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Sample records for beta hemolytic streptococcus

  1. [Tonsillopharyngitis outbreak caused by foodborne group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Vera, Juan; Figueroa Murillo, Estrella; Cruz Calderón, María Victoria; Pérez Alonso, Aránzazu

    2011-08-01

    Although infrequent, some authors have reported outbreaks of foodborne tonsillopharyngitis. On May 11, 2010 a series of cases of tonsillopharyngitis among those attending a fellowship meeting on 8 March was notified to the Epidemiological Surveillance Network in Andalusia (SVEA). The aim of this study is to epidemiologically characterise the outbreak. Descriptive analysis of reported cases and case - control exposure to the implicated food. The variables taken into account were age, sex, symptoms and start date. Sources of information used were the records of the SVEA and individual digital report (DIRAYA). Frequencies and attack rates were calculated, and a Bayesian analysis for the comparison of difference in proportions of disease was carried out for a 95% probability or credibility range (IP). Among the 130 attendees at a communion 41 cases of tonsillopharyngitis (attack rate 31.5%) were detected, and in smears Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated. The most affected age group was the 25-44 year-olds, 16 (39,0%); 68.6% (24) female. The egg salad showed a probability greater than 80% P(Δ>0.10 and Δ>0.15) for a 95% IP of risk of disease after intake and a probability of having a lower risk of no disease. It was a Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal outbreak, the epidemiological evidence indicates exposure to common single source, hence the hypothesis of dietary origin, the implicated food was egg salad. Contributing factors could be cross-contamination after preparation favoured by the bad practice and the conditions of the place.

  2. Beta-hemolytic streptococcus group a endocarditis: a rare clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, A.; Tariq, M.

    2008-01-01

    A case report of an elderly gentleman is reported herein, who presented with one week history of fever, drowsiness and left lower limb weakness. Examination revealed left lower limb weakness with power of grade 3/5. His workup showed evidence of infection and multiple cerebral infarcts on the right side. Blood culture grew Streptococcus pyogens. Echocardiogram showed two vegetations on the aortic valve. Fever was the main presenting feature in this case but it was the presentation of patient with multiple cerebral infarcts that lead to the diagnosis of infective endocarditis. The organism causing Infective Endocarditis (IE) in this patient was a rare one. (author)

  3. [Prevention of perinatal infection caused by group B beta-hemolytic streptococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, G

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae strains or group B streptococci (GBS) are the leading cause of bacterial pneumoniae, sepsis and meningitis in neonates. GBS is also a major cause of bacteriemia in pregnant women. Colonization of the human rectovaginal tract with GBS is a risk factor associated with chorioamnionitis and transmission of the infection to the infant. Neonatal exposure to high concentrations of GBS, mainly during vaginal delivery, leads to colonisation of the lung airways and subsequent onset of severe diseases like pneumonia, sepsis and menigitis. GBS is present in the genitourinary tract of 10% to 40% of pregnant women, about 50% of the newborns of these mothers will be colonised during delivery and of these neonates, 1% to 2% present a severe invasive disease. The early-onset disease, appear in the neonates within 7 days of life and more than 90% occur within the first day of life. Fatal infection is associated commonly with fulminat and overwhelming early-onset disease. Maternal-intrapartum chemoprophylaxis is able to prevent the transmission of GBS to the newborn and to reduce the frequency and the severity of early onset disease. In many countries, in particular in US, several recommendations have been proposed to prevent the perinatal GBS infection. In this paper some recommendations to prevent GBS disease of the newborn, performed in collaboration with Italian Society of Perinatal Medicine, are presented. The most important problem in the prevention programme is the identification of the cases to treat, since it is not possible to give antibiotics to all the women. We combine two strategies for the identification of the women to be treated, one risk based and the other screening based. Intra-partum administration of ampicillin or penicillin is recommended for the women with one or more risk-factors (labour = 18 hours, intrapartum temperature > = 38 degrees C, previous infant with invasive GBS disease, diabetes) and for women with collect vaginal and

  4. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Bacteremia with beta-hemolytic Streptococci groups A, B, C and G has a mortality rate of approximately 20%. In this study we analyzed the association of various patient risk factors with mortality. Records from 241 patients with beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed with particular...... attention to which predisposing factors were predictors of death. A logistic regression model found age, burns, immunosuppressive treatment and iatrogenic procedures prior to the infection to be significant predictors of death, with odds ratios of 1.7 (per decade), 19.7, 3.6 and 6.8, respectively...

  5. [The effect of hydrophobicity of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in the process of adherence and biofilm production ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cell hydrophobicity and adherence to a substrate are one of the most important factors in biofilm formation. Group A streptococcus is an unstable and low biofilm productor. Importance of biofilm production in streptococcal pathogenesis is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hydrophobicity and adherence on the biofilm production of group A streptococcal invasive and noninvasive isolates, and also to evaluate the stability of biofilm production in time function. Adherence, hydrophobicity and biofilm production were investigated in a total of 172 isolates divided into three groups: noninvasive, low invasive and highly invasive. Adher- ence to uncoated and laminin-coated microtiter plates and biofilm production after 12, 24 and 48 hours of incubation was determined using the method described by Stepanović et al. Hydrophobicity was measured using the MATH test by Rosenberg and SAT test by Lindhal. Correlation between adherence and biofilm produc- tion was detected in the group of noninvasive isolates. These isolates were stable biofilm productors during all three time periods of biofilm production. In the groups of invasive and noninvasive isolates no statistical correlation was detected among the analysed variables. The invasive isolates were un- stable biofilm productors. Noninvasive isolates were stable biofilm producers; as detected, they showed a direct correlation between adherence and biofilm production, and a negative impact of hydrophobicity on the biofilm production. Invasive isolates were unstable biofilm productors; it was observed that there was no correlation between adherence and hydrophobicity with biofilm production.

  6. Biofilm formation of beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates and its association with emm polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jui-Shan; Chen, Sin-Yu; Lo, Hsueh-Hsia

    2017-11-01

    Biofilm formation has been well known as a determinant of bacterial virulence. Group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), a relevant pathogen with increasing medical importance, was evaluated for the biofilm-forming potential. Microtiter plate assay was used to assess the most feasible medium for group G SDSE to form a biofilm. Among 246 SDSE isolates examined, 46.7%, 43.5%, 33.3%, and 26.4% of isolates showed moderate or strong biofilm-forming abilities using tryptic soy broth (TSB), brain heart infusion broth (BHI), Todd-Hewitt broth (THB), and C medium with 30 mM glucose (CMG), respectively. The addition of glucose significantly increased the biofilm-forming ability of group G SDSE. FCT (fibronectin-collagen-T-antigen) typing of SDSE was first undertaken and 11 FCT types were found. Positive associations of stG10.0 or negative associations of stG245.0, stG840.0, and stG6.1 with biofilm-forming ability of SDSE were, respectively, found. This was the first investigation demonstrating biofilm-forming potential in clinical group G SDSE isolates; also, some significant associations of biofilm-forming ability with certain emm types were presented. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Importance of diagnostic laboratory methods of beta hemolytic streptococcus group A in comparison with clinical findings in the diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat and unnecessary antibacterial therapy

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    Peiman Eini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus Pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is the most important cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adolescents. Acute pharyngitis is one of the most common conditions in all ages but it is most common in children. Over diagnosis of acute pharyngitis represents one of the major causes of antibiotic abuse. The goal of this study is to make an estimate of the frequency of group A streptococcus in sore throat patients in Farshchian hospital emergency department and clinic in Hamadan. Methods: For estimation of the clinical features role in diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat, we took samples of 100 patients with average age of 32.96±29.86 years with sore throat. We took samples from pharynx and used standard methods of bacteriology in order to detect streptococcus. Results: Group A Streptococcus (GAS accounts for 3 percent of all cases of pharyngitis. Clinically, all of the patients had sore throat. The percent breakdowns are as follows: 30% had exudate, 78% had fever, 8% had lymphadenopathy and 7.7 percent of exudative pharyngitis was streptococcal. The cost for unnecessary antibiotic therapy for every single patient who had negative pharynx culture was approximately 32160 Rails. Conclusion: The low frequency of streptococcus pharyngitis in treated patients reveal that diagnosis based on clinical features is not reliable. We recommend use of other diagnostic methods such as Rapid Antigen Detection Tests (RATs. Only reliable and scientific protocols for antibiotic to therapy.

  8. Group A Streptococcus vulvovaginitis in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Lacy, Judith; Hillard, Paula A

    2008-08-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus-associated vulvovaginitis is uncommon in adult women. Clinicians should include group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus as a possible cause of vulvovaginal symptoms in breastfeeding women. Along with appropriate antibiotic therapy, vaginal estrogen therapy may be considered to diminish susceptibility to recurrent infection in women with vaginal atrophy.

  9. Lactobacilli interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes hemolytic activity and adherence to host epithelial cells

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    Sunil D Saroj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus (GAS, a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of GAS. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS. Conditioned medium (CM from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289 and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  10. A hemolytic pigment of Group B Streptococcus allows bacterial penetration of human placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidbey, Christopher; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Burnside, Kellie; Ngo, Lisa; Becraft, Alexis K.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.; Hitti, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infection of the amniotic fluid is a significant cause of fetal injury, preterm birth, and newborn infections. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important human bacterial pathogen associated with preterm birth, fetal injury, and neonatal mortality. Although GBS has been isolated from amniotic fluid of women in preterm labor, mechanisms of in utero infection remain unknown. Previous studies indicated that GBS are unable to invade human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), which represent the last barrier to the amniotic cavity and fetus. We show that GBS invades hAECs and strains lacking the hemolysin repressor CovR/S accelerate amniotic barrier failure and penetrate chorioamniotic membranes in a hemolysin-dependent manner. Clinical GBS isolates obtained from women in preterm labor are hyperhemolytic and some are associated with covR/S mutations. We demonstrate for the first time that hemolytic and cytolytic activity of GBS is due to the ornithine rhamnolipid pigment and not due to a pore-forming protein toxin. Our studies emphasize the importance of the hemolytic GBS pigment in ascending infection and fetal injury. PMID:23712433

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christian Salgård; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying results, with an identification rate from below 50% to 100%. Large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G isolated from blood cultures between January 1, 2007 and May 1, 2012 were included in the study. Isolates were identified to the species level using a combination of phenotypic characteristics and 16s rRNA sequencing. The isolates were subjected to MALDI-ToF analysis. We used a two-stage approach starting with the direct method. If no valid result was obtained we proceeded to an extraction protocol. Scores above 2 were considered valid identification at the species level. A total of 97 Streptococcus pyogenes, 133 Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and 2 Streptococcus canis isolates were tested; 94%, 66%, and 100% of S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis, respectively, were correctly identified by MALDI-ToF. In most instances when the isolates were not identified by MALDI-ToF this was because MALDI-ToF was unable to differentiate between S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae. By removing two S. pyogenes reference spectra from the MALDI-ToF database the proportion of correctly identified isolates increased to 96% overall. MALDI-ToF is a promising method for discriminating between S. dysgalactiae, S. canis, and S. equi, although more strains need to be tested to clarify this.

  12. Penicillin tolerance among Beta-hemolytic streptococci and production of the group carbohydrates, hemolysins, hyaluronidases and deoxyribonucleases

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    Cássia C. Avelino

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Penicillin tolerance among 67 strains of beta-hemolytic streptococci was examined by determining the ratio of the minimal bactericidal concentration to the minimal inhibitory concentration as 32 or greater. Tolerance was demonstrated in 15 group A strains and in 11,7, and 4 of groups B, C and G, respectively. Thereafter the effects of a subminimal inhibitory concentration (1/2MIC of penicillin on the bacterial products of four tolerant and four nontolerant strains (two of each Lancefield group were analyzed and compared. The antibiotic caused a marked increase in the expression of the group carbo-hydrates for strains of group B. Penicillin was found to reduce the cell-bound hemolysin activities of the four tolerant strains and to increase the activity of the other (free form of nontolerant groups A, C and G hemolysins. Penicillin caused an increase in the extracellular hyaluronidase activities of one group A and groups B, C and G streptococci. With added antibiotic the production of deoxyribonuclease by tolerant groups A, C and G was greatly enhanced and that of the group B streptococcus was arrested.

  13. Gestantes colonizadas pelo Streptococcus do grupo B e seus recém-nascidos: análise crítica da conduta adotada no Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz Beta-hemolytic streptococcus in pregnant women and their newborn infants: a critical analysis of the protocol used at Fernandes Figueira Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, in Brazil

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    Natalie Del-Vecchio L. Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a aplicação do protocolo do Centers of Disease Control (CDC, 2002 quanto à profilaxia da sepse neonatal precoce por Streptococcus do grupo B (SGB. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com revisão de prontuários de 125 gestantes colonizadas pelo SGB e 133 recém-nascidos, no período de janeiro/2003 a dezembro/2006. A conduta intraparto foi considerada correta quando a gestante recebia antibioticoprofilaxia pelo menos quatro horas antes do parto, ou quando não recebia, mas era submetida a parto cesáreo eletivo. A conduta intraparto foi considerada incorreta quando a gestante recebia antibioticoprofilaxia menos de quatro horas antes do parto, a prescrição antibiótica estava incorreta ou quando não havia profilaxia prescrita. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de colonização materna pelo SGB foi de 4,7%. A época de coleta do swab vaginal/retal variou entre 14 e 40 semanas de gestação, com média de 32 semanas. Das gestantes colonizadas, 54 (43% receberam conduta intraparto correta. Dos 133 recém-nascidos estudados, 95 (71% receberam avaliação diagnóstica corretamente, 17 (13% evoluíram com sepse clínica e um (0,75% apresentou sepse comprovada. A incidência de sepse foi maior em recém-nascidos cujas mães não receberam profilaxia intraparto corretamente, porém esta associação não apresentou diferença estatística significativa (18 versus 7%, p>0,05. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar de o protocolo para prevenção de sepse precoce pelo SGB estar implementado na instituição, ainda é possível observar falhas na profilaxia intraparto materna. Essas falhas representam oportunidades perdidas na prevenção da sepse precoce pelo SGB.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of the guidelines of the Centers of Disease Control (CDC, 2002 regarding the prophylaxes of group B Streptococcus (GBS early onset neonatal sepsis. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study by chart review of 125 pregnant women colonized by GBS and 133 neonates born at a

  14. Hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by a new deletion of the entire beta-globin cluster.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirastu, M; Kan, Y W; Lin, C C; Baine, R M; Holbrook, C T

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new type of gamma delta beta-thalassemia in four generations of a family of Scotch-Irish descent. The proposita presented with hemolytic disease of the newborn, which was characterized by a microcytic anemia. Initial restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA showed no grossly abnormal patterns, but studies of polymorphic restriction sites and gene dosage revealed an extensive deletion that removed all the beta- and beta-like globin genes from the affected chromosome. In situ ...

  15. Inhibitory role of acyl homoserine lactones in hemolytic activity and viability of Streptococcus pyogenes M6 S165.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Sunil D; Holmer, Linda; Berengueras, Júlia M; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2017-03-17

    Streptococcus pyogenes an adapted human pathogen asymptomatically colonizes the nasopharynx, among other polymicrobial communities. However, information on the events leading to the colonization and expression of virulence markers subject to interspecies and host-bacteria interactions are limited. The interference of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) with the hemolytic activity and viability of S. pyogenes M6 S165 was examined. AHLs, with fatty acid side chains ≥12 carbon atoms, inhibited hemolytic activity by downregulating the expression of the sag operon involved in the production of streptolysin S. Inhibitory AHLs upregulated the expression of transcriptional regulator LuxR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the interaction of LuxR with the region upstream of sagA. AHL-mediated bactericidal activity observed at higher concentrations (mM range) was an energy-dependent process, constrained by the requirement of glucose and iron. Ferrichrome transporter FtsABCD facilitated transport of AHLs across the streptococcal membrane. The study demonstrates a previously unreported role for AHLs in S. pyogenes virulence.

  16. The role of group A beta hemolytic streptococcal infections in patients with tic and tourett's disorders

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    Noorbakhsh S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Recently, many cases diagnosed as pediatric autoimmune neuropsy-chiatric disorders associated with group A beta hemolytic streptococcus infection (PANDAS due to production of autoimmune antibodies. Object of this study was comparison the titer of antibodies against group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (ASOT, Anti-DNase B, and Anti streptokinase between children with movement disorders (tic and tourett's disorders; pediatric autoimmune psychiatric disorders and healthy control."n"nMethods: A cross sectional/ cases control study in pediatric neuropsychology ward and clinics in two referral hospitals (Rasoul & Aliasghar affiliated by IUMS had done in Tehran, Iran (2008-2010. We selected 53 children with tic disorder and 76 healthy controls (age matched children. The antibody titers (IU/ml in their area were compared and analyzed statistically. The area under ROC, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of tests calculated."n"nResults: Age of cases was between 4-16 years. All antibody titers had significant difference between two groups (p<0.0001; p=0.05; p=0.002 for ASOT, Anti-DNase and Antihyaloronidase respectively. ASOT (cut off level> 200IU/ml had 75% sensitivity; 84% specificity and 80

  17. Unusual Manifestation of Severe Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in an Infant with Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    Jung-Pin Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon etiologic organism in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Historically, severe S. pneumoniae-associated HUS usually has a poor clinical outcome. The clinical manifestations of marked jaundice and hepatic dysfunction in this form of HUS are extremely rare. We report a 10-month-old female infant with S. pneumoniae-associated HUS who had the unusual manifestation of severely elevated conjugated bilirubin and hepatic transaminases. Screening for viral hepatitis was negative, and evidence of biliary obstruction and hepatotoxic drug exposure was also absent. The patient was treated with antihypertensive agents for 2.5 months and required peritoneal dialysis for a period of 26 days. Hepatic function returned to normal on the 8th day of hospitalization. Renal function was mildly impaired at 1-year follow-up. Our report suggests that severe conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a rare manifestation of S. pneumoniae-associated HUS in children. It is important for pediatricians that pneumococcal infection with severe hematologic and renal disorders should be investigated for evidence of S. pneumoniae-associated HUS. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S17-S22

  18. Controlled Human Infection for Vaccination Against Streptococcus Pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Streptococcus Pyogenes Pharyngitis; Streptococcus Pharyngitis; Strep Throat; Streptococcus Pyogenes Infection; Group A Streptococcus: B Hemolytic Pharyngitis; Group A Streptococcal Infection; Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections; Bacterial Infections

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salgård Jensen, Christian; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying...

  20. Resolution of alloimmunization and refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a multi-transfused beta-thalassemia major patient

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    Joseph Philip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-thalassemia is one of the most prevalent autosomal disorders, which affect more than 400,000 newborn per year worldwide. In India, the carrier rate of beta-thalassemia varies from 3-17%. The overall rate of alloimmunization in thalassemia patients has been reported to be 5-30% in the world, which is mostly contributed by the alloimmunization to minor blood group antigen. Among Asians, the incidence of red cell alloimmunization is 22%. The recommended treatment for beta-thalassemia major is regular blood transfusion every 3 to 4 weeks. The development of anti-red cell antibodies (alloantibodies and/or autoantibodies can significantly complicate transfusion therapy. Alloantibodies are commonly associated with red cell hemolysis. Red cell autoantibodies appear less frequently, but they can result in clinical hemolysis called autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, and in difficulty in cross-matching blood. Patients with autoantibodies may have a higher transfusion rate and often require immunosuppressive drugs or alternative treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg and rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

  1. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  2. Comparative Study of 5-Day and 10-Day Cefditoren Pivoxil Treatments for Recurrent Group A β-Hemolytic Streptococcus pharyngitis in Children

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    Hideaki Kikuta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of short-course therapy with cephalosporins for treatment of group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS pharyngitis is still controversial. Subjects were 226 children with a history of at least one episode of GABHS pharyngitis. Recurrence within the follow-up period (3 weeks after initiation of therapy occurred in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and in 1 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group; the incidence of recurrence being significantly higher in the 5-day treatment group. Bacteriologic treatment failure (GABHS isolation without overt pharyngitis at follow-up culture was observed in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and 17 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group. There was no statistical difference between the two groups. A 5-day course of oral cephalosporins is not always recommended for treatment of GABHS pharyngitis in children who have repeated episodes of pharyngitis.

  3. Hemolytic crisis

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003270.htm Hemolytic crisis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemolytic crisis occurs when large numbers of red blood cells ...

  4. Streptococcus pyogenes pharyngeal colonization resulting in recurrent, prepubertal vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Megan T; Sanchez, Veronica T; Eyster, Kathleen; Hansen, Keith A

    2007-10-01

    Recurrent, prepubertal, vaginal infections are an uncommon, troublesome problem for the patient and her family. Failure of initial therapy to alleviate vulvovaginitis may be related to vulvar skin disease, foreign body, sexual abuse, pinworms, reactions to medications, anatomic anomalies, or allergies. This report describes a case of recurrent Streptococcus pyogenes vulvovaginitis secondary to presumed vaginal re-inoculation from pharyngeal colonization. A 4-yr-old presented with one year of culture proven, recurrent Streptococcus pyogenes vulvovaginitis. Her symptoms repeatedly resolved with penicillin therapy, but continued to recur following cessation of antibiotic therapy. Evaluation included physical examination, trans-abdominal pelvic ultrasound, and vaginoscopy which all revealed normal upper and lower genital tract anatomy. Both the patient and her mother demonstrated culture proven, Group A Streptococcus pharyngeal colonization. Because of the possibility of repeated inoculations of the vaginal area from the colonized pharynx, they were both treated for decolonization with a regimen of amoxicillin and rifampin for ten days. Following this therapy there was resolution of vaginal symptoms with no further recurrence. Follow-up pharyngeal culture done on both mother and child on their last visit were negative for Group A Streptococcus. This case demonstrated an unusual specific cause of recurrent vaginitis resulting from presumed self or maternal re-inoculation with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus from pharyngeal colonization. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus are consistently sensitive to penicillin, but up to 25% of acute pharyngitis cases treated with penicillin having continued asymptomatic, bacterial carriage within the nasopharynx. Thus initial alleviation of symptoms in a patient with Group A beta-hemolytic vulvovaginitis treated with penicillin, can have continued asymptomatic pharyngeal colonization which can result in recurrence of the

  5. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen your condition or lead to complications. Hemolytic Anemia and Children Parents of children who have hemolytic anemia usually ... members, friends, and your child's classmates about hemolytic anemia. You also may want to tell your child's teachers or other caregivers about the condition. Let ...

  6. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

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    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A doença pneumocócica é importante problema de saúde pública e raramente há associação desta infecção com a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU grave. O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso de um paciente com esta associação. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Criança do sexo masculino, com 17 meses de idade, admitida no hospital com insuficiência respiratória aguda e necessitando de suporte ventilatório. O exame radiológico mostrava extensa opacidade homogênea em hemitórax direito. A hemocultura foi positiva para Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nos exames de admissão, notaram-se: hemoglobina de 6,5g/dL, 38.000 plaquetas/mm³, uréia de 79mg/dL e creatinina de 1,64mg/dL. No primeiro dia, apresentou oligoanúria e hipervolemia, necessitando de hemodiafiltração. Evoluiu com disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e óbito no sétimo dia. A necrópsia mostrou áreas extensas de necrose cortical e tubular renal, com depósito de fibrina nas arteríolas. COMENTÁRIOS: A SHU associada ao pneumococo apresenta morbidade e mortalidade elevadas. Em crianças com doença pneumocócica invasiva e acometimento hematológico ou renal grave, deve-se estar atento a esta rara complicação. Merecem investigação os seguintes aspectos relacionados à doença: a função da detecção precoce de antígenos T ativados no diagnóstico e terapêutica, o papel do fator H na patogênese, o método ideal de substituição renal e a definição do prognóstico em longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal diseases are a major public health problem. Severe hemolytic-uremic syndrome is an uncommon complication. The aim of this study is to report a child with this complication. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male child with 17 months old was admitted to the hospital, due to acute respiratory failure, needing ventilatory support. Roentgenogram demonstrated massive condensation of right lung and Streptococcus pneumonia was isolated from blood cultures. Laboratory tests showed

  7. Invasieve infecties door beta-haemolytische Streptokokken Lancefield Groep A (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) in Nederland, 1992-1993

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens JFP; Schouls LM; van Silfhout A; Elzenaar CP; Brunings HA; Blokpoel MCJ; Top J; van Leeuwen WJ; LBA; MMB

    1994-01-01

    In recent years an increase of severe invasive infections and toxic shock syndrome (TSS) with beta-haemolytic Group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) has been reported from North-America and North-Western Europe. In the spring of 1992 several reports of cases suggested that this epidemic

  8. Vaginal isolation of beta-haemolytic Streptococcus from bitches with and without neonatal deaths in the litters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A E; Stornelli, M C; Jurado, S B; Giacoboni, G; Sguazza, G H; de la Sota, R L; Stornelli, M A

    2018-02-18

    The aim of the study was to identify beta-haemolytic streptococci in the vagina of bitches who had delivered healthy litters and bitches who had delivered litters in which neonatal deaths occurred. Fifty-one bitches divided into two groups were used. Group 1 (G1) included 28 bitches that had delivered healthy litters and group 2 (G2) included 23 bitches that had delivered puppies who died in the neonatal period. Two vaginal samples were taken, one in proestrus and the other at the end of gestation (EG). Beta-haemolytic Streptococcus (BS) was isolated from 16 bitches (57%) in G1 and from 21 bitches (91%) in G2. The bacteriological cultures, serological tests (Streptex ® ) and PCR assay allowed identification of Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae in G1 and G2. Ultramicroscopic studies allowed the observation of M Protein and capsules in strains of S. dysgalactiae and S. canis in G1 and G2. The S. canis strains isolated from G2 showed thicker capsules than S. canis strains isolated from G1 (234 ± 24.2 vs 151.23 ± 28.93 nm; p  .70). All strains of beta-haemolytic Streptococcus isolated were penicillin sensitive. Penicillin was administered from EG to 5 days post-partum in 10 G2 females with isolation of BS (G2A). Saline solution was administered in eleven G2 females with isolation of BS (G2B). Ninety per cent of the puppies survived in G2A and 25% survived in G2B. Our results suggest BS is involved in canine neonatal deaths. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Prevalence of Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus isolated from children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba-Saddik, I A; Munibari, A A; Alhilali, A M; Ismail, S M; Murshed, F M; Coulter, J B S; Cuevas, L E; Hart, C A; Brabin, B J; Parry, C M

    2014-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus (GAS) and non-GAS infections among children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen, to evaluate the value of a rapid diagnostic test and the McIsaac score for patient management in this setting and to determine the occurrence of emm genotypes among a subset of GAS isolated from children with acute pharyngotonsillitis and a history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus infections in school-aged children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen, were diagnosed by a rapid GAS antigen detection test (RADT) and/or GAS culture from a throat swab. The RADT value and the McIsaac screening score for patient management were evaluated. The emm genotype of a subset of GAS isolates was determined. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus pharyngotonsillitis was diagnosed in 287/691 (41.5%; 95% CI 37.8-45.3) children. Group B, Group C and Group G beta-haemolytic streptococci were isolated from 4.3% children. The RADT had a sensitivity of 238/258 (92.2%) and specificity of 404/423 (95.5%) against GAS culture. A McIsaac score of ≥4 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 82% for confirmed GAS infection. The emm genotypes in 21 GAS isolates from children with pharyngitis and a history of ARF and confirmed RHD were emm87 (11), emm12 (6), emm28 (3) and emm5 (1). This study demonstrates a very high prevalence of GAS infections in Yemeni children and the value of the RADT and the McIsaac score in this setting. More extensive emm genotyping is necessary to understand the local epidemiology of circulating strains. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. EFFECT OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL, INFUSION AND ETHANOL EXTRACT OF Thymus vulgaris L., ON THE GROWTH IN VITRO OF GROUP A ß-HEMOLYTIC Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Solano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estimó un tratamiento alternativo de bajo costo para conocer la efectividad del tomillo Thymus vulgaris L., sobre la faringoamigdalitis bacteriana. Al aceite esencial obtenido por destilación, extracto etanólico e infusión de tomillo; se les evaluó su actividad biológica sobre el crecimiento de Streptococcus pyogenes ß-hemolítico del grupo A de Lancefield, principal causante de la faringoamigdalitis. Se realizaron pruebas de sensibilidad y se midieron las zonas de inhibición in vitro. El aceite esencial destilado, registró el mayor halo de inhibición (3.2 cm, incluso superó a la penicilina (2.4 cm. Con el extracto etanólico la inhibición fue menor y con la infusión no hubo inhibición. El aceite esencial y el extracto etanólico fueron analizados por medio de cromatografía en capa fina y cromatografía de gases para determinar su concentración y pureza en comparación con el aceite escencial puro de tomillo, obteniéndose la presencia de timol y en menor grado carvacrol, agentes activos que producen inhibición en el crecimiento bacteriano.

  11. A case of rheumatic fever with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome caused by a cutaneous infection with beta-hemolytic streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle-aged patient of Greenlandic origin was referred for skin infection of the leg. An initial minor trauma of the skin of the distal right lower extremity was complicated by bullous erysipelas which cultured positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS. The clinical condition deteriorated and necrotizing fasciitis developed despite relevant surgical and antibiotic treatment. Approximately 3 weeks later, the patient developed arthralgia, impaired renal function with azotemia, hypertension and severe nephrotic syndrome with periorbital and peripheral edema. A kidney biopsy demonstrated endocapillary glomerulonephritis. Concomitantly, carditis with chest pain, moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and mitral regurgitation were noted. The patient had no signs of pharyngitis in the whole period. The patient thus contracted poststreptococ glomerulonephritis and furthermore she fulfilled the criteria of acute rheumatic fever following a GABHS skin infection. We suggest a possible relation between a virulent GABHS clone causing NF and ARF.

  12. Určování a diagnostika beta-hemolytických streptokoků v klinické mikrobiologii

    OpenAIRE

    VOŘÍŠKOVÁ, Martina

    2008-01-01

    The genus of Streptococcus includes gram-positive catalase of negative coccus, which rank into pairs and chains and their colonies are also sometimes very small in enriched soils. Most of species are selectively anaerobic. This genus includes a large number of species with different significance for people ´s disorders, and also the species significant for veterinary medicine. Beta-hemolytic or pyogenic Streptococci important in human medicine include first of all streptococci of A and B grou...

  13. [Orbital cellulitis complicated by subperiosteal abscess due to Streptococcus pyogenes infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz Carrillo, José Daniel; Vázquez Guerrero, Edwin; Mercado Uribe, Mónica Cecilia

    Orbital cellulitis is an infectious disease that is very common in pediatric patients, in which severe complications may develop. Etiological agents related to this disease are Haemophilus influenzae B, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis, which correspond to 95% of cases. Moreover, Streptococcus beta hemolytic and anaerobic microorganisms may also be present corresponding to < 5% of the cases. We present an uncommon case of cellulitis complicated by sub-periosteal abscess caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus). A 9-year-old male patient with a history of deficit disorder and hyperactivity since 5 years of age. His current condition started with erythema in the external edge of the right eye, increase in peri-orbicular volume with limitation of eyelid opening, progression to proptosis, pain with eye movements and conjunctival purulent discharge. Image studies reported subperiosteal abscess and preseptal right with extraocular cellulitis. The patient started with empirical antibiotic treatment, surgical drainage and culture of purulent material from which Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated. Due to the implementation of vaccination schemes against H. influenza and S. pneumoniae since the 90s, the cases by these pathogens have decreased, causing new bacteria to take place as the cause of the infection. The importance of considering S. pyogenes as an etiology of orbital cellulitis is the rapid progression to abscess formation, and the few cases described in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and group A beta-haemolytic streptococci in 2002-2003. Results of the multinational GRASP Surveillance Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekmann, Susan E; Heilmann, Kris P; Richter, Sandra S

    2005-01-01

    A multinational surveillance study, GRASP, was conducted between November 2002 and April 2003 with the aim of assessing rates of antimicrobial resistance among 2656 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2486 isolates of group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, 1358 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae...... and 1047 of Moraxella catarrhalis from 20 countries in Europe, eastern Asia and southern Africa. Conspicuous differences between various countries were noted in the S. pneumoniae resistance rates observed for penicillin (0-79.2%) and erythromycin (4-66%), along with other antimicrobials. The percentage...... of MDR strains was above 25% in 8 of the 20 countries studied. Group A streptococcal macrolide resistance rates ranged from 0% to 35% by country, while rates of beta-lactamase production ranged from 0% to 39% for H. influenzae and 80-100% for M. catarrhalis. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae remains...

  15. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  16. Poststreptococcal keratouveitis associated with group C streptococcus pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataneli N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nathaniel Nataneli1, Zenia P Aguilera1, Pearl S Rosenbaum1, Tamar Goldstein1,2, Martin Mayers11Department of Ophthalmology, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelPurpose: To report the first case of poststreptococcal syndrome uveitis (PSU in association with group C streptococcus (GCS.Patients and methods: Chart review of a 24-year-old man who presented with bilateral ocular redness, pain, and photophobia for 5 days and "white rings" around his eyes for a duration of 3 days. The patient further reported fever and sore throat in the preceding week. Slit-lamp examination showed bilateral keratouveitis. A thorough uveitis workup, antistreptolysin O (ASLO titer, and throat culture were obtained. The patient was treated with frequent topical steroids and systemic doxycycline. The uveitis and keratitis subsided over the next few weeks, leaving extensive peripheral keratolysis.Results: The results of laboratory diagnostic testing revealed an elevated ASLO, C-reactive protein, as well as HLA-B27 positivity. Throat cultures grew beta-hemolytic GCS; group A streptococcus was culture negative.Conclusion: GCS pharyngitis may be a causative organism of PSU.Keywords: pharyngitis, keratolysis, keratouveitis

  17. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome triggered by varicella infection

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    Pauline Condom

    2017-01-01

    The current case describes an aHUS associated to varicella infection as demonstrated by the simultaneous occurrence of the viral infection and aHUS manifestations. Apart from typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome which is triggered by bacteria mostly Shiga toxin producing Echerichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae or Shigella, aHUS may be linked to viral infections such as HIV, EBV and enteroviruses, but very rarely by varicella. This case highlights a possible even rare complication of varicella infection a very common childhood disease. This complication could be avoided by to anti-VZV vaccination.

  18. Virulence Gene Pool Detected in Bovine Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae Isolates by Use of a Group A S. pyogenes Virulence Microarray ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Márcia G.; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, René; Bexiga, Ricardo; Nunes, Sandro F.; Vilela, Cristina L.; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2011-01-01

    A custom-designed microarray containing 220 virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) was used to test group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (GCS) field strains causing bovine mastitis and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (GCS/GGS) isolates from human infections, with the latter being used for comparative purposes, for the presence of virulence genes. All bovine and all human isolates carried a fraction of the 220 genes (23% and 39%, respectively). The virulence genes encoding streptolysin S, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the plasminogen-binding M-like protein PAM, and the collagen-like protein SclB were detected in the majority of both bovine and human isolates (94 to 100%). Virulence factors, usually carried by human beta-hemolytic streptococcal pathogens, such as streptokinase, laminin-binding protein, and the C5a peptidase precursor, were detected in all human isolates but not in bovine isolates. Additionally, GAS bacteriophage-associated virulence genes encoding superantigens, DNase, and/or streptodornase were detected in bovine isolates (72%) but not in the human isolates. Determinants located in non-bacteriophage-related mobile elements, such as the gene encoding R28, were detected in all bovine and human isolates. Several virulence genes, including genes of bacteriophage origin, were shown to be expressed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of superantigen gene sequences revealed a high level (>98%) of identity among genes of bovine GCS, of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and of the human pathogen GAS. Our findings indicate that alpha-hemolytic bovine GCS, an important mastitis pathogen and considered to be a nonhuman pathogen, carries important virulence factors responsible for virulence and pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21525223

  19. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  20. Hemolytic potential of hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, S D; Bartlett, R H; Ceccio, S L

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hemolytic potentials of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation. To generate controlled cavitation events, a venturigeometry hydrodynamic device, called a Cavitation Susceptibility Meter (CSM), was constructed. A comparison between the hemolytic potential of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation was investigated with a single-pass flow apparatus and a recirculating flow apparatus, both utilizing the CSM. An analytical model, based on spherical bubble dynamics, was developed for predicting the hemolysis caused by discrete bubble cavitation. Experimentally, discrete bubble cavitation did not correlate with a measurable increase in plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb), as predicted by the analytical model. However, attached cavitation did result in significant PFHb generation. The rate of PFHb generation scaled inversely with the Cavitation number at a constant flow rate, suggesting that the size of the attached cavity was the dominant hemolytic factor.

  1. Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., two novel Streptococcus species isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Zaina; Vandamme, Peter; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; Elfahime, El Mostafa; Farricha, Omar El; Swings, Jean; Amar, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on two unidentified Gram-stain positive, catalase and oxidase negative, non-hemolytic Streptococcus-like organisms recovered from raw camel milk in Morocco. Phenotypic characterization and comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the two strains were highly different from each other and that they did not correspond to any recognized species of the genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the unidentified organisms each formed a hitherto unknown sub-line within the genus Streptococcus, displaying a close affinity with Streptococcus moroccensis, Streptococcus minor and Streptococcus ovis. DNA G+C content determination, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and biochemical tests demonstrated the bacterial isolates represent two novel species. Based on the phenotypic distinctiveness of the new bacteria and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed to classify the two strains as Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov., with CCMM B832(T) (=LMG 27683(T)) as the type strain, and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., with CCMM B834(T) (=LMG 27685(T)) as the type strain.

  2. Severe pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome in an 8-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar Gargah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure, represents one of the major causes of acute renal failure in infancy and childhood. The typical form occurring after an episode of diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli is the most frequent in children. Other microorganisms also may be responsible for HUS, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes more severe forms of the disease. We report an 8-month-old girl who presented with pneumonia and subsequently developed HUS. Renal biopsy showed characteristic lesion of thrombotic microangiopathy and extensive cortical necrosis. She was managed with peritoneal dialysis but did not improve and developed severe sepsis due to staphylococcal peritonitis, resulting in the death of the patient. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced HUS is uncommon, but results in severe disease in the young. There is a high risk of these patients developing end-stage kidney disease in the long term.

  3. Thrombotic Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia without Evidence of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şinasi Özsoylu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent issue of this journal Dr. Oymak and her colleagues presented a clinically and genetically well-studied 5-year-old boy who was seen with severe microangiopathic hemolytic anemia without laboratory findings of renal involvement despite complement factor H gene mutations [1]. Because of Yeneral’s extensive review [2] on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS published recently in the Turkish Journal of Hematology, I brought it to readers’ attention that more recently some authors do not use ‘aHUS’, which was historically used to distinguish heterogeneous uncharacterized syndromes from Shiga toxin-related HUS, since the term lacks both specificity and suggested causes [3]. Though in our patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura renal involvement was documented at the beginning but not in the last two recurrences, neither serum nor urinary findings indicated kidney involvement [4]. Although the discussions of Dr. Oymak et al. are well taken, the term ‘microangiopathic hemolytic anemia’ is covering the syndrome to a large extent as suggested by George and Nester

  4. Role of Streptococcus Anginosus on the formation of dental caries

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    Yetty Herdiyati Nonong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Generally, the etiology of dental caries is the cariogenic properties of bacteria, these are always associated with Streptococcus mutans. Glucosyltransferase fragment (Gtf are also in other strains of Streptococcus such as Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus milleri which includes beta hemolysis. Genotypically B Streptococcus anginosus has genetic characteristics that are similar to Streptococcus mutans. The research objective was to determine the existence of Gtf B/C gene as a cause of caries in Streptococcus anginosus. The study was conducted in experimental laboratories with PCR technique by taking a sample of 20 children who had caries. The results showed there was the amplification of Streptococcus anginosus with a level of homology 96%, 97%, and 99%. The results of the Gtf genes amplification fragment B/C provided 600 pb ribbon. The conclusion was Streptococcus anginosus classified as cariogenic bacteria because they had Gtf B/C genes.

  5. Structure of N-acetyl-[beta]-D-glucosaminidase (GcnA) from the Endocarditis Pathogen Streptococcus gordonii and its Complex with the Mechanism-based Inhibitor NAG-thiazoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, David B.; Harty, Derek W.S.; Jacques, Nicholas A.; Hunter, Neil; Guss, J. Mitchell; Collyer, Charles A. (Sydney); (Westmead)

    2008-09-17

    The crystal structure of GcnA, an N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase from Streptococcus gordonii, was solved by multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using crystals of selenomethionine-substituted protein. GcnA is a homodimer with subunits each comprised of three domains. The structure of the C-terminal {alpha}-helical domain has not been observed previously and forms a large dimerization interface. The fold of the N-terminal domain is observed in all structurally related glycosidases although its function is unknown. The central domain has a canonical ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} TIM-barrel fold which harbours the active site. The primary sequence and structure of this central domain identifies the enzyme as a family 20 glycosidase. Key residues implicated in catalysis have different conformations in two different crystal forms, which probably represent active and inactive conformations of the enzyme. The catalytic mechanism for this class of glycoside hydrolase, where the substrate rather than the enzyme provides the cleavage-inducing nucleophile, has been confirmed by the structure of GcnA complexed with a putative reaction intermediate analogue, N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosamine-thiazoline. The catalytic mechanism is discussed in light of these and other family 20 structures.

  6. A SKIN TEST FOR DETECTING GROUP C HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION CAUSING EPIZOOTIC LYMPHADENITIS IN GUINEA PIGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Johannes K.

    1936-01-01

    1. A skin test with a crude bacterial extract prepared from group C (Lancefield) hemolytic streptococci was used as a means of detecting possible carriers of the streptococcus causing epizootic lymphadenitis in guinea pigs. A positive test similar to a positive tuberculin reaction was considered presumptive evidence of present or recent infection with this streptococcus. 2. 20 positive reactors were found in 330 supposedly normal guinea pigs. 3. 195 negatively reacting animals were used as a breeding stock which yielded 1,296 progeny over a period of 15 months. None of the breeding stock or their progeny showed evidence of spontaneous lymphadenitis. Skin tests of 100 of the progeny were all negative. 4. The use of this skin test as a means of obtaining guinea pig breeding stock free of the streptococcus causing spontaneous lymphadenitis is suggested. PMID:19870552

  7. Anticardiolipin antibodies in D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Alfen-van der Velden, J. van; Onland, W.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The diarrhea-associated form of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) is characterized by a triad of symptoms, namely thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Histopathological studies of patients with D+ HUS show microthrombi in arterioles and glomeruli of the kidney. Recently,

  8. Anti-Streptococcus IgM Antibodies Induce Repetitive Stereotyped Movements: Cell Activation and Co-Localization with Fcα/μ Receptors in the Striatum and Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Patel, Ankur; Zhu, Youhua; Siegel, Allan; Zalcman, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) infections are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders associated with an increased expression of repetitive stereotyped movements. Anti-streptococcus IgG presumably cross-reacts with elements on basal ganglia cells, modifies their function, and triggers symptoms. IgM may play a unique role in precipitating behavioral disturbances since variations in cortico-striatal activity occur in temporal congruity with peak IgM titers during an orchestrated immune response. We discovered in Balb/c mice that single subcutaneous injections of mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies to Streptococcus Group A bacteria induce marked dose-dependent increases in repetitive stereotyped movements, including head bobbing, sniffing, and intense grooming. Effects were antibody- and antigen-specific: anti-streptococcus IgG stimulated ambulatory activity and vertical activity but not these stereotypies, while anti-KLH IgM reduced activity. We suggest that anti-streptococcus IgM and IgG play unique roles in provoking GABHS-related behavioral disturbances. Paralleling its stereotypy-inducing effects, anti-streptococcus IgM stimulated Fos-like immunoreactivity in regions linked to cortico-striatal projections involved in motor control, including subregions of the caudate, nucleus accumbens, and motor cortex. This is the first evidence that anti-streptococcus IgM antibodies induce in vivo functional changes in these structures. Moreover, there was a striking similarity in the distributions of anti-streptococcus IgM deposits and Fos-like immunoreactivity in these regions. Of further importance, Fcα/μ receptors, which bind IgM, were present- and co-localized with anti-streptococcus IgM in these structures. We suggest that anti-streptococcus IgM-induced alterations of cell activity reflect local actions of IgM that involve Fcα/μ receptors. These findings support the use of anti-streptococcus monoclonal antibody administration in Balb/c mice to model GABHS

  9. The antibacterial activity of peptides derived from human beta-2 glycoprotein I is inhibited by protein H and M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, Maria; Wasylik, Sylwia; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Derksen, Ronald H. W. M.; de Groot, Philip G.; Herwald, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    During the last years, the importance of antibacterial peptides has attracted considerable attention. We report here that peptides derived from the fifth domain of beta-2 glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI), a human heparin binding plasma protein, have antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and

  10. The synthetic human beta-defensin-3 C15 peptide exhibits antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, both alone and in combination with dental disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki Bum; Kim, A Reum; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major etiologic agent of human dental caries that forms biofilms on hard tissues in the human oral cavity, such as tooth and dentinal surfaces. Human β-defensin-3 (HBD3) is a 45-amino-acid natural antimicrobial peptide that has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi. A synthetic peptide consisting of the C-terminal 15 amino acids of HBD3 (HBD3-C15) was recently shown to be sufficient for its antimicrobial activity. Thus, clinical applications of this peptide have garnered attention. In this study, we investigated whether HBD3-C15 inhibits the growth of the representative cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans and its biofilm formation. HBD3-C15 inhibited bacterial growth, exhibited bactericidal activity, and attenuated bacterial biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. HBD3-C15 potentiated the bactericidal and anti-biofilm activity of calcium hydroxide (CH) and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), which are representative disinfectants used in dental clinics, against S. mutans. Moreover, HBD3-C15 showed antimicrobial activity by inhibiting biofilm formation by S. mutans and other dentinophilic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus gordonii, which are associated with dental caries and endodontic infection, on human dentin slices. These effects were observed for HBD3-C15 alone and for HBD3-C15 in combination with CH or CHX. Therefore, we suggest that HBD3-C15 is a potential alternative or additive disinfectant that can be used for the treatment of oral infectious diseases, including dental caries and endodontic infections.

  11. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  12. The challenge of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanain Hani Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA is a Coomb's-negative hemolytic anemia characterized by red cell fragmentation (schistocytes. Thrombotic microangiopathy anemia, including thrombotic thrombocytopenia and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, malignant hypertension, preeclampsia are among the most common causes. We present a case of MAHA presenting with thrombocytopenia initially diagnosed as MAHA secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and received five sessions plasmapheresis without improvement but with worsening of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On further inquiry, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was identified, and the patient showed dramatic recovery after the trial of B12 and folate.

  13. In vitro characterization of PlySK1249, a novel phage lysin, and assessment of its antibacterial activity in a mouse model of Streptococcus agalactiae bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Daraspe, Jean; Giddey, Marlyse; Moreillon, Philippe; Resch, Grégory

    2013-12-01

    Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae is the leading cause of bacteremia and invasive infections. These diseases are treated with β-lactams or macrolides, but the emergence of less susceptible and even fully resistant strains is a cause for concern. New bacteriophage lysins could be promising alternatives against such organisms. They hydrolyze the bacterial peptidoglycan at the end of the phage cycle, in order to release the phage progeny. By using a bioinformatic approach to screen several beta-hemolytic streptococci, a gene coding for a lysin was identified on a prophage carried by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis SK1249. The gene product, named PlySK1249, harbored an original three-domain structure with a central cell wall-binding domain surrounded by an N-terminal amidase and a C-terminal CHAP domain. Purified PlySK1249 was highly lytic and bactericidal for S. dysgalactiae (2-log10 CFU/ml decrease within 15 min). Moreover, it also efficiently killed S. agalactiae (1.5-log10 CFU/ml decrease within 15 min) but not several streptococcal commensal species. We further investigated the activity of PlySK1249 in a mouse model of S. agalactiae bacteremia. Eighty percent of the animals (n = 10) challenged intraperitoneally with 10(6) CFU of S. agalactiae died within 72 h, whereas repeated injections of PlySK1249 (45 mg/kg 3 times within 24 h) significantly protected the mice (P S. dysgalactiae, demonstrated high cross-lytic activity against S. agalactiae both in vitro and in vivo. These encouraging results indicated that PlySK1249 might represent a good candidate to be developed as a new enzybiotic for the treatment of systemic S. agalactiae infections.

  14. Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René; Gaïni, Shahin; Kjaeldgaard, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Meningitis and spondylodiscitis caused by Streptococcus suis is a rare disease which is contracted by occupational exposure to pigs. We report a 54-y-old pig-farm worker with S. suis meningitis and septicaemia complicated with thoracal and lumbar spine spondylodiscitis. The S. suis strain involved...

  15. Analysis of multidrug resistant group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility forming small, less hemolytic colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Banno

    Full Text Available Group B streptococci (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae are the leading cause of neonatal invasive diseases and are also important pathogens for elderly adults. Until now, nearly all GBS with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS have shown β-hemolytic activity and grow on sheep blood agar. However, we have previously reported three PRGBS clinical isolates harboring a CylK deletion that form small less hemolytic colonies. In this study, we examined the causes of small, less hemolytic colony formation in these clinical isolates. Isogenic strains were sequenced to identify the mutation related to a small colony size. We identified a 276_277insG nucleic acid insertion in the thiamin pyrophosphokinase (tpk gene, resulting in premature termination at amino acid 103 in TPK, as a candidate mutation responsible for small colony formation. The recombinant strain Δtpk, which harbored the 276_277insG insertion in the tpk gene, showed small colony formation. The recombinant strain ΔcylK, which harbored the G379T substitution in cylK, showed a reduction in hemolytic activity. The phenotypes of both recombinant strains were complemented by the expression of intact TPK or CylK, respectively. Moreover, the use of Rapid ID 32 API and VITEK MS to identify strains as GBS was evaluated clinical isolates and recombinant strains. VITEK MS, but not Rapid ID 32 API, was able to accurately identify the strains as GBS. In conclusion, we determined that mutations in tpk and cylK caused small colonies and reduced hemolytic activity, respectively, and characterized the clinical isolates in detail.

  16. Co-Infection of Rickettsia rickettsii and Streptococcus pyogenes: Is Fatal Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Underdiagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczniak, Gregory A.; Kato, Cecilia; Chung, Ida H.; Austin, Amy; McQuiston, Jennifer H.; Weis, Erica; Levy, Craig; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria S.; Mitchell, Audrey; Bjork, Adam; Regan, Joanna J.

    2014-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is challenging to diagnose and rapidly fatal if not treated. We describe a decedent who was co-infected with group A β-hemolytic streptococcus and R. rickettsii. Fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever may be underreported because they present as difficult to diagnose co-infections. PMID:25331804

  17. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  18. Role of the Group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Caliot

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  19. Hematological outcome in neonatal alloimmune hemolytic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, Mirjam Eva Aafke

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on several aspects related to the hematological outcome of infants with hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to red blood cell alloimmunization, including pathogenesis and management of the disease. The presence of leukocytopenie and thrombocytopenia support the

  20. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpesh B Ishnava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria.The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0. Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract.The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36μg/ml and 182.19μg/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50 value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein.Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria.

  1. Resistencia a antibióticos no betalactámicos de aislamientos invasores de Streptococcus pneumoniae en niños latinoamericanos: SIREVA II, 2000-2005 Resistance to non-beta-lactam antibiotics in the clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae of children in Latin America: SIREVA II, 2000-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Inés Agudelo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:Determinar la evolución de la resistencia a la eritromicina, el cloranfenicol, el trimetoprim-sulfametozaxol (SXT y la vancomicina de aislamientos invasores de Streptococcus pneumoniae obtenidos de niños de 10 países de América Latina y del Caribe en seis años de vigilancia. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron 8 993 aislamientos de S. pneumoniae recuperados entre 2000 y 2005 de niños menores de 6 años con infecciones invasoras, procedentes de Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, México, Paraguay, República Dominicana, Uruguay y Venezuela. La sensibilidad a los antibióticos se determinó mediante los métodos establecidos y estandarizados en el proyecto SIREVA. La resistencia a múltiples antibióticos se definió como la resistencia a tres o más familias de antibióticos, de los no betalactámicos analizados en este estudio o de los betalactámicos evaluados en un estudio previo en el que 37,8% de estos aislamientos presentaron sensibilidad disminuida a la penicilina. RESULTADOS: Se encontró algún grado de resistencia al SXT y la eritromicina (56,4% y 15,4% de los aislamientos estudiados, respectivamente y 4,6% presentó alta resistencia al cloranfenicol. Todos los aislamientos fueron sensibles a la vancomicina. Se observó la mayor frecuencia de resistencia al SXT en los aislamientos de neumonía y a la eritromicina en los casos de sepsis (61,6% y 25,5%, respectivamente; P OBJECTIVE: To examine the development of resistance to erythromycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ, and vancomycin of the invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from children in 10 Latin American/Caribbean countries during six years of surveillance. METHODS: Analysis of 8 993 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered in 2000-2005 from children with invasive infections, who were less than 6 years of age, and from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Paraguay, Uruguay, or Venezuela. Antibiotic

  2. Conjugal plasmid transfer (pAM beta 1) in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    OpenAIRE

    Shrago, A W; Chassy, B M; Dobrogosz, W J

    1986-01-01

    The streptococcal plasmid pAM beta 1 (erythromycin resistance) was transferred via conjugation from Streptococcus faecalis to Lactobacillus plantarum and was transferred among L. plantarum strains. Streptococcus sanguis Challis was transformed with pAM beta 1 isolated from these transconjugants, and transformants harboring intact pAM beta 1 could conjugate the plasmid back to L. plantarum.

  3. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some ...

  4. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Ayako; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Tanikawa, Shu [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1998-06-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated for the subsequent development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS developed in seven patients (four males and three females, five acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), one acute myelogenous leukemia, one non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma) between 36-196 days after BMT. Four patients were recipients of autologous BMT and three were those of allogeneic BMT. Six patients were preconditioned with the regimens including fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). ALL and preconditioning regimen with TBI were suspected to be the risk factors for the development of HUS. Cyclosporin A (CSP) administration was discontinued in three patients who had been given CSP for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Predonisolone was given to the three patients and plasma exchange was performed in one patient. Both hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia were resolved in virtually all patients, while creatinine elevation has persisted along with hypertension in one patient. (author)

  5. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Khatami S.F; Behjati SH.

    2007-01-01

    Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newbor...

  6. A SKIN TEST FOR DETECTING GROUP C HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION CAUSING EPIZOOTIC LYMPHADENITIS IN GUINEA PIGS : APPLICATIONS IN SELECTING BREEDING STOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, J K

    1936-09-30

    1. A skin test with a crude bacterial extract prepared from group C (Lancefield) hemolytic streptococci was used as a means of detecting possible carriers of the streptococcus causing epizootic lymphadenitis in guinea pigs. A positive test similar to a positive tuberculin reaction was considered presumptive evidence of present or recent infection with this streptococcus. 2. 20 positive reactors were found in 330 supposedly normal guinea pigs. 3. 195 negatively reacting animals were used as a breeding stock which yielded 1,296 progeny over a period of 15 months. None of the breeding stock or their progeny showed evidence of spontaneous lymphadenitis. Skin tests of 100 of the progeny were all negative. 4. The use of this skin test as a means of obtaining guinea pig breeding stock free of the streptococcus causing spontaneous lymphadenitis is suggested.

  7. SEVERE IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after liver transplantation is represen- ted in this article. The cause of complication was so-called passenger lymphocyte syndrome (a type of graft- versus-host disease. Two plasmapheresis sessions and Ig (0.5 g/kg in combination with increased maintenance immunosuppression with a short course of oral methylprednisolone in a total dose of 150 mg during 12 days were effective. The patient was discharged from hospital 34 days after transplantation in a satisfactory condition with a stable hemoglobin level. 

  8. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be colonized ... planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of the ...

  9. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  10. Hemolytic anemia caused by kinking of dacron grafts implanted in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hemolytic anemia caused by a kinked Dacron graft is a rare complication after repair of acute aortic dissection. We present a case of hemolytic anemia due to kinking of previously implanted Dacron graft for ascending aorta dissection treated by surgery and replaced with new Dacron. Case Details: We report a ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical MalaCards: genetic atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Anemia Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  12. A noninvasive method for the prediction of fetal hemolytic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Kravchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the diagnosis of fetal hemolytic disease.Subjects and methods. A study group consisted of 42 pregnant women whose newborn infants had varying degrees of hemolytic disease. The women were divided into 3 subgroups according to the severity of neonatal hemolytic disease: 1 pregnant women whose neonates were born with severe hemolytic disease (n = 14; 2 those who gave birth to babies with moderate hemolytic disease (n = 11; 3 those who delivered infants with mild hemolytic disease (n = 17. A comparison group included 42 pregnant women whose babies were born without signs of hemolytic disease. Curvesfor blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery were analyzed in a fetus of 25 to 39 weeks’ gestation.Results. The peak systolic blood flow velocity was observed in Subgroup 1; however, the indicator did not exceed 1.5 MoM even in severe fetal anemic syndrome. The fetal middle artery blood flow velocity rating scale was divided into 2 zones: 1 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity from the median to the obtained midscore; 2 the boundary values of peak systolic blood flow velocity of the obtained values of as high as 1.5 MoM.Conclusion. The value of peak systolic blood flow velocity being in Zone 2, or its dynamic changes by transiting to this zone can serve as a prognostic factor in the development of severe fetal hemolytic disease. 

  13. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  14. Colonización por estreptococo beta hemolítico del grupo b durante el embarazo y prevención de enfermedad neonatal Group B streptococcus colonization during pregnancy and prevention of early onset of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Sad Larcher

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El estreptococo beta-hemolítico del grupo B (SGB es uno de los principales agentes causantes de sepsis neonatal precoz. La mortalidad de los afectados oscila entre el 6 y el 20%, y la tasa de secuela neurológica llega al 30%. En 1996 el Centro de Prevención y Control de Enfermedades de Atlanta, el Colegio Americano de Obstetras y Ginecólogos y la Academia Americana de Pediatría sugirieron en consenso que el personal de atención de salud materna-neonatal debía adoptar una estrategia para la prevención de la sepsis por este germen. Los objetivos del presente trabajo prospectivo fueron determinar el porcentaje de colonización por SGB en las pacientes gestantes asistidas del 1° de julio de 2001 al 31 de diciembre de 2002 e implementar un programa de prevención de sepsis neonatal precoz por SGB a través de profilaxis antibiótica intraparto basado en cultivos. Sobre 1756 pacientes, se realizaron cultivos con hisopado vaginal y anal a 1228 (69.9%. El porcentaje de colonización materna por SGB fue del 1.4% (17 pacientes. Se presentó un caso de sepsis neonatal compatible con SGB (0.6‰ en una madre con cultivo negativo. Sólo una paciente portadora de SGB presentó factores de riesgo. Los resultados nos sugieren continuar con la estrategia de prevención basada en cultivos debido a que la mayoría de las pacientes colonizadas no presentaron factores de riesgo. Son necesarios estudios de relación costo-beneficio en nuestro medio para definir si esta estrategia de prevención es aplicable a la realidad sanitaria argentina.Group B Streptococcus (GBS is the most frequent cause of early onset of neonatal sepsis. Case-fatality rate is 6-20% for newborns. Neurological sequel occurs in 30% of survivors. In 1996, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that obstetrics providers should adopt either a culture-based or a risk

  15. Hemolytic anemias during pregnancy and the reproductive years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintz, U.; Moohr, J.W.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1977-11-01

    Anemia is a common phenomenon in women during the reproductive years. In pregnancy, it is associated with an increased incidence of maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality. The approach to the investigation of anemic women suspected of having hemolytic anemia of either congenital or acquired etiology is the subject of this article. Various conditions in the pregnant women can have hematologic consequences for the newborn infant; these conditions include sensitization to fetal blood cells, infections, drug ingestion and the possession of genes for hereditary hemolytic disorders, which may be transmitted to the fetus. Because several forms of hemolytic anemias are hereditary or are caused by an altered gene, genetic consultation is important.

  16. Antimicrobial, hemolytic and thrombolytic activities of some new N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Hemolytic and thrombolytic activities were determined by measuring absorbance before and after incubation of blood cells with test compound. Results: Compound 9d strongly inhibited Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli with zone of ...

  17. Hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A De Carli

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic activity of live isolates and clones of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The isolates were tested against human erythrocytes. No hemolytic activity was detected by the isolates of T. foetus. Whereas the isolates of T. vaginalis lysed erythrocytes from all human blood groups. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be detected. Our preliminary results suggest that hemolysis depend on the susceptibility of red cell membranes to destabilization and the intervention of cell surface receptors as a mechanism of the hemolytic activity. The mechanism could be subject to strain-species-genera specific variation of trichomonads. The hemolytic activity of T. vaginalis is not due to a hemolysin or to a product of its metabolism. Pretreatment of trichomonads with concanavalin A reduced levels of hemolysis by 40%.

  18. Bacillus subtilis generates a major specific deletion in pAM beta 1.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Lelie, D; Venema, G

    1987-01-01

    pAM beta 1, a 26.5-kilobase plasmid originally isolated from Streptococcus faecalis, was conjugally transferred from Streptococcus lactis to Bacillus subtilis. No conjugal transfer of pAM beta 1 from B. subtilis to S. lactis was observed. In addition, pAM beta 1 which had been reintroduced in S. lactis after cycling through B. subtilis had lost its conjugal transferability to Streptococcus cremoris, although under the same conditions noncycled pAM beta 1 was transferred at high efficiency. Re...

  19. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  1. Case report: Co-infection of Rickettsia rickettsii and Streptococcus pyogenes: is fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever underdiagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczniak, Gregory A; Kato, Cecilia; Chung, Ida H; Austin, Amy; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Weis, Erica; Levy, Craig; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria S; Mitchell, Audrey; Bjork, Adam; Regan, Joanna J

    2014-12-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is challenging to diagnose and rapidly fatal if not treated. We describe a decedent who was co-infected with group A β-hemolytic streptococcus and R. rickettsii. Fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever may be underreported because they present as difficult to diagnose co-infections. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Hemolytic activity of Fusobacterium necrophorum culture supernatants due to presence of phospholipase A and lysophospholipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, P M; Kendall, C J; Stauffer, L R; Holland, J W

    1979-01-01

    Culture supernatants of Fusobacterium necrophorum demonstrated hemolytic activity. The hemolysin(s), which was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, was temperature-dependent and heat labile. The spectrum of hemolytic activity against various erythrocytes included rabbit, human, and dog erythrocytes. Goats, sheep, and bovine erythrocytes showed only trace hemolysis. According to results of thin-layer chromatography, the hemolysin hydrolyzed rabbit erythrocyte phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl choline, and bovine phosphatidyl choline. Hydrolysis of egg yolk phosphatidyl choline, bovine phosphatidyl ethanolamine, cholesterol, 1,2-dipalmitin, 1,3-dipalmitin, sphingomyelin, or triolein was not detected by thin layer chromatography. A more sensitive procedure utilizing gas-liquid chromatography revealed that, of the substrates tested, the following were bein hydrolyzed: bovine and egg yolk phosphatidyl choline, lysophosphatidyl choline, alpha-palmito-beta-eleoyl-L-alpha lecithin and alpha-oleoyl-betal-palmitoyl-L-alpha lecithin. Substrates which were weakly hydrolyzed were bovine phosphatidyl ethanolamine, DL-alpha-hosphatidyl ethanolamine dipalmitoyl, 1,2-dipalmitin, 1,3-dipalmitin, and triolein.

  3. Gene Regulation in Streptococcus pneumoniae: interplay between nutrition and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Hendriksen (Wouter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStreptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which belongs to the species of streptococci. Other pathogenic bacteria belonging to this class include Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus

  4. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  5. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. BETA digital beta radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikov, N.V.; Kosinov, G.A.; Fedorov, Yu.N.

    1989-01-01

    Portable transportable digital beta radiometer providing for measuring beta-decay radionuclide specific activity in the range from 5x10 -9 up to 10 -6 Cu/kg (Cu/l) with error of ±25% is designed and introduced into commercial production for determination of volume and specific water and food radioactivity. The device specifications are given. Experience in the BETA radiometer application under conditions of the Chernobyl' NPP 30-km zone has shown that it is convenient for measuring specific activity of the order of 10 -8 Cu/kg, and application of a set of different beta detectors gives an opportunity to use it for surface contamination measurement in wide range of the measured value

  8. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  9. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  10. Septicemia with Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuursted, Kurt; Littauer, Pia Jeanette; Greve, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was described in 2004 as a new human pathogen, acknowledged in a range of clinical infections typically associated to the respiratory tract. This report demonstrates that S. pseudopneumoniae has the potential to cause invasive infection. In blood cultures from three...... and the antibiogram and resistome revealed no antibiotic resistance....

  11. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  12. Immunoglobulin for alloimmune hemolytic disease in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; Scheffer-Rath, Mirjam Ea; Lopriore, Enrico; de Haas, Masja; Liley, Helen G

    2018-03-18

    Exchange transfusion and phototherapy have traditionally been used to treat jaundice and avoid the associated neurological complications. Because of the risks and burdens of exchange transfusion, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been suggested as an alternative therapy for alloimmune hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) to reduce the need for exchange transfusion. To assess the effect and complications of IVIg in newborn infants with alloimmune HDN on the need for and number of exchange transfusions. We performed electronic searches of CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase (Ovid), Web of Science, CINAHL (EBSCOhost), Academic Search Premier, and the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and controlled-trials.com in May 2017. We also searched reference lists of included and excluded trials and relevant reviews for further relevant studies. We considered all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of IVIg in the treatment of alloimmune HDN. Trials must have used predefined criteria for the use of IVIg and exchange transfusion therapy to be included. We used the standard methods of Cochrane and its Neonatal Review Group. We assessed studies for inclusion and two review authors independently assessed quality and extracted data. We discussed any differences of opinion to reach consensus. We contacted investigators for additional or missing information. We calculated risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for categorical outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) for continuous variables. We used GRADE criteria to assess the risk of bias for major outcomes and to summarize the level of evidence. Nine studies with 658 infants fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Term and preterm infants with Rh or ABO (or both) incompatibility were included. The use of exchange transfusion decreased significantly in the immunoglobulin treated group (typical RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.49; typical RD -0.22, 95% CI -0.27 to

  13. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  14. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, Karolien H.; Florquin, Sandrine; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Verlaak, René; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Weening, Jan J.; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of

  15. A Two-Component Regulatory System, CsrR-CsrS, Represses Expression of Three Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence Factors, Hyaluronic Acid Capsule, Streptolysin S, and Pyrogenic Exotoxin B

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, Andrew; DiRita, Victor J.; Barg, Neil L.; Engleberg, N. Cary

    1999-01-01

    Certain Tn916 insertions in the chromosome of an M1-type, nonmucoid Streptococcus pyogenes isolate (MGAS166) were previously shown to result in stable mucoidy with increased expression of the capsular synthetic genes. The transposon insertions in these strains are directly upstream of an apparent operon encoding a two-component regulatory system, designated csrR-csrS. Compared with MGAS166, these mucoid mutants are more hemolytic and cause significantly more tissue damage in a murine model of...

  16. In vitro assessment of recombinant, mutant immunoglobulin G anti-D devoid of hemolytic activity for treatment of ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Leif K; Green, Trine H; Sandlie, Inger

    2008-01-01

    A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D.......A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D....

  17. Streptococcus agalactiae vaginitis: nonhemolytic variant on the Liofilchem® Chromatic StreptoB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; D'Antonio, Marianna; D'Amario, Claudio; Fazii, Paolo; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) vaginal pathogenicity is not uniformly acknowledged throughout the literature; accordingly, in women, genital itching and burning, along with leukorrhea are commonly and almost exclusively referred to bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis and trichomoniasis. Conversely, GBS virulence for vagina was recognized in the past, as the organism has been observed to potentially cause local inflammation and discharge, as well as lactobacilli rarefaction. We depict here a case where a nonhemolytic (γ-hemolytic) GBS strain was found to be the etiologic agent of vaginal infection. Such uncommon S. agalactiae phenotypes are hard to be recognized and may be therefore responsible for misdiagnosing and underestimation of GBS vaginitis prevalence; here, we had the support of the Liofilchem(®) Chromatic StreptoB medium, that successfully detected such an atypical variant.

  18. Virulence Factors of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    763512/715242 Final Report U VIRULENCE FACTORS OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS U Samuel Rosen Department of Oral Biology For the Period April 1, 1983 - June 30...00 FINAL REPORT VIRULENCE FACTORS OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS Sam Rosen, Irving Shklair, E. X. Beck and F. M. Beck Ohio State University Columbus,Oh and...206-212. Johnson CP, Gorss S, Hillman JD (1978). Cariogenic properties of LDH deficient mutants of streptococcus mutans . J Dent Res 57, Special Issue

  19. Evaluation of anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of Aitchisonia rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Rasool

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic effect of Aitchisonia rosea. The anticonvulsant effect was studied at doses 400 and 800 mg/kg against pentylenetetrazole, strychnine and picrotoxin-induced seizures in albino mice. The antimicrobial assay was conducted by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. Hemolytic effect was analyzed by reported method. Phenolic compounds present in the n-butanol fraction of the plant were estimated by HPLC. The plant showed maximum response against drug-induced convulsions and provided protection to animals at both doses. It also showed maximum zone of inhibition and highly significant MIC against all bacterial and fungal strains. The plant protected the RBCs from hemolysis. The highest amount of phenolics found was caffeic acid (7.5 ± 0.04.

  20. Severe late anemia of hemolytic disease of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Simon; James, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Late anemia is a well-recognized complication of Rhesus hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The incidence of Rhesus HDN is declining, with a tendency for more severely affected pregnancies to be managed in specialist centres. Consequently, many paediatric departments may see relatively few affected infants with comparatively mild disease, and the risk of late anemia in such cases may not always be appreciated. Two cases of infants born with evidence of Rhesus isoimmunization noted at birth and encountering no immediate problems other than mild hyperbilirubinemia are described. After an uneventful early neonatal course, both infants were discharged without follow-up and presented in the second to third weeks of life with severe, life-threatening anemia, leading to neurological sequelae in one case. The importance of close surveillance, including hemoglobin measurements, in all infants with Rhesus hemolytic disease, irrespective of initial severity, is reiterated. PMID:20212966

  1. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: An enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  2. Anti-M causing delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, J.B.; Riglin, H.; Branch, D.R.; Gallagher, M.T.; Petz, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A 52-year-old gravida 1, para 1 woman with M- red cells experienced a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction and exhibited an anti-M antibody following the infusion of four units of M+ red cells. Measurements of erythrocyte survival using 51 Cr-labeled donor M+ and M- red cells and in vitro studies of monocyte-macrophage phagocytosis of sensitized reagent red cells implicate anti-M in the pathogenesis of hemolysis

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulin in ABO and Rh hemolytic diseases of newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Fatemeh; Mamouri, Gholam A; Babaei, Homa

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate whether the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in newborn infants with isoimmune hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility is an effective treatment in reducing the need for exchange transfusion. This study included all direct Coombs' test positive Rh and ABO isoimmunized babies, who admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from October 2003 to October 2004. Significant hyperbilirubinemia was defined as rising by >or=0.5 mg/dl per hour. Babies were randomly assigned to received phototherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) 0.5 g/kg over 4 hours, every 12 hours for 3 doses (study group) or phototherapy alone (control group). Exchange transfusion was performed in any group if serum bilirubin exceeded >or=20mg/dl or rose by >or=1mg/dl/h. A total of 34 babies were eligible for this study (17 babies in each group). The number of exchange transfusion, duration of phototherapy and hospitalization days, were significant shorter in the study group versus control group. When we analyzed the outcome results in ABO and Rh hemolytic disease separately, the efficacy of IVIg was significantly better in Rh versus ABO isoimmunization. Late anemia was more common in the IVIg group 11.8% versus 0%, p=0.48. Adverse effects were not observed during IVIg administration. Administration of IVIg to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to Rh hemolytic disease reduced the need for exchange transfusion but in ABO hemolytic disease there was no significant difference between IVIg and double surface blue light phototherapy.

  4. Hemolytic disease of the newborn- anti c antibody induced hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Kandraju, Hemasree; Devi, Surekha A

    2012-02-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn, as a cause of early jaundice, is not uncommon. This is mostly due to Rh (D), ABO incompatibility and rarely due to other minor blood group incompatibility. The authors report two cases of Rh anti c isoimmunization presenting as significant early neonatal jaundice within the 20 h of life. Both the babies were treated with intensive phototherapy. One baby underwent exchange transfusion and the other required packed cell transfusion for anemia.

  5. Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn from anti-e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R M; Dotzler, S A; Winter, L W; Kerecman, J D

    2008-03-01

    Maternal antibody-mediated fetal red blood cell destruction secondary to non-D Rhesus (Rh) antibodies is a significant cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Here, we report a rare case of severe HDN associated with maternal antibody to Rh e. In addition to severe anemia, the infant developed thrombocytopenia, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and cholelithiasis. Resolution of the infant's cholelithiasis occurred following treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid.

  6. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    OpenAIRE

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Silviu GrisaruUniversity of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there ...

  7. [The immunometaboic effects of benfotiamine and riboxine on hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteshev, B S; Lazareva, G A; Prokopenko, L G

    2002-01-01

    Single (80 mg/kg) or multiply repeated (30 mg/kg) intramuscular injections of phenylhydrazine decrease the functional activity of mononuclear blood cells and the reduces immunological reactivity of the organism. Benfotiamine and riboxin decrease the extent of changes in the immunological response to a single administration of phenylhydrazine but do not significantly influence the immunological functions impaired by repeated injections of the hemolytic toxin.

  8. Genetic Transformation of Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Dennis; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    1981-01-01

    Three strains of Streptococcus mutans belonging to serotypes a, c, and f were transformed to streptomycin resistance by deoxyribonucleic acids derived from homologous and heterologous streptomycin-resistant strains of S. mutans and Streptococcus sanguis strain Challis. Homologous transformation of S. mutans was less efficient than heterologous transformation by deoxyribonucleic acids from other strains of S. mutans.

  9. Serratamolide is a hemolytic factor produced by Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

  10. Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1 D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2 typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3 atypical HUS (aHUS: Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4 recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5 familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS.

  11. Meningitis por Streptococcus suis

    OpenAIRE

    Geffner Sclarsky, D. E.; Moreno Muñoz, R.; Campillo Alpera, Mª.S.; Pardo Serrano, F.J.; Gómez Gómez, A.; Martínez-Lozano, Mª.D.

    2001-01-01

    La infección humana por Streptococcus suis (S. suis) es una zoonosis, con un riesgo ocupacional conocido y que suele presentarse como meningitis purulenta, que tiene baja mortalidad y frecuentes secuelas de hipoacusia y ataxia. Se han publicado menos de 150 casos humanos desde el informe original de hace 30 años. Hay una reconocida distribución geográfica viviendo la mayoría de los afectados en el norte de Europa y el sudeste Asiático. En España se han comunicado dos pacientes con enfermedad ...

  12. Conjugal transfer of plasmid pAM beta 1 in Lactobacillus reuteri and between lactobacilli and Enterococcus faecalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tannock, G W

    1987-01-01

    The broad-host-range plasmid pAM beta 1 (erythromycin resistance) was transferred conjugally from Streptococcus lactis to Lactobacillus reuteri, L. murinus, and L. fermentum. Transfer of pAM beta 1 between two L. reuteri strains occurred, and lactobacillus transconjugants could act as donors of pAM beta 1 in crosses with Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2.

  13. Celulitis orbitaria complicada por absceso subperióstico debido a infección por Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Ruíz Carrillo, José Daniel; Vázquez Guerrero, Edwin; Mercado Uribe, Mónica Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: La celulitis orbitaria es una enfermedad infecciosa muy frecuente en la edad pediátrica que puede provocar el desarrollo de severas complicaciones. Los principales microorganismos involucrados son Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae y Moraxella catarrhalis, que juntos corresponden al 95% de los casos. También se pueden presentar Streptococcus beta hemolíticos y microorganismos anaerobios, que corresponden a menos del 5% de los casos. Se presen...

  14. Speculative Betas

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison Hong; David Sraer

    2012-01-01

    We provide a model for why high beta assets are more prone to speculative overpricing than low beta ones. When investors disagree about the common factor of cash-flows, high beta assets are more sensitive to this macro-disagreement and experience a greater divergence-of-opinion about their payoffs. Short-sales constraints for some investors such as retail mutual funds result in high beta assets being over-priced. When aggregate disagreement is low, expected return increases with beta due to r...

  15. Vaccination against group B streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Paul T; Feldman, Robert G

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) is an important cause of disease in infants, pregnant women, the elderly and in immunosuppressed adults. An effective vaccine is likely to prevent the majority of infant disease (both early and late onset), as well as Group B streptococcus-related stillbirths and prematurity, to avoid the current real and theoretical limitations of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, and to be cost effective. The optimal time to administer such a vaccine would be in the third trimester of pregnancy. The main limitations on the production of a Group B streptococcus vaccine are not technical or scientific, but regulatory and legal. A number of candidates including capsular conjugate vaccines using traditional carrier proteins such as tetanus toxoid and mutant diphtheria toxin CRM197, as well as Group B streptococcus-specific proteins such as C5a peptidase, protein vaccines using one or more Group B streptococcus surface proteins and mucosal vaccines, have the potential to be successful vaccines. The capsular conjugate vaccines using tetanus and CRM197 carrier proteins are the most advanced candidates, having already completed Phase II human studies including use in the target population of pregnant women (tetanus toxoid conjugate), however, no definitive protein conjugates have yet been trialed. However, unless the regulatory environment is changed specifically to allow the development of a Group B streptococcus vaccine, it is unlikely that one will ever reach the market.

  16. Delineation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, its subspecies, and its clinical and phylogenetic relationship to Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Kilian, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The close phylogenetic relationship of the important pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and several species of commensal streptococci, particularly Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and the recently demonstrated sharing of genes and phenotypic traits previously considered...

  17. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  18. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruth R. Palla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab, PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab, and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab, have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789–1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089–1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin’s lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5–12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202–204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373–378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  19. Neutropenia in infants with hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Esther; Johnston, Donna L

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the incidence, outcome and risk factors of neutropenia in infants with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). A retrospective chart review was performed on infants with HDN. Of 69 evaluable infants, 45% developed neutropenia. Only one infectious complication was recorded. In most instances the neutropenia resolved spontaneously, but in seven infants it persisted for a median of 397 days. Males were at higher risk for developing neutropenia, but severity of HDN, antibody specificity, or therapy were not significant risk factors. Neutropenia is a common feature of HDN, regardless of severity of disease, treatment received, or antibody specificity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Streptococcus suis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  1. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after dental care: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Zoppelletto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcus salivarius is a common commensal of the oral mucosa, associated with infections in different sites. Meningitis due to this species are described in a few occasions . In this study refer to a case recently diagnosed in our hospital for treatment of a subsequent dental caries. Case report. A man of 35 years, presents to the emergency room with fever, headache, confusion, marked nuchal rigor.Anamnesis is the treatment of dental caries on the previous day.The blood count showed 24.7x109 / L with WBC 22.9x109 / L (92.9% neutrophils. The lumbar puncture CSF noted cloudy with 15.0 x 109 / L WBC, glicorrachia 5 g / L, protidorrachia 6.5 g / L. Microscopic examination showed numerous granulocytes and prevalence of Gram-positive cocci.The pneumococcal antigen was negative.The blood cultures before starting antibiotic therapy, were negative. CSF was isolated from the culture of a Streptococcus salivarius. To antibiotic therapy started in the ED, after lumbar puncture is associated with the Ampicillin Ceftriaxone and continued for 15 days to improve the patient’s general condition, then resigned in the 17 th day. Materials and methods. From CSF inoculated in blood agar plates and chocolate agar alpha hemolytic colonies were isolated, catalysis negative, optochin resistant. The biochemical identification performed with Phoenix (BD and confirmed by PCR Pan bacterial (16S rDNA bacterial strain identified as Streptococcus salivarius.The antibiogram performed with Phoenix (BD according to the CLSI guidelines indicated sensitivity to penicillin, vancomycin, cefotaxime, cefepime, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions. Meningitis by Streptococcus salivarius was found in a few cases, mainly related to the transmission of health personnel from the oral cavity during lumbar punctures performed without the use of surgical masks. The following bacterial meningitis in dental treatment having a low incidence and often fatal course be suspected by

  2. Prevalence of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Groups A, C, and G in Patients with Acute Pharyngitis

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    Trupti B Naik

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Although rate of pharyngitis associated with GCS and GGS is marginally lower than GAS, their carriage rate among healthy and relative higher drug resistance emphasizes the need for periodic surveillance of infection by the different serogroups of BHS.

  3. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  4. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tank, Kashmira P.; Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson–Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30–60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  5. Neonatal management and outcome in alloimmune hemolytic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Isabelle M C; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; van der Bom, Johanna G; van Klink, Jeanine M M; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) occurs when fetal and neonatal erythroid cells are destroyed by maternal erythrocyte alloantibodies, it leads to anemia and hydrops in the fetus, and hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus in the newborn. Postnatal care consists of intensive phototherapy and exchange transfusions to treat severe hyperbilirubinemia and top-up transfusions to treat early and late anemia. Other postnatal complications have been reported such as thrombocytopenia, iron overload and cholestasis requiring specific management. Areas covered: This review focusses on the current neonatal management and outcome of hemolytic disease and discusses postnatal treatment options as well as literature on long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Expert commentary: Despite major advances in neonatal management, multiple issues have to be addressed to optimize postnatal management and completely eradicate kernicterus. Except for strict adherence to guidelines, improvement could be achieved by clarifying the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HDFN. Several pharmacotherapeutic agents should be further researched as alternative treatment options in hyperbilirubinemia, including immunoglobulins, albumin, phenobarbital, metalloporphyrins, zinc, clofibrate and prebiotics. Larger trials are warranted to evaluate EPO, folate and vitamin E in neonates. Long-term follow-up studies are needed in HDFN, especially on thrombocytopenia, iron overload and cholestasis.

  6. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisaru S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Silviu GrisaruUniversity of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS. In most cases (90%, this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures.Keywords: hemolytic, uremic, E.coli O157:H7, thrombotic, microangiopathy, complement system

  7. [Microalbuminuria in pediatric patients diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos C, María Paz; Del Salas, Paulina; Zambrano, Pedro O

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by the presence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney failure. It is the leading cause of acute kidney failure in children under 3 years of age. A variable number of patients develop proteinuria, hypertension, and chronic renal failure. To evaluate the renal involvement in pediatric patients diagnosed with HUS using the microalbumin/creatinine ratio. Descriptive concurrent cohort study that analyzed the presence of microalbuminuria in patients diagnosed with HUS between January 2001 and March 2012, who evolved without hypertension and normal renal function (clearance greater than 90ml/min using Schwartz formula). Demographic factors (age, sex), clinical presentation at time of diagnosis, use of antibiotics prior to admission, and need for renal replacement therapy were evaluated. Of the 24 patients studied, 54% were male. The mean age at diagnosis was two years. Peritoneal dialysis was required in 45%, and 33% developed persistent microalbuminuria. Antiproteinuric treatment was introduce in 4 patients, with good response. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range 6 months to 11 years). The serum creatinine returned to normal in all patients during follow up. The percentage of persistent microalbuminuria found in patients with a previous diagnosis of HUS was similar in our group to that described in the literature. Antiproteinuric treatment could delay kidney damage, but further multicenter prospective studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  8. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  9. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: New Developments in Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Boyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome is defined by the characteristic triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. In children, most cases of HUS are caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, especially Escherichia coli O157:H7. Common vehicles of transmission include ground beef, unpasteurized milk, and municipal or swimming water. Shiga-toxin-associated HUS is a main cause of acute renal failure in young children. Management remains supportive as there is at present no specific therapy to ameliorate the prognosis. Immediate outcome is most often favourable but long-term renal sequelae are frequent due to nephron loss. Atypical HUS represents 5% of cases. In the past 15 years, mutations in complement regulators of the alternative pathway have been identified in almost 60% of cases, leading to excessive complement activation. The disease has a relapsing course and more than half of the patients either die or progress to end-stage renal failure. Recurrence after renal transplantation is frequent.

  10. Hemolytic porcine intestinal Escherichia coli without virulence-associated genes typical of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  11. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    . Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. RESULTS: We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all...

  12. An outbreak of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp equisimilis in a hospital in the south of Brazil Surto causado por Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp equisimilis, em um hospital, no Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Stadnick Lauth de Almeida Torres

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The beta-hemolytic group C streptococci (Lancefield's group has been considered an emergent human pathogen, showing an important role as an opportunist agent, being responsible for nosocomial infections and outbreaks. This study is reporting the first outbreak of nosocomial infection caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in Brazil. From January, 2002, to December, 2004, S. equisimilis was isolated in 67/207 (32.37% samples from secretions of patients' infected wounds, interned at the Hospital of Sanitary Dermatology in the State of Paraná (HDSPR. The prevalence of this microorganism increased from 11/42 (26.19% in 2002, 14/65 (21.54% in 2003 to 42/100 (42.00% in 2004. This increase was statistically significant (p=0.024, and this microorganism became the most frequently isolated in these patients, overtaking the rates of isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The S. equisimilis grew in pure culture, as a unique microorganism, in six samples (2.9% out of 207. Fresh feces of 15 animals (horses and sheep living in the proximities of the hospital were also examined and three of them positive for S. equisimilis. The biochemical profile of the strains isolated from the patients and from the animals was the same. These animals might have been the source of the dissemination of the outbreak in the hospital. New studies will be necessary to confirm the genetic relationship between the strains isolated from patients and animals.O estreptococo beta-hemolítico do grupo C de Lancefield tem sido considerado patógeno humano emergente, mostrando importante papel como agente oportunista, implicado algumas vezes em infecções hospitalares e surtos. Este estudo está relatando o primeiro surto de infecção hospitalar causado pelos Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis no Brasil. De janeiro de 2002 a dezembro de 2004, isolou-se S. equisimilis em 67/207 (32,37% das amostras de secreções de lesões de feridas coletadas de pacientes

  13. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-01-29

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Beta spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryak, P.; Zderadicka, J.; Plch, J.; Kokta, L.; Novotna, P.

    1977-01-01

    For the purpose of beta spectrometry, a semiconductor spectrometer with one Si(Li) detector cooled with liquid nitrogen was designed. Geometrical detection efficiency is about 10% 4 sr. The achieved resolution for 624 keV conversion electrons of sup(137m)Ba is 2.6 keV (FWHM). A program was written in the FORTRAN language for the correction of the deformation of the measured spectra by backscattering in the analysis of continuous beta spectra. The method permits the determination of the maximum energy of the beta spectrum with an accuracy of +-5 keV. (author)

  15. Susceptibility to β-lactams in β-hemolytic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonofiglio, Laura; Gagetti, Paula; García Gabarrot, Gabriela; Kaufman, Sara; Mollerach, Marta; Toresani, Inés; Vigliarolo, Laura; von Specht, Martha; Lopardo, Horacio A

    2018-03-13

    Group A (GAS), B (GBS), C (GCS) and G (GGS) β-hemolytic streptococci are important human pathogens. They cause infections of different severity and frequency. Nowadays, after 70 years of use, penicillin is still universally active against GAS, GCS and GGS. However, therapeutic failures have been recorded in 2-28% of pharyngitis cases (median: 12%) attributable to different causes. By contrast, some GBS with reduced susceptibility to penicillin have been described, especially in Japan. In this group of bacteria, it is important to highlight that confirmation by reference methods is mandatory when decreased susceptibility to penicillin is suspected as well as checked for the detection of the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome-associated Encephalopathy Successfully Treated with Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Takashi; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-11-01

    The encephalopathy that occurs in association with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli), has a high mortality rate and patients sometimes present sequelae. We herein describe the case of a 20-year-old woman who developed encephalopathy during the convalescent stage of HUS caused by E.coli O26. Hyperintense lesions were detected in the pons, basal ganglia, and cortex on diffusion-weighted brain MRI. From the onset of HUS encephalopathy, we treated the patient with methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy alone. Her condition improved, and she did not present sequelae. Our study shows that corticosteroids appear to be effective for the treatment of some patients with HUS encephalopathy.

  17. Beta Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may not work as effectively for people of African heritage and older people, especially when taken without ... conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/beta-blockers/ART-20044522 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  18. Novel {beta}-Carboline Alkaloid from Peganum Harmala As Antibacterial Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Aziz, H G; Abdel Kader, S M; El-Sayed, M M; EL-Malt, E A; Shaker, E S [Chem. Dept., Fac. Agric., Minia Univ., Minia (Egypt)

    2011-07-01

    A novel {beta}-carboline alkaloid isolated from the aerial parts of Peganum harmala L. (Gen: Phyeophylaceae) have been characterized as l-thioformyl-8-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside-bis-2,3-dihydro-isopyridinopyrrol. It is one of {beta}-carboline alkaloids derivatives. The chemical structure was elucidated on the basis of elementary analysis and spectroscopic studies (UV, IR, {sup 1}H-NMR and MS). The isolated compound showed significant antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pyogenus.

  19. Rasburicase-induced Hemolytic Anemia in an Adolescent With Unknown Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Manzilat; Audino, Anthony N; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-01-01

    Rasburicase, used in the prevention and treatment of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), may cause hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Although routine screening for G6PD deficiency has been recommended, given the turnaround time for test results and the urgency to treat TLS, such screening may not be feasible. We report a case of rasburicase-induced hemolytic anemia without methemoglobinemia in an adolescent with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, TLS, and previously unrecognized G6PD deficiency. Previous reports of hemolytic anemia with rasburicase are reviewed, mechanisms discussed, and preventative strategies presented.

  20. Acute Bacterial Meningitis and Systemic Abscesses due to Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jourani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated abscesses due to group G β-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae were observed in a 57-year-old cirrhotic patient with the skin being the putative way of entry for the pathogen. S. dysgalactiae is a rare agent in human infections responsible for acute pyogenic meningitis. The mortality rate associated with S. dysgalactiae bacteraemia and meningitis may be as high as 50%, particularly in the presence of endocarditis or brain abscesses. In our patient, main sites of infections were meningitis and ventriculitis, spondylodiscitis, septic arthritis, and soft-tissue infections. In contrast, no endocarditis was evidenced. Cirrhosis-related immune suppression was considered as a pathophysiological cofactor for the condition. Fortunately, clinical status improved after long-term (3 months antimicrobial therapy.

  1. Recombination-deficient Streptococcus sanguis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneo-Moore, L.; Volpe, A.

    1985-01-01

    A UV-sensitive derivative was obtained from Streptococcus sanguis Challis. The organism could be transformed with a number of small streptococcal plasmids at frequencies equal to, or 1 logarithm below, the transformation frequencies for the parent organism. However, transformation with chromosomal DNA was greatly impaired in the UV-sensitive derivative

  2. Lung papillary adenocarcinoma complicated with paraneoplastic autoimmune hemolytic anemia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Limin; Wang, Huaquan; Qu, Wen; Fang, Fang; Dong, Qi-e; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged woman presented at our facility and was diagnosed after surgery with lung papillary adenocarcinoma. Seven years earlier, she had suffered from autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which was refractory. Following lung surgery, the AIHA was cured.

  3. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Pakshir

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species.

  4. A Rare Case; Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-jkb

    OpenAIRE

    İlknur Tolunay; Meral Oruç; Orkun Tolunay

    2015-01-01

    Jka and Jkb antibodies (Kidd blood group system) can cause acute and delayed type transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn. Jka and Jkb antibodies are seen after events like blood transfusions, pregnancy, abortion and curettage. Hemolytic disease of newborn related to Kidd-Jkb incompatibility is rare and mostly has a good prognosis. The patient was consulted to our department because of 20 hours of jaundice after birth. He was treated with intensive phot...

  5. Immunoglobulin transfusion in hemolytic disease of the newborn: place in therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mundy CA; Bhatia J

    2015-01-01

    Cynthia A Mundy, Jatinder Bhatia Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Georgia Regents University, Children's Hospital of Georgia, GA, USA Abstract: Hemolytic disease of the newborn continues to be a common neonatal disorder that requires a comprehensive understanding on the part of those caring for infants. Common treatments include hydration and phototherapy. Exchange transfusion is used in severe hemolytic disease, but infants undergoing this treatment are exposed to ...

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  7. [Contribution of blue-green pigments to hemolytic activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultural fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyzh, A É; Nikandrov, V N

    2011-01-01

    To assess the contribution of blue-green pigments of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to hemolytic activity of its cultural fluid. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Eight hospital strains and reference strain ATCC 15442 were used. Growth dynamics of strains as well as features of accumulation of hemolytic and phospholipase activity were studied. Purified samples of pyoverdin and pyocyanin were extracted by gel-chromatography and chloroform extraction methods. Hemolytic and lecitinase activities of the samples as well as effect of active oxygen scavengers and chelating agents on these activities were studied. Dynamics of accumulation of hemolytic activity significantly differed from that of phospholipase activity when strains were grown in liquid medium. Chromatographic separation of the pigments from cultural fluid supernatants sharply reduced its hemolytic activity. Purified samples of pyoverdin and pyocyanin were capable to lyse erythrocytes and chicken egg lecitin. These characteristics of the pigments were inhibited by nitroblue tetrazolium and sensitive to chelating agents. Conclusion. Pyoverdin and pyocyanin of pathogenic strains of P. aeruginosa are capable to lyse erythrocytes and suspension of purified chicken egg lecitin, they contribute to total hemolytic activity of pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas, which is not determined only by phospholipase C produced by microorganism. Lytic activity of the pigments is blocked by nitroblue tetrazolium and susceptible to some chelating agents. Apparently, this activity is mediated by superoxide radical and determined by presence of metals with transient valence in pigments' molecules.

  8. Intravenous Immunoglobulin G Treatment in ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn, is it Myth or Real?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beken, Serdar; Hirfanoglu, Ibrahim; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Altuntas, Nilgun; Unal, Sezin; Turan, Ozden; Onal, Esra; Ergenekon, Ebru; Koc, Esin; Atalay, Yildiz

    2014-03-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been used as a component of the treatment of hemolytic disease of the newborn. There is still no consensus on its use in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn routinely. The aim of this study is to determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with ABO incompatibility is necessary. One hundred and seventeen patients with ABO hemolytic disease and positive Coombs test were enrolled into the study. The subjects were healthy except jaundice. Infants were divided into two groups: Group I (n = 71) received one dose of IVIG (1 g/kg) and LED phototherapy whereas Group II (n = 46) received only LED phototherapy. One patient received erythrocyte transfusion in Group I, no exchange transfusion was performed in both groups. Mean duration of phototherapy was 3.1 ± 1.3 days in Group I and 2.27 ± 0.7 days in Group II (p hemolytic disease. Meticulus follow-up of infants with ABO hemolytic disease and LED phototherapy decreases morbidity. IVIG failed to show preventing hemolysis in ABO hemolytic disease.

  9. Whole-cell vaccine of Streptococcus agalactiae in Oreochromis sp. with immersion method

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    , Sukenda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of formalin-killed non-hemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae N14G and NK1 isolates whole-killed vaccine to prevent streptococcosis in tilapia. Ten fishes were reared in a tank 60x30x35 cm3 with an average body weight at 10.79±0.99 g. Fish was vaccinated through bath immersion at a concentration of 109 cfu/mL. Fish was subsequently challenged by intraperitonial injection of Streptococcus agalactiae 105 cfu/mL at 11 days post-vaccination. Parameters observed were survival, relative percent survival (RPS, total leukocyte, phagocytic activity, antibody titer, total erythrocyte, haemoglobin level, haematocrit level, dan water quality. Samplings were performed in day-0, 20, and 30 after vaccination. Both vaccines have shown higher survival (60% and RPS (40% when challenged with pathogenic Streptococcus N14G isolates than other treatments. Based on RPS percentage observed, those vaccine were still not sufficiently effective to combat S. agalactiae infection. Keywords: tilapia, bath immersion, Streptococcus agalactiae, whole-cell vaccine ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengevaluasi efikasi vaksin formalin-killed cell Streptococcus agalactiae tipe isolat nonhemolitik N14G dan NK1 se utuh yang diberikan melalui perendaman dalam mencegah penyakit streptococcosis pada ikan nila. Ikan nila yang digunakan memiliki bobot 10,79±0,99 g, dipelihara sebanyak sepuluh ekor dalam akuarium ukuran 60x30x35 cm3. Ikan divaksinasi dengan metode perendaman dengan dosis 109 cfu/mL. Uji tantang dilakukan pada hari ke-11 pascavaksinasi dengan dosis 105 cfu/mL. Parameter yang diamati meliputi sintasan (SR, sintasan relatif/relative percent survival (RPS, total leukosit, aktivitas fagositik, titer antibodi, total eritrosit, kadar hemoglobin, kadar hematokrit, dan kualitas air. Pengamatan parameter dilakukan pada hari ke-0, ke-10, ke-20, dan ke-30. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan perlakuan kedua vaksin yang diinfeksi

  10. Gene repertoire evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes inferred from phylogenomic analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

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    Tristan Lefébure

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46% of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86% in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus and (ii the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB.

  11. Adhesion of streptococcus rattus and streptococcus mutans to metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branting, C.; Linder, L.E.; Sund, M.-L.; Oden, A.; Wiatr-Adamczak, E.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of Streptococcus rattus BHT and Streptococcus mutans IB to metal specimens of amalgam, silver, tin and copper was studied using (6- 3 H) thymidine labeled cells. In the standard assay the metal specimens were suspended by a nylon thread in an adhesion solution containing a chemically defined bacterial growth medium (FMC), sucrose, and radiolabeled bacteria. Maximum amounts of adhering bacteria were obtained after about 100 min of incubation. Saturation of the metal specimens with bacteria was not observed. Both strains also adhered in the absence of sucrose, indicating that glucan formation was not necessary for adhesion. However, in the presence of glucose, adhesion was only 26-45% of that observed in the presence of equimolar sucrose. Sucrose-dependent stimulation of adhesion seemed to be due to increased cell-to-cell adhesion capacity. Isolated radiolabeled water-insoluble and water-soluble polysaccharides produced from sucrose by S. rattus BHT were not adsorbed to the metal surfaces. (author)

  12. Adhesion of streptococcus rattus and streptococcus mutans to metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branting, C.; Linder, L.E.; Sund, M.-L.; Oden, A.; Wiatr-Adamczak, E.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of Streptococcus rattus BHT and Streptococcus mutans IB to metal specimens of amalgam, silver, tin and copper was studied using (6-/sup 3/H) thymidine labeled cells. In the standard assay the metal specimens were suspended by a nylon thread in an adhesion solution containing a chemically defined bacterial growth medium (FMC), sucrose, and radiolabeled bacteria. Maximum amounts of adhering bacteria were obtained after about 100 min of incubation. Saturation of the metal specimens with bacteria was not observed. Both strains also adhered in the absence of sucrose, indicating that glucan formation was not necessary for adhesion. However, in the presence of glucose, adhesion was only 26-45% of that observed in the presence of equimolar sucrose. Sucrose-dependent stimulation of adhesion seemed to be due to increased cell-to-cell adhesion capacity. Isolated radiolabeled water-insoluble and water-soluble polysaccharides produced from sucrose by S. rattus BHT were not adsorbed to the metal surfaces.

  13. Alloimmunization in autoimmune hemolytic anemia patient: The differential adsorption approach

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    Ravi C Dara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients of β-thalassemia major are dependent on regular blood transfusions for their entire lifetime. Development of antibodies against red blood cell (RBC antigen which may be alloantibody or autoantibody, several times as a result of frequent red cell component transfusions, further complicates the subsequent transfusion therapy. Among the autoantibodies, warm-reactive autoantibodies are commoner and interfere in the pretransfusion testing. These RBC autoantibodies present in patient's serum potentially react with all the cells of antibody identification panel giving “pan-reactive” picture and making alloantibody identification complex. In this report, we present our approach in a thalassemia patient who presented with warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia, low hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl, and three significant alloantibodies (anti-D, anti-S, and anti-Jk b which were masked by pan-reactive warm autoantibody(s. Differential adsorption was used to unmask underlying alloantibodies. We suggest that differential adsorption procedure is an effective and efficient method for autoantibody adsorption, detection, and identification of masked alloantibody(s, especially in patients with low hemoglobin and history of recent blood transfusion.

  14. [Wavelength Selection in Hemolytic Evaluation Systems with Spectrophotometry Detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Su, Baochang; Ye, Xunda; Luo, Man

    2016-04-01

    Spectrophotometry is a simple hemolytic evaluation method commonly used in new drugs,biomedical materials and blood products.It is for the quantitative analysis of the characteristic absorption peaks of hemoglobin.Therefore,it is essential to select the correct detection wavelength when the evaluation system has influences on the conformation of hemoglobin.Based on the study of changes in the characteristic peaks over time of the hemolysis supernatant in four systems,namely,cell culture medium,phosphate buffered saline(PBS),physiological saline and banked blood preservation solution,using continuous wavelength scanning,the selections of detection wavelength were proposed as follows.In the cell culture medium system,the wavelength of 415 nm should be selected within 4h;,near 408 nm should be selected within 4~72h.In PBS system,within 4h,541 nm,577nm or 415 nm should be selected;4~72h,541 nm,577nm or near 406 nm should be selected.In physiological saline system,within 4h,414 nm should be selected;4~72h,near 405 nm should be selected;within 12 h,541nm or 577 nm could also be selected.In banked blood preservation solution system,within 72 h,415nm,540 nm or 576 nm should be selected.

  15. ADAMTS13 Gene Mutations in Children with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoung Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Kim, Nam Keun

    2011-01-01

    We investigated ADAMTS13 activity as well as the ADAMTS13 gene mutation in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Eighteen patients, including 6 diarrhea-negative (D-HUS) and 12 diarrhea-associated HUS (D+HUS) patients, were evaluated. The extent of von Willebrand factor (VWF) degradation was assayed by multimer analysis, and all exons of the ADAMTS13 gene were PCR-amplified using Taq DNA polymerase. The median and range for plasma activity of ADAMTS13 in 6 D-HUS and 12 D+HUS patients were 71.8% (22.8-94.1%) and 84.9% (37.9-119.9%), respectively, which were not statistically significantly different from the control group (86.4%, 34.2-112.3%) (p>0.05). Five ADAMTS13 gene mutations, including 2 novel mutations [1584+2T>A, 3941C>T (S1314L)] and 3 polymorphisms (Q448E, P475S, S903L), were found in 2 D-HUS and one D+HUS patients, which were not associated with deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity. Whether these mutations without reduced ADAMTS13 activity are innocent bystanders or predisposing factors in HUS remains unanswered. PMID:21488199

  16. A Rare Association of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia with Gastric Adenocarcinoma

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    Kavita Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old male presented with dyspnea on exertion for at least two months. He also complained of progressive dysphagia and weight loss of 35 pounds over the last eight months. Initial blood tests showed hemoglobin of 6.1 g/dl, reticulocytes count of 19.7%, total bilirubin of 3.2 mg/dl, lactate dehydrogenase of 600 U/L, and haptoglobin of less than 8 mg/dl, and direct Coombs test was positive for warm immunoglobulin G. The impression was autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. The evaluation of dysphagia with esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a single irregular 4 cm malignant appearing ulcerated mass at the incisura angularis of the stomach. The mass was confirmed as adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Diagnostic laparoscopy was positive for malignant cells and he was diagnosed with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Other extensive workup to determine the etiology of AIHA was negative (described in detail below. Surgery was deferred primarily due to metastasis of cancer. Initially, hemoglobin was stabilized by intravenous methylprednisolone, high dose immunoglobulins, and packed red blood cell transfusions. After a few weeks, hemoglobin started trending down again. The patient was weaned off steroids and paradoxically IgG-mediated autohemolysis was controlled with the initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Our case highlights a rare occurrence of AIHA in association with gastric adenocarcinoma.

  17. [Detection and analysis of ABO Hemolytic disease in newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao-Xia; Dong, Qing-Song

    2014-10-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the incidence and the model of ABO hemolytic disease in newborn (ABO-HDN) and the results of the three hemolysis test, so as to provide the evidences for clinical diagnosis and therapy. A total of 227 cases of maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility from January 2013 to October 2013 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University were enrolled in the study. The ABO blood group of newborn and mother was detemined and three hemolysis tests (direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test, RBC antibody release test) were performed. The results indicated that in 227 cases of ABO incompatible pregnancies,186 cases were ABO-HDN (81.94%). There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies (P > 0.05). The positive ratio of direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test and RBC antibody release test were 59.14% (110/186), 84.78% (156/186) and 94.62% (176/186) respectively. It is concluded that the incidence of ABO-HDN is high. The main models of ABO-HDN were O-A and O-B. There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies. Three hemolysis tests are high sensitivity and are helpful in early diagnosis and early treatment of HDN.

  18. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures.

  19. Streptococcus oligofermentans inhibits Streptococcus mutans in biofilms at both neutral pH and cariogenic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, X.; de Soet, J.J.; Tong, H.; Gao, X.; He, L.; van Loveren, C.; Deng, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Periodontal Streptococcus Constellatus and Streptococcus Intermedius Clinical Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius in subgingival dental plaque biofilms may contribute to forms of periodontitis that resist treatment with conventional mechanical root debridement/surgical procedures and may additionally participate in some extraoral infections.

  1. The enhanced pneumococcal LAMP assay: a clinical tool for the diagnosis of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Dong Wook Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease in developed and developing countries. We studied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP technique to assess its suitability for detecting S. pneumoniae nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an improved LAMP assay targeting the lytA gene (Streptococcus pneumoniae [Sp] LAMP. The analytical specificity of the primers was validated by using 32 reference strains (10 Streptococcus and seven non-Streptococcus species plus 25 clinical alpha-hemolytic streptococcal strains, including four S. pneumoniae strains and 21 other strains (3 S. oralis, 17 S. mitis, and one Streptococcus species harboring virulence factor-encoding genes (lytA or ply. Within 30 minutes, the assay could detect as few as 10 copies of both purified DNA and spiked CSF specimens with greater sensitivity than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The linear determination range for this assay is 10 to 1,000,000 microorganisms per reaction mixture using real-time turbidimetry. We evaluated the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the Sp LAMP assay using 106 randomly selected CSF specimens from children with suspected meningitis in Korea, China and Vietnam. For comparison, CSF specimens were also tested against conventional PCR and culture tests. The detection rate of the LAMP method was substantially higher than the rates of PCR and culture tests. In this small sample, relative to the LAMP assay, the clinical sensitivity of PCR and culture tests was 54.5% and 33.3%, respectively, while clinical specificity of the two tests was 100%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared to PCR, Sp LAMP detected S. pneumoniae with higher analytical and clinical sensitivity. This specific and sensitive LAMP method offers significant advantages for screening patients on a population basis and for diagnosis in clinical settings.

  2. Complement Mutations in Diacylglycerol Kinase-ε–Associated Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Chinchilla, Daniel; Pinto, Sheila; Hoppe, Bernd; Adragna, Marta; Lopez, Laura; Justa Roldan, Maria Luisa; Peña, Antonia; Lopez Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by vascular endothelial damage caused by complement dysregulation. Consistently, complement inhibition therapies are highly effective in most patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Recently, it was shown that a significant percentage of patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome carry mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, an intracellular protein with no obvious role in complement. These data support an alternative, complement-independent mechanism leading to thrombotic microangiopathy that has implications for treatment of early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. To get additional insights into this new form of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, the diacylglycerol kinase-ε gene in a cohort with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was analyzed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Eighty-three patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (<2 years) enrolled in the Spanish atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome registry between 1999 and 2013 were screened for mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε. These patients were also fully characterized for mutations in the genes encoding factor H, membrane cofactor protein, factor I, C3, factor B, and thrombomodulin CFHRs copy number variations and rearrangements, and antifactor H antibodies. Results Four patients carried mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, one p.H536Qfs*16 homozygote and three compound heterozygotes (p.W322*/p.P498R, two patients; p.Q248H/p.G484Gfs*10, one patient). Three patients also carried heterozygous mutations in thrombomodulin or C3. Extensive plasma infusions controlled atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrences and prevented renal failure in the two patients with diacylglycerol kinase-ε and thrombomodulin mutations. A positive response to plasma infusions and complement inhibition treatment was also observed in the patient with concurrent diacylglycerol

  3. Complement mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε-associated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Chinchilla, Daniel; Pinto, Sheila; Hoppe, Bernd; Adragna, Marta; Lopez, Laura; Justa Roldan, Maria Luisa; Peña, Antonia; Lopez Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-09-05

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by vascular endothelial damage caused by complement dysregulation. Consistently, complement inhibition therapies are highly effective in most patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Recently, it was shown that a significant percentage of patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome carry mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, an intracellular protein with no obvious role in complement. These data support an alternative, complement-independent mechanism leading to thrombotic microangiopathy that has implications for treatment of early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. To get additional insights into this new form of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, the diacylglycerol kinase-ε gene in a cohort with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was analyzed. Eighty-three patients with early-onset atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (<2 years) enrolled in the Spanish atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome registry between 1999 and 2013 were screened for mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε. These patients were also fully characterized for mutations in the genes encoding factor H, membrane cofactor protein, factor I, C3, factor B, and thrombomodulin CFHRs copy number variations and rearrangements, and antifactor H antibodies. Four patients carried mutations in diacylglycerol kinase-ε, one p.H536Qfs*16 homozygote and three compound heterozygotes (p.W322*/p.P498R, two patients; p.Q248H/p.G484Gfs*10, one patient). Three patients also carried heterozygous mutations in thrombomodulin or C3. Extensive plasma infusions controlled atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrences and prevented renal failure in the two patients with diacylglycerol kinase-ε and thrombomodulin mutations. A positive response to plasma infusions and complement inhibition treatment was also observed in the patient with concurrent diacylglycerol kinase-ε and C3 mutations. Data suggest that complement dysregulation influences

  4. Anti-hemolytic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Solenostemon Monostachyus (P.Beauv.) Briq. leaves in 2-butoxyethanol-hemolytic induced rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osikoya, Iyanuoluwa Olubukola; Afolabi, Israel Sunmola; Rotimi, Solomon Oladapo; Okafor, Adaobi Mary-Joy

    2018-04-01

    Traditional medicine is largely used to sustain global health requirements. Determining the biological activities of Solenostemon monostachyus is essential to provide a platform for treating hemolytic diseases. The methanolic extract of the leaves was orally administered for 5 days at 150 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg of body weight doses to determine concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and the activities of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) of plasma in the kidney, spleen and liver of 2-butoxyethanol hemolytic-induced rats. A dose of 150 mg of extract/kg of body weight significantly increased (p<0.05) HO-1 in the kidney. COX-2 activity was significantly reduced (p<0.05) mainly in the kidney untreated hemolytic induced rats. All treatments significantly increased (p<0.05) TNF-α concentrations in the kidney and spleen. HO-1 gene expression was downregulated, indicating stress reduction in the liver, by an extract dose of 200 mg/kg of body weight and caffeic acid and was upregulated, indicating stress in the spleen, by an extract dose of 150-200 mg/kg of body weight. A dose of 200-250 mg of extract/kg of body weight resulted in relatively good anti-inflammatory properties, and may possess healing properties in patients with hemolytic related diseases.

  5. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

  6. Specific features of a neonatal period in infants following intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion for fetal hemolytic disease

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    A. V. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the characteristics of a neonatal period in infants following intrauterine blood transfusion for Rh-induced fetal hemolytic disease. It is shown that the early diagnosis and detection of the signs of fetal hemolytic disease, and intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion may prolong pregnancy, ensure the birth of a baby with normal anthropometric indicators, optimize his/her neonatal period and prognosis of severe hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn.

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy for significant hyperbilirubinemia in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miqdad, A M; Abdelbasit, O B; Shaheed, M M; Seidahmed, M Z; Abomelha, A M; Arcala, O P

    2004-09-01

    Although intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been reported in hyperbilirubinemia of Rh hemolytic disease, its use in ABO hemolytic disease has been reported in only a few studies. In our institute we have observed that almost 30% of babies with hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease required exchange transfusion. To determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease would reduce the need for exchange transfusion as a primary goal in these babies. This was a prospective study involving all newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to direct Coombs-positive ABO hemolytic disease. All healthy term babies with ABO hemolytic disease with positive direct Coombs test in the period between 2000 and 2002 were identified. Significant hyperbilirubinemia was defined as hyperbilirubinemia requiring phototherapy and/or rising by 8.5 micromol/l per h (0.5 mg/dl per h) or more to require exchange transfusion. Babies were randomly assigned into two groups: group 1 (study group) received phototherapy plus IVIG (500 mg/kg); and group 2 (control group) received phototherapy alone. Exchange transfusion was carried out in any group if at any time the bilirubin level reached 340 micromol/l (20 mg/dl) or more, or rose by 8.5 micromol/l per h (0.5 mg/dl per h) in group 2. A total of 112 babies were enrolled over 2 years, 56 in each group. Exchange transfusion was carried out in four babies in the study group, while 16 babies in the control group required exchange. Late anemia was not of concern in either group. No adverse effects related to IVIG administration were recorded. Administration of IVIG to newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia due to ABO hemolytic disease with positive direct Coomb's test reduces the need for exchange transfusion without producing immediate adverse effects.

  8. N-terminal amphipathic helix as a trigger of hemolytic activity in antimicrobial peptides: a case study in latarcins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyansky, Anton A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Vorontsova, Olga V; Samsonova, Olga V; Egorova, Natalya S; Krylov, Nicolay A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

    2009-07-21

    In silico structural analyses of sets of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are performed. Differences between hemolytic and non-hemolytic AMPs are revealed in organization of their N-terminal region. A parameter related to hydrophobicity of the N-terminal part is proposed as a measure of the peptide propensity to exhibit hemolytic and other unwanted cytotoxic activities. Based on the information acquired, a rational approach for selective removal of these properties in AMPs is suggested. A proof of concept is gained through engineering specific mutations that resulted in elimination of the hemolytic activity of AMPs (latarcins) while leaving the beneficial antimicrobial effect intact.

  9. Remodeling of the Streptococcus agalactiae transcriptome in response to growth temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Mereghetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To act as a commensal bacterium and a pathogen in humans and animals, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus, GBS must be able to monitor and adapt to different environmental conditions. Temperature variation is a one of the most commonly encountered variables. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the extent to which GBS modify gene expression in response to temperatures encountered in the various hosts, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome analysis of organisms grown at 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C. We identified extensive transcriptome remodeling at various stages of growth, especially in the stationary phase (significant transcript changes occurred for 25% of the genes. A large proportion of genes involved in metabolism was up-regulated at 30 degrees C in stationary phase. Conversely, genes up-regulated at 40 degrees C relative to 30 degrees C include those encoding virulence factors such as hemolysins and extracellular secreted proteins with LPXTG motifs. Over-expression of hemolysins was linked to larger zones of hemolysis and enhanced hemolytic activity at 40 degrees C. A key theme identified by our study was that genes involved in purine metabolism and iron acquisition were significantly up-regulated at 40 degrees C. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Growth of GBS in vitro at different temperatures resulted in extensive remodeling of the transcriptome, including genes encoding proven and putative virulence genes. The data provide extensive new leads for molecular pathogenesis research.

  10. Radiation resistance of a hemolytic micrococcus isolated from chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors on a highly radiation-resistant hemolytic micrococcus isolated from chicken meat were studied. NaCl tolerance and gamma radiation resistance of the cells were growth phase-related. The cells were resistant to injury from drying or freezing/thawing. Under certain conditions, cells in the frozen state required approximately 5 Mrad to inactivate 90% of the population; 0.2 Mrad injured an equivalent proportion. Survival curve of the cells heated at 60 0 C showed a unique pattern which was in three distinct phases. Heat-stressed cells were much more sensitive to radiation inactivation than unheated cells. When suspended in fresh m-Plate Count Broth (PCB), the injured cells repaired without multiplication during incubation at 32 0 C. The repair process in this bacterium, however, was slower compared to thermally injured organisms studied by other workers. An improved replica-plating technique, was devised for isolation of radiation-sensitive mutants of pigmented bacteria. A simple method to demonstrate radiation-inducible radiation resistance in microbial cells was developed. The new method required neither washing/centrifugation nor procedures for cell enumeration. Mutagenesis treatment of radiation-resistant micrococcal bacterium with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) followed by FPR and screening steps resulted in isolation of two radiation-sensitive mutants. The more sensitive mutant strain, designated as 702, was seven times as sensitive to gamma or UC radiation as the wild type. No apparent difference was observed between 702 and the wild type in (1) cell morphology, colonial morphology, and pigment production or (2) tolerance to NaCl, drying/storage, freezing/thawing, and heating. Sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment (for curing) of wild type did not result in isolation of a radiation-sensitive mutant

  11. Utilización de la penicilina en la infección extrameníngea por Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Amauri Lázaro Noda Albelo; Lázaro Arturo Vidal Tallet; Joan Iavier Vidal Casal; Leanet Hernández Álvarez

    2011-01-01

    La resistencia del Streptococcus pneumoniae a los antibióticos betalactámicos es relativa, y puede ser superada si se incrementa la dosis de esta clase de medicamentos. La definición de susceptibilidad y resistencia del Streptococcus pneumoniae se creó originalmente para predecir respuesta al tratamiento de la infección del sistema nervioso central. La infección fuera del sistema nervioso central por la mayoría de las cepas de S. pneumoniae responde a las dosis habituales de antibióticos beta...

  12. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni effect on the hemolytic potential of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansano, S; Rivas, A; Pina-Pérez, M C; Martinez, A; Rodrigo, D

    2017-06-05

    The effect of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni on the hemolytic potential of Listeria monocytogenes was studied by means of the assessment of the Listeriolysin O (LLO) production. The three factors under study, stevia concentration in the range [0-2.5] % (w/v), incubation temperature (10 and 37°C), and exposure time (0-65h) significantly affected (p≤0.05) the hemolytic activity of L. monocytogenes. Results showed that at the lower incubation temperature the hemolytic potential of the bacterium was significantly reduced, from 100% at 37°C to 8% at 10°C (after 65h of incubation) in unsupplemented substrate (0% stevia). Irrespective of the temperature, 10 or 37°C, supplementation of the medium with stevia at 2.5 % (w/v) reduced the bacterium's hemolytic activity by a maximum of 100%. Furthermore, the time of exposure to 2.5 % (w/v) stevia concentration was also a significant factor reducing the hemolytic capability of L. monocytogenes. The possibility of reducing the pathogenic potential of L. monocytogenes (hemolysis) by exposure to stevia should be confirmed in real food matrices, opening a research niche with a valuable future impact on food safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to multiple maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kara Beth; Rossi, Karen Q; Nagaraja, Haikady N; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether women with combinations of red blood cell antibodies are more likely to develop significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn than those with single antibodies. A retrospective exposure cohort study was conducted of pregnant women with red blood cell antibodies. The development of significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn was then compared between patients with single antibodies and those with multiple antibodies. Data analysis was limited to pregnancies delivering since the year 2000. Thirteen percent of the patients referred to our program had multiple red blood cell antibodies. Odds of developing significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn for patients with anti-Rh(D) combined with at least 1 additional red blood cell antibody were 3.65 times the odds for women with anti-Rh(D) antibodies in isolation (95% confidence interval, 1.84-7.33). In the setting of multiple antibodies including anti-Rh(D), Rh-positive fetuses/neonates have an increased odds of developing significant hemolytic disease even if the fetus is negative for the other corresponding red blood cell antigen. Women with multiple red blood cell antibodies are more likely to develop significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn than those with a single antibody especially in the presence of anti-(Rh)D. This pathophysiology may suggest a more aggressive immune response in women who develop more than 1 red blood cell antibody. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple lung abscesses caused by Streptococcus constellatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Rognoni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous descriptions of body abscesses produced by Streptococcus milleri group bacteria, lung abscesses caused by this group remain under-reported and the clinical and laboratory features have yet to be fully characterised. We present the case of a patient admitted with lung multiple abscesses produced by Streptococcus constellatus.

  15. Streptococcus suis meningitis, a poacher's risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halaby, T.; Hoitsma, E.; Hupperts, R.; Spanjaard, L.; Luirink, M.; Jacobs, J.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis infection is a zoonosis that has been mainly reported in pig-rearing and pork-consuming countries. The most common disease manifestation is meningitis, often associated with cochleovestibular signs. The causative agent is Streptococcus suis serotype 2, found as a commensal in the

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Sonani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct were high. This patient′s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT, antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2 nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4 th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  17. Anti-Mur as the most likely cause of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtary, Sara; Gikas, Anastasia; Glader, Bertil; Andrews, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Although rare in the United States, anti-Mur is relatively common in Southeast Asia and has been reported to have clinical significance in Chinese and Taiwanese populations. The infant was full term and the second child of a Chinese mother and Vietnamese father, presenting with jaundice. He was clinically diagnosed with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The direct antiglobulin test indicated that the infant's red blood cells were coated only with anti-IgG. Anti-Mur was identified in the maternal serum and the neonate's plasma. The father was found to be positive for the Mur antigen. The cause of the infant's hemolytic anemia was determined to be most likely anti-Mur. Since anti-Mur is implicated in causing hemolytic disease of the newborn, it is important to recognize this antibody more commonly found in Asian patients in the United States as the Mur+ phenotype has a higher prevalence in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  18. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without...... the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains......, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli....

  19. Intervention and Prevention of Hereditary Hemolytic Disorders in Two Ethnic Communities of Sundargarh District of Orissa, India: An Experience from KAP Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgir RS

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic disorders are important public health challenges in India. They cause a high degree of morbidity, mortality and fetal wastage in vulnerable communities. Tradition-bound-psychosocial influences are detrimental to the process of prevention. This study was designed to create awareness, motivate, and sensitize two major vulnerable tribal communities: Bhuyan and Kharia for hemoglobin and allied hemolytic disorders in addition to imparting prospective and retrospective genetic/marriage counseling. Bhuyan and Kharia tribal people in Orissa live in clusters practicing inter-village tribal endogamy and clan exogamy. For the present study, random sampling procedure for the selection of whole village was followed. Imparting of education, motivation and sensitization for carrier detection were carried out through IEC materials, holding interactive meetings and discussions at district, block and village levels. Both prospective and retrospective intervention and genetic/marriage counseling was done through the local PHC doctor. The pre- and post-intervention knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP studies were conducted. Tribal people were not knowing the signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease (2.1% and beta-thalassemia (1.0%, but after IEC, their knowledge was considerably improved (67.8%, 56.4%, respectively. Sickle cell patient needs treatment (37.6% like folic acid, blood transfusion, etc. Beta-thalassemia is disease causes bloodlessness and is a transfusion dependent (73.2%. All patients of thalassemia major or sickle cell disease have carrier parents and carriers do not suffer from any clinical ailments. After intervention, it was known that G-6-PD is an enzyme, which helps in glucose metabolism of red cells (76.4% and its hereditary deficiency causes hemolytic anemia, jaundice and black urination (73.8% in malaria cases when anti-malarials are administered. Methodical and prudent intervention and preventive strategies found

  20. Contribution of hly homologs to the hemolytic activity of Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Naoko; Fukamachi, Haruka; Arimoto, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a periodontal pathogen that requires iron for its growth. Although this organism has hemolytic activity, the precise nature of its hemolytic substances and their associated hemolytic actions are yet to be fully determined. In the present study, we identified and characterized several putative hly genes in P. intermedia ATCC25611 which appear to encode hemolysins. Six hly genes (hlyA, B, C, D, E, and hlyI) of P. intermedia were identified by comparing their nucleotide sequences to those of known hly genes of Bacteroides fragilis NCTC9343. The hlyA-E, and hlyI genes were overexpressed individually in the non-hemolytic Escherichia coli strain JW5181 and examined its contribution to the hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar plates. E. coli cells expressing the hlyA and hlyI genes exhibited hemolytic activity under anaerobic conditions. On the other hand, only E. coli cells stably expressing the hlyA gene were able to lyse the red blood cells when cultured under aerobic conditions. In addition, expression of the hlyA and hlyI genes was significantly upregulated in the presence of red blood cells. Furthermore, we found that the growth of P. intermedia was similar in an iron-limited medium supplemented with either red blood cells or heme. Taken together, our results indicate that the hlyA and hlyI genes of P. intermedia encode putative hemolysins that appear to be involved in the lysis of red blood cells, and suggest that these hemolysins might play important roles in the iron-dependent growth of this organism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  2. Renoscintigraphy in assessment of renal lesions in children after hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, P.; Marczak, E.; Romanowicz, G.; and others.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of renoscintigraphic examination in monitoring of patients after the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. 27 children mean 9 years the hemolytic-uremic syndrome underwent the complex of biochemical, ultrasound and renoscintigraphic examinations. The abnormal renoscintigraphic was seen in 85.1% of children, while the alternative test described the renal lesion in 29-66%. Renoscintigraphic examination seems to be the most sensitive in monitoring of remote sequel in patients after HUS. Those patients should undergone long-lasting observation, for the sake of possibility of development of renal insufficiency. (author). 14 refs

  3. Immunoglobulin transfusion in hemolytic disease of the newborn: place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundy CA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia A Mundy, Jatinder Bhatia Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Georgia Regents University, Children's Hospital of Georgia, GA, USA Abstract: Hemolytic disease of the newborn continues to be a common neonatal disorder that requires a comprehensive understanding on the part of those caring for infants. Common treatments include hydration and phototherapy. Exchange transfusion is used in severe hemolytic disease, but infants undergoing this treatment are exposed to many adverse effects. Intravenous immunoglobulin is a newer strategy that is showing promise in the treatment of the disease. This review discusses the current use and future expectations of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in newborns. Keywords: hyperbilirubinemia, ABO incompatibility, neonatal jaundice 

  4. Hemolytic and urease activities in vibrios isolated from fresh and frozen oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Albuquerque Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study aimed to survey the Vibrio microbiota of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae obtained from restaurants in Fortaleza, State of Ceará, Brazil, and to identify virulence factors. METHODS: The isolated vibrios were submitted to biochemical identification and were tested for hemolytic and urease activities. RESULTS: The isolated strains belonged to 13 species, with predominance of Vibrio mimicus. Of the strain isolates only from fresh samples, 20.5% and 2.8% showed hemolytic and urease activities, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the little-publicized claim that Vibrio species other than V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus can represent a health risk to public health.

  5. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    OpenAIRE

    Usman, Adiyyatu Sa?idu; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ramli, Noraida; Diggi, Sirajo A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting wit...

  6. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, C S; Suchitha, S; Manjunath, G V; Murthy, Srinivas

    2013-09-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive mother.

  7. Hemolytic Porcine Intestinal Escherichia coli without Virulence-Associated Genes Typical of Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:21965399

  8. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  9. Infective endocarditis caused by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus mitis in a combined immunocompromised patient: an autopsy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Natsuko; Ito, Makoto; Kuramae, Hitoshi; Inukai, Tomomi; Sakai, Akiyoshi; Okugawa, Masaru

    2013-04-01

    An autopsy case of infective endocarditis caused by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus mitis was described in a patient with a combination of factors that compromised immune status, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia, post-splenectomy state, prolonged steroid treatment, and IgA deficiency. The isolated S. mitis strain from blood culture was broadly resistant to penicillin, cephalosporins, carbapenem, macrolides, and fluoroquinolone. Recurrent episodes of bacterial infections and therapeutic use of several antibiotics may underlie the development of multidrug resistance for S. mitis. Because clinically isolated S. mitis strains from chronically immunocompromised patients have become resistant to a wide spectrum of antibiotics, appropriate antibiotic regimens should be selected when treating invasive S. mitis infections in these compromised patients.

  10. Very late-onset group B Streptococcus meningitis, sepsis, and systemic shigellosis due to interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jens C; Ghandil, Pegah; Chrabieh, Maya; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Creech, C Buddy

    2009-11-01

    We describe a child with very late-onset group B Streptococcus sepsis and meningitis, systemic shigellosis, and chronic osteomyelitis. Peripheral blood cells obtained from the patient and her brother did not respond to stimulation with either interleukin-1beta or lipopolysaccharide. Sequencing of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 gene revealed 2 novel mutations.

  11. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, C. Wim; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Rossen, John W. A.; van der Kuip, Martijn; van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E.

  12. Severe Hemolytic Jaundice in a Neonate with a Novel COL4A1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotaki, Seiichi; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hamabata, Takayuki; Kumakura, Akira; Shiota, Mitsutaka; Arai, Hiroshi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hata, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    We report our experience with a preterm infant with severe hemolytic jaundice who required exchange transfusion just after birth. The patient was negative for alloimmune hemolysis as a result of maternal-fetal blood type incompatibility, and tests for inherited defects in erythrocyte metabolism, membrane function, and hemoglobin synthesis were normal. We also performed a bone marrow examination, but could not identify the cause of hemolysis. The patient had several other complications, including porencephaly, epilepsy, elevated serum levels of creatine kinase, and persistent microscopic hematuria. Later, we detected a genetic mutation in COL4A1, which was recently found to be associated with hemolytic anemia. We therefore believe that all of the patient's clinical features, including hemolytic anemia, were due to the mutation in COL4A1. Genetic testing for COL4A1 mutations is recommended in neonates who exhibit hemolytic disease of unknown etiology, especially when other complications compatible with COL4A1-related disorders are present. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Hemolytic and cytotoxic properties of saponin purified from Holothuria leucospilota sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mozhgan; Parivar, Kazem; Baharara, Javad; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin; Asili, Javad

    2014-10-01

    Holothuroids (sea cucumbers) are members of the phylum echinodermata, which produce saponins. Saponins exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, we isolated the crude saponins from the body wall of the dominant Iranian species of sea cucumber, Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota). The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of saponins in the Persian Gulf H. leucospilota and study the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of these compounds. The body wall of sea cucumber was dried and powdered and the crude saponins were isolated using various solvents. The crude saponins were further purified by column chromatography using HP-20 resin. The foam test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), hemolytic assay, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of saponins. Cytotoxicity was analyzed using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. The foam test, hemolytic assay, and TLC supported the presence of saponin compounds in the 80% ethanol fraction of H. leucospilota. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the extract showed hydroxyl (-OH), alkyl (C-H), ether (C-O) and ester (-C=O) absorption characteristic of teriterpenoid saponins. The C-O-C absorption indicated glycoside linkages to the sapogenins. The crude saponin extracted from sea cucumber was cytotoxic to A549 cells. The 80% ethanol fraction of saponin isolated from H. leucospilota exhibited hemolytic activity and offers promise as an anti-cancer candidate.

  14. An international consensus approach to the management of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loirat, C.; Fakhouri, F.; Ariceta, G.; Besbas, N.; Bitzan, M.; Bjerre, A.; Coppo, R.; Emma, F.; Johnson, S.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Langman, C.B.; Lapeyraque, A.L.; Licht, C.; Nester, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Riedl, M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Walle, J. Vande; Vivarelli, M.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) emerged during the last decade as a disease largely of complement dysregulation. This advance facilitated the development of novel, rational treatment options targeting terminal complement activation, e.g., using an anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab). We review

  15. [Neonatal ABO incompatibility underlies a potentially severe hemolytic disease of the newborn and requires adequate care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senterre, T; Minon, J-M; Rigo, J

    2011-03-01

    ABO allo-immunization is the most frequent hemolytic disease of the newborn and ABO incompatibility is present in 15-25 % of pregnancies. True ABO alloimmunization occurs in approximately one out of 150 births. Intensity is generally lower than in RhD allo-immunization. We report on three cases showing that ABO allo-immunization can lead to severe hemolytic disease of the newborn with potentially threatening hyperbilirubinemia and complications. Early diagnosis and adequate care are necessary to prevent complications in ABO incompatibility. A direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of diagnosis and should be performed at birth on cord blood sampling in all group infants born to O mothers, especially if of African origin. Risk factor analysis and attentive clinical monitoring during the first days of life are essential. Vigilance is even more important for infants discharged before the age of 72 h. Every newborn should be assessed for the risk of developing severe hyperbilirubinemia and should be examined by a qualified healthcare professional in the first days of life. Treatment depends on the total serum bilirubin level, which may increase very rapidly in the first 48 h of life in cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn. Phototherapy and, in severe cases, exchange transfusion are used to prevent hyperbilirubinemia encephalopathy. Intravenous immunoglobulins are used to reduce exchange transfusion. Treatments of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn should be provided and performed by trained personnel in neonatal intensive care units. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfraz Saleemi

    2014-01-01

    Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

  17. Guideline for the investigation and initial therapy of diarrhea-negative hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariceta, G.; Besbas, N.; Johnson, S.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Licht, C.; Loirat, C.; Pecoraro, C.; Taylor, C.M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Vandewalle, J.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.

    2009-01-01

    This guideline for the investigation and initial treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is intended to offer an approach based on opinion, as evidence is lacking. It builds on the current ability to identify the etiology of specific diagnostic sub-groups of HUS. HUS in children is

  18. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies.

  19. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelie, H.; Baars, J. W.; Rodenhuis, S.; Van Dijk, M. A.; de Glas-Vos, C. W.; Thomas, B. L.; van Oers, R. H.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy intensification may lead to new forms of toxicity such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. METHODS: Three patients are described who developed this complication 4 to 6 months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell support. The literature on this subject is

  20. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Christiansen, I; Harbo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...

  1. Sigma E regulators control hemolytic activity and virulence in a shrimp pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimonsri Rattanama

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Vibrio are important marine and aquaculture pathogens. Hemolytic activity has been identified as a virulence factor in many pathogenic vibrios including V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi and V. vulnificus. We have used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the hemolytic activity of shrimp-pathogenic V. harveyi strain PSU3316. Out of 1,764 mutants screened, five mutants showed reduced hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar and exhibited virulence attenuation in shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei. Mutants were identified by comparing transposon junction sequences to a draft of assembly of the PSU3316 genome. Surprisingly none of the disrupted open reading frames or gene neighborhoods contained genes annotated as hemolysins. The gene encoding RseB, a negative regulator of the sigma factor (σ(E, was interrupted in 2 out of 5 transposon mutants, in addition, the transcription factor CytR, a threonine synthetase, and an efflux-associated cytoplasmic protein were also identified. Knockout mutations introduced into the rpoE operon at the rseB gene exhibited low hemolytic activity in sheep blood agar, and were 3-to 7-fold attenuated for colonization in shrimp. Comparison of whole cell extracted proteins in the rseB mutant (PSU4030 to the wild-type by 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed 6 differentially expressed proteins, including two down-regulated porins (OmpC-like and OmpN and an upregulated protease (DegQ which have been associated with σ(E in other organisms. Our study is the first report linking hemolytic activity to the σ(E regulators in pathogenic Vibrio species and suggests expression of this virulence-linked phenotype is governed by multiple regulatory pathways within the V. harveyi.

  2. Occurrence, isolation and DNA identification of Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Streptococcus thermophilus involved in Algerian ... among reference, and wild strains of S. thermophilus and for their differentiation from Enterococcus spp. ..... Isolation and characterization of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp.

  3. streptococcus pneumoniae , klebsiella pneumoniae proteus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2-20mm) on Streptococcus pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris when compared to the ... The result from this preliminary study suggests that the plant contains active compounds that .... Veterinary and Medical Laboratory Technology, Vom,. Jos.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary tract infection in pedeatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Sapin, Jeanne; De Parscau, Loïc; Pougnet, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in children are most often lung infections or meningitis. Urinary tract infections are much rarer. We present the case of a urinary tract infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The clinical picture was classical. The urine culture showed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine (10 4 UFC/mL; with 2 × 10 4 leucocytes/mL). The literature mentions a few cases of such infections. In some studies, the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine of children is less than 1%. Those children mostly present abnormalities of urinary tract. In our case, urinary ultrasound scan have shown the presence of an ectopic kidney in this child. The discussion between the clinician and the biologist has contributed to the discovery of this renal anomaly.

  5. Aortitis with bacteraemia by Streptococcus equi Zooepidemicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancur, Carlos Alberto; Giraldo, Juan David; Saldarriaga Eugenia Lucia

    2005-01-01

    Infections by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus occur in animals. In human beings these infections are generally accidental, and few cases have been reported. We present the case of a 56-year-old male, a butcher, who presented with abdominal pain. Aneurismatic dilatation of the aorta below the renal arteries was documented by CT-scanning. A purulent collection and arterial ulceration were found during surgery; Streptococcus equi zooepidemicus was isolated from the collection and from blood cultures

  6. Streptococcus didelphis sp. nov., a streptococcus with marked catalase activity isolated from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) with suppurative dermatitis and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurangirwa, F R; Teitzel, C A; Cui, J; French, D M; McDonough, P L; Besser, T

    2000-03-01

    beta-Haemolytic, catalase-positive, Gram-positive cocci that formed chains in broth media but did not react with Lancefield group antisera were isolated from skin lesions, spleen, liver and lungs of nine opossums, including eight from a research colony and one from a wildlife rehabilitation organization. The isolates had vigorous catalase activity that was retained on initial passage on non-blood-containing media, but this activity was lost in subsequent passages. The use of standard phenotypic tests did not lead to satisfactory identification of these organisms beyond the genus level, even if the aberrant catalase reaction was not considered. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolates was most similar (96%) to Streptococcus dysgalactiae, but distinct from that species as 16S rRNA gene similarity of different strains of S. dysgalactiae was > 99%. Characterization of biochemical reactions and cell-wall fatty acid profiles also revealed significant differences between the opossum isolates and all other known Streptococcus spp., thus it is proposed as a new species with the name Streptococcus didelphis, sp. nov. The type strain is ATCC 700828T.

  7. Recommended conservation of the names Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus rattus, Streptococcus cricetus, and seven other names included in the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names. Request for an opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    With reference to the first Principle of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria, which emphasizes stability of names, it is proposed that the original names Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus rattus, Streptococcus cricetus, Erwinia ananas, Eubacterium tarantellus, Lactobacillus sake......, Nitrosococcus oceanus, Pseudomonas betle, Rickettsia canada and Streptomyces rangoon, all included in the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names, be conserved. Request for an Opinion...

  8. Beta Emission and Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-13

    Bremsstrahlung is continuous radiation produced by beta particles decelerating in matter; different beta emitters have different endpoint energies; high-energy betas interacting with high-Z materials will more likely produce bremsstrahlung; depending on the data, sometimes all you can say is that a beta emitter is present.

  9. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel role for the Streptococcus pneumoniae toxin pneumolysin in the assembly of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R; Ludewick, Herbert P; Howery, Kristen E; Sakai, Fuminori; Yi, Hong; Harvey, Richard M; Paton, James C; Klugman, Keith P; Vidal, Jorge E

    2013-09-10

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important commensal and pathogen responsible for almost a million deaths annually in children under five. The formation of biofilms by S. pneumoniae is important in nasopharyngeal colonization, pneumonia, and otitis media. Pneumolysin (Ply) is a toxin that contributes significantly to the virulence of S. pneumoniae and is an important candidate as a serotype-independent vaccine target. Having previously demonstrated that a luxS knockout mutant was unable to form early biofilms and expressed less ply mRNA than the wild type, we conducted a study to investigate the role of Ply in biofilm formation. We found that Ply was expressed in early phases of biofilm development and localized to cellular aggregates as early as 4 h postinoculation. S. pneumoniae ply knockout mutants in D39 and TIGR4 backgrounds produced significantly less biofilm biomass than wild-type strains at early time points, both on polystyrene and on human respiratory epithelial cells, cultured under static or continuous-flow conditions. Ply's role in biofilm formation appears to be independent of its hemolytic activity, as S. pneumoniae serotype 1 strains, which produce a nonhemolytic variant of Ply, were still able to form biofilms. Transmission electron microscopy of biofilms grown on A549 lung cells using immunogold demonstrated that Ply was located both on the surfaces of pneumococcal cells and in the extracellular biofilm matrix. Altogether, our studies demonstrate a novel role for pneumolysin in the assembly of S. pneumoniae biofilms that is likely important during both carriage and disease and therefore significant for pneumolysin-targeting vaccines under development. The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (commonly known as the pneumococcus) is commonly carried in the human nasopharynx and can spread to other body sites to cause disease. In the nasopharynx, middle ear, and lungs, the pneumococcus forms multicellular surface-associated structures called biofilms

  11. Functional variation of the antigen I/II surface protein in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, FC; Assev, S; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Scheie, AA

    Although Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus mutans are regarded as members of the commensal microflora of the body, S. intermedius is often associated with deep-seated purulent infections, whereas S. mutans is frequently associated with dental caries. In this study, we investigated the

  12. Relation of Growth of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris to Amino Acid Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.

    The maximum specific growth rate of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris on synthetic medium containing glutamate but no glutamine decreases rapidly above pH 7. Growth of these organisms is extended to pH values in excess of 8 in the presence of glutamine. These results can be explained

  13. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Renal thrombotic microangiopathy caused by interferon beta-1a treatment for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahe J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Julien Mahe,1 Aurélie Meurette,2 Anne Moreau,3 Caroline Vercel,2 Pascale Jolliet1,4 1Clinical Pharmacology Department, Institute of Biology, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 2Clinical Nephrology and Immunology Department, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 3Laboratory of Pathology, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 4EA 4275 Biostatistics, Pharmacoepidemiology and Subjective Measures in Health Sciences, University of Nantes, Nantes, France Abstract: Interferon beta-1a is available as an immunomodulating agent for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Common side effects include flu-like symptoms, asthenia, anorexia, and administration site reaction. Kidney disorders are rarely reported. In this study we describe the case of a woman who has been undergoing treatment with interferon beta-1a for multiple sclerosis for 5 years. She developed a hemolytic-uremic syndrome with intravascular hemolysis in a context of severe hypertension. A kidney biopsy showed a thrombotic microangiopathy. This observation highlights an uncommon side effect of long-term interferon beta-1a therapy. Pathophysiological mechanisms leading to this complication might be explained by the antiangiogenic activity of interferon. Keywords: thrombotic microangiopathy, interferon beta, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, antiangiogenic activity

  15. Case Study of Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Subsequent Postpartum Beta-Lactam Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Mary Ann; Ross, Mary Frances; Kershner, Wendy; Searing, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Universal screening for maternal group B Streptococcus (GBS) in the prenatal period has led to administration of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP). Although IAP decreased the rate of early neonatal GBS disease, exposure of childbearing women to penicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics has increased. Beta-lactam-induced anaphylaxis in the breastfeeding woman during the postpartum period illustrates risk factors for beta-lactam allergy and anaphylaxis. Treatment and nursing implications for this adverse reaction are suggested. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  16. Isolation, characterization, and investigation of surface and hemolytic activities of a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan-Noude, Gholamreza; Housaindokht, Mohammadreza; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigeh Fazly

    2005-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 was grown in BHIB medium supplemented with Mn2+ for 96 h at 37 degrees C in a shaker incubator. After removing the microbial biomass, a lipopeptide biosurfactant was extracted from the supernatant. Its structure was established by chemical and spectroscopy methods. The structure was confirmed by physical properties, such as Hydrophile-Lipophile Balance (HLB), surface activity and erythrocyte hemolytic capacity. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) and erythrocyte hemolytic capacity of the biosurfactant were compared to those of surfactants such as SDS, BC (benzalkonium chloride), TTAB (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide) and HTAB (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide). The maximum hemolytic effect for all surfactants mentioned was observed at concentrations above cmc. The maximum hemolytic effect of synthetic surfactants was more than that of the biosurfactant produced by B. subtilis ATCC 6633. Therefore, biosurfactant would be considered a suitable surface-active agent due to low toxicity to the membrane.

  17. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis and carriage rate among Egyptian children: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Ghany, Shereen Mohamed; Abdelmaksoud, Abeer Ahmed; Saber, Sally Mohamed; Abd El Hamid, Dalia Hosni

    2015-01-01

    Improper prescription of antibiotics for treatment of acute pharyngitis predisposes to emergence of a carrier state and antibiotic-resistant strains of group A streptococci (GAS). We sought to identify the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of group A streptococci among Egyptian children with acute pharyngitis compared with asymptomatic children. Case-control study conducted from September 2013 to August 2014 at a pediatric outpatient clinic in Egypt. Throat swabs were collected from children with acute pharyngitis and from asymptomatic children. We evaluated the accuracy of McIsaac scores and the rapid antigen detection test (RADT) for diagnosis of GAS pharyngitis with throat culture as a reference test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of GAS isolates was done by the disc diffusion method. Of 142 children with acute pharyngitis (cases) and 300 asymptomatic children (controls) (age range, 4-16 years), GAS pharyngitis was diagnosed in 60/142 children (42.2%); 48/300 (16%) were found to be carriers. All GAS isolates in the case group were sensitive to penicillin; however, an MIC90 (0.12 micro g/mL) for penicillin is high and an alarming sign. The resistance rate to macrolides was 70% with the cMLSB phenotype in 65.1%. The sensitivities and specificities were 78.3% and 73.2% for McIsaac score of >=4 and 81.1% and 93.9% for RADT, respectively. GAS isolates in the control group were 100% sensitive to penicillin, while 12.5% and 37.5% were resistant to macrolides and tetracycline, respectively. An increased MIC90 for GAS isolates to penicillin is an alarming sign. A high frequency of resistance to macrolides was also observed.

  18. Human milk oligosaccharides inhibit growth of group B Streptococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Ann E; Autran, Chloe A; Szyszka, Alexandra; Escajadillo, Tamara; Huang, Mia; Godula, Kamil; Prudden, Anthony R; Boons, Geert-Jan; Lewis, Amanda L; Doran, Kelly S; Nizet, Victor; Bode, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in newborns, typically acquired vertically during childbirth secondary to maternal vaginal colonization. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) have important nutritional and biological activities

  19. Streptococcus agalactiae: a vaginal pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, A N; Palermos, J; Kantzanou, M; Maniatis, N A; Christodoulou, C; Legakis, N J

    1996-03-01

    The significance of Streptococcus agalactiae as an aetiological agent in vaginitis was evaluated. A total of 6226 samples from women who presented with vaginal symptoms was examined. The presence of >10 leucocytes/high-power field (h.p.f.) was taken to be the criterion of active infection. S. agalactiae was isolated from 10.1% of these samples. The isolation rates of other common pathogens such as Candida spp., Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas spp. were 54.1%, 27.2% and 4.2%, respectively, in the same group of patients. In contrast, the isolation rates of these micro-organisms in the group of patients who had no infection (S. agalactiae was isolated, it was the sole pathogen isolated (83%) and its presence was associated with an inflammatory response in 80% of patients. Furthermore, the relative risk of vaginal infection with S. agalactiae (2.38) in patients with purulent vaginal discharge was greater than that of Candida spp. infection (1.41) and lower than that of Trichomonas spp. infection (8.32). These data suggest that S. agalactiae in symptomatic women with microscopic evidence of inflammation should be considered a causative agent of vaginitis.

  20. Parvovirus B19-triggered acute hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia in a child with Evans syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELPIS MANTADAKIS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19 is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Case report. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thromocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Conclusion: Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present with reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  1. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Mamoune

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  2. A case of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome as an early manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Kyun Han

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children younger than 4 years and is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. HUS associated with diarrheal prodrome is usually caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 or by Shigella dysenteriae, which generally has a better outcome. However, atypical cases show a tendency to relapse with a poorer prognosis. HUS has been reported to be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in children. The characteristics and the mechanisms underlying this condition are largely unknown. In this study, we describe the case of an 11-year-old boy in whom the diagnosis of ALL was preceded by the diagnosis of atypical HUS. Thus, patients with atypical HUS should be diagnosed for the possibility of developing ALL.

  3. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kara B; Scrape, Scott R; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse.

  4. Successful Management of a Rare Cause of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome With Eculizumab in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alparslan, Caner; Yavaşcan, Önder; Kasap Demir, Belde; Atmiş, Bahriye; Karabay Bayazit, Aysun; Leblebisatan, Göksel; Öncel, Elif P; Alaygut, Demet; Mutlubaş, Fatma; Aksu, Nejat

    2018-03-23

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. It very rarely coexists with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging before, simultaneously, or after the diagnosis has been made, and management of the patient may be difficult. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with HUS and initially managed by hemodialysis (HD). Thereafter, HUS progressed, and neurological findings developed. The patient was treated with eculizumab, agressive blood pressure control, and antiepileptic drugs. At the fifth month of follow-up, the patient was diagnosed with acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia with fever, bone pain, hepatosplenomegaly, and pancytopenia. After initiation of ALL treatment, he had no episodes of HUS, despite cessation of eculizumab. In conclusion, eculizumab may be a treatment of choice to prevent further systemic damage in recurrent HUS episodes of patients with borderline changes in the bone marrow until ALL is constantly diagnosed.

  5. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and hypertensive crisis post dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervin Tri Hadianto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS clinically manifests as acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Acute renal failure with oliguria, hypertension, and proteinuria usually develops in affected patients.1,2 In children under 15 years of age, typical HUS occurs at a rate of 0.91 cases per 100,000 population.3 The initial onset of this disease usually happens in children below 3 years of age. Incidence is similar in boys and girls. Seasonal variation occurs, with HUS peaking in the summer and fall. In young children, spontaneous recovery is common. In adults, the probability of recovery is low when HUS is associated with severe hypertension.2

  6. Recurrent atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome after renal transplantation: treatment with eculizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Latzke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare entity. It is characterized by a thrombotic microangiopathy (nonimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure, with a typical histopathology of thickening of capillary and arteriolar walls and an obstructive thrombosis of the vascular lumen. The syndrome is produced by a genetic or acquired deregulation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, with high rates of end stage renal disease, post-transplant recurrence, and high mortality. Mutations associated with factor H, factor B and complement C3 show the worst prognosis. Even though plasma therapy is occasionally useful, eculizumab is effective both for treatment and prevention of post-transplant recurrence. We describe here an adult case of congenital aHUS (C3 mutation under preventive treatment with eculizumab after renal transplantation, with neither disease recurrence nor drug-related adverse events after a 36-months follow-up.

  7. Parvovirus B19-triggered Acute Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in a Child with Evans Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikidou, Panagiota; Grapsa, Anastassia; Bezirgiannidou, Zoe; Chatzimichael, Athanassios; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2018-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19) is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with the presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  8. Hemolytic and Cytotoxic Properties of Saponin Purified from Holothuria leucospilota Sea Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Soltani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holothuroids (sea cucumbers are members of the phylum echinodermata, which produce saponins. Saponins exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, we isolated the crude saponins from the body wall of the dominant Iranian species of sea cucumber, Holothuria leucospilota (H. leucospilota. The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of saponins in the Persian Gulf H. leucospilota and study the hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of these compounds. Methods: The body wall of sea cucumber was dried and powdered and the crude saponins were isolated using various solvents. The crude saponins were further purified by column chromatography using HP-20 resin. The foam test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC, hemolytic assay, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR confirmed the presence of saponins. Cytotoxicity was analyzed using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay on A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. Results: The foam test, hemolytic assay, and TLC supported the presence of saponin compounds in the 80% ethanol fraction of H. leucospilota. The infrared (IR spectrum of the extract showed hydroxyl (-OH, alkyl (C-H, ether (C-O and ester (–C=O absorption characteristic of teriterpenoid saponins. The C-O-C absorption indicated glycoside linkages to the sapogenins. The crude saponin extracted from sea cucumber was cytotoxic to A549 cells. Conclusion: The 80% ethanol fraction of saponin isolated from H. leucospilota exhibited hemolytic activity and offers promise as an anti-cancer candidate.

  9. Proteolytic activity and cooperative hemolytic effect of dermatophytes with different species of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakshir, K; Mohamadi, T; Khodadadi, H; Motamedifar, M; Zomorodian, K; Alipour, S; Motamedi, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Globally, dermatophytes are the most common filamentous group of fungi causing cutaneous mycoses. Dermatophytes were shown to secrete a multitude of enzymes that play a role in their pathogenesis. There is limited data on co-hemolytic (CAMP-like) effect of different bacterial species on dermatophyte species. In this study, we sought to the evaluate exoenzyme activity and co-hemolytic effect of four bacteria on clinical dermatophytes isolated from patients in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 clinical dermatophyte species were isolated from patients suffering dermatophytosis and identified by conventional methods. Hemolytic activity was evaluated with Columbia 5% sheep blood agar. Proteolytic activity was determined by plate clearance assay method, using gelatin 8% agar. CAMP-like factor was evaluated with four bacteria, namely, S. areus, S. saprophyticus, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae. Fisher's exact test was run for statistical analysis. Results: T. mentagrophytes was the most predominant agent (27 [32.1%]) followed by T. verrucosum(20 [23.8%]), T. tonsurans (10 [11.9%]), Microsporum canis (7 [8.3%]), T. rubrum (6 [7.1%]), E. floccosum (6 [7.1%]), M. gypseum (5 [6%]), and T. violaceum (3[3.6%]). The most common clinical area of dermatophytosis was the skin. All the isolates expressed the zone of incomplete alpha hemolysis. All the isolates had CAMP- positive reaction with S. aureus and the other bacteria were CAMP-negative. All the isolates expressed proteolytic activity and no significant differences were noted among diverse genera of dermatophytes and severities of proteolytic activity. Conclusion: This study indicated that hemolysin and proteolytic enzymes potentially play a role in dermatophyte pathogenesis and S. aureus could be considered as a main bacterium for creation of co-hemolytic effect in association with dermatophyte species. PMID:28959790

  10. Report of a case with Hodgkin's lymphoma, tuberculosis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    OpenAIRE

    TUĞCU, Deniz; KEBUDİ, Rejin; ZÜLFİKAR, Bülent; AYAN, İnci; GÖRGÜN, Ömer; AĞAN, Mehmet; SOMER, Alper; AKINCI, Ferhan

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been described in association with malignancies including Hodgkin's disease (HD). In this article, a patient with diagnoses of H D, tuberculosis and hemolytic anemia is reported. Both tuberculosis and HD may present with similar symptoms and signs, and one of the diagnoses may be overlooked. The physicians should be aware of the simultaneous occurrence of both of these diseases when they are faced with initial therapeutic failure, during care of H D and tuberculosis patients.

  11. Anticardiolipin antibodies in classic pediatric hemolytic-uremic syndrome: a possible pathogenic role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, L G; Olavarría, F; Elgueta, M; Moya, P; Mezzano, S

    1998-01-01

    Anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies have been associated with thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and an increased risk of thrombosis in different vascular locations, even in the absence of lupus. The classic hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a postinfectious acute renal failure characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and the presence of widespread glomerular thrombosis in the kidney, with pathogenic mechanisms that remain to be identified. In order to establish the frequency of aCL antibodies in this syndrome and to identify a possible role in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, 17 patients were studied during the reactant phase of the disease looking for an association between the presence of aCL antibodies (isotypes IgG, IgA and IgM) and the main clinical variables of the syndrome. In 8 patients IgG aCL was present, 2 patients had IgM aCL, and 1 had IgA antibodies on the solid-phase ELISA aCL assays, but no association could be demonstrated with the clinical variables studied. Although it might correspond to an epiphenomenon related to the triggering intestinal infection, a pathogenic role cannot be discarded and additional studies should be performed.

  12. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: Current trends and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Sabita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of hemolytic disease of the newborn has changed over the last few decades. With the implementation of Rhesus D immunoprophylaxis, hemolytic disease due to ABO incompatibility and other alloantibodies has now emerged as major causes of this condition. Though in developing countries, anti D is still a common antibody in pregnant women, many Asian countries have identified alloantibodies other than anti D as a cause of moderate-severe hemolytic disease. The most concerned fact is that, some of these have been described in Rh D positive women. It appears that universal antenatal screening in all pregnant women needs to be initiated, since Rh D positive women are just as likely as D negative women to form alloantibodies. Many developed nations have national screening programs for pregnant women. This is necessary to ensure timely availability of antigen negative blood and reduce effects on the newborn. Although universal screening seems justified, the cost and infrastructure required would be immense. Developing countries and under resourced nations need to consider universal antenatal screening and frame guidelines accordingly.

  13. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: Current trends and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Ravneet; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of hemolytic disease of the newborn has changed over the last few decades. With the implementation of Rhesus D immunoprophylaxis, hemolytic disease due to ABO incompatibility and other alloantibodies has now emerged as major causes of this condition. Though in developing countries, anti D is still a common antibody in pregnant women, many Asian countries have identified alloantibodies other than anti D as a cause of moderate-severe hemolytic disease. The most concerned fact is that, some of these have been described in Rh D positive women. It appears that universal antenatal screening in all pregnant women needs to be initiated, since Rh D positive women are just as likely as D negative women to form alloantibodies. Many developed nations have national screening programs for pregnant women. This is necessary to ensure timely availability of antigen negative blood and reduce effects on the newborn. Although universal screening seems justified, the cost and infrastructure required would be immense. Developing countries and under resourced nations need to consider universal antenatal screening and frame guidelines accordingly. PMID:21572705

  14. [A case of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Dia antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Min; Im, Sun Ju; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Eun Yup; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2007-10-01

    Here we report a severe case of hemolytic anemia of the newborn with kernicterus caused by anti-Di(a) antibody. A full term male infant was transferred due to hyperbilirubinemia on the third day of life. Despite single phototherapy, the baby's total bilirubin had elevated to 30.1 mg/dL. After exchange transfusion, total bilirubin decreased to 11.45 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the infant's red cells was positive. The maternal and infant's sera showed a negative reaction in routine antibody detection tests, but were positive in Di(a) panel cells. The frequency of the Di(a) antigen among the Korean population is estimated to be 6.4-14.5%. Anti-Di(a) antibody could cause a hemolytic reaction against transfusion or hemolytic disease of the newborn. We suggest the need for reagent red blood cell panels to include Di(a) antigen positive cells in antibody identification test for Korean.

  15. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting with severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, while the other had moderate anemia and unconjugated hyperbilrubinemia. Although both the neonates were treated by phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin, one of them received double volume exchange transfusion. Conclusion: There appeared to be an increase in the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by Rh antibodies other than anti-D. In this case report, both patients presented with anemia and hyperbilirubinemia but were successfully treated, with a favorable outcome.

  16. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweidan AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander J Sweidan,1,2 Adam K Brys,3 David D Sohn,1,2 Milan R Sheth4 1University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, St Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, USA; 3School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Long Beach Memorial Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. Keywords: hypereosinophilia, eosinophils, myeloproliferative disorder, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leukemia

  17. Dangerous drug interactions leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome following lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissis Haralabos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report our experience of a rather uncommon drug interaction, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Methods Two consecutive cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome were diagnosed in our service. In both patients the use of macrolides in patients taking Tacrolimus, resulted in high levels of Tacrolimus. Results The first patient was a 48 years old female with Bilateral emphysema. She underwent Single Sequential Lung Transplantation. She developed reperfusion injury requiring prolonged stay. Tacrolimus introduced (Day 51. The patient remained well up till 5 months later; Erythromycin commenced for chest infection. High Tacrolimus levels and a clinical diagnosis of HUS were made. She was treated with plasmapheresis successfully. The second case was a 57 years old female with Emphysema & A1 Antithrypsin deficiency. She underwent Right Single Lung Transplantation. A2 rejection with mild Obliterative Bronchiolitis diagnosed 1 year later and she switched to Tacrolimus. She was admitted to her local Hospital two and a half years later with right middle lobe consolidation. The patient commenced on amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Worsening renal indices, high Tacrolimus levels, hemolytic anemia & low Platelets were detected. HUS diagnosed & treated with plasmapheresis. Conclusions There are 21 cases of HUS following lung transplantation in the literature that may have been induced by high tacrolimus levels. Macrolides in patients taking Cyclosporin or Tacrolimus lead to high levels. Mechanism of action could be glomeruloconstrictor effect with reduced GFR increased production of Endothelin-1 and increased Platelet aggregation.

  18. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule....... pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S...... of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is the basis for successful vaccines against infections caused by this important pathogen. Contrasting with previous assumptions, this study showed that expression of capsular polysaccharides by the same genetic mechanisms is a general property of closely related species...

  19. Consideraciones sobre elaislamiento en exudados vaginales de Streptococcus morbillorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. F. Egido

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available De el estúdio de 195 exudados vaginales enviados por el Servicio de Ginecologia de este hospital, durante el período 1988-1990, hemos seleccionado aquellos en los que el cultivo fue positivo para estreptococos, 58 (30% de los cuales 26 (44.8% correspondia a Streptococcus morbillorum, 9 (15.5% a Gardnerella vaginalis, 5 (8.6% a Enterococcus faecalis-durans, y a Streptococcus agalactiae, 3 (5.1% a Streptococcus mitis y Streptococcus mitis, 2 (3-4% a Streptococcus bovis y Streptococcus cremoris y 1 (1.7% a Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus equinus y Strptococcus sanguis II respectivamente. En todos los casos se observo antecedentes de actuacción medico- quirurjica en el tracto genital, y en el 52.8% de los casos fuô concomitante con el diagnostico clinico-micologico de candidiasis vaginal. La ideittificaccion bacteriologica se realizo mediante el sistema API 20 STREP (sistema api bioMêríeux GmbH, Nütingen, Alemania dando un patron tipico ("excelente identificacción" para el Streptococcus morbillorum.We have tested 195 vaginal secretions sent by Gynecology Service of this hospital between the years 1988 - 1990. We achieved positive culture for streptococci in 58 (30% of these cultures, 26 (44.8% corresponding to Streptococcus morbillorum 9 (15.5%, to Gardnerella vaginalis 5 (8.6%, to Enterococcus faecalis-durans and to Streptococcus agalactiae, 3 (5.1 % to Streptococcus mitis and milleri 2 (3-4%, to Streptococcus bovis and cremoris, and 1 (1.7% to Streptococcus salivarius, equinus and sanguis II respectively. We previously found that 52.8% of these patients were positive for vaginal candidiasis. The bacteriological identification done by the API 20 STREP System (bioMerieux GmbH, Nútingen, Germanyprovides a typical pattern ("good identification" for the Streptococcus morbillorum.

  20. Protective efficiency of an inactivated vaccine against Streptococcus iniae in olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Yong-Uk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus iniae is a causative agent of hemorrhagic septicemia in olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, in Korea, resulting in serious economic losses. As a preventive measure, M VAC INIAE (Mastuken, Japan was prepared from the S. iniae F2K strain and tested against the SI-36 strain prevalent on flounder fish farms on Jeju Island, Korea. F2K had a serotype of 38 (− and SI-36 38 (+. The vaccine recognized both serotypes. It showed a very high effective immune response against S. iniae; the challenge test using the S. iniae SI-36 strain resulted in a relative percent survival (RPS of 85.7-87.0% 2 weeks after vaccination and 71.0-80.0% 6 months after vaccination. Field vaccination and clinical challenge tests were performed at local Jeju aquafarms with S. iniae SI-36. These showed significantly reduced cumulative mortality when compared to the control group with RPS rates that ranged between 71-80%. Hence, the present study suggests that this vaccine showed a significant immune response against S. iniae and could be applied in commercial aquafarms as a therapeutic agent against β-hemolytic streptococcosis in cultured P. olivaceus.

  1. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  2. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  3. Beta-haemolytic streptococci in farmed Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, from Sullana-Piura, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yessica Ortega A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This investigation aimed to study the presence of Streptococcus spp. in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus from fish farm located in Sullana-Piura, Peru. Materials and methods. 150 fish with clinical signs of streptococcal disease were sampled, and the bacterium isolation was performed on blood agar, correlated to histopathological lesions description and molecular confirmation by real-time PCR. Results. The necropsy revealed exophthalmia, hyphema, congestion and/or haemorrhagic meninges, ascites, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and diffuse haemorrhagic zones throughout the body. 102 isolated positives (54 tilapias to Streptococcus spp. were identified in the microbiological analysis (prevalence of 26%, the brain was the organ with the highest percentage of this bacteria (34.31%, and 19 isolates were beta-haemolytic (18.63% with prevalence of 10.12%. Fish beta-haemolytic streptococci presented epicarditis, perisplenitis and chronic meningitis, panophthalmitis, coagulative necrosis of skeletal muscle and granulomas formation. In the confirmatory test by real-time PCR, any positive tilapia to S. iniae was obtained. The results were analysed using a stochastic simulation of beta distribution using @Risk program uncertainty, reporting an average prevalence of 0.66% in sick tilapias. Conclusions. The analysed fishes were positive to bacteria of the genus Streptococcus, which confirms its presence in the fish farm. However, 19 isolates were beta-haemolytic, and the presence of S. iniae was not positive to the limit prevalence of 2.7% in real-time PCR.

  4. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Beta Thalassemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Beta Thalassemia What's in this ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Print en español Beta talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  5. Oral Campylobacter Species Involved in Extraoral Abscess: a Report of Three Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiang Y.; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.; Rice, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Oral Campylobacter species are rarely reported to cause extraoral infections. Here we present three cases of extraoral abscess caused by an oral Campylobacter sp. and a Streptococcus sp. The Campylobacter species were all isolated anaerobically and identified by sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The cases included a breast abscess caused by Campylobacter rectus and a non-group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in a patient with lymphoma, a liver abscess caused by Campylobacter curvus and an alpha-hemolytic streptococcus in a patient with complicated ovarian cancer, and a postobstructive bronchial abscess caused by C. curvus and group C beta-hemolytic Streptococcus constellatus in a patient with lung cancer. The abscesses were drained or resected, and the patients were treated with antibiotics with full resolution of the lesions. The C. curvus cases are likely the first reported infections by this organism, and the C. rectus case represents the second such reported extraoral infection. PMID:15872299

  6. Distinct Biological Potential of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wenning; Tan, Mui Fern; Old, Lesley A.; Paterson, Ian C.; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis are pioneer colonizers of dental plaque and important agents of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE). To gain a greater understanding of these two closely related species, we performed comparative analyses on 14 new S. gordonii and 5 S. sanguinis strains using various bioinformatics approaches. We revealed S. gordonii and S. sanguinis harbor open pan-genomes and share generally high sequence homology and number of core genes including virule...

  7. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    Few issues are more important for finance practice than the computation of market betas. Existing approaches compute market betas using historical data. While these approaches differ in terms of statistical sophistication and the modeling of the time-variation in the betas, they are all backward......-looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  8. Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from oral cavities of elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masanori; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-09-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped organisms were isolated from elephant oral cavities. The isolates were tentatively identified as streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two isolates (NUM 6304(T) and NUM 6312) were related most closely to Streptococcus salivarius with 96.8 % and 93.1 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and the RNA polymerase β subunit encoding gene (rpoB), respectively, and to Streptococcus vestibularis with 83.7 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates (NUM 6306(T) and NUM 6318) were related most closely to S. vestibularis with 97.0 % and 82.9 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively, and to S. salivarius with 93.5 % similarity based on the rpoB gene. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, these isolates are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6304(T) = JCM 19287(T) = DSM 27382(T)) and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6306(T) = JCM 19288(T) = DSM 27513(T)) are proposed. © 2014 IUMS.

  9. Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov., isolated from raw camel milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Zaina; Amar, Mohamed; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; El Farricha, Omar; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Two catalase- and oxidase-negative Streptococcus-like strains, LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T), were isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing assigned these bacteria to the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus rupicaprae 2777-2-07(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbour (95.9% and 95.7% similarity, respectively). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the two strains was 96.7%. Although strains LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T) shared a DNA-DNA hybridization value that corresponded to the threshold level for species delineation (68%), the two strains could be distinguished by multiple biochemical tests, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes and by their MALDI-TOF MS profiles. On the basis of these considerable phenotypic and genotypic differences, we propose to classify both strains as novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27682(T)  = CCMM B831(T)) and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27684(T)  = CCMM B833(T)) are proposed. © 2014 IUMS.

  10. Factors associated with colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with schooling and presence chronic diseases. ... Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of serious community-acquired infections such as ... large number of individuals are still suffering from infections caused by these bacteria, especially ... samples of children with severe pneumonia (Nantanda et al., 2008).

  11. Streptococcus suis meningitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; de Gans, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We present four patients with Streptococcus suis meningitis identified during a 3.5-year prospective surveillance study in the Netherlands. All cases were associated with exposure to pigs. Patients presented with classic symptoms and signs of bacterial meningitis. Outcome was characterized by severe

  12. STREPTOCOCCUS: A WORLDWIDE FISH HEALTH PROBLEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are important emergent pathogens that affect many fish species worldwide, especially in warm-water regions. In marine and freshwater systems, these Gram-positive bacteria cause significant economic losses, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars annually. ...

  13. Detection and quantification of Streptococcus pneumoniae from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for quantitative detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae from clinical respiratory specimens. Initially, 184 respiratory specimens from patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) (n = 129) and 55 cases with hospital associated ...

  14. Antibacterial activity of Euphorbia hirta against Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation was conducted to determine the in-vitro effect of aqueous, ethanol and methanol crude extracts of Euphorbia hirta at concentrations ranging from 10mg/ml – 100mg/ml against three pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris) using cup plate method.

  15. Dyrkningsnegativ Streptococcus pneumoniae endokarditis diagnosticeret med polymerasekaedereaktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Vedby; Kemp, Michael; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    2008-01-01

    A 60-year old man was admitted with sepsis and meningitis of unknown aetiology. Underlying aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed by echocardiography and severe insufficiency led to aortic valve replacement. Application of broad-range PCR to cusp tissue revealed a DNA product, and a diagnosis of...... of Streptococcus pneumoniae endocarditis was obtained by DNA sequencing....

  16. NEW VIRULENCE FACTORS OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Peter Wilhelmus Maria; Bootsma, Jeanette Hester; Burghout, Pieter Jan; Kuipers, Oscar; Bijlsma, Johanna Jacoba Elisabeth; Kloosterman, Tomas Gerrit; Andersen, Christian O.

    2011-01-01

    The present invention provides proteins/genes, which are essential for survival, and consequently, for virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in vivo, and thus are ideal vaccine candidates for a vaccine preparation against pneumococcal infection. Further, also antibodies against said protein(s) are

  17. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  18. Prevalence of Complement-Mediated Cell Lysis-like Gene (sicG) in Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Isolates From Japan (2014-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takashi; Fujita, Tomohiro; Shibayama, Akiyoshi; Tsuyuki, Yuzo; Yoshida, Haruno

    2017-07-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE; a β-hemolytic streptococcus of human or animal origin) infections are emerging worldwide. We evaluated the clonal distribution of complement-mediated cell lysis-like gene (sicG) among SDSE isolates from three central prefectures of Japan. Group G/C β-hemolytic streptococci were collected from three institutions from April 2014 to March 2016. Fifty-five strains (52 from humans and three from animals) were identified as SDSE on the basis of 16S rRNA sequencing data.; they were obtained from 25 sterile (blood, joint fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid) and 30 non-sterile (skin-, respiratory tract-, and genitourinary tract-origin) samples. emm genotyping, multilocus sequence typing, sicG amplification/sequencing, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of sicG-positive strains were performed. sicG was detected in 30.9% of the isolates (16 human and one canine) and the genes from the 16 human samples (blood, 10; open pus, 3; sputum, 2; throat swab, 1) and one canine sample (open pus) showed the same sequence pattern. All sicG-harboring isolates belonged to clonal complex (CC) 17, and the most prevalent emm type was stG6792 (82.4%). There was a significant association between sicG presence and the development of skin/soft tissue infections. CC17 isolates with sicG could be divided into three subtypes by RAPD analysis. CC17 SDSE harboring sicG might have spread into three closely-related prefectures in central Japan during 2014-2016. Clonal analysis of isolates from other areas might be needed to monitor potentially virulent strains in humans and animals. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  19. Use of recombinant erythropoietin for the management of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn of a K0 phenotype mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoura, Antonia; Korakaki, Eftychia; Hatzidaki, Eleftheria; Saitakis, Emmanuel; Maraka, Sofia; Papamastoraki, Isabella; Matalliotakis, Emmanuel; Foundouli, Kaliopi; Giannakopoulou, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Very few people do not express any Kell antigens on their red blood cells (K0 phenotype). They can be immunized by transfusion or pregnancy and develop antibodies against Kell system antigens. These maternal antibodies can cause severe hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn, as a result of the suppression of erythropoiesis and hemolysis. Multiple intrauterine transfusions in the management of severe hemolytic disease have been shown to cause erythropoietic suppression as well. Recombinant erythropoietin has been successfully used in the management of late anemia of infants with Rh hemolytic disease and in 1 case of KEL1 (Kell)-associated hemolytic disease. The authors present the case of severe hemolytic disease of a newborn due to KEL5 (Ku) isoimmunization of his K0 phenotype mother. Regular intrauterine transfusions were performed to manage the severe fetal anemia (Hb 3 g/dL). A male infant was born at the 36th week of gestation having normal hemoglobin (15.8 g/dL) and developed only mild hyperbilirubinemia. On the 15th day of life, the infant's hematocrit had fallen to 27.3%, with low reticulocyte count and low erythropoietin level. The infant was managed successfully with recombinant erythropoietin.

  20. Cholestasis in neonates with red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease: incidence, risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; Rath, Mirjam E A; Lindenburg, Irene T M; Oepkes, Dick; van Zwet, Erik W; Walther, Frans J; Lopriore, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Etiology of cholestatic liver disease in neonates with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) has been associated with iron overload due to intrauterine red cell transfusions (IUTs). Data on the incidence and severity of cholestasis in neonates with HDN are scarce, and little is known about pathogenesis, risk factors, neonatal management and outcome. To evaluate incidence, risk factors, management and outcome of cholestasis in neonates with red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease. All (near-) term neonates with HDN due to red cell alloimmunization admitted to our center between January 2000 and July 2010 were included in this observational study. Liver function tests (including conjugated bilirubin) were routinely performed in the neonatal period. We recorded the presence of cholestasis, investigated several potential risk factors and evaluated the management and outcome in affected neonates. A total of 313 infants with red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease treated with or without IUTs were included. The incidence of cholestasis was 13% (41/313). Two risk factors were independently associated with cholestasis: treatment with at least one IUT (OR 5.81, 95% CI 1.70-19.80, p = 0.005) and rhesus D type of alloimmunization (OR 4.66, 95% CI 1.05-20.57, p = 0.042). Additional diagnostic tests to investigate possible causes of cholestasis were all negative. In 5 infants (12%), supportive medical and nutritional therapy was started, and one neonate required iron chelation therapy. Cholestasis occurs in 13% of neonates with HDN due to red cell alloimmunization, and it is independently associated with IUT treatment and rhesus D type of alloimmunization. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Zinc-induced hemolytic anemia caused by ingestion of pennies by a pup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, K.S.; Jain, A.V.; Inglesby, H.B.; Clarkson, W.D.; Johnson, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    A 4-month-old Pomeranian pup was examined because of anorexia, salivation, and persistent vomiting. Initial laboratory testing revealed marked hemolytic anemia with spherocytosis. Survey abdominal radiography revealed 4 metal objects which, when removed by gastrotomy, were identified as pennies. Of 4 pennies, 3 were minted since 1983 and were heavily pitted over the surface and rim. Partially digested pennies were composed of a copper-plated high zinc concentration alloy. Further laboratory testing indicated a marked increase in serum zinc concentration in the pup (28.8 mg/L), confirming metal toxicosis. Serum zinc concentrations decreased during recovery

  3. [Historical stages of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Argentina (1964-2009)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardo, Marcela

    2012-10-01

    The aim is to present an historical time frame of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) in Argentina. From a public policy approach, the history of the disease is analyzed as an object of health policy and seeks to contribute in understanding the multiple dimensions of illness. As a medical and scientific issue, as a social problem and a matter of health policy, the article describes three phases ranging from its discovery up to the national program of HUS adopted in 2009. This article aims to provide an overview of developments in biomedical knowledge and the emergence of the issue in both social and political problem.

  4. Molecular characterization and multidisciplinary management of Gerbich hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Rebecca N; Gourri, Elise; Gassner, Christoph; Banez-Sese, Grace; Salam, Abdus; Denomme, Gregory A; Yang, Elizabeth

    2018-06-01

    Gerbich (Ge) antigens are high frequency red cell antigens expressed on glycophorin C (GYPC) and glycophorin D. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to Gerbich antibody is rare and presents a clinical challenge, as Gerbich negative blood is scarce. We report a case of HDFN due to maternal Ge3 negative phenotype and anti-Ge3 alloimmunization, successfully managed by transfusion of maternal blood. Molecular testing revealed that the mother has homozygous deletion of exon 3 of GYPC, the father is homozygous wildtype for GYPC, and the infant is obligate heterozygote expressing Ge3. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Shigella sonnei and hemolytic uremic syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Adams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a well-described process that is known to cause severe renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. HUS is typically associated with toxins (shiga-like and shigella toxin found in strains of E. coli and Shigella spp [1–3]. We present a case of a 27 year-old man with jaundice, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction who was found to have HUS in the setting of Shigella sonnei infection. Outside of developing countries, cases of HUS related to S. sonnei are largely unreported.

  6. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Plasmodium vivax malaria successfully treated with plasma exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Keskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in an adult patient with Plasmodium vivax malaria. The patient presented with worsening anemia, persistent thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. HUS was diagnosed based on the high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated reticulocyte count and presence of schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Kidney biopsy showed features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Complete hematological remission was achieved after five sessions of therapeutic plasma exchange. Renal function partially recovered and stabilized at discharge. Vivax malaria, generally considered benign, may be rarely associated with HUS.

  7. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets........S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...

  8. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    -section. An investment strategy that goes long stocks with high jump betas and short stocks with low jump betas produces significant average excess returns. These higher risk premiums for the discontinuous and overnight market betas remain significant after controlling for a long list of other firm characteristics......Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross......-section of expected returns. Based on a novel highfrequency dataset of almost one-thousand individual stocks over two decades, we find that the two rough betas associated with intraday discontinuous and overnight returns entail significant risk premiums, while the intraday continuous beta is not priced in the cross...

  9. Molecular and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of atypical Streptococcus species from porcine clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Matajira, Carlos E C; Gomes, Vasco T M; Silva, Ana Paula S; Mesquita, Renan E; Christ, Ana Paula G; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-10-01

    The Streptococcus species present broad phenotypic variation, making identification difficult using only traditional microbiological methods. Even though Streptococcus suis is the most important species for the worldwide swine industry, other Streptococcus species appear to be able to cause disease in swine and could represent a higher underestimated risk for porcine health. The aim of this study was to identify Streptococcus-like isolates by MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA sequencing and further molecular and antibiotic susceptibility characterization of the atypical Streptococcus species capable of causing disease in swine. Fifty presumptive Streptococcus isolates from diseased pigs isolated from different Brazilian States between 2002 and 2014 were evaluated. Among the studied isolates, 26% were identified as Streptococcus hyovaginalis, 24% as Streptococcus plurianimalium, 12% as Streptococcus alactolyticus, 10% as Streptococcus hyointestinalis, and the remaining isolates belonged to Streptococcus henryi (6%), Streptococcus thoraltensis (6%), Streptococcus gallolyticus (6%), Streptococcus gallinaceus (4%), Streptococcus sanguinis (4%), and Streptococcus mitis (2%). The Streptococcus isolates were successfully identified by spectral cluster analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing with 96% of concordance between the techniques. The SE-AFLP analysis also supported Streptococcus species distinction and enabled further observation of higher genetic heterogeneity intra-species. The identified Streptococcus species presented variable MIC values to β-lactams, enrofloxacin and florfenicol, and high resistance rates to tetracyclines and macrolides, which appear to be directly related to the industry's antimicrobial usage and resistance selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Analysis of Correlation between IgG Titer of Pregnant Women and Neonatal Hemolytic Complications of Different Blood Groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hai-Hui; Huang, Hong-Hai; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Pi, You-Jun

    2017-10-01

    To study the relationship between IgG titer of pregnant women and hemolytic disease of newborn(HDN) with different blood groups. Four hundred pregnant women, including pregnant women with type O blood, were selected from May 2014 to January 2015 in our hospital for inspection and a couple of different blood groups, the IgG titer of pregnant women were detected in the inspection process. According to neonatal HDN, newborns were divided into 2 groups: HDN group(85 cases) and non-HDN group(315 cases). The incidence of postpartum neonatal hemolytic disease was tracked and the correlation of IgG titers with HDN were systematically analyzed. In the production and inspection process, the IgG titer in pregnant women was divided into groups. the comparison of HDN incidence rate in 4 groups of IgG titer >64 and IgG titer group showed that the prevalence of ABO hemolytic disease of newborn were 96.9%, 79.6%, 63, 7% and 28.8%, there was a certain correlation of pregnant women IgG titers with ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn, that is, with the increase of IgG titer, the incidence of hemolytic disease of newborns increased in certain degree (r=0.8832), the risk in 4 groups of neonatal HDN was higher than that in IgG titer 64 HDN group. There is a certain corelation between prevalence of ABO-HDN and IgG titer of pregnant women. For these pregnant women, the control of the pregnant women IgG titer has a positive clinical significance to reduce the incidence of hemolytic disease of the newborn.

  11. Beta limits for ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, F.J.; Miller, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    ETF (Engineering Test Facility) one-dimensional transport simulations indicate that a volume-average beta of 4% is required for ignition. It is therefore important that theoretical beta limits, determined by requiring equilibria to be stable to all ideal modes, exceed 4%. This paper documents an ideal MHD analysis wherein it is shown that, with appropriate plasma cross-sectional shape and current profile optimization, operation near 5% is possible. The critical beta value, however, depends on the functional form used for ff', which suggests that higher critical betas could be achieved by directly optimizing the safety factor profile. (author)

  12. Beta-energy averaging and beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatelatos, M.G.; England, T.R.

    1976-07-01

    A simple yet highly accurate method for approximately calculating spectrum-averaged beta energies and beta spectra for radioactive nuclei is presented. This method should prove useful for users who wish to obtain accurate answers without complicated calculations of Fermi functions, complex gamma functions, and time-consuming numerical integrations as required by the more exact theoretical expressions. Therefore, this method should be a good time-saving alternative for investigators who need to make calculations involving large numbers of nuclei (e.g., fission products) as well as for occasional users interested in restricted number of nuclides. The average beta-energy values calculated by this method differ from those calculated by ''exact'' methods by no more than 1 percent for nuclides with atomic numbers in the 20 to 100 range and which emit betas of energies up to approximately 8 MeV. These include all fission products and the actinides. The beta-energy spectra calculated by the present method are also of the same quality

  13. [Establishment and validation of a neonatal pig model of hemolytic jaundice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Fu; Ma, Yue-Lan; Nie, Ling; Chen, Shuan; Jin, Mei-Fang; Wang, San-Lan

    2016-05-01

    To establish a neonatal pig model of hemolytic jaundice. Twelve seven-day-old purebred Yorkshire pigs were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group (n=6 each). Immunization of New Zealand white rabbits was used to prepare rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell antibodies, and rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell serum was separated. The neonatal pigs in the experimental group were given an intravenous injection of rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell serum (5 mL), and those in the control group were given an intravenous injection of normal saline (5 mL). Venous blood samples were collected every 6 hours for routine blood test and liver function evaluation. The experimental group had a significantly higher serum bilirubin level than the control group at 18 hours after the injection of rabbit anti-porcine red blood cell serum (64±30 μmol/L vs 20±4 μmol/L; Pjaundice simulates the pathological process of human hemolytic jaundice well and provides good biological and material bases for further investigation of neonatal hemolysis.

  14. Post Blood Transfusion Hypertensive Encephalopathy in a Child with Congenital Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiman Arshpreet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children having hemolytic anemias who have received multiple blood transfusions exhibit a rare complication of development of hypertension and seizures following transfusion, which may or may not be associated with intracranial hemorrhage. Case description: A 9-year-old boy presented with history of progressive paleness of body and weakness for the 30 days. There was a history of blood transfusion one week ago and multiple transfusions for one year of age. Examination revealed tachycardia, tachypnea, severe pallor and splenohepatomegaly. Blood work revealed a hemoglobin level of 4.0 grams with peripheral smear findings suggestive of hemolytic anemia. After blood transfusion, child complained of difficulty in breathing, vomiting and visual loss, followed by convulsions. Blood pressure was 180/110 mmHg. Seizure was controlled with intravenous midazolam and hypertension with furosemide and labetalol. CT brain was normal. As hypertension got under control, child gradually gained consciousness. Conclusion: A less intensive transfusion regimen among such patients along with prompt management of hypertension can prevent this potentially fatal syndrome.

  15. Hemolytic disease in the newborn - history and prevention in the world and the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavy, Jiri

    2010-06-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn with its typical signs and poor prognosis has been known for centuries. Historically it can be divided into three pathological states which are fetal hydrops (hydrops fetus universalis), neonatal jaundice (icterus neonati gravis familiaris) and fetal anemia (anemia neonati). Almost 70 reports with quite accurate descriptions were found up to the end of 19th century. The patho physiological basis of the condition began to be studied at the beginning of the last century and the development of our knowledge is an example of the cooperation between pathologists, pediatricians, hematologists and later, obstetricians, immunologists and geneticists. Despite all the advances in this field it remains a serious disease up to this time. It is not managed successfully in all cases and despite successful immunological prophylaxis there are cases when we need to administer intrauterine transfusion based on the information received by dopplerometric measurement of arteria cerebri perfusion and fetal blood sampling. Review of lover cited literature. The history of the hemolytic disease in the newborn, its condition and approaches to it has not been recently compiled in the Czech Republic.

  16. Ext The effect of littoralis leaf extract on Hemolytic Value (HC50 of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jiang WANG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Umbelliferae littoralis leaf extract on the Hemolytic Value (HC50 of mice, and to provide the basis for the development and utilization medicinal resources and edible resources. Methods: Prepare littoralis leaf water extract and alcohol extract, and set different dose treatment groups and blank control group, and continuously deliver American ginseng capsule for 15 days. Inject sRBC according to the weight on the tenth day. Take the blood serum from eyeball blood after 5 days. Put supernatant of 1ml and Dulbecco's reagent of 3ml in the test tube, and mix the 10% sRBC of 0.25ml and Dulbecco's reagent of 4ml together in another test tube, and measure absorbance at 540nm fine control (SA liquid tubing as blank, HC50 value were calculated. Results: Different extracts of stems and littoralis leaf were given to the mice for 15 days, and hemolytic value of the mice in water extract 4.68g/kg dose group, alcohol extract 4.68g/kg dose group and American ginseng capsule group significantly increased while comparing with the blank control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Littoralis Leaf plays an important role in regulating human immunity.

  17. Investigation into the hemolytic activity of tentacle venom from jellyfish Cyanea nozakii Kishinouye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-03-01

    Cyanea nozakii Kishinouy e ( C. nozakii), a giant cnidarian of the class Scyphomedusae, order Semaeostomeae and family Cyaneidae, is widely distributed in the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea, and is abundant from late summer to early autumn. Venom produced by C. nozakii during mass agglomerations can contaminate seawater resulting in death of the halobios and seriously damage commercial fisheries. Swimmers and fishermen commonly suff er painful stings from this jellyfish, resulting in local edema, tingling, breathing difficulties, depressed blood pressure and even death. Such effects arise from the complex mixture of biologically active molecules that make up jellyfish venom. In the present study, the hemolytic activity of venom from tentacles of C. nozakii and factors aff ecting its activity were assayed. The HU50 ( defined as the amount of protein required to lyse 50 % of erythrocytes) of the venom against dove and chicken erythrocytes was 34 and 59 μg/mL, respectively. Carboxylmethyl chitosan and glycerol could increase hemolytic activity at concentrations greater than 0.06% and 0.2 mol/L, respectively.

  18. An improved microculture-hemolytic spot assay for the study of carrier-specific antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Weisman, Z; Mozes, E; Bentwich, Z

    1984-11-30

    A microculture system based on limiting dilution and a hemolytic spot assay was adapted for study of the carrier-specific anti-hapten response in vitro. Spleen or lymph node cells from normal mice or mice immunized with NIP-ovalbumin (NIP-OVA) or NIP-human thyroglobulin (NIP-Tg) were cultured for 5 days by the microculture technique. The anti-hapten (anti-NIP) response was measured by assaying the supernatants of the microcultures in a hemolytic spot test with NIP coupled to sheep red blood cells. A micro-ELISA reader was adapted to read the degree of lysis in the spot assay which gives an objective quantitation of the degree of lysis and thus reduces the number of culture replicates. In vivo induced specific helper cells in mice immunized with the carrier protein, human thyroglobulin, as well as carrier-specific T cell factors, gave rise to carrier-specific anti-NIP responses. The microculture system may enhance the expression of T-cell helper function when suppressor cells or their precursors are present in the initial cell preparation.

  19. A Fatal Case of Severe Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-Jkb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Duck

    2006-01-01

    The Kidd blood group is clinically significant since the Jk antibodies can cause acute and delayed transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In general, HDN due to anti-Jkb incompatibility is rare and it usually displays mild clinical symptoms with a favorable prognosis. Yet, we apparently experienced the second case of HDN due to anti-Jkb with severe clinical symptoms and a fatal outcome. A female patient having the AB, Rh(D)-positive boodtype was admitted for jaundice on the fourth day after birth. At the time of admission, the patient was lethargic and exhibited high pitched crying. The laboratory data indicated a hemoglobin value of 11.4 mg/dL, a reticulocyte count of 14.9% and a total bilirubin of 46.1 mg/dL, a direct bilirubin of 1.1 mg/dL and a strong positive result (+++) on the direct Coomb's test. As a result of the identification of irregular antibody from the maternal serum, anti-Jkb was detected, which was also found in the eluate made from infant's blood. Despite the aggressive treatment with exchange transfusion and intensive phototherapy, the patient died of intractable seizure and acute renal failure on the fourth day of admission. Therefore, pediatricians should be aware of the clinical courses of hemolytic jaundice due to anti-Jkb, and they should be ready to treat this disease with active therapeutic interventions. PMID:16479082

  20. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  1. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Di (a) Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Di(a) is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Di(a) antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Di(a) must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis.

  2. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  3. Perinatal care in British Columbia: Diagnosis and management of hemolytic disease of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyment, A. F.; Manning, R. Elizabeth; Kinnis, Claire

    1974-01-01

    We undertook to measure standards of perinatal care in British Columbia by studying the management of hemolytic disease of the newborn as the sample situation. Our data show that many isoimmunized pregnant women are delivered in hospitals that have infrequent experience with this problem, and by physicians who have little experience with this disease. The physician referral pattern, in regard to maternal isoimmunization, indicated that the more severely affected patients were managed by specialists, particularly those attached to teaching hospitals. However, 25% of the infants treated by exchange transfusion were managed by nonspecialists in nonteaching hospitals. Hospital record search, used as a method of medical audit and as a source of data for comparison with physician reports, did not result in dependable or complete information. Rates of disagreement between items from two data sources, physician report and hospital record, were frequently very high. Our experience suggests that comparison of these two data sources is not an ideal method of assessment of quality of care. A smaller caseload of isoimmunized pregnant women will result from the present prevention program. Nevertheless, cases will continue to occur. Our work supports the conclusion that a program of continuing education covering the diagnosis and management of hemolytic disease of the newborn is still necessary. PMID:4213290

  4. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashif Jethava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate’s red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+ red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis.

  5. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: Laboratory characteristics, complement-amplifying conditions, renal biopsy, and genetic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hossain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, consumptive thrombocytopenia, and widespread damage to multiple organs including the kidney. The syndrome has a high mortality necessitating the need for an early diagnosis to limit target organ damage. Because thrombotic microangiopathies present with similar clinical picture, accurate diagnosis of aHUS continues to pose a diagnostic challenge. This article focuses on the role of four distinct aspects of aHUS that assist clinicians in making an accurate diagnosis of aHUS. First, because of the lack of a single specific laboratory test for aHUS, other forms of thrombotic microangiopathies such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-associated HUS must be excluded to successfully establish the diagnosis of aHUS. Second, application of the knowledge of complement-amplifying conditions is critically important in making an accurate diagnosis. Third, when available, a renal biopsy can reveal changes consistent with thrombotic microangiopathy. Fourth, genetic mutations are increasingly clarifying the underlying complement dysfunction and gaining importance in the diagnosis and management of patients with aHUS. This review concentrates on the four aspects of aHUS and calls for heightened awareness in making an accurate diagnosis of aHUS.

  6. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung with initial presentation of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chun Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a rare entity of lung malignancy that is subclassified into high-grade or low-grade types according to its histological features. High-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a more aggressive form of malignancy, with a tendency towards lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. Cancer-related microangiopathic hemolytic anemia as a less common situation of paraneoplastic syndrome may be encountered with metastatic malignancy, but has not been reported previously in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung. Herein, we report a 78-year-old male patient who presented with hemoptysis for one day. Laboratory tests showed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. A chest X-ray demonstrated consolidation in the left lung field. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the left upper lobe, and a subsequent bronchoscopic biopsy was performed. The histopathological results indicated a high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. The patient refused systemic chemotherapy, and palliative radiation therapy only was conducted for local disease control. The patient has performed well for 12 months to date since diagnosis of the tumor.

  7. Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiao Bu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases and familial (20% of cases forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  8. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease.

  9. Hypophosphatemia and hemolytic anemia associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L G; Hardy, R M; Weiss, D J; Bartges, J W

    1993-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia associated with hemolytic anemia was diagnosed in five cats with diabetes mellitus and in one cat with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis. The hematocrit began decreasing within 24 to 48 hours after documented hypophosphatemia in each case. The anemia resolved in all five surviving cats. Because of the temporal relationship and lack of other detectable causes, hemolytic anemia was presumed to be caused by hypophosphatemia. There were increased Heinz bodies in three of six hypophosphatemic cats during episodes of hemolysis. Intravenous potassium phosphate administration corrected the hypophosphatemia in four of five cats. The effective dosages of intravenous phosphate ranged from 0.011 to 0.017 mmol of phosphate/kg/h for 6 to 12 hours. Hypocalcemia (5.4 to 8.7 mg/dL) occurred in four of five cats treated with intravenous phosphate; however, only one cat developed clinical signs attributable to hypocalcemia. Based on this retrospective study, we recommend monitoring serum phosphorus concentration every 6 to 12 hours in cats likely to become hypophosphatemic. Treatment of hypophosphatemia in cats is warranted because of the apparent increased susceptibility of cats to hypophosphatemia-induced hemolysis. Cats with severe hypophosphatemia (< or = 1.5 mg/dL) should be given oral or parenteral phosphate if contraindications do not exist.

  10. Eculizumab Therapy Leads to Rapid Resolution of Thrombocytopenia in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Mou Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eculizumab is highly effective in controlling complement activation in patients with the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS. However, the course of responses to the treatment is not well understood. We reviewed the responses to eculizumab therapy for aHUS. The results show that, in patients with aHUS, eculizumab therapy, when not accompanied with concurrent plasma exchange therapy, led to steady increase in the platelet count and improvement in extra-renal complications within 3 days. By day 7, the platelet count was normal in 15 of 17 cases. The resolution of hemolytic anemia and improvement in renal function were less predictable and were not apparent for weeks to months in two patients. The swift response in the platelet counts was only observed in one of five cases who received concurrent plasma exchange therapy and was not observed in a case of TMA due to gemcitabine/carboplatin. In summary, eculizumab leads to rapid increase in the platelet counts and resolution of extrarenal symptoms in patients with aHUS. Concurrent plasma exchange greatly impedes the response of aHUS to eculizumab therapy. Eculizumab is ineffective for gemcitabine/carboplatin associated TMA.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Splenectomy in Children: Report of the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Henry E; Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Smithers, Charles; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St. Peter, Shawn; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of children with congenital hemolytic anemia (CHA) undergoing total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) remain unclear. In this study, we collected data from 100 children with CHA who underwent TS or PS from 2005–2013 at 16 sites in the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium using a patient registry. We analyzed demographics and baseline clinical status, operative details, and outcomes at 4, 24, and 52 weeks after surgery. Results were summarized as hematologic outcomes, short-term adverse events (AEs) (≤ 30 days after surgery), and long-term AEs (31–365 days after surgery). For children with hereditary spherocytosis, after surgery there was an increase in hemoglobin (baseline 10.1 ± 1.8 gm/dl, 52 week 12.8 ± 1.6 gm/dl; mean ± SD), decrease in reticulocyte and bilirubin as well as control of symptoms. Children with sickle cell disease had control of clinical symptoms after surgery, but had no change in hematologic parameters. There was an 11% rate of short-term AEs and 11% rate of long-term AEs. As we accumulate more subjects and longer follow-up, use of a patient registry should enhance our capacity for clinical trials and engage all stakeholders in the decision-making process. PMID:25382665

  12. Hemolytic anemia after ingestion of the natural hair dye Lawsonia inermis (henna) in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardes, Daniel J; Ross, Linda A; Markovich, Jessica E

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical presentation and case management of a dog that developed hemolytic anemia and evidence of renal tubular dysfunction after ingestion of a natural hair dye containing Lawsonia inermis (henna). To review cases of henna toxicity reported in the human literature. An 8-year-old female spayed Border Collie was presented 5 days after ingestion of a box of natural hair dye. The dog was showing signs of lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. A serum biochemistry profile, complete blood count, and urinalysis demonstrated evidence of renal tubular dysfunction and a regenerative anemia without spherocytosis. The dog was treated with a transfusion of packed RBCs and IV fluids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Repeat diagnostics showed resolution of the anemia and no lasting evidence of tubular dysfunction. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case in the veterinary literature of toxicity following ingestion of Lawsonia inermis (henna). Henna ingestion was associated with the development of hemolytic anemia and acute kidney injury. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  13. Seeing Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Common Killer Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    Look around you. The diversity and complexity of life on earth is overwhelming and data continues to grow. In our desire to understand and explain everything scientifically from molecular evolution to supernovas we depend on visual representations. This paper investigates visual representations...... of the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae by use of ink, watercolours and computer graphics. We propose a novel artistic visual rendering of Streptococcus pneumoniae and ask what the value of these kind of representations are compared to traditional scientific data. We ask if drawings and computer......-assisted representations can add to our scientific knowledge about this dangerous bacteria. Is there still a role for the scientific illustrator in the scientific process and synthesis of scientific knowledge?...

  14. Intervention and prevention of hereditary hemolytic disorders in India: a case study of two ethnic communities of Sundargarh district in Orissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgir, R S

    2008-11-01

    This study was aimed at to sensitize, motivate, and screen two major vulnerable tribal communities--Bhuyan and Kharia, for hemoglobinopathies and allied hemolytic disorders, along with prospective and retrospective genetic/marriage counseling to the affected persons. For sustainability, imparting of relevant training to local paramedical staff, and to undertake periodic follow up for evaluation, intervention and clinical management through local PHCs/hospitals. Tribal people in Orissa live in clusters practicing inter-village marriages following tribal endogamy and clan exogamy. The random sampling procedure for the selection of whole village was followed. Population of each tribe was representative because incoming and outgoing married women represent other surrounding villages belonging to their community. The pre- and post-intervention knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) studies were conducted. Sensitization, motivation and education for carrier detection were carried out through IEC materials, holding interactive meetings and discussions at district, block and village levels. Standard biochemical and hematological techniques were followed for analysis of blood samples. Relevant training to local health personnel was imparted. Both prospective and retrospective intervention and genetic/marriage counseling was done through local PHC doctor. Study revealed high occurrence of hemoglobinopathies in Bhuyan (9.8%) and Kharia (13.3%) tribes, including uncommon hemoglobin variants like hemoglobin D, E, beta-thalassemia, and hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH). G-6-PD enzyme deficiency was high in Dhelki Kharia (30.7%) and in Dudh Kharia (19.2%), whereas, it was recorded to be 21.1%, 16.3% and 13.7% in Paraja, Paik and Paudi Bhuyan subtribes, respectively. Use of antimalarials was cautioned in these tribal communities. Due to low frequency of Rhesus (D) negative (0.2-1.2%), the Rhesus (D) incompatibility problem seemed to be absent. Impact of methodical

  15. Consideraciones sobre elaislamiento en exudados vaginales de Streptococcus morbillorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. F. Egido

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available De el estúdio de 195 exudados vaginales enviados por el Servicio de Ginecologia de este hospital, durante el período 1988-1990, hemos seleccionado aquellos en los que el cultivo fue positivo para estreptococos, 58 (30% de los cuales 26 (44.8% correspondia a Streptococcus morbillorum, 9 (15.5% a Gardnerella vaginalis, 5 (8.6% a Enterococcus faecalis-durans, y a Streptococcus agalactiae, 3 (5.1% a Streptococcus mitis y Streptococcus mitis, 2 (3-4% a Streptococcus bovis y Streptococcus cremoris y 1 (1.7% a Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus equinus y Strptococcus sanguis II respectivamente. En todos los casos se observo antecedentes de actuacción medico- quirurjica en el tracto genital, y en el 52.8% de los casos fuô concomitante con el diagnostico clinico-micologico de candidiasis vaginal. La ideittificaccion bacteriologica se realizo mediante el sistema API 20 STREP (sistema api bioMêríeux GmbH, Nütingen, Alemania dando un patron tipico ("excelente identificacción" para el Streptococcus morbillorum.

  16. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for differentiation between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Prehn, Joffrey; van Veen, Suzanne Q; Schelfaut, Jacqueline J G; Wessels, Els

    2016-05-01

    We compared the Vitek MS and Microflex MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform for species differentiation within the Streptococcus mitis group with PCR assays targeted at lytA, Spn9802, and recA as reference standard. The Vitek MS correctly identified 10/11 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 13/13 Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and 12/13 S. mitis/oralis. The Microflex correctly identified 9/11 S. pneumoniae, 0/13 S. pseudopneumoniae, and 13/13 S. mitis/oralis. MALDI-TOF is a powerful tool for species determination within the mitis group. Diagnostic accuracy varies depending on platform and database used. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomics, evolution, and molecular epidemiology of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Christoph; Meile, Leo; Lacroix, Christophe; Stevens, Marc J A

    2015-07-01

    The Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) is a group of human and animal derived streptococci that are commensals (rumen and gastrointestinal tract), opportunistic pathogens or food fermentation associates. The classification of SBSEC has undergone massive changes and currently comprises 7 (sub)species grouped into four branches based on sequences identities: the Streptococcus gallolyticus, the Streptococcus equinus, the Streptococcus infantarius and the Streptococcus alactolyticus branch. In animals, SBSEC are causative agents for ruminal acidosis, potentially laminitis and infective endocarditis (IE). In humans, a strong association was established between bacteraemia, IE and colorectal cancer. Especially the SBSEC-species S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus is an emerging pathogen for IE and prosthetic joint infections. S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and the S. infantarius branch are further associated with biliary and urinary tract infections. Knowledge on pathogenic mechanisms is so far limited to colonization factors such as pili and biofilm formation. Certain strain variants of S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus and S. infantarius subsp. infantarius are associated with traditional dairy and plant-based food fermentations and display traits suggesting safety. However, due to their close relationship to virulent strains, their use in food fermentation has to be critically assessed. Additionally, implementing accurate and up-to-date taxonomy is critical to enable appropriate treatment of patients and risk assessment of species and strains via recently developed multilocus sequence typing schemes to enable comparative global epidemiology. Comparative genomics revealed that SBSEC strains harbour genomics islands (GI) that seem acquired from other streptococci by horizontal gene transfer. In case of virulent strains these GI frequently encode putative virulence factors, in strains from food fermentation the GI encode functions that are

  18. High beta tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, R.A.; Berger, D.P.; Charlton, L.A.; Hogan, J.T.; Munro, J.K.; Nelson, D.B.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Sigmar, D.J.; Strickler, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    MHD equilibrium, stability, and transport calculations are made to study the accessibility and behavior of ''high beta'' tokamak plasmas in the range β approximately 5 to 15 percent. For next generation devices, beta values of at least 8 percent appear to be accessible and stable if there is a conducting surface nearby

  19. Sorting out Downside Beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Post (Thierry); P. van Vliet (Pim); S.D. Lansdorp (Simon)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDownside risk, when properly defined and estimated, helps to explain the cross-section of US stock returns. Sorting stocks by a proper estimate of downside market beta leads to a substantially larger cross-sectional spread in average returns than sorting on regular market beta. This

  20. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically...

  1. [Streptococcus suis infection--clinical manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojlović, Julijana; Milosević, Branko; Sasić, Neda; Pelemis, Mijomir; Sasić, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a bacterium causing a disease in pigs and rarely in humans. This zoonosis is mostly found as a sporadic disease in individuals that were in contact with the affected or infected pigs: farmers, veterinarians and workers engaged in fresh pork processing. It is assumed that the bacterium enters the body through a cut abrasion in the skin. Initially, the condition resembles a flu, followed by signs of bacteriemia and sepsis. The most frequent clinical manifestation of Streptococcus suis infection is meningitis, leading to hearing loss in over 75% of patients, and subsequent arthritis, endophtalmitis, endocarditis and pneumonia. Toxic shock syndrome with hemorhagic manifestations rarely develops. This study included five male patients aged 22 to 63 years treated in the Intensive Care Unit of the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases in Belgrade, due to Streptococcus suis infection. The aim of this study was to point to the existence of this bacteria in our environment, to describe clinical manifestations of the disease and to point out the importance of its prevention. All patients had epidemiological evidence of being in contact with pork meat. There were no data about diseased pigs. The estimated incubation period was 4 to 8 days. All patients had meningeal signs. Clinical symptoms included shivering, fever, vomiting, headache, malaise, vertigo and tinitus. Three patients presented with alerterd level of awarrness. Four patients developed very severe bilateral hearing impairment, whereas one endophtalmtis and one developed endocarditis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was opalescent in four patients, and only one patient presented with clear CSF. CSF examination showed typical changes characteristic for bacterial meningitis. Streptoccocus suis was isolated in CSF in all patients, and in one patient the bacteria was isolated in blood as well. All patients underwent treatement with II and III generation cephalosporins and one with one

  2. Mast cell degranulation by a hemolytic lipid toxin decreases GBS colonization and infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gendrin, Claire; Vornhagen, Jay; Ngo, Lisa; Whidbey, Christopher; Boldenow, Erica; Santana-Ufret, Veronica; Clauson, Morgan; Burnside, Kellie; Galloway, Dionne P.; Waldorf, Kristina Adams; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Ascending infection of microbes from the lower genital tract into the amniotic cavity increases the risk of preterm birth, stillbirth, and newborn infections. Host defenses that are critical for preventing ascending microbial infection are not completely understood. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are Gram-positive bacteria that frequently colonize the lower genital tract of healthy women but cause severe infections during pregnancy, leading to preterm birth, stillbirth, or early-onset newborn in...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Beta thalassemia Beta thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Beta thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  4. Regional consensus opinion for the management of Beta thalassemia major in the Arabian Gulf area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Thalassemia syndrome has diverse clinical presentations and a global spread that has far exceeded the classical Mediterranean basin where the mutations arose. The mutations that give rise to either alpha or beta thalassemia are numerous, resulting in a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from carrier state to life-threatening, inherited hemolytic anemia that requires regular blood transfusion. Beta thalassemia major constitutes a remarkable challenge to health care providers. The complications arising due to the anemia, transfusional iron overload, as well as other therapy-related complications add to the complexity of this condition. To produce this consensus opinion manuscript, a PubMed search was performed to gather evidence-based original articles, review articles, as well as published work reflecting the experience of physicians and scientists in the Arabian Gulf region in an effort to standardize the management protocol. PMID:24044606

  5. Identificação dos sorotipos de Streptococcus agalactiae pela técnica de PCR de amostras isoladas em pacientes colonizados e infectados na cidade de Campinas e região

    OpenAIRE

    Katelí Fiolo

    2011-01-01

    Resumo: Streptococcus agalactiae, conhecido como Estreptococo beta-hemolítico do grupo B (EGB), é classificado por diferenças capsulares que podem variar em dez sorotipos, alguns responsáveis por infecções materno-infantis sérias e debilitantes ou podendo ainda levar ao óbito. O EGB pode ocasionar também, infecções graves em adultos e idosos. OBJETIVO: Descrever e analisar o perfil epidemiológico dos sorotipos prevalentes de Streptococcus agalactiae, provenientes de infecção em recém-nascidos...

  6. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  7. [Etiologies of non-hemolytic jaundice in infants: a retrospective analysis of 3113 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Hongmei

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the causes of non-hemolytic jaundice among infants in Chongqing, China from the period of 1982 to 2011 and to determine whether the etiologies have changed over the past 30 years. The medical records of 3 113 infants,aged 1 month to 1 year,admitted to our hospital with non-hemolytic jaundice were collected and stratified according to decade-long time periods: group A (1982-1991), n=537; group B (1992-2001), n=786; group C (2002-2011), n=1 790. Data on sex, age, etiology and bilirubin level were retrospectively assessed using the chi-square test. In the three groups, boys consistently accounted for the majority of cases (group A:74.3%, group B:66.7%, group C:62.6%). In group A, 52% of the patients were 1-2 months of age; the peak age of patients in both group B and C was 2-3 months (group B:67.8%, group C:61.0%). Group A showed the highest level of patients with mildly elevated total bilirubin level (80.3%); however, moderately elevated total bilirubin level was most frequent in group B (53.4%) and group C (49.7%). The main etiologic diagnoses of the patients in group A were cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection (31.7%), sepsis (18.2%), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1.3%), and biliary tract anomalies (1.3%); 46.6% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group B were CMV infection (36.0%), sepsis (21.5%), breast milk jaundice (2.0%), and HBV (1.9%); 37.9% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group C were CMV infection (42.6%), sepsis (7.5%), breast milk jaundice (17.7%), and biliary tract anomalies (2.46%); 29.1% of the cases had unclear cause. In Chongqing, infective factors, especially CMV, remain the main cause of nonhemolytic jaundice in infants, but bacterial etiologies have declined over the past 30 years.Non-infective factors, such as biliary tract anomalies and inherited metabolic diseases, have trended upwards. Although there has been great progress in the clinical management of

  8. Enteroaggregative, Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O111:H2 Associated with an Outbreak of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Stefano; Karch, Helge; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patrizia; Schmidt, Herbert; Minelli, Fabio; Bingen, Edouard; Caprioli, Alfredo

    1998-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111:H2 strains from an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome showed aggregative adhesion to HEp-2 cells and harbored large plasmids which hybridized with the enteroaggregative E. coli probe PCVD432. These strains present a novel combination of virulence factors and might be as pathogenic to humans as the classic enterohemorrhagic E. coli. PMID:9508328

  9. Whole-Genome Characterization and Strain Comparison of VT2f-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grande, Laura; Michelacci, Valeria; Bondì, Roslen; Gigliucci, Federica; Franz, Eelco; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Schlager, Sabine; Minelli, Fabio; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in humans cause disease ranging from uncomplicated intestinal illnesses to bloody diarrhea and systemic sequelae, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Previous research indicated that pigeons may be a reservoir for a population of verotoxigenic E. coli

  10. Medicago truncatula CYP716A12 Is a Multifunctional Oxidase Involved in the Biosynthesis of Hemolytic Saponins[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Panara, Francesco; Tava, Aldo; Scaramelli, Laura; Porceddu, Andrea; Graham, Neil; Odoardi, Miriam; Piano, Efisio; Arcioni, Sergio; May, Sean; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2011-01-01

    Saponins, a group of glycosidic compounds present in several plant species, have aglycone moieties that are formed using triterpenoid or steroidal skeletons. In spite of their importance as antimicrobial compounds and their possible benefits for human health, knowledge of the genetic control of saponin biosynthesis is still poorly understood. In the Medicago genus, the hemolytic activity of saponins is related to the nature of their aglycone moieties. We have identified a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP716A12) involved in saponin synthesis in Medicago truncatula using a combined genetic and biochemical approach. Genetic loss-of-function analysis and complementation studies showed that CYP716A12 is responsible for an early step in the saponin biosynthetic pathway. Mutants in CYP716A12 were unable to produce hemolytic saponins and only synthetized soyasaponins, and were thus named lacking hemolytic activity (lha). In vitro enzymatic activity assays indicate that CYP716A12 catalyzes the oxidation of β-amyrin and erythrodiol at the C-28 position, yielding oleanolic acid. Transcriptome changes in the lha mutant showed a modulation in the main steps of triterpenic saponin biosynthetic pathway: squalene cyclization, β-amyrin oxidation, and glycosylation. The analysis of CYP716A12 expression in planta is reported together with the sapogenin content in different tissues and stages. This article provides evidence for CYP716A12 being a key gene in hemolytic saponin biosynthesis. PMID:21821776

  11. Medicago truncatula CYP716A12 is a multifunctional oxidase involved in the biosynthesis of hemolytic saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Panara, Francesco; Tava, Aldo; Scaramelli, Laura; Porceddu, Andrea; Graham, Neil; Odoardi, Miriam; Piano, Efisio; Arcioni, Sergio; May, Sean; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2011-08-01

    Saponins, a group of glycosidic compounds present in several plant species, have aglycone moieties that are formed using triterpenoid or steroidal skeletons. In spite of their importance as antimicrobial compounds and their possible benefits for human health, knowledge of the genetic control of saponin biosynthesis is still poorly understood. In the Medicago genus, the hemolytic activity of saponins is related to the nature of their aglycone moieties. We have identified a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP716A12) involved in saponin synthesis in Medicago truncatula using a combined genetic and biochemical approach. Genetic loss-of-function analysis and complementation studies showed that CYP716A12 is responsible for an early step in the saponin biosynthetic pathway. Mutants in CYP716A12 were unable to produce hemolytic saponins and only synthetized soyasaponins, and were thus named lacking hemolytic activity (lha). In vitro enzymatic activity assays indicate that CYP716A12 catalyzes the oxidation of β-amyrin and erythrodiol at the C-28 position, yielding oleanolic acid. Transcriptome changes in the lha mutant showed a modulation in the main steps of triterpenic saponin biosynthetic pathway: squalene cyclization, β-amyrin oxidation, and glycosylation. The analysis of CYP716A12 expression in planta is reported together with the sapogenin content in different tissues and stages. This article provides evidence for CYP716A12 being a key gene in hemolytic saponin biosynthesis.

  12. Long-term neurodevelopmental outcome after intrauterine transfusion for hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn: the LOTUS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenburg, Irene T.; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E.; van Klink, Jeanine M.; Verduin, Esther; van Kamp, Inge L.; Walther, Frans J.; Schonewille, Henk; Doxiadis, Ilias I.; Kanhai, Humphrey H.; van Lith, Jan M.; van Zwet, Erik W.; Oepkes, Dick; Brand, Anneke; Lopriore, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    To determine the incidence and risk factors for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in children with hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn treated with intrauterine transfusion (IUT). Neurodevelopmental outcome in children at least 2 years of age was assessed using standardized tests, including the

  13. Kinetics of hemolytic plaque formation. IV. IgM plaque inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLisi, C

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the inhibition of hemolytic plaques formed against IgM antibodies is presented. The starting point is the equations of DeLisi and Bell (1974) which describe the kinetics of plaque growth, and DeLisi and Goldstein (1975) which describe inhibition of IgG plaques. However, the physical chemical models which were used previously to describe IgG inhibition data are shown to be inadequate for describing the characteristics of IgM inhibition curves. Moreover, it is shown that the experimental results place severe restrictions on the possible choices of physical chemical models for IgM upon which to base the calculations. It is argued that in order to account even qualitatively for all the data, one must assume (1) a very restricted motion of IgMs about the Fab hinge region and (2) a very narrow secretion rate distribution of IgM by antibody secreting cells. (auth)

  14. Targeting renin-angiotensin system in malignant hypertension in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Raghunathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is common in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and often difficult to control. Local renin-angiotensin activation is believed to be an important part of thrombotic microangiopathy, leading to a vicious cycle of progressive renal injury and intractable hypertension. This has been demonstrated in vitro via enhanced tissue factor expression on glomerular endothelial cells which is enhanced by angiotensin II. We report two pediatric cases of atypical HUS with severe refractory malignant hypertension, in which we targeted the renin-angiotensin system by using intravenous (IV enalaprilat, oral aliskiren, and oral enalapril with quick and dramatic response of blood pressure. Both drugs, aliskiren and IV enalaprilat, were effective in controlling hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensive medications. These appear to be promising alternatives in the treatment of severe atypical HUS-induced hypertension and hypertensive emergency.

  15. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C (cblC) disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay P; Greenberg, Cheryl R; Prasad, Asuri N; Prasad, Chitra

    2007-12-01

    Diarrhea-positive hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a common cause of acute renal failure in children. Diarrhea-negative (D-), or atypical HUS, is etiologically distinct. A Medline search identified seven previously reported D- cases of HUS secondary to cobalamin C (cblC) disease presenting in infancy. An infantile presentation is reported to be associated with a high mortality rate (6/7 cases). We describe the results of a 5-year longitudinal follow-up in a child diagnosed with D- HUS secondary to cblC disease in infancy. Mutation analysis in this patient identified homozygosity for the 271 dupA mutation (c.271 dupA) in the cblC MMACHC gene. We briefly review the published experience in cblC-associated HUS to highlight the clinical characteristics of this uncommon, but potentially treatable, condition.

  16. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific features of red blood cell morphology in hemolytic disease neonates undergoing intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the characteristics of red blood cell morphology in infants who have undergone intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion for hemolytic disease of the fetus. The infants are shown to have a reduction in the mean volume of red blood cells and in their mean level of hemoglobin, a decrease in the fraction of fetal hemoglobin and an increase in oxygen tension at half saturation. The above morphological characteristics of red blood cells remain decreased during the neonatal period after exchange transfusion or others, as clinically indicated, which seems to suggest that the compensatory-adaptive mechanisms to regulate hematopoiesis are exhausted and a donor’s red blood cells continue to be predominant.

  18. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  19. Kell hemolytic disease of the fetus. Combination treatment with plasmapheresis and intrauterine blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, S; Machado, P; Pecos, P; Coloma, M; Rebollo, S; Raya, J M

    2011-08-01

    We report the case of a 36-year old pregnant woman with a Kell alloimmunization (anti-K1), probably secondary to a previous blood transfusion, and a severe hemolytic disease of the fetus. Once the first fetal blood transfusion by cordocentesis was performed, we started treatment with repeated plasmapheresis to maintain anti-K1 titer below 1:32. With this scheme we did not need to perform a second intrauterine fetal blood transfusion and only mild anemia was found in the newborn. Taking into account that the rate of serious complications with plasmapheresis is lower than that related with intrauterine blood transfusion, this could be an alternative approach to repeated transfusions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rhesus-D zygosity and hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Moghaddam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alloimmunization against the Rhesus-D (RhD antigen still remains as a major cause of hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN. Determination of paternal RhDzygosity is performed by molecular testing and is valuable for the management of alloimmunized pregnant women. A 30-year-old pregnant woman with AB negative blood group presented with two consecutive abortions and no history of blood transfusion. By application of the antibody screening, identification panel, and selected cells, she was found to be highly alloimmunized. RhDzygosity was performed on her partner and was shown to be homozygous for RhD. The sequence- specific priming-polymerase chain reaction used in this report is essential to establish whether the mother requires an appropriate immunoprophylaxis or the fetus is at risk of HDFN.

  1. Adrenal failure followed by status epilepticus and hemolytic anemia in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bures Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 14 year old boy who presented with the symptoms abdominal pain, fever and proteinuria. A hematoma in the region of the right pararenal space was diagnosed. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were positive and serum cortisol was normal. Ten days after admission the boy suddenly suffered generalized seizures due to low serum sodium. As well, the patient developed hemolytic anemia, acute elevated liver enzymes, hematuria and increased proteinuria. At this time a second hemorrhage of the left adrenal gland was documented. Adrenal function tests revealed adrenal insufficiency. We suspected microthromboses in the adrenals and secondary bleeding and treated the boy with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and phenprocoumon. Conclusion Adrenal failure is a rare complication of APS in children with only five cases reported to date. As shown in our patient, this syndrome can manifest in a diverse set of simultaneously occurring symptoms.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes.

  3. Control of Glycolysis by Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; BOSMAN, B; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    The decreased response of the energy metabolism of lactose-starved Streptococcus cremoris upon readdition of lactose is caused by a decrease of the glycolytic activity. The decrease in glycolysis is accompanied by a decrease in the activities of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and

  4. Antimicrobial activity of vanadium chloroperoxidase on planktonic Streptococcus mutans cells and Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Crielaard, W.; ten Cate, J.M.; Wever, R.; Hartog, A.F.; Renirie, R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of vanadium chloroperoxidase (VCPO) reaction products on planktonic and biofilm cellsof Streptococcus mutans C180-2. Planktonic and biofilm cells were incubated in a buffered reaction mixture containing VCPO, halide (either chloride

  5. Influence of pH on inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by Streptococcus oligofermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Chu, Lei; Wu, Fei; Guo, Lili; Li, Mengci; Wang, Yinghui; Wu, Ligeng

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus oligofermentans is a novel strain of oral streptococcus that can specifically inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans. The aims of this study were to assess the growth of S. oligofermentans and the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit growth of Streptococcus mutans at different pH values. Growth inhibition was investigated in vitro using an interspecies competition assay. The 4-aminoantipyine method was used to measure the initial production rate and the total yield of hydrogen peroxide in S. oligofermentans. S. oligofermentans grew best at pH 7.0 and showed the most pronounced inhibitory effect when it was inoculated earlier than S. mutans. In terms of the total yield and the initial production rate of hydrogen peroxide by S. oligofermentans, the effects of the different culture pH values were as follows: pH 7.0 > 6.5 > 6.0 > 7.5 > 5.5 = 8.0 (i.e. there was no significant difference between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0). Environmental pH and the sequence of inoculation significantly affected the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit the growth of S. mutans. The degree of inhibition may be attributed to the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Spring forward with improved Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus resistant to Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilapia aquaculture worldwide is valued around US $ 7 billion. Tilapia are an important source of protein for domestic (top 5 most consumed seafoods) and global food security. Two gram postitive bacteria, Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae, are responsible for billion dollar losses annually. Gen...

  7. Efficacy of some synthetic antibiotics on Streptococcus pneumoniae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of some synthetic antibiotics on Streptococcus pnemoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolated from cultured Clarias gariepinus, an important food fish raised in a concrete tank was carried out to ascertain their remedies on mortalities of the Clarias gariepinus adult fish. Streptococcus pnemoniae and Proteus mirabilis were ...

  8. Streptococcus suis meningitis can require a prolonged treatment course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Dejace

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of recrudescent Streptococcus suis meningitis requiring a prolonged treatment course. A few similar cases can be found in the burgeoning literature on what remains a relatively uncommon disease in humans, and these patients should be monitored carefully upon completion of therapy. Keywords: Meningitis, Relapse, Duration, Streptococcus suis

  9. Endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis: an emerging zoonosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacave, Guillaume; Coutard, Aymeric; Troché, Gilles; Augusto, Sandrine; Pons, Stéphanie; Zuber, Benjamin; Laurent, Virginie; Amara, Marlène; Couzon, Brigitte; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Pangon, Béatrice; Grimaldi, David

    2016-02-01

    We report a human case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis. Identification was carried out from positive blood culture using mass spectrometry and SodA gene sequencing. S. canis related zoonotic invasive infections may have been previously underdiagnosed due to inadequate identification of group G Streptococcus species.

  10. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Beta particle measurement fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The necessary concepts for understanding beta particle behavior are stopping power, range, and scattering. Dose as a consequence of beta particle interaction with tissue can be derived and explained by these concepts. Any calculations of dose, however, assume or require detailed knowledge of the beta spectrum at the tissue depth of calculation. A rudimentary knowledge of the incident spectrum can be of use in estimating dose, interpretating dose measuring devices and designing protection. The stopping power and range based on the csda will give a conservative estimate in cases of protection design, as scattering will reduce the range. Estimates of dose may be low because scattering effects were neglected

  12. Clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to cobalamin C disorder in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Liang; Song, Wen-Qi; Peng, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Rong; He, Le-Jian; Fu, Li-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C disorder (cbl-C disorder). We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 3 children with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder who had been treated between April 1, 2009 and October 31, 2013. The 3 patients with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder presented with progressive hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, poor feeding, and failure to thrive. Two of the 3 patients once had high blood pressure. The mutations of c.609G>A (p.W203X), c.217C>T (p.R73X) and c.365A>T (p.H122L) in the methylmalonic aciduria (cobalamin deficiency) cbl-C type, with homocystinuria gene were detected in the 3 patients. In these patients the levels of lactate dehydrogenase and homocysteine in serum were elevated and the level of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in urine was also elevated. After treatment with hydroxocobalamin, 2 patients were discharged with no obvious abnormal growth and neurological development and 1 patient died of multiple organ failure. The results of this study demonstrated that cbl-C disorder should be investigated in any child presenting with HUS. The high concentrations of homocysteine and MMA could be used for timely recognization of the disease. Once the high levels of plasma homocystein and/or plasma or urine MMA are detected, the treatment with parenteral hydroxocobalamin should be prescribed immediately. The early diagnosis and treatment would contribute to the good prognosis of the disease.

  13. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. A. Khoa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS, Duroc (DU, Berlin miniature pig (BMP, German Landrace (LR, Pietrain (PIE, and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig. Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK. Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9 as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future.

  14. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn: Modern Practice and Future Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Delaney, Meghan

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) sensitization occurs in some women in response to exposure to paternally derived RBC antigens during pregnancy or to nonself antigens on transfused RBCs during their lifetime. Once sensitized, future pregnancies may be at risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although great strides have been made over the past few decades in terms of identifying blood group antigens and in predicting fetal anemia through the use of noninvasive monitoring, many questions remain in terms of understanding RBC alloimmunization risk factors, preventative therapies, and treatment strategies. At the present time, there is room for improvement in these areas in both developed and developing countries. Evidence-based, universal guidelines describing recommended RBC antigen matching transfusion strategies for girls or women, before pregnancy or during intrauterine transfusions, would be welcomed. A better understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of Rh immunoglobulin, first introduced more than half of a century ago and one of the most successful immunoprophylaxis therapies in existence today, would also be a large step forward. For example, answers to questions of the role(s) that fetal RBC clearance, antigen masking, antigen modulation, and immune suppression play in the effectiveness of Rh immunoglobulin may help to guide the development of novel preventative therapies during pregnancy for immunization to RhD and non-RhD antigens. Furthermore, a better understanding of the importance of anti-RhD or other alloantibody glycosylation patterns may be beneficial not only in developing such novel immunoprophylaxis therapies but also in predicting the clinical significance of existing maternal alloantibodies. One other area of need includes the development of therapies beyond intrauterine transfusions to mitigate the dangers of maternal alloantibodies to developing fetuses. We challenge physicians, scientists, and funding agencies to prioritize studies of

  15. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  16. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2 had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  17. The Surface-Exposed Protein SntA Contributes to Complement Evasion in Zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Simin; Xu, Tong; Fang, Qiong; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Jiaqi; Chen, Long; Liu, Jiahui; Zhou, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen causing streptococcal toxic shock like syndrome (STSLS), meningitis, septicemia, and even sudden death in human and pigs. Serious septicemia indicates this bacterium can evade the host complement surveillance. In our previous study, a functionally unknown protein SntA of S. suis has been identified as a heme-binding protein, and contributes to virulence in pigs. SntA can interact with the host antioxidant protein AOP2 and consequently inhibit its antioxidant activity. In the present study, SntA is identified as a cell wall anchored protein that functions as an important player in S. suis complement evasion. The C3 deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on the surface of sntA -deleted mutant strain Δ sntA are demonstrated to be significantly higher than the parental strain SC-19 and the complementary strain CΔ sntA . The abilities of anti-phagocytosis, survival in blood, and in vivo colonization of Δ sntA are obviously reduced. SntA can interact with C1q and inhibit hemolytic activity via the classical pathway. Complement activation assays reveal that SntA can also directly activate classical and lectin pathways, resulting in complement consumption. These two complement evasion strategies may be crucial for the pathogenesis of this zoonotic pathogen. Concerning that SntA is a bifunctional 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 2'-phosphodiesterase/3'-nucleotidase in many species of Gram-positive bacteria, these complement evasion strategies may have common biological significance.

  18. Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae as potential vaccines by selecting for resistance to sparfloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H

    2013-05-31

    To develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, sparfloxacin was used in this study to modify 40 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae. Majority of S. agalactiae used in this study were able to develop at least 80-fold resistance to sparfloxacin. When the virulence of the sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates were tested in 10-12g Nile tilapia by intraperitoneal injection at dose of 2×10(7)CFU/fish, 31 were found to be avirulent to fish. Of the 31 avirulent sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates, 30 provided 75-100% protection to 10-12g Nile tilapia against challenges with a virulent S. agalactiae isolate Sag 50. When the virulence of the 30 sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates was tested in 3-5g Nile tilapia by intraperitoneal injection at dose of 2×10(7)CFU/fish, six were found to be avirulent to 3-5g Nile tilapia. Of the six avirulent sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates, four provided 3-5g Nile tilapia 100% protection against challenges with homologous isolates, including Sag 97-spar isolate that was non-hemolytic. However, Sag 97-spar failed to provide broad cross-protection against challenges with heterologous isolates. When Nile tilapia was vaccinated with a polyvalent vaccine consisting of 30 sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates at dose of 2×10(6)CFU/fish, the polyvalent vaccine provided significant (PS. agalactiae. Taken together, our results suggest that a polyvalent vaccine consisting of various strains of S. agalactiae might be essential to provide broader protection to Nile tilapia against infections caused by S. agalactiae. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Activity of Genital Tract Secretions and Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides against Group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nidhi; Buckley, Niall; Nakra, Natasha; Gialanella, Philip; Yuan, Weirong; Ghartey, Jeny P

    2015-12-01

    Genital tract secretions inhibit Escherichia coli (E. coli) through antimicrobial peptides (AMP) secreted by the host and vaginal microbiota. However, there are limited data against group B Streptococcus (GBS). Group B Streptococcus were incubated with cervico-vaginal lavage (CVL) samples from healthy non-pregnant women (n = 12) or synthetic AMP and monitored for bacterial growth using a turbidimetric approach. E. coli inhibitory activity was determined by a colony-forming unit assay. None of the CVL samples inhibited GBS. The human neutrophil peptide-1 and human defensin 5 inhibited GBS growth by ≥80% at concentrations ≥20 μg/mL and ≥50 μg/mL, respectively, while human beta-defensin 2 and LL-37 did not inhibit at highest concentration tested (100 μg/mL). In contrast, all AMP inhibited E. coli. Antimicrobial peptides may protect against E. coli colonization but have more limited activity against GBS. Future studies will focus on augmenting host defense with specific AMP to prevent genitourinary infection with these pathogenic organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. X-ray scattering signatures of {beta}-thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desouky, Omar S. [Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT) (Egypt); Elshemey, Wael M. [Biophysics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: waelelshemey@yahoo.com; Selim, Nabila S. [Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT) (Egypt)

    2009-08-11

    X-ray scattering from lyophilized proteins or protein-rich samples is characterized by the presence of two characteristic broad peaks at scattering angles equivalent to momentum transfer values of 0.27 and 0.6 nm{sup -1}, respectively. These peaks arise from the interference of coherently scattered photons. Once the conformation of a protein is changed, these two peaks reflect such change with considerable sensitivity. The present work examines the possibility of characterizing the most common cause of hemolytic anaemia in Egypt and many Mediterranean countries; {beta}-thalassemia, from its X-ray scattering profile. This disease emerges from a genetic defect causing reduced rate in the synthesis of one of the globin chains that make up hemoglobin. As a result, structurally abnormal hemoglobin molecules are formed. In order to detect such molecular disorder, hemoglobin samples of {beta}-thalassemia patients are collected, lyophilized and measured using a conventional X-ray diffractometer. Results show significant differences in the X-ray scattering profiles of most of the diseased samples compared to control. The shape of the first scattering peak at 0.27 nm{sup -1}, in addition to the relative intensity of the first to the second scattering peaks, provides the most reliable signs of abnormality in diseased samples. The results are interpreted and confirmed with the aid of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of normal and thalassemia samples.

  1. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... Anyhow, the 'multi-isotope' ansatz is needed to compensate for matrix element ... The neccessary half-life requirement to touch this ... site energy depositions (like double beta decay) and multiple site interactions (most of.

  2. Beta-Carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (COPD). It is also used to improve memory and muscle strength. Some people use beta-carotene ... to reduce the chance of death and night blindness during pregnancy, as well as diarrhea and fever ...

  3. Double beta decay: experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2006-01-01

    The results obtained so far and those of the running experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The plans for second generation experiments, the techniques to be adopted and the expected sensitivities are compared and discussed

  4. In silico assessment of virulence factors in strains of Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis isolated from patients with Infective Endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise H.; Iversen, Katrine Højholt; Dargis, Rimtas

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis belong to the Mitis group, which are mostly commensals in the human oral cavity. Even though S. oralis and S. mitis are oral commensals, they can be opportunistic pathogens causing infective endocarditis. A recent taxonomic re-evaluation of the Mitis...

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  6. Streptococcus anginosus infections: crossing tissue planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Bernie Y; Miller, Wallace T

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus anginosus has long been recognized to cause invasive pyogenic infections. This holds true for thoracic infections where S. anginosus has a propensity for abscess and empyema formation. Early diagnosis is important given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with thoracic S. anginosus infections. Yet, distinguishing thoracic S. anginosus clinically is difficult. We present three cases of thoracic S. anginosus that demonstrated radiographic extension across tissue planes, including the interlobar fissure, diaphragm, and chest wall. Few infectious etiologies are known to cross tissue planes. Accordingly, we propose S. anginosus be considered among the differential diagnosis of potential infectious etiologies causing radiographic extension across tissue planes.

  7. Meningitis caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae: a retrospective clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Harder, Eva; Wandall, Johan

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 26 patients (median age 62 years, range 5-76 years) admitted to our institution during 1978-98 with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae (comprising 1.9% of all patients with ABM). 19 cases were community......-acquired and 7 were nosocomial. 73% had comorbid or predisposing conditions and 73% had an identifiable extracerebral focus; only in 2 patients no comorbid disease, primary focus or predisposing condition was present. Five patients had cerebral abscesses, and 5 had endocarditis. Beta-haemolytic streptococci were...... grown in 14 cases (serotype A: 4, B: 5, C: 1, G: 4) and were predominant among patients with endocarditis, whereas alpha- or non-haemolytic strains grew in 12 cases (S. mitis: 4, S. constellatus: 2, E. faecalis: 2, S. bovis: 1, unspecified: 3) and were predominant in patients with a brain abscess...

  8. Prevalence and Characteristics of Streptococcus canis Strains Isolated from Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lysková

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of Streptococcus canis in dogs and cats, a total of 926 swabs were examined bacteriologically in the period from 2003 to 2005. Eighty-six isolates obtained from various anatomical locations were further characterized for their phenotypic properties. The most frequently isolated biotype produced phosphatase, leucine amidopeptidase, arginine dihydrolase, alpha-D- and beta-D-galactosidase and fermented lactose and ribose. Additional identification by species-specific amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region was consistent with S. canis. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G and ampicillin. The least effective antimicrobial agent was found to be tetracycline (only 33.8% of susceptible strains.

  9. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  10. Structural insight into the role of Streptococcus parasanguinis Fap1 within oral biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, James A.; Simpson, Peter J.; Taylor, Jonathan; Benjamin, Stefi V.; Tagliaferri, Camille; Cota, Ernesto [Department of Biological Sciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Chen, Yi-Ywan M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Research Center for Pathogenic Bacteria, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hui [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Dentistry, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Matthews, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.matthews@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Biological Sciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of Streptococcus parasanguinis Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} at pH 5.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pH-dependent conformational changes mediated through electrostatic potential of Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fap1 facilitates pH-dependent biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model inter-Fap1 biofilm interactions. -- Abstract: The fimbriae-associated protein 1 (Fap1) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus parasanguinis, a primary colonizer of the oral cavity that plays an important role in the formation of dental plaque. Fap1 is an extracellular adhesive surface fibre belonging to the serine-rich repeat protein (SRRP) family, which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of streptococci and staphylococci. The N-terminal adhesive region of Fap1 (Fap1-NR) is composed of two domains (Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} and Fap1-NR{sub {beta}}) and is projected away from the bacterial surface via the extensive serine-rich repeat region, for adhesion to the salivary pellicle. The adhesive properties of Fap1 are modulated through a pH switch in which a reduction in pH results in a rearrangement between the Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} and Fap1-NR{sub {beta}} domains, which assists in the survival of S. parasanguinis in acidic environments. We have solved the structure of Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} at pH 5.0 at 3.0 A resolution and reveal how subtle rearrangements of the 3-helix bundle combined with a change in electrostatic potential mediates 'opening' and activation of the adhesive region. Further, we show that pH-dependent changes are critical for biofilm formation and present an atomic model for the inter-Fap1-NR interactions which have been assigned an important role in the biofilm formation.

  11. Group B Streptococcus and the Vaginal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Geoffrey H; Randis, Tara M; Desai, Purnahamsi V; Sapra, Katherine J; Ma, Bing; Gajer, Pawel; Humphrys, Michael S; Ravel, Jacques; Gelber, Shari E; Ratner, Adam J

    2017-09-15

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is an important neonatal pathogen and emerging cause of disease in adults. The major risk factor for neonatal disease is maternal vaginal colonization. However, little is known about the relationship between GBS and vaginal microbiota. Vaginal lavage samples from nonpregnant women were tested for GBS, and amplicon-based sequencing targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA V3-V4 region was performed. Four hundred twenty-eight of 432 samples met the high-quality read threshold. There was no relationship between GBS carriage and demographic characteristics, α-diversity, or overall vaginal microbiota community state type (CST). Within the non-Lactobacillus-dominant CST IV, GBS positive status was significantly more prevalent in CST IV-A than CST IV-B. Significant clustering by GBS status was noted on principal coordinates analysis, and 18 individual taxa were found to be significantly associated with GBS carriage by linear discriminant analysis. After adjusting for race/ethnicity, 4 taxa were positively associated with GBS, and 6 were negatively associated. Vaginal microbiota CST and α-diversity are not related to GBS status. However, specific microbial taxa are associated with colonization of this important human pathogen, highlighting a potential role for the microbiota in promotion or inhibition of GBS colonization. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. [Evaluation of Prolex for the rapid identification of streptococci isolated in medical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubinoux, J; Mihaila-Amrouche, L; Bouvet, A

    2004-10-01

    The need to rapidly identify streptococci responsible for acute infectious diseases has led to the development of agglutination techniques that are able to identify streptococcal group antigens (A, B, C, D, F, and G) directly from primoculture colonies on blood agar. The Prolex agglutination tests (Pro-Lab Diagnostics, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada), distributed in France by i2a, have been used for the determination of group antigens of 166 isolates of streptococci and enterococci previously identified in the National Reference Center for Streptococci. The results obtained with the Prolex reagents have permitted to correctly identify all pyogenic beta-hemolytic streptococci (23 Streptococcus pyogenes, 21 Streptococcus agalactiae, 33 Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis including 6 group C and 27 group G, and 5 Streptococcus porcinus including 4 group B). Four differences between unexpected agglutinations (A or F) and species identifications have been obtained. These differences were observed for four non-hemolytic isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus infantarius, and Streptococcus suis. The anti-D reagent has been of value as a marker for isolates of enterococci. Thus, these results confirm the abilities of these agglutination tests for the grouping of beta-hemolytic streptococci. Moreover, the use of Prolex has the advantage to be rapid because of the non-enzymatic but chemical extraction of streptococcal antigens.

  13. A rare cause of neonatal meningitis: Group A streptecocci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Annagür

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococci are rare cause of neonatal meningitis.In this case report, we discussed a case of newbornmeningitis caused by Group A beta hemolytic streptococcusunder the light of related literature. Twenty four daysold male baby who was reported to be completely healthybefore was referred to our clinic with symptoms of fever,not sucking and left localized convulsion which were presentfor one day. Lumbar puncture was consistent with purulentmeningitis. Group A beta hemolytic streptococcusgrowth both in blood and Cerebrospinal liquid. Patientwas treated with Penicillin G. In clinical follow-up, tetraventricular hydrocephaly was detected but there was noneed for shunt. Later follow-up revealed hearing loss.Meningitis caused by Group A beta hemolytic streptococcusalthough is quite rare must be kept in mind in casesof newborn meningitis. Group A Streptococcus can alsocause serious neurological sequel as in other newbornmeningitis causes.Key words: Group A streptococci, neonatal meningitis,Streptococcus pyogenes, hydrocephaly

  14. Boosted beta regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schmid

    Full Text Available Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1. Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures.

  15. Ways to develop the prophylaxis of post-transfusion hemolytic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Bahovadinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transfusion hemolytic complications (РНС remain аn urgent рrоblem in medical practice despite the improvement of selecting methods of compatible blood transfusion for patients. The numbеr of РНС remains still high (1 in 6 000 - 29 000 transfusions. Aim: to analyze cases of РНС registered in health care facilities (HCF in the Republic of Tajikistan. Method of investigation. Retrospective analysis of materials of national аnd regional committees оп investigation of РНС cases, histories fro hospital archives. During the period 1989-2014 in health facilities were registered 86 cases of РНС approximately 850 000 doses of red bооd cell transfusions containing blооd components, or 1 in 9418 doses of red blood cell-containing blood components. РНС reasons were: incompatibility of АВО blооd group system - 32 (37,3 %, antigen D of blооd group Rhesus factor system - 34 (39,53 %, according to minor blood group antigens of Rhesus factor and Kell blood group system (С, с, Е, е, К - 16 (18,6 %. In 4 cases (4,6 % the cases of РНС were hemolytic transfusions of erythrocyte-containing bags as а result of improper storage in domestic refrigeration without control of temperature storage. Causes of development 78 out of 86 РНС (90,69 % were HCF doctors' mistakes, 8 (9,31 % - mistakes of health personnel of health facilities departments of blood transfusion аnd regional blооd centers. Reducing the frequency of PHC is impossible without training physicians оn transfusion medicine, introduction of modern methods of phenotyping erythrocyte antigens of recipients and donors оn major transfusion significant blood group antigens the АВО system by direct and cross-over methods, Rhesus (С, с, Е, е, Kell (К of patients requiring multiple transfusions, as well as to girls and women of childbearing age.

  16. Grafting synthetic transmembrane units to the engineered low-toxicity α-hemolysin to restore its hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Mihoko; Harima, Kousuke; Takei, Toshiaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Endo, Sumire; Akiyama, Kimio; Muraoka, Takahiro; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-12-01

    The chemical modification of proteins to provide desirable functions and/or structures broadens their possibilities for use in various applications. Usually, proteins can acquire new functions and characteristics, in addition to their original ones, via the introduction of synthetic functional moieties. Here, we adopted a more radical approach to protein modification, i.e., the replacement of a functional domain of proteins with alternative chemical compounds to build "cyborg proteins." As a proof of concept model, we chose staphylococcal α-hemolysin (Hla), which is a well-studied, pore-forming toxin. The hemolytic activity of Hla mutants was dramatically decreased by truncation of the stem domain, which forms a β-barrel pore in the membrane. However, the impaired hemolytic activity was significantly restored by attaching a pyrenyl-maleimide unit to the cysteine residue that was introduced in the remaining stem domain. In contrast, negatively charged fluorescein-maleimide completely abolished the remaining activity of the mutants.

  17. Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Di b treated with phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jee; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Jang, Hyun-Sik; Park, Hae-Il; Park, Yeon-Joon; Choi, Hyun Ah; Chun, Chung-Sik; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2008-01-01

    The Di(b) antigen usually occurs with high incidence, except in certain Asian and South American Indian populations. In general, hemolysis caused by anti-Di(b) is not severe and its clinical course is benign. We report a Korean neonate with severe hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by anti-Di(b). The phenotype and genotype of the Diego blood group system of the patient and his mother were Di(a+b+) and Di(a+b-), respectively. The mother's serum and eluate from the neonate's erythrocytes contained anti-Di(b). This case was successfully managed with phototherapy and high dose iv immunoglobulin. Since most commercial antibody detection panels do not contain Di(b-) red cells, it is important to consider anti-Di(b) in cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by an antibody against a high frequency antigen.

  18. Use of partial budgeting to determine the economic benefits of antibiotic treatment of chronic subclinical mastitis caused by Streptococcus uberis or Streptococcus dysgalactiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, J.M.; Rooijendijk, J.G.A.; Zadoks, R.N.; Hogeveen, H.

    2005-01-01

    The economic effect of lactational antibiotic treatment of chronic subclinical intramammary infections due to Streptococcus uberis or Streptococcus dysgalactiae was explored by means of partial budgeting. Effects at cow level and herd level were modelled, including prevention of clinical mastitis

  19. Comparison of genes required for H2O2 resistance in Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Itzek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced by several members of the genus Streptococcus mainly through the pyruvate oxidase SpxB under aerobic growth conditions. The acute toxic nature of H2O2 raises the interesting question of how streptococci cope with intrinsically produced H2O2, which subsequently accumulates in the microenvironment and threatens the closely surrounding population. Here, we investigate the H2O2 susceptibility of oral Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis and elucidate potential mechanisms of how they protect themselves from the deleterious effect of H2O2. Both organisms are considered primary colonizers and occupy the same intraoral niche making them potential targets for H2O2 produced by other species. We demonstrate that S. gordonii produces relatively more H2O2 and has a greater ability for resistance to H2O2 stress. Functional studies show that, unlike in Streptococcus pneumoniae, H2O2 resistance is not dependent on a functional SpxB and confirms the important role of the ferritin-like DNA-binding protein Dps. However, the observed increased H2O2 resistance of S. gordonii over S. sanguinis is likely to be caused by an oxidative stress protection machinery present even under anaerobic conditions, while S. sanguinis requires a longer period of time for adaptation. The ability to produce more H2O2 and be more resistant to H2O2 might aid S. gordonii in the competitive oral biofilm environment, since it is lower in abundance yet manages to survive quite efficiently in the oral biofilm. PMID:25280752

  20. Interactions between Oral Bacteria: Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Bacteriocin Production by Streptococcus gordonii

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bing-Yan; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been recognized as an important etiological agent in human dental caries. Some strains of S. mutans also produce bacteriocins. In this study, we sought to demonstrate that bacteriocin production by S. mutans strains GS5 and BM71 was mediated by quorum sensing, which is dependent on a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system encoded by the com genes. We also demonstrated that interactions with some other oral streptococci interfered with S. mutans bacterio...

  1. Reappraisal of the taxonomy of Streptococcus suis serotypes 20, 22 and 26: Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, R; Maruyama, F; Ishida, S; Tohya, M; Sekizaki, T; Osawa, Ro

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the taxonomic position of serotypes 20, 22 and 26 of Streptococcus suis, biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on isolates (SUT-7, SUT-286(T), SUT-319, SUT-328 and SUT-380) reacted with specific antisera of serotypes 20, 22 or 26 from the saliva of healthy pigs as well as reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26. Comparative recN gene sequencing showed high genetic relatedness among our isolates, but marked differences from the type strain S. suis NCTC 10234(T), i.e. 74.8-75.7 % sequence similarity. The genomic relatedness between the isolates and other strains of species of the genus Streptococcus, including S. suis, was calculated using the average nucleotide identity values of whole genome sequences, which indicated that serotypes 20, 22 and 26 should be removed taxonomically from S. suis and treated as a novel genomic species. Comparative sequence analysis revealed 99.0-100 % sequence similarities for the 16S rRNA genes between the reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26, and our isolates. Isolate STU-286(T) had relatively high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with S. suis NCTC 10234(T) (98.8 %). SUT-286(T) could be distinguished from S. suis and other closely related species of the genus Streptococcus using biochemical tests. Due to its phylogenetic and phenotypic similarities to S. suis we propose naming the novel species Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov., with SUT-286(T) ( = JCM 30273(T) = DSM 29126(T)) as the type strain. © 2015 IUMS.

  2. Megadose Methylprednisolone (MDMP Treatment in a Patient with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA Resistant to Conventional Corticosteroid Administration: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şinasi Özsoylu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A female in the Netherlands with severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA was treated with conventional corticosteroid (2 mg/kg/d in divided doses and blood transfusions for 18 months without improvement. The presented patient responded to megadose methylprednisolone (MDMP 30 mg/kg/d for 3 d, followed by 20 mg/kg for 4 d, and subsequently 10, 5, 2, and 1 mg/kg/d each for 1 week.

  3. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS): a 24-year clinical experience with 178 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Primo; Harvey Danielle; Levandovsky Mark; Wun Ted

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS) are related and uncommon disorders with a high fatality and complication rate if untreated. Plasma exchange therapy has been shown to produce high response rates and improve survival in patients with many forms of TTP-HUS. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 178 consecutively treated patients with TTP-HUS and analyzed whether clinical or laboratory characteristics could predict for imp...

  4. The value of transcutaneous method of bilirubin measurement in newborn population with the risk of ABO hemolytic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoniene, Dalia; Buinauskiene, Jūrate; Markūniene, Egle

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY. To evaluate the correlation between total serum bilirubin (TSB) and transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) levels in newborn infants at risk of ABO hemolytic disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS. During a prospective study, 130 full-term (>or=37 weeks of gestation) newborn infants with diagnosed ABO blood group incompatibility were examined. TSB level was measured at the age of 6 hours; further measurements were performed at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the first measurement. Blood samples were collected from the peripheral veins. In clinical laboratory, total serum bilirubin level was measured using Jendrassik-Grof method. TcB level in the forehead was measured using a noninvasive bilirubinometer BiliCheck (SpectRX Inc, Norcross, GA) according to the manufacturer's instructions within +/-30 min after getting a blood sample. RESULTS. During the study, 387 double tests were performed to measure TSB and TcB levels. TSB level (114.83 [62.85] micromol/L) closely correlated with TcB level (111.51 [61.31] micromol/L) (r=0.92, Por=98 micromol/L, ABO hemolytic disease in newborns may be diagnosed with 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity; positive predictive value was 62% and negative predictive value was 100%. While a newborn's age increases, TcB sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing ABO hemolytic disease decrease. CONCLUSION. While evaluating bilirubin level transcutaneously according to nomograms of serum bilirubin level, the results should be considered with caution, especially for newborns with a risk of ABO hemolytic disease. The hour-specific nomograms of transcutaneous bilirubin level should be used to evaluate hyperbilirubinemia using only a noninvasive method.

  5. Labelling of. beta. -endorphin (. beta. -END) and. beta. -lipotropin (. beta. -LPH) by /sup 125/I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deby-Dupont, G.; Joris, J.; Franchimont, P. (Universite de Liege (Belgique)); Reuter, A.M.; Vrindts-Gevaert, Y. (Institut des Radioelements, Fleurus (Belgique))

    1983-01-01

    5 ..mu..g of human ..beta..-endorphin were labelled with 2 mCi /sup 125/I by the chloramine T technique. After two gel filtrations on Sephadex G-15 and on Sephadex G-50 in phosphate buffer with EDTA, Trasylol and mercapto-ethanol, a pure tracer was obtained with a specific activity about 150 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g.Kept at + 4/sup 0/C, the tracer remained utilizable for 30 days without loss of immunoreactivity. The labelling with lactoperoxydase and the use of another gel filtration method (filtration on Aca 202) gave a /sup 125/I ..beta..-END tracer with the same immunoreactivity. The binding of this tracer to the antibody of an anti-..beta..-END antiserum diluted at 1/8000 was 32% with a non specific binding of 2%. 5 ..mu..g of human ..beta..-lipotropin were labelled with 0.5 mCi /sup 125/I by the lactoperoxydase method. After two gel filtrations on Sephadex G-25 and on Sephadex G-75 in phosphate buffer with EDTA, Trasylol and mercapto-ethanol, a pure tracer with a specific activity of 140 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g was obtained. It remained utilizable for 30 days when kept at + 4/sup 0/C. Gel filtration on Aca 202 did not give good purification, while gel filtration on Aca 54 was good but slower than on Sephadex G-75. The binding to antibody in absence of unlabelled ..beta..-LPH was 32% for an anti-..beta..-LPH antiserum diluted at 1/4000. The non specific binding was 2.5%.

  6. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2017-03-01

    Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood samples and parvovirus B19 genotypes in plasma samples of patients with thalassemia major. The population consisted of 150 patients with beta-thalassemia major who attended the Zafar clinic in Tehran. Specimens were studied using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 in our study population was 4%. Of 150 patients with thalassemia, six (4%) were positive for B19 DNA. There was no significant correlation between blood transfusion frequency and B19 DNA positivity. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of human parvovirus B19 revealed genotype I in these six patients. In this study, acute B19 infections were detected in patients with beta thalassemia major. Screening of such high-risk groups can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection; thus, screening is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease-prevention measures.

  7. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported

  8. Contribution to the food products' analysis: A research and evaluation on the hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alam, Josephine; Millet, Maurice; Chbani, Asma; Fajloun, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides are a real concern for the society as their use has become critical, leading sometimes to their accumulation as residues in fruits and vegetables. After examining the pesticides sold in Northern Lebanon, this study is focused on the analysis and identification of pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables that are harvested in this region and treated with the locally sold pesticides. Results show: first, (i) a use of Zineb by the name of another pesticide Micronized Sulfur to avoid prosecution; (ii) a significant presence of Metalaxyl in lemons and oranges; (iii) a significant presence of Trifluralin in strawberries; and (iv) a significant presence of Zineb in lemons and tomatoes. Second, with the use of hemolytic tests on human blood results show: (i) a critical concentration and a significant hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon; and (ii) an absence of hemolytic effect in the collected fractions of the different analyzed fruit extracts containing pesticides. Finally, this work is the first step for pesticides' analysis in vegetables and fruits in Lebanon, initiating a wider analytical study in order to control and examine the use of pesticides which, according to our results, could have an adverse effect on human health over a long term.

  9. Vegetable Peel Waste for the Production of ZnO Nanoparticles and its Toxicological Efficiency, Antifungal, Hemolytic, and Antibacterial Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, T. V.; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Sarkar, Gargi; Suthindhiran, K.

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are important materials when making different products like sun screens, textiles, and paints. In the current study, the photocatalytic effect of prepared ZnO NPs from Moringa oleifera ( M. oleifera) was evaluated on degradation of crystal violet (CV) dye, which is largely released from textile industries and is harmful to the environment. Preliminarily, ZnO NP formation was confirmed using a double beam ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer; further, the NP size was estimated using XRD analysis and the functional group analysis was determined using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the synthesized NPs was found to be a hexagonal shape using SEM and TEM analysis and elemental screening was analyzed using EDX. ZnO NPs were shown sized 40-45 nm and spherical in shape. The degradation percentage of ZnO NPs was calculated as 94% at 70 min and the rate of the reaction -k = 0.0282. The synthesized ZnO NPs were determined for effectiveness on biological activities such as antifungal, hemolytic, and antibacterial activity. ZnO NPs showed good antifungal activity against Alternaria saloni and Sclerrotium rolfii strains. Further, we have determined the hemolytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO NPs and we got successive results in antibacterial and hemolytic activities.

  10. Plasma beta HCG determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L.B.D.; Pinto, J.C.M.; Linhares, E.; Linhares, Estevao

    1981-01-01

    There are three important indications for the early diagnosis of pregnancy through the determination of the beta sub-unit of chorionic gonadotrophin using radioimmunoassay: 1) some patient's or doctor's anxiety to discover the problem; 2) when it will be necessary to employ diagnostic or treatment procedures susceptible to affect the ovum; and 3) in the differential diagnosis of amenorrhoea, uterine hemorrhage and abdominal tumors. Other user's are the diagnosis of missed absortion, and the diagnosis and follow-up of chrorioncarcinoma. The AA. studied 200 determinations of plasma beta-HCG, considering the main difficulties occuring in the clinical use of this relevant laboratory tool in actual Obstetrics. (author) [pt

  11. Relation between the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} and 0{nu}{beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Petr [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina F1, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-12-16

    A formal relation between the GT part of the nuclear matrix elements M{sub GT}{sup 0{nu}} of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay and the closure matrix elements M{sub cl}{sup 2{nu}} of 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay is established. This relation is based on the integral representation of these quantities in terms of their dependence on the distance r between the two nucleons undergoing transformation. We also discuss the difficulties in determining the correct values of the closure 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay matrix elements.

  12. Current Taxonomical Situation of Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Nomoto, Ryohei; Arai, Sakura; Osawa, Ro; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-06-24

    Streptococcus suis, a major porcine pathogen and an important zoonotic agent, is considered to be composed of phenotypically and genetically diverse strains. However, recent studies reported several "S. suis-like strains" that were identified as S. suis by commonly used methods for the identification of this bacterium, but were regarded as distinct species from S. suis according to the standards of several taxonomic analyses. Furthermore, it has been suggested that some S. suis-like strains can be assigned to several novel species. In this review, we discuss the current taxonomical situation of S. suis with a focus on (1) the classification history of the taxon of S. suis; (2) S. suis-like strains revealed by taxonomic analyses; (3) methods for detecting and identifying this species, including a novel method that can distinguish S. suis isolates from S. suis-like strains; and (4) current topics on the reclassification of S. suis-like strains.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae, mecanismos de resistencia antimicrobiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Noda Albelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El Streptococcus pneumoniae, principal agente causal de la neumonía comunitaria, líder en la etiología de la otitis media y la meningitis, en las últimas 3 décadas ha incrementado, de manera importante, su resistencia a los agentes terapéuticos más utilizados, como los betalactámicos, macrólidos, azálidos y fluroquinolonas. La versatilidad adaptativa del microorganismo le ha permitido crear mecanismos capaces de sobreponerse a cualquiera de estas agresiones terapéuticas con un grado variable de eficacia. Se realiza una revisión de los mecanismos más importantes implicados en la adquisición de resistencia antimicrobiana por S. pneumoniae, y se precisan algunos de los factores de riesgo implicados en infección por S. pneumoniae resistente.

  14. The homodimeric GBS1074 from Streptococcus agalactiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Anshuman; Pallen, Mark; Anthony, Mark; White, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The homodimeric nature of the ESAT-6 homologue GBS1074 and the potential for fibre-like assemblies are revealed by the 2 Å resolution crystal structure. ESAT-6 is a well characterized secreted protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and represents the archetype of the WXG100 family of proteins. Genes encoding ESAT-6 homologues have been identified in the genome of the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae; one of these genes, esxA, has been cloned and the recombinant protein has been crystallized. In contrast to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6, the crystal structure of GBS1074 reveals a homodimeric structure similar to homologous structures from Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori. Intriguingly, GBS1074 forms elongated fibre-like assemblies in the crystal structure

  15. Streptococcus pyogenes vulvovaginitis in children in Nottingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, F. E.; Slack, R. C.; Colman, G.

    1991-01-01

    Isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from vaginal swabs of children with vulvovaginitis received at Nottingham Public Health Laboratory during 1986-9 were studied. A total of 159 isolates was made during the 4 years, increasing from 17 in 1986 to 64 in 1989 and accounting for 11% of all vaginal swabs received from children. The numbers of throat swabs yielding S. pyogenes also showed an increase from 974 in 1986 to 1519 in 1989. A winter peak of isolates was noted for both vaginal swabs and throat swabs. A total of 98 strains from vaginal swabs were serotyped: 22 different types were identified, 61% of which were the common types M4, M6, R28 and M12. Erythromycin sensitivity was done on 89 strains; 84% were highly sensitive (MIC less than 0.03 mg/l). There are no other reports of such large numbers in the literature; the reason for seeing this increase in Nottingham is unclear. PMID:2050200

  16. Development of Streptococcus agalactiae vaccines for tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangjin; Zhu, Jielian; Chen, Kangming; Gao, Tingting; Yao, Huochun; Liu, Yongjie; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2016-12-21

    Vaccination is a widely accepted and effective method to prevent most pathogenic diseases in aquaculture. Various species of tilapia, especially Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, are farmed worldwide because of their high consumer demand. Recently, the tilapia-breeding industry has been hampered by outbreaks of Streptococcus agalactiae infection, which cause high mortality and huge economic losses. Many researchers have attempted to develop effective S. agalactiae vaccines for tilapia. This review provides a summary of the different kinds of S. agalactiae vaccines for tilapia that have been developed recently. Among the various vaccine types, inactivated S. agalactiae vaccines showed superior protection efficiency when compared with live attenuated, recombinant and DNA vaccines. With respect to vaccination method, injecting the vaccine into tilapia provided the most effective immunoprotection. Freund's incomplete adjuvant appeared to be suitable for tilapia vaccines. Other factors, such as immunization duration and number, fish size and challenge dose, also influenced the vaccine efficacy.

  17. Life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: successful seletive splenic artery embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    matteo molica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy.

  18. Sulfaguanidine cocrystals: Synthesis, structural characterization and their antibacterial and hemolytic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Asghar; Azim, Yasser; Khan, Shahper Nazeer; Khan, Asad U

    2018-02-05

    Sulfaguanidine (SG), belongs to the class of sulfonamide drug used as an effective antibiotic. In the present work, using crystal engineering approach two novel cocrystals of SG were synthesized (SG-TBA and SG-PT) with thiobarbutaric acid (TBA) and 1,10-phenanthroline (PT), characterized by solid state techniques viz., powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. A comparative antibacterial activity and hemolytic potential was done on SG drug, coformers and their cocrystals. The tested cocrystals formulations showed almost two fold higher antibacterial activity against the tested strains of bacteria Gram-positive bacteria (S. mutans and E. faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, K. pneumonia and E. clocae) over SG alone and their coformers. Cocrystal SG-TBA showed better antibacterial activity and reduced hemolysis, thereby, reduced cytotoxicity than SG-PT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-Related Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Three Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The association between primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is uncommon; only fourteen such case reports have been described. In this report, three patients who developed AIHA on the basis of PBC underwent successful therapy with corticosteroids and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA. Patient 3 was more complicated, suffering from PBC, Evans syndrome, Sjögren syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome simultaneously. This has not previously been reported in the world literature. Review of all fifteen cases showed that there is a prominent occurrence sequence that AIHA might take place on the basis of PBC. With sufficient doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressant therapy, besides hemolysis under effective control, liver function also improved. According to the criteria of secondary AIHA, we may call them PBC-related AIHA. Thus, patients with PBC with serum bilirubin levels rising suddenly should undergo screening for associated hemolysis. Recommended treatment for PBC-related AIHA includes sufficient doses of corticosteroids to control the hemolysis in the acute phase, and immunosuppressant or adequate dose of UDCA to maintain therapy. These case reports have been increasing in recent years, so further reserch is needed to illustrate the incidence and natural courses of these two organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

  20. Characterization of autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia following treatment with interferon alfa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencomo Hernandez, Antonio; Gutierrez Diaz, Adys; Avila Cabrera, Onel; Rodriguez, Luis Ramon

    2012-01-01

    We studied 13 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by interferon alfa. They underwent tests for immune protein detection and characterization of IgG subclasses in RBCs by direct antiglobulin test (PAD) and the microplate technique. Also they were applied ELISA test for quantifying immunoglobulins in the red blood cells. It was detected the presence of IgG and C3 in 53.84 % of cases, IgG alone in 23.07 % and in 15.38 % were identified IgG and IgA autoantibodies. In 11 patients the presence of IgG1 was showed and also in one case the subclass IgG3 autoantibodies was identified. The ELISA detected antibodies at concentrations of 183 IgG molecules per erythrocyte in a patient with negative PAD. In high-grade hemolysis patients, it was found a concentration of autoantibodies between 1 500 and 3 180 molecules of IgG per erythrocyte, while in low-grade hemolysis patients it behaved between 183 and 1 000 molecules. There was a negative correlation between Hb and plasma haptoglobin values with the number of IgG molecules per erythrocyte and a positive correlation between the latter with the reticulocyte count

  1. Late Onset Cobalamin Disorder and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Ardissino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is an unrare and severe thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA caused by several pathogenetic mechanisms among which Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and complement dysregulation are the most common. However, very rarely and particularly in neonates and infants, disorders of cobalamin metabolism (CblC can present with or be complicated by TMA. Herein we describe a case of atypical HUS (aHUS related to CblC disease which first presented in a previously healthy boy at age of 13.6 years. The clinical picture was initially dominated by nephrotic range proteinuria and severe hypertension followed by renal failure. The specific treatment with high dose of hydroxycobalamin rapidly obtained the remission of TMA and the complete recovery of renal function. We conclude that plasma homocysteine and methionine determinations together with urine organic acid analysis should be included in the diagnostic work-up of any patient with TMA and/or nephrotic syndrome regardless of age.

  2. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M

    2016-02-01

    Maternal-fetal red cell antigen incompatibility can lead to alloimmunization, maternal immunoglobulin transplacental transfer, and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). The use of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) has sharply decreased the incidence of and mortality from HDFN due to RhD allosensitization. The ability to identify pregnancies/fetuses at risk of HDFN has significantly improved due to paternal molecular RHD zygosity testing, and non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics for detecting putative antigen(s) (notably RhD) in fetuses utilizing cff-DNA in maternal plasma. Fetal RHD genotyping using cff-DNA has become increasingly accurate for fetal RHD detection, prompting some countries to implement targeted RAADP through mass screening programs of RhD-negative pregnant women. Along with middle cerebral artery Doppler ultrasonography for predicting fetal anemia, non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics have greatly decreased the need for invasive diagnostic procedures in pregnancies at risk for severe HDFN. This review highlights these molecular advancements in HDFN-related prenatal diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Case report: Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernman, Riina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Korhonen, Anu; Haimila, Katri; Sareneva, Inna; Sulin, Kati; Kuosmanen, Malla; Sainio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anti-G is commonly present with anti-D and/or anti-C and can confuse serological investigations. in general, anti-G is not considered a likely cause of severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), but it is important to differentiate it from anti-D in women who should be administered anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. We report one woman with three pregnancies severely affected by anti-C+G requiring intrauterine treatment and a review of the literature. In our case, the identification of the correct antibody was delayed because the differentiation of anti-C+G and anti-D+C was not considered important during pregnancy since the father was D-. In addition, anti-C+G and anti-G titer levels were not found to be reliable as is generally considered in Rh immunization. Severe HDFN occurred at a maternal anti-C+G antibody titer of S and anti-G titer of 1 in comparison with the critical titer level of 16 or more in our laboratory. close collaboration between the immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low.

  4. Prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: what have we learned from animal models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Leal, Yoelys; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2017-11-01

    This review aims to highlight recent advances in our understanding of how anti-red blood cell (RBC) antibodies prevent erythrocyte immunization with an emphasis on new murine models. New murine models with clinically relevant human erythrocyte antigens have been used to understand the alloimmunization process and its inhibition. The search to elucidate the mechanism of action of IgG-mediated inhibition of erythrocyte alloimmunization has provided new evidence in support of a potential role for epitope masking, immune deviation and/or antigen modulation in this process. In addition, recent evidence suggests that blends of monoclonal antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes on the RBC surface can improve the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies approaching that of polyclonal IgG. Animal models with defined alloantigens have helped to identify important mechanistic components that lead to alloimmunization and its inhibition by IgG. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms leading to hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is required to develop the most effective prevention strategies for future patients.

  5. Immunologic basis and immunoprophylaxis of RhD induced hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payam Khaja Pasha, Roya; Shokri, Fazel

    2008-12-01

    RhD antigen is the most immunogenic and clinically significant antigen of red blood cells after ABO system. It has historically been associated with hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) which is now routinely prevented by the administration of polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin. This management of HDN has proven to be one of the most successful cases of prophylactic treatment based on antibody mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Despite the increasing efficiency of treatment, the mechanism of action of anti-D is not completely defined. There is a widespread interest in obtaining a reliable therapeutic monoclonal anti-D, due to difficulty of maintaining a pool of high titer volunteer donors for plasma collection and also increasing demand for antenatal prophylaxis and safety issues with plasma derived products. Candidate monoclonal anti-D preparations should demonstrate appropriate functionality in both in vitro and in vivo assays comparable to polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin. These criteria are reviewed in addition to the factors regulating development of D specific immune response in D negative individuals and its suppression in HDN prophylaxis.

  6. [Recombinant erythropoietin as treatment for hyporegenerative anemia following hemolytic disease of the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Bacciedoni, Viviana; García, Cecilia; Schvartzman, Gabriel; Vain, Néstor

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study is to report results of erythropoietin treatment for late hyporegenerative anemia in the hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Reports previously published concern only a few cases, with controversial results. Case series report concerning 50 neonates with HDN due to Rh, ABO or KpA antigens, aged more than 7 days. Erythropoietin treatment started when hematocrit dropped to levels requiring transfusion, with an inappropriate reticulocyte response (Reticulocyte Production Index <1). At start of treatment mean age was 24.3 +/- 12.0 days (range 8-65 days), hematocrit 24.1 +/- 2.8% (range 18-30%), and Reticulocyte Production Index 0.34 +/- 0.25 (range 0.05-0.98). Hematocrit and Reticulocyte Production Index showed significant increases after 7 and 14 days of treatment (p <0.001). No difference was observed either between infants with Rh-HDN and ABO-HDN or between Rh-HDN patients with or without intrauterine transfusions. Seven infants (14%) required one packed RBC transfusion during erythropoietin therapy, 2 of them within 72 hours from starting treatment. The percentage of transfused infants showed no difference either between ABO-HDN and Rh-HDN or between Rh-HDN with and without intrauterine transfusions. Moderate, short-lasting neutropenia, not associated to infections, was observed in 11 patients. No other adverse effect was observed. The administration of erythropoietin appears to be a safe and useful therapy. Its efficacy should be confirmed by randomized studies.

  7. Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D. C.; Rai, Sunita; Mehra, Aakash; Kaur, M. M.; Sao, Satya; Gaur, Ajay; Sapra, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET) with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh) HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates's and mother's blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb's cross-matched compatible with neonates’ and mother's serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET) was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01%) in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions. PMID:21938234

  8. Prenatal testing for hemolytic disease of the newborn and fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia - current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avent, Neil D

    2014-12-01

    Incompatibility of red cell and platelet antigens can lead to maternal alloimmunization causing hemolytic disease of the fetus & newborn and fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia respectively. As the molecular background of these polymorphisms emerged, prenatal testing using initially fetal DNA obtained from invasively obtained amniotic fluid or chorionic villus was implemented. This evolved into testing using maternal plasma as source of fetal DNA, and this is in routine use as a safe non-invasive diagnostic that has no risk to the fetus of alloimmunization or spontaneous miscarriage. These tests were initially applied to high risk pregnancies, but has been applied on a mass scale, to screen fetuses in D-negative pregnant populations as national screening programs. Fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia management has had comparatively small take up in non-invasive testing for causative fetal platelet alleles (e.g., HPA-1A), but mass scale genotyping of mothers to identify at risk HPA-1b1b pregnancies and their treatment with prophylactic anti-HPA-1A is being considered in at least one country (Norway).

  9. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-Lan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah; Squires, Jerry E

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies to the high-incidence red blood cell (RBC) antigen Lan (Langereis) are typically immunoglobulin G and have been shown to fix complement and cause hemolysis of Lan antigen-positive RBCs. Only three cases of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) have been reported involving anti-Lan and all have been characterized as "mild." A 26-year-old Hispanic female presented in her fifth pregnancy for routine obstetric care. Due to progressively rising anti-Lan titers, middle cerebral artery (MCA) Dopplers were performed. At 32 weeks of gestation, the antibody titer had reached 128; the MCA Doppler indicated that fetal anemia was severe. An intrauterine transfusion with Lan antigen-negative RBCs was performed and a viable infant was delivered 25 days later. Three cases of HDFN associated with anti-Lan have been previously reported. While these cases have been associated with somewhat variable serologic findings, none have resulted in fetal demise or severe symptomatology requiring pre- or postnatal intervention other than routine phototherapy. The current report, however, suggests that in some instances anti-Lan can result in a more severe form of HDFN requiring more aggressive prenatal therapy. In spite of previous case reports suggesting that anti-Lan is associated with relatively mild HDFN, this case suggests that in some instances, this antibody can cause severe HDFN requiring prenatal intervention. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates′ and mother′s blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb′s cross-matched compatible with neonates′ and mother′s serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01% in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions.

  11. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  12. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia

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    Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue "best match" packed red blood cells (PRBC to these patients. Results: A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28% were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5% of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the ′best match′ blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Conclusion: Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  13. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, Rafiq Uz; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD) with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue best match packed red blood cells (PRBC) to these patients. A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28%) were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5%) of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the "best match" blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  14. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Beyers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC database infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD. Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS.

  15. Dehydration at admission increased the need for dialysis in hemolytic uremic syndrome children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Alejandro; Martin, Sandra Mariel; Toledo, Ismael; Alvarado, Caupolican; Wainsztein, Raquel Eva

    2012-08-01

    Oligoanuric forms of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) usually have more severe acute stage and higher risk of chronic sequelae than nonoligoanuric forms. During the diarrheal phase, gastrointestinal losses could lead to dehydration with pre-renal injury enhancing the risk of oligoanuric D+ HUS. Furthermore, it had been shown that intravenous volume expansion during the prodromal phase could decrease the frequency of oligoanuric renal failure. Thus, we performed this retrospective study to determine whether dehydration on admission is associated with increased need for dialysis in D+ HUS patients. Data from 137 children was reviewed, which were divided into two groups according to their hydration status at admission: normohydrated (n = 86) and dehydrated (n = 51). Laboratory parameters of the dehydrated patients reflected expected deteriorations (higher urea, higher hematocrit and lower sodium, bicarbonate, and pH) than normohydrated ones. Likewise, the dehydrated group had a higher rate of vomiting and need for dialysis (70.6 versus 40.7 %, p = 0.0007). Our data suggests that dehydration at hospital admission might represent a concomitant factor aggravating the intrinsic renal disease in D+ HUS patients increasing the need for dialysis. Therefore, the early recognition of patients at risk of D+ HUS is encouraged to guarantee a well-hydrated status.

  16. C3 Glomerulopathy and Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Two Important Manifestations of Complement System Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet Bajwa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The advances in our understanding of the alternative pathway have emphasized that uncontrolled hyperactivity of this pathway causes 2 distinct disorders that adversely impact the kidney. In the so-called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, renal dysfunction occurs along with thrombocytopenia, anemia, and target organ injury to multiple organs, most commonly the kidney. On the other hand, in the so-termed C3 glomerulopathy, kidney involvement is not associated with thrombocytopenia, anemia, or other system involvement. In this report, we present 2 cases of alternative pathway dysfunction. The 60-year-old female patient had biopsy-proven C3 glomerulopathy, while the 32-year-old female patient was diagnosed with aHUS based on renal dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and normal ADAMTS-13 level. The aHUS patient was successfully treated with the monoclonal antibody (eculizumab for complement blockade. The patient with C3 glomerulopathy did not receive the monoclonal antibody. In this patient, management focused on blood pressure and proteinuria control with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. This article focuses on the clinical differences, pathophysiology, and treatment of aHUS and C3 glomerulopathy.

  17. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Late Renal Injury and Changing Incidence—A Single Centre Experience in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Robitaille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To assess trends in the incidence of pediatric diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS and document long-term renal sequelae. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children with D+ HUS admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital in Montreal, Canada, from 1976 to 2010. In 2010, we recontacted patients admitted before 2000. Results. Of 337 cases, median age at presentation was 3.01 years (range 0.4–14. Yearly incidence peaked in 1988 and 1994-95, returning to near-1977 levels since 2003. Twelve patients (3.6% died and 19 (5.6% experienced long-term renal failure. Almost half (47% The patients required dialysis. Need for dialysis was the best predictor of renal sequelae, accounting for 100% of severe complications. Of children followed ≥1 year (, mean follow-up years, 19 had severe and 18 mild-to-moderate kidney injury, a total sequelae rate, of 18.6%. Ten years or more after-HUS (, mean follow-up years, 8 (9.4% patients demonstrated serious complications and 22 (25.9% mild-to-moderate, including 14 (16% microalbuminuria: total sequelae, 35.3%. Conclusions. Patients with D+ HUS should be monitored at least 5 years, including microalbuminuria testing, especially if dialysis was required. The cause of the declining incidence of D+HUS is elusive. However, conceivably, improved public health education may have played an important role in the prevention of food-borne disease.

  18. A novel strategy for hemolytic uremic syndrome: successful treatment with thrombomodulin α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Mineo, Eri; Nagamori, Yukako; Nakamura, Shinya; Bando, Yuki; Ishii, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a life-threatening infectious disease in childhood for which there is no confirmed therapeutic strategy. Endothelial inflammation leading to microthrombosis formation via complement activation is the main pathology of HUS. Thrombomodulin is an endothelial membrane protein that has anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory effects, including the suppression of complement activity. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) is a novel therapeutic medicine for disseminated intravascular coagulation. We administered rTM to 3 patients with HUS for 7 days and investigated the outcomes in view of the patients' prognoses, changes in biochemical markers, complications, and adverse effects of rTM. Symptoms and laboratory data improved after initiation of rTM in all 3 patients. Abnormal activation of complements was also dramatically suppressed in 1 patient. The patients recovered without any complications or adverse effects of rTM. They were discharged having normal neurologic status and with no renal dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of rTM being used to treat HUS. These case reports show the positive effect of rTM in patients with HUS. Randomized controlled studies should be performed to assess the efficacy and safety of rTM for children with HUS.

  19. ADAMTS-13 level in children with severe diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: Unmasking new association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa A Khalifa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 leads to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Few studies have reported reduced activity of ADAMTS-13 in patients with atypical and typical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. We hypothesized that ADAMTS-13 deficiency might play a role in the pathogenesis of severe HUS. This study aimed to evaluate the ADAMTS-13 level in severe typical HUS. This prospective case–control study was carried out in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit and Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University from February 2013 to February 2014. The study included 15 consecutive children with typical HUS as well as 15 healthy children as a control group. Routine laboratory investigations were performed. Assessment of serum ADAMTS-13 level was performed using the Quantikine human ADAMTS-13 ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 16. Nonparametric values were expressed as median and range, and the median of two groups was tested by Mann–Whitney test. The serum ADAMTS-13 level was significantly lower in HUS patients when compared to the control group (P < 0.05. There were significant negative correlations between ADAMTS-13 level and duration on dialysis, as well as serum urea and creatinine. Furthermore, there were significant positive correlations between serum ADAMTS-13 level and both hemoglobin level and platelet count. Our study suggests that the ADAMTS-13 level was decreased in children with severe typical HUS and its deficiency correlated with disease severity.

  20. Hematologic outcomes after total splenectomy and partial splenectomy for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Jason Smithers, C; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St Peter, Shawn D; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L; Rice, Henry E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the hematologic response to total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) in children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) or sickle cell disease (SCD). The Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium registry collected hematologic outcomes of children with CHA undergoing TS or PS to 1 year after surgery. Using random effects mixed modeling, we evaluated the association of operative type with change in hemoglobin, reticulocyte counts, and bilirubin. We also compared laparoscopic to open splenectomy. The analysis included 130 children, with 62.3% (n=81) undergoing TS. For children with HS, all hematologic measures improved after TS, including a 4.1g/dl increase in hemoglobin. Hematologic parameters also improved after PS, although the response was less robust (hemoglobin increase 2.4 g/dl, p<0.001). For children with SCD, there was no change in hemoglobin. Laparoscopy was not associated with differences in hematologic outcomes compared to open. TS and laparoscopy were associated with shorter length of stay. Children with HS have an excellent hematologic response after TS or PS, although the hematologic response is more robust following TS. Children with SCD have smaller changes in their hematologic parameters. These data offer guidance to families and clinicians considering TS or PS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hematologic outcomes after total splenectomy and partial splenectomy for congenital hemolytic anemia☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R.; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M.; Smithers, C. Jason; Brown, Rebeccah L.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C.; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T.; Scott, J. Paul; St Peter, Shawn D; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B.; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E.; Dassinger, Melvin S.; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L.; Rice, Henry E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to define the hematologic response to total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) in children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) or sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods The Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium registry collected hematologic outcomes of children with CHA undergoing TS or PS to 1 year after surgery. Using random effects mixed modeling, we evaluated the association of operative type with change in hemoglobin, reticulocyte counts, and bilirubin. We also compared laparoscopic to open splenectomy. Results The analysis included 130 children, with 62.3% (n = 81) undergoing TS. For children with HS, all hematologic measures improved after TS, including a 4.1 g/dl increase in hemoglobin. Hematologic parameters also improved after PS, although the response was less robust (hemoglobin increase 2.4 g/dl, p < 0.001). For children with SCD, there was no change in hemoglobin. Laparoscopy was not associated with differences in hematologic outcomes compared to open. TS and laparoscopy were associated with shorter length of stay. Conclusion Children with HS have an excellent hematologic response after TS or PS, although the hematologic response is more robust following TS. Children with SCD have smaller changes in their hematologic parameters. These data offer guidance to families and clinicians considering TS or PS. PMID:26613837

  2. Investigation of an outbreak of bloody diarrhea complicated with hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otar Chokoshvili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In July–August 2009, eight patients with bloody diarrhea complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS were admitted to hospitals in Tbilisi, Georgia. We started active surveillance in two regions for bloody diarrhea and post-diarrheal HUS. Of 25 case-patients who developed HUS, including the initial 8 cases, half were ⩾15 years old, 67% were female and seven (28% died. No common exposures were identified. Among 20 HUS case-patients tested, Shiga toxin was detected in the stools of 2 patients (one with elevated serum IgG titers to several Escherichia coli serogroups, including O111 and O104. Among 56 persons with only bloody diarrhea, we isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O104:H4 from 2 and Shigella from 10; 2 had serologic evidence of E. coli O26 infection. These cases may indicate a previously unrecognized burden of HUS in Georgia. We recommend national reporting of HUS and improving STEC detection capacity.

  3. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected Medicinal Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research August 2013; 12 (4): 535-540. ISSN: 1596-5996 .... Table 1: Antibacterial activity of selected Thai medicinal plants against Streptococcus pyogenes NPRC 101. Botanical ..... Naphthoquinones,.

  4. The changing epidemiology of group B streptococcus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballard, Mark S; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2016-01-01

    Background Population-based studies conducted in single regions or countries have identified significant changes in the epidemiology of invasive group B streptococcus (GBS) infection. However, no studies have concurrently compared the epidemiology of GBS infections among multiple different region...

  5. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  6. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus... derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria...

  7. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Amelieke J H; Mobegi, Fredrick M; de Jonge, Marien I; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Meis, Jacques F; Hermans, Peter W M; Ferwerda, Gerben; Bentley, Stephen D; Zomer, Aldert L

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped

  8. Novel metabolic activity indicator in Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, D.M.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of micro-organisms in biofilms requires novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries preventive agents in actual biofilms. Hence we investigated fluorescence intensity (FI) in Streptococcus mutans biofilms constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP).

  9. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  10. Quantification of bovine oxylipids during intramammary Streptococcus uberis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus uberis mastitis results in severe mammary tissue damage in dairy cows due to uncontrolled inflammation. Oxylipids are potent lipid mediators that orchestrate pathogen-induced inflammatory responses, however, changes in oxylipid biosynthesis during S. uberis mastitis are unknown. Thus, ...

  11. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Anastasiou, Rania; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Blom, Jochen; Papandreou, Nikos C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Renault, Pierre; Supply, Philip; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2014-04-08

    Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly, similar findings were

  13. [Comparative study of the antimicrobial effect of various cavity liners used in conservative dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola Suñé, J; Espias Gómez, A; Canalda Sahli, C

    1989-01-01

    We have compared the microbiological activity of the following cavity liners: Life, Dycal II, Calcipulpe, Pure calcium hydroxide and Cavitec; against five different bacterial strains: Veillonella parvula, Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus s.p., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus beta hemolytic: The results demonstrate the higher antimicrobial activity of the manufactured cavity liners with calcium hydroxide base in comparison with the pure calcium hydroxide.

  14. Rational Antibiotic Therapy for BHSA-Infection as a Factor of Prevention of Primary and Secondary Acute Rheumatic Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Bugeruk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the choice of antibiotic agent to treat infections caused by beta-hemolytic streptococcus group A (BHSA. There are given antibiotic regimens in different variants — carriage of BHSA, BHSA-pharyngitis in patients with and without allergy on penicillin, in acute rheumatic fever.

  15. Streptococcus sinensis may react with Lancefield group F antiserum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Teng, Jade L L; Leung, Kit-wah; Lau, Susanna K P; Tse, Herman; Wong, Beatrice H L; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2004-11-01

    Lancefield group F streptococci have been found almost exclusively as members of the 'Streptococcus milleri' group, although they have been reported very occasionally in some other streptococcal species. Among 302 patients with bacteraemia caused by viridans streptococci over a 6-year period, three cases were caused by Streptococcus sinensis (type strain HKU4T, HKU5 and HKU6). All three patients had infective endocarditis complicating their underlying chronic rheumatic heart diseases. Gene sequencing showed no base differences between the 16S rRNA gene sequences of HKU5 and HKU6 and that of HKU4T. All three strains were Gram-positive, non-spore-forming cocci arranged in chains. All grew on sheep blood agar as alpha-haemolytic, grey colonies of 0.5-1 mm in diameter after 24 h incubation at 37 degrees C in ambient air. Lancefield grouping revealed that HKU5 and HKU6 were Lancefield group F, but HKU4T was non-groupable with Lancefield groups A, B, C, D, F or G antisera. HKU4T was identified by the Vitek system (GPI), API system (20 STREP) and ATB system (ID32 STREP) as 99 % Streptococcus intermedius, 51.3 % S. intermedius and 99.9 % Streptococcus anginosus, respectively. Using the same tests, HKU5 was identified as 87 % Streptococcus sanguinis/Streptococcus gordonii, 59 % Streptococcus salivarius and 99.6 % S. anginosus, respectively, and HKU6 as 87 % S. sanguinis/S. gordonii, 77 % Streptococcus pneumoniae and 98.3 % S. anginosus, respectively. The present data revealed that a proportion of Lancefield group F streptococci could be S. sinensis. Lancefield group F streptococci should not be automatically reported as 'S. milleri'.

  16. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection...... with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome. METHODS: Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed...

  17. Induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Certain nuclear beta decay transitions normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations can be induced to occur by the application of an electromagnetic field. Such decays can be useful in the controlled production of power, and in fission waste disposal

  18. Trichoderma .beta.-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-01-03

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements

  20. Beta thalassemia - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is a globin gene disorder that results in a diminished rate of synthesis of one or more of the globin chains. About 1.5% of the global population (80 to 90 million people are carriers of beta Thalassemia. More than 200 mutations are described in beta thalassemia. However not all mutations are common in different ethnic groups. The only effective way to reduce burden of thalassemia is to prevent birth of homozygotes. Diagnosis of beta thalassemia can be done by fetal DNA analysis for molecular defects of beta thalassemia or by fetal blood analysis. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only available curative approach for Thalassemia. Many patients with thalassemia in underdeveloped nations die in childhood or adolescence. Programs that provide acceptable care, including transfusion of safe blood and supportive therapy including chelation must be established.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i8.11609 Journal of Pathology of Nepal; Vol.4,No. 8 (2014 663-671

  1. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepke, A.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental observation of neutrino oscillations and thus neutrino mass and mixing gives a first hint at new particle physics. The absolute values of the neutrino mass and the properties of neutrinos under CP-conjugation remain unknown. The experimental investigation of the nuclear double beta decay is one of the key techniques for solving these open problems

  2. Streptococcus pneumonia YlxR at 1.35 A shows a putative new fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, J; Górnicki, P; Maj, L; Dementieva, I; Laskowski, R; Joachimiak, A

    2001-11-01

    The structure of the YlxR protein of unknown function from Streptococcus pneumonia was determined to 1.35 A. YlxR is expressed from the nusA/infB operon in bacteria and belongs to a small protein family (COG2740) that shares a conserved sequence motif GRGA(Y/W). The family shows no significant amino-acid sequence similarity with other proteins. Three-wavelength diffraction MAD data were collected to 1.7 A from orthorhombic crystals using synchrotron radiation and the structure was determined using a semi-automated approach. The YlxR structure resembles a two-layer alpha/beta sandwich with the overall shape of a cylinder and shows no structural homology to proteins of known structure. Structural analysis revealed that the YlxR structure represents a new protein fold that belongs to the alpha-beta plait superfamily. The distribution of the electrostatic surface potential shows a large positively charged patch on one side of the protein, a feature often found in nucleic acid-binding proteins. Three sulfate ions bind to this positively charged surface. Analysis of potential binding sites uncovered several substantial clefts, with the largest spanning 3/4 of the protein. A similar distribution of binding sites and a large sharply bent cleft are observed in RNA-binding proteins that are unrelated in sequence and structure. It is proposed that YlxR is an RNA-binding protein.

  3. Differential recognition and hydrolysis of host carbohydrate antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae family 98 glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Melanie A; Whitworth, Garrett E; El Warry, Nahida; Randriantsoa, Mialy; Samain, Eric; Burke, Robert D; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2009-09-18

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-beta-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-beta-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  4. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades...... in the expansion of the beta cell mass in human pregnancy, and the relative roles of endocrine factors and nutrients....

  5. J-GLOBAL MeSH Dictionary: Streptococcus mitis [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term Streptococcus mitis 名詞 一般 * * * * Streptococcus mit...is ... MeSH D034361 200906051281920120 C LS07 UNKNOWN_2 Streptococcus mitis

  6. Immunochemical studies on the N-acetyllactosamine beta-(1----6)-linked trisaccharide specificity of Ricinus communis agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A M; Sugii, S; Gruezo, F G; Kabat, E A

    1988-07-15

    The combining site of Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1) was studied by quantitative precipitin and precipitin inhibition assays. Of 31 complex carbohydrates tested, all except active and inactive antifreeze glycoproteins, Streptococcus group C polysaccharide, and native rat salivary glycoprotein, reacted strongly, and 22 completely precipitated the lectin, indicating that RCA1 has both a broad range of affinity and a low solubility of its carbohydrate-bound complex. Of the monosaccharides and glycosides tested for inhibition of precipitation, p-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactopyranoside was the best. It was about 6.4 times better than methyl beta-D-galactopyranoside. The beta anomer of glycosides of D-galactose was much more potent than the corresponding alpha anomer. Among the oligosaccharides tested, beta-D-Galp-(1----4)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1----6)-D-Gal was the best inhibitor, which was approximately 2/3 as active as p-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactopyranoside. It was approximately 1.4 times as active as beta-D-Gal-(1----4)-D-GlcNAc (N-acetyllactosamine), twice as active as beta-D-Gal-(1----3)-D-GlcNAc, and 4.5 times more active than lacto-N-tetraose. From the results, it can be concluded that; (a) hydrophobic interaction is important for binding; (b) the combining site of this lectin is at least as large as a trisaccharide; and (c) of the compounds studied, the trisaccharide beta-D-Galp-(1----4)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1----6)-D-Gal was the most complementary to the human blood group I Ma determinant beta-D-Galp-(1----4)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1----6)-D-Gal.

  7. Population diversity and dynamics of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis in the upper respiratory tracts of adults, determined by a nonculture strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Tettelin, H; Hance, I

    2008-01-01

    . A culture-independent method was used, based on cloning and sequencing of PCR amplicons of the housekeeping gene gdh, which shows remarkable, yet species-specific, genetic polymorphism. Samples were collected from all potential ecological niches in the oral cavity and pharynx of two adults on two occasions......We reinvestigated the clonal diversity and dynamics of Streptococcus mitis and two other abundant members of the commensal microbiota of the upper respiratory tract, Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus infantis, to obtain information about the origin of frequently emerging clones in this habitat...... with loss and acquisition from contacts. These findings provide a platform for understanding the mechanisms that govern the balance within the complex microbiota at mucosal sites and between the microbiota and the mucosal immune system of the host....

  8. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguo Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies.

  9. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deguo; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-05-26

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies.

  10. Misleading Betas: An Educational Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, James; Halcoussis, Dennis; Phillips, G. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The dual-beta model is a generalization of the CAPM model. In the dual-beta model, separate beta estimates are provided for up-market and down-market days. This paper uses the historical "Anscombe quartet" results which illustrated how very different datasets can produce the same regression coefficients to motivate a discussion of the…

  11. Interaction with beta-arrestin determines the difference in internalization behavor between beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T; Kawasaki, A; Nagao, T; Kurose, H

    2000-09-15

    The beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) shows the resistance to agonist-induced internalization. As beta-arrestin is important for internalization, we examine the interaction of beta-arrestin with beta(1)AR with three different methods: intracellular trafficking of beta-arrestin, binding of in vitro translated beta-arrestin to intracellular domains of beta(1)- and beta(2)ARs, and inhibition of betaAR-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities by beta-arrestin. The green fluorescent protein-tagged beta-arrestin 2 translocates to and stays at the plasma membrane by beta(2)AR stimulation. Although green fluorescent protein-tagged beta-arrestin 2 also translocates to the plasma membrane, it returns to the cytoplasm 10-30 min after beta(1)AR stimulation. The binding of in vitro translated beta-arrestin 1 and beta-arrestin 2 to the third intracellular loop and the carboxyl tail of beta(1)AR is lower than that of beta(2)AR. The fusion protein of beta-arrestin 1 with glutathione S-transferase inhibits the beta(1)- and beta(2)AR-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities, although inhibition of the beta(1)AR-stimulated activity requires a higher concentration of the fusion protein than that of the beta(2)AR-stimulated activity. These results suggest that weak interaction of beta(1)AR with beta-arrestins explains the resistance to agonist-induced internalization. This is further supported by the finding that beta-arrestin can induce internalization of beta(1)AR when beta-arrestin 1 does not dissociate from beta(1)AR by fusing to the carboxyl tail of beta(1)AR.

  12. Management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children and adolescents: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Sarper

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present and discuss the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. Materials and Methods: The medical records of all patients (n=19 diagnosed in a tertiary hematology center between 1999 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed.Results: Median age at diagnosis of AIHA was 5 years (range: 4 months-17 years. In all, 13 patients had primary (idiopathic AIHA, whereas 2 had primary Evans Syndrome (ES, 2 had autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS+ES, and 1 had Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS+AIHA. Among the 13 primary idiopathic AIHA patients, 9 recovered following a 4-8-week course of prednisolone treatment without relapses, whereas 3 patients required a longer course of prednisolone. One AIHA patient that was very resistant to prednisolone recovered after cyclosporine A was added to the treatment. All patients with primary idiopathic AIHA were in remission for a median of 3 years (range: 4 months-10 years at the time this manuscript was written. Among the patients with primary ES, 2 had relapses similar to the ALPS patients. Splenectomy was performed in 1 primary ES patient, who at the time this report was written was also in remission. One ALPS patient required the addition of mycophenolate mofetil due to prednisolone resistance. The WAS patient was treatment resistant and died due to septicemia.Conclusions: Primary AIHA in pediatric patients generally has an acute onset and good response to corticosteroids. Primary or secondary ES has a chronic or relapsing course, and treatment may require other immunosuppressive agents in addition to corticosteroids. Complications of splenectomy must not be underestimated in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. AIHA often causes considerable morbidity and mortality in WAS.

  13. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabron, A; Moreira, G; Bordin, J O

    1999-01-07

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are frequently transfused with red blood cells (RBC). Recently we reported that the calculated risk of RBC alloimmunization per transfussed unit in Brazilian patients with SCA is 1.15%. We describe a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with SCA. A 35-year-old Brazilian female with homozygous SCA was admitted for a program of partial exchange transfusion prior to cholecystectomy. Her blood group was O RhD positive and no atypical RBC alloantibody was detected using the indirect antiglobulin technique. Pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) was 8.7 g/dL and isovolumic partial exchange transfusion was performed using 4 units of ABO compatible packed RBC. Five days after the last transfusion she developed generalized joint pain and fever of 39 degrees C. Her Hb level dropped from 12.0 g/dL to 9.3 g/dL and the unconjugated bilirrubin level rose to 27 mmol/L. She was jaundiced and had hemoglobinuria. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 48.7% HbS, 46.6% HbA1, 2.7% HbA2, and 2.0% HbF. The patient's extended RBC phenotype was CDe, K-k+, Kp(a-b+), Fy(a-b-), M+N+s+, Le(a+b-), Di(a-). An RBC alloantibody with specificity to the Rh system (anti-c, titer 1:16.384) was identified by the indirect antiglobulin test. The Rh phenotype of the RBC used in the last packed RBC transfusion was CcDEe. The patient was discharged, asymptomatic, 7 days after admission.

  14. Priming dose of phenylhydrazine protects against hemolytic and lethal effects of 2-butoxyethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palkar, Prajakta S.; Philip, Binu K.; Reddy, Ramesh N.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2007-01-01

    Protection against a high dose of a toxicant by prior exposure to another toxicant is called heteroprotection. Our objective was to establish a heteroprotection model in RBCs. Female Sprague Dawley rats treated with an LD90 dose of 2-butoxyethanol (BE, 1500 mg/kg in water, 5 ml/kg po) 14 days after priming with 0.9% NaCl suffered 90% mortality by 15 days, whereas all rats receiving the LD90 dose of BE 14 days after priming with phenylhydrazine (PHZ, 125 mg/kg in 0.9% NaCl, 3 ml/kg po) survived. Hematocrit decreased from normal 45% to 24% by day 3 after PHZ priming and improved thereafter. Increasing the time interval between the priming and LD90 dose to 21 days abolished the heteroprotection. RBCs obtained on days 7 and 14 after PHZ priming unlike those on day 21 were resilient to the hemotoxic metabolite of BE, butoxyacetic acid (BAA). Unaltered hepatic alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities upon PHZ priming suggested that bioactivation of BE to BAA was unaffected. Lower renal (6 and 12 h) and hepatic (12 h) BAA levels and 3 fold higher excretion of BAA in PHZ-primed rat urine suggested a protective role of toxicokinetics. Higher erythropoietin, reticulocytes, and resiliency of PHZ-primed rat RBCs indicated that newly formed RBCs are resilient to hemolytic BAA. The antioxidant levels in the PHZ-primed rat RBCs did not indicate a protective role in heteroprotection. In conclusion, the resistance of PHZ-primed rats against BE-induced hemotoxicity and lethality is mediated by a combination of altered toxicokinetics, robust erythropoiesis, and resiliency of new RBCs

  15. [The importance of antenatal immunoprophylaxis for prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcević, Mirta; Mataija, Marina; Sović, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Matijević, Ratko; Kukuruzović, Monika

    2011-03-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is a consequence of maternal alloimmunization against fetal red blood cell antigens. Alloimmunization against D antigen from Rhesus (Rh) blood group system is particularly important because of its strong immunogenicity. During the last few decades, the introduction of RhD prophylaxis by postpartum administration of anti-D immunoglobulin to RhD negative women, now improved with antenatal prophylaxis, has led to a dramatic decrease in perinatal mortality and morbidity from HDFN. However, severe cases have not disappeared, mostly due to prophylaxis failure. In our case, inappropriate prenatal care during the first pregnancy in an RhD negative mother resulted in primary immunization. In the next pregnancy with an RhD positive child, the mother's secondary immune response was extremely strong and led to early development of severe fetal anemia. The fetus survived thanks to the treatment with intrauterine transfusions (IUT), but they caused suppression of erythropoiesis, which lasted for months after birth. The long lasting, late anemia was treated with repeated postnatal red cell transfusions and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Despite the severity of HDFN in our case, the short-term outcome is good. The boy has normal growth until now, but due to the possibility of an adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcome, this case requires continuous follow up. It also reminds of the fact that RhD alloimmunization remains an actual problem in daily routine. Antenatal prophylaxis is a crucial step in quality care of those who are at a risk of HDFN.

  16. Fatal hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn associated with anti-Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrard, Thierry; Pham, Bach-Nga; Arnaud, Lionel; Fleutiaux, Sophie; Brossard, Yves; Guerin, Bénédicte; Desmoulins, Isabelle; Rouger, Philippe; Le Pennec, Pierre-Yves

    2008-09-01

    Jr(a) is a high-prevalence red cell (RBC) antigen. The clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) is controversial. When hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) occurred, most reported cases were clinically mild. We report the first case of fatal HDFN due to anti-Jr(a). A 28-year-old Caucasian woman with transfusion history was monitored at the 29th week of pregnancy (G4P1). An ultrasound scan showed fetal cardiomegaly and hepatomegaly. An antibody directed against a high-prevalence antigen was detected, but without conclusive identification. An emergency cesarean section was performed at the 36th week. The newborn was hydropic and showed severe anemia. Death occurred 30 hours after birth. Serologic methods were performed to investigate the mother's RBCs and serum. An in vitro functional cellular assay and semiquantitative measurement of anti-Jr(a) were used to determine the clinical significance of the antibody. Anti-Jr(a) was identified in the serum and Jr(a-) phenotype was confirmed. The anti-Jr(a) titer was 1024, with predominant immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and minor IgG4 subclasses. The functional cellular assay was consistent with an antibody unlikely to cause HDFN. Semiquantitative measurement of anti-Jr(a) showed a reactivity equivalent to a 25 IU per mL (5 microg/mL) concentration of anti-D, a value associated with a significant risk of HDFN. This is the first documented case of fatal HDFN due to anti-Jr(a). Therefore, we recommend close monitoring of pregnant women with a high-titer anti-Jr(a), especially those with an incompatible transfusion history and/or multiple pregnancies. This case report provides new arguments about the clinical significance of anti-Jr(a) in the transfusion setting.

  17. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome post Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami eAlasfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1-2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (Infection-induced HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease (ESRD. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a (C5a and subsequent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence.

  18. End-stage renal disease from hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United States, 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Donal J; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig A; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N

    2015-10-01

    Management of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has evolved rapidly, and optimal treatment strategies are controversial. However, it is unknown whether the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from HUS has changed, and outcomes on dialysis in the United States are not well described. We retrospectively examined data for patients initiating maintenance renal replacement therapy (RRT) (n = 1,557,117), 1995-2010, to define standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and outcomes of ESRD from HUS) (n = 2241). Overall ESRD rates from HUS in 2001-2002 were 0.5 cases/million per year and were higher for patients characterized by age 40-64 years (0.6), ≥65 years (0.7), female sex (0.6), and non-Hispanic African American race (0.7). Standardized incidence ratios remained unchanged (P ≥ 0.05) between 2001-2002 and 2009-2010 in the overall population. Compared with patients with ESRD from other causes, patients with HUS were more likely to be younger, female, white, and non-Hispanic. Over 5.4 years of follow-up, HUS patients differed from matched controls with ESRD from other causes by lower rates of death (8.3 per 100 person-years in cases vs. 10.4 in controls, P < 0.001), listing for renal transplant (7.6 vs. 8.6 per 100 person-years, P = 0.04), and undergoing transplant (6.9 vs. 9 per 100 person-years, P < 0.001). The incidence of ESRD from HUS appears not to have risen substantially in the last decade. However, given that HUS subtypes could not be determined in this study, these findings should be interpreted with caution. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  19. Acute dialysis-associated peritonitis in children with D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adragna, Marta; Balestracci, Alejandro; García Chervo, Laura; Steinbrun, Silvina; Delgado, Norma; Briones, Liliana

    2012-04-01

    Acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the preferred therapy for renal replacement in children with post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS), but peritonitis remains a frequent complication of this procedure. We reviewed data from 149 patients with D+ HUS who had undergone acute PD with the aim of determining the prevalence and risk factors for the development of peritonitis. A total of 36 patients (24.2%) presented peritonitis. The median onset of peritonitis manifestations was 6 (range 2-18) days after the initiation of dialysis treatment, and Gram-positive microorganisms were the predominant bacterial type isolated (15/36 patients). The patients were divided into two groups: with or without peritonitis, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that a longer duration of the oligoanuric period, more days of dialysis, catheter replacement, stay in the intensive care unit, and hypoalbuminemia were significantly associated to the development of peritonitis. The multivariate analysis, controlled by duration of PD, identified the following independent risk factors for peritonitis: catheter replacement [p = 0.037, odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.73], stay in intensive care unit (p = 0.0001, OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.65-4.19), and hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.0076, OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.10-1.91). Based on these findings, we conclude that the optimization of the aseptic technique during catheter manipulation and early nutritional support are targets for the prevention of peritonitis, especially in critically ill patients.

  20. Low-beta investment strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Olaf; Kuntz, Laura-Chloé

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates investment strategies that exploit the low-beta anomaly. Although the notion of buying low-beta stocks and selling high-beta stocks is natural, a choice is necessary with respect to the relative weighting of high-beta stocks and low-beta stocks in the investment portfolio. Our empirical results for US large-cap stocks show that this choice is very important for the risk-return characteristics of the resulting portfolios and their sensitivities to common risk factors. W...

  1. Neutrophil beta-2 microglobulin: an inflammatory mediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, O W; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Borregaard, N

    1990-01-01

    Beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2m) constitutes the light invariant chain of HLA class I antigen, and is a constituent of mobilizable compartments of neutrophils. Two forms of beta 2m exist: native beta 2m and proteolytically modified beta 2m (Des-Lys58-beta 2m), which shows alpha mobility in crossed ...

  2. Beta and muon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-01-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  3. Beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Origa Raffaella

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands, dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes, gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely

  4. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions...... of differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears...... that the present practice of avoiding samples above a depth of 0.3 m may be over-cautious...

  5. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A; Pascual, P

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  6. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  7. High beta experiments in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nishimura, K.

    1994-09-01

    High beta experiments were performed in the low-aspect-ratio helical device CHS with the volume-averaged equilibrium beta up to 2.1 %. These values (highest for helical systems) are obtained for high density plasmas in low magnetic field heated with two tangential neutral beams. Confinement improvement given by means of turning off gas puffing helped significantly to make high betas. Magnetic fluctuations increased with increasing beta, but finally stopped to increase in the beta range > 1 %. The coherent modes appearing in the magnetic hill region showed strong dependence on the beta values. The dynamic poloidal field control was applied to suppress the outward plasma movement with the plasma pressure. Such an operation gave fixed boundary operations of high beta plasmas in helical systems. (author)

  8. Beta rays and neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    It was over 30 years between the first observation of the enigmatic process of beta decay and the first postulation of the neutrino. It took a further 26 years until the first neutrino was detected and yet another 27 until the electroweak theory was confirmed by the discovery of W and Z particles. This article traces some of the puzzles and paradoxes associated with the history of the neutrino. (author)

  9. Coroutine Sequencing in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    In object-oriented programming, a program execution is viewed as a physical model of some real or imaginary part of the world. A language supporting object-oriented programming must therefore contain comprehensive facilities for modeling phenomena and concepts form the application domain. Many...... applications in the real world consist of objects carrying out sequential processes. Coroutines may be used for modeling objects that alternate between a number of sequential processes. The authors describe coroutines in BETA...

  10. COM Support in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Component technologies based on binary units of independent production are some of the most important contributions to software architecture and reuse during recent years. Especially the COM technologies and the CORBA standard from the Object Management Group have contributed new and interesting...... principles for software architecture, and proven to be useful in parctice. In this paper ongoing work with component support in the BETA language is described....

  11. Características laboratoriais das ceratites e conjuntivites causadas por Streptococcus sp Laboratorial findings of Streptococcus keratitis and conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Parente Solari

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Analisar os resultados laboratoriais de conjuntivites e ceratites com cultura positiva para Streptococcus sp, avaliando a incidência das diferentes espécies e os dados dos antibiogramas. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de revisão de prontuários de pacientes encaminhados ao laboratório de Doenças Externas do Departamento de Oftalmologia da UNIFESP com resultado de cultivo bacteriano positivo de córnea ou conjuntiva e com identificação de alguma cepa do gênero Streptococcus sp, no período de janeiro de 1995 a dezembro de 2001. Analisou-se idade do paciente, espécie de Streptococcus e os testes de sensibilidade aos seguintes antibióticos: cefalotina, amicacina, gentamicina, tobramicina, ciprofloxacina, lomefloxacina, ofloxacina, norfloxacina e vancomicina. RESULTADOS: As espécies mais encontradas foram Streptococcus pneumoniae e Streptococcus viridans. Com relação aos antibióticos, a sensibilidade foi maior à cefalotina, às quinolonas e à vancomicina. CONCLUSÕES: Considerando-se os antibióticos tópicos comercialmente disponíveis, as quinolonas apresentam melhor espectro de ação quando comparadas aos aminoglicosídios.PURPOSE: To evaluate laboratorial findings of Streptococcus keratitis and conjunctivitis, analyzing the different species and the results of bacterial susceptibility to an antibiotics. METHODS: Retrospective study of the records from the External Disease Laboratory of the Ophthalmology Department of the Federal University of São Paulo, with conjunctival or corneal positive bacterial culture for Streptococcus sp, between January 1995 and December 2001. The collected data were age, Streptococcus species and the bacterial susceptibility to the following antibiotics: cephalotin, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramicin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin and vancomicin. RESULTS: The most frequent species were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus viridans. Regarding bacterial

  12. The AMP-activated protein kinase beta 1 subunit modulates erythrocyte integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge, Emma L; McIntyre, Zoe; Clare, Simon; Arends, Mark J; Goulding, David; Isherwood, Christopher; Caetano, Susana S; Reviriego, Carmen Ballesteros; Swiatkowska, Agnieszka; Kane, Leanne; Harcourt, Katherine; Adams, David J; White, Jacqueline K; Speak, Anneliese O

    2017-01-01

    Failure to maintain a normal in vivo erythrocyte half-life results in the development of hemolytic anemia. Half-life is affected by numerous factors, including energy balance, electrolyte gradients, reactive oxygen species, and membrane plasticity. The heterotrimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that acts as a critical regulator of cellular energy balance. Previous roles for the alpha 1 and gamma 1 subunits in the control of erythrocyte survival have been reported. In the work described here, we studied the role of the beta 1 subunit in erythrocytes and observed microcytic anemia with compensatory extramedullary hematopoiesis together with splenomegaly and increased osmotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of trodimensional structure and characterisation of active sites of selected beta-galaktosidases

    OpenAIRE

    Vukić, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Proteini imaju osnovnu ulogu u  životnim procesima, usled čega je isptivanje raznovrsnosti njihove strukture jedna od ključnih potreba modernih bioloških istraživanja. Cilj ove doktorske disertacije je predviđanje trodimenzionalne strukture beta-galaktozidaza odabranih bakterijskih sojeva (Streptococcus thermophillus,  Lactobacillus acidophilus,  i Bifidobacterium animalis  ssp.  lactis) kao i karakterizacija  njihovih aktivnih mesta i određivanje aktivnih rezdua. Takođe, cilj disertacije obu...

  14. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  15. Regulation of virulence by a two-component system in group B streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sheng-Mei; Cieslewicz, Michael J; Kasper, Dennis L; Wessels, Michael R

    2005-02-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is frequently carried in the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract as a commensal organism, yet it has the potential to cause life-threatening infection in newborn infants, pregnant women, and individuals with chronic illness. Regulation of virulence factor expression may affect whether GBS behaves as an asymptomatic colonizer or an invasive pathogen, but little is known about how such factors are controlled in GBS. We now report the characterization of a GBS locus that encodes a two-component regulatory system similar to CsrRS (or CovRS) in Streptococcus pyogenes. Inactivation of csrR, encoding the putative response regulator, in two unrelated wild-type strains of GBS resulted in a marked increase in production of beta-hemolysin/cytolysin and a striking decrease in production of CAMP factor, an unrelated cytolytic toxin. Quantitative RNA hybridization experiments revealed that these two phenotypes were associated with a marked increase and decrease in expression of the corresponding genes, cylE and cfb, respectively. The CsrR mutant strains also displayed increased expression of scpB encoding C5a peptidase. Similar, but less marked, changes in gene expression were observed in CsrS (putative sensor component) mutants, evidence that CsrR and CsrS constitute a functional two-component system. Experimental infection studies in mice demonstrated reduced virulence of both CsrR and CsrS mutant strains relative to the wild type. Together, these results indicate that CsrRS regulates expression of multiple GBS virulence determinants and is likely to play an important role in GBS pathogenesis.

  16. Clonal structure of Streptococcus sanguinis strains isolated from endocarditis cases and the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, T; Gilbert, S C; Klein, J; Warren, S; Wade, W G; Beighton, D

    2011-10-01

    A collection of Streptococcus sanguinis strains from patients with endocarditis (n = 21) and from the oral cavity (n = 34) was subjected to a multi-locus sequence typing analysis using seven housekeeping genes, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (carB), Co/Zn/Cd efflux system component (czcD), d-alanyl-d-alanine ligase (ddl), DNA polymerase III (dnaX), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (gdh), DNA-directed RNA polymerase, beta subunit (rpoB) and superoxide dismutase (sodA). The scheme was expanded by the inclusion of two the putative virulence genes, bacitracin-resistance protein (bacA) and saliva-binding protein (ssaB), to increase strain discrimination. Extensive intra-species recombination was apparent in all genes but inter-species recombination was also apparent with strains apparently harbouring gdh and ddl from unidentified sources and one isolate harboured a sodA allele apparently derived from Streptococcus oralis. The recombination/mutation ratio for the concatenated housekeeping gene sequences was 1.67 (95% confidence limits 1.25-2.72) and for the two virulence genes the r/m ratio was 3.99 (95% confidence limits 1.61-8.72); recombination was the major driver for genetic variation. All isolates were distinct and the endocarditis strains did not form distinct sub-clusters when the data were analysed using ClonalFrame. These data support the widely held opinion that infecting S. sanguinis strains are opportunistic human pathogens. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Identification of salivary mucin MUC7 binding proteins from Streptococcus gordonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton David J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The salivary mucin MUC7 (previously known as MG2 can adhere to various strains of streptococci that are primary colonizers and predominant microorganisms of the oral cavity. Although there is a growing interest in interaction between oral pathogens and salivary mucins, studies reporting the specific binding sites on the bacteria are rather limited. Identification and characterization of the specific interacting proteins on the bacterial cell surface, termed adhesins, are crucial to further understand host-pathogen interactions. Results We demonstrate here, using purified MUC7 to overlay blots of SDS-extracts of Streptococcus gordonii cell surface proteins, 4 MUC7-binding bands, with apparent molecular masses of 62, 78, 84 and 133 kDa from the Streptococcus gordonii strain, PK488. Putative adhesins were identified by in-gel digestion and subsequent nanoLC-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of resultant peptides. The 62 kDa and 84 kDa bands were identified as elongation factor (EF Tu and EF-G respectively. The 78 kDa band was a hppA gene product; the 74 kDa oligopeptide-binding lipoprotein. The 133 kDa band contained two proteins; alpha enolase and DNA-directed RNA polymerase, beta' subunit. Some of these proteins, for example alpha enolase are expected to be intracellular, however, flow cytometric analysis confirmed its location on the bacterial surface. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that S. gordonii expressed a number of putative MUC7 recognizing proteins and these contribute to MUC7 mucin binding of this streptococcal strain.

  18. Comparing the cariogenic species Streptococcus sobrinus and S. mutans on whole genome level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conrads, G.; de Soet, J.J.; Song, L.; Henne, K.; Sztajer, H.; Wagner-Döbler, I.; Zeng, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two closely related species of mutans streptococci, namely Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, are associated with dental caries in humans. Their acidogenic and aciduric capacity is directly associated with the cariogenic potential of these bacteria. To survive acidic and

  19. Molecular and mathematical epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus uberis mastitis in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadoks, Ruth Nicolet

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is the most common and costly production disease affecting dairy cows. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus uberis are two major mastitis-causing pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus is traditionally classified as contagious pathogen, while Streptococcus uberis is classified as environmental

  20. Capsular typing of Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B streptococci) from fish using multiplex PCR and serotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus spp. including Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B streptococci) are considered emerging pathogens responsible for approximately $1 billion USD in annual losses to the global tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) aquaculture industry. This study evaluated a published multiplex PCR capsul...

  1. Parvovirus B19 infection presenting with severe erythroid aplastic crisis during pregnancy in a woman with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and alpha-thalassemia trait: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ching; Chen, Chin-Shan; Wang, Wei-Yao; Ma, Jui-Shan; Shu, Hwei-Fan; Fan, Frank S

    2015-03-12

    Parvovirus B19 virus commonly causes subclinical infection, but it can prove fatal to the fetus during pregnancy and cause severe anemia in an adult with hemolytic diseases. We present the case of a woman with autoimmune hemolytic anemia who was diagnosed with parvovirus B19-induced transient aplastic crisis during her second trimester of pregnancy and faced the high risk of both fetal and maternal complications related to this specific viral infection. To the best of our knowledge, the experience of successful intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for B19 virus infection during pregnancy, as in our case, is limited. A 28-year-old and 20-week pregnant Chinese woman with genetically confirmed alpha-thalassemia trait was diagnosed with cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia and suffered from transient aplastic crisis caused by B19 virus infection. She received intravenous immunoglobulin treatment to reduce the risk of hydrops fetalis. Her peripheral blood reticulocyte percentage recovered, but anemia persisted, so she underwent several courses of high dose intravenous dexamethasone for controlling her underlying hemolytic problem. Finally, her hemoglobin levels remained stable with no need of erythrocyte transfusion, and a healthy baby boy was naturally delivered. Parvovirus B19 virus infection should be considered when a sudden exacerbation of anemia occurs in a patient with hemolytic disease, and the possible fetal complications caused by maternal B19 virus infection during pregnancy should not be ignored. Close monitoring and adequate management can keep both mother and fetus safe.

  2. SYNTHESIS AND HEMOLYTIC PROPERTIES OF DERIVATIVES OF 4,4'-DIHYDROXYBIPHENYL – 2,2'-[BIPHENYL-4,4'- DIYLBIS(OXY]BIS[N-(METHYLAMINOALKILACETAMIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Zanoza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was synthesis of 4,4’-dihydroxybiphenyl derivatives, namely 2,2’-[biphenyl-4,4’-diylbis(oxy]bis[N-(2-aminoalkylacetamide], study of their hemolytic properties and the effect of the side chain structure on hemolytic properties. 2,2’-[Biphenyl-4,4’-diylbis(oxy]diacetic acid was synthesized by alkylation of 4,4’-dihydroxybiphenyl with methylbromoacetate, followed by alkaline hydrolysis. Chloroanhydride was obtained by treatment of this acid with thionyl chloride. 2,2’-[Biphenyl-4,4’-diylbis(oxy]  bis-[N-(2-aminoalkylacetamides] were synthesized in the biphasic media (dichloromethane/ aqueous sodium carbonate. Structures of synthesized compounds were proved by mass-spectrometryand 1Н NMR. Hemolytic properties were studied using healthy donors’ erythrocytes 0(I/Rh+. The absence of hemolytic properties for obtained compounds was shown, unlike similar 4,4’-aminoalkoxybiphenyls for which a significant hemolysis was shown. Thus, replacement of the ethylene group with amide group in the side chain of 4,4’-bissubstituted biphenyls significantly reduces hemolytic properties.

  3. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1987-01-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate [ 14 C]ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular [ 14 C]ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular [ 14 C]ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of [ 14 C]ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of [ 14 C]ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis

  4. Ecology and pathogenicity of gastrointestinal Streptococcus bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Paul; Kwon, Young Min; Ricke, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis is an indigenous resident in the gastrointestinal tracts of both humans and animals. S. bovis is one of the major causes of bacterial endocarditis and has been implicated in the incidence of human colon cancer, possibly due to chronic inflammatory response at the site of intestinal colonization. Certain feeding regimens in ruminants can lead to overgrowth of S. bovis in the rumen, resulting in the over-production of lactate and capsular polysaccharide causing acute ruminal acidosis and bloat, respectively. There are multiple strategies in controlling acute lactic acidosis and bloat. The incidence of the two diseases may be controlled by strict dietary management. Gradual introduction of grain-based diets and the feeding of coarsely chopped roughage decrease the incidence of the two disease entities. Ionophores, which have been used to enhance feed conversion and growth rate in cattle, have been shown to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria in the rumen. Other methods of controlling lactic acid bacteria in the ruminal environment (dietary supplementation of long-chain fatty acids, induction of passive and active immune responses to the bacteria, and the use of lytic bacteriophages) have also been investigated. It is anticipated that through continued in-depth ecological analysis of S. bovis the characteristics responsible for human and animal pathogenesis would be sufficiently identified to a point where more effective control strategies for the control of this bacteria can be developed.

  5. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  6. Efflux inhibitor suppresses Streptococcus mutans virulence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huihui; Liu, Jia; Ling, Junqi

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that efflux pumps play important roles in bacterial pathogenicity and efflux inhibitors (EIs) have been proved to be effective in suppressing bacterial virulence properties. However, little is known regarding the EI of Streptococcus mutans, a well-known caries-inducing bacterium. In this study, we identified the EI of S. mutans through ethidium bromide efflux assay and investigated how EI affected S. mutans virulence regarding the cariogenicity and stress response. Results indicated that reserpine, the identified EI, suppressed acid tolerance, mutacin production and transformation efficiency of S. mutans, and modified biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution. Suppressed glycosyltransferase activity was also noted after reserpine exposure. The data from quantitative real-time-PCR demonstrated that reserpine significantly altered the expression profile of quorum-sensing and virulence-associated genes. These findings suggest that reserpine represents a promising adjunct anticariogenic agent in that it suppresses virulence properties of S. mutans. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Vahey, B.R. [Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, 925 W 34 St, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Pimenta, A.L., E-mail: andrea@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Biologia, ERRMECe, Université de Cergy Pontoise, 2, Av. Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy, Pontoise (France); Integrated Laboratories Technologies (InteLab), Dept. Chemical and Food Engineering (EQA), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-970 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml{sup −1}), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces • Biofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  8. Genome of the opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Alves, Joao M; Kitten, Todd; Brown, Arunsri; Chen, Zhenming; Ozaki, Luiz S; Manque, Patricio; Ge, Xiuchun; Serrano, Myrna G; Puiu, Daniela; Hendricks, Stephanie; Wang, Yingping; Chaplin, Michael D; Akan, Doruk; Paik, Sehmi; Peterson, Darrell L; Macrina, Francis L; Buck, Gregory A

    2007-04-01

    The genome of Streptococcus sanguinis is a circular DNA molecule consisting of 2,388,435 bp and is 177 to 590 kb larger than the other 21 streptococcal genomes that have been sequenced. The G+C content of the S. sanguinis genome is 43.4%, which is considerably higher than the G+C contents of other streptococci. The genome encodes 2,274 predicted proteins, 61 tRNAs, and four rRNA operons. A 70-kb region encoding pathways for vitamin B(12) biosynthesis and degradation of ethanolamine and propanediol was apparently acquired by horizontal gene transfer. The gene complement suggests new hypotheses for the pathogenesis and virulence of S. sanguinis and differs from the gene complements of other pathogenic and nonpathogenic streptococci. In particular, S. sanguinis possesses a remarkable abundance of putative surface proteins, which may permit it to be a primary colonizer of the oral cavity and agent of streptococcal endocarditis and infection in neutropenic patients.

  9. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D.; Vahey, B.R.; Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S.; Pimenta, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml −1 ), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10 2 CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10 2 CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces • Biofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  10. Sorption of streptococcus faecium to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerstavik, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed by which to study the sorption of Streptococcus faecium to soda-lime cover glasses. Conditions were chosen to minimize the influence on sorption of bacterial polymer production, passive sorption being studied rather than attachment mediated by metabolic activities. Sorption of S. faecium increased with increasing temperature (to 50degC), time, and cell concentration, but equilibrium apparently was not reached even after incubation for 8 hours or at a cell concentration of 3 x 10 10 per ml. Sorption increased with solute molarity up to 0.1 M concentration of NaCl and KCl, indicating an effect of the electrical double layers on the apposition of cells to the glass surface. Desorption of bacteria could be obtained after multiple washings of the glasses in buffer or by the action of Tween 80, but not if sorbed bacteria were left in distilled water, various salt solutions, urea, or in suspensions of unlabelled bacteria. It was concluded that sorption occurred as a result of chemical interactions between the glass and the cell surface. Tween 80 at a concentration of 1 per cent inhibited sorption to 26 per cent of buffer controls, 2 M urea was less effective, and 1 M NaCl was without effect. It is suggested that hydrophobic interactions may be of importance in the binding of S. faecium to glass. (author)

  11. Factor H autoantibody is associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklebank, Vicky; Johnson, Sally; Sheerin, Thomas P; Marks, Stephen D; Gilbert, Rodney D; Tyerman, Kay; Kinoshita, Meredith; Awan, Atif; Kaur, Amrit; Webb, Nicholas; Hegde, Shivaram; Finlay, Eric; Fitzpatrick, Maggie; Walsh, Patrick R; Wong, Edwin K S; Booth, Caroline; Kerecuk, Larissa; Salama, Alan D; Almond, Mike; Inward, Carol; Goodship, Timothy H; Sheerin, Neil S; Marchbank, Kevin J; Kavanagh, David

    2017-11-01

    Factor H autoantibodies can impair complement regulation, resulting in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, predominantly in childhood. There are no trials investigating treatment, and clinical practice is only informed by retrospective cohort analysis. Here we examined 175 children presenting with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United Kingdom and Ireland for factor H autoantibodies that included 17 children with titers above the international standard. Of the 17, seven had a concomitant rare genetic variant in a gene encoding a complement pathway component or regulator. Two children received supportive treatment; both developed established renal failure. Plasma exchange was associated with a poor rate of renal recovery in seven of 11 treated. Six patients treated with eculizumab recovered renal function. Contrary to global practice, immunosuppressive therapy to prevent relapse in plasma exchange-treated patients was not adopted due to concerns over treatment-associated complications. Without immunosuppression, the relapse rate was high (five of seven). However, reintroduction of treatment resulted in recovery of renal function. All patients treated with eculizumab achieved sustained remission. Five patients received renal transplants without specific factor H autoantibody-targeted treatment with recurrence in one who also had a functionally significant CFI mutation. Thus, our current practice is to initiate eculizumab therapy for treatment of factor H autoantibody-mediated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome rather than plasma exchange with or without immunosuppression. Based on this retrospective analysis we see no suggestion of inferior treatment, albeit the strength of our conclusions is limited by the small sample size. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of pro-inflammatory phenotype in monocytes after engulfing Hb-activated platelets in hemolytic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Rashi; Chawla, Sheetal; Rathore, Deepak K; Bhasym, Angika; Annarapu, Gowtham K; Sharma, Vandana; Seth, Tulika; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-02-01

    Monocytes and macrophage combat infections and maintain homeostatic balance by engulfing microbes and apoptotic cells, and releasing inflammatory cytokines. Studies have described that these cells develop anti-inflammatory properties upon recycling the free-hemoglobin (Hb) in hemolytic conditions. While investigating the phenotype of monocytes in two hemolytic disorders-paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and sickle cell disease (SCD), we observed a high number of pro-inflammatory (CD14 + CD16 hi ) monocytes in these patients. We further investigated in vitro the phenotype of these monocytes and found an estimated 55% of CD14 + cells were transformed into the CD14 + CD16 hi subset after engulfing Hb-activated platelets. The CD14 + CD16 hi monocytes, which were positive for both intracellular Hb and CD42b (platelet marker), secreted significant amounts of TNF-α and IL-1β, unlike monocytes treated with only free Hb, which secreted more IL-10. We have shown recently the presence of a high number of Hb-bound hyperactive platelets in patients with both diseases, and further investigated if the monocytes engulfed these activated platelets in vivo. As expected, we found 95% of CD14 + CD16 hi monocytes with both intracellular Hb and CD42b in both diseases, and they expressed high TNF-α. Furthermore our data showed that these monocytes whether from patients or developed in vitro after treatment with Hb-activated platelets, secreted significant amounts of tissue factor. Besides, these CD14 + CD16 hi monocytes displayed significantly decreased phagocytosis of E. coli. Our study therefore suggests that this alteration of monocyte phenotype may play a role in the increased propensity to pro-inflammatory/coagulant complications observed in these hemolytic disorders-PNH and SCD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms.

  14. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Azizi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20. Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms.

  15. Interactions between oral bacteria: inhibition of Streptococcus mutans bacteriocin production by Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing-Yan; Kuramitsu, Howard K

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been recognized as an important etiological agent in human dental caries. Some strains of S. mutans also produce bacteriocins. In this study, we sought to demonstrate that bacteriocin production by S. mutans strains GS5 and BM71 was mediated by quorum sensing, which is dependent on a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system encoded by the com genes. We also demonstrated that interactions with some other oral streptococci interfered with S. mutans bacteriocin production both in broth and in biofilms. The inhibition of S. mutans bacteriocin production by oral bacteria was stronger in biofilms than in broth. Using transposon Tn916 mutagenesis, we identified a gene (sgc; named for Streptococcus gordonii challisin) responsible for the inhibition of S. mutans bacteriocin production by S. gordonii Challis. Interruption of the sgc gene in S. gordonii Challis resulted in attenuated inhibition of S. mutans bacteriocin production. The supernatant fluids from the sgc mutant did not inactivate the exogenous S. mutans CSP as did those from the parent strain Challis. S. gordonii Challis did not inactivate bacteriocin produced by S. mutans GS5. Because S. mutans uses quorum sensing to regulate virulence, strategies designed to interfere with these signaling systems may have broad applicability for biological control of this caries-causing organism.

  16. Inhibitory effects of antiseptic mouthrinses on Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A; Leishman, S J; Walsh, L J; Seow, W K

    2015-06-01

    Oral antiseptics are valuable in controlling oral infections caused by cariogenic bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mouthrinses and pure antiseptic compounds on Streptococcus mutans and non-mutans bacteria (Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus acidophilus). The agar diffusion assay was employed to determine bacterial growth inhibition. Commercial mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine gluconate (0.2%), cetylpyridinium chloride (0.05%) and sodium fluoride (0.05%) produced statistically similar growth inhibition of S. mutans, S. sanguinis and L. acidophilus (with zones of inhibition ranging from 7.56 ± 0.52 mm to 7.39 ± 0.53 mm, 17.44 ± 0.94 mm to 18.31 ± 0.62 mm and 8.61 ± 1.43 to 8.67 ± 1.43 mm respectively, p > 0.05). The chlorhexidine mouthwash produced the greatest mean growth inhibition of S. sanguinis and S. mutans compared to all other mouthrinses tested (p mutans could be detected were chlorhexidine gluconate at 0.005% (wt/vol), cetylpyridinium chloride 0.01% (wt/ vol), povidone iodine 10% (wt/vol) and sodium hypochlorite 0.5% (vol/vol). Chlorhexidine (0.01%), cetylpyridinium chloride (0.01%), povidone iodine (10%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.5%) are effective at inhibiting the growth of S. mutans, S. sanguinis and L. acidophilus. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. In-vitro efficacy of different morphology zinc oxide nanopowders on Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Bakhori, Siti Khadijah; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ling, Chuo Ann; Sirelkhatim, Amna Hassan; Hasan, Habsah; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Seeni, Azman; Abd Rahman, Rosliza

    2017-09-01

    ZnO with two different morphologies were used to study the inhibition of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus mutans which are closely associated with tooth cavity. Rod-like shaped ZnO-A and plate-like shaped ZnO-B were produced using a zinc boiling furnace. The nanopowders were characterized using energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to confirm the properties of the ZnO polycrystalline wurtzite structures. XRD results show that the calculated crystallite sizes of ZnO-A and ZnO-B were 36.6 and 39.4nm, respectively, whereas DLS revealed particle size distributions of 21.82nm (ZnO-A) and 52.21nm (ZnO-B). PL spectra showed ion vacancy defects related to green and red luminescence for both ZnO particles. These defects evolved during the generation of reactive oxygen species which contributed to the antibacterial activity. Antibacterial activity was investigated using microdilution technique towards S. sobrinus and S. mutans at different nanopowder concentrations. Results showed that ZnO-A exhibited higher inhibition on both bacteria compared with ZnO-B. Moreover, S. mutans was more sensitive compared with S. sobrinus because of its higher inhibition rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Distinct Biological Potential of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenning; Tan, Mui Fern; Old, Lesley A; Paterson, Ian C; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Choo, Siew Woh

    2017-06-07

    Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis are pioneer colonizers of dental plaque and important agents of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE). To gain a greater understanding of these two closely related species, we performed comparative analyses on 14 new S. gordonii and 5 S. sanguinis strains using various bioinformatics approaches. We revealed S. gordonii and S. sanguinis harbor open pan-genomes and share generally high sequence homology and number of core genes including virulence genes. However, we observed subtle differences in genomic islands and prophages between the species. Comparative pathogenomics analysis identified S. sanguinis strains have genes encoding IgA proteases, mitogenic factor deoxyribonucleases, nickel/cobalt uptake and cobalamin biosynthesis. On the contrary, genomic islands of S. gordonii strains contain additional copies of comCDE quorum-sensing system components involved in genetic competence. Two distinct polysaccharide locus architectures were identified, one of which was exclusively present in S. gordonii strains. The first evidence of genes encoding the CylA and CylB system by the α-haemolytic S. gordonii is presented. This study provides new insights into the genetic distinctions between S. gordonii and S. sanguinis, which yields understanding of tooth surfaces colonization and contributions to dental plaque formation, as well as their potential roles in the pathogenesis of IE.

  19. Organization of the capsule biosynthesis gene locus of the oral streptococcus Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunashima, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Katsuhide; Motono, Makoto; Iijima, Shinji

    2012-03-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of the important oral streptococcus Streptococcus anginosus, which causes endocarditis, and the genes for its synthesis have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the gene locus required for CPS synthesis in S. anginosus. Southern hybridization using the cpsE gene of the well-characterized bacterium S. agalactiae revealed that there is a similar gene in the genome of S. anginosus. By using the colony hybridization technique and inverse PCR, we isolated the CPS synthesis (cps) genes of S. anginosus. This gene cluster consisted of genes containing typical regulatory genes, cpsA-D, and glycosyltransferase genes coding for glucose, rhamnose, N-acetylgalactosamine, and galactofuranose transferases. Furthermore, we confirmed that the cps locus is required for CPS synthesis using a mutant strain with a defective cpsE gene. The cps cluster was found to be located downstream the nrdG gene, which encodes ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase activator, as is the case in other oral streptococci such as S. gordonii and S. sanguinis. However, the location of the gene cluster was different from those of S. pneumonia and S. agalactiae. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Aciduricity and acid tolerance mechanisms of Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kodama, Yoshitoyo; Shimoyama, Yu; Ishikawa, Taichi; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2018-04-17

    Although Streptococcus anginosus constitutes a proportion of the normal flora of the gastrointestinal and genital tracts, and the oral cavity, it has been reported that S. anginosus infection could be closely associated with abscesses at various body sites, infective endocarditis, and upper gastrointestinal cancers. The colonization in an acidic environment due to the aciduricity of S. anginosus could be the etiology of the systemic infection of the bacteria. To elucidate the aciduricity and acid tolerance mechanisms of the microbe, we examined the viability and growth of S. anginosus under acidic conditions. The viabilities of S. anginosus NCTC 10713 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 at pH 4.0 showed as being markedly higher than those of Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558, and Streptococcus mitis ATCC 49456; however, the viability was partially inhibited by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, an H + -ATPase inhibitor, suggesting that H + -ATPase could play a role in the viability of S. anginosus under acidic conditions. In addition, S. anginosus NCTC 10713 could grow at pH 5.0 and showed a marked arginine deiminase (ADI) activity, unlike its ΔarcA mutant, deficient in the gene encoding ADI, and other streptococcal species, which indicated that ADI could also be associated with aciduricity. These results suggest that S. anginosus has significant aciduric properties, which can be attributed to these enzyme activities.

  1. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf Rabeya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is most commonly caused by anti-D alloantibody. It is usually seen in Rhesus D (RhD-negative mothers that have been previously sensitized. We report here a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in a newborn baby caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies, born to a mother who was RhD negative, but with no previous serological evidence of RhD alloimmunization. Case presentation A one-day-old Chinese baby boy was born to a mother who was group A RhD negative. The baby was jaundiced with hyperbilirubinemia, but with no evidence of infection. His blood group was group A RhD positive, his direct Coombs' test result was positive and red cell elution studies demonstrated the presence of anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies. Investigations performed on the maternal blood during the 22 weeks of gestation showed the presence of anti-S antibodies only. Repeat investigations performed post-natally showed the presence of similar antibodies as in the newborn and an anti-D titer of 1:32 (0.25 IU/mL, which was significant. A diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn secondary to anti-D and anti-S was made. The baby was treated with phototherapy and close monitoring. He was discharged well after five days of phototherapy. Conclusions This case illustrates the possibility of an anamnestic response of allo-anti-D from previous sensitization in a RhD-negative mother, or the development of anti-D in mid-trimester. Thus, it highlights the importance of thorough antenatal ABO, RhD blood grouping and antibody screening, and if necessary, antibody identification and regular monitoring of antibody screening and antibody levels for prevention or early detection of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, especially in cases of mothers with clinically significant red cell alloantibody.

  2. Rh(D) fraction incompatibility causing hemolytic disease of the newborn. Report of two cases in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S K; Tham, K T; Cheung, K P; Jenkins, W J

    1982-07-01

    Two cases of hemolytic disease of new born in a Chinese family are reported. The hemolysis was due to the production in the mother of antibodies against fractions A, C, and D of Rh(D) antigen. The fractions were absent in the mother's red blood cells which are Rh(DB) but present in her babies. Rh(DB) may be detected by the use of two types of anti-D sera, one with and the other without anti-DB activity. For transfusion purpose, all DB patients so tested, would be regarded as Rh(D) negative.

  3. ABO hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: an iatrogenic complication of heterologous assisted reproductive technology-induced pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Cardiello, Valentina; Lai, Marco; Cataldi, Luigi; D'Andrea, Vito; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2010-10-01

    ABO hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (ABO HDFN) may manifest itself in cases of mothers belonging to blood group O and newborns of groups A or B and more frequently in group A and less so in group B. The case subjects are twin-birth newborns with ABO HDFN, of group AB born to a mother of group O. These cases of ABO HDFN prove inconsistent with Mendel's law of segregation. This case study finds its explanation in new methods of assisted reproduction, particularly heterologous in vitro fertilization with ovodonation. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  4. B-lymphocyte reconstitution after repeated rituximab treatment in a child with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelieke A.A. van der Linde

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the detailed long-term reconstitution of B-lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulins, and specific antibody production after two courses of rituximab in a young, previously healthy girl with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia. B-lymphocyte subpopulations were surprisingly normal directly after reconstitution. However, there was a slower reconstitution after the second rituximab course, especially of non-switched and switched memory B-lymphocytes, and a temporary decline in IgM below age-matched reference values.

  5. [Meningitis and white matter lesions due to Streptococcus mitis in a previously healthy child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiş, Reyhan; Yüksel, Ciğdem Nükhet; Derundere, Umit; Yiş, Uluç

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus mitis, an important member of viridans streptococci, is found in the normal flora of the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, female genital tract and skin. Although it is of low pathogenicity and virulence, it may cause serious infections in immunocompromised patients. Meningitis caused by S.mitis has been described in patients with previous spinal anesthesia, neurosurgical procedure, malignancy, bacterial endocarditis with neurological complications and alcoholics, but it is rare in patients who are previously healthy. In this report, a rare case of meningoencephalitis caused by S.mitis developed in a previously healthy child has been presented. A previously healthy eight-year-old girl who presented with fever, altered state of consciousness, and headache was hospitalized in intensive care unit with the diagnosis of meningitis. Past history revealed that she was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for acute sinusitis ten days before her admission. Whole blood count revealed the followings: hemoglobin 13 g/dl, white blood cell count 18.6 x 109/L (90% neutrophils), platelet count 200 x 109/L and 150 leucocytes were detected on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination. Protein and glucose levels of CSF were 80 mg/dl and 40 mg/dl (concomitant blood glucose 100 mg/dl), respectively. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed widespread white matter lesions, and alpha-hemolytic streptococci were grown in CSF culture. The isolate was identified as S.mitis with conventional methods, and also confirmed by VITEK2 (bioMerieux, France) and API 20 STREP (bioMerieux, France) systems. Isolate was found susceptible to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, cefotaxime, vancomycin and chloramphenicol. Regarding the etiology, echocardiography revealed no vegetation nor valve pathology, and peripheral blood smear showed no abnormality. Immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal limits. Ongoing inflammation in maxillary sinuses detected in

  6. Molecular identification and histopathological study of natural Streptococcus agalactiae infection in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laith, A A; Ambak, Mohd Azmi; Hassan, Marina; Sheriff, Shahreza Md; Nadirah, Musa; Draman, Ahmad Shuhaimi; Wahab, Wahidah; Ibrahim, Wan Nurhafizah Wan; Aznan, Alia Syafiqah; Jabar, Amina; Najiah, Musa

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to emphasize on histopathological examinations and molecular identification of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from natural infections in hybrid tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus ) in Temerloh Pahang, Malaysia, as well as to determine the susceptibility of the pathogen strains to various currently available antimicrobial agents. The diseased fishes were observed for variable clinical signs including fin hemorrhages, alterations in behavior associated with erratic swimming, exophthalmia, and mortality. Tissue samples from the eyes, brain, kidney, liver, and spleen were taken for bacterial isolation. Identification of S. agalactiae was screened by biochemical methods and confirmed by VITEK 2 and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The antibiogram profiling of the isolate was tested against 18 standard antibiotics included nitrofurantoin, flumequine, florfenicol, amoxylin, doxycycline, oleandomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, lincomycin, colistin sulfate, oxolinic acid, novobiocin, spiramycin, erythromycin, fosfomycin, neomycin, gentamycin, and polymyxin B. The histopathological analysis of eyes, brain, liver, kidney, and spleen was observed for abnormalities related to S. agalactiae infection. The suspected colonies of S. agalactiae identified by biochemical methods was observed as Gram-positive chained cocci, β-hemolytic, and non-motile. The isolate was confirmed as S. agalactiae by VITEK 2 (99% similarity), reconfirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (99% similarity) and deposited in GenBank with accession no. KT869025. The isolate was observed to be resistance to neomycin and gentamicin. The most consistent gross findings were marked hemorrhages, erosions of caudal fin, and exophthalmos. Microscopic examination confirmed the presence of marked congestion and infiltration of inflammatory cell in the eye, brain, kidney, liver, and spleen. Eye samples showed damage of the lens capsule, hyperemic and hemorrhagic choroid tissue, and retina

  7. Molecular identification and histopathological study of natural Streptococcus agalactiae infection in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith Abdul Razzak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of this study was to emphasize on histopathological examinations and molecular identification of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from natural infections in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus in Temerloh Pahang, Malaysia, as well as to determine the susceptibility of the pathogen strains to various currently available antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: The diseased fishes were observed for variable clinical signs including fin hemorrhages, alterations in behavior associated with erratic swimming, exophthalmia, and mortality. Tissue samples from the eyes, brain, kidney, liver, and spleen were taken for bacterial isolation. Identification of S. agalactiae was screened by biochemical methods and confirmed by VITEK 2 and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The antibiogram profiling of the isolate was tested against 18 standard antibiotics included nitrofurantoin, flumequine, florfenicol, amoxylin, doxycycline, oleandomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, lincomycin, colistin sulfate, oxolinic acid, novobiocin, spiramycin, erythromycin, fosfomycin, neomycin, gentamycin, and polymyxin B. The histopathological analysis of eyes, brain, liver, kidney, and spleen was observed for abnormalities related to S. agalactiae infection. Results: The suspected colonies of S. agalactiae identified by biochemical methods was observed as Gram-positive chained cocci, β-hemolytic, and non-motile. The isolate was confirmed as S. agalactiae by VITEK 2 (99% similarity, reconfirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (99% similarity and deposited in GenBank with accession no. KT869025. The isolate was observed to be resistance to neomycin and gentamicin. The most consistent gross findings were marked hemorrhages, erosions of caudal fin, and exophthalmos. Microscopic examination confirmed the presence of marked congestion and infiltration of inflammatory cell in the eye, brain, kidney, liver, and spleen. Eye samples showed damage of the lens capsule

  8. Enantioselective synthesis of alpha,beta-disubstituted-beta-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Prabagaran, Narayanasamy; Ghorpade, Sandeep G; Jasperse, Craig P

    2003-10-01

    Highly diastereoselective and enantioselective addition of N-benzylhydroxylamine to imides 17 and 20-30 produces alpha,beta-trans-disubstituted N-benzylisoxazolidinones 19 and 31-41. These reactions proceed in 60-96% ee with 93-99% de's using 5 mol % of Mg(NTf2)2 and ligand 18. The product isoxazolidinones can be hydrogenolyzed directly to provide alpha,beta-disubstituted-beta-amino acids.

  9. 21 CFR 866.3720 - Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. 866.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3720 Streptococcus spp. exo-enzyme reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices used...

  10. Utilización de la penicilina en la infección extrameníngea por Streptococcus pneumoniae Use of penicillin in the extrameningeal infection from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Lázaro Noda Albelo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La resistencia del Streptococcus pneumoniae a los antibióticos betalactámicos es relativa, y puede ser superada si se incrementa la dosis de esta clase de medicamentos. La definición de susceptibilidad y resistencia del Streptococcus pneumoniae se creó originalmente para predecir respuesta al tratamiento de la infección del sistema nervioso central. La infección fuera del sistema nervioso central por la mayoría de las cepas de S. pneumoniae responde a las dosis habituales de antibióticos betalactámicos. Se realiza una revisión de los nuevos puntos de corte del Laboratory Standars Institute para sensibilidad a penicilina del patógeno, y se analiza su implicación en la terapéutica actual de la enfermedad extrameníngea por S. pneumoniae.The beta-lactamase resistance of Strepcoccus pneumoniae is relative and may to be overcome if the dose of this type of drugs is increased. The definition of oversensitivity and of resistance of above mentioned bacteria was originally created to predict the infection response of central nervous system (CNS to treatment. The infection outside of the CNS by most of strains of S. pneumoniae responds to habitual dose of betalactamic antibiotics. A review of the new cut points of Laboratory Standards Institute for the sensitivity to pathogen penicillin and its implication in current therapy of extrameningeal disease by S. pneumoniae is analyzed.

  11. Protection from hemolytic uremic syndrome by eyedrop vaccination with modified enterohemorrhagic E. coli outer membrane vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Sub Choi

    Full Text Available We investigated whether eyedrop vaccination using modified outer membrane vesicles (mOMVs is effective for protecting against hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS caused by enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7 infection. Modified OMVs and waaJ-mOMVs were prepared from cultures of MsbB- and Shiga toxin A subunit (STxA-deficient EHEC O157:H7 bacteria with or without an additional waaJ mutation. BALB/c mice were immunized by eyedrop mOMVs, waaJ-mOMVs, and mOMVs plus polymyxin B (PMB. Mice were boosted at 2 weeks, and challenged peritoneally with wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs at 4 weeks. As parameters for evaluation of the OMV-mediated immune protection, serum and mucosal immunoglobulins, body weight change and blood urea nitrogen (BUN/Creatinin (Cr were tested, as well as histopathology of renal tissue. In order to confirm the safety of mOMVs for eyedrop use, body weight and ocular histopathological changes were monitored in mice. Modified OMVs having penta-acylated lipid A moiety did not contain STxA subunit proteins but retained non-toxic Shiga toxin B (STxB subunit. Removal of the polymeric O-antigen of O157 LPS was confirmed in waaJ-mOMVs. The mice group vaccinated with mOMVs elicited greater humoral and mucosal immune responses than did the waaJ-mOMVs and PBS-treated groups. Eyedrop vaccination of mOMVs plus PMB reduced the level of humoral and mucosal immune responses, suggesting that intact O157 LPS antigen can be a critical component for enhancing the immunogenicity of the mOMVs. After challenge, mice vaccinated with mOMVs were protected from a lethal dose of wtOMVs administered intraperitoneally, conversely mice in the PBS control group were not. Collectively, for the first time, EHEC O157-derived mOMV eyedrop vaccine was experimentally evaluated as an efficient and safe means of vaccine development against EHEC O157:H7 infection-associated HUS.

  12. Blueberry muffin rash, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypoglycemia: a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Kp(a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, J E; Morgan, S; Beck, J C; Zantek, N; Kearney, S; Bendel, C M; Roberts, K D

    2011-05-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn occurs when maternal IgG antibodies cross the placenta and cause hemolysis of fetal red blood cells. Kp(a) is a low frequency red blood cell antigen that has rarely been implicated in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. The few reported cases attributed to anti-Kp(a) have typically had minimal clinical consequences. We report a critically ill neonate who presented with purpura, respiratory failure, severe liver dysfunction, hyperbilirubinemia, hypoglycemia and anemia. This case report broadens the spectrum of neonatal disease associated with anti-Kp(a), addresses the evaluation of hemolysis with liver failure in a neonate, and emphasizes the importance of screening for antibodies to low frequency red blood cell antigens in suspected hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

  13. The change of macrolide resistance rates in group A Streptococcus isolates from children between 2002 and 2013 in Asahikawa city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    This study targeted patients in the Department of Pediatrics, Asahikawa Kosei Hospital, between January 2002 and December 2013. In patients suspected of having hemolytic streptococcal infection, Group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains isolated from a throat swab were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The MICs were measured by the broth microdilution method. The annual number of GAS strains examined for antimicrobial susceptibility testing ranged from 28 to 65 strains, for a total of 574 strains. Some of the isolates obtained from 2006 to 2009 and from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed to determine their emm types. An erythromycin (EM) resistant strain was not detected until 2004, but one EM-resistant strain appeared in 2005. Subsequently, EM-resistant strains rapidly increased, and 48 of 65 strains (73.8%) examined in 2009 were resistant. In 2010, the number of EM-resistant strains decreased to 12 of 36 strains (33.3%). However, it gradually increased afterwards, and 37 of 60 strains (61.7%) were resistant in 2013. Out of 574 strains examined, 184 exhibited EM-resistance, and the overall resistance rate was 31.9%. Partitioning the 124 strains examined between 2006 and 2008 according to emm types, only emm28 strains, which exhibited a high resistance rate, and emm12 strains demonstrated resistance. For the 142 strains examined between 2011 and 2013, the resistance rate of emm28 strains was similarly high; the resistance of emm12 strains significantly increased, and emm1 strains exhibited a high resistance rate. The number of emm types associated with the resistant strains increased. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lung abscess caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B

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    Yuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Lung abscess has been considered to be a rare complication of pneumococcal infection, and most cases are reported to be Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3. A 67-year-old man presented with fever and was diagnosed to have lung abscess caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 6B. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of penicillin for the isolate was 1 μg/mL. He was treated with high-dose intravenous sulbactam/ampicillin as definitive therapy based on susceptibility testing for S. pneumoniae and recovered successfully without surgical intervention. S. pneumoniae serotype 6B can cause lung abscess. Keywords: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Lung abscess, Serotype 6B, Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

  15. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Beta measurement evaluation and upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Rathbun, L.A.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1986-01-01

    This program focuses on the resolution of problems associated with the field measurement of the beta dose component at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The change in DOE programs, including increased efforts in improved waste management and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of facilities, coupled with beta measurement problems identified at Three Mile Island has increased the need to improve beta measurements. In FY 1982, work was initiated to provide a continuing effort to identify problems associated with beta dose assessment at DOE facilities. The problems identified resulted in the development of this program. The investigation includes (1) an assessment of measurement systems now in use, (2) development of improved calibration systems and procedures, (3) application of innovative beta dosimetry concepts, (4) investigation of new instruments or concepts for monitoring and spectroscopy, and (5) development of recommendations to assure an adequate beta measurement program within DOE facilities

  18. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzy-Clara Cita

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters.Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group. Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time. Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, total bilirubin (BIL levels and reticulocyte (RET percentage to calculate a hemolytic index.Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01, LDH (p = 0.03, RET (p = 0.03 levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02. Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01 and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005 were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01 and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03 were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01 than controls.Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability.

  19. Conditional Betas and Investor Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando D. Chague

    2013-01-01

    We derive theoretical expressions for market betas from a rational expectation equilibrium model where the representative investor does not observe if the economy is in a recession or an expansion. Market betas in this economy are time-varying and related to investor uncertainty about the state of the economy. The dynamics of betas will also vary across assets according to the assets' cash-flow structure. In a calibration exercise, we show that value and growth firms have cash-flow structures...

  20. Functional amyloid formation by Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oli, M. W.; Otoo, H. N.; Crowley, P. J.; Heim, K. P.; Nascimento, M. M.; Ramsook, C. B.; Lipke, P. N.

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a common infectious disease associated with acidogenic and aciduric bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans. Organisms that cause cavities form recalcitrant biofilms, generate acids from dietary sugars and tolerate acid end products. It has recently been recognized that micro-organisms can produce functional amyloids that are integral to biofilm development. We now show that the S. mutans cell-surface-localized adhesin P1 (antigen I/II, PAc) is an amyloid-forming protein. This conclusion is based on the defining properties of amyloids, including binding by the amyloidophilic dyes Congo red (CR) and Thioflavin T (ThT), visualization of amyloid fibres by transmission electron microscopy and the green birefringent properties of CR-stained protein aggregates when viewed under cross-polarized light. We provide evidence that amyloid is present in human dental plaque and is produced by both laboratory strains and clinical isolates of S. mutans. We provide further evidence that amyloid formation is not limited to P1, since bacterial colonies without this adhesin demonstrate residual green birefringence. However, S. mutans lacking sortase, the transpeptidase enzyme that mediates the covalent linkage of its substrates to the cell-wall peptidoglycan, including P1 and five other proteins, is not birefringent when stained with CR and does not form biofilms. Biofilm formation is inhibited when S. mutans is cultured in the presence of known inhibitors of amyloid fibrillization, including CR, Thioflavin S and epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which also inhibited ThT uptake by S. mutans extracellular proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that S. mutans is an amyloid-forming organism and suggest that amyloidogenesis contributes to biofilm formation by this oral microbe. PMID:23082034