayer while the unfolded inserted state migrated to the membrane surface up to 4000ns. The two new states remained stable for 200ns at the atomistic scale after the reverse mapping. Our results suggested that different Abeta membrane-orientation states separated by free energy barriers can be explored by the multiscale MD more effectively than by Atomistic MD simulations alone. NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  7. Reprint of: Liquid chromatographic enzymatic studies with on-line Beta-secretase immobilized enzyme reactor and 4-(4-dimethylaminophenylazo) benzoic acid/5-[(2-aminoethyl) amino] naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid peptide as fluorogenic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Angela; Seidl, Claudia; Santos, Cid Aimbiré M; Andrisano, Vincenza

    2014-10-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) techniques are required for the fast hit inhibitors selection in the early discovery process. However, in Beta-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors screening campaign, the most frequently used methoxycoumarin based peptide substrate (M-2420) is not widely applicable when aromatic or heterocycle compounds of natural source show auto-fluorescence interferences. Here, in order to overcome these drawbacks, we propose the use of a highly selective 4-(4-dimethylaminophenylazo)benzoic acid/5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (DABCYL/1,5-EDANS) based peptide substrate (Substrate IV), whose cleavage product is devoid of spectroscopic interference. HrBACE1-IMER was prepared and characterized in terms of units of immobilised hrBACE1. BACE1 catalyzed Substrate IV cleavage was on-line kinetically characterized in terms of KM and vmax, in a classical Michaelis and Menten study. The on-line kinetic constants were found consistent with those obtained with the in solution fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) standard method. In order to further validate the use of Substrate IV for inhibition studies, the inhibitory potency of the well-known BACE1 peptide InhibitorIV (IC₅₀: 0.19 ± 0.02 μM) and of the natural compound Uleine (IC₅₀: 0.57 ± 0.05) were determined in the optimized on-line hrBACE1-IMER. The IC₅₀ values on the hrBACE1-IMER system were found in agreement with that obtained by the conventional methods confirming the applicability of Substrate IV for on-line BACE1 kinetic and inhibition studies. PMID:24932540

  8. Beta-amyloid peptides enhance the proliferative response of activated CD4CD28 lymphocytes from Alzheimer disease patients and from healthy elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Jóźwik

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most frequent form of dementia among elderly. Despite the vast amount of literature on non-specific immune mechanisms in AD there is still little information about the potential antigen-specific immune response in this pathology. It is known that early stages of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ- reactive antibodies production and inflammatory response. Despite some evidence gathered proving cellular immune response background in AD pathology, the specific reactions of CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells remain unknown as the previous investigations yielded conflicting results. Here we investigated the CD4(+CD28(+ population of human peripheral blood T cells and showed that soluble β-amyloids alone were unable to stimulate these cells to proliferate significantly, resulting only in minor, probably antigen-specific, proliferative response. On the other hand, the exposure of in vitro pre-stimulated lymphocytes to soluble Aβ peptides significantly enhanced the proliferative response of these cells which had also lead to increased levels of TNF, IL-10 and IL-6. We also proved that Aβ peptide-enhanced proliferative response of CD4(+CD28(+ cells is autonomous and independent from disease status while being associated with the initial, ex vivo activation status of the CD4(+ cells. In conclusion, we suggest that the effect of Aβ peptides on the immune system of AD patients does not depend on the specific reactivity to Aβ epitope(s, but is rather a consequence of an unspecific modulation of the cell cycle dynamics and cytokine production by T cells, occurring simultaneously in a huge proportion of Aβ peptide-exposed T lymphocytes and affecting the immune system performance.

  9. Cross-strand coupling and site-specific unfolding thermodynamics oa a Trpzip beta-hairpin peptide using 13C isotopic labeling and IR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, R.; Wu, L.; McElheny, D.; Bouř, Petr; Roy, A.; Keiderling, T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 16 (2009), s. 5661-5674. ISSN 1520-6106 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE03-16014; NSF(US) CHE07-18543; NSF(US) BIR00-79604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : circular dichroism * IR * trpzip * peptides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2009

  10. Peptoid-Peptide hybrid backbone architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam

    2010-01-01

    Peptidomimetic oligomers and foldamers have received considerable attention for over a decade, with beta-peptides and the so-called peptoids (N-alkylglycine oligomers) representing prominent examples of such architectures. Lately, hybrid or mixed backbones consisting of both alpha- and beta......-amino acids (alpha/beta-peptides) have been investigated in some detail as well. The present Minireview is a survey of the literature concerning hybrid structures of alpha-amino acids and peptoids, including beta-peptoids (N-alkyl-beta-alanine oligomers), and is intended to give an overview of this area...

  11. Beta-scission of side-chain alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins results in the loss of side-chains as aldehydes and ketones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O(2) results in side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation; the interrelationship between these processes is not fully understood. Recently, initial attack on Ala side-chains was shown to give alpha-carbon radicals (and hence backbone...... cleavage) and formaldehyde, via the formation and subsequent beta-scission, of C-3 alkoxyl radicals. We now show that this side-chain to backbone damage transfer, is a general mechanism for aliphatic side-chains. Oxidation of Val, Leu, and Asp residues by HO(*)/O(2) results in the release of a family of...... carbonyls (including formaldehyde, acetone, isobutyraldehyde, and glyoxylic acid) via the formation, and subsequent beta-scission of alkoxyl radicals. The concentration of these products increases with the HO(*) flux. The release of multiple carbonyls confirms the occurrence of oxidation at C-3 and C-4 for...

  12. Valine pyrrolidide preserves intact glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and improves abnormal glucose tolerance in minipigs with reduced beta-cell mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Olholm; Rolin, Bidda; Ribel, Ulla; Wilken, Michael; Deacon, Carolyn F; Svendsen, Ove; Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Carr, Richard David

    2003-01-01

    for type 2 diabetes was evaluated in a new large animal model of insulin-deficient diabetes and reduced beta-cell mass, the nicotinamide (NIA) (67 mg/kg) and streptozotocin (STZ) (125 mg/kg)-treated minipig, using the DPPIV inhibitor, valine pyrrolidide (VP) (50 mg/kg). VP did not significantly affect...... levels of intact GLP-1 but increased levels of intact GIP (from 4543 +/- 1880 to 9208 +/- 3267 pM x min; P <.01), thus improving glucose tolerance (area under the curve [AUC] for glucose reduced from 1904 +/- 480 to 1582 +/- 353 mM x min; P =.05). VP did not increase insulin levels during the oral......; however, additional mechanisms for the effect of DPPIV inhibition cannot be excluded. The authors conclude that DPPIV inhibitors may be useful to treat type 2 diabetes, even when this is due to reduced beta-cell mass....

  13. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    was denatured, extracted, purified and folded using a recently developed in vitro reiterative refolding strategy. This led to the formation of soluble, recombinant MHC-I molecules, which migrated as monomers of the expected size when submitted to non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Serological analysis revealed the presence of some, but not all, MHC-I-specific epitopes. Biochemically, PepSc could bind peptide, however, rather ineffectively. We suggest that a partially correctly refolded MHC-I has been obtained....

  14. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Molekulare Ursachen und therapeutische Intervention bei der Alzheimer-Demenz

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhardt, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Ein charakteristisches, neuropathologisches Merkmal der Alzheimer-Demenz (AD), der am häufigsten vorkommenden Demenz-Form des Menschen, ist das Auftreten von senilen Plaques im Gehirn der Patienten. Hierbei stellt das neurotoxische A-beta Peptid den Hauptbestandteil dieser Ablagerungen dar. Einen Beitrag zu der pathologisch erhöhten A-beta Generierung liefert das verschobene Expressionsgleichgewicht der um APP-konkurrierenden Proteasen BACE-1 und ADAM10 zu Gunsten der beta-Sekretase BACE-1. I...

  16. Depression is associated with low plasma Abeta42 independently of cardiovascular disease in the homebound elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression often precedes the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) before the appearance of cognitive symptoms. Plasma Amyloid-b peptide 42 (Ab42) declines before and soon after the onset of AD, yet the relationship between plasma Ab42 and depression is unclear. We used 515 homebound elders aged 60 an...

  17. Conformational preferences of heterochiral peptides. Crystal structures of heterochiral peptides Boc-(D) Val-(D) Ala-Leu-Ala-OMe and Boc-Val-Ala-Leu-(D) Ala-OMe--enhanced stability of beta-sheet through C-H...O hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiola, G F; Bobde, V; Damodharan, L; Pattabhi, V; Durani, S

    2001-02-01

    The crystal structures of Boc-(D) Val-(D) Ala-Leu-Ala-OMe (vaLA) and Boc-Val-Ala-Leu-(D) Ala-OMe (VALa) have been determined. vaLA crystallises in space group P2(1),2(1),2(1), with a = 9.401 (4), b = 17.253 (5), c = 36.276 (9)A. V = 5,884 (3) A3, Z = 8, R = 0.086. VALa crystallises in space group P2(1) with a = 9.683 (9), b = 17.355 (7), c = 18.187 (9) A, beta = 95.84 (8) degrees , V = 3,040(4) A3, Z = 4, R = 0.125. There are two molecules in the asymmetric unit in antiparallel beta-sheet arrangement in both the structures. Several of the Calpha hydrogens are in hydrogen bonding contact with the carbonyl oxygen in the adjacent strand. An analysis of the observed conformational feature of D-chiral amino acid residues in oligopeptides, using coordinates of 123 crystal structures selected from the 1998 release of CSD has been carried out. This shows that all the residues except D-isoleucine prefer both extended and alphaL conformation though the frequence of occurence may not be equal. In addition to this, D-leucine, valine, proline and phenylalanine have assumed alphaR conformations in solid state. D-leucine has a strong preference for helical conformation in linear peptides whereas they prefer an extended conformation in cyclic peptides. PMID:11245253

  18. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin ... then there is a 25% chance with each pregnancy that their child will inherit two abnormal beta ...

  19. Abeta targets of the biosimilar antibodies of Bapineuzumab, Crenezumab, Solanezumab in comparison to an antibody against N‑truncated Abeta in sporadic Alzheimer disease cases and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Yvonne; Lopez Noguerola, Jose Socrates; Tucholla, Petra; Crespi, Gabriela A N; Parker, Michael W; Wiltfang, Jens; Miles, Luke A; Bayer, Thomas A

    2015-11-01

    Solanezumab and Crenezumab are two humanized antibodies targeting Amyloid-β (Aβ) which are currently tested in multiple clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. However, there is a scientific discussion ongoing about the target engagement of these antibodies. Here, we report the immunohistochemical staining profiles of biosimilar antibodies of Solanezumab, Crenezumab and Bapineuzumab in human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and human fresh frozen tissue. Furthermore, we performed a direct comparative immunohistochemistry analysis of the biosimilar versions of the humanized antibodies in different mouse models including 5XFAD, Tg4-42, TBA42, APP/PS1KI, 3xTg. The staining pattern with these humanized antibodies revealed a surprisingly similar profile. All three antibodies detected plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy and intraneuronal Aβ in a similar fashion. Remarkably, Solanezumab showed a strong binding affinity to plaques. We also reaffirmed that Bapineuzumab does not recognize N-truncated or modified Aβ, while Solanezumab and Crenezumab do detect N-terminally modified Aβ peptides Aβ4-42 and pyroglutamate Aβ3-42. In addition, we compared the results with the staining pattern of the mouse NT4X antibody that recognizes specifically Aβ4-42 and pyroglutamate Aβ3-42, but not full-length Aβ1-42. In contrast to the biosimilar antibodies of Solanezumab, Crenezumab and Bapineuzumab, the murine NT4X antibody shows a unique target engagement. NT4X does barely cross-react with amyloid plaques in human tissue. It does, however, detect cerebral amyloid angiopathy in human tissue. In Alzheimer mouse models, NT4X detects intraneuronal Aβ and plaques comparable to the humanized antibodies. In conclusion, the biosimilar antibodies Solanezumab, Crenezumab and Bapineuzumab strongly react with amyloid plaques, which are in contrast to the NT4X antibody that hardly recognizes plaques in human tissue. Therefore, NT4X is the first of a new class of

  20. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  1. Beta-scission of alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins can give rise to backbone cleavage and loss of side-chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 brings about multiple changes including side-chain oxidation, backbone fragmentation, cross-linking, unfolding, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes and formation of new reactive groups (e.g. hydroperoxides and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). All of these processes can result in loss of structural or enzymatic activity. The mechanisms that give rise to backbone cleavage are only partly understood. Whilst it is known that direct hydrogen atom abstraction at a-carbon sites gives backbone cleavages it has also been proposed that initial attack at side-chain sites might also give rise to backbone cleavage. In this study we have examined whether initial attack at the β- (C-3) position can give rise to α-carbon radicals (and hence backbone cleavage) via the formation, and subsequent β- scission, of C-3 alkoxyl radicals. This process has been observed previously with protected amino acids in organic solvents (J. Chem. Soc. Perkin Trans. 2, 1997, 503-507) but the occurrence of such reactions with proteins in aqueous solution has not been explored. Alkoxyl radicals were generated at the C-3 position of a variety of protected amino acids and small peptides by two methods: metal-ion catalysed decomposition of hydroperoxides formed as a result of γ-radiolysis in the presence of O2, and UV photolysis of nitrate esters. In most cases radicals have been detected by EPR spectroscopy using nitroso and nitrone spin traps, which can be assigned by comparison with literature data to α-carbon radicals; in some case assignments were confirmed by the generation of the putative species by other routes. With Ala peptide hydroperoxides and nitrate esters, and MNP as the spin trap, the major radical detected in each case has been assigned to the adduct of an α-carbon radical with partial structure - NH-.CH-C(O) - consistent with the rapid occurrence of the above reaction

  2. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36) amide stimulates exocytosis in human pancreatic beta-cells by both proximal and distal regulatory steps in stimulus-secretion coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromada, J; Bokvist, K; Ding, W G; Holst, J J; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Rorsman, P

    1998-01-01

    The effect of glucagon-like peptide 1(7-36) amide [GLP-1(7-36) amide] on membrane potential, whole-cell ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K[ATP]) and Ca2+ currents, cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and exocytosis was explored in single human beta-cells. GLP-1(7-36) amide induced membrane...... depolarization that was associated with inhibition of whole-cell K(ATP) current. In addition, GLP-1(7-36) amide (and forskolin) produced greater than fourfold potentiation of Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. The latter effect resulted in part (40%) from acceleration of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent (L-type) Ca......2+ channels. More importantly, GLP-1(7-36) amide (via generation of cyclic AMP and activation of protein kinase A) potentiated exocytosis at a site distal to a rise in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration. Photorelease of caged cAMP produced a two- to threefold potentiation of exocytosis when the...

  3. Mechanisms of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Perspectives of pharmacotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Abraham, [No Value; Konya, C; Nyakas, C; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM

    2000-01-01

    One of the characteristic neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the extracellular accumulation of beta -amyloid peptides (A beta) in neuritic plaques, Experimental data indicate that different molecular forms of A beta affect a wide array of neuronal and glial functions and ther

  4. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  5. A chemical analog of curcumin as an improved inhibitor of amyloid Abeta oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Orlando

    Full Text Available Amyloid-like plaques are characteristic lesions defining the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The size and density of these plaques are closely associated with cognitive decline. To combat this disease, the few therapies that are available rely on drugs that increase neurotransmission; however, this approach has had limited success as it has simply slowed an imminent decline and failed to target the root cause of AD. Amyloid-like deposits result from aggregation of the Aβ peptide, and thus, reducing amyloid burden by preventing Aβ aggregation represents an attractive approach to improve the therapeutic arsenal for AD. Recent studies have shown that the natural product curcumin is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier in the CNS in sufficient quantities so as to reduce amyloid plaque burden. Based upon this bioactivity, we hypothesized that curcumin presents molecular features that make it an excellent lead compound for the development of more effective inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. To explore this hypothesis, we screened a library of curcumin analogs and identified structural features that contribute to the anti-oligomerization activity of curcumin and its analogs. First, at least one enone group in the spacer between aryl rings is necessary for measureable anti-Aβ aggregation activity. Second, an unsaturated carbon spacer between aryl rings is essential for inhibitory activity, as none of the saturated carbon spacers showed any margin of improvement over that of native curcumin. Third, methoxyl and hydroxyl substitutions in the meta- and para-positions on the aryl rings appear necessary for some measure of improved inhibitory activity. The best lead inhibitors have either their meta- and para-substituted methoxyl and hydroxyl groups reversed from that of curcumin or methoxyl or hydroxyl groups placed in both positions. The simple substitution of the para-hydroxy group on curcumin with a methoxy substitution improved

  6. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of antimicrobial peptides in membrane mimics can provide the high resolution, atomistic picture that is necessary to decipher which sequence and structure components are responsible for activity and toxicity. With such detailed insight, engineering new sequences that are active but non...... peptides and their interaction with membrane mimics. In this article, we discuss the promise and the challenges of widely used models and detail our recent work on peptide-micelle simulations as an attractive alternative to peptide-bilayer simulations. We detail our results with two large structural...... classes of peptides, helical and beta-sheet and demonstrate how simulations can assist in engineering of novel antimicrobials with therapeutic potential....

  7. Dietary deficiency increases presenilin expression, gamma-secretase activity and Abeta levels: potentiation by ApoE genotype and alleviation by S-adenosyl methionine

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Amy; Tchantchou, Flaubert; Eugene J. Rogers; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether this risk arises from a deficient function of E4 or the lack of protection provided by E2 ir E3 is unclear. Previous studies demonstrate that deprivation of folate and vitamin E, coupled with dietary iron as a pro-oxidant, for 1 month displayed increased PS-1 expression, gamma-secretase and Abeta generation in mice lacking ApoE (ApoE-/- mice). While ApoE-/- mice are a model for ApoE deficiency, they may not refle...

  8. Effect of peptide secondary structure on peptide amphiphile supramolecular structure and interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Missirlis, Dimitris; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Fu, Caroline J; Khant, Htet A.; Krogstad, Daniel V.; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Bottom-up fabrication of self-assembled nanomaterials requires control over forces and interactions between building blocks. We here report on the formation and architecture of supramolecular structures constructed from two different peptide amphiphiles. Inclusion of four alanines between a 16-mer peptide and a 16-carbon long aliphatic tail resulted in a secondary structure shift of the peptide headgroups from alpha helices to beta sheets. A concomitant shift in self-assembled morphology from...

  9. Formation and Degradation of Beta-casomorphins in Dairy Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Duc Doan; Johnson, Stuart Keith; Busetti, Francesco; Solah, Vicky Ann

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins including casein are sources of peptides with bioactivity. One of these peptides is beta-casomorphin (BCM) which belongs to a group of opioid peptides formed from β-casein variants. Beta-casomorphin 7 (BCM7) has been demonstrated to be enzymatically released from the A1 or B β-casein variant. Epidemiological evidence suggests the peptide BCM 7 is a risk factor for development of human diseases, including increased risk of type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases but this has ...

  10. Dietary deficiency increases presenilin expression, gamma-secretase activity, and Abeta levels: potentiation by ApoE genotype and alleviation by S-adenosyl methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Amy; Tchantchou, Flaubert; Rogers, Eugene J; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-08-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether this risk arises from a deficient function of E4 or the lack of protection provided by E2 or E3 is unclear. Previous studies demonstrate that deprivation of folate and vitamin E, coupled with dietary iron as a pro-oxidant, for 1 month displayed increased presenilin 1 (PS-1) expression, gamma-secretase, and Abeta generation in mice lacking ApoE (ApoE-/- mice). While ApoE-/- mice are a model for ApoE deficiency, they may not reflect the entire range of consequences of E4 expression. We therefore compared herein the impact of the above deficient diet on mice expressing human E2, E3, or E4. As folate deficiency is accompanied by a decrease in the major methyl donor, S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), additional mice received the deficient diet plus SAM. E2 was more protective than murine ApoE or E3 and E4. Surprisingly, PS-1 and gamma-secretase were over-expressed in E3 to the same extent as in E4 even under a complete diet, and were not alleviated by SAM supplementation. Abeta increased only in E4 mice maintained under the complete diet, and was alleviated by SAM supplementation. These findings suggest dietary compromise can potentiate latent risk factors for AD. PMID:19457069

  11. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of [1-14C]trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and 14CO2 release. At this point, reduction by NaB3H4 and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes

  12. Tityus serrulatus venom peptidomics: assessing venom peptide diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rates, Breno; Ferraz, Karla K F; Borges, Márcia H; Richardson, Michael; De Lima, Maria Elena; Pimenta, Adriano M C

    2008-10-01

    MALDI-TOF-TOF and de novo sequencing were employed to assess the Tityus serrulatus venom peptide diversity. Previous works has shown the cornucopia of molecular masses, ranging from 800 to 3000Da, present in the venom from this and other scorpions species. This work reports the identification/sequencing of several of these peptides. The majority of the peptides found were fragments of larger venom toxins. For instance, 28 peptides could be identified as fragments from Pape proteins, 10 peptides corresponded to N-terminal fragments of the TsK beta (scorpine-like) toxin and fragments of potassium channel toxins (other than the k-beta) were sequenced as well. N-terminal fragments from the T. serrulatus hypotensins-I and II and a novel hypotensin-like peptide could also be found. This work also reports the sequencing of novel peptides without sequence similarities to other known molecules. PMID:18718845

  13. Delayed onset of changes in soma action potential genesis in nociceptive A-beta DRG neurons in vivo in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry James L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical data on osteoarthritis (OA suggest widespread changes in sensory function that vary during the progression of OA. In previous studies on a surgically-induced animal model of OA we have observed that changes in structure and gene expression follow a variable trajectory over the initial days and weeks. To investigate mechanisms underlying changes in sensory function in this model, the present electrophysiological study compared properties of primary sensory nociceptive neurons at one and two months after model induction with properties in naïve control animals. Pilot data indicated no difference in C- or Aδ-fiber associated neurons and therefore the focus is on Aβ-fiber nociceptive neurons. Results At one month after unilateral derangement of the knee by cutting the anterior cruciate ligament and removing the medial meniscus, the only changes observed in Aβ-fiber dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons were in nociceptor-like unresponsive neurons bearing a hump on the repolarization phase; these changes consisted of longer half width, reflecting slowed dynamics of AP genesis, a depolarized Vm and an increased AP amplitude. At two months, changes observed were in Aβ-fiber high threshold mechanoreceptors, which exhibited shorter AP duration at base and half width, shorter rise time and fall time, and faster maximum rising rate/maximum falling rate, reflecting accelerated dynamics of AP genesis. Conclusion These data indicate that Aβ nociceptive neurons undergo significant changes that vary in time and occur later than changes in structure and in nociceptive scores in this surgically induced OA model. Thus, if changes in Aβ-fiber nociceptive neurons in this model reflect a role in OA pain, they may relate to mechanisms underlying pain associated with advanced OA.

  14. New Alzheimer amyloid beta responsive genes identified in human neuroblastoma cells by hierarchical clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Uhrig

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by neuronal degeneration and cell loss. Abeta(42, in contrast to Abeta(40, is thought to be the pathogenic form triggering the pathological cascade in AD. In order to unravel overall gene regulation we monitored the transcriptomic responses to increased or decreased Abeta(40 and Abeta(42 levels, generated and derived from its precursor C99 (C-terminal fragment of APP comprising 99 amino acids in human neuroblastoma cells. We identified fourteen differentially expressed transcripts by hierarchical clustering and discussed their involvement in AD. These fourteen transcripts were grouped into two main clusters each showing distinct differential expression patterns depending on Abeta(40 and Abeta(42 levels. Among these transcripts we discovered an unexpected inverse and strong differential expression of neurogenin 2 (NEUROG2 and KIAA0125 in all examined cell clones. C99-overexpression had a similar effect on NEUROG2 and KIAA0125 expression as a decreased Abeta(42/Abeta(40 ratio. Importantly however, an increased Abeta(42/Abeta(40 ratio, which is typical of AD, had an inverse expression pattern of NEUROG2 and KIAA0125: An increased Abeta(42/Abeta(40 ratio up-regulated NEUROG2, but down-regulated KIAA0125, whereas the opposite regulation pattern was observed for a decreased Abeta(42/Abeta(40 ratio. We discuss the possibilities that the so far uncharacterized KIAA0125 might be a counter player of NEUROG2 and that KIAA0125 could be involved in neurogenesis, due to the involvement of NEUROG2 in developmental neural processes.

  15. New Alzheimer amyloid beta responsive genes identified in human neuroblastoma cells by hierarchical clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, Markus; Ittrich, Carina; Wiedmann, Verena; Knyazev, Yuri; Weninger, Annette; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Hartmann, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal degeneration and cell loss. Abeta(42), in contrast to Abeta(40), is thought to be the pathogenic form triggering the pathological cascade in AD. In order to unravel overall gene regulation we monitored the transcriptomic responses to increased or decreased Abeta(40) and Abeta(42) levels, generated and derived from its precursor C99 (C-terminal fragment of APP comprising 99 amino acids) in human neuroblastoma cells. We identified fourteen differentially expressed transcripts by hierarchical clustering and discussed their involvement in AD. These fourteen transcripts were grouped into two main clusters each showing distinct differential expression patterns depending on Abeta(40) and Abeta(42) levels. Among these transcripts we discovered an unexpected inverse and strong differential expression of neurogenin 2 (NEUROG2) and KIAA0125 in all examined cell clones. C99-overexpression had a similar effect on NEUROG2 and KIAA0125 expression as a decreased Abeta(42)/Abeta(40) ratio. Importantly however, an increased Abeta(42)/Abeta(40) ratio, which is typical of AD, had an inverse expression pattern of NEUROG2 and KIAA0125: An increased Abeta(42)/Abeta(40) ratio up-regulated NEUROG2, but down-regulated KIAA0125, whereas the opposite regulation pattern was observed for a decreased Abeta(42)/Abeta(40) ratio. We discuss the possibilities that the so far uncharacterized KIAA0125 might be a counter player of NEUROG2 and that KIAA0125 could be involved in neurogenesis, due to the involvement of NEUROG2 in developmental neural processes. PMID:19707560

  16. Isolation and characterization of testis-specific cDNAs for luteinizing hormone beta-subunit in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F P; Rannikko, A; Huhtaniemi, I

    1995-05-25

    To study further the unexpected expression of the luteinizing hormone (LH) beta-subunit in the rat testis, we identified in a rat testicular cDNA library three LH beta clones with lengths of 3.2, 2.4 and 0.86 kb (TLH beta 1, TLH beta 2 and TLH beta 3). The clones were identified using a 32P-labeled cDNA probe complimentary to the known rat pituitary LH beta mRNA. Clone TLH beta 2 corresponds in size to the main LH beta mRNA species (2.7 kb) detected by Northern hybridization in the rat testis. Sequence analysis indicated that the different sizes of the three clones are due to alternative RNA splicing and differences at the 5' ends of transcripts. The sequence of one open reading frame deduced from TLH beta 1 is almost identical with the pituitary LH beta peptide, differing only in three amino acids in the putative signal peptide. It might encode a functional testis-specific LH beta peptide. Shorter transcripts from clones TLH beta 2 and TLH beta 3 may correspond to short testicular LH beta peptides. The present findings provide further evidence in the rat for expression of testis-specific mRNA variants of the LH beta gene. Their translation products may form a novel class of testicular para/autocrine factors. PMID:7763258

  17. Improved tumor targeting of radiolabeled RGD peptides using rapid dose fractionation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.; Frielink, C.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Edwards, D.S.; Liu, S.; Rajopadhye, M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2004-01-01

    Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides preferentially bind to alphavbeta3 integrin, an integrin expressed on newly formed endothelial cells and on various tumor cells. When labeled with beta-emitting radionuclides, these peptides can be used for peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy of malign

  18. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Relevance to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Hortobagyi, T; Sasvari, M; Konya, C; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM; Nyakas, C

    1999-01-01

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition arid processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are producedin a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor prot

  19. MHC class I phenotype and function of human beta 2-microglobulin transgenic murine lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, L; Pedersen, L O; Bregenholt, S; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claesson, M H

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid cells from beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) knockout mice transgenic for human (h) beta 2m (C57BL/10 m beta 2m-/h beta 2m+) were compared with normal mice for their binding to exogenously added h beta 2m, binding to a H-2Db peptide and for functional activity in a one-way allogenic MLC...... normal splenocytes. In contrast, transgenic alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes developed earlier in MLC than their non-transgenic counterparts. These data indicate that the hybrid mouse heavy chain/h beta 2m complex alters the alloantigenic repertoire and influences important aspects of T...

  20. Measurement of the Interaction Between Recombinant I-domain from Integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and a Triple Helical Collagen Peptide with the GFOGER Binding Motif Using Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Welland, Mark E.; Farndale, Richard W.; Dominique Bihan; Debdulal Roy; Simon J Attwood; Simpson, Anna M. C.; Hamaia, Samir W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the collagen-platelet interaction is of crucial importance to the haemostatic response during both injury and pathogenesis of the blood vessel wall. Of particular interest is the high affinity interaction of the platelet transmembrane receptor, alpha 2 beta 1, responsible for firm attachment of platelets to collagen at and around injury sites. We employ single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to study the interaction of the I-domain from i...

  1. beta-Endorphin immunoreactive material and authentic beta-endorphin in the plasma of males undergoing anaerobic exercise on a rowing ergometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, A; Harbach, H; Katz, N; Geiger, L; Teschemacher, H

    2000-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), beta-endorphin immunoreactive material (beta-endorphin IRM), and authentic beta-endorphin (1 -31) have been determined in the plasma of 23 volunteers undergoing anaerobic exercise on a rowing ergometer. The volunteers had different histories of training from occasional physical activities up to intensive preparation for international rowing competitions. ACTH and beta-endorphin-IRM were determined using commercially available immunometric assays; for determination of beta-endorphin (1-31) a highly specific two-site fluid phase immunoprecipitation radioimmunoassay was developed, which did not cross-react with any beta-endorphin derivative or any other opioid peptide tested. In agreement with reports from the literature ACTH and beta-endorphin-IRM concentrations in the plasma rose upon anaerobic exercise in all 23 subjects; this increase in the ACTH and beta-endorphin IRM levels was significantly correlated with the increase of lactate levels observed upon anaerobic exercise. Authentic beta-endorphin (1-31) was only found in two plasma samples containing minor concentrations of the peptide. We conclude that the beta-endorphin immunoreactive material released into blood under anaerobic exercise is identical with authentic beta-endorphin (1-31) only to a minor extent and thus should not be called "beta-endorphin". The major part of the material in fact released into the blood upon anaerobic exercise is probably identical with beta-lipotropin and further components so far unknown. PMID:11071055

  2. Thymosin beta 4 and thymosin beta 10 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Theunissen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4 and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10 are two members of the beta-thymosin family involved in many cellular processes such as cellular motility, angiogenesis, inflammation, cell survival and wound healing. Recently, a role for beta-thymosins has been proposed in the process of carcinogenesis as both peptides were detected in several types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. To this end, the expression pattern of both peptides was analyzed in liver samples obtained from 23 subjects diagnosed with HCC. Routinely formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded liver samples were immunostained by indirect immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies to Tβ4 and Tβ10. Immunoreactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 was detected in the liver parenchyma of the surrounding tumor area. Both peptides showed an increase in granular reactivity from the periportal to the periterminal hepatocytes. Regarding HCC, Tβ4 reactivity was detected in 7/23 cases (30% and Tβ10 reactivity in 22/23 (97% cases analyzed, adding HCC to human cancers that express these beta-thymosins. Intriguing finding was seen looking at the reactivity of both peptides in tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding liver. Where Tβ10 showed a strong homogeneous expression, was Tβ4 completely absent in cells undergoing stromal invasion. The current study shows expression of both beta-thymosins in HCC with marked differences in their degree of expression and frequency of immunoreactivity. The higher incidence of Tβ10 expression and its higher reactivity in tumor cells involved in stromal invasion indicate a possible major role for Tβ10 in HCC progression.

  3. Evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals: synthesis, evaluation, and biodistribution of radiolabelled peptide of VCAM-1 and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}; Evaluation de nouveaux radiopharmaceutiques: synthese, evaluation et biodistribution de nouveaux radiologands peptidiques de VCAM-1 et {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardisson, V

    2006-07-15

    The new development of nuclear medicine implies the search of new isotopes but also for new vectors specific of functions or metabolic pathways. We investigated new radiopharmaceuticals intended for new diagnostic approaches of two physiopathological mechanisms frequently met in our populations: the atherosclerosis vulnerable plaque and the tumor angio genesis. We studied and optimized the iodine and 99 m-technetium radiolabelling, of a series of peptides in order to allow the in vivo use of these tracers for imaging studies in animals and possibly in humans. The radioiodination, was carried out by electrophilic substitution, and technetium was linked by a tri-carbonyl B.F.C.A. (Isolink). The reaction parameters were defined so that the labelling reactions presents a high radiochemical purity (>95%), and a high specificity activity. The reactions are fast and reproducible. Various physicochemical properties: lipo-solubility, stability of labelling, and pharmacokinetic properties: non specific binding, metabolization and organ biodistribution of peptides in animal model, were studied. These results indicate which peptide may be a suitable candidate for targeting trials. (author)

  4. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  5. Antimicrobial actions of the human epididymis 2 (HE2 protein isoforms, HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Frank S

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HE2 gene encodes a group of isoforms with similarities to the antimicrobial beta-defensins. We demonstrated earlier that the antimicrobial activity of HE2 proteins and peptides is salt resistant and structure dependent and involves permeabilization of bacterial membranes. In this study, we further characterize the antimicrobial properties of HE2 peptides in terms of the structural changes induced in E. coli and the inhibition of macromolecular synthesis. Methods E. coli treated with 50 micro g/ml of HE2alpha, HE2beta1 or HE2beta2 peptides for 30 and 60 min were visualized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the impact of these peptides on bacterial internal and external structure. The effects of HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 on E. coli macromolecular synthesis was assayed by incubating the bacteria with 2, 10 and 25 micro g/ml of the individual peptides for 0–60 min and measuring the incorporation of the radioactive precursors [methyl-3H]thymidine, [5-3H]uridine and L-[4,5-3H(N]leucine into DNA, RNA and protein. Statistical analyses using Student's t-test were performed using Sigma Plot software. Values shown are Mean ± S.D. Results E. coli treated with HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 peptides as visualized by transmission electron microscopy showed extensive damage characterized by membrane blebbing, thickening of the membrane, highly granulated cytoplasm and appearance of vacuoles in contrast to the smooth and continuous membrane structure of the untreated bacteria. Similarly, bacteria observed by scanning electron microscopy after treating with HE2alpha, HE2beta1 or HE2beta2 peptides exhibited membrane blebbing and wrinkling, leakage of cellular contents, especially at the dividing septa, and external accumulation of fibrous materials. In addition, HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 peptides inhibited E. coli DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Conclusions The morphological changes observed

  6. Proteomic analysis of transducin beta-subunit structural heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, James W; Juhl, Martha; Rice, Carol A; Li, Junyu; Witzmann, Frank A

    2003-10-01

    Partially purified transducin was resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Peptide mass fingerprinting of several different spots believed to correspond to the 37 kDa beta-subunit of transducin (T(beta)) was performed. Spots were excised and proteolyzed using modified trypsin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was performed on the peptide mixture resulting from each spot. As many as six spots with different pI, ranging from 5.2 to 6.1, were observed when separated using 2-DE. MALDI peptide mass fingerprinting determined with high probability that all of the spots were the same gene product, guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) beta-subunit 1 (GNB1; T(beta1)). This suggested that post-translational modification was responsible for the differences in pI. Phosphorylation experiments showed that at least one T(beta1) spot was phosphorylated in vitro with [gamma-(32)P]ATP by an endogenous kinase. Treatment of T(beta) with alkaline phosphatase caused a large change in the spot pattern of T(beta), suggesting that phosphorylated T(beta) is a substrate for alkaline phosphatase. We conclude that T(beta1) constitutes over 99% of the T(beta) expressed in bovine rod outer segments and displays structural heterogeneity that is due to post-translational modification. We also conclude that some, but not all, of the heterogeneity observed is due to phosphorylation of Tb1. PMID:14595696

  7. Two distinct variants of erythrocyte spectrin beta IV domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, B; Alloisio, N; Morlé, L; Maréchal, J; Barthélemy, H; Ducluzeau, M T; Dorier, A; Delaunay, J

    1989-11-01

    We report two distinct variants affecting the beta IV domain of erythrocyte spectrin, designated spectrin Saint-Chamond and spectrin Tlemcen. They were discovered in a French family and an Algerian individual, respectively. They appeared clinically and morphologically asymptomatic in the heterozygous state. In two-dimensional maps of spectrin partial digests, both mutants were manifested by cathodic shifts (with no change of the molecular weights) of the peptides that cover the N-terminal region of spectrin beta IV domain. The relevance of the abnormal peptides to the beta IV domain was established by quantitative analysis and by Western blotting using anti-beta IV domain-specific antibodies. These two variants are thus far the most distal variants of spectrin to be defined on an unequivocal structural basis. PMID:2807277

  8. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in \\beta-sheet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Chitra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate interactions of extended conformations of homodimeric peptides made of small (glycine or alanine) and large hydrophobic (valine or leucine) sidechains using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to decipher driving forces for \\beta-sheet formation. We make use of a periodic boundary condition setup in which individual peptides are infinitely long and stretched. Dimers adopt \\beta-sheet conformations at short interpeptide distances (\\xi ~ 0.5 nm) and at intermediate distances (~ 0.8 nm), valine and leucine homodimers assume cross-\\beta-like conformations with side chains interpenetrating each other. These two states are identified as minima in the Potential of Mean Force (PMF). While the number of interpeptide hydrogen bonds increases with decreasing interpeptide distance, the total hydrogen bond number in the system does not change significantly, suggesting that formation of \\beta-sheet structures from extended conformations is not driven by hydrogen bonds. This is supported by...

  9. Bradykinin antagonists modified with dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaro, Maria C; Vinci, Valerio; D'Ursi, Anna M; Scrima, Mario; Chelli, Mario; Giuliani, Sandro; Meini, Stefania; Di Giacomo, Marcello; Colombo, Lino; Papini, Anna Maria

    2006-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is involved in a wide variety of pathophysiological processes. Potent BK peptide antagonists can be developed introducing constrained unnatural amino acids, necessary to force the secondary structure of the molecule. In this paper, we report a structure-activity relationship study of two peptide analogues of the potent B2 antagonist HOE 140 by replacing the D-Tic-Oic dipeptide with conformationally constrained dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers. PMID:16504505

  10. PET imaging of alphavbeta integrin expression in tumours with Ga-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Yim, C.B.; Franssen, G.M.; Schuit, R.C.; Luurtsema, G.; Liu, S.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Due to the restricted expression of alpha(v)beta(3) in tumours, alpha(v)beta(3) is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the alpha(v)beta(3)-binding characteristics of (68)Ga-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD peptides were determined and compared wi

  11. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreh, Michael [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Willander, Hanna [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Soeder, Olle [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Jan [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Joernvall, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Jornvall@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  12. Phosphorylation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by checkpoint kinase Chk1: identification of the in vitro CK2beta phosphorylation site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Højrup, Peter; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Guerra, Barbara

    The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 mediates the formation of the CK2 tetrameric form and it has functions independent of CK2 catalytic subunit through interaction with several intracellular proteins. Recently, we have shown that CK2beta associates with the human checkpoint kinase Chk......1. In this study, we show that Chk1 specifically phosphorylates in vitro the regulatory beta-subunit of CK2. Chymotryptic peptides and mutational analyses have revealed that CK2beta is phosphorylated at Thr213. Formation of a stable complex between CK2beta and Chk1 is not affected by the...

  13. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  14. Salivary Antimicrobial Peptide Expression and Dental Caries Experience in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Renchuan; Jurevic, Richard J.; Coulton, Kimberly K.; Tsutsui, Marjorie T.; Roberts, Marilyn C.; Kimball, Janet R.; Wells, Norma; Berndt, Jeffery; Dale, Beverly A.

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries is a major worldwide oral disease problem in children. Although caries are known to be influenced by dietary factors, the disease results from a bacterial infection; thus, caries susceptibility may be affected by host factors such as salivary antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to determine a possible correlation between caries prevalence in children and salivary concentrations of the antimicrobial peptides human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3), the cathelicidin LL37, and the alpha...

  15. The interaction of bioactive peptides with an immobilized phosphatidylcholine monolayer.

    OpenAIRE

    Mozsolits, H; Lee, T. H.; Wirth, H J; Perlmutter, P; Aguilar, M I

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of three bioactive peptides, bombesin, beta-endorphin, and glucagon with a phosphatidylcholine monolayer that was immobilized to porous silica particles and packed into a stainless steel column cartridge, has been studied using dynamic elution techniques. This immobilized lipid monolayer provides a biophysical model system with which to study the binding of peptides to a lipid membrane. In particular, the influence of temperature and methanol concentration on the affinity of e...

  16. Beta-endorphin (1-31) in the plasma of male volunteers undergoing physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbach, H; Hell, K; Gramsch, C; Katz, N; Hempelmann, G; Teschemacher, H

    2000-08-01

    beta-Endorphin is an opioid peptide representing the C-terminal 31 amino acid residue fragment of proopiomelanocortin (POMC). The release of beta-endorphin from the pituitary into the cardiovascular compartment under physical or emotional stress has been frequently reported. However, besides beta-endorphin (1-31), nine acetylated or non-acetylated beta-endorphin analogues exist - in addition to N-terminally elongated beta-endorphin derivatives such as beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH). Since conventional radioimmunoassays (RIAs) and even commercially available two site-RIAs pick up at least some of those beta-endorphin derivatives, only "beta-endorphin immunoreactive materials" and not authentic beta-endorphin have been determined in those studies. We have developed a highly specific two site-RIA for beta-endorphin (1-31), which does not cross-react with all beta-endorphin derivatives known to occur as yet. Using this RIA as well as further assays for determination of beta-endorphin (1-31), beta-endorphin immunoreactive material (IRM), ACTH and Cortisol in the plasma of 14 volunteers upon intensive physical exercise, we found authentic beta-endorphin only in about 50% of the plasma samples, representing therein only a minor portion of the beta-endorphin IRM. PMID:10840168

  17. A simple and realistic model system for studying hydrogen bonds in beta-sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Hinnemann, Berit; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel;

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the interaction between peptide chains at the level of state-of-the-art ab initio density functional theory. We propose an interacting periodic polypeptide model for studying the interactions in beta-sheets and apply this to glycine and alanine peptide chains in both parallel and...

  18. Novel antifungal peptides from Ceylon spinach seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2001-11-01

    Two novel antifungal peptides, designated alpha- and beta-basrubrins, respectively, were isolated from seeds of the Ceylon spinach Basella rubra. The purification procedure involved saline extraction, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex peptide column. alpha- and beta-basrubrins exhibited a molecular weight of 4.3 and 5 kDa, respectively. They inhibited translation in a rabbit reticulocyte system with an IC(50) value of 400 and 100 nM, respectively. alpha- and beta-basrubrin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by (79.4 +/- 7.8)% and (54.6 +/- 3.6)%, respectively, at a concentration of 400 microM, and (10.56 +/- 0.92)% and (2.12 +/- 0.81)%, respectively, at a concentration of 40 microM. Both alpha- and beta-basrubrins exerted potent antifungal activity toward Botrytis cinerea, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Fusarium oxysporum. PMID:11688973

  19. The comorbidity of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease: a foreseeable medical challenge in post-HAART era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiqing; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2009-06-01

    Although the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a strong reduction of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) incidence, the prevalence of minor HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is rising among AIDS patients. HAART medication has shifted neuropathology from a subacute encephalitic condition to a subtle neurodegenerative process involving synaptic and dendritic degeneration, particularly of hippocampal neurons that are spared prior to HAART medication. Considerable neuroinflammation coupled with mononuclear phagocyte activation is present in HAART-medicated brains, particularly in the hippocampus. Accumulating evidence suggests that the resultant elevated secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1beta can increase amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) generation and reduce Abeta clearance. Recent advancements in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research identified Abeta biogenesis and clearance venues that are potentially influenced by HIV viral infection, providing new insights into beta-amyloidosis segregation in HIV patients. Our study suggests enhanced beta-amyloidosis in ART-treated HAD and HIV-associated encephalitis brains and suppression of Abeta clearance by viral infection of human primary macrophages. A growing awareness of potential convergent mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration shared by HIV and Abeta points to a significant chance of comorbidity of AD and HAND in senile HIV patients, which calls for a need of basic studies. PMID:19016329

  20. The extracellular PI-type proteinase of Lactococcus lactis hydrolyzes beta-casein into more than one hundred different oligopeptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Juillard, V; van der Laan, H.; Kunji, E R; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C M; Bruins, A P; Konings, W. N.

    1995-01-01

    The peptides released from beta-casein by the action of PI-type proteinase (PrtP) from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 have been identified by on-line coupling of liquid chromatography to mass spectrometry. After 24 h of incubation of beta-casein with purified PrtP, a stable mixture of peptides was obtained. The trifluoroacetic acid-soluble peptides of this beta-casein hydrolysate were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and introduced into the liquid chromatography-...

  1. Evaluation of beta defensin 2 production by chicken heterophils using direct MALDI mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta defensins (BD) are cysteine rich, cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMP) produced mainly by epithelial and myeloid cells such as neutrophils. In birds, the equivalent of neutrophils, heterophils produce avian beta defensins (AvBD) of which AvBD2 is the major isoform. Heterophils recognize patho...

  2. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined.......To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  3. A novel affinity purification method to isolate peptide specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Alan E; Lernmark, A; Kofod, Hans; Dyrberg, T

    1990-01-01

    affinity-purify anti-peptide antibodies. To test our system, rabbits were immunized with model peptides representing sequences of the putative rabbit growth hormone receptor and several HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules. Polystyrene plastic beads were coated with peptides. Immune serum was incubated with the...... beads and after a wash step the bound antibodies were eluted in 1 M acetic acid. The eluted material was composed predominantly of intact immunoglobulin as evidenced by the presence of heavy and light chain bands in SDS-PAGE. The eluted antibodies were peptide specific in ELISA and bound only to intact......, antigenic protein in immunoblot analyses. The sequence-specific nature of the eluted antibodies was confirmed since binding to the antigenic proteins could be displaced by the immunizing but not by unrelated peptides....

  4. Biosynthesis of phosphorylated forms of corticotropin-related peptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, H P; Browne, C. A.; Solomon, S.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of corticotropin[ACTH (1-39)], corticotropin-like intermediary lobe peptide[CLIP, ACTH (18-39)], and the common precursor for ACTH and beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH) have been identified in extracts of rat pituitaries, 32P-Labeled inorganic phosphate was successfully incorporated into ACTH (1-39), CLIP, and the ACTH/beta-LPH precursor in rat neurointermediary lobe explants and into ACTH (1-39) in isolated rat anterior pituitary cells. After peptidase digestion of the labeled ...

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding thermophilic beta-amylase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamoto, N; Yamagata, H; Kato, T; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1988-01-01

    A gene coding for thermophilic beta-amylase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes was cloned into Bacillus subtilis, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The nucleotide sequence suggested that the thermophilic beta-amylase is translated from monocistronic mRNA as a secretory precursor with a signal peptide of 32 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature beta-amylase contained 519 residues with a molecular weight of 57,167. The amino acid sequence of the C. thermosu...

  6. Antagonist of the amylin receptor blocks beta-amyloid toxicity in rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhamandas, Jack H; MacTavish, David

    2004-06-16

    Salvage of cholinergic neurons in the brain through a blockade of the neurotoxic effects of amyloidbeta protein (Abeta) is one of the major, but still elusive, therapeutic goals of current research in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, no receptor has been unequivocally identified for Abeta. Human amylin, which acts via a receptor composed of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor and a receptor-associated membrane protein, possesses amyloidogenic properties and has a profile of neurotoxicity that is strikingly similar to Abeta. In this study, using primary cultures of rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, we show that acetyl-[Asn30, Tyr32] sCT(8-37) (AC187), an amylin receptor antagonist, blocks Abeta-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of cultures with AC187 before exposure to Abeta results in significantly improved neuronal survival as judged by MTT and live-dead cell assays. Quantitative measures of Abeta-evoked apoptotic cell death, using Hoechst and phosphotidylserine staining, confirm neuroprotective effects of AC187. We also demonstrate that AC187 attenuates the activation of initiator and effector caspases that mediate Abeta-induced apoptotic cell death. These data are the first to show that expression of Abeta toxicity may occur through the amylin receptor and suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:15201330

  7. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  8. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  9. Peptider holder krabben rask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar......Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar...

  10. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    .S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return of the...

  11. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    Few issues are more important for finance practice than the computation of market betas. Existing approaches compute market betas using historical data. While these approaches differ in terms of statistical sophistication and the modeling of the time-variation in the betas, they are all backward-...

  12. Characterization of the Mouse Beta Defensin 1, Defb1, Mutant Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Gillian; Kilanowski, Fiona; Davidson, Donald; Dorin, Julia

    2002-01-01

    Beta defensins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides present in the respiratory system which have been proposed to be dysfunctional in the environment of the cystic fibrosis lung. Defb1, a murine homologue to the human beta defensins, has also been found to be expressed in the respiratory system and, in order to examine the function of beta defensins in vivo, gene targeting was used to generate Defb1-deficient (Defb1tm1Hgu/Defb1tm1Hgu [Defb1−/−]) mice. The Defb1 synthetic peptide was show...

  13. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide-mediated Gene Therapy for Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanih Sanlioglu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available All patients with type 1 Diabetes (T1DM and most patients with type 2 Diabetes (T2DM become insulin dependent due to the progressive nature of the disease, eventually leading to beta-cell loss. The increase in apoptosis, but not the decrease in new islet formation or beta-cell replication, is blamed for the loss of beta-cell mass observed in patients with T2DM. Thus, therapeutic approaches that either interfere with apoptosis of beta cells and/or increase beta-cell mass have the potential not only for managing hyperglycemia but also for reversing disease progression. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP is a neuropeptide of the secretin family just like GLP1 and PACAP with equipotent insulinotropic effects. More importantly, it is an effective anti-inflammatory agent involved in suppression of Th1 immune response and activation of regulatory T cells for inducing immune tolerance.

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  19. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  20. Phosphorylation of a neuronal-specific beta-tubulin isotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult rats were intracraneally injected with [32P] phosphate and brain microtubules isolated. The electrophoretically purified, in vivo phospholabeled, beta-tubulin was digested with the V8-protease and the labeled peptide purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its amino acid sequence corresponds to the COOH-terminal sequence of a minor neuronal beta 3-tubulin isoform from chicken and human. The phosphorylation site was at serine 444. A synthetic peptide with sequence EMYEDDEEESESQGPK, corresponding to that of the COOH terminus of beta 3-tubulin, was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase II at the same serine 444. The functional meaning of tubulin phosphorylation is still unclear. However, the modification of the protein takes place after microtubule assembly, and phosphorylated tubulin is mainly present in the assembled microtubule protein fraction

  1. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  2. Anesthesia and stimulation of pituitary beta-endorphin release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiewski, S; Muldoon, S; Mueller, G P

    1984-07-01

    The effects of several anesthetic drugs and artificial respiration on the release of pituitary beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta-END-LI) were examined in rats. Plasma beta-END-LI responses to halothane and pentobarbital were similar in magnitude and duration, being maximal (2- to 3-fold) by 10 min and returning to control values by 30 min after induction. Urethane anesthesia was associated with an 8-fold increase in plasma beta-END-LI throughout the 30-min treatment period. In comparison to anesthesia alone, anesthesia plus intubation with artificial respiration (standard parameters) was associated with considerably greater elevations in plasma beta-END-LI (up to 30-fold). Further, intubation and artificial respiration appear to have contributed separately, and in an additive fashion, to the overall beta-END-LI responses observed. As compared to halothane anesthesia alone, intubation evoked a 4-fold increase in circulating beta-END-LI, whereas intubation plus ventilation was associated with a 12-fold increase. Treatment with morphine (1 or 5 mg/kg), but not pancuronium (0.3 mg/kg), attenuated the plasma beta-END-LI response to mechanical ventilation, suggesting that a subconscious phenomenon, perhaps related to pain, was partially responsible for the profound release of pituitary beta-END-LI associated with artificial respiration. Chromatographic analysis of the molecular forms of beta-END-LI released into plasma revealed that both beta-END- and beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH)-sized peptides were secreted under the present experimental conditions. Since the analgesic form of beta-END (beta- END1 -31) is cosecreted with beta-LPH from the pars distalis, increases in the fraction of plasma beta-END-LI corresponding to beta-END in size were probably due to the release of opiate active beta- END1 -31. PMID:6328533

  3. Peptide and non-peptide opioid-induced hyperthermia in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The intracerebroventricular administration of prototype nonpeptide opioid receptor (mu, kappa, and sigma) agonists, morphine, ketocyclazocine, and N-allyl-normetazocine was found to induce hyperthermia in rabbits. The similar administration of peptide opioids like beta-endorphin (BE), methionine-enkephalin (ME), and its synthetic analogue D-ala2-methionine-enkephalinamide (DAME) was also found to cause hyperthermia. Results indicate that only the liver-like transport system is important to the ventricular inactivation of BE and DAME. Prostaglandins and norepinephrine were determined not to be involved in peptide and nonpeptide opioid-induced hyperthermia. In addition, cAMP was not required since a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, did not accentuate the hyperthermia due to peptide and nonpeptide opioids. Naloxone-sensitive receptors were found to be involved in the induction of hyperthermia by morphine, BE, ME, and DAME since naloxone attenuated them. However, the hyperthermic response to ketocyclazocine and N-allyl-normetazocine was not antagonized by naloxone.

  4. 依据B型钠尿肽水平调整急性冠脉综合征患者β受体阻滞剂使用的临床研究%Clinical research of beta receptor blocker in acute coronary syndrome patients based on the level of B-type natriuretic peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭明; 杨杰; 张亚梅; 郑霞飞; 张宗辉; 蒋国军

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨不同B型钠尿肽(BNP)水平下急性冠脉综合征(ACS)患者使用β受体阻滞剂的安全性。方法依据入院后即时BNP水平将231例ACS患者分3组:对照组(<100μg/L)64例、灰带组(100~400μg/L)78例、升高组(>400μg/L)89例。三组患者给予ACS常规治疗及初始剂量的β受体阻滞剂6.25 mg,每日2次。观察记录三组患者BNP浓度变化,血压、心率、心律、killip心功能分级,以及是否并发胸腔积液、下肢水肿和急性左侧心力衰竭。依据各组患者观察治疗期间出现的病情变化不同将其分为A、B和C事件,并根据不同事件确定是否继续使用β受体阻滞剂及其用量。结果三组间A事件和C事件发生率差异均有统计学意义(χ2=28.528、32.608,P均<0.001),其中对照组A事件发生率最低,升高组A事件发生率最高;C事件在对照组中发生率最高,在升高组中发生率最低(P均<0.017)。三组胸腔积液发生率差异有统计学意义,对照组最低,升高组最高(F=35.408,P<0.001)。而下肢水肿的发生数三组相比差异没有统计学意义(χ2=2.973,P=0.226)。对照组β受体阻滞剂使用量最大,升高组最低,三组间差异有统计学意义(F=8.670,P<0.001)。结论 ACS患者BNP水平越高,发生严重不良事件以及心功能下降和胸腔积液的风险也越高,依据BNP水平调整β受体阻滞剂使用剂量可以降低ACS患者并发症和严重不良事件的发生率。%Objective To investigate the safety of beta receptor blocker in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients based on the level of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Methods A total of 231 ACS patients were classified into three groups according to their BNP level::control group (BNP400μg/L, n=89). All patients were treated with routine therapy plus beta receptor blocker (6.25 mg each time, twice a day). The BNP level, blood pressure

  5. Nanoencapsulation of Biologically Active Peptides from Whey Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem Tellioglu Harsa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available "Now a days consumers, in order to feed with balanced diet, prefer healthy and reliable foods. In this respect food manufacturers are trying to respond the demands of consumers by developing new types of foods such as diet foods ( low calorie foods, modified foods (organic foods and functional foods (probiotic and prebiotics. Thus, production of nutritious, functional and beneficial foods has become a growing sector in the United States and European countries. Proteins are major source of many bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides have been defined as specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions and may ultimately influence human health. These peptides stay inactive within the main protein structure and activated by the enzymatic hydrolysis. These bioactive peptides, derived from proteins, are able to influence basic body systems (cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal and immune systems and show multi-functional character. Due to these properties, studies have recently been focused on milk proteins and their bioactive peptides. Such peptides are inactive within the sequence of the milk protein. Whey contains a multitude of biologically active proteins and peptides. Physiologically active serum proteins are serum albumin, immunoglobulins, proteose-peptone, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase and growth factors. In addition to these, enzymatic degradation of serum proteins releases a number of bioactive peptides such as alfa-lactophorin, beta-lactophorin, beta- lactotensin, lactokinin, albutensin, serophorin and lactoferricin. One of the common qualities of bioactive substances is their sensitivity to the physical and chemical properties of the environment. For this reason, the usefulness of bioactive components in food is limited by the structure. In order to sustain bioavailibility of these peptides, limiting its relationship with the media by encapsulation technology is one of them osthotly debated issues on in recent

  6. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  7. A molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, N. P.; Yudenko, A. N.; Terterov, I. N.; Eliseev, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of small, usually positively charged amphiphilic peptides that are used by the innate immune system to combat bacterial infection in multicellular eukaryotes. Antimicrobial peptides are known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and thus can be used as a basis for a development of new antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The most challengeous task on the way to a therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides is a rational design of new peptides with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here we report a molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide D51. This peptide was earlier designed by Loose et al. using a linguistic model of natural antimicrobial peptides. Molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide folding in explicit solvent shows fast formation of two antiparallel beta strands connected by a beta-turn that is confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. Obtained from simulation amphipatic conformation of the peptide is analysed and possible mechanism of it's interaction with bacterial membranes together with ways to enhance it's antibacterial activity are suggested.

  8. A molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of small, usually positively charged amphiphilic peptides that are used by the innate immune system to combat bacterial infection in multicellular eukaryotes. Antimicrobial peptides are known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and thus can be used as a basis for a development of new antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The most challengeous task on the way to a therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides is a rational design of new peptides with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here we report a molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide D51. This peptide was earlier designed by Loose et al. using a linguistic model of natural antimicrobial peptides. Molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide folding in explicit solvent shows fast formation of two antiparallel beta strands connected by a beta-turn that is confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. Obtained from simulation amphipatic conformation of the peptide is analysed and possible mechanism of it's interaction with bacterial membranes together with ways to enhance it's antibacterial activity are suggested

  9. Koedam {beta} factors revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J.E. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doughty, D.A. [Perkin-Elmer Optoelectronics, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Lister, G.G. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., Beverly, MA (United States)

    2002-07-21

    A Koedam {beta} factor makes it possible to compute the total output power in line radiation from a positive column discharge using a single radiance measurement normal to an aperture in the wall. The results of analytic derivations of {beta} factors are presented for columns with uniform ({beta}=1.0) and parabolic ({beta}=0.75) excitation rates per unit volume and with negligible opacity. A Monte Carlo code for simulating radiation trapping with a spatially uniform density of absorbing atoms is then used to determine {beta} factors as a function of opacity. The code includes partial frequency redistribution and a Voigt line shape with radiative broadening, resonance collisional broadening, and Doppler broadening. The resulting {beta} factors are found to be nearly independent of opacity over a wide range of column radii for spectral line shapes dominated by Doppler broadening or by resonance collisional broadening. Additional Monte Carlo simulations are used to study {beta} factors as a function of a non-uniform density of absorbing atoms from radial cataphoresis with line shapes dominated by Doppler broadening, foreign gas broadening, and resonance collisional broadening. Radial cataphoresis is found to increase {beta} factors in all cases. Geometrical effects, refraction, and imperfect transmission at the glass wall are studied and found to decrease {beta} factors. (author)

  10. Beta-energy averaging and beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple yet highly accurate method for approximately calculating spectrum-averaged beta energies and beta spectra for radioactive nuclei is presented. This method should prove useful for users who wish to obtain accurate answers without complicated calculations of Fermi functions, complex gamma functions, and time-consuming numerical integrations as required by the more exact theoretical expressions. Therefore, this method should be a good time-saving alternative for investigators who need to make calculations involving large numbers of nuclei (e.g., fission products) as well as for occasional users interested in restricted number of nuclides. The average beta-energy values calculated by this method differ from those calculated by ''exact'' methods by no more than 1 percent for nuclides with atomic numbers in the 20 to 100 range and which emit betas of energies up to approximately 8 MeV. These include all fission products and the actinides. The beta-energy spectra calculated by the present method are also of the same quality

  11. Functionalization of titanium surfaces with TGF-beta inhibitor peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Sánchez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Esta tesis queda enmarcada en el ámbito de los biomateriales metálicos, concretamente en superficies de titanio desarrolladas para la regeneración ósea. Las aplicaciones más habituales del titanio como biomaterial son los implantes dentales y las prótesis de cadera y rodilla. Estos componentes requieren, en servicio, buena estabilidad y fijación al hueso a largo plazo. El titanio es un material idóneo para el cumplimiento de estos requisitos gracias a su alta resistencia mecánica, tenacidad, ...

  12. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II does not process amyloid-beta peptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, František; Šácha, Pavel; Blechová, Miroslava; Březinová, Anna; Šafařík, Martin; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2013), s. 2626-2632. ISSN 0892-6638 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : PSMA * Alzheimer's disease * disaggregation * exopeptidase * substrate specificity * depsipeptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2013

  13. Interaction between bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a) and {beta}-cyclodextrin: A structural and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lula, Ivana; De Sousa, Frederico B. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Denadai, Angelo M.L. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, CEFET-MG, Campus VII, 35.183-006, Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Ferreira de Lima, Guilherme; Duarte, Helio Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mares Guia, Thiago R. dos [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Faljoni-Alario, Adelaide [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santoro, Marcelo M. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Imunologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Camargo, Antonio C.M. de [Center for Applied Toxinology CAT-CEPID, Laboratorio Especial de Toxicologia Aplicada, Instituto Butantan, 05503-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Robson A.S. dos [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofisica, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); and others

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the physical and chemical characterizations of the supramolecular complex formed between {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}CD) and bradykinin potentiating nonapeptide (BPP9a), an endogenous toxin found in Bothrops jararaca. Circular dichroism results indicate a conformational change in the BPP9a secondary structure upon its complexation with {beta}CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance results, mainly from NOESY experiments, and theoretical calculations showed a favorable interaction between the tryptophan residue of BPP9a and the {beta}CD cavity. Thermodynamic inclusion parameters were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry, demonstrating that {beta}CD/BPP9a complex formation is an exothermic process that results in a reduction in entropy. Additionally, in vitro degradation study of BPP9a against trypsin (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7.2) showed higher stability of peptide in presence of {beta}CD. This {beta}CD/BPP9a complex, which presents new chemical properties arising from the peptide inclusion process, may be useful as an antihypertensive drug in oral pharmaceutical formulations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd and NMR showed evidences for the existence of more than one structure in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexation with {beta}CD reduces the conformational rigidity of the peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}CD cavity recognize Trp and/or Pro segments of BPP9a. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions involving disaggregation of BPP9a assemblies and binding with {beta}CD.

  14. Plant signalling peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wiśniewska, Justyna; Trejgell, Alina; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic studies have identified peptides that play crucial roles in plant growth and development, including defence mechanisms in response to wounding by pests, the control of cell division and expansion, and pollen self-incompatibility. The first two signalling peptides to be described in plants were tomato systemin and phytosulfokine (PSK). There is also biochemical evidence that natriuretic peptide-like molecules, immunologically-relatedt o those found ...

  15. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  16. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  17. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  18. In vivo biotinylation of recombinant beta-glucosidase enables simultaneous purification and immobilization on streptavidin coated magnetic particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alftrén, Johan; Ottow, Kim Ekelund; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-01-01

    Beta-glucosidase from Bacillus licheniformis was in vivo biotinylated in Escherichia coli and subsequently immobilized directly from cell lysate on streptavidin coated magnetic particles. In vivo biotinylation was mediated by fusing the Biotin Acceptor Peptide to the C-terminal of beta-glucosidas...

  19. Specific recognition of the C-terminal end of A beta 42 by a high affinity monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, T.V.; Holm, A.; Birkelund, S.;

    2009-01-01

    The neurotoxic peptide A beta(42) is derived from the amyloid precursor protein by proteolytic cleavage and is deposited in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we generate a high affinity monoclonal antibody that targets the C-terminal end of A beta(42) with...

  20. Role of the beta subunit of casein kinase-2 on the stability and specificity of the recombinant reconstituted holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O; Pinna, L A; Issinger, O G

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human alpha subunit from casein kinase-2 (CK-2) was subjected, either alone or in combination with recombinant human beta subunit, to high temperature, tryptic digestion and urea treatment. In all three cases, it was shown that the presence of the beta subunit could drastically reduce...... the loss of kinase activity, strongly suggesting a protective function for the beta subunit. Assaying different peptides for specificity toward the recombinant alpha subunit and the recombinant reconstituted enzyme, showed that the presence of the beta subunit could modify the specificity of the...... catalytic alpha subunit. Therefore, a dual function for the beta subunit is proposed which confers both specificity and stability to the catalytic alpha subunit within the CK-2 holoenzyme complex. The peptide DLEPDEELEDNPNQSDL, reproducing the highly acidic amino acid 55-71 segment of the human beta subunit...

  1. Effects of linker variation on the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of an 111In-labeled RGD peptide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Liu, S.; Kruijtzer, J.A.; Soede, A.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Liskamp, R.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Due to the selective expression of the alpha(v)beta3 integrin in tumors, radiolabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides are attractive candidates for tumor targeting. Minor modifications of these peptides could have a major impact on in vivo characteristics. In this study,

  2. Double beta decay experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Barabash, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  3. Negative Beta Encoder

    CERN Document Server

    Kohda, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A new class of analog-digital (A/D), digital-analog (D/A) converters as an alternative to conventional ones, called $\\beta$-encoder, has been shown to have exponential accuracy in the bit rates while possessing self-correction property for fluctuations of amplifier factor $\\beta$ and quantizer threshold $\

  4. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for...

  5. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  6. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M;

    2008-01-01

    proteins, beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301, were produced in Escherichia coli, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta(2)-microglobulin is joined together with a flexible (GGGGS)(3) linker to the amino terminus of the heavy chain. One hundred and seven individual phages bound to beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301 were isolated...... after four rounds of panning from the 7mer random-peptide library. The peptide encoding sequences were determined and peptide alignment led to the prediction of position-specific anchor residue. A prominent proline at position 2 was observed and we predict that it might be one of the anchors at the N...

  7. Asymmetric azidation-cycloaddition with open-chain peptide-based catalysts. A sequential enantioselective route to triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, David J; Miller, Scott J

    2002-03-13

    A family of beta-substituted histidine-containing peptides has been synthesized to probe the effect of noncovalent conformational rigidification on catalyst enantioselectivity. Unambiguous enhancement of enantioselectivity in the conjugate addition of azide to alpha,beta-unsaturated carboxylate derivatives has been achieved, enabling application to a sequential asymmetric azidation/cycloaddition for the synthesis of optically enriched triazoles and triazolines. PMID:11878965

  8. The glucagonostatic and insulinotropic effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 contribute equally to its glucose-lowering action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristine J; Vilsbøll, Tina; Asmar, Meena; Deacon, Carolyn F; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens Juul

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts beneficial antidiabetic actions via effects on pancreatic beta- and alpha-cells. Previous studies have focused on the improvements in beta-cell function, while the inhibition of alpha-cell secretion has received less attention. The aim of this research was to...

  9. Mouse egg integrin alpha 6 beta 1 functions as a sperm receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, E A; Huovila, A P; Sutherland, A E; Stephens, L E; Calarco, P G; Shaw, L M; Mercurio, A M; Sonnenberg, A; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G; White, J M

    1995-06-30

    Binding between sperm and egg plasma membranes is an essential step in fertilization. Whereas fertilin, a mammalian sperm surface protein, is involved in this crucial interaction, sperm receptors on the egg plasma membrane have not been identified. Because fertilin contains a predicted integrin ligand domain, we investigated the expression and function of integrin subunits in unfertilized mouse eggs. Polymerase chain reactions detected mRNAs for alpha 5, alpha 6, alpha v, beta 1, beta 3, and beta 5. Immunofluorescence revealed alpha 6 beta 1 and alpha v beta 3 on the plasma membrane. GoH3, a function-blocking anti-alpha 6 monoclonal antibody, abolished sperm binding, but a nonfunction-blocking anti-alpha 6 monoclonal antibody, a function-blocking anti-alpha v beta 3 polyclonal antibody, and an RGD peptide had no effect. Somatic cells bound sperm avidly, but only if they expressed alpha 6 beta 1. A peptide analog of the fertilin integrin ligand domain inhibited sperm binding to eggs and alpha 6 beta 1+ cells and diminished GoH3 staining of eggs. Our results indicate a novel role for the integrin alpha 6 beta 1 as a cell-cell adhesion receptor that mediates sperm-egg binding. PMID:7600577

  10. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...

  11. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.; Jørgensen, M.; Larsson, C.; Buchardt, O.; Stanly, C.J.; Norden, B.; Nielsen, P.E.; Ørum, H.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  12. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  13. Beta-endorphin decreases fatigue and increases glucose uptake independently in normal and dystrophic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salim; Evans, Anthony A L; Hughes, Sharon; Smith, Margaret E

    2005-04-01

    beta-Endorphin and a C-terminal analogue have been shown to decrease muscle fatigue and increase glucose uptake in muscles of normal mice. In order to provide evidence whether these peptides might be useful in muscle-wasting conditions and whether the two actions of the peptides are interdependent, the effect of beta-endorphin on muscle fatigue and glucose uptake was studied using isolated hemidiaphragm preparations of dystrophic mice as well as normal mice. Muscle contractions were elicited by high-frequency stimulation of the phrenic nerve. Glucose uptake was measured using (nonmetabolizable) 2-deoxy-D-[1-(3)H]glucose. beta-Endorphin and the C-terminal analogue reduced fatigue in normal muscles of males but not females. Insulin had no effect in either sex. The peptides increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in contracting and noncontracting muscles of normal males and females. beta-Endorphin reduced fatigue and increased deoxyglucose uptake in dystrophic muscles. The effect on fatigue was not due to increased glucose uptake, as the energy substrate present was pyruvate. Nerve stimulation released beta-endorphin immunoreactivity from intramuscular nerves of dystrophic mice. It is hypothesized that beta-endorphin released from motor nerves as well as from the pituitary could be responsible for improving muscle function during exercise. beta-Endorphin or analogues could have therapeutic use in muscle-wasting disease. PMID:15704144

  14. Laser-Induced In-Source Decay Applied to the Determination of Amyloid-Beta in Alzheimer's Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Andrea R; Perry, George; Castellani, Rudolph J; Bach, Stephan B H

    2016-03-16

    A method for the analysis of amyloid-beta peptides in isolated plaques and intact tissue sections affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is presented. This method employs matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and the inherent laser-induced in-source decay (ISD) that occurs coupled with imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to investigate the composition of these samples eliminating the need for other confirmational MS/MS techniques. These results demonstrate this technique's usefulness for the identification of amyloid-beta peptides in tissue and isolated senile plaques from AD patients using the reproducible fragmentation pattern demonstrated via the laser-induced ISD of synthetic amyloid-beta peptide clips (1-40, 1-42). Clear differences between the hippocampal AD tissue and the control hippocampal tissue regarding the presence of amyloid-beta have been identified. These are based on laser-induced ISD of standard amyloid-beta clips as controls as well as the analysis of isolated senile plaques as a confirmation before tissue analysis. Using the resulting observed peptide clip masses from the control data, we present mass spectrometry based identification of the amyloid-beta peptides in both isolated plaques and hippocampal regions of those patients diagnosed with AD. PMID:26720297

  15. Beta-carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and deterioration of the lining of the mouth (oral mucositis). Taking beta-carotene by mouth doesn’t appear to prevent the development of oral mucositis during radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Pancreatic cancer. Taking ...

  16. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given. (author)

  17. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  18. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class of...... antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which of these are...

  19. Assessment of beta-cell function and insulin secretion in subjects that underwent renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tura, Andrea; Hecking, Manfred; Wolzt, Michael; Saemann, Marcus D; Pacini, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to assess the performance of various indices of beta-cell function derived from oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in subjects that underwent renal transplantation. Impaired insulin secretion seems in fact central for development of new onset diabetes after transplantation, but its assessment has not been systematically evaluated. Twenty subjects underwent a 75 g 2h-OGTT for measurement of glucose, insulin, C-peptide. OGTT indices of beta-cell function were either derived by mathematical modeling (yielding the reference index: glucose sensitivity) or were empirical: insulinogenic index (IGI), IGI derived indices, whole shape C-peptide (WHOSH_CP). Indices of beta cell function, showed significant correlation with glucose sensitivity (R(2)=0.40-0.86, all Pbody mass index, mean glycemia. In conclusion, in transplanted subjects OGTT empirical indices are typically acceptable for the estimation of beta-cell function. PMID:26736770

  20. [High beta tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our activities on High Beta Tokamak Research during the past 20 months of the present grant period can be divided into six areas: reconstruction and modeling of high beta equilibria in HBT; measurement and analysis of MHD instabilities observed in HBT; measurements of impurity transport; diagnostic development on HBT; numerical parameterization of the second stability regime; and conceptual design and assembly of HBT-EP. Each of these is described in some detail in the sections of this progress report

  1. High beta multipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multipoles are being employed as devices to study fusion issues and plasma phenomena at high values of beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) in a controlled manner. Due to their large volume, low magnetic field (low synchrotron radiation) region, they are also under consideration as potential steady state advanced fuel (low neutron yield) reactors. Present experiments are investigating neoclassical (bootstrap and Pfirsch-Schlueter) currents and plasma stability at extremely high beta

  2. Autoregressive conditional beta

    OpenAIRE

    Yunmi Kim

    2012-01-01

    The capital asset pricing model provides various predictions about equilibrium expected returns on risky assets. One key prediction is that the risk premium on a risky asset is proportional to the nondiversifiable market risk measured by the asset's beta coefficient. This paper proposes a new method for estimating and drawing inferences from a time-varying capital asset pricing model. The proposed method, which can be considered a vector autoregressive model for multiple beta coefficients, is...

  3. beta-Scission of C-3 (beta-carbon) alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, H A; Mortimer, A; Easton, C J; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O(2) brings about multiple changes in the target molecules. These alterations include oxidation of side chains, fragmentation, cross-linking, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes, and formation...

  4. JNK/p38 MAPK involves in ginsenoside Rb1 attenuating beta-amyloid peptide (25-35)-induced tau protein hyperphosphorylation in embryo rat cortical neurons%人参皂苷Rb1通过JNK/p38 MAPK途径减轻Aβ25-35诱导的胎鼠皮层神经元tau蛋白过度磷酸化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋锦秋; 陈晓春; 张静; 黄天文; 曾育琦; 沈杰; 陈丽敏

    2008-01-01

    探讨在Aβ25-35(beta-amyloid peptide (25-35),Aβ25-35)诱导的拟阿尔茨海默病样胎鼠皮层神经元tau蛋白过度磷酸化中,人参皂苷Rb1对tau蛋白磷酸化及JNK/p38 MAPK的可能作用.应用蛋白免疫印迹和免疫细胞化学染色的方法,观察tau蛋白磷酸化和JNK(c-jun N-terminal kinase)/p38 MAPK的表达情况.凝聚态Aβ25-35(20 μmol·L-1)作用于皮层神经元12 h,tau蛋白的磷酸化水平明显增高,同时JNK/p38 MAPK的总量及其活性形式--磷酸化JNK/p38 MAPK的蛋白表达水平也增加,人参皂苷Rb1可以减轻tau蛋白的磷酸化水平及JNK/p38 MAPK的蛋白水平.人参皂苷Rb1可通过JNK/p38 MAPK途径减轻Aβ25-35诱导的tau蛋白过度磷酸化.

  5. Central effects of beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of centrally administered beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog were studied. Intracerebroventricular administration of beta-endorphin (0.2 mg/h) caused a 70% increase in plasma glucose. The mechanism of the hyperglycemia was twofold: there was an early increase in glucose production and a late inhibition of glucose clearance. These changes are explained by marked increases in plasma epinephrine (30-fold) and norepinephrine (6-fold) that occurred during infusion of beta-endorphin. Central administration of beta-endorphin also resulted in increased levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol. In addition there was an increase in plasma insulin but no increase in plasma glucagon. Intravenous administration of beta-endorphin did not alter glucose homeostasis. Intracerebroventricular administration of acetylated beta-endorphin did not perturb glucose kinetics or any of the hormones that changed during infusion of the unacetylated peptide. We conclude that beta-endorphin acts centrally to cause hyperglycemia by stimulating sympathetic outflow and the pituitary-adrenal axis. Acetylation of beta-endorphin abolishes the in vivo activity of the peptide

  6. Expression and Antimicrobial Function of Beta-Defensin 1 in the Lower Urinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Becknell, Brian; Spencer, John David; Carpenter, Ashley R.; Chen, Xi; Singh, Aspinder; Ploeger, Suzanne; Kline, Jennifer; Ellsworth, Patrick; Li, Birong; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.; Justice, Sheryl S.; McHugh, Kirk M.

    2013-01-01

    Beta defensins (BDs) are cationic peptides with antimicrobial activity that defend epithelial surfaces including the skin, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts. However, BD expression and function in the urinary tract are incompletely characterized. The purpose of this study was to describe Beta Defensin-1 (BD-1) expression in the lower urinary tract, regulation by cystitis, and antimicrobial activity toward uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) in vivo. Human DEFB1 and orthologous mouse ...

  7. BACE1 activity impairs neuronal glucose oxidation: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Findlay, John A.; Hamilton, David L.; Ashford, Michael L J

    2015-01-01

    Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity...

  8. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  9. A study on the C-peptide radioimmunoassay with synthetized connecting peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of C-peptide radioimmunoassay with the synthetized connecting peptide by Yanaihara was tested for the determination of serum C-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) in normal people and in diabetics with or without insulin treatment. The CPR value obtained by this method was not interfered with by the presence of serum proteins or by the insulin of people with or without insulin treatment judged by the dilution test and the recovery test. The normal fasting CPR was 2.80 +- 0.78 ng/ml with the synthetized C-peptide as a standard. The CPR value increased and reached a maximum 90 minutes after the ingestion of 50 g of glucose. The increase after the glucose loading reduced corresponding to the severity of diabetes, and some juvenile-onset diabetes showed no response. Adult-type diabetics under insulin treatment, however, showed weak but significant CPR response. The increment of CPR and immunoreactive insulin after glucose loading in normal people and non-treated diabetics was well correlated (γ=0.8262). Judged from the above mentioned results, CPR determination in insulin-treated diabetics was thought to be a useful method for the assessment of the insulin-secreting ability of beta-cells of the pancreas. (J.P.N.)

  10. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ErkkiRuoslahti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  11. Introduction to Peptide Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B.

    2002-01-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose homeostasis and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Deacon, Carolyn F; Vilsbøll, Tina;

    2008-01-01

    pancreatic beta cells, and inhibits glucagon secretion, gastric emptying and food intake, leading to weight loss. GLP-1 mimetics, which are stable-peptide-based activators of the GLP-1 receptor, and incretin enhancers, which inhibit the incretin-degrading enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4, have emerged as...... therapies for type-2 diabetes and have recently reached the market. The pathophysiological basis the clinical use of these therapeutics is reviewed here....

  13. Antimicrobial peptides in echinoderm host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important effector molecules in innate immunity. Here we briefly summarize characteristic traits of AMPs and their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity. Echinoderms live in a microbe-rich marine environment and are known to express a wide range of AMPs. We address two novel AMP families from coelomocytes of sea urchins: cysteine-rich AMPs (strongylocins) and heterodimeric AMPs (centrocins). These peptide families have conserved preprosequences, are present in both adults and pluteus stage larvae, have potent antimicrobial properties, and therefore appear to be important innate immune effectors. Strongylocins have a unique cysteine pattern compared to other cysteine-rich peptides, which suggests a novel AMP folding pattern. Centrocins and SdStrongylocin 2 contain brominated tryptophan residues in their native form. This review also includes AMPs isolated from other echinoderms, such as holothuroidins, fragments of beta-thymosin, and fragments of lectin (CEL-III). Echinoderm AMPs are crucial molecules for the understanding of echinoderm immunity, and their potent antimicrobial activity makes them potential precursors of novel drug leads. PMID:25445901

  14. Radioimmunoassay for C-peptide in diabetic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct insulin radioimmunoassay (RIA) studies in a diabetic are no longer meaningful once insulin therapy has been instituted. For this reason, use is made of RIA for blood C-peptide, a proinsulin component reflecting endogenous insulin secretion independently of insulin therapy. The paper reports experience with C-peptide RIA studies carried out on blood from 273 diabetic children of normal body weight and 11.3 years average age, as well as 31 healthy children (control group). Diabetes duration ranged from 7 days to 14 years. The basic level of C-peptide in diabetic children is lower than that of healthy ones. Glucose stimulation produces C-peptide elevation in healthy but not in diabetic children. Glucagon stimulation produced a further rise of blood C-peptide in the healthy children. Diabetics showed very modest response to glucagon stimulation. C-peptide secretion in diabetic children proved to be inversely proportional to the duration of the diabetes. These findings in children with diabetes mellitus indicated their insulin secretion by beta cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans to be substantially decreased and unresponsive to glucose and glucagon stimulation. 3 figs, 1 tab

  15. Dysferlin-peptides reallocate mutated dysferlin thereby restoring function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Schoewel

    Full Text Available Mutations in the dysferlin gene cause the most frequent adult-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy, LGMD2B. There is no therapy. Dysferlin is a membrane protein comprised of seven, beta-sheet enriched, C2 domains and is involved in Ca(2+dependent sarcolemmal repair after minute wounding. On the protein level, point mutations in DYSF lead to misfolding, aggregation within the endoplasmic reticulum, and amyloidogenesis. We aimed to restore functionality by relocating mutant dysferlin. Therefore, we designed short peptides derived from dysferlin itself and labeled them to the cell penetrating peptide TAT. By tracking fluorescently labeled short peptides we show that these dysferlin-peptides localize in the endoplasmic reticulum. There, they are capable of reducing unfolded protein response stress. We demonstrate that the mutant dysferlin regains function in membrane repair in primary human myotubes derived from patients' myoblasts by the laser wounding assay and a novel technique to investigate membrane repair: the interventional atomic force microscopy. Mutant dysferlin abuts to the sarcolemma after peptide treatment. The peptide-mediated approach has not been taken before in the field of muscular dystrophies. Our results could redirect treatment efforts for this condition.

  16. Dysferlin-peptides reallocate mutated dysferlin thereby restoring function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoewel, Verena; Marg, Andreas; Kunz, Severine; Overkamp, Tim; Carrazedo, Romy Siegert; Zacharias, Ute; Daniel, Peter T; Spuler, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene cause the most frequent adult-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy, LGMD2B. There is no therapy. Dysferlin is a membrane protein comprised of seven, beta-sheet enriched, C2 domains and is involved in Ca(2+)dependent sarcolemmal repair after minute wounding. On the protein level, point mutations in DYSF lead to misfolding, aggregation within the endoplasmic reticulum, and amyloidogenesis. We aimed to restore functionality by relocating mutant dysferlin. Therefore, we designed short peptides derived from dysferlin itself and labeled them to the cell penetrating peptide TAT. By tracking fluorescently labeled short peptides we show that these dysferlin-peptides localize in the endoplasmic reticulum. There, they are capable of reducing unfolded protein response stress. We demonstrate that the mutant dysferlin regains function in membrane repair in primary human myotubes derived from patients' myoblasts by the laser wounding assay and a novel technique to investigate membrane repair: the interventional atomic force microscopy. Mutant dysferlin abuts to the sarcolemma after peptide treatment. The peptide-mediated approach has not been taken before in the field of muscular dystrophies. Our results could redirect treatment efforts for this condition. PMID:23185377

  17. Structure and membrane interaction of the internal fusion peptide of avian sarcoma leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wu, Cheng-Wei; Kantchev, Eric Assen B; Chang, Ding-Kwo

    2004-12-01

    The structure and membrane interaction of the internal fusion peptide (IFP) fragment of the avian sarcoma and leucosis virus (ASLV) envelope glycoprotein was studied by an array of biophysical methods. The peptide was found to induce lipid mixing of vesicles more strongly than the fusion peptide derived from the N-terminal fusion peptide of influenza virus (HA2-FP). It was observed that the helical structure was enhanced in association with the model membranes, particularly in the N-terminal portion of the peptide. According to the infrared study, the peptide inserted into the membrane in an oblique orientation, but less deeply than the influenza HA2-FP. Analysis of NMR data in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle suspension revealed that Pro13 of the peptide was located near the micelle-water interface. A type II beta-turn was deduced from NMR data for the peptide in aqueous medium, demonstrating a conformational flexibility of the IFP in analogy to the N-terminal FP such as that of gp41. A loose and multimodal self-assembly was deduced from the rhodamine fluorescence self-quenching experiments for the peptide bound to the membrane bilayer. Oligomerization of the peptide and its variants can also be observed in the electrophoretic experiments, suggesting a property in common with other N-terminal FP of class I fusion proteins. PMID:15606759

  18. Peptide growth factors can provoke "fetal" contractile protein gene expression in rat cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, T G; Packer, S E; Schneider, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac-specific gene expression is intricately regulated in response to developmental, hormonal, and hemodynamic stimuli. To test whether cardiac muscle might be a target for regulation by peptide growth factors, the effect of three growth factors on the actin and myosin gene families was investigated by Northern blot analysis in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF beta 1, 1 ng/ml) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF, 25 ng/ml) elicited changes ...

  19. Brain natriuretic peptide and optimal management of heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; WANG Jian-an

    2005-01-01

    Aside from the important role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in diagnosis, and differential diagnosis of heart failure, this biological peptide has proved to be an independent surrogate marker of rehospitalization and death of the fatal disease.Several randomized clinical trials demonstrated that drugs such as beta blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, spironolactone and amiodarone have beneficial effects in decreasing circulating BNP level during the management of chronic heart failure. The optimization of clinical decision-making appeals for a representative surrogate marker for heart failure prognosis. The serial point-of-care assessments of BNP concentration provide a therapeutic goal of clinical multi-therapy and an objective guidance for optimal treatment of heart failure. Nevertheless new questions and problems in this area remain to be clarified. On the basis of current research advances, this article gives an overview of BNP peptide and its property and role in the management of heart failure.

  20. New insights into structure-function relationship of the DHPR beta1a subunit in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling using zebrafish 'relaxed' as an expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mechanism or already contributes at the ultrastructural level i.e. DHPR tetrad arrangement. Surprisingly, our experiments revealed full tetrad formation and an almost complete restoration of EC coupling in [beta]1-null zebrafish relaxed larvae and isolated myotubes upon expression of a [beta]1a-specific heptad repeat mutant (LVV to AAA) and thus contradict the earlier results. According to our novel finding that the [beta]1a heptad repeat motif is not the key determinant of DHPR-RyR1 coupling, the next aim was to perform further in-depth structural-functional studies on the role of the DHPR [beta]1a subunit in skeletal muscle EC coupling. Previous loss-of-function studies identified the [beta]1a C-terminus as a key determinant of skeletal muscle EC coupling. However, loss-of-function studies always raise concerns if the observed effects are solely due to a more general loss of function because of global protein misfolding. Consequently, we were rather interested to carry out a gain-of-function approach. The ancestral [beta] subunit, [beta]M, despite lacking major parts of the variable N-, C-termini and the HOOK region is able to perform all basic [beta]-functions as mentioned above. So, we used [beta]M as the basis for chimeric gain-of-function experiments to probe for in vivo rescue of EC coupling via the larval motility restoration. Systematic expression studies with [beta]M/[beta]1a chimeras carrying substitutions of all variable (C-, N-termini, and HOOK) and conserved regions (SH3 and GK domains) were performed. All the heterologously expressed [beta]M/[beta]1a chimeras completely restored [alpha]1S triad targeting in relaxed myotubes. Surprisingly, [beta]M/[beta]1a chimeras carrying substitutions of either N- or C-terminus, or of all the three variable regions together with [beta]1a sequence displayed very reduced larval motility restoration. Thus, in clear contrast to the expectations raised by previous loss-of-function studies with [beta]2a/[beta]1a chimeras by

  1. Hyperthermic responses to central injections of some peptide and non-peptide opioids in the guinea-pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The intracerebroventricular administration of prototype nonpeptide opioid receptor (mu, kappa, and sigma) agonists, morphine, ketocyclazocine, and N-allyl normetazocine and an agonist at both kappa and sigma receptors, pentazocine, was found to induce hyperthermia in guinea pigs. The similar administration of peptide opioids like beta endorphin, methionine endkephalin, leucine endkephaline, and several of their synthetic analogues was also found to cause hyperthermia. Only the liver-like transport system of the three anion transport systems (iodide, hippurate, and liver-like) present in the choroid plexus was determined to be important to the central inactivation of beta-endorphin and two synthetic analogues. Prostaglandins and norepinephrine (NE) as well as cAMP were not involved in peptide and nonpeptide opioid-induced hyperthermia. Naloxone-sensitive receptors were found to be involved in the induction of hyperthermia by morphine and beta-endorphin, while hyperthermic responses to ketocyclazocine, N-allyl normetazocine, pentazocine, Met-enkephalin, Leu-enkephalin, and two of the synthetic analogues were not antagonized by nalozone. The lack of antagonism of naloxone on pyrogen, arachidonic acid, PGE2, dibutyryl cAMP, and NE-induced hyperthermia shows that endogenous opioid peptides are not likely to be central mediators of the hyperthermia induced by these agents.

  2. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Plaisance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes.

  3. Neuronale Verteilung des Enzyms Glutaminylzyklase im Kortex und der hippocampalen Formation des humanen Gehirns

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzberger, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Intra- und extrazelluläre ß-Amyloid-Ablagerungen (Abeta) sind ein neuropathologisches Hauptmerkmal der Alzheimerschen Demenz (AD). Aktuelle Studien belegen, dass nicht Abeta-Plaques, sondern Abeta-Oligomere die Schädigung von Synapsen und Nervenzellen verursachen und dass ihre Konzentration gut mit der Schwere der kognitiven Dysfunktion korreliert. Allerdings sind Abeta-Peptide eine heterogene Gruppe schwer wasserlöslicher Peptide mit zahlreichen C- und N-terminalen Modifikationen. Dabei häng...

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of three beta-defensins from canine testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yongming; Ortega, M Teresa; Blecha, Frank; Prakash, Om; Melgarejo, Tonatiuh

    2005-05-01

    Mammalian beta-defensins are small cationic peptides possessing broad antimicrobial and physiological activities. Because dogs are particularly resilient to sexually transmitted diseases, it has been proposed that their antimicrobial peptide repertoire might provide insight into novel antimicrobial therapeutics and treatment regimens. To investigate this proposal, we cloned the full-length cDNA of three canine beta-defensin isoforms (cBD-1, -2, and -3) from canine testicular tissues. Their predicted peptides share identical N-terminal 65-amino-acid residues, including the beta-defensin consensus six-cysteine motif. The two longer isoforms, cBD-2 and -3, possess 4 and 34 additional amino acids, respectively, at the C terminus. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of cBD, a 34-amino-acid peptide derived from the shared mature peptide region was synthesized. Canine beta-defensin displayed broad antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus; MICs of 6 and 100 mug/ml, respectively), gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae; MICs of 20 to 50, 20, and 50 mug/ml, respectively), and yeast (Candida albicans; MIC of 5 to 50 mug/ml) and lower activity against Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. canigenitalium (MIC of 200 mug/ml). Antimicrobial potency was significantly reduced at salt concentrations higher than 140 mM. All three canine beta-defensins were highly expressed in testis. In situ hybridization indicated that cBD-1 was expressed primarily in Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules. In contrast, cBD-2 was located primarily within Leydig cells. The longest isoform, cBD-3, was detected in Sertoli cells and to a lesser extent in the interstitium. The tissue-specific expression and broad antimicrobial activity suggest that canine beta-defensins play an important role in host defense and other physiological functions of the male reproductive system. PMID:15845463

  5. Double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great sensitivity of double beta decay to neutrino mass and right handed currents has motivated many new and exciting attempts to observe this elusive nuclear phenomenon directly. Experiments in operation and other coming on line in the next one or two years are expected to result in order-of-magnitude improvements in detectable half lives for both the two-neutrino and no-neutrino modes. A brief history of double beta decay experiments is presented together with a discussion of current experimental efforts, including a gas filled time projection chamber being used to study selenium-82. (author)

  6. Plasma beta HCG determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are three important indications for the early diagnosis of pregnancy through the determination of the beta sub-unit of chorionic gonadotrophin using radioimmunoassay: 1) some patient's or doctor's anxiety to discover the problem; 2) when it will be necessary to employ diagnostic or treatment procedures susceptible to affect the ovum; and 3) in the differential diagnosis of amenorrhoea, uterine hemorrhage and abdominal tumors. Other user's are the diagnosis of missed absortion, and the diagnosis and follow-up of chrorioncarcinoma. The AA. studied 200 determinations of plasma beta-HCG, considering the main difficulties occuring in the clinical use of this relevant laboratory tool in actual Obstetrics. (author)

  7. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.;

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions of...... differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears that the...

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  10. Electromembrane extraction of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balchen, Marte; Reubsaet, Léon; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2008-06-20

    Rapid extraction of eight different peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) was demonstrated for the first time. During an extraction time of 5 min, the model peptides migrated from a 500 microL aqueous acidic sample solution, through a thin supported liquid membrane (SLM) of an organic liquid sustained in the pores in the wall of a porous hollow fiber, and into a 25 microL aqueous acidic acceptor solution present inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The driving force of the extraction was a 50 V potential sustained across the SLM, with the positive electrode in the sample and the negative electrode in the acceptor solution. The nature and the composition of the SLM were highly important for the EME process, and a mixture of 1-octanol and 15% di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate was found to work properly. Using 1mM HCl as background electrolyte in the sample and 100 mM HCl in the acceptor solution, and agitation at 1050 rpm, enrichment up to 11 times was achieved. Recoveries were found to be dependent on the structure of the peptide, indicating that the polarity and the number of ionized groups were important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency. The experimental findings suggested that electromembrane extraction of peptides is possible and may be a valuable tool for future extraction of peptides. PMID:18479691

  11. Degradation and debittering of a tryptic digest from beta-casein by aminopeptidase N from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2.

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, P S; van Kessel, T A; van de Veerdonk, F.L.; Zuurendonk, P F; Bruins, A P; Konings, W. N.

    1993-01-01

    The mode of action of purified aminopeptidase N from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 on a complex peptide mixture of a tryptic digest from bovine beta-casein was analyzed. The oligopeptides produced in the tryptic digest before and after aminopeptidase N treatment were identified by analysis of the N- and C-terminal amino acid sequences and amino acid compositions of the isolated peptides and by on-line liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Incubation of purified peptides with amino...

  12. Characterization of a gonad-specific transforming growth factor-beta superfamily member differentially expressed during the reproductive cycle of the oyster Crassostrea gigas

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury, Elodie; Fabioux, Caroline; Lelong, C.; Favrel, P; Huvet, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Through differential screening between oyster families selected for high and low summer survival, we have characterized a new transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily member. This novel factor, named oyster-gonadal-TGF beta-like (og-TGF beta-like), is synthesized as a 307 amino acid precursor and displays 6 of the 7 characteristic cysteine residues of the C-terminal, mature peptide. Sequence comparison revealed that og-TGF beta-like has a low percentage of identity with other kn...

  13. beta-endorphin modulates the acute response to a social conflict in male mice but does not play a role in stress-induced changes in sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaanholt, LM; Turek, FW; Meerlo, P

    2003-01-01

    beta-Endorphin is an endogenous opioid peptide that is released during stress and has been associated with many physiological functions. In this experiment beta-endorphin deficient mice were used to study the role of endorphins in the acute physiological and behavioral responses to a social conflict

  14. Three-dimensional structure in lipid micelles of the pediocin-like antimicrobial peptide curvacin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Helen Sophie; Fimland, Gunnar; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Kristiansen, Per Eugen

    2005-12-13

    The 3D structure of the membrane-permeabilizing 41-mer pediocin-like antimicrobial peptide curvacin A produced by lactic acid bacteria has been studied by NMR spectroscopy. In DPC micelles, the cationic and hydrophilic N-terminal half of the peptide forms an S-shaped beta-sheet-like domain stabilized by a disulfide bridge and a few hydrogen bonds. This domain is followed by two alpha-helices: a hydrophilic 6-mer helix between residues 19 and 24 and an amphiphilic/hydrophobic 11-mer helix between residues 29 and 39. There are two hinges in the peptide, one at residues 16-18 between the N-terminal S-shaped beta-sheet-like structure and the central 6-mer helix and one at residues 26-28 between the central helix and the 11-mer C-terminal helix. The latter helix is the only amphiphilic/hydrophobic part of the peptide and is thus presumably the part that penetrates into the hydrophobic phase of target-cell membranes. The hinge between the two helices may introduce the flexibility that allows the helix to dip into membranes. The helix-hinge-helix structure in the C-terminal half of curvacin A clearly distinguishes this peptide from the other pediocin-like peptides whose structures have been analyzed and suggests that curvacin A along with the structural homologues enterocin P and carnobacteriocin BM1 belong to a subgroup of the pediocin-like family of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:16331975

  15. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  16. Rat Cardiomyocytes Express a Classical Epithelial Beta-Defensin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Linde

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-defensins (BDs are classical epithelial antimicrobial peptides of immediate importance in innate host defense. Since recent studies have suggested that certain BDs are also expressed in non-traditional tissues, including whole heart homogenate and because effector molecules of innate immunity and inflammation can influence the development of certain cardiovascular disease processes, we hypothesized that BDs are produced by cardiomyocytes as a local measure of cardioprotection against danger signals. Here we report that at least one rat beta-defensin, rBD1, is expressed constitutively in cardiomyocytes specifically isolated using position-ablation-laser-microdissection (P.A.L.M. Microlaser Technologies. RT-PCR analysis showed expression of a single 318 bp transcript in adult rat heart (laser-excised cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells (neonatal rat heart myoblasts. Moreover, the full length cDNA of rBD1 was established and translated into a putative peptide with 69 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the adult rat cardiac BD-1 peptide displayed 99% identity with the previously reported renal rBD1 and 88, 53, 53 and 50% identity with mouse, human, gorilla and rhesus monkey BD1 respectively. Furthermore, structural analysis of the cardiac rBD1 showed the classical six-cysteine conserved motif of the BD family with an alpha-helix and three beta-sheets. Additionally, rBD1 displayed a significantly greater number of amphoteric residues than any of the human analogs, indicating a strong pH functional dependence in the rat. We suggest that rBD1, which was initially believed to be a specific epithelium-derived peptide, may be also involved in local cardiac innate immune defense mechanisms.

  17. Aumento en la prevalencia de estreptococos beta hemolíticos en hisopados faríngeos en Buenos Aires High prevalence of beta hemolytic streptococci isolated from throat swabs in Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo E. Villar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El estreptococo beta hemolítico grupo A (EBHGA es el agente bacteriano más frecuentemente aislado en casos de faringoamigdalitis. Otros estreptococos beta hemolíticos no A también pueden producir esta enfermedad. Ante el elevado número de aislamientos obtenidos en el año 2004 decidimos realizar un estudio con el objeto de evaluar la prevalencia de estos microorganismos durante un período de 5 años. Se incluyeron todos los cultivos de hisopados faríngeos que se realizaron con idéntica metodología. Se consideró niños a los comprendidos entre 6 meses y 18 años de edad, y adultos a los mayores de 18 años. Los aislamientos fueron identificados según la metodología habitual. La determinación de grupo se realizó mediante la aglutinación con partículas de látex. La recuperación de EBHGA fue significativamente mayor en niños en relación a los adultos. En el año 2004 se obtuvo una recuperación significativamente mayor de EBHGA, EBHGC y EBHGG en niños y de EBHGA y EBHGG en adultos respecto de los años anteriores. El aislamiento de EBHGG fue mayor en adultos. El 18.9% y el 5.8% de los estreptococos beta hemolíticos aislados en niños y adultos respectivamente no pertenecieron al grupo A. El incremento en la prevalencia de estreptococos beta hemolíticos refuerza la buena práctica de realizar cultivos en adultos y niños así como la correcta búsqueda en el laboratorio de bacteriología de los estreptococos beta hemolíticos no pertenecientes al grupo A.Beta hemolytic streptococci, particulary group A, are the most frequently isolated pathogens in cases of pharyngoamigdalitis. Other beta hemolytic streptococci also produce this pathology. An increase of positive cultures for group A streptococci was detected during 2004 in relation to previous years. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation rates of beta hemolytic streptococci groups A, C and G during a period of 5 years. Pharyngeal exudates were obtained from

  18. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  19. Evaluation of neutrino masses from $m_{\\beta\\beta}$ values

    CERN Document Server

    Khrushchov, V V

    2008-01-01

    A neutrino mass matrix is considered under conditions of the CP invariance and the negligible reactor mixing $\\theta_{13}$ angle. Absolute mass values for three neutrinos are evaluated in normal and inverted hierarchy spectra on the ground of data for oscillation mixing neutrino parameters and effective neutrino mass entering into a probability of neutrinoless two beta decay $m_{\\beta\\beta}$ values.

  20. Peptide transport through the blood-brain barrier. Final report 1 Jul 87-31 Dec 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, W.M.

    1991-01-15

    Most neuropeptides are incapable of entering the brain from blood owing to the presence of unique anatomical structures in the brain capillary wall, which makes up the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Such neuropeptides could be introduced into the bloodstream by intranasal insufflation and, thus, could have powerful medicinal properties (e.g., Beta-endorphin for the treatment of pain, vasopressin analogues for treatment of memory, ACTH analogues for treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy), should these peptides be capable of traversing the BBB. One such strategy for peptide delivery through the BBB is the development of chimeric peptides, which is the basis of the present contract. The production of chimeric peptides involves the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide (e.g., Beta-endorphin, vasopressin) to a transportable vector peptide (e.g., insulin, transferrin, cationized albumin, histone). The transportable peptide is capable of penetrating the BBB via receptor-mediated or absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Therefore, the introduction of chimeric peptides allows the nontransportable peptide to traverse the BBB via a physiologic piggy back mechanism.

  1. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  2. Low-beta structures

    OpenAIRE

    M. Vretenar(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland)

    2012-01-01

    'Low-beta' radio-frequency accelerating structures are used in the sections of a linear accelerator where the velocity of the particle beam increases with energy. The requirement for space periodicity to match the increasing particle velocity led to the development of a large variety of structures, both normal and superconducting, which are described in this lecture.

  3. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements.

  4. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross-section...

  5. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    We review the potential to probe new physics with neutrinoless double beta decay $(A,Z) \\to (A,Z+2) + 2 e^-$. Both the standard long-range light neutrino mechanism as well as short-range mechanisms mediated by heavy particles are discussed. We also stress aspects of the connection to lepton number violation at colliders and the implications for baryogenesis.

  6. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements

  7. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  8. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Laverty, Garry; Gilmore, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy serves as a valuable tool for assessing the structural integrity and viability of eukaryotic cells. Through the use of calcein AM and the DNA stain 4,6-diamidino-2 phenylindole (DAPI), cell viability and membrane integrity can be qualified. Our group has previously shown the ultra-short cationic antimicrobial peptide H-OOWW-NH2; the amphibian derived 27-mer peptide Maximin-4and the ultra-short lipopeptide C12-OOWW-NH2 to be effective against a range of bacterial biofil...

  9. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M;

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them to...... molecular snapshot of the orchestrated changes in expression of proteins involved in key processes which could be correlated with the altered phenotype of human beta-cells. Collectively our observations prompt research towards the establishment of bioengineered human beta-cells providing a new and needed...... source of cultured human beta-cells for beta-cell research, along with the development of new therapeutic strategies for detection, characterization and treatment of insulinomas....

  10. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C; Kaas, A; Hansen, L;

    2008-01-01

    progression of the disease. Likewise, CCL3 was negatively related to C-peptide and positively associated with the beta-cell stress marker proinsulin but increased in remitters. CCL4 associated with decreased beta-cell stress shown by negative association with proinsulin. Blockage of chemokines or antagonism...

  11. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon beta-1b injection is used to reduce episodes of symptoms in patients with relapsing-remitting (course ... and problems with vision, speech, and bladder control). Interferon beta-1b is in a class of medications ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory: Your Genes Your Health Disease InfoSearch: Beta Thalassemia Genomics Education Programme (UK) MalaCards: dominant beta-thalassemia Merck Manual ...

  13. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J;

    2009-01-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose, insu...

  14. Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease with Anti-Homocysteic Acid Antibody in 3xTg-AD Male Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru Hasegawa; Nobuyuki Mikoda; Masashi Kitazawa; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder with dementia, the exact pathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. We previously reported that homocysteic acid (HA) may be one of the pathological biomarkers in the brain with AD and that the increased levels of HA may induce the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. In this study, we further investigated the pathological role of HA in a mouse model of AD. Four-month-old prepathol...

  15. An expanded set of amino acid analogs for the ribosomal translation of unnatural peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C T Hartman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The application of in vitro translation to the synthesis of unnatural peptides may allow the production of extremely large libraries of highly modified peptides, which are a potential source of lead compounds in the search for new pharmaceutical agents. The specificity of the translation apparatus, however, limits the diversity of unnatural amino acids that can be incorporated into peptides by ribosomal translation. We have previously shown that over 90 unnatural amino acids can be enzymatically loaded onto tRNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have now used a competition assay to assess the efficiency of tRNA-aminoacylation of these analogs. We have also used a series of peptide translation assays to measure the efficiency with which these analogs are incorporated into peptides. The translation apparatus tolerates most side chain derivatives, a few alpha,alpha disubstituted, N-methyl and alpha-hydroxy derivatives, but no beta-amino acids. We show that over 50 unnatural amino acids can be incorporated into peptides by ribosomal translation. Using a set of analogs that are efficiently charged and translated we were able to prepare individual peptides containing up to 13 different unnatural amino acids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that a diverse array of unnatural building blocks can be translationally incorporated into peptides. These building blocks provide new opportunities for in vitro selections with highly modified drug-like peptides.

  16. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac p...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....... characterized. An ongoing characterization of the molecular heterogeneity will help appreciate the biosynthetic capacity of the endocrine heart and could introduce new diagnostic possibilities. Notably, different biosynthetic products may not be equal markers of the same pathophysiological processes. An...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  17. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  18. Beta gets better with age

    OpenAIRE

    Tomunen, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    The objective of my thesis is to study the cause for the low beta anomaly, which is an observation that the high beta stocks perform poorly relative to the low beta stocks. Based on earlier findings, I hypothesize that if a stock has high investor attention, its price overreacts to market-wide shocks, which results in a positive measurement error in its beta. Simultaneously, high attention causes overpricing, because the stock overreacts more often to positive shocks than to negat...

  19. New insights in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency: a pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kuilenburg, André B P; Stroomer, Alida E M; Van Lenthe, Henk; Abeling, Nico G G M; Van Gennip, Albert H

    2004-04-01

    DPD (dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolized to beta-alanine and the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB (beta-aminoisobutyric acid) respectively. The S-enantiomer of beta-AIB is predominantly derived from the catabolism of valine. It has been suggested that an altered homoeostasis of beta-alanine underlies some of the clinical abnormalities encountered in patients with a DPD deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrated that only a slightly decreased concentration of beta-alanine was present in the urine and plasma, whereas normal levels of beta-alanine were present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a DPD deficiency. Therefore the metabolism of beta-alanine-containing peptides, such as carnosine, may be an important factor involved in the homoeostasis of beta-alanine in patients with DPD deficiency. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approx. 2-3-fold lower in cerebrospinal fluid and urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared with controls. In contrast, strongly decreased levels (10-fold) of beta-AIB were present in the plasma of DPD patients. Our results demonstrate that, under pathological conditions, the catabolism of valine can result in the production of significant amounts of beta-AIB. Furthermore, the observation that the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB is abundantly present in the urine of DPD patients suggests that significant cross-over exists between the thymine and valine catabolic pathways. PMID:14705962

  20. Rat beta-LPH, gamma-LPH and beta-endorphin biosynthesized by isolated cells of pars intermedia and pars distalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats pars intermedia cells were incubated for 3 h with the following amino-acids: a) 35S-methionine and 3H-phenylalamine; b) 3H-valine; and c) 3H-valine and 3H-lysine. Radioactive gamma-lipotropin, beta-lipotropin and beta-endorphin were purified on carboxy- methyl-cellulose and characterized by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis af pH 4.5, molecular weight estimation and microsequencing. Rat gamma-lipotropin was shown to differ slightly from ovine gamma-lipotropin in its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence, in containing no methionine and having phenylalanine at position 6, valine at positions 13 and 27, and lysine at position 20. The same variations were observed in the sequence of rat beta-lipotropin, while rat beta-endorphin was shown to be identical to the ovine beta-endorphin. Following a 3-h pulse of rat pars distalis, the cells were extracted with care to avoid beta-lipotropin degradation by proteolytic enzymes. A peptide was purified and identified to be rat beta-endorphin, thus demonstrating that beta-endorphin is biosynthesized in pars distalis and is not an extraction artifact. (author)

  1. Misleading Betas: An Educational Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, James; Halcoussis, Dennis; Phillips, G. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The dual-beta model is a generalization of the CAPM model. In the dual-beta model, separate beta estimates are provided for up-market and down-market days. This paper uses the historical "Anscombe quartet" results which illustrated how very different datasets can produce the same regression coefficients to motivate a discussion of the…

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the gene for human. beta. -casein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennerdal, B.; Bergstroem, S.; Andersson, Y.; Hialmarsson, K.; Sundgyist, A.; Hernell, O. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Human {beta}-casein is a major protein in human milk. This protein is part of the casein micelle and has been suggested to have several physiological functions in the newborn. Since there is limited information on {beta}casein and the factors that affect its concentration in human milk, the authors have isolated and sequenced the gene for this protein. A human mammary gland cDNA library (Clontech) in gt 11 was screened by plaque hy-hybridization using a 42-mer synthetic {sup 32}p-labelled oligo-nucleotide. Positive clones were identified and isolated, DNA was prepared and the gene isolated by cleavage with EcoR1. Following subcloning (PUC18), restriction mapping and Southern blotting, DNA for sequencing was prepared. The gene was sequenced by the dideoxy method. Human {beta}-casein has 212 amino acids and the amino acid sequence deducted from the nucleotide sequence is to 91% identical to the published sequence for human {beta}-casein show a high degree of conservation at the leader peptide and the highly phosphorylated sequences, but also deletions and divergence at several positions. These results provide insight into the structure of the human {beta}-casein gene and will facilitate studies on factors affecting its expression.

  3. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  4. Small peptides hydrolysis in dry-cured meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Leticia; Gallego, Marta; Escudero, Elizabeth; Reig, Milagro; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of different peptides are naturally generated in dry-cured meats as a consequence of the intense proteolysis mechanisms which take place during their processing. In fact, meat proteins are extensively hydrolysed by muscle endo-peptidases (mainly calpains and cathepsins) followed by exo-peptidases (mainly, tri- and di-peptidyl peptidases, dipeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases). The result is a large amount of released free amino acids and a pool of numerous peptides with different sequences and lengths, some of them with interesting sequences for bioactivity. This manuscript is presenting the proteomic identification of small peptides resulting from the hydrolysis of four target proteins (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, beta-enolase, myozenin-1 and troponin T) and discusses the enzymatic routes for their generation during the dry-curing process. The results indicate that the hydrolysis of peptides follows similar exo-peptidase mechanisms. In the case of dry-fermented sausages, most of the observed hydrolysis is the result of the combined action of muscle and microbial exo-peptidases except for the hydrolysis of di- and tri-peptides, mostly due to microbial di- and tri-peptidases, and the release of amino acids at the C-terminal that appears to be mostly due to muscle carboxypeptidases. PMID:25944374

  5. Peptide inhibitors of dengue virus and West Nile virus infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral fusion proteins mediate cell entry by undergoing a series of conformational changes that result in virion-target cell membrane fusion. Class I viral fusion proteins, such as those encoded by influenza virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, contain two prominent alpha helices. Peptides that mimic portions of these alpha helices inhibit structural rearrangements of the fusion proteins and prevent viral infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E of flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV and dengue virus (DENV, are class II viral fusion proteins comprised predominantly of beta sheets. We used a physio-chemical algorithm, the Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity scale (WWIHS 1 in combination with known structural data to identify potential peptide inhibitors of WNV and DENV infectivity that target the viral E protein. Viral inhibition assays confirm that several of these peptides specifically interfere with target virus entry with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 in the 10 μM range. Inhibitory peptides similar in sequence to domains with a significant WWIHS scores, including domain II (IIb, and the stem domain, were detected. DN59, a peptide corresponding to the stem domain of DENV, inhibited infection by DENV (>99% inhibition of plaque formation at a concentrations of 99% inhibition at

  6. Expression and characterization of recombinant single-chain salmon class I MHC fused with beta2-microglobulin with biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Stet, René J M; Skjødt, Karsten;

    2008-01-01

    Heterodimeric class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules consist of a putative 45-kDa heavy chain and a 12-kDa beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) light chain. The knowledge about MHC genes in Atlantic salmon accumulated during the last decade has allowed us to generate soluble and stable ...... molecules by biosensor analysis. This production of sufficient amounts of class I MHC proteins may represent a useful tool to study the peptide-binding specificity of MHC class I molecules, in order to design a peptide vaccine against viral pathogens....... resistance to infectious salmon anaemia virus. The single-chain salmon MHC class I molecule has been designed and generated, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta2m is joined together with a flexible 15 or 20 amino acid peptide linker to the amino terminus of the heavy chain (Sasabeta2mUBA*0301). Monoclonal...

  7. Radiolabeled antibodies and RGD-peptides for the treatment of ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.L.H.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, preclinical studies on new treatment modalities for ovarian cancer are descibed, applying radiolabeled antibodies and radiolabeled RGD-peptides. In chapter 2 a study is described comparing the therapeutic efficacy of the antibody HMFG1 radiolabeled with several beta-emitting radionuc

  8. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  9. Radiolabeled peptides for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy of tumors; Radiomarkierte Peptide zur bildgebenden Diagnostik und Radiotherapie von Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friebe, M.; Bugaj, J.E.; Srinivasan, A.; Dinkelborg, L.M. [Research Lab. of Schering AG (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Radioactively labeled peptides are powerful tools for an individualized, patient based treatment of oncological diseases. The excellent targeting concomittant with the easy radiolabeling enable such fully synthetic molecules for patient selection (diagnosis) and internal irradiation (therapy). Peptides labeled with radiohalogenes as well as radiometals were used successfully for the diagnosis and therapy of numerous malignancies. The use of {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC and {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE for the treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumors, refrectory to chemotherapy, underline the potential of radiopeptides. {sup 99m}Tc-NeoTect registered, another somatostatin targeting peptide-radiometal conjugate, detects lung lesions with 97% sensitivity and > 70% specificity employing SPECT. Pre-clinical results of {sup 188}Re-NeoTide registered, the radiotherapeutic counterpart of {sup 99m}Tc-NeoTect registered, indicate significant tumor regression in lung tumor models. The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted detection of neoangiogenesis proves radiopeptides to be valuable tools for the diagnostic imaging of multiple tumor entities, since {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-receptors are overexpressed in a variety of tumors undergoing new blood-vessel formation. The application of ({sup 18}F)-Galacto-RGD, a high-affinity binder for {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-receptors, pinpoints the potential of peptides for tumor detection (Fig. 5) and staging. The successful use of {sup 99m}Tc-Demogastrin registered for detection of medullary thyroid carcinoma and its multiple metastases opens a new field in diagnosis and therapy of solid tumors. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of a new beta-lactamase gene from isolates of Vibrio spp. in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Lyu Jin; Kim, Jae Hoon; Jin, Ji Woong; Jeong, Hyun Do

    2012-04-01

    PCR was performed to analyze the beta-lactamase genes carried by ampicillin-resistant Vibrio spp. strains isolated from marine environments in Korea between 2006 and 2009. All 36 strains tested showed negative results in PCR with the primers designed from the nucleotide sequences of various known beta-lactamase genes. This prompted us to screen new beta-lactamase genes. A novel beta-lactamase gene was cloned from Vibrio alginolyticus KV3 isolated from the aquaculture water of Geoje Island of Korea. The determined nucleotide sequence (VAK-3 beta-lactamase) revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 852 bp, encoding a protein of 283 amino acids (aa), which displayed low homology to any other beta-lactamase genes reported in public databases. The deduced 283 aa sequence of VAK-3, consisting of a 19 aa signal peptide and a 264 aa mature protein, contained highly conserved peptide segments specific to class A beta-lactamases including the specific amino acid residues STFK (62-65), SDN (122-124), E (158), and RTG (226-228). Results from PCR performed with primers specific to the VAK-3 beta-lactamase gene identified 3 of the 36 isolated strains as V. alginolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, and Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, indicating the utilization of various beta-lactamase genes including unidentified ones in ampicillin-resistant Vibrio spp. strains from the marine environment. In a mating experiment, none of the isolates transfered the VAK-3 beta-lactamase gene to the Escherichia coli recipient. This lack of mobility, and the presence of a chromosomal acyl-CoA flanking sequence upstream of the VAK-3 beta- lactamase gene, led to the assumption that the location of this new beta-lactamase gene was in the chromosome, rather than the mobile plasmid. Antibiotic susceptibility of VAK-3 beta-lactamase was indicated by elevated levels of resistance to penicillins, but not to cephalosporins in the wild type and E. coli harboring recombinant plasmid pKV-3, compared with those of

  11. Long-term electromagnetic pulse exposure induces Abeta deposition and cognitive dysfunction through oxidative stress and overexpression of APP and BACE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Da-Peng; Li, Jin-Hui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Sheng-Long; Kuang, Fang; Lang, Hai-Yang; Wang, Ya-Feng; An, Guang-Zhou; Li, Jing; Guo, Guo-Zhen

    2016-07-01

    A progressively expanded literature has been devoted in the past years to the noxious or beneficial effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) to Alzheimer׳s disease (AD). This study concerns the relationship between electromagnetic pulse (EMP) exposure and the occurrence of AD in rats and the underlying mechanisms, focusing on the role of oxidative stress (OS). 55 healthy male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were used and received continuous exposure for 8 months. Morris water maze (MWM) test was conducted to test the ability of cognitive and memory. The level of OS was detected by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) content. We found that long-term EMP exposure induced cognitive damage in rats. The content of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein in hippocampus was increased after long-term EMP exposure. OS of hippocampal neuron was detected. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay showed that the content of Aβ protein and its oligomers in EMP-exposed rats were higher than that of sham-exposed rats. The content of Beta Site App Cleaving Enzyme (BACE1) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) in EMP-exposed rats hippocampus were also higher than that of sham-exposed rats. SOD activity and GSH content in EMP-exposed rats were lower than sham-exposed rats (p<0.05). Several mechanisms were proposed based on EMP exposure-induced OS, including increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) aberrant cleavage. Although further study is needed, the present results suggest that long-term EMP exposure is harmful to cognitive ability in rats and could induce AD-like pathological manifestation. PMID:26972535

  12. Beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Origa Raffaella

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands, dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes, gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely

  13. Beta and muon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  14. Peptide iodination on phenylalanine residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide labelling with radioactive isotopes is always a compromise between peptide chemistry, labelling chemistry, and biological receptor tolerance. Therefore new ways for isotope introduction are always useful. The present contribution describes the introduction of iodine isotopes onto synthetic polypeptides by means of the Gattermann/ Sandmeyer reactions. Peptides containing the nitrophenylalanyl residue are reduced to the corresponding aminophenylalanyl, diazolized to the diazonium phenylalanyl peptide and converted to the iodophenylalanyl peptide in the presence of copper. Two examples are presented: angiotensin II and enkephalin. In both cases, the iodophenylalanyl residue is well accepted by the biological target. (author). 13 refs.; 4 figs

  15. Integration of BETA with Eclipse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Enevoldsen, Mads Brøgger

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents language interoperability issues appearing in order to implement support for the BETA language in the Java-based Eclipse integrated development environment. One of the challenges is to implement plug-ins in BETA and be able to load them in Eclipse. In order to do this, some form...... of language interoperability between Java and BETA is required. The first approach is to use the Java Native Interface and use C to bridge between Java and BETA. This results in a workable, but complicated solution. The second approach is to let the BETA compiler generate Java class files. With this...... approach it is possible to implement plug-ins in BETA and even inherit from Java classes. In the paper the two approaches are described together with part of the mapping from BETA to Java class files. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/15710661...

  16. COM Support in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Component technologies based on binary units of independent production are some of the most important contributions to software architecture and reuse during recent years. Especially the COM technologies and the CORBA standard from the Object Management Group have contributed new and interesting ...... principles for software architecture, and proven to be useful in parctice. In this paper ongoing work with component support in the BETA language is described....

  17. Beta decay for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry Jeannot

    1962-01-01

    The ""pedestrian approach"" was developed to describe some essentially simple experimental results and their theoretical implications in plain language. In this graduate-level text, Harry J. Lipkin presents simply, but without oversimplification, the aspects of beta decay that can be understood without reference to the formal theory; that is, the reactions that follow directly from conservation laws and elementary quantum mechanics.The pedestrian treatment is neither a substitute for a complete treatment nor a watered-down version.

  18. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  19. alpha 11beta 1 integrin recognizes the GFOGER sequence in interstitial collagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wan-Ming; Kapyla, Jarmo; Puranen, J Santeri; Knight, C Graham; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Pentikainen, Olli T; Johnson, Mark S; Farndale, Richard W; Heino, Jyrki; Gullberg, Donald

    2003-02-28

    The integrins alpha(1)beta(1), alpha(2)beta(1), alpha(10)beta(1), and alpha(11)beta(1) are referred to as a collagen receptor subgroup of the integrin family. Recently, both alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) integrins have been shown to recognize triple-helical GFOGER (where single letter amino acid nomenclature is used, O = hydroxyproline) or GFOGER-like motifs found in collagens, despite their distinct binding specificity for various collagen subtypes. In the present study we have investigated the mechanism whereby the latest member in the integrin family, alpha(11)beta(1), recognizes collagens using C2C12 cells transfected with alpha(11) cDNA and the bacterially expressed recombinant alpha(11) I domain. The ligand binding properties of alpha(11)beta(1) were compared with those of alpha(2)beta(1). Mg(2+)-dependent alpha(11)beta(1) binding to type I collagen required micromolar Ca(2+) but was inhibited by 1 mm Ca(2+), whereas alpha(2)beta(1)-mediated binding was refractory to millimolar concentrations of Ca(2+). The bacterially expressed recombinant alpha(11) I domain preference for fibrillar collagens over collagens IV and VI was the same as the alpha(2) I domain. Despite the difference in Ca(2+) sensitivity, alpha(11)beta(1)-expressing cells and the alpha(11) I domain bound to helical GFOGER sequences in a manner similar to alpha(2)beta(1)-expressing cells and the alpha(2) I domain. Modeling of the alpha I domain-collagen peptide complexes could partially explain the observed preference of different I domains for certain GFOGER sequence variations. In summary, our data indicate that the GFOGER sequence in fibrillar collagens is a common recognition motif used by alpha(1)beta(1), alpha(2)beta(1), and also alpha(11)beta(1) integrins. Although alpha(10) and alpha(11) chains show the highest sequence identity, alpha(2) and alpha(11) are more similar with regard to collagen specificity. Future studies will reveal whether alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(11)beta(1

  20. Immunoreactivity for thymosin beta 4 and thymosin beta 10 in the adult rat oro-gastro-intestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nemolato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4 and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10 are two members of the β-thymosin family, involved in multiple cellular activities in different organs in multiple animal species. Here we report the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in rat tissues, in the gut and in annexed glands. The two peptide were differently expressed: Tβ4 was absent in salivary glands whereas Tβ10 was expressed in parotid and in submandibular glands. Tβ4 was mildly expressed in the tongue and in the oesophagus, where Tβ10 was absent. A similar expression was found in the stomach, ileum and colon mucosa. In pancreas Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the Langerhans islet cells; Tβ4 was also detected in the exocrine cells. Both peptide were not expressed in liver cells. When the rat expression pattern in rat organs was compared to reactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 in humans, marked differences were found. Our data clearly indicate a species-specific expression of Tβ4 and Tβ10, characterized by the actual unpredictability of the expression of these peptides in different cells and tissues. The common high expression of Tβ4 in mast cells, both in humans and in rats, represents one of the few similarities between these two species.

  1. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  2. Expression of the neuronal adaptor protein X11alpha protects against memory dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2010-01-01

    X11alpha is a neuronal-specific adaptor protein that binds to the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Overexpression of X11alpha reduces Abeta production but whether X11alpha also protects against Abeta-related memory dysfunction is not known. To test this possibility, we crossed X11alpha transgenic mice with AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice. AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice produce high levels of brain Abeta and develop age-related defects in memory function that correlate with increasing Abeta load. Overexpression of X11alpha alone had no detectable adverse effect upon behavior. However, X11alpha reduced brain Abeta levels and corrected spatial reference memory defects in aged X11alpha\\/AbetaPP double transgenics. Thus, X11alpha may be a therapeutic target for Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  3. Molecular cloning of the first metazoan beta-1,3 glucanase from eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bachman, E S; McClay, D R

    1996-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of the first beta-1,3 glucanase from animal tissue. Three peptide sequences were obtained from beta-1,3 glucanase that had been purified from eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and the gene was cloned by PCR using oligonucleotides deduced from the peptide sequences. The full-length cDNA shows a predicted enzyme structure of 499 aa with a hydrophobic signal sequence. A 3.2-kb message is present in eggs, during early embryogenesis, and in adult ...

  4. Inhibition of GSK3 phosphorylation of beta-catenin via phosphorylated PPPSPXS motifs of Wnt coreceptor LRP6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Wu

    Full Text Available The Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles in cell proliferation and differentiation, and deregulated beta-catenin protein levels lead to many types of human cancers. On activation by Wnt, the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor related protein 6 (LRP6 is phosphorylated at multiple conserved intracellular PPPSPXS motifs by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 and casein kinase 1 (CK1, resulting in recruitment of the scaffolding protein Axin to LRP6. As a result, beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 is inhibited and beta-catenin protein is stabilized. However, how LRP6 phosphorylation and the ensuing LRP6-Axin interaction lead to the inhibition of beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 is not fully understood. In this study, we reconstituted Axin-dependent beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 and CK1 in vitro using recombinant proteins, and found that the phosphorylated PPPSPXS peptides directly inhibit beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 in a sequence and phosphorylation-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect of phosphorylated PPPSPXS motifs is direct and specific for GSK3 phosphorylation of beta-catenin at Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 but not for CK1 phosphorylation of beta-catenin at Ser45, and is independent of Axin function. We also show that a phosphorylated PPPSPXS peptide is able to activate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and to induce axis duplication in Xenopus embryos, presumably by inhibition of GSK3 in vivo. Based on these observations, we propose a working model that Axin recruitment to the phosphorylated LRP6 places GSK3 in the vicinity of multiple phosphorylated PPPSPXS motifs, which directly inhibit GSK3 phosphorylation of beta-catenin. This model provides a possible mechanism to account, in part, for inhibition of beta-catenin phosphorylation by Wnt-activated LRP6.

  5. APP17肽调节胰岛素受体底物1在糖尿病小鼠脑内分布及对脑海马区神经元退行性变的作用%Effects of amyloid beta protein precursor 17 peptide on distribution of insulin receptor substrate-1 in brain and degeneration of neurons in hippocampus of diabetic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆珊; 雷亚平; 崔艳君; 王蓬文; 盛树力

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In brain insulin does its work through the insulin receptor substrate (IRS). Amyloid beta protein precursor 17 (APP17) peptide has the neurotrophic function, which may improve diabetic encephalopathy resulted from insulin deficiency by affecting insulin receptor substrate.OBJECTIVE: The mouse diabetic model was produced to observe the effect of APP17 peptide on the distribution of IRS-1 in brain tissues.DESIGN: Randomized control animal experiment.SETTING: Staff Room of Pathology, College of Basic Medical Sciences,Capital University of Medical Sciences; Beijing Research Laboratory for Brain Aging of Xuanwu Hospital.MATERIALS: The experiment was performed in Staff Room of Pathology,College of Basic Medical Sciences, Capital University of Medical Sciences and Beijing Research Laboratory for Brain Aging of Xuanwu Hospital from September to October 2003. Totally 18 male kunming mice were employed,and randomly assigned into control group, diabetic group and APP17 peptide treatment group with 6 mice in each group.METHODS: ①The mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, Sigma) by 200 mg/kg, and 3 days later, the tail blood was sampled to examine non-fasting blood glucose, and the blood glucose over 15 mmol/L was set as the criteria for successful diabetic model establishment. ②In APP17 + diabetes mellitus group, the mice received subcutaneous injection of 0.35 μg APP17 peptide once daily for 2 weeks. The mice in the normal control group were not interfered. ③Then brain was removed and crystat sections were prepared. Immunohistochemical staining was done for IRS-1 at four weeks after giving streptozotocin.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pattern and distribution of IRS-1 positive cells of mice in each group.RESULTS: Totally 18 mice were involved in the result analysis. ①In the brains of diabetic mice the IRS-1 immunohistochemical positive cells distributed at cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus and so on, while the positive

  6. 心肺复苏大鼠海马神经元磷脂酰肌醇-3-激酶、蛋白激酶B和磷酸化cAMP应答元件结合蛋白表达的变化及APP17肽的影响%The effect of beta-amyloid precursor protein peptide on the expressions of PDK, PKB, p-CREB in the neurons of hippocampal gyrus in rats after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶; 路毅; 赵妍; 秦俭; 王蓉; 赵志炜

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP17) peptide on the changes in the expressions of phosphoinositide 3-kinase(PI3K), protein kinase B(PKB) and phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) in the neurons of hippocampal gyms in rats after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Method Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups, namely the sham-operated control group, the resuscitation group and resuscitation with APP17 peptide-treated group. The rat model of asphyxial cardiac arrest was made by clamping the endotracheal tube and the standard external cardiopulmonary resuscitation ( CPR) was performed until the restoration of spontaneous circulation ( ROSC) observed.ROSC was defined by the appearance of normal QRS waves of electrocardiogram and mean artery pressure ( MAP)≥60 mmHg for more than 10 minutes. Rats of resuscitation group and control group received intravenous 0.9%NaCl, and the rats of the APP17 peptide group were treated with APP17 peptide(10μg·300 g~(-1), i. v.) after ROSC. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation after reperfusion 2 hours and then the cerebral hippocampal gyrus was immediately separated to detect PI3K, PKB and p-CREB by immunohistochemistry ( IHC) and Western-blot analysis. Statistical comparisons were made by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) . Results IHC showed that there was no significant difference in PDK positive cells between resuscitation group and control group (2.75 ±1.80 vs. 2.53 ± 1.53, P > 0.05) . The PDK obviously more increased in the APP17 peptide group than in resuscitation group(5.85 ± 2.83 vs. 2.75 ± 1.80, P < 0.01) .The counts of PKB and p-CREB positive cells were obviously lower in resuscitation group than those in control group (2.45 ± 1.36 vs. 5.22 ± 2.50, P < 0.05);(2.41 ± 1.11 vs. 8.31 ±3.02, P < 0.01 ). The PKB and p-CREB positive cells were significantly higher in the APP17 peptide group than in resuscitation group (9.66±4.32 vs. 2

  7. Evaluation of the hydrophilic behaviour of a β-casein peptide by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. X.; Douillard, R.; Tran, V.

    1994-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a beta-casein peptide in the alpha-helix conformation in vacuum and aqueous solution have been performed to study the hydrophilic (and conversely hydrophobic) and hydration behavior of this peptide. Both simulations were performed for a duration of 150 ps at 300 K using the GROMOS force field, with apolar hydrogen atoms treated as united atoms, and the SPC water model. A general conclusion is that the beta-casein peptide hydrophilic behaviour can be characterized by comparison of (solvent) accessible surface area (SASA) and of the radius of gyration (R(sub g)) in vacuum and in aqueous solution. These two criterion values increase when the peptide is moved from vacuum to water. For each amino-acid, the SASA difference gives a picture of their hydrophobicity which compares favorably with the standard scale used to predict the hydrophobicity profile of the polypeptide. The hydrogen bonding analysis has been carried out and the result of peptide-water hydrogen bonding has been satisfactory compared with previous simulation and nuclear magnetic resonance NMR experiment. From calculations of the diffusion coefficient of water around the different atom types of peptide, it is found that the diffusion coefficient of water near polar atom is the smallest one, which is consistent with the recent experimental and simulation data.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  9. Incretin receptor null mice reveal key role of GLP-1 but not GIP in pancreatic beta cell adaptation to pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Moffett R.C.; Vasu S; Thorens B.; Drucker D.J.; Flatt P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Islet adaptations to pregnancy were explored in C57BL6/J mice lacking functional receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Pregnant wild type mice and GIPRKO mice exhibited marked increases in islet and beta cell area, numbers of medium/large sized islets, with positive effects on Ki67/Tunel ratio favouring beta cell growth and enhanced pancreatic insulin content. Alpha cell area and glucagon content were unchanged but prohormone convertases PC2 a...

  10. Incretin Receptor Null Mice Reveal Key Role of GLP-1 but Not GIP in Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Moffett, R. Charlotte; Vasu, Srividya; Thorens, Bernard; Drucker, Daniel J.; Peter R. Flatt

    2014-01-01

    Islet adaptations to pregnancy were explored in C57BL6/J mice lacking functional receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Pregnant wild type mice and GIPRKO mice exhibited marked increases in islet and beta cell area, numbers of medium/large sized islets, with positive effects on Ki67/Tunel ratio favouring beta cell growth and enhanced pancreatic insulin content. Alpha cell area and glucagon content were unchanged but prohormone convertases PC2 a...

  11. Antifungal peptides, a heat shock protein-like peptide, and a serine-threonine kinase-like protein from Ceylon spinach seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2004-07-01

    Two antifungal peptides (designated alpha- and beta-basrubrins) with molecular masses of 4-5 kDa and distinct N-terminal sequences, and a peptide and a protein with N-terminal sequences resembling heat shock protein (hsp) and serine-threonine kinase, respectively, were isolated from seeds of the Ceylon spinach Basella rubra. The purification procedure entailed saline extraction, (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, and FPLC-gel filtration on a Superdex peptide column. alpha- and beta-basrubrins inhibited mycelial growth in Botrytis cirerea with an IC50 value of 7.5 and 14.7 microM, respectively, Mycosphaerella arachidicola with an IC50 of 12.4 and 6.9 microM, and Fusarium oxysporum with an IC50 of 5.8 and 6.2 microM. Neither alpha-basrubrin nor beta-basrubin exhibited DNase, RNase, lectin or protease activity, indicating that their antifungal action is not due to these activities. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited by alpha- and beta-basrubrins with an IC50 of 246 and 370 microM, respectively. Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate was inhibited by alpha- and beta-basrubrins with an IC50 of 400 and 100 nM. The heat shock protein-like peptide and serine-threonine kinase-like protein exhibited a molecular mass of 3 and 30 kDa, respectively. They inhibited neither translation in a rabbit reticulocyte system at concentrations up to 50 microM nor HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity at concentrations up to 400 microM. They did not exert antifungal activity toward B. cinerea, M. arachidicola, and F. oxysporum when tested up to 16 microg. None of the aforementioned proteins demonstrated DNase, RNase, protease or lectin activity. PMID:15245882

  12. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    OpenAIRE

    RD Rosa; MA Barracco

    2010-01-01

    Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs) are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP fam...

  13. Peptide nanofibers modified with a protein by using designed anchor molecules bearing hydrophobic and functional moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Ayaka; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsumura, Sachiko; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2010-06-11

    Self-assembly of peptides and proteins is a key feature of biological functions. Short amphiphilic peptides designed with a beta-sheet structure can form sophisticated nanofiber structures, and the fibers are available as nanomaterials for arranging biomolecules. Peptide FI (H-PKFKIIEFEP-OH) self-assembles into nanofibers with a coiled fine structure, as reported in our previous work. We have constructed anchor molecules that have both a binding moiety for the fiber structure and a functional unit capable of capturing target molecules, with the purpose of arranging proteins on the designed peptide nanofibers. Designed anchors containing an alkyl chain as a binding unit and biotin as a functional moiety were found to bind to peptide fibers FI and F2i (H-ALEAKFAAFEAKLA-NH(2)). The surface-exposed biotin moiety on the fibers could capture an anti-biotin antibody. Moreover, hydrophobic dipeptide anchor units composed of iminodiacetate connected to Phe-Phe or Ile-Ile and a peptide composed of six histidine residues connected to biotin could also connect FI peptide fibers to the anti-biotin antibody through the chelation of Ni(2+) ions. This strategy of using designed anchors opens a novel approach to constructing nanoscale protein arrays on peptide nanomaterials. PMID:20419712

  14. [Brain natriuretic peptide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Villa, G; Lazzeri, C; Fronzaroli, C; Franchi, F; Gentilini, P

    1995-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with a spectrum of activities quite similar to those of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), including diuretic, natriuretic, hypotensive and smooth muscle relaxant activities. These effects are due to the stimulation of guanylate cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors, leading to an increase in cyclic GMP concentration in target cells. BNP has a lower affinity than ANP for C (clearance) receptors, and is less susceptible to degradation by neutral endopeptidase-24.11, resulting in a longer half-life. In the kidney, BNP increases the glomerular filtration rate and inhibits sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule. It also inhibits the release of renin and aldosterone. Unlike ANP, produced by the atria, BNP is mainly synthesized and released into circulation by the left ventricle and is therefore influenced by stimuli involving this cardiac chamber, such as an increase in arterial pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. Plasma BNP levels are very low in healthy subjects, and respond modestly, although significantly to physiological stimuli such as changes in posture or sodium intake. In contrast, plasma BNP concentrations increase in disease states such as cirrhosis with ascites, hypertension, chronic renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. In the latter condition, plasma BNP concentration is a reliable prognostic index. Evidence obtained by administering BNP to healthy subjects and hypertensive patients suggests that BNP, at physiological and pathophysiological plasma concentrations, markedly influences cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to its effects on sodium excretion and the renin-aldosterone axis. PMID:8718658

  15. A fluorescent glycolipid-binding peptide probe traces cholesterol dependent microdomain-derived trafficking pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Steinert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake and intracellular trafficking of sphingolipids, which self-associate into plasma membrane microdomains, is associated with many pathological conditions, including viral and toxin infection, lipid storage disease, and neurodegenerative disease. However, the means available to label the trafficking pathways of sphingolipids in live cells are extremely limited. In order to address this problem, we have developed an exogenous, non-toxic probe consisting of a 25-amino acid sphingolipid binding domain, the SBD, derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, and conjugated by a neutral linker with an organic fluorophore. The current work presents the characterization of the sphingolipid binding and live cell trafficking of this novel probe, the SBD peptide. SBD was the name given to a motif originally recognized by Fantini et al in a number of glycolipid-associated proteins, and was proposed to interact with sphingolipids in membrane microdomains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In accordance with Fantini's model, optimal SBD binding to membranes depends on the presence of sphingolipids and cholesterol. In synthetic membrane binding assays, SBD interacts preferentially with raft-like lipid mixtures containing sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and complex gangliosides in a pH-dependent manner, but is less glycolipid-specific than Cholera toxin B (CtxB. Using quantitative time-course colocalization in live cells, we show that the uptake and intracellular trafficking route of SBD is unlike that of either the non-raft marker Transferrin or the raft markers CtxB and Flotillin2-GFP. However, SBD traverses an endolysosomal route that partially intersects with raft-associated pathways, with a major portion being diverted at a late time point to rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Trafficking of SBD to acidified compartments is strongly disrupted by cholesterol perturbations, consistent with the regulation of sphingolipid trafficking by cholesterol

  16. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ion...

  17. Increased renal gene transcription of protein kinase C-beta in human diabetic nephropathy: relationship to long-term glycaemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, R.G.; Kelly, D.J.; Gow, R.M.;

    2008-01-01

    -embedded sections of renal biopsies using immunohistochemistry. The effects of high glucose on PRKC-beta expression and peptide production in cultured human proximal tubular epithelial cells were assessed. RESULTS: Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated a 9.9-fold increase in PRKC-beta mRNA in kidney biopsies of......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms has been implicated as a central mediator in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Although high glucose levels stimulate catalytic activity of PKC, the effects of high glucose levels on the expression of genes encoding PKC isoforms...... tubules. A 60% increase in PRKC-beta mRNA and peptide in cultured human proximal tubular epithelial cells exposed to high glucose (p<0.05) was seen in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: PKC-beta is upregulated at the gene expression level in human diabetic nephropathy. PRKC-beta mRNA correlates closely...

  18. Xeroradiography in. beta. -thalassaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scutellari, P.N.; Orzincolo, C.; Tamarozzi, R.

    1985-01-01

    Xeroradiographic investigations of the skull, hand, and elbow were performed on 27 patients with homozygous ..beta..-thalassaemia. The results were compared with plain radiographic examinations. Xeroradiography, because of its technical properties (i.e. edge contrast enhancement and wide latitude), was shown to demonstrate cortical thinning of long bones, swelling of the diploic space in the skull, and reticulated patterns in the elbow better than standard radiography. Moreover, the use of 'positive' mode imaging was shown to have advantages in the study of the skull and extremities.

  19. Realized Beta GARCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger; Voev, Valeri Radkov

    2014-01-01

    particularly useful for modeling financial returns during periods of rapid changes in the underlying covariance structure. When applied to market returns in conjunction with returns on an individual asset, the model yields a dynamic model specification of the conditional regression coefficient that is known as...... conditional beta series during the financial crises.......We introduce a multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model that incorporates realized measures of variances and covariances. Realized measures extract information about the current levels of volatilities and correlations from high-frequency data, which is...

  20. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Blower

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly "highly resistant" to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2 and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3 were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis.

  1. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J., E-mail: o.j.rolinski@strath.ac.uk [Photophysics group, Centre for Molecular Nanometrology, Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-10

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  2. Reaction of the hydrated electron with amino acids, peptides, and proteins in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraggi, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus); Bettelheim, A.

    1977-08-01

    The reaction rate constants of e/sup -//sub aq/ with glycyl-histidine (Gly-His) and ..beta..-alanylhistidine (Carnosine, ..beta..-Ala-His) were determined and compared to those of ..beta..-alanylalanine (..beta..-Ala-Ala), alanyl-alanine ((Ala)/sub 2/), and histidine (His). The rate constants were found to be pH dependent. Below the pK value of the imidazole ring, the rate constants of the histidyl peptides are similar to that of His. This indicates that the main site of the e/sup -//sub aq/ reaction is the protonated ring. Above this pK value the pH dependent rate constants were less in the His amino acids than in the His peptides. This difference was attributed to the presence of the carbonyl grup in the peptides. This group, which is known to react quite rapidly with e/sup -//sub aq/, exhibits its presence when the imidazole ring loses its reactivity after deprotonation. The difference in reactivity toward e/sup -//sub aq/ between the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. His peptides is explained by the relative position of the protonated amino groups with respect to the carbonyl groups. A similar difference was also found in (Ala)/sub 2/ and ..beta..-Ala-Ala. The transient absorption spectra resulting from the reaction of e/sup -//sub aq/ with the His peptides were recorded and examined with respect to peptide concentration and pH dependence. Here again, at pH values below the pK of the imidazole, the transient absorption spectra are similar to that of histidine. In alkaline solutions, however, proper experimental conditions could be attained only for Gly-His. In His and ..beta..-Ala-His the interference of the OH radical reaction was observed. In Gly/sup -/His it was found that the band characterizing the imidazole transient (lambda/sub max/ = 360 nm) disappears with a simultaneous appearance of a band at lambda/sub max/ similarly ordered 410 nm.

  3. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    pharmacological tools interfering with NCAM functions. Recent progress in our understanding of the structural basis of NCAM-mediated cell adhesion and signaling has allowed a structure-based design of NCAM mimetic peptides. Using this approach a number of peptides termed P2, P1-B, P-3-DE and P-3-G, whose...... sequences contain one or several NCAM homophilic binding sites involved in NCAM binding to itself, have been identified. By means of NMR titration analysis and molecular modeling a number of peptides derived from NCAM and targeting NCAM heterophilic ligands such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor and...... heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) have been identified. The FGL, dekaCAM, FRM/EncaminA, BCL, EncaminC and EncaminE peptides all target the FGF receptor whereas the heparin binding peptide HBP targets HSPG. Moreover, a number of NCAM binding peptides have been identified employing screening of...

  4. Double beta decay: present status

    OpenAIRE

    Barabash, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments (including the search for $2\\beta^{+}$, EC$\\beta^{+}$ and ECEC processes) are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Average and recommended half-life values for two-neutrino double beta decay are presented. Conservative upper limits on effective Majorana neutrino mass and the coupling constant of the Majoron to the neutrino are established as $ < 0.75$ eV and $ < 1.9 \\cdot 10^{-4}$, respectively. Proposals fo...

  5. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  6. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ATP synthase by amphibian antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Thomas F; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2010-04-01

    Previously melittin, the alpha-helical basic honey bee venom peptide, was shown to inhibit F(1)-ATPase by binding at the beta-subunit DELSEED motif of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. Herein, we present the inhibitory effects of the basic alpha-helical amphibian antimicrobial peptides, ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, carein 1.8, carein 1.9, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, maculatin 1.1, maganin II, MRP, or XT-7, on purified F(1) and membrane bound F(1)F(0)Escherichia coli ATP synthase. We found that the extent of inhibition by amphibian peptides is variable. Whereas MRP-amide inhibited ATPase essentially completely (approximately 96% inhibition), carein 1.8 did not inhibit at all (0% inhibition). Inhibition by other peptides was partial with a range of approximately 13-70%. MRP-amide was also the most potent inhibitor on molar scale (IC(50) approximately 3.25 microM). Presence of an amide group at the c-terminal of peptides was found to be critical in exerting potent inhibition of ATP synthase ( approximately 20-40% additional inhibition). Inhibition was fully reversible and found to be identical in both F(1)F(0) membrane preparations as well as in isolated purified F(1). Interestingly, growth of E. coli was abrogated in the presence of ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, magainin II-amide, MRP, MRP-amide, melittin, or melittin-amide but was unaffected in the presence of carein 1.8, carein 1.9, maculatin 1.1, magainin II, or XT-7. Hence inhibition of F(1)-ATPase and E. coli cell growth by amphibian antimicrobial peptides suggests that their antimicrobial/anticancer properties are in part linked to their actions on ATP synthase. PMID:20100509

  7. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  8. The PeptideAtlas Project

    OpenAIRE

    Deutsch, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving g...

  9. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified ...

  10. Scintillator based beta batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  11. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, M.D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an {alpha}-helix, a {open_quotes}scaffold{close_quotes} region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of {lambda} Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of {lambda} Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an {alpha}-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded {beta}sheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of {sup 15}N NMR relaxation properties.

  12. Development and Testing of a 212Pb/212Bi Peptide for Targeting Metastatic Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2012-10-25

    The purpose of this project is to develop a new radiolabeled peptide for imaging and treating metastatic melanoma. The immunoconjugate consists of a receptor-specific peptide that targets melanoma cells. The beta-emitter lead-212 (half-life = 10.4 hours) is linked by coordination chemistry to the peptide. After injection, the peptide targets melanoma receptors on the surfaces of melanoma cells. Lead-212 decays to the alpha-emitter bismuth-212 (half-life = 60 minutes). Alpha-particles that hit melanoma cell nuclei are likely to kill the melanoma cell. For cancer cell imaging, the lead-212 is replaced by lead-203 (half-life = 52 hours). Lead-203 emits 279 keV photons (80.1% abundance) that can be imaged and measured for biodistribution analysis, cancer imaging, and quantitative dosimetry.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the incretin axis have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 and gastroinhibitory intestinal peptide constitutes >90% of all the incretin function. Augmentation of GLP-1 results in improvement of beta cell health in a glucose-dependant manner (post-prandial hyperglycemia and suppression of glucagon (fasting hyperglycemia, amongst other beneficial pleiotropic effects. Native GLP-1 has a very short plasma half-life and novel methods have been developed to augment its half life, such that its anti-hyperglycemic effects can be exploited. They can be broadly classified as exendin-based therapies (exenatide, exenatide once weekly, DPP-4-resistant analogues (lixisenatide, albiglutide, and analogues of human GLP-1 (liraglutide, taspoglutide. Currently, commercially available analogues are exenatide, exenatide once weekly, and liraglutide. This review aims to provide an overview of most GLP-1 analogues.

  14. Di/tri-peptide transporters as drug delivery targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Brodin, Birger

    2003-01-01

    -dependent, and the transporters thus belong to the Proton-dependent Oligopeptide Transporter (POT)-family. The transporters are not drug targets per se, however due to their uniquely broad substrate specificity; they have proved to be relevant drug targets at the level of drug transport. Drug molecules such as...... oral active beta-lactam antibiotics, bestatin, prodrugs of aciclovir and ganciclovir have oral bioavailabilities, which largely are a result of their interaction with PepT1. In the last few years an increasing number of studies concerned with regulation of di/tri-peptide transporter capacity have...... the level of increased gene transcription. PepT1-mediated transport is up-regulated by short-term exposure to receptor agonists such as EGF, insulin, leptin, and clonidine, and down-regulated by VIP. Overall, the regulation of di/tri-peptide transport may be contributed to 1) changes in apical proton...

  15. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  16. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  17. Water-Floating Giant Nanosheets from Helical Peptide Pentamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehun; Nam, Ki Tae

    One of the important challenges in the development of protein-mimetic materials is to understand the sequence specific assembly behavior and the dynamic folding change. Conventional strategies to construct two dimensional nanostructures from the peptides have been limited to beta-sheet forming sequences in use of basic building blocks because of their natural tendency to form sheet like aggregations. Here we identified a new peptide sequence, YFCFY that can form dimers by the disulfide bridge, fold into helix and assemble into macroscopic flat sheet at the air/water interface. Because of large driving force for two dimensional assembly and high elastic modulus of the resulting sheet, the peptide assembly induces the flattening of initially round water droplet. Additionally, we found that stabilization of helix by the dimerization is a key determinant for maintaining macroscopic flatness over a few tens centimeter even with a uniform thickness below 10 nm. Furthermore, the capability to transfer 2D film from water droplet to other substrates allows for the multiple stacking of 2D peptide nanostructure, suggesting possible applications in the biomimetic catalysts, biosensor and 2D related electronic devices. This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-MA1401-01.

  18. Evaluating molecular mechanical potentials for helical peptides and proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J Thompson

    Full Text Available Multiple variants of the AMBER all-atom force field were quantitatively evaluated with respect to their ability to accurately characterize helix-coil equilibria in explicit solvent simulations. Using a global distributed computing network, absolute conformational convergence was achieved for large ensembles of the capped A(21 and F(s helical peptides. Further assessment of these AMBER variants was conducted via simulations of a flexible 164-residue five-helix-bundle protein, apolipophorin-III, on the 100 ns timescale. Of the contemporary potentials that had not been assessed previously, the AMBER-99SB force field showed significant helix-destabilizing tendencies, with beta bridge formation occurring in helical peptides, and unfolding of apolipophorin-III occurring on the tens of nanoseconds timescale. The AMBER-03 force field, while showing adequate helical propensities for both peptides and stabilizing apolipophorin-III, (i predicts an unexpected decrease in helicity with ALA-->ARG(+ substitution, (ii lacks experimentally observed 3(10 helical content, and (iii deviates strongly from average apolipophorin-III NMR structural properties. As is observed for AMBER-99SB, AMBER-03 significantly overweighs the contribution of extended and polyproline backbone configurations to the conformational equilibrium. In contrast, the AMBER-99phi force field, which was previously shown to best reproduce experimental measurements of the helix-coil transition in model helical peptides, adequately stabilizes apolipophorin-III and yields both an average gyration radius and polar solvent exposed surface area that are in excellent agreement with the NMR ensemble.

  19. The crystal structure of the complex of Zea mays alpha subunit with a fragment of human beta subunit provides the clue to the architecture of protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistutta, R; Sarno, S; De Moliner, E;

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of a complex between the catalytic alpha subunit of Zea mays CK2 and a 23-mer peptide corresponding the C-terminal sequence 181-203 of the human CK2 regulatory beta subunit has been determined at 3.16-A resolution. The complex, composed of two alpha chains and two peptides...

  20. Polyclonal Peptide Antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Tina H; Illigen, Kristin E; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce and may supplement monoclonal antibodies for some applications or even have some advantages. The choice of species for production of (peptide) antisera is based on practical considerations, including availability of immunogen (vaccine) and animals. Two major factors govern the production of antisera: the nature of adaptive immune responses, which take place over days/weeks and ethical guidelines for animal welfare. Here, simple procedures for immunization of mice, rabbits, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, and chickens are presented. PMID:26424267

  1. Therapeutic strategies based on glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F

    2004-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 is an incretin hormone with potent glucose-dependent insulinotropic and glucagonostatic actions, trophic effects on the pancreatic beta-cells, and inhibitory effects on gastrointestinal secretion and motility, which combine to lower plasma glucose and reduce glycemic...... of factors influencing its metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile, have therefore been the focus of intense research in both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Such strategies include DPP-IV-resistant GLP-1 analogs and selective enzyme inhibitors to prevent in vivo...

  2. The effect of polylysine on casein-kinase-2 activity is influenced by both the structure of the protein/peptide substrates and the subunit composition of the enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O;

    1992-01-01

    stimulation, moreover, is variably accounted for by changes in Vmax and/or Km, depending on the structure of the peptide substrate. Maximum stimulation with all protein/peptide substrates tested requires the presence of the beta subunit, since the recombinant alpha subunit is much less responsive than CK2...

  3. A recessive mutation in the APP gene with dominant-negative effect on amyloidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Morbin, Michela; Rossi, Giacomina; Suardi, Silvia; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Merlin, Marco; Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Prioni, Sara; Erbetta, Alessandra; Falcone, Chiara; Gobbi, Marco; Colombo, Laura; Bastone, Antonio; Beeg, Marten; Manzoni, Claudia; Francescucci, Bruna; Spagnoli, Alberto; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Levy, Efrat; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-03-13

    beta-Amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations cause familial Alzheimer's disease with nearly complete penetrance. We found an APP mutation [alanine-673-->valine-673 (A673V)] that causes disease only in the homozygous state, whereas heterozygous carriers were unaffected, consistent with a recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance. The A673V mutation affected APP processing, resulting in enhanced beta-amyloid (Abeta) production and formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. Co-incubation of mutated and wild-type peptides conferred instability on Abeta aggregates and inhibited amyloidogenesis and neurotoxicity. The highly amyloidogenic effect of the A673V mutation in the homozygous state and its anti-amyloidogenic effect in the heterozygous state account for the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and have implications for genetic screening and the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19286555

  4. BETA SPECTRA. I. Negatrons spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Fermi theory of beta decay, the beta spectra for 62 negatrons emitters have been computed introducing a correction factor for unique forbidden transitions. These spectra are plotted vs. energy, once normal i sed, and tabulated with the related Fermi functions. The average and median energies are calculated. (Author)

  5. The best-beta CAPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The issue of 'best-beta' arises as soon as potential errors in the Sharpe-Lintner-Black capital asset pricing model (CAPM) are acknowledged. By incorporating a target variable into the investor preferences, this study derives a best-beta CAPM (BCAPM) that maintains the CAPM's theoretical appeal and

  6. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  7. Structural and functional characterization of hBD-1(Ser35), a peptide deduced from a DEFB1 polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Raffaella; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Gennaro, Renato; Amoroso, Antonio; Zanetti, Margherita

    2002-04-26

    beta-Defensins are mammalian antimicrobial peptides that share a unique disulfide-bonding motif of six conserved cysteines. An intragenic polymorphism of the DEFB1 gene that changes a highly conserved Cys to Ser in the peptide coding region has recently been described. The deduced peptide cannot form three disulfide bonds, as one of the cysteines is unpaired. We have determined the cysteine connectivities of a corresponding synthetic hBD-1(Ser35) peptide, investigated the structure by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and assayed the in vitro antimicrobial activity. Despite a different arrangement of the disulfides, hBD-1(Ser35) proved as active as hBD-1 against the microorganisms tested. This activity likely depends on the ability of hBD-1(Ser35) to adopt an amphipathic conformation in hydrophobic environment, similar to the wild type peptide, as suggested by CD spectroscopy. PMID:12054642

  8. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity. PMID:25754406

  9. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  10. RAVEN Beta Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  11. CK2(beta)tes gene encodes a testis-specific isoform of the regulatory subunit of casein kinase 2 in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalmykova, Alla I; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Polesskaya, Oksana O; Dobritsa, Anna A; Evstafieva, Alexandra G; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Gvozdev, Vladimir A

    2002-01-01

    An earlier described CK2(beta)tes gene of Drosophila melanogaster is shown to encode a male germline specific isoform of regulatory beta subunit of casein kinase 2. Western-analysis using anti-CK2(beta)tes Ig revealed CK2(beta)tes protein in Drosophila testes extract. Expression of a CK2(beta)tes-beta......-galactosidase fusion protein driven by the CK2(beta)tes promoter was found in transgenic flies at postmitotic stages of spermatogenesis. Examination of biochemical characteristics of a recombinant CK2(beta)tes protein expressed in Escherichia coli revealed properties similar to those of CK2beta: (a) CK2(beta......)tes protein stimulates CK2alpha catalytic activity toward synthetic peptide; (b) it inhibits phosphorylation of calmodulin and mediates stimulation of CK2alpha by polylysine; (c) it is able to form (CK2(beta)tes)2 dimers, as well as (CK2alpha)2(CK2(beta)tes)2 tetramers. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and...

  12. Beta Beams Implementation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Beta Beam,the concept of generating a pure and intense (anti) neutrino beam by letting accelerated radioactive ions beta decay in a storage ring, called Decay Ring (DR), is the base of one of the proposed next generation neutrino oscillation facilities, necessary for a complete study of the neutrino oscillation parameter space. Sensitivities of the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters depend on the Decay Ring's ion intensity and of it's duty factor (the filled ratio of the ring). Therefore efficient ion production, stripping, bunching, acceleration and storing are crucial sub-projects under study and development within the Beta Beam collaboration. Specifically the feasibility of these tasks as parts of a Beta Beam implementation at CERN will be discussed in this report. The positive impact of the large {\\theta}13 indications from T2K on the Beta Beam performance will also be discussed.

  13. Successful adjuvant-free vaccination of BALB/c mice with mutated amyloid β peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi Monika M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent human clinical trial of an Alzheimer's disease (AD vaccine using amyloid beta (Aβ 1–42 plus QS-21 adjuvant produced some positive results, but was halted due to meningoencephalitis in some participants. The development of a vaccine with mutant Aβ peptides that avoids the use of an adjuvant may result in an effective and safer human vaccine. Results All peptides tested showed high antibody responses, were long-lasting, and demonstrated good memory response. Epitope mapping indicated that peptide mutation did not lead to epitope switching. Mutant peptides induced different inflammation responses as evidenced by cytokine profiles. Ig isotyping indicated that adjuvant-free vaccination with peptides drove an adequate Th2 response. All anti-sera from vaccinated mice cross-reacted with human Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that an adjuvant-free vaccine with different Aβ peptides can be an effective and safe vaccination approach against AD. This study represents the first report of adjuvant-free vaccines utilizing Aβ peptides carrying diverse mutations in the T-cell epitope. These largely positive results provide encouragement for the future of the development of human vaccinations for AD.

  14. Pathological consequences of C-peptide deficiency ininsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Ghorbani; Reza Shafiee-Nick

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with several complicationssuch as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy andcardiovascular diseases. Currently, insulin is the mainused medication for management of insulin-dependentdiabetes mellitus (type-1 diabetes). In this metabolicsyndrome, in addition to decrease of endogenous insulin,the plasma level of connecting peptide (C-peptide) is alsoreduced due to beta cell destruction. Studies in the pastdecade have shown that C-peptide is much more than abyproduct of insulin biosynthesis and possess differentbiological activities. Therefore, it may be possible thatC-peptide deficiency be involved, at least in part, in thedevelopment of different complications of diabetes. It hasbeen shown that a small level of remaining C-peptide isassociated with significant metabolic benefit. The purposeof this review is to describe beneficial effects of C-peptidereplacement on pathological features associated withinsulin-dependent diabetes. Also, experimental andclinical findings on the effects of C-peptide on wholebodyglucose utilization, adipose tissue metabolism andtissues blood flow are summarized and discussed. Thehypoglycemic, antilipolytic and vasodilator effects ofC-peptide suggest that it may contribute to fine-tuningof the tissues metabolism under different physiologic orpathologic conditions. Therefore, C-peptide replacementtogether with the classic insulin therapy may prevent,retard, or ameliorate diabetic complications in patientswith type-1 diabetes.

  15. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  16. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical...

  17. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  18. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Sosabowski, J.K.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of resea

  19. Intuitionistic Fuzzy Generalized Beta Closed Mappings

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce intuitionistic fuzzy generalized beta closed mappings and intuitionistic fuzzy generalized beta open mappings. We investigate some of their properties. We also introduce intuitionistic fuzzy M-generalized beta closed mappings as well as intuitionistic fuzzy M-generalized beta open mappings. We provide the relation between intuitionistic fuzzy M-generalized beta closed mappings and intuitionistic fuzzy generalized beta closed mappings.

  20. Derivatives of the Incomplete Beta Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Boik

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The incomplete beta function is defined as where Beta(p, q is the beta function. Dutka (1981 gave a history of the development and numerical evaluation of this function. In this article, an algorithm for computing first and second derivatives of Ix,p,q with respect to p and q is described. The algorithm is useful, for example, when fitting parameters to a censored beta, truncated beta, or a truncated beta-binomial model.

  1. Derivatives of the Incomplete Beta Function

    OpenAIRE

    Robison-Cox, James F.; Robert J. Boik

    1998-01-01

    The incomplete beta function is defined as where Beta(p, q) is the beta function. Dutka (1981) gave a history of the development and numerical evaluation of this function. In this article, an algorithm for computing first and second derivatives of Ix,p,q with respect to p and q is described. The algorithm is useful, for example, when fitting parameters to a censored beta, truncated beta, or a truncated beta-binomial model.

  2. beta-Keratins in crocodiles reveal amino acid homology with avian keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Changjiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Yan, Peng; Amato, George

    2010-03-01

    The DNA sequences encoding beta-keratin have been obtained from Marsh Mugger (Crocodylus palustris) and Orinoco Crocodiles (Crocodylus intermedius). Through the deduced amino acid sequence, these proteins are rich in glycine, proline and serine. The central region of the proteins are composed of two beta-folded regions and show a high degree of identity with beta-keratins of aves and squamates. This central part is thought to be the site of polymerization to build the framework of beta-keratin filaments. It is believed that the beta-keratins in reptiles and birds share a common ancestry. Near the C-terminal, these beta-keratins contain a peptide rich in glycine-X and glycine-X-X, and the distinctive feature of the region is some 12-amino acid repeats, which are similar to the 13-amino acid repeats in chick scale keratin but absent from avian feather keratin. From our phylogenetic analysis, the beta-keratins in crocodile have a closer relationship with avian keratins than the other keratins in reptiles. PMID:19266314

  3. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation by SOCS-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, K; Rønn, S G; Tornehave, D;

    2005-01-01

    Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT...... tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT-5 when compared with wild-type islets. Transduction of primary islet cultures with adenoviruses expressing various SOCS proteins followed by stimulation with GH or glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) revealed that SOCS-3 inhibited GH- but not GLP-1-mediated islet cell...

  4. Reference intervals for glucose, beta-cell polypeptides, and counterregulatory factors during prolonged fasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wildner-Christensen, M; Eshøj, O;

    2001-01-01

    of counterregulatory factors increased during the fast [P Growth hormone secretion increased from the first to third day of fasting (P ...To establish reference intervals for the pancreatic beta-cell response and the counterregulatory hormone response to prolonged fasting, we studied 33 healthy subjects (16 males, 17 females) during a 72-h fast. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin levels decreased (P ... the fast (P fast. We observed a diminished beta-cell response concomitant with an increased secretion of counterregulatory hormones. These results should be of clinical and scientific value...

  5. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  6. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  7. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  8. Plasmin-induced migration requires signaling through protease-activated receptor 1 and integrin alpha(9)beta(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Mousumi; Tarui, Takehiko; Shi, Biao; Akakura, Nobuaki; Ruf, Wolfram; Takada, Yoshikazu

    2004-09-01

    Plasmin is a major extracellular protease that elicits intracellular signals to mediate platelet aggregation, chemotaxis of peripheral blood monocytes, and release of arachidonate and leukotriene from several cell types in a G protein-dependent manner. Angiostatin, a fragment of plasmin(ogen), is a ligand and an antagonist for integrin alpha(9)beta(1). Here we report that plasmin specifically interacts with alpha(9)beta(1) and that plasmin induces of cells expressing migration recombinant alpha(9)beta(1) (alpha(9)-Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells). Migration was dependent on an interaction of the kringle domains of plasmin with alpha(9)beta(1) as well as the catalytic activity of plasmin. Angiostatin, representing the kringle domains of plasmin, alone did not induce the migration of alpha(9)-CHO cells, but simultaneous activation of the G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 with an agonist peptide induced the migration on angiostatin, whereas PAR-2 or PAR-4 agonist peptides were without effect. Furthermore, a small chemical inhibitor of PAR-1 (RWJ 58259) and a palmitoylated PAR-1-blocking peptide inhibited plasmin-induced migration of alpha(9)-CHO cells. These results suggest that plasmin induces migration by kringle-mediated binding to alpha(9)beta(1) and simultaneous proteolytic activation of PAR-1. PMID:15247268

  9. Structural characterization and expression analysis of a beta-thymosin homologue (Tβ) in disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Premachandra, H K A; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-15

    Repertoires of proteins and small peptides play numerous physiological roles as hormones, antimicrobial peptides, and cellular signaling factors. The beta-thymosins are a group of small acidic peptides involved in processes such as actin sequestration, neuronal development, wound healing, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Recent characterization of the beta thymosins as immunological regulators in invertebrates led to our identification and characterization of a beta-thymosin homologue (Tβ) from Haliotis discus discus. The cDNA possessed an ORF of 132 bp encoding a protein of 44 amino acids with a molecular mass of 4977 Da. The amino acid sequence shows high identity with another molluskan beta-thymosin and has a characteristic actin binding motif (LKKTET) and glutamyl donors. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship with molluskan homologues, as well as its distinct identity and common ancestral origin. Genomic analysis revealed a 3 exon-2 intron structure similar to the other homologues. In silico promoter analysis also revealed significant transcription factor binding sites, providing evidence for the expression of this gene under different cellular conditions, including stress or pathogenic attack. Tissue distribution profiling revealed a ubiquitous presence in all the examined tissues, but with the highest expression in mantle and hemocyte. Immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide, poly I:C and Vibrio parahemolyticus induced beta-thymosin expression in gill and hemocytes, affirming an immune-related role in invertebrates. PMID:23680646

  10. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and FSH mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  11. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and Fsh mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  12. A semiconductor beta ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of energy spectra of beta particles emitted from nuclei in beta-decay processes provides information concerning the mass difference of these nuclei between initial and final state. Moreover, experimental beta spectra yield information on the feeding of the levels in the daughter nucleus. Such data are valuable in the construction and checking of the level schemes. This thesis describes the design, construction, testing and usage of a detector for the accurate measurement of the mentioned spectra. In ch. 2 the design and construction of the beta spectrometer, which uses a hyper-pure germanium crystal for energy determination, is described. A simple wire chamber is used to discriminate beta particles from gamma radiation. Disadvantages arise from the large amounts of scattered beta particles deforming the continua. A method is described to minimize the scattering. In ch. 3 some theoretical aspects of data analysis are described and the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of the summation of annihilation radiation are compared with experiments. Ch. 4 comprises the results of the measurements of the beta decay energies of 103-108In. 87 refs.; 34 figs.; 7 tabs

  13. Ion-Induced Dipole Interactions and Fragmentation Times : C$\\alpha$ -C$\\beta$ Chromophore Bond Dissociation Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Soorkia, Satchin; Kumar, Sunil; Pérot-Taillandier, Marie; Lucas, Bruno; Jouvet, Christophe; Barat, Michel; Fayeton, Jacqueline A

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation times corresponding to the loss of the chromophore (C$\\alpha$-- C$\\beta$ bond dissociation channel) after photoexcitation at 263 nm have been investigated for several small peptides containing tryptophan or tyrosine. For tryptophan-containing peptides, the aromatic chromophore is lost as an ionic fragment (m/z 130), and the fragmentation time increases with the mass of the neutral fragment. In contrast, for tyrosine-containing peptides the aromatic chromophore is always lost as a neutral fragment (mass = 107 amu) and the fragmentation time is found to be fast (\\textless{}20 ns). These different behaviors are explained by the role of the postfragmentation interaction in the complex formed after the C$\\alpha$--C$\\beta$ bond cleavage.

  14. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies. PMID:22407615

  15. Residue-specific membrane location of peptides and proteins using specifically and extensively deuterated lipids and {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Residue-specific location of peptides in the hydrophobic core of membranes was examined using {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H REDOR and samples in which the lipids were selectively deuterated. The transmembrane topology of the KALP peptide was validated with this approach with substantial dephasing observed for deuteration in the bilayer center and reduced or no dephasing for deuteration closer to the headgroups. Insertion of {beta} sheet HIV and helical and {beta} sheet influenza virus fusion peptides into the hydrophobic core of the membrane was validated in samples with extensively deuterated lipids.

  16. Effect of beta blockade and beta stimulation on stage fright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantigan, C O; Brantigan, T A; Joseph, N

    1982-01-01

    Stage fright, physiologically the "fight or flight" reaction, is a disabling condition to the professional musician. Because it is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, we have investigated the effects of beta blockade on musical performance with propranolol in a double blind fashion and the effects of beta stimulation using terbutaline. Stage fright symptoms were evaluated in two trials, which included a total of 29 subjects, by questionnaire and by the State Trai Anxiety Inventory. Quality of musical performance was evaluated by experienced music critics. Beta blockade eliminates the physical impediments to performance caused by stage fright and even eliminates the dry mouth so frequently encountered. The quality of musical performance as judged by experienced music critics is significantly improved. This effect is achieved without tranquilization. Beta stimulating drugs increase stage fright problems, and should be used in performing musicians only after consideration of the detrimental effects which they may have on musical performance. PMID:6120650

  17. Beta decay of 31Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete study of 31Ar beta decay has been made by high-resolution charged-particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Beta-delayed radiation was detected by an array of three charged-particle detectors and a large-volume germanium detector. Fifteen new energy levels were discovered in 31Cl. The beta-strength distribution, measured to 14.5 MeV, is compared with a shell-model calculation in the full sd space. The quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength and the isospin impurity of the IAS in 31Cl are discussed. (orig.)

  18. The Age of Beta Pic

    OpenAIRE

    Navascues, D. Barrado y; Stauffer, J. R.; Song, I.; Caillault, J-P.

    1999-01-01

    We have reanalyzed data for the proposed moving group associated with beta Pic in order to determine if the group (or part of it) is real, and, if so, to derive an improved age estimate for beta Pic. By using new, more accurate proper motions from PPM and Hipparcos and a few new radial velocities, we conclude that on kinematic grounds, two M dwarfs have space motions that coincide with that of beta Pic to within 1 km/s with small error bars. Based on a CM diagram derived from accurate photome...

  19. Smart Beta or Smart Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kenneth Lillelund; Steenstrup, Søren Resen

    2016-01-01

    that smart beta investing probably will do better than passive market capitalization investing over time, we believe many are coming to a conclusion too quickly regarding active managers. Institutional investors are able to guide managers through benchmarks and risk frameworks toward the same well...... only superior to the common capitalization weighted index but also to their smart beta benchmark, even after cost for value, size, and low volatility funds. We encourage investors to increase the use of smart beta as benchmarks while still obtaining extra performance through active management—a concept...

  20. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J. [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  1. Self-assembly of 33-mer gliadin peptide oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M G; Benedini, L A; Lonez, C; Schilardi, P L; Hellweg, T; Ruysschaert, J-M; Dodero, V I

    2015-11-28

    The 33-mer gliadin peptide, LQLQPF(PQPQLPY)3PQPQPF, is a highly immunogenic peptide involved in celiac disease and probably in other immunopathologies associated with gliadin. Herein, dynamic light scattering measurements showed that 33-mer, in the micromolar concentration range, forms polydisperse nano- and micrometer range particles in aqueous media. This behaviour is reminiscent of classical association of colloids and we hypothesized that the 33-mer peptide self-assembles into micelles that could be the precursors of 33-mer oligomers in water. Deposition of 33-mer peptide aqueous solution on bare mica generated nano- and microstructures with different morphologies as revealed by atomic force microscopy. At 6 μM, the 33-mer is organised in isolated and clusters of spherical nanostructures. In the 60 to 250 μM concentration range, the spherical oligomers associated mainly in linear and annular arrangements and structures adopting a "sheet" type morphology appeared. At higher concentrations (610 μM), mainly filaments and plaques immersed in a background of nanospherical structures were detected. The occurrence of different morphologies of oligomers and finally the filaments suggests that the unique specific geometry of the 33-mer oligomers has a crucial role in the subsequent condensation and organization of their fractal structures into the final filaments. The self-assembly process on mica is described qualitatively and quantitatively by a fractal diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) behaviour with the fractal dimension in the range of 1.62 ± 0.02 to 1.73 ± 0.03. Secondary structure evaluation of the oligomers by Attenuated Total Reflection FTIR spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) revealed the existence of a conformational equilibrium of self-assembled structures, from an extended conformation to a more folded parallel beta elongated structures. Altogether, these findings provide structural and morphological information about supramolecular organization of the 33-mer

  2. Dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources; Dosimetria de fuentes {beta} extensas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Lallena R, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  3. Resistance training & beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate supplementation on hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Arazi; Hadi Rohani; Ahmad Ghiasi; Nasrin Abdi Keikanloo

    2015-01-01

    RESUMOIntroduction:In recent years, there was an increased interest on the effects of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation on skeletal muscle due to its anti-catabolic effects.Objectives:To investigate the effect of HMB supplementation on body composition, muscular strength and anabolic-catabolic hormones after resistance training.Methods:Twenty amateur male athletes were randomly assigned to supplement and control groups in a double-blind crossover design and participated i...

  4. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  5. Peptide primary messengers in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The peptide primary messengers regulate embryonic development,cell growth and many other activities in animal cells. But recent evidence verified that peptide primary messengers are also involved in plant defense responses, the recognition between pollen and stigma and keep the balance between cell proliferation and differentiations in shoot apical meristems. Those results suggest that plants may actually make wide use of peptide primary messengers, both in embryonic development and late life when they rally their cells to defend against pathogens and insect pests. The recent advance in those aspects is reviewed.

  6. Structural Basis of the CD8[alpha beta]/MHC Class I Interaction: Focused Recognition Orients CD8[beta] to a T Cell Proximal Position[superscript 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.; (NIH)

    2009-09-18

    In the immune system, B cells, dendritic cells, NK cells, and T lymphocytes all respond to signals received via ligand binding to receptors and coreceptors. Although the specificity of T cell recognition is determined by the interaction of T cell receptors with MHC/peptide complexes, the development of T cells in the thymus and their sensitivity to Ag are also dependent on coreceptor molecules CD8 (for MHC class I (MHCI)) and CD4 (for MHCII). The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer is a potent coreceptor for T cell activation, but efforts to understand its function fully have been hampered by ignorance of the structural details of its interactions with MHCI. In this study we describe the structure of CD8{alpha}{beta} in complex with the murine MHCI molecule H-2D{sup d} at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The focus of the CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction is the acidic loop (residues 222-228) of the {alpha}3 domain of H-2D{sup d}. The {beta} subunit occupies a T cell membrane proximal position, defining the relative positions of the CD8{alpha} and CD8{beta} subunits. Unlike the CD8{alpha}{alpha} homodimer, CD8{alpha}{beta} does not contact the MHCI {alpha}{sub 2}- or {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin domains. Movements of the CD8{alpha} CDR2 and CD8{beta} CDR1 and CDR2 loops as well as the flexibility of the H-2D{sup d} CD loop facilitate the monovalent interaction. The structure resolves inconclusive data on the topology of the CD8{alpha}{beta}/MHCI interaction, indicates that CD8{beta} is crucial in orienting the CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer, provides a framework for understanding the mechanistic role of CD8{alpha}{beta} in lymphoid cell signaling, and offers a tangible context for design of structurally altered coreceptors for tumor and viral immunotherapy.

  7. Apolipoprotein E-mimetics inhibit neurodegeneration and restore cognitive functions in a transgenic Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Sarantseva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations of the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP are found in familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD and some lead to the elevated production of amyloid-beta-protein (Abeta. While Abeta has been implicated in the causation of AD, the exact role played by Abeta and its APP precursor are still unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our study, Drosophila melanogaster transgenics were established as a model to analyze AD-like pathology caused by APP overexpression. We demonstrated that age related changes in the levels and pattern of synaptic proteins accompanied progressive neurodegeneration and impairment of cognitive functions in APP transgenic flies, but that these changes may be independent from the generation of Abeta. Using novel peptide mimetics of Apolipoprotein-E, COG112 or COG133 proved to be neuroprotective and significantly improved the learning and memory of APP transgenic flies. CONCLUSIONS: The development of neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits was corrected by injections of COG112 or COG133, novel mimetics of apolipoprotein-E (apoE with neuroprotective activities.

  8. Correlation between electrical activity and ACTH/beta-endorphin secretion in mouse pituitary tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The electrical and secretory activities of mouse pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20/D-16v), which contain and release the ACTH/beta-endorphin family of peptides, were studied by means of intracellular recordings and radioimmunoassays. Injection of depolarizing current pulses evoked action potentials in all cells and the majority (82%) displayed spontaneous action potential activity. Action potentials were found to be calcium-dependent. Barium increased membrane resistance, action potential amplitu...

  9. Role of clathrin in the regulated secretory pathway of pancreatic beta-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Molinete, M.; Dupuis, S.; Brodsky, F M; Halban, Philippe A.

    2001-01-01

    The role of clathrin in the sorting of proinsulin to secretory granules, the formation of immature granules and their subsequent maturation is not known. To this end, primary rat pancreatic beta-cells were infected with a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing the Hub fragment, a dominant-negative peptide of the clathrin heavy chain and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP as a marker of infected cells). A population of cells expressing the highest levels of EGFP (and thus Hub) was obtained...

  10. Human beta-defensin gene copy number variation and consequences in disease and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pala, Raquel Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Research on human genetic variation has shown that the human genome is not a fixed, invariant framework, but that there can be extensive structural variation. This variation includes copy number variation (CNV), which can lead to changes in DNA dosage contributing significantly to variation between individual human genomes and heritable traits. Human beta-defensins are small, secreted antimicrobial peptides encoded by DEFB genes located in a cluster of at least seven genes on 8p23.1. These...

  11. Endothelin-1 activates phospholipase D and thymidine incorporation in fibroblasts overexpressing protein kinase C beta 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, J K; Dobek, E A; Bishop, W R

    1991-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) are a family of extremely potent vasoconstrictor peptides. In addition, ET-1 acts as a potent mitogen and activates phospholipase C in smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. We examined the effects of ET-1 on phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism and thymidine incorporation in control Rat-6 fibroblasts and in cells that overexpress protein kinase C beta 1 (PKC). PC pools were labeled with [3H]myristic acid, and formation of phosphatidylethanol (PEt), an unambiguous marker of pho...

  12. Beta particle monitor for surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beta radiation detector which is capable of reliably detecting beta radiation emitted from a surface. An electrically conductive signal collector is adjustably mounted inside an electrically conductive enclosure which may define a single large opening for placing against a surface. The adjustable mounting of the electrically conductive signal collector can be based on the distance from the surface or on the expected beta energy range. A voltage source is connected to the signal collector through an electrometer or other display means for creating an electric field between the signal collector and the enclosure. Air ions created by the beta radiation are collected and the current produced is indicated on the electrometer or other display means. 2 figs

  13. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms such as headaches, bone or muscle aches, fever, chills, and tiredness during your treatment with peginterferon beta- ... not go away: headache muscle or joint pain fever chills weakness Some side effects can be serious. If ...

  14. Beta-gamma discriminator circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major difficulty encountered in the determination of beta-ray dose in field conditions is generally the presence of a relatively high gamma-ray component. Conventional dosimetry instruments use a shield on the detector to estimate the gamma-ray component in comparison with the beta-ray component. More accurate dosimetry information can be obtained from the measured beta spectrum itself. At Los Alamos, a detector and discriminator circuit suitable for use in a portable spectrometer have been developed. This instrument will discriminate between gammas and betas in a mixed field. The portable package includes a 256-channel MCA which can be programmed to give a variety of outputs, including a spectral display, and may be programmed to read dose directly

  15. Endogenous opiate peptides in the spinal cord are involved in the analgesia of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Chu, Jiegen; Wang, Gen; Xu, Hongtao; Liu, Wen-Yan; Wang, Cheng-Hai; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have shown that hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays a role in pain process, and endogenous opiate peptide system in the spinal cord is involved in nociception. This communication was designed to study the relationship between PVN and endogenous opiate system in the spinal cord in the rat. The results showed that in both the thoracic and the lumber spinal cord, microinjection of 100 ng L-glutamate sodium into PVN could increase leucine-enkephalin (L-Ek), beta-endorphin (beta-Ep), dynorphinA(1-13) (DynA(1-13)) concentrations and PVN cauterization decreased L-Ek and beta-Ep concentrations. Pretreatment of the spinal cord with 5 microg naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist could partly reverse the analgesia induced by microinjection of 100 ng L-glutamate sodium into PVN. The data suggested that PVN analgesia might be involved in the endogenous opiate peptide system in the spinal cord independently. PMID:19452637

  16. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Mitochondrial accumulation of APP and Abeta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Pavel F; Petersen, Anna Camilla Hansson; Glaser, Elzbieta;

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that alterations in energy metabolism are among the earliest events that occur in the Alzheimer disease (AD) affected brain. Energy consumption is drastically decreased in the AD-affected regions of cerebral cortex and hippocampus pointing towards compromised...... mitochondrial function of neurons within specific brain regions. This is accompanied by an elevated production of reactive oxygen species contributing to increased rates of neuronal loss in the AD-affected brain regions. In this review, we will discuss the role of mitochondrial function and dysfunction in AD...

  18. Recent double beta decay results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balysh, A. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Beck, M. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Belyaev, S.T. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Bensch, F.; Bockholt, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Demehin, A.; Gurov, A. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Heusser, G.; Hirsch, M.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Kondratenko, I.; Lebedev, V.I. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Maier, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Mueller, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare LNGS, 67010 Assergi (Italy)); Petry, F.; Piepke, A.; Strecker, H.; Voellinger, M.; Zuber, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-02-01

    The status and recent results of second generation [beta][beta]-experiments using isotopically enriched source materials are described. These experiments are at present the most sensitive tools to distinguish Dirac from Majorana neutrinos. The at present most advanced experimental techniques, namely the use of high-resolution calorimetric detectors and of time projection chambers are compared. New limits on the Majorana neutrino mass as well as for the Majoron-neutrino coupling are presented.

  19. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  20. Concomitant duplications of opioid peptide and receptor genes before the origin of jawed vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görel Sundström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The opioid system is involved in reward and pain mechanisms and consists in mammals of four receptors and several peptides. The peptides are derived from four prepropeptide genes, PENK, PDYN, PNOC and POMC, encoding enkephalins, dynorphins, orphanin/nociceptin and beta-endorphin, respectively. Previously we have described how two rounds of genome doubling (2R before the origin of jawed vertebrates formed the receptor family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Opioid peptide gene family members were investigated using a combination of sequence-based phylogeny and chromosomal locations of the peptide genes in various vertebrates. Several adjacent gene families were investigated similarly. The results show that the ancestral peptide gene gave rise to two additional copies in the genome doublings. The fourth member was generated by a local gene duplication, as the genes encoding POMC and PNOC are located on the same chromosome in the chicken genome and all three teleost genomes that we have studied. A translocation has disrupted this synteny in mammals. The PDYN gene seems to have been lost in chicken, but not in zebra finch. Duplicates of some peptide genes have arisen in the teleost fishes. Within the prepropeptide precursors, peptides have been lost or gained in different lineages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ancestral peptide and receptor genes were located on the same chromosome and were thus duplicated concomitantly. However, subsequently genetic linkage has been lost. In conclusion, the system of opioid peptides and receptors was largely formed by the genome doublings that took place early in vertebrate evolution.