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Sample records for beta hemolytic streptococcus

  1. Frequency of the Group A Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus Infection in Children Presenting with Acute Tonsillopharyngitis

    OpenAIRE

    Özgül Yiğit; Nevin Cambaz; Emin Özkaya; Yeşim Coşkun; Nedim Samancı; Elif Ünver; Betül Sezgin

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) in children with tonsillopharyngitis and to assess their complaints and clinical findings.Materials and Method: A total of 420 children who presented to our outpatient department with acute tonsillopharyngitis were enrolled to the study. The clinical features of patients with positive throat cultures for GABHS were compared to those with negative culture results. Presence of fever (≥37.50C...

  2. Beta-Hemolytic, Multi-Lancefield Antigen-Agglutinating Enterococcus durans from a Pregnant Woman, Mimicking Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Savini, Vincenzo; Franco, Alessia; Gherardi, Giovanni; Marrollo, Roberta; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; Pimentel de Araujo, Fernanda; Amoruso, Roberta; Battisti, Antonio; Fazii, Paolo; Carretto, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    A beta-hemolytic Lancefield antigen A-, B-, C-, D-, F-, and G-positive Enterococcus durans strain was cultivated from the rectovaginal swab of a pregnant woman who underwent antenatal screening for Streptococcus agalactiae. The isolate raised concern as to what extent similar strains are misrecognized and lead to false diagnosis of group B streptococci.

  3. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae strains isolated from horses are a genetically distinct population within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae taxon.

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    Pinho, Marcos D; Erol, Erdal; Ribeiro-Gonçalves, Bruno; Mendes, Catarina I; Carriço, João A; Matos, Sandra C; Preziuso, Silvia; Luebke-Becker, Antina; Wieler, Lothar H; Melo-Cristino, Jose; Ramirez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic role of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae in the equine host is increasingly recognized. A collection of 108 Lancefield group C (n = 96) or L (n = 12) horse isolates recovered in the United States and in three European countries presented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) alleles, sequence types and emm types (only 56% of the isolates could be emm typed) that were, with few exceptions, distinct from those previously found in human Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Characterization of a subset of horse isolates by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that most equine isolates could also be differentiated from S. dysgalactiae strains from other animal species, supporting the existence of a horse specific genomovar. Draft genome information confirms the distinctiveness of the horse genomovar and indicates the presence of potentially horse-specific virulence factors. While this genomovar represents most of the isolates recovered from horses, a smaller MLST and MLSA defined sub-population seems to be able to cause infections in horses, other animals and humans, indicating that transmission between hosts of strains belonging to this group may occur. PMID:27530432

  4. Frequency of the Group A Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus Infection in Children Presenting with Acute Tonsillopharyngitis

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    Özgül Yiğit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS in children with tonsillopharyngitis and to assess their complaints and clinical findings.Materials and Method: A total of 420 children who presented to our outpatient department with acute tonsillopharyngitis were enrolled to the study. The clinical features of patients with positive throat cultures for GABHS were compared to those with negative culture results. Presence of fever (≥37.50C, axilary, vomiting, coryza, sore throat, cough, abdominal pain, tenderness of cervical lymph nodes, and tonsillopharyngitis were recorded. Results: The mean age of the patients was 6.5±3.4 years (range, 1 to 14 years. The positive throat culture rate for GABHS was 22.62% (95 of 420 patients. It was found that fever, sore throat, cough, abdominal pain and tender cervical lymph nodes were significantly more frequent in patients with positive throat culture for GABHS than those with negative result for GABHS.Conclusion: GABHS should be firstly considered in patients presenting with symptoms of fever, sore throat, cough, abdominal pain and tenderness of cervical lymph nodes. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2009; 7: 13-7

  5. Immunoasssay Chromatographic Antigen Test for Rapid Diagnosis of Group A Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus Pharyngitis in Children: A Cross/ Sectional Study

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    S Noorbakhsh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS is an important pharyngotonsillitis etiologic agent in children. The objective of this study was diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis based on rapid antigen detection test and conventional pharyngeal culture.Materials and Methods: The rapid GABHS antigen detection test was compared to culture on blood agar, the gold standard for the diagnosis of this etiologic agent.Results: Streptococcal antigen was detected in pharyngeal specimens of 34.5% of cases by rapid strip test. We detected group A Streptococcus in 17.2% of pharyngeal culture. There was no agreement between two methods ( PV < 0.1. The negative pharyngeal culture results are probably due to antibiotic usage in 43.2 % of patients. Positive rapid test results in pharyngeal swab was age dependent ( P < 0.05. There was good correlation between observing the "petechia in pharynx of patients" and positive rapid test in pharyngeal swab (P < 0.004. Throat culture results were relatated to previous antibiotic usage ( P < 0.03.Conclusion: The rapid test in pharyngeal swab is helpful for rapid diagnosis and treatment of GABHS pharyngitis. Diagnosis of GABHS pharyngitis based on soley clinical findings is misleading in the majority of cases. Petechia observed in pharynx of the cases was highly predictive of streptococcal pharyngitis.

  6. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study

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    Gregori G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Gregori,1 Ornella Righi,1 Paolo Risso,2 Goffreda Boiardi,1 Giovanni Demuru,1 Anna Ferzetti,1 Antonio Galli,1 Marco Ghisoni,1 Sonia Lenzini,1 Claudio Marenghi,1 Caterina Mura,1 Roberto Sacchetti,1 Lucia Suzzani1 1Primary Care Department, Local Health Unit (ASL, Piacenza, 2Department of Health Science (DISSAL, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Abstract: Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective observational analysis whether the administration of the oral probiotic, Streptococcus salivarius K12 (SsK12, could reduce the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children who had a recent history of recurrent episodes of these infections. Twelve primary care pediatricians identified, through their databases, a total of 130 children who had experienced recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections over a period of at least 6–12 months prior to their inclusion in the study. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new GABHS infections was significantly lower (P>0.001 when compared to the period before dosing commenced. When compared to the untreated children, those taking SsK12 appear to have had significantly fewer GABHS infections both during the 90-day period of prophylaxis and during the following 9

  7. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Giuseppe; Righi, Ornella; Risso, Paolo; Boiardi, Goffreda; Demuru, Giovanni; Ferzetti, Anna; Galli, Antonio; Ghisoni, Marco; Lenzini, Sonia; Marenghi, Claudio; Mura, Caterina; Sacchetti, Roberto; Suzzani, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective observational analysis whether the administration of the oral probiotic, Streptococcus salivarius K12 (SsK12), could reduce the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children who had a recent history of recurrent episodes of these infections. Twelve primary care pediatricians identified, through their databases, a total of 130 children who had experienced recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections over a period of at least 6-12 months prior to their inclusion in the study. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis) lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control) children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new GABHS infections was significantly lower (P>0.001) when compared to the period before dosing commenced. When compared to the untreated children, those taking SsK12 appear to have had significantly fewer GABHS infections both during the 90-day period of prophylaxis and during the following 9 months (P<0.001). These observations are supportive of the use of probiotic SsK12 for the control of recurrent GABHS pharyngo-tonsillar infections in children, and as an associated benefit, the use of this probiotic could lead to reduced antibiotic consumption. Follow-up controlled prospective studies should now be initiated in order to further establish the efficacy of this newly

  8. Group C beta-hemolytic streptococci causing pharyngitis and scarlet fever.

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    Corson, A P; Garagusi, V F; Chretien, J H

    1989-09-01

    After a young woman had scarlet fever associated with group C beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, we reviewed all cases of pharyngitis treated at a student health clinic during that semester. From 541 cases of pharyngitis, 34 cultures yielded group C Streptococcus. The patients who harbored group C organisms were similar to the patients with group A streptococcal pharyngitis in the presence of fever, exudate, and cervical adenopathy. The severity of symptoms and the demonstration of scarlet fever developing from infection with this organism supports antibiotic treatment of patients with group C streptococcal pharyngitis.

  9. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection causing hemolytic uremic syndrome in children: Two recent cases

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    Vanderkooi, Otto G; Kellner, James D; Wade, Andrew W.; Jadavji, Tajdin; Midgley, Julian P; Louie, Thomas; Tyrrell, Gregory J.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with a unique pathophysiology that differs from Shiga toxin-related HUS.METHODS: Case descriptions for each patient are provided. Each strain of S pneumoniae was subjected to a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, Shiga toxin assay and polymerase chain reaction to detect Shiga toxin genes. A review of the current literature was conducted.CASE PRESENTATIONS: Two patients with S pneumonia...

  10. [Outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta hemolytic group L streptococci (S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis) in an Austrian dairy herd].

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    Baumgartner, Martina; Giffinger, Friederike; Hoppe, Jan Christoph; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This study is reporting an outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta-hemolytic group L streptococci in an Austrian dairy herd with a history of high somatic cell count. At the first survey 16 of 33 lactating cows (28 quarters of 132) were cultured positive for beta-hemolytic, CAMP and esculin negative cocci that grew on Columbia blood agar with small grey catalase negative colonies. With the commercial API 20 Strep system (bioMerieux, F) isolates were classified as members of streptococci group L. All tested strains (eight of 28) produced acid from ribose, lactose, trehalose, amidon and glycogen; they hydrolysed hippurate and showed beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucinaminopeptidase and arginindehydrolase activity. Isolates were sensitive to bacitracin but resistant to tetracycline. Using phenotypic characterisation as well as sequence analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of a representative strain, recovered isolates were identified as Streptococcus (S.) dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis. Mastitis was characterized by normal milk secretions and absence of clinical abnormalities but high elevations of somatic cell count. Based on the characteristics of the strains and on the observations during the first herd survey, contagious transmission during milking as a result of poor milking hygiene was assumed. The mastitis was controlled through implementation of a strict hygiene protocol including use of single-use udder towels, post milking teat desinfection and cluster disinfection between milking cows in combination with antibiotic treatment of infected udders.

  11. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells.

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    Saroj, Sunil D; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  12. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Sunil D; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics. PMID:27524981

  13. Gestantes colonizadas pelo Streptococcus do grupo B e seus recém-nascidos: análise crítica da conduta adotada no Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz Beta-hemolytic streptococcus in pregnant women and their newborn infants: a critical analysis of the protocol used at Fernandes Figueira Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, in Brazil

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    Natalie Del-Vecchio L. Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a aplicação do protocolo do Centers of Disease Control (CDC, 2002 quanto à profilaxia da sepse neonatal precoce por Streptococcus do grupo B (SGB. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com revisão de prontuários de 125 gestantes colonizadas pelo SGB e 133 recém-nascidos, no período de janeiro/2003 a dezembro/2006. A conduta intraparto foi considerada correta quando a gestante recebia antibioticoprofilaxia pelo menos quatro horas antes do parto, ou quando não recebia, mas era submetida a parto cesáreo eletivo. A conduta intraparto foi considerada incorreta quando a gestante recebia antibioticoprofilaxia menos de quatro horas antes do parto, a prescrição antibiótica estava incorreta ou quando não havia profilaxia prescrita. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de colonização materna pelo SGB foi de 4,7%. A época de coleta do swab vaginal/retal variou entre 14 e 40 semanas de gestação, com média de 32 semanas. Das gestantes colonizadas, 54 (43% receberam conduta intraparto correta. Dos 133 recém-nascidos estudados, 95 (71% receberam avaliação diagnóstica corretamente, 17 (13% evoluíram com sepse clínica e um (0,75% apresentou sepse comprovada. A incidência de sepse foi maior em recém-nascidos cujas mães não receberam profilaxia intraparto corretamente, porém esta associação não apresentou diferença estatística significativa (18 versus 7%, p>0,05. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar de o protocolo para prevenção de sepse precoce pelo SGB estar implementado na instituição, ainda é possível observar falhas na profilaxia intraparto materna. Essas falhas representam oportunidades perdidas na prevenção da sepse precoce pelo SGB.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of the guidelines of the Centers of Disease Control (CDC, 2002 regarding the prophylaxes of group B Streptococcus (GBS early onset neonatal sepsis. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study by chart review of 125 pregnant women colonized by GBS and 133 neonates born at a

  14. [Molecular features of beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors].

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    Asami, Ryoko; Okada, Keisuke; Chiba, Naoko; Ubukata, Kimiko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    We studied the relationship between features of beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 45) isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors observed from January 2001 through August at a hospital for the elderly. The meanage of subjects having invasive streptococcal infection with 22 invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) strains, 2 S. pyogenes isolates, and 21 S. agalactiae (GBS) was 80 years, and 85.7% and 86.4% had underly diseases in the GBS and SDSE infections. SDSE-infected were mainly emergency woman outpatients and GBS infected were mainly man inpatients. The clinical syndrome involved pneumonia, urosepsis, and cellulitis. GBS mortality was 14.3% and SDSE mortality 27.3%. Compared to survivors, nonsurvivors had more thrombocytopenia and marked serum C-reactive protein elevation when blood culture were performed. No difference was seen in white blood cell count between bath groups. Our observations suggest that blood culture should be obtained before antimicrobials administration in elderly individuals with underlying illness who are seen at the emergency department and have laboratory blood data suggestive of infectious disease. PMID:20560419

  15. Comportamiento de los estreptococos beta-hemolíticos en escolares Beta-hemolytic streptococci in school children

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    M.ªC. Miranda García

    2012-03-01

    in the community; some of them with serious consequences as rheumatic fever, endocarditis, glomerulonefritis, alopecia or scarlet fever, and have the potential to cause outbreaks in closed communities like school children. Objectives: the objective of this study was to determine the frequency and variability of the different groups of beta-hemolytic streptococci in carrier school children (12-18 years old in different schools in the town of San Fernando, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Material and Methods: samples taken from 160 school children of both sexes were cultured and incubated for 48 hours. Gram stains, catalase tests and bacitracin sensitivity tests were carried out. Serogroups were identified by agglutination tests using the Oxoid kit. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined with Becton-Dickinson discs with different antibiotics. Results: from 34 positive samples we isolated 6 group A beta hemolytic streptococci strains (3,75%, 2 group B strains, 5 group C, 10 group F, 6 group G and 5 non-groupables (considered important due to the abundance of colonies on the plate. Although not significant we found a higher frequency of groups A and G streptococci in males and groups C and F in females. Conclusions: the frequency of the isolated groups B, C, F, G and non-groupable beta hemolytic streptococci represents a higher percentage in comparison with studies carried out in other cities. As for the strains of S. pyogenes we found antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance rates similar to those of other cities, but lower than that of the Valencia study in 2002.

  16. Failure of Clindamycin To Eradicate Infection with Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Inducibly Resistant to Clindamycin in an Animal Model and in Human Infections

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    Lewis, James S.; Lepak, Alex J.; Thompson, George R.; Craig, William A.; Andes, David R.; Sabol-Dzintars, Kathryn E.; Jorgensen, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci remains an underrecognized phenomenon of unknown clinical significance. We performed an evaluation of inducible clindamycin resistance using an animal model as well as retrospectively reviewing the charts of patients treated with clindamycin monotherapy who were infected with beta-hemolytic streptococci inducibly resistant to clindamycin. The neutropenic mouse thigh model of infection was used to evaluate the in vivo activity of ...

  17. A族β溶血性链球菌耐药%Resistance of Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁云梅; 李苗; 呙芳; 张金; 任思其

    2016-01-01

    A 族β溶血性链球菌(GAS)即酿脓链球菌,是人类最重要的病原体之一,可导致皮肤、黏膜浅表感染性疾病,危及生命的侵袭性疾病,毒素介导性疾病及免疫相关性疾病。抗生素是控制 GAS 菌感染的有效手段,β-内酰胺类抗生素是治疗 GAS 感染的首选药物,大环内酯类抗生素常作为阻断 GAS 外毒素产物的手段或对β-内酰胺类抗生素过敏患者替代治疗药物而被推荐。但随着大环内酯类抗生素的广泛使用,大环内酯类抗生素耐药 GAS 在全球范围内播散,成为全球关注的问题。现将对 GAS 对大环内酯类抗生素耐药情况进行阐述。%Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS),namely Streptococcus pyogenes,is one of the most im-portant human pathogen.GAS can cause skin and mucous membrane superficial infectious diseases,life -threatening invasive disease,toxin -mediated diseases and immune -related diseases.Antibiotic is an effective mean to control GAS infection.The β-lactam antibiotics remain the first -choice treatment for GAS infection and the macrolides are often recommended as a replacement therapy for β-lactam antibiotics allergic patients or a means to blocking GAS exotoxin product.But with the widespread use of macrolides autibiotics,macrolide -resistant GAS spread in the world. This paper will elaborate the situation of macrolide -resistant clones.

  18. A New Alkaline pH-Adjusted Medium Enhances Detection of β-Hemolytic Streptococci by Minimizing Bacterial Interference Due to Streptococcus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierksen, Karen P.; Ragland, Nancy L.; Tagg, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A new selective medium (CNA-P) that reduces or eliminates the inhibitory activity of bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus salivarius against β-hemolytic streptococci has been developed and compared with sheep blood agar (SBA) for the sensitive detection of small numbers of β-hemolytic streptococci in clinical specimens. CNA-P has as its basis a commercial medium (Difco Columbia CNA agar) supplemented with 5% (vol/vol) sheep blood, and the CNA is further modified by addition of 100 mM PIPES buffer [piperazine-N,N′-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)] (pH 7.5) to maintain cultures at an alkaline pH during incubation. CNA-P was shown to inhibit the production and/or release of four different types of S. salivarius bacteriocins or bacteriocin-like inhibitory molecules. The efficacies of CNA-P and SBA for detection of β-hemolytic streptococci in 1,352 pharyngeal samples from 376 children were compared. The β-hemolytic streptococcal isolates recovered from the samples included 314 group A (S. pyogenes), 61 group G, 33 group B, and 5 group C streptococci. Of 314 samples that yielded S. pyogenes, 300 were positive on CNA-P (96%) and 264 (86%) were positive on SBA. A significantly greater number of S. pyogenes isolates from these samples were recovered only on CNA-P (50 of 314) compared with the number of isolates recovered only on SBA (14 of 314). In addition, the degree of positivity, a measure of the total numbers of S. pyogenes isolates on the plate, was significantly higher on CNA-P than on SBA (2.40 versus 2.07; P < 0.001). Interestingly, CNA-P was also found to enhance the hemolytic activity of streptolysin O, allowing detection of streptolysin S-deficient S. pyogenes strains which might otherwise go undetected on SBA and other isolation media. PMID:10655361

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salgård Jensen, Christian; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying...

  20. Aumento en la prevalencia de estreptococos beta hemolíticos en hisopados faríngeos en Buenos Aires High prevalence of beta hemolytic streptococci isolated from throat swabs in Buenos Aires

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    Hugo E. Villar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El estreptococo beta hemolítico grupo A (EBHGA es el agente bacteriano más frecuentemente aislado en casos de faringoamigdalitis. Otros estreptococos beta hemolíticos no A también pueden producir esta enfermedad. Ante el elevado número de aislamientos obtenidos en el año 2004 decidimos realizar un estudio con el objeto de evaluar la prevalencia de estos microorganismos durante un período de 5 años. Se incluyeron todos los cultivos de hisopados faríngeos que se realizaron con idéntica metodología. Se consideró niños a los comprendidos entre 6 meses y 18 años de edad, y adultos a los mayores de 18 años. Los aislamientos fueron identificados según la metodología habitual. La determinación de grupo se realizó mediante la aglutinación con partículas de látex. La recuperación de EBHGA fue significativamente mayor en niños en relación a los adultos. En el año 2004 se obtuvo una recuperación significativamente mayor de EBHGA, EBHGC y EBHGG en niños y de EBHGA y EBHGG en adultos respecto de los años anteriores. El aislamiento de EBHGG fue mayor en adultos. El 18.9% y el 5.8% de los estreptococos beta hemolíticos aislados en niños y adultos respectivamente no pertenecieron al grupo A. El incremento en la prevalencia de estreptococos beta hemolíticos refuerza la buena práctica de realizar cultivos en adultos y niños así como la correcta búsqueda en el laboratorio de bacteriología de los estreptococos beta hemolíticos no pertenecientes al grupo A.Beta hemolytic streptococci, particulary group A, are the most frequently isolated pathogens in cases of pharyngoamigdalitis. Other beta hemolytic streptococci also produce this pathology. An increase of positive cultures for group A streptococci was detected during 2004 in relation to previous years. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation rates of beta hemolytic streptococci groups A, C and G during a period of 5 years. Pharyngeal exudates were obtained from

  1. Comparative Study of 5-Day and 10-Day Cefditoren Pivoxil Treatments for Recurrent Group A β-Hemolytic Streptococcus pharyngitis in Children

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    Hideaki Kikuta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of short-course therapy with cephalosporins for treatment of group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS pharyngitis is still controversial. Subjects were 226 children with a history of at least one episode of GABHS pharyngitis. Recurrence within the follow-up period (3 weeks after initiation of therapy occurred in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and in 1 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group; the incidence of recurrence being significantly higher in the 5-day treatment group. Bacteriologic treatment failure (GABHS isolation without overt pharyngitis at follow-up culture was observed in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and 17 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group. There was no statistical difference between the two groups. A 5-day course of oral cephalosporins is not always recommended for treatment of GABHS pharyngitis in children who have repeated episodes of pharyngitis.

  2. Perbandingan Daya Hambat Madu Alami dengan Madu Kemasan secara In Vitro terhadap Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A sebagai Penyebab Faringitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsi Wineri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakMadu merupakan substansi alam yang dihasilkan oleh lebah yang diketahui memiliki manfaat, salah satunya untuk mengobati faringitis yang disebabkan Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. Efek antibakteri dari madu dapat menghambat pertumbuhan  Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. Berdasarkan cara pembuatannya madu terdiri dari madu alami dan madu kemasan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perbedaan daya hambat madu alami dengan madu kemasan secara in vitro terhadap Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. sebagai penyebab faringitis. Jenis penelitian ini adalah eksperimental dengan rancangan posttest only control group design yang dilaksanakan dari September sampai Desember 2013 di laboratorium Mikrobiologi Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Andalas. Hasil penelitian menunjukan madu alami dan madu kemasan dapat menghambat pertumbuhan Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A dengan diameter daya hambat terbesar pada madu alami adalah 14 mm dan madu kemasan 11 mm. Berdasarkan uji analisis Kruskal-Wallis yang dilanjutkan dengan post-hoc Mann-Whitney terdapat perbedaan yang signifikan antara daya hambat  madu alami dengan madu kemasan dengan nilaip=0,004 (p<0,05. Kesimpulan hasil penelitian adalah madu alami dan madu kemasan memiliki daya hambat terhadap pertumbuhan Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. Madu alami memiliki daya hambat yang lebih kuat dibandingkan madu kemasan.Kata kunci: madu alami, madu kemasan, Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A, antibakteri, faringitis AbstractHoney is a natural substance that produced by bees which is known have many benefits, one of them is to treat pharyngitis that caused by Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. The antibacterial effect of honey can inhibit bacterial growth. By way of making, honey is divided to natural honey dan packing honey. The purpose of this study was to see comparison of the antibacterial effect of natural honey and packing honey againt Streptococcus beta

  3. Perbandingan Daya Hambat Madu Alami dengan Madu Kemasan secara In Vitro terhadap Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A sebagai Penyebab Faringitis

    OpenAIRE

    Elsi Wineri; Roslaili Rasyid; Yustini Alioes

    2014-01-01

    AbstrakMadu merupakan substansi alam yang dihasilkan oleh lebah yang diketahui memiliki manfaat, salah satunya untuk mengobati faringitis yang disebabkan Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. Efek antibakteri dari madu dapat menghambat pertumbuhan  Streptococcus beta hemoliticus Group A. Berdasarkan cara pembuatannya madu terdiri dari madu alami dan madu kemasan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perbedaan daya hambat madu alami dengan madu kemasan secara in vitro terhadap Streptoco...

  4. Late-onset Rash in Patients with Group A Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis Treated with Amoxicillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We observed late-onset rashes in patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Of 1028 patients with GAS pharyngitis, which was principally treated with amoxicillin, we evaluated those who developed a late-onset rash and excluded those with scarlet fever alone. Twenty-one patients developed a rash (2.0%, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.1%), 7 to 20 days (median, 8 days) after GAS pharyngitis onset. The rashes were characterized by maculopapules, which increased in size with coalescence and some developing into plaques, with a symmetrical distribution with a propensity for the extremities, including the palms and soles. The clinical courses of the patients were good, and the rashes subsided within 14 days. A non-immediate reaction to β-lactams, which usually manifests as a maculopapular rash, is a possible cause in our patients, however, repeated courses of amoxicillin in 3 patients did not induce the rash. The underlying mechanism of the late-onset rash after GAS pharyngitis with amoxicillin treatment remains unclear. PMID:26734124

  5. Late-onset rash in patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis treated with amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Kimura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We observed late-onset rashes in patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS pharyngitis. Of 1028 patients with GAS pharyngitis, which was principally treated with amoxicillin, we evaluated those who developed a late-onset rash and excluded those with scarlet fever alone. Twenty-one patients developed a rash (2.0%, 95% confidence interval, 1.3- 3.1%, 7 to 20 days (median, 8 days after GAS pharyngitis onset. The rashes were characterized by maculopapules, which increased in size with coalescence and some developing into plaques, with a symmetrical distribution with a propensity for the extremities, including the palms and soles. The clinical courses of the patients were good, and the rashes subsided within 14 days. A non-immediate reaction to β-lactams, which usually manifests as a maculopapular rash, is a possible cause in our patients, however, repeated courses of amoxicillin in 3 patients did not induce the rash. The underlying mechanism of the late-onset rash after GAS pharyngitis with amoxicillin treatment remains unclear.

  6. Late-onset Rash in Patients with Group A Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis Treated with Amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masahiko

    2015-12-01

    We observed late-onset rashes in patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Of 1028 patients with GAS pharyngitis, which was principally treated with amoxicillin, we evaluated those who developed a late-onset rash and excluded those with scarlet fever alone. Twenty-one patients developed a rash (2.0%, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.1%), 7 to 20 days (median, 8 days) after GAS pharyngitis onset. The rashes were characterized by maculopapules, which increased in size with coalescence and some developing into plaques, with a symmetrical distribution with a propensity for the extremities, including the palms and soles. The clinical courses of the patients were good, and the rashes subsided within 14 days. A non-immediate reaction to β-lactams, which usually manifests as a maculopapular rash, is a possible cause in our patients, however, repeated courses of amoxicillin in 3 patients did not induce the rash. The underlying mechanism of the late-onset rash after GAS pharyngitis with amoxicillin treatment remains unclear. PMID:26734124

  7. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jager U, Lechner K. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ... Price EA, Schrier SS. Extrinsic nonimmune hemolytic anemias. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ...

  8. Co-induction of beta-galactosidase and the lactose-P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase system in Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I R; Lo, G C

    1978-01-01

    The addition of lactose, galactose, or isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to glucose-grown cells of Streptococcus salivarius 25975 resulted in the co-induction of both the lactose-P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (lactose-PTS) and beta-galactosidase, with the latter the predominant metabolic system. With various strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis 10556, on the other hand, the lactose-PTS was the major metabolic pathway with beta-galactosidase induced either to low or negligible levels. In all cases, induction of the lactose-PTS resulted in the concomitant induction of 6-P-beta-galactosidase. The induction by lactose of both the lactose-PTS and beta-galactosidase in all strains was repressed by glucose and other catabolites, notably, fructose. Induction of beta-galactosidase in S. salivarius 25975 by IPTG was, however, relatively resistant to glucose repression. Induction experiments with IPTG and lactose suggested that a cellular metabolite of lactose metabolism was a repressor of enzyme activity. Exogenous cAMP was shown to reverse the transient repression by glucose of beta-galactosidase induction in cells of S. salivarius 25975 receiving lactose, provided the cells were grown with small amounts of toluene to overcome the permeability barrier to this nucleotide, cAMP, was however, unable to overcome the permanent repression of beta-galactosidase activity to a significant extent under these conditions. PMID:214423

  9. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A doença pneumocócica é importante problema de saúde pública e raramente há associação desta infecção com a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU grave. O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso de um paciente com esta associação. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Criança do sexo masculino, com 17 meses de idade, admitida no hospital com insuficiência respiratória aguda e necessitando de suporte ventilatório. O exame radiológico mostrava extensa opacidade homogênea em hemitórax direito. A hemocultura foi positiva para Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nos exames de admissão, notaram-se: hemoglobina de 6,5g/dL, 38.000 plaquetas/mm³, uréia de 79mg/dL e creatinina de 1,64mg/dL. No primeiro dia, apresentou oligoanúria e hipervolemia, necessitando de hemodiafiltração. Evoluiu com disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e óbito no sétimo dia. A necrópsia mostrou áreas extensas de necrose cortical e tubular renal, com depósito de fibrina nas arteríolas. COMENTÁRIOS: A SHU associada ao pneumococo apresenta morbidade e mortalidade elevadas. Em crianças com doença pneumocócica invasiva e acometimento hematológico ou renal grave, deve-se estar atento a esta rara complicação. Merecem investigação os seguintes aspectos relacionados à doença: a função da detecção precoce de antígenos T ativados no diagnóstico e terapêutica, o papel do fator H na patogênese, o método ideal de substituição renal e a definição do prognóstico em longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal diseases are a major public health problem. Severe hemolytic-uremic syndrome is an uncommon complication. The aim of this study is to report a child with this complication. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male child with 17 months old was admitted to the hospital, due to acute respiratory failure, needing ventilatory support. Roentgenogram demonstrated massive condensation of right lung and Streptococcus pneumonia was isolated from blood cultures. Laboratory tests showed

  10. Identification of weakly beta-hemolytic porcine spirochetes by biochemical reactions, PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and species-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Tatsuo; Araki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2008-08-01

    We examined the usefulness of PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and species-specific PCR combined with a newly devised rapid biochemical test using microplates for identifying weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes (WBHIS) isolated from pigs. WBHIS strains showing atypical biochemical characteristics were decisively identified at the species level by PCR-RFLP and species-specific PCR. Identification of WBHIS at the species level in routine diagnostic work will certainly contribute to clarifying the pathogenicity of WBHIS.

  11. Comparison of the Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test with culture for detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Huck, W; Reed, B D; French, T; Mitchell, R S

    1989-01-01

    The Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test (DGAST; BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) was compared with conventional culture procedures on Trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BBL) and Selective Streptococcal Agar (ssA; BBL) for detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) for 1,006 patients complaining of sore throat. The DGAST was performed at five acute-care clinics according to the instructions of the manufacturer; interpretation of the cultures was done at the cent...

  12. Regulation of lactose catabolism in Streptococcus mutans: purification and regulatory properties of phospho-beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmes, R; Brown, A T

    1979-01-01

    Phospho-beta-galactosidase (P-beta-gal), the enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the metabolism of intracellular lactose phosphate, occurred at high specific activity in the cytoplasm in 12 of 13 strains of streptococcus mutans grown on lactose but not other carbon sources. The P-beta-gal from S. mutans SL1 was purified 13-fold using diethylaminoethyl-cellulose ion exchange and agarose A--0.5 M molecular exclusion column chromatography. The molecualr weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 40,000, and its pH optimum was 6.5 in three different buffer systems. P-beta-gal activity was inhibited by Co2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+, but other cations, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, orthophosphate, and fluoride had no effect upon enzyme activity. The kinetic response of P-beta-gal to a model substrate, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside-6-phosphate, obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the Km for this substrate was 0.19 mM. In addition to being under genetic control, P-beta-gal activity was regulated by a number of biologically active metabolites. Enzyme activity was inhibited in a sigmoidal fashion by phosphoenolpyruvate. The M 0.5 V value for phosphoenolpyruvate was 2.8 mM, and the Hill coefficient (n) was 3. In addition, P-beta-gal exhibited strong inhibition by ATP, galactose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. In contrast to inhibition of P-beta-gal activity by phosphoenolpyruvate, the inhibition exerted by ATP, galactose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate obeyed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the Ki values for these inhibitors were 0.55, 1.6, and 4.0 mM, respectively. PMID:33899

  13. 罗非鱼源γ溶血性无乳链球菌的分离鉴定%Isolation and identification of γ-hemolytic streptococcus agalactiae from tilapia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎娅; 罗福广; 左跃; 易弋; 伍时华; 杨军

    2014-01-01

    On September 5, 2012, a disease outbreak was occurred at a tilapia farm in Liuzhou , Guangxi.Aγ-hemolyt-ic gram-positive streptococcus was isolated from brain of infected tilapia .The isolate was identified as rare Streptococcus agalactiae by biochemical assays, PCR identify and 16S rDNA analysis.The strain was γ-hemolytic and negative in CAMP test which showed it was different from normal Streptococcus agalactia strains.The isolate exhibited high virulence to tilapia by experimental infection .Drug sensitivity experiment showed that it was resistant to norfloxacin , polymyxin B , co-trimoxazole and sensitive to 17 types of antibiotics such as penicillin G , et al.%2012年9月5日广西柳州市某罗非鱼养殖场出现暴发性疾病,从患病罗非鱼的脑组织中分离到1株γ溶血性革兰氏阳性链球菌。通过生理生化试验、基于cfb基因的PCR鉴定及16S rDNA序列分析,将该菌株鉴定为无乳链球菌。该菌株为γ溶血性, CAMP试验阴性,与常见无乳链球菌有较大差别。人工感染试验结果显示分离菌株对罗非鱼具有很强的致病性。药物敏感试验结果显示分离菌株对诺氟沙星、多黏菌素B、复方新诺明耐药,对青霉素G等17种药物均敏感。

  14. Invasieve infecties door beta-haemolytische Streptokokken Lancefield Groep A (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) in Nederland, 1992-1993

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens JFP; Schouls LM; van Silfhout A; Elzenaar CP; Brunings HA; Blokpoel MCJ; Top J; van Leeuwen WJ; LBA; MMB

    1994-01-01

    In recent years an increase of severe invasive infections and toxic shock syndrome (TSS) with beta-haemolytic Group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) has been reported from North-America and North-Western Europe. In the spring of 1992 several reports of cases suggested that this epidemic

  15. Activation of band 3 mediates group A Streptococcus streptolysin S-based beta-haemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Dustin L; Biais, Nicolas; Donahue, Deborah L; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Tessier, Charles R; Rodriguez, Kevin; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Luchetti, Jeffrey; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J; Lee, Shaun W

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a human bacterial pathogen that can manifest as a range of diseases from pharyngitis and impetigo to severe outcomes such as necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. GAS disease remains a global health burden with cases estimated at over 700 million annually and over half a million deaths due to severe infections(1). For over 100 years, a clinical hallmark of diagnosis has been the appearance of complete (beta) haemolysis when grown in the presence of blood. This activity is due to the production of a small peptide toxin by GAS known as streptolysin S. Although it has been widely held that streptolysin S exerts its lytic activity through membrane disruption, its exact mode of action has remained unknown. Here, we show, using high-resolution live cell imaging, that streptolysin S induces a dramatic osmotic change in red blood cells, leading to cell lysis. This osmotic change was characterized by the rapid influx of Cl(-) ions into the red blood cells through SLS-mediated disruption of the major erythrocyte anion exchange protein, band 3. Chemical inhibition of band 3 function significantly reduced the haemolytic activity of streptolysin S, and dramatically reduced the pathology in an in vivo skin model of GAS infection. These results provide key insights into the mechanism of streptolysin S-mediated haemolysis and have implications for the development of treatments against GAS. PMID:27571972

  16. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  17. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF 686 STRAINS OF BETA-HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI ISOLATED FROM CASES OF PHARYNGITIS TO FIVE ANTIBIOTICS IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Gharagozloo

    1974-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to determine the antibiotic sensitivity of 686 strains of hemolytic streptococci isolated at the School of Public Health, Divi­sion of Streptococcal Studies, to five antibiotics in vitro. All of the strains were sensitive to penicillin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol and ampicillin. 27 (4% of the strains, were resistant to tetracyclin. The clinical implications of this study, particularly in the light of information from other areas, emphasize the fact that, if the blind treatment of acute upper respiratory tract infection with tetracycline were ever justified it has certainly ceased to be so.

  18. Purification and preliminary characterization of exo-beta-D-fructosidase in Streptococcus salivarius KTA-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N; Mizuno, F; Takamori, K

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius fructosidase (beta-D-fructan fructohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.80) was purified to homogeneity. The molecular weight of the fructosidase was estimated to be 83,000 to 85,000 by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 7.0, and the isoelectric point was pH 4.7. The purified enzyme preparation hydrolyzed levan, inulin, and several 2-beta-linkage-containing oligosaccharides such as sucrose and raffinose, but not melezitose, dextran, and pseudonigeran. The fructosidase was inhibited by Fe3+, Cu2+, Hg2+, and Ag+, but not by Ca2+, Co2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+, at a concentration of 10(-3) M. Mn2+ was particularly effective in stimulating activity at the same concentration. The presence of either EDTA or KCN also increased fructosidase activity by 20 to 30%. The enzyme was susceptible to sulfhydryl reagents since p-chloromercuribenzoate (10(-7) M) produced 63% inhibition of the activity. However, this inhibition was overcome in the presence of cysteine. This enzyme acts as an exofructosidase since thin-layer chromatographic analysis revealed that D-fructose was formed from levan or inulin by the action of the enzyme. Images PMID:3965399

  19. Expression, purification, and characterization of an exo-beta-D-fructosidase of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burne, R A; Schilling, K; Bowen, W H; Yasbin, R E

    1987-01-01

    A genetic library of Streptococcus mutans GS-5, constructed in an Escherichia coli plasmid vector, was screened for cells which could utilize sucrose as the sole carbon and energy source. The recombinant plasmid pFRU1, containing a 4.2-kilobase pair insert of S. mutans DNA, was shown to confer this phenotype. Further characterization of the gene product encoded by pFRU1 revealed that the enzyme was a beta-D-fructosidase with the highest specificity for the beta (2----6)-linked fructan polymer levan. The enzyme could also hydrolyze inulin [beta (2----1)-linked fructan], sucrose, and raffinose with 34, 21, and 12%, respectively, of the activity observed for levan. The gene (designated fruA) appeared to be expressed under its own control in E. coli, as judged by the lack of influence on gene product activity of induction or repression of the beta-galactosidase promoter adjacent to the insertion site on the cloning vector. The protein was purified to homogeneity, as judged by silver staining of purified protein in denaturing and reducing conditions in polyacrylamide gels, from sonic lysate of E. coli, as well as from culture supernatants of S. mutans GS-5 grown in a chemostat at low dilution rate with fructose as the sole carbohydrate source. Both purified proteins had an apparent molecular mass of 140,000 daltons in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were immunologically related and comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as determined by Western blotting with antisera raised against the cloned gene product, and were identical in all physical and biochemical properties tested. The pH optimum of the enzyme acting on fructan polymers was 5.5, with a significant amount of activity remaining at pH 4.0. The optimum pH for sucrose degradation was broader and lower, with a peak at approximately 4.5. Enzyme activity was inhibited almost completely by Hg2+ and Ag2+, inhibited partially by Cu2+, not inhibited by fluoride

  20. Isolation and overexpression of a gene encoding an extracellular beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase from Streptococcus bovis JB1.

    OpenAIRE

    Ekinci, M S; McCrae, S I; Flint, H.J. (Harry J.)

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1 was found to produce a 25-kDa extracellular enzyme active against beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucans. A gene was isolated encoding a specific beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase that corresponds to this size and belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 16. A 4- to 10-fold increase in supernatant beta-glucanase activity was obtained when the cloned beta-glucanase gene was reintroduced into S. bovis JB1 by use of constructs based on the plasmid vector pTRW10 or pIL253. The beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanas...

  1. [Activity of cefpodoxime and other oral beta-lactams against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae with different susceptibilities to penicillin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, A; Robledo, O; Lerma, M; Giménez, M J; Cebrián, L; Casal, J; Aguilar, L; Gómez-Lus, M L

    2006-03-01

    This study explores the influence on the intrinsic activity of different oral beta-lactams of beta-lactamase production in Haemophilus influenzae and penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three substudies were performed: a) a general susceptibility study, analyzing 550 strains received by the Spanish Laboratorio de Referencia de Neumococos throughout February and March 2005; b) a study on the influence of penicillin resistance on the activity of beta-lactams, analyzing 251 penicillin-susceptible strains (MICor=2 mg/l) randomly chosen among those received by the Spanish Laboratorio de Referencia de Neumococos throughout 2005; and c) an H. influenzae susceptibility study analyzing 150 strains received by Instituto Valenciano de Microbiologia throughout 2005. A total of 71% of S. pneumoniae strains were susceptible to penicillin, 21% exhibited intermediate resistance and 8% strains presented full resistance. H. influenzae beta-lactamase production rate was 18.6%. Of the non-beta-lactamase-producing strains, 3% were not susceptible to ampicillin. Cefpodoxime and cefixime exhibited the highest intrinsic activity against H. influenzae, while amoxicillin and cefpodoxime were the most active compounds against S. pneumoniae. All H. influenzae strains were susceptible to oral cephalosporins and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The increase in penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae influenced cefixime, cefaclor and cefuroxime to a higher degree than amoxicillin and cefpodoxime.

  2. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children Page Content On this page: What is hemolytic ... spine. [ Top ] What causes hemolytic uremic syndrome in children? The most common cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome ...

  3. Subtractive genomics approach to identify putative drug targets and identification of drug-like molecules for beta subunit of DNA polymerase III in Streptococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georrge, John J; Umrania, V V

    2012-07-01

    The prolonged use of the antibiotics over the years has transformed many organisms resistant to multiple drugs. This has made the field of drug discovery of vital importance in curing various infections and diseases. The drugs act by binding to a specific target protein of prime importance for the cell's survival. Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes are the few gram positive organisms that have developed resistance to drugs. It causes pneumonia, meningitis, pharyngitis, otitis media, sinusitis, bacteremia, pericarditis, and arthritis infections. The present study was carried out to identify potential drug targets and inhibitors for beta subunit of DNA polymerase III in these three Streptococcus species that might facilitate the discovery of novel drugs in near future. Various steps were adopted to find out novel drug targets. And finally 3D structure of DNA polymerase III subunit beta was modeled. The ligand library was generated from various databases to find the most suitable ligands. All the ligands were docked using Molegro Virtual Docker and the lead molecules were investigated for ADME and toxicity. PMID:22415782

  4. Sequential necrotizing fasciitis caused by the monomicrobial pathogens Streptococcus equisimilis and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akiko; Matsuoka, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressing bacterial infection of the superficial fascia and subcutaneous tissue that is associated with a high mortality rate and is caused by a single species of bacteria or polymicrobial organisms. Escherichia coli is rarely isolated from patients with monomicrobial disease. Further, there are few reports of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli associated with necrotizing fasciitis. We report here our treatment of an 85-year-old man who was admitted because of necrotizing fasciitis of his right thigh. Streptococcus equisimilis was detected as a monomicrobial pathogen, and the infection was cured by amputation of the patient's right leg and the administration of antibiotics. However, 5 days after discontinuing antibiotic therapy, he developed necrotizing fasciitis on his right upper limb and died. ESBL-producing E. coli was the only bacterial species isolated from blood and skin cultures. This case demonstrates that ESBL-producing E. coli can cause monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis, particularly during hospitalization and that a different bacterial species can cause disease shortly after a previous episode. PMID:26912298

  5. A case of rheumatic fever with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome caused by a cutaneous infection with beta-hemolytic streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle-aged patient of Greenlandic origin was referred for skin infection of the leg. An initial minor trauma of the skin of the distal right lower extremity was complicated by bullous erysipelas which cultured positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS. The clinical condition deteriorated and necrotizing fasciitis developed despite relevant surgical and antibiotic treatment. Approximately 3 weeks later, the patient developed arthralgia, impaired renal function with azotemia, hypertension and severe nephrotic syndrome with periorbital and peripheral edema. A kidney biopsy demonstrated endocapillary glomerulonephritis. Concomitantly, carditis with chest pain, moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and mitral regurgitation were noted. The patient had no signs of pharyngitis in the whole period. The patient thus contracted poststreptococ glomerulonephritis and furthermore she fulfilled the criteria of acute rheumatic fever following a GABHS skin infection. We suggest a possible relation between a virulent GABHS clone causing NF and ARF.

  6. B group hemolytic streptococcus carrier and the correlation of infection in early intervention study%对 B 族溶血性链球菌带菌者早期干预与母婴感染的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦秀琴

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨B族溶血性链球菌(GBS )带菌者早期干预与母婴感染的相关性。方法按照整体抽样的方法,随机选择孕20~30周的孕妇526例为研究对象,取其阴道分泌物进行细菌培养,将74例GBS阳性者按照是否进行早期干预分为对照组31例和研究组43例。对照组对使用抗菌药物有顾虑未进行任何早期药物干预治疗。研究组使用青霉素进行早期干预,对青霉素过敏者使用克林霉素或头孢唑林。观察两组产妇产后情况和新生儿感染情况。结果本组526例孕妇携带GBS者74例,带菌率为14.07%;研究组新生儿带菌率16.28%,对照组为54.84%,两组比较有显著性差异(χ2=10.526,P<0.01);研究组产后由GBS感染引起急症发生率为6.98%,对照组为51.62%,两组比较有显著性差异(χ2=16.541,P<0.01);研究组新生儿感染性急症发生率6.99%,对照组为54.84%,两组比较有显著性差异(χ2=18.566,P<0.01)。结论对携带GBS的孕妇,早期进行抗感染治疗是非常有必要的。%Objective To explore the B group hemolytic streptococcus carrier implementation of early intervention and the cor‐relation of mother or child infections .Methods According to the whole sampling ,random selection of 20 ~ 30 week of pregnancy , 526 cases of pregnant women as the object ,take the vaginal bacteria culture ,74 cases of GBS was carried out in accordance with the whether early intervention group ,the use of antimicrobial agents have concerns 31 cases do not make any early drug intervention treatment ,as the control group ,the use of penicillin early intervention (Allergic to penicillin use clindamycin or cefazolin) of 43 ca‐ses for the team ,observation of maternal and neonatal infections .Results This group of 74 cases ,526 cases of pregnant women with GBS ,at a rate of 14 .07% ;With GBS team 43 infants (16 .28% ) ,control

  7. PREVALENCE, PATHOLOGY, AND RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH STREPTOCOCCUS PHOCAE INFECTION IN SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS), 2004-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Georgina; Smith, Woutrina; Dominik, Clare; Batac, Francesca; Dodd, Erin; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer; Jessup, David; Chantrey, Julian; Miller, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated beta-hemolytic streptococci as opportunistic pathogens of marine mammals, including southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), but little is known about their prevalence or pathophysiology. Herein, we focus on risk factors for sea otter infection by a single beta-hemolytic streptococcal species, Streptococcus phocae. Streptococcus phocae was first identified as a marine mammal pathogen in 1994, and the first report in southern sea otters was in 2009. Its broad host range encompasses fish, pinnipeds, cetaceans, and mustelids, with S. phocae now recognized as an important pathogen of marine species worldwide. We assessed risk factors and lesion patterns for S. phocae infection in southern sea otters. Using archival necropsy data, S. phocae prevalence was 40.5% in fresh dead otters examined 2004-10. Skin trauma of any type was identified as a significant risk factor for S. phocae infection. The risk of infection was similar regardless of the cause and relative severity of skin trauma, including mating or fight wounds, shark bite, and anthropogenic trauma. Streptococcus phocae-infected sea otters were also more likely to present with abscesses or bacterial septicemia. Our findings highlight the importance of S. phocae as an opportunistic pathogen of sea otters and suggest that the most likely portal of entry is damaged skin. Even tiny skin breaks appear to facilitate bacterial colonization, invasion, abscess formation, and systemic spread. Our data provide important insights for management and care of marine species. PMID:26555115

  8. A capillary electrophoretic study on the specificity of beta-galactosidases from Aspergillus oryzae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleny, R; Altmann, F; Praznik, W

    1997-03-01

    The specificities of the beta-galactosidases from Aspergillus oryzae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean) have been studied by capillary zone electrophoresis. Various di- and oligosaccharides as well as a biantennary asialo N-glycan were used as substrates. Following enzymatic hydrolysis, the mixtures of substrates and products were derivatized with ethyl 4-aminobenzoate and separated by high-performance capillary electrophoresis in a borate buffer system using uv detection. Baseline separation of the respective peaks was obtained in 4 min, allowing the analysis of a large number of samples. Therefore, initial rates of hydrolysis could be determined. The beta-galactosidase from A. oryzae exhibited minimal activity toward Galbeta1-3GlcNAc. In contrast to the enzyme from S. pneumoniae which is almost specific for beta1-4 linkages, the Aspergillus galactosidase readily hydrolyzed Galbeta1-4GlcNAc and Galbeta1-6GlcNAc. Neither of the four beta-galactosidases acted upon Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAcbeta1-3Galbeta1-4Gl c (lacto-N-fucopentaose III) even though the corresponding nonfucosylated oligosaccharides were good substrates. With the exception of the enzyme from E. coli, the beta-galactosidases degalactosylated a biantennary N-linked oligosaccharide. PMID:9056188

  9. Antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and group A beta-haemolytic streptococci in 2002-2003. Results of the multinational GRASP Surveillance Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekmann, Susan E; Heilmann, Kris P; Richter, Sandra S;

    2005-01-01

    A multinational surveillance study, GRASP, was conducted between November 2002 and April 2003 with the aim of assessing rates of antimicrobial resistance among 2656 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2486 isolates of group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, 1358 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae...... and 1047 of Moraxella catarrhalis from 20 countries in Europe, eastern Asia and southern Africa. Conspicuous differences between various countries were noted in the S. pneumoniae resistance rates observed for penicillin (0-79.2%) and erythromycin (4-66%), along with other antimicrobials. The percentage...... of MDR strains was above 25% in 8 of the 20 countries studied. Group A streptococcal macrolide resistance rates ranged from 0% to 35% by country, while rates of beta-lactamase production ranged from 0% to 39% for H. influenzae and 80-100% for M. catarrhalis. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae remains...

  10. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  11. Induction of anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I autoantibodies in mice by protein H of Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Os, G. M. A.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Agar, C.; Seron, M. V.; Marquart, J. A.; Akesson, P.; Urbanus, R. T.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Herwald, H.; Morgelin, M.; De Groot, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by the persistent presence of anti-beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2-GPI) autoantibodies. beta 2-GPI can exist in two conformations. In plasma it is a circular protein, whereas it adopts a fish-hook conformation after binding to phospholip

  12. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  13. beta-lactamase-producing nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae fails to protect Streptococcus pneumoniae from amoxicillin during experimental acute otitis media

    OpenAIRE

    Westman, E.; Lundin, S.; Hermansson, Ann; Melhus, Åsa

    2004-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common reason for outpatient antimicrobial therapy. Mixed infections pose a potential problem, since the first-line drug used for the treatment of AOM, amoxicillin, can be neutralized by ß-lactamase-producing pathogens of the upper respiratory tract. To study the effects of a 5-day course of amoxicillin on a mixed middle ear infection, rats were challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae alone or in combination with ß-lactamase-producing nontypeable Haemophi...

  14. Exposure of Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen in Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection is Dependent on Pneumococcal Neuraminidase A**

    OpenAIRE

    Coats, Mamie T.; Murphy, Trudy; James C Paton; Gray, Barry; Briles, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome is recognized in a small portion of otherwise healthy children who have or have recently had Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, including severe pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteremia. As in other types of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), pneumococcal HUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, usually with extensive kidney damage. Although not demonstrated in vivo, the pathogenesis of pneumococcal HUS has been attri...

  15. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus thermophilus and reduction of gastrointestinal discomfort pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus thermophilus and reduction of gastrointestinal discomfort. According to the applicant, the food constituent which is the subject of the claim is beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus...... thermophilus. Streptococcus thermophilus is added to infant formulae in the production process for fermentation purposes and the live organisms are inactivated after the fermentation process. The Panel considers that the food constituent, beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus thermophilus, under the conditions...... of use proposed by the applicant, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed by the applicant is “reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort”. The target population proposed by the applicant is infants and young children. The Panel considers that reduction of gastrointestinal...

  16. Poststreptococcal keratouveitis associated with group C streptococcus pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataneli N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nathaniel Nataneli1, Zenia P Aguilera1, Pearl S Rosenbaum1, Tamar Goldstein1,2, Martin Mayers11Department of Ophthalmology, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelPurpose: To report the first case of poststreptococcal syndrome uveitis (PSU in association with group C streptococcus (GCS.Patients and methods: Chart review of a 24-year-old man who presented with bilateral ocular redness, pain, and photophobia for 5 days and "white rings" around his eyes for a duration of 3 days. The patient further reported fever and sore throat in the preceding week. Slit-lamp examination showed bilateral keratouveitis. A thorough uveitis workup, antistreptolysin O (ASLO titer, and throat culture were obtained. The patient was treated with frequent topical steroids and systemic doxycycline. The uveitis and keratitis subsided over the next few weeks, leaving extensive peripheral keratolysis.Results: The results of laboratory diagnostic testing revealed an elevated ASLO, C-reactive protein, as well as HLA-B27 positivity. Throat cultures grew beta-hemolytic GCS; group A streptococcus was culture negative.Conclusion: GCS pharyngitis may be a causative organism of PSU.Keywords: pharyngitis, keratolysis, keratouveitis

  17. Group B and F Beta Streptococcus Necrotizing Infection-Surgical Challenges with a Deep Central Plantar Space Abscess A Diabetic Limb Salvage Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendivil, Jason M; Jolley, David; Walters, Jodi; Dancho, Jim; Martin, Billy

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 66-year-old, type II diabetic male with a deep wound to the plantar-lateral aspect of his right hallux. On examination, the central plantar compartment of his right foot was moderately erythematous and tender on palpation. After obtaining a deep wound culture, treatment was complicated by a progression of a group B and F beta streptococcus, necrotizing infection. The patient underwent a right hallux amputation, followed by a plantar medial incision for drainage of an abscess to the medial and central plantar compartments of the foot. Due to the extent and limb threat of the infection, the patient ultimately underwent a transmetatarsal amputation. Advanced healing modalities were also employed to decrease wound healing times, which allowed the patient to achieve early weightbearing and return to activities of daily living. This study depicts how the astute podiatric surgeon needs to make a decision in a timely manner to surgically debride all nonviable and necrotic tissue in order to minimize further amputation and preserve foot function.

  18. Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Azık

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fatal hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs is approximately 1:200000 per unit. Acute HTRs occur during or within 24 h after administration of a blood product. Transfusion of incompatible red blood cells (RBCs, and, more rarely, of a large volume of incompatible plasma usually are the causative agents. Delayed HTRs are caused by a secondary immune response to an antigen on the donor’s RBCs. Different mechanisms lead to intra- and extravascular hemolysis, such as complete complement activation, phagocytosis of RBCs covered with C3b by macrophages after incomplete complement activation, or destruction of RBCs covered only with IgG by direct cell to cell contact with K cells. The clinical consequences of HTRs are triggered via several pathophysiological pathways. Formation of anaphylatoxins, release of cytokines causing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, activation of the kinin system, the intrinsic clotting cascade and fibrinolysis result in hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diffuse bleeding, and disruption of microcirculation leading to renal failure and shock. In this review, the symptoms of HTR are introduced, laboratory investigations and treatment are described, and some recommendations for prevention are given. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 127-32

  19. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  20. A族β溶血性链球菌与猩红热的相关研究%Relation between Beta-Haemolytic Group A Streptococcus Isolate and Scarlet Fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁云梅; 杨永弘

    2009-01-01

    A族β溶血性链球菌(beta-haemolytic group A Streptococcus isolate,GAS)又称为酿脓链球菌(Streptococcus pyogenes),是一种常见的致病性化脓性革兰阳性球菌,猩红热是由GAS引起的儿童常见呼吸道传染病.近年来,随着严重侵袭性GAS感染在欧美一些国家再次增多,猩红热在一些国家中的发病率也在升高.简要介绍GAS的分型、超抗原及耐药与猩红热之间的关系.

  1. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  2. Severe pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome in an 8-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar Gargah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure, represents one of the major causes of acute renal failure in infancy and childhood. The typical form occurring after an episode of diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli is the most frequent in children. Other microorganisms also may be responsible for HUS, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes more severe forms of the disease. We report an 8-month-old girl who presented with pneumonia and subsequently developed HUS. Renal biopsy showed characteristic lesion of thrombotic microangiopathy and extensive cortical necrosis. She was managed with peritoneal dialysis but did not improve and developed severe sepsis due to staphylococcal peritonitis, resulting in the death of the patient. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced HUS is uncommon, but results in severe disease in the young. There is a high risk of these patients developing end-stage kidney disease in the long term.

  3. Heterogeneity of Hemolysin Expression during Neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae Sepsis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sigge, Anja; Schmid, Manuel; Mauerer, Stefanie; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The β-hemolysin of Streptococcus agalactiae is a major virulence factor; consequently, nonhemolytic strains rarely cause infections. We report on a case of neonatal sepsis caused by a strain displaying heterogeneous hemolysin expression. It was detected by the simultaneous isolation of hemolytic and nonhemolytic colonies from cultures of the infant's blood.

  4. 抗β2糖蛋白Ⅰ抗体对自身免疫性溶血性贫血临床结局的影响%Effect of Anti-beta2 Glycoprotein I Antibodies on Outcome of the Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾晓虹; 薛原; 林臖芳; 郑玲; 康日辉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship of anti-beta2 glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2GPI)and the outcome of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).Methods During December 2008 to April 2013,consecutive case series of patients with AIHA were studied in the First affiliated hospital of Fujian Medical university.Patients were classified as Primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia (Primary AIHA Group)and autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to SLE (SLE-AIHA Group).Levels of IgG subtype anti-β2GPI were assessed in all cases.Data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5.Results A total of 42 patients with AIHA were enrolled in the study,22 cases were primary AIHA,while 20 cases were SLE-AIHA.In the SLE-AIHA Group,patients with positive IgG subtype anti-β2GPI,revealed longer time in achieving partial remission than patients without the antibody [(18 ±7)d vs.(13 ±4)d,P 0.05].Conclusion IgG subtype anti-β2GPI antibody may be one of the factors related to the prognosis of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.%目的:评估抗β2糖蛋白 I 抗体(anti β2 glycoprotein Ⅰ,aβ2GPI)与自身免疫性溶血性贫血(autoimmune hemolytic anemia,AIHA)临床结局的相关性。方法连续收集2008年12月至2013年4月在福建医科大学附属第一医院血液风湿科门诊和病房诊治的 AIHA 患者,包括继发于 SLE 的 AIHA 患者(SLE-AIHA 组)和原发性 AIHA 患者(原发性 AIHA 组)。检测所有患者 IgG 类抗β2GPI。采用 SPSS11.5软件统计分析。结果共纳入 AIHA 患者42例,SLE-AIHA 组22例,原发性AIHA 组20例。SLE-AIHA 组 IgG 类抗β2GPI 阳性患者溶血达部分缓解所需时间显著长于该抗体阴性患者,差异有统计学意义[(18±7)d vs.(13±4)d,P <0.05]。原发性 AIHA 组 IgG 类抗β2GPI 阳性组和阴性组患者溶血达部分缓解所需时间无统计学差异[(15±5)d vs.(11±3)d,P >0.05]。结论IgG 类抗β2

  5. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. PMID:26306021

  6. Recent efforts to understand Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disese:Concepts about the Streptococcus and the Human Host

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L. Kaplan

    2001-01-01

    @@though an association between the group A beta hemolytic streptococcus and rheumatic fever has been recognized for more than half a century, many important issues about this relationship remain incompletely defined. The initiating pharyngeal throat infection and the difference between true infection and the relatively harmless streptococcal “carrier state” are not yet understood. Many properties of the organism itself largely remain a mystery. While much has been written about “rheumatogenecity” of certain streptococci, the precise mechanism for inducing “rheumatogenecity”is unknown. Nor is there sufficient evidence to understand the role of “antigenic mimicry” in the pathogenesis.With the introduction of molecular techniques into the basic science laboratory, the nurmer of different streptococcal types (based either on the M protein or the emm gene) has almost doubled during the past ten years, making the problem even greater since little is known about the relative importance or epidemiology of these newly described types.

  7. Molecular Basis for Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerqvist, Carl G.; Sundell, Hakan; Gettins, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin.

  8. Structure of N-acetyl-[beta]-D-glucosaminidase (GcnA) from the Endocarditis Pathogen Streptococcus gordonii and its Complex with the Mechanism-based Inhibitor NAG-thiazoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, David B.; Harty, Derek W.S.; Jacques, Nicholas A.; Hunter, Neil; Guss, J. Mitchell; Collyer, Charles A. (Sydney); (Westmead)

    2008-09-17

    The crystal structure of GcnA, an N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase from Streptococcus gordonii, was solved by multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using crystals of selenomethionine-substituted protein. GcnA is a homodimer with subunits each comprised of three domains. The structure of the C-terminal {alpha}-helical domain has not been observed previously and forms a large dimerization interface. The fold of the N-terminal domain is observed in all structurally related glycosidases although its function is unknown. The central domain has a canonical ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} TIM-barrel fold which harbours the active site. The primary sequence and structure of this central domain identifies the enzyme as a family 20 glycosidase. Key residues implicated in catalysis have different conformations in two different crystal forms, which probably represent active and inactive conformations of the enzyme. The catalytic mechanism for this class of glycoside hydrolase, where the substrate rather than the enzyme provides the cleavage-inducing nucleophile, has been confirmed by the structure of GcnA complexed with a putative reaction intermediate analogue, N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosamine-thiazoline. The catalytic mechanism is discussed in light of these and other family 20 structures.

  9. Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René; Gaïni, Shahin; Kjaeldgaard, Poul;

    2008-01-01

    Meningitis and spondylodiscitis caused by Streptococcus suis is a rare disease which is contracted by occupational exposure to pigs. We report a 54-y-old pig-farm worker with S. suis meningitis and septicaemia complicated with thoracal and lumbar spine spondylodiscitis. The S. suis strain involved...

  10. Outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes emm type 58 in a high dependency unit of a level-1 trauma center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purva Mathur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Group A Streptococcus (GAS can cause illnesses ranging from self-limited to severe, life-threatening, invasive infections. The objective of the following study was to investigate a suspected Streptococcus pyogenes outbreak in a high dependency unit (HDU of our trauma center. Materials and Methods: All the isolates of beta hemolytic Streptococci were identified by standard microbiological methods, Vitek 2 system and latex agglutination tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Exotoxin genes, including speA, speB, speC, speF, smeZ, ssa, speG, speH, speJ, speL, speM and speI were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The emm types of isolates of S. pyogenes were determined by sequencing the variable 5′ end of emm gene after amplification by PCR. Results: In a 28 bedded poly-trauma ward with a four bedded HDU three out of four patients developed S. pyogenes emm type 58 infection. The strain was macrolide and tetracycline resistant and produced the Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins speB, speC, speG, speF and smeZ. Surveillance sampling was done for investigation from patients, health-care workers and environmental samples. Conclusion: An outbreak of GAS infections was established caused by the uncommonly reported emm type 58. The outbreak was controlled by prompt treatment, intensive surveillance, feedback and training.

  11. Role of the Group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Caliot

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  12. Antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of fish epidermal mucus Cynoglossus arel andArius caelatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subramanian Bragadeeswaran; Selvam Priyadharshini; Kolandhasamy Prabhu; Solomon Raj Sophia Rani

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the antimicrobial, hemolytic activity and immunomodulatory activity of fish epidermal mucus and their chemical constituents fromCynoglossus arel (C. arel) and Arius caelatus (A. caelatus). Mucus plays an important role in the prevention of colonization by parasites, bacteria and fungi.Methods: Epidermal mucus was obtained from two marine fishes, lyophilized and the chemical composition of epidermal mucus was analysed byFT-IR analysis. Thein vitro antimicrobial activity against human pathogens (fungi, gram positive and gram-negative bacteria) and also the hemolytic activity and immunomodulatory activity were determined.Results:Totally ten human pathogens were tested against the fish mucus. Out of the ten pathogens, five pathogens have proved to be sensitive to the mucus. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed againstVibrio cholera (V. cholera) (9 mm and2 mm in diameter), followed byStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with a inhibition zone of (6 mm and3 mm),Streptococcus areus (S. areus) (5 mm and4 mm),Vibrio parahemolyticus (V. parahemolyticus) (4mm and5 mm) respectively.Conclusions: The present investigation has revealed that positive progresses in the fish mucus extracts against human pathogens and hemolytic activity. But further efforts are required for the purification and isolation of the active antimicrobial compounds in order to establish their possible applications.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome C3 CD46 CFB CFH CFHR5 CFI THBD Related Information ... Manual Consumer Version: Thrombocytopenia Merck Manual Professional Version: Complement System Orphanet: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Patient Support ...

  14. Chemical analysis and hemolytic activity of the fava bean aglycon divicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, D C; Schey, K L; Meier, G P; Jollow, D J

    1993-01-01

    Divicine is an unstable aglycon metabolite of the fava bean pyrimidine beta-glucoside vicine. Divicine has long been thought to be a mediator of an acute hemolytic crisis, known as favism, in susceptible individuals who ingest fava beans (Vicia faba). However, a recent report has questioned the chemical identity of the divicine that was used in most of the studies on divicine hemotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the hemolytic potential of synthetic divicine. Divicine was synthesized and its identity and purity were confirmed by HPLC, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy. The stability and redox behavior of divicine, under physiological conditions, were examined by HPLC and cyclic voltammetry. The data indicate that divicine is readily oxidized under aerobic conditions; however, it was sufficiently stable at pH 7.4 to permit its experimental manipulation. When 51Cr-labeled rat erythrocytes were exposed in vitro to the parent glucoside, vicine (5 mM), and then readministered to rats, no decrease in erythrocyte survival was observed. In contrast, erythrocyte survival was dramatically reduced by in vitro exposure to divicine (1.5 mM). These data demonstrate that divicine is a direct-acting hemolytic agent and thus may be a mediator of the hemolytic crisis induced by fava bean ingestion. PMID:8374040

  15. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpesh B Ishnava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria.The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0. Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract.The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36μg/ml and 182.19μg/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50 value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein.Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria.

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M Ittyachen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham M Ittyachen; Mohan B Jose; Varghese Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  18. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clinical manifestations. Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical manifestation are described in children with epidemic HUS. The intestinal involvement in the prodromic period, is outlined and the most common disturbances such acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, leucocitosis hypertension, neurological, pancreatic and cardiac manifestations are described. We discuss the acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia. The etiopathogenic treatment and the control of renal sequelae are also discussed.

  19. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  20. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. I. Importance of hydrophobic interactions in stabilization of beta-hairpin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Makowska, Joanna; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-06-01

    We previously studied a 16-amino acid-residue fragment of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain (residues 46-61), [IG(46-61)] of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, and found that hydrophobic interactions and the turn region play an important role in stabilizing the structure. Based on these results, we carried out systematic structural studies of peptides derived from the sequence of IG (46-61) by systematically shortening the peptide by one residue at a time from both the C- and the N-terminus. To determine the structure and stability of two resulting 12- and 14-amino acid-residue peptides, IG(48-59) and IG(47-60), respectively, we carried out circular dichroism, NMR, and calorimetric studies of these peptides in pure water. Our results show that IG(48-59) possesses organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50-Phe57 and Trp48-Val59) at T = 283 and 305 K. At T = 313 K, the structure breaks down because of increased chain entropy, but the turn region is preserved in the same position observed for the structure of the whole protein. The breakdown of structure occurs near the melting temperature of this peptide (T(m) = 310 K) measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The melting temperature of IG(47-60) determined by DSC is T(m) = 330 K and its structure is similar to that of the native beta-hairpin at all (lower) temperatures examined (283-313 K). Both of these truncated sequences are conserved in all known amino acid sequences of the B domains of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from bacteria. Thus, this study contributes to an understanding of the mechanism of folding of this whole family of proteins, and provides information about the mechanism of formation and stabilization of a beta-hairpin structural element. PMID:19089955

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, R. K.; Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct ...

  2. Identification of Hemolytic Streptococcal Isolates from Central Air Conditioning Systems in Public Places in Fujian%公共场所集中空调通风系统溶血性链球菌分离株的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨毓环; 叶玲清; 林坚; 林玉珍

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand the contamination and distribution status of hemolytic Streptococcus in the central air conditioning systems in public places. Methods Four investigations were carried out in 2008-2010,according to 'Hygienic Criterion for Central Air Conditioning Ventilation System in Public Places', identification of the hemolytic Streptococcus isolates was finished by VITEK auto microbiology system. Results Twenty-four isolates of hemolytic Streptococcus were identified, including 17 β-hemolytic Streptococcus ,there were 11 of Streptococcus agalactiae, four of Streptococcus dysgalactiae,one of Streptococcus equi,one of Streptococcus pyogenes;sevena-hemolytic Streptococcus,there were four of Streptococcus mitist, one of Streptococcus pneumoniae, one of Streptococcus uberis, one of Streptococcus oralis. Conclusion The central air conditioning systems were contaminated with hemolytic Streptococcus, cleaning and disinfection of the systems will reduce the pollution.%目的 了解集中空调通风系统送风中溶血性链球菌的污染和菌种的分布特征.方法于2008-2010年夏季期间4次对福建省属直管的9家大型宾馆集中空调采集的送风口空气样品进行溶血性链球菌检测,依据卫生部的采样和检测方法,确定为溶血性链球菌的菌株,经纯培养后进一步采用VITEK全自动微生物鉴定仪鉴定.结果共分离到溶血性链球菌24株,β溶血性链球菌17株,包括4个种(无乳链球菌、停乳链球菌、马链球菌、酿脓链球菌);α溶血性链球菌7株,也包括4个种(肺炎链球菌、缓症链球菌、口腔链球菌、乳房链球菌).菌株数从2008年8月首次监测时的15株降至2009年的5株、2010年的4株.结论福建省属直管的9家大型宾馆集中空调通风系统存在不同程度的溶血性链球菌污染,且经分离鉴定的菌株均是比较典型的致病代表株,经加强对公共场所集中空调的定期清洗和消毒等监管后,其污染程度有下降的趋势.

  3. Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Faro

    1993-01-01

    Статья посвящена исследованию степени колонизации Streptococcus agalactiae мочеполовых (СГВ) органов и прямой кишки беременных на раннем сроке беременности и исходов беременности для матери и плода в зависимости от применения антибиотикопрофилактики. Частота колонизации СГВ составила 15,9 %, при этом в моче СГВ выявлялись с частотой 8,6 %, в отделяемом влагалища 3,5 %, в прямой кишке 10 %. Эффективность амоксициллина клавуланата, назначаемого во II триместре беременности при выявлении СГВ, со...

  4. Reliable five-minute test strip method for identification of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealler, S F; Campbell, L; Kerr, K G; McGoldrick, J; Flannigan, K A; Hawkey, P M

    1989-04-01

    A novel and rapid method (Strep Strip, Lab M) for identification of Streptococcus pyogenes was evaluated. The method combines the established test for pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase (PYR) with a rapid chromogenic test for beta-glucosidase on a paper strip. The test was evaluated with 274 clinical isolates and 237 culture collection isolates of beta-haemolytic streptococci. Streptococcus pyogenes was identified with 100% specificity. Six isolates identified as Lancefield group A and which might therefore be assumed to be Streptococcus pyogenes were shown by the test strip method not to be this species. The beta-glucosidase test on the test strip allowed differentiation between enterococci and Streptococcus pyogenes (both PYR positive) in all cases. The test strip method represents an economical and accurate method for identification of Streptococcus pyogenes in clinical material. PMID:2565813

  5. SEVERE IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after liver transplantation is represen- ted in this article. The cause of complication was so-called passenger lymphocyte syndrome (a type of graft- versus-host disease. Two plasmapheresis sessions and Ig (0.5 g/kg in combination with increased maintenance immunosuppression with a short course of oral methylprednisolone in a total dose of 150 mg during 12 days were effective. The patient was discharged from hospital 34 days after transplantation in a satisfactory condition with a stable hemoglobin level. 

  6. [Phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolates obtained from clinical specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Bulut, Yunus; Tunçoglu, Ebru

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans strains isolated from clinical specimens. A total of 147 C. albicans strains isolated from blood (n = 29), respiratory specimens (n = 44), urine (n = 52), pus (n = 17) and stool (n = 5) were included in the study. Proteinase and phospholipase activities were determined in 81% and 76% of C. albicans isolates, respectively. All C. albicans isolates revealed beta-hemolytic activity on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 7% fresh sheep blood and 3% glucose. Phospholipase and proteinase positivity were highest among the respiratory isolates. Proteinase activity of respiratory (93%) and blood (83%) isolates were statistically significantly higher than that of urine (77%; p = 0.032), pus (65%; p = 0.007) and stool isolates (60%; p = 0.026). While phospholipase activity showed statistically significant difference between respiratory (84%) and pus (53%) isolates (p = 0.014), no statistically significant difference was determined for blood (79%), urine (75%) and stool (80%) isolates (p > 0.05). Two blood isolates with 4+ proteinase activity and 3 urine isolates with 3+ proteinase activity were phospholipase negative. One urine isolate with 4+ phospholipase activity and 4 with 3+ phospholipase activity were proteinase negative. Phospholipase and proteinase negative 1 isolate from stool and 1 isolate from pus were found to have 4+ hemolytic activity. In conclusion, besides proteinase and phospholipase enzyme activities, hemolytic activity may play an important role for the C.albicans infections. The pathogenetic role of these virulence factors should be evaluated by further clinical studies.

  7. Streptococcus agalactiae endogenous endophthalmitis

    OpenAIRE

    Saffra, Norman; Rakhamimov, Aleksandr; Husney, Robert; Ghitan, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (SA) is a Group B Streptococcus, which is a common pathogen implicated in neonatal and geriatric sepsis. Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE) is a condition that results from haematogenous seeding of the globe, during transient or persistent bacteremia. We document a case of a non-septic geriatric patient, who developed EBE after a transient bacteraemia with SA.

  8. Group B Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H. Adriaanse

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae is an important cause of neonatal sepsis. Prevention is possible by intrapartum screening for maternal GBS carriership and antimicrobial treatment of colonized women with risk factors during labor. The conflicting results of diagnostic performance are reported both for the newly developed rapid GBS antigen tests and Gram's stain.

  9. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  10. Colonización por estreptococo beta hemolítico del grupo b durante el embarazo y prevención de enfermedad neonatal Group B streptococcus colonization during pregnancy and prevention of early onset of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Sad Larcher

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El estreptococo beta-hemolítico del grupo B (SGB es uno de los principales agentes causantes de sepsis neonatal precoz. La mortalidad de los afectados oscila entre el 6 y el 20%, y la tasa de secuela neurológica llega al 30%. En 1996 el Centro de Prevención y Control de Enfermedades de Atlanta, el Colegio Americano de Obstetras y Ginecólogos y la Academia Americana de Pediatría sugirieron en consenso que el personal de atención de salud materna-neonatal debía adoptar una estrategia para la prevención de la sepsis por este germen. Los objetivos del presente trabajo prospectivo fueron determinar el porcentaje de colonización por SGB en las pacientes gestantes asistidas del 1° de julio de 2001 al 31 de diciembre de 2002 e implementar un programa de prevención de sepsis neonatal precoz por SGB a través de profilaxis antibiótica intraparto basado en cultivos. Sobre 1756 pacientes, se realizaron cultivos con hisopado vaginal y anal a 1228 (69.9%. El porcentaje de colonización materna por SGB fue del 1.4% (17 pacientes. Se presentó un caso de sepsis neonatal compatible con SGB (0.6‰ en una madre con cultivo negativo. Sólo una paciente portadora de SGB presentó factores de riesgo. Los resultados nos sugieren continuar con la estrategia de prevención basada en cultivos debido a que la mayoría de las pacientes colonizadas no presentaron factores de riesgo. Son necesarios estudios de relación costo-beneficio en nuestro medio para definir si esta estrategia de prevención es aplicable a la realidad sanitaria argentina.Group B Streptococcus (GBS is the most frequent cause of early onset of neonatal sepsis. Case-fatality rate is 6-20% for newborns. Neurological sequel occurs in 30% of survivors. In 1996, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that obstetrics providers should adopt either a culture-based or a risk

  11. [Severe hemolytic jaundice and Wilson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, D; Bareiss, P; Jesel, B; Warter, J

    1976-12-01

    The onset of spontaneous hemolytic jaundice in a young subject should lead to the search for Wilson's disease when clinical examination reveals cirrhosis. This hemolysis may evolve in the form of severe jaundice to a stage where the cirrhosis remains usually latent or well tolerated. The intervention of a toxic, allergic of infective factor liable to produce a hepatic lesion which frees a dose of copper sufficient to trigger off hemolysis, is discussed. The mechanism of the latter, that of the coagulation disorders observed, liver cell failure and widespread intravascular coagulation, are analysed in this paper and compared with data in the literature. The dramatic character of the case indicates that it is necessary to treat as a routine with penicillamine all homozygous forms of Wilson's disease.

  12. [Streptococcus pyogenes: penicillin and erythromycin susceptibility in the cities of Neuquen and Cipolletti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, S V; Brasili, S; Saiz, M; Carranza, C; Vidal, P; Calderón, J; Lopardo, H A

    2000-01-01

    Penicillin resistance has not yet been detected in Streptococcus pyogenes. However macrolide-resistant streptococci have emerged in several countries. Only low rates of erythromycin-resistant S. pyogenes were reported in Argentina, with the exception of a 11.1% observed in Mendoza. The aim of the present study was to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and to erythromycin of 251 consecutive clinically-significant isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from four centers of Cipolletti and Neuquén during the period April-December 1998. The double disk test with erythromycin and clindamycin disks was employed as a screening method to detect ERY-resistant streptococci and to determine the phenotype of macrolide resistance. Disk diffusion was also employed for determining penicillin susceptibility. Macrolide-resistant isolates were also tested for penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, clindamycin and azithromycin susceptibility by the agar dilution method. Additionally they were also tested for erythromycin susceptibility by E-test (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden). All streptococci studied were susceptible to penicillin and thirty of them (12.0%) were resistant to erythromycin. All these resistant isolates were also resistant to azithromycin but susceptible to ceftriaxone and clindamycin. They showed the phenotype M (probably efflux-mediated mechanism) and the MICs of erythromycin ranged between 8 and 16 micrograms/ml. According to these results we conclude that in spite of universal susceptibility to penicillin in S. pyogenes, macrolide resistance is a matter of concern in Neuquén and Cipolletti. At least in those cities it appears to be necessary to routinely perform macrolide susceptibility tests in beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  13. Assessment of Clindamycin and Erythromycin Resistance, and Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Streptococcus Group B Isolated from Urinary Samples of Outpatient Women in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Frouhesh-Tehrani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus group B (GBS or Streptococcus agalactiae is typically associated with neonatal disease and infection in pregnant women. Mortality of GBS sepsis in neonates is over 50% and is particularly high in preterm infants. GBS also causes invasive infection in pregnant and non-pregnant women including urinary tract infection (UTI. Penicillin-derived antibiotics remained as choice drugs for treatment of GBS infection; however, Erythromycin and Clindamycin are useful in cases of allergic to Penicillin. The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance to Erythromycin and Clindamycin, especially inducible Clindamycin resistance, in GBS isolated from urinary samples of women who attended medical offices in Tehran, Iran.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 5000 urine samples from Jan. 2011 to Oct. 2012 that 104 GBS were isolated. The isolates were identified as GBS using laboratory criteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was done by Erythromycin disk 15µg and Clindamycin disk 2µg for observation inducible resistant D-zone test by double-disk diffusion method with Erythromycin and adjacent Clindamycin.Results: Among the 5000 urine samples 104 (2.08% were Beta hemolytic GBS. Of the 104 isolated GBS, 22 (21.2% were resistance, 24 (23% were intermediate, and 58 (55.8% were susceptible to Erythromycin; however, 24 (23% were resistance, 5 (4.8% were intermediate, and 75 (72.2% were susceptible to Clindamycin. Of the 22 Erythromycin-resistant isolates, 10 (9.5% in total GBS isolated displayed the D zone; it means they have inducible Erythromycin resistant to Clindamycin.Conclusion: Various studies in other countries report lower rates of inducible Clindamycin resistance; it indicates the use of more macrolides in the treatment of UTI.

  14. Gene Regulation in Streptococcus pneumoniae: interplay between nutrition and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Hendriksen (Wouter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStreptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which belongs to the species of streptococci. Other pathogenic bacteria belonging to this class include Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus bovi

  15. Acute Transient Variety of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Following Varicella Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Parmar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of an 11 year female presenting with Acute Transient variety of Autoimmune hemolytic anemia following chickenpox, the patient was treated with blood transfusion and prednisolone and discharged with successful rise in hemoglobin.

  16. Prophage-Cured Derivatives of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris

    OpenAIRE

    Gasson, Michael J.; Davies, F. Lyndon

    1980-01-01

    Prophage curing was achieved in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris, and the cured derivatives were shown to be indicators for their temperate bacteriophages. Relysogenization of these cured derivatives completed the first formal demonstration of the lysogenic state in lactic streptococci.

  17. Covalent binding and hemolytic activity of complement proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Law, S K; Lichtenberg, N A; Levine, R P

    1980-01-01

    We report the inactivation of the third component of complement (C3) by hydroxylamine. C3 hemolytic and covalent binding activities decline with identical kinetics, demonstrating a direct correlation between the two activities. We conclude that covalent, surface-bound C3b is hemolytically active. The inactivation of C3 is first order with respect to hydroxylamine. We also studied C3 inactivation with [14C]methylamine. The inactivation corresponds quantitatively with the labeling of C3 in the ...

  18. Immune Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient with Tuberculous Lymphadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunath Nandennavar; Sanju Cyriac; Krishnakumar; Sagar, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in tuberculosis is usually anemia of chronic disease. Severe hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare in tuberculosis patients. We report a patient diagnosed with tubercular lymphadenitis complicated by Coomb′s positive hemolytic anemia. Patient responded well to antituberculous treatment. Hematological parameters improved after initiation of antituberculosis treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case from India of an adult patient with tuberculous lymphadenitis presen...

  19. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement.

  20. Contribution of IL-1 to resistance to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Daniel; Ling, Eduard; Feldman, Galia; Benharroch, Daniel; Voronov, Elena; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Dagan, Ron; Apte, Ron N; Mizrachi-Nebenzahl, Yaffa

    2008-09-01

    The role of IL-1 in susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection was studied in mice deficient in genes of the IL-1 family [i.e. IL-1alpha-/-, IL-1beta-/-, IL-1alpha/beta-/- and IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra)-/- mice] following intra-nasal inoculation. Intra-nasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae of IL-1beta-/- and IL-1alpha/beta-/- mice displayed significantly lower survival rates and higher nasopharyngeal and lung bacterial load as compared with control, IL-1alpha-/- and IL-1Ra-/- mice. Treatment of IL-1beta-/- mice with rIL-1beta significantly improved their survival. A significant increase in blood neutrophils was found in control, IL-1alpha-/- and IL-1Ra-/- but not in IL-1beta-/- and IL-1alpha/beta-/- mice. Local infiltrates of neutrophils and relatively preserved organ architecture were observed in the lungs of IL-1alpha-/- and control mice. However, S. pneumoniae-infected IL-1beta-/-, IL-1alpha/beta-/- and IL-1Ra-/- mice demonstrated diffuse pneumonia and tissue damage. Altogether, all three isoforms contribute to protection against S. pneumoniae; our results point to differential role of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in the pathogenesis and control of S. pneumoniae infection and suggest that IL-1beta has a major role in resistance to primary pneumococcal infection while the role of IL-1alpha is less important.

  1. Roles of the Valine Clusters in Domain 3 of the Hemolytic Lectin CEL-III in Its Oligomerization and Hemolytic Abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hisamatsu, Keigo; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2009-01-01

    The hemolytic lectin CEL-III and its site-directed mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Replacement of the valine clusters in domain 3 with alanine residues led to increased self-oligomerization in solution and higher hemolytic activity. The results suggest the involvement of these valine clusters in CEL-III oligomerization and hemolytic activity.

  2. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ105 PREGNANCY Group B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be ... a planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of ...

  3. [Antiphospholipid syndrome with autoimmune hemolytic anemia which mimics thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Naoki; Taniguchi, Yasuhiro; Hidaka, Tomonori; Katayose, Keiko; Kameda, Takuro; Side, Kotaro; Shimoda, Haruko; Nagata, Kenji; Kubuki, Yoko; Matsunaga, Takuya; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2010-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for lethargy, fever, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and consciousness disturbance. Direct Coombs test was positive, and anti-cardiolipin beta2-glycoprotein I antibody was detected. She was diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). She demonstrated variable consciousness disturbance, inability to distinguish right from left, dysgraphia and dyscalculia. Multiple cerebral infarctions, especially dominant cerebral hemisphere infarctions, were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. A ventilation-perfusion scan demonstrated the presence of a ventilation-perfusion mismatch in both lung fields, and multiple veinous embolisms in the right femoral, bilateral the great saphenous and popliteal veins. Therefore, pulmonary embolism and thrombophlebitis were diagnosed. Based on these findings, it was necessary to distinguish this diagnosis from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). As ADAMTS-13 activity was within the normal range, TTP was denied. Thereafter, the patient was treated with 1 mg/kg of prednisolone for AIHA, 3 mg of warfarin, and 3500 units of low-molecular-weight heparin for thrombosis, and her condition improved. PMID:20467225

  4. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R K; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

  5. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  6. Streptococcus agalactiae Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and the Sacroiliac Joints: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Imam, Yahia Z.; Housam Aldeen Sarakbi; Nagui Abdelwahab; Issa Mattar

    2012-01-01

    Invasive group beta-streptococcal arthritis is being increasingly diagnosed as suggested by recent data. We report a case of a middle-aged lady from Sri Lanka who developed septic arthritis of the right shoulder and the left sacroiliac joint as well as an iliopsoas collection caused by Streptococcus agalactiae shortly after labor at Hamad General Hospital in Doha, Qatar. We conclude that Streptococcus agalactiae septic arthritis is rare. It can present with invasive disease in adults. It usua...

  7. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Kaijalainen, Tarja

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcus, is an importanthuman pathogen that causes both serious invasive infections, suchas septicaemia, meningitis and pneumonia, as well as mild upper respiratoryinfections. It also belongs to the normal nasopharyngeal microbialflora. The purpose of this study was to compare bacteriologicalphenotypic methods with genetechnological methods in the identificationof pneumococci, especially among suspect pneumococcal isolateslacking one or more typical ...

  8. Diagnosis and management of rare congenital nonimmune hemolytic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2015-01-01

    Rare, congenital nonimmune hemolytic disorders of the erythrocyte, although uncommon, are important causes of anemia in the child and adult. These are a heterogeneous group of diseases that disrupt normal erythrocyte structure and function in varying ways. Predominant are abnormalities of hemoglobin stability, defects of erythrocyte metabolism, and disorders of erythrocyte hydration. Unstable hemoglobinopathies may lead to chronic or episodic hemolysis. Perturbation of critical enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway lead to altered erythrocyte metabolism and chronic hemolysis. Disorders of erythrocyte hydration are an under-recognized cause of hemolytic anemia. Beyond pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease, clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity characterize this group of disorders. Often, they are underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This review discusses pathophysiology, inheritance, clinical findings, laboratory manifestations, and management considerations in several rare nonimmune hemolytic diseases including the unstable hemoglobins, disorders of erythrocyte metabolism, and abnormalities of erythrocyte hydration. PMID:26637748

  9. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  10. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR.The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery

  11. The role of CpG DNA from group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus on T cells activation in the patients with psoriasis vulgaris%链球菌CpG DNA对寻常型银屑病患者T细胞活化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡怡华; 施若非; 郑捷

    2006-01-01

    研究链球菌核酸成分对寻常型银屑病患者T细胞活化的影响.利用层析法去除A型β溶血型链球菌超声粉碎产物中的核酸成分,分别用链球菌全菌抗原(streptococcal antigen,SA)和去除核酸的链球菌抗原(nucleic acid depleted-streptococcal antigen,non-NASA)刺激寻常型银屑病患者(20例)和正常人(12例)外周血单个核细胞(PBMC);同时non-NASA联合人工合成的CpG ODN(CpG-A和CpG-B)以及单用CpG ODN刺激患者PBMC(12例),24 h后采用流式细胞术检测并比较总T细胞及皮肤淋巴细胞抗原阳性(CLA+)T细胞活化表达CD69+及患者B细胞活化表达CD86+的百分率的差异.结果显示,在银屑病患者中,SA刺激后总T细胞和CLA+T细胞活化表达CD69+的百分率均高于non-NASA(P=0.012和0.042),而在正常人中两者无统计学差异,且均不激活T细胞表达CD69+(P>0.05);同时non-NASA联合CpG-A刺激患者PBMCs后总T细胞及CLA+T细胞表达CD69+的百分率亦高于non-NASA单独刺激(P=0.031和0.022),但联合CpG-B未发现差异(P>0.05),且CpG-A和B单独刺激对T细胞活化表达CD69+的百分率无影响(P>0.05).另一方面,SA、non-NASA以及后者联合CpG-A刺激患者B细胞活化表达CD86+的百分率无统计学差异(P>0.05),但non-NASA联合CpG-B刺激可显著增加B细胞CD86+的表达率(P<0.01),同时CpG-B可激活B细胞表达CD86+,CpG-A无此作用.研究表明,去除核酸的链球菌抗原降低银屑病患者总T细胞以及CLA+T细胞的活化,但对B细胞活化无影响,提示链球菌CpG DNA可协同菌体蛋白诱导病理性T细胞的活化,参与银屑病的发生.

  12. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  13. Comparative study of hemolytic activity of Bordetella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C N Khobragade

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Bordetella species colonize the respiratory tract of mammals and thereby cause the whooping cough. Most of the species produce adenylate cyclase - a toxin ( hemolysin responsible for increasing intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels in mammalian neutrophils and macrophages and as a consequence their phagocytic function get impaired . This study was carried out to isolate species of Bordetella and to study the hemolytic activity of each species on RBCs of sheep, human and poultry at varied culture conditions by altering the temperature, pH and cell age."nMaterials and Methods: Three pathogenic Bordetella species were isolated from fifty suspected whooping cough patients on Bordet-Gengou agar and identified by their biochemical profiles. The hemolytic activity of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica was investigated in terms of cell bound and cell free hemolysin on human, poultry and sheep RBCs at variable pH, temperature and cell age in Stainer Scholt broth. The hemolysin activity was also determined qualitatively on blood agar containing different blood samples."nResults: All the species revealed optimum hemolytic activity in pH range 7.5-8.0 (in slight alkaline condition, temperature 37°C and cell age up to 20-24 hrs. The cell bound hemolytic activity was found to be maximum than cell free activity and varied with blood samples of different species. B. pertussis showed maximum hemolytic activity on human red blood cells followed by poultry and sheep RBCs. B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica showed maximum hemolytic activity on sheep and poultry RBCs respectively."nConclusion: The findings of our study revealed that different determinants are involved in host interactions and virulence of Bordetella species.

  14. Adult patent ductus arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination.

  15. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.; Kelly S. Doran

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to cont...

  16. Hyaluronidase production in Streptococcus milleri in relation to infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Unsworth, P F

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and seven (41%) of 262 isolates of Streptococcus milleri, from human sources, produced hyaluronidase. Hyaluronidase production was commoner in beta haemolytic isolates 32 of 39 (82%), many of which were of Lancefield group F. But hyaluronidase was also found in alpha and non-haemolytic isolates, and in groups A, C, G, and non-groupable isolates. There was a strong association between hyaluronidase production and isolation from known internal abscesses (48/58, 83%) compared with is...

  17. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin-binding protein G from Streptococcus. IV. Implication for the mechanism of folding of the parent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanislaw; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-05-01

    A 34-residue alpha/beta peptide [IG(28-61)], derived from the C-terminal part of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, was studied using CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the C-terminal part (a 16-residue-long fragment) of this peptide, which corresponds to the sequence of the beta-hairpin in the native structure, forms structure similar to the beta-hairpin only at T = 313 K, and the structure is stabilized by non-native long-range hydrophobic interactions (Val47-Val59). On the other hand, the N-terminal part of IG(28-61), which corresponds to the middle alpha-helix in the native structure, is unstructured at low temperature (283 K) and forms an alpha-helix-like structure at 305 K, and only one helical turn is observed at 313 K. At all temperatures at which NMR experiments were performed (283, 305, and 313 K), we do not observe any long-range connectivities which would have supported packing between the C-terminal (beta-hairpin) and the N-terminal (alpha-helix) parts of the sequence. Such interactions are absent, in contrast to the folding pathway of the B domain of protein G, proposed recently by Kmiecik and Kolinski (Biophys J 2008, 94, 726-736), based on Monte-Carlo dynamics studies. Alternative folding mechanisms are proposed and discussed. PMID:20049918

  18. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. III. Dynamics of long-range hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-02-15

    A 20-residue peptide, IG(42-61), derived from the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus was studied using circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Unlike other related peptides studied so far, this peptide displays two heat capacity peaks in DSC measurements (at a scanning rate of 1.5 deg/min at a peptide concentration of 0.07 mM), which suggests a three-state folding/unfolding process. The results from DSC and NMR measurements suggest the formation of a dynamic network of hydrophobic interactions stabilizing the structure, which resembles a beta-hairpin shape over a wide range of temperatures (283-313 K). Our results show that IG (42-61) possesses a well-organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by long-range hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50 ... Phe57 and Trp48 ... Val59) at T = 283 K and (Trp48 ... Val59) at 305 and 313 K. The mechanism of beta-hairpin folding and unfolding, as well as the influence of peptide length on its conformational properties, are also discussed. PMID:19847914

  19. Cationic amphiphilic non-hemolytic polyacrylates with superior antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punia, Ashish; He, Edward; Lee, Kevin; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2014-07-01

    Acrylic copolymers with appropriate compositions of counits having cationic charge with 2-carbon and 6-carbon spacer arms can show superior antibacterial activities with concomitant very low hemolytic effect. These amphiphilic copolymers represent one of the most promising synthetic polymer antibacterial systems reported. PMID:24854366

  20. Terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab in atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legendre, C.M.; Licht, C.; Muus, P.; Greenbaum, L.A.; Babu, S.; Bedrosian, C.; Bingham, C.; Cohen, D.J.; Delmas, Y.; Douglas, K.; Eitner, F.; Feldkamp, T.; Fouque, D.; Furman, R.R.; Gaber, O.; Herthelius, M.; Hourmant, M.; Karpman, D.; Lebranchu, Y.; Mariat, C.; Menne, J.; Moulin, B.; Nurnberger, J.; Ogawa, M.; Remuzzi, G.; Richard, T.; Sberro-Soussan, R.; Severino, B.; Sheerin, N.S.; Trivelli, A.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Goodship, T.; Loirat, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a genetic, life-threatening, chronic disease of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma exchange or infusion may transiently maintain normal levels of hematologic measures but does not treat the underlying systemic disease. METHODS: We

  1. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-01-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S....

  2. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: An enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  3. In vitro assessment of recombinant, mutant immunoglobulin G anti-D devoid of hemolytic activity for treatment of ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Leif K; Green, Trine H; Sandlie, Inger;

    2008-01-01

    A specific treatment for ongoing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) due to anti-D would be very attractive. One approach could be administration to the mother of nonhemolytic anti-D, which by crossing the placenta can block the binding of hemolytic maternal anti-D....

  4. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  5. HEMOLYTIC ASPECTS OF STRAINS AND CLONES OF Trichomonas vaginalis

    OpenAIRE

    GERALDO A DE CARLI; PHILIPPE BRASSEUR; TIANA TASCA; da Silva, Ana C; DANIELA S CASTILHOS; ALINE WENDORFF

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro hemolytic activity of live strains and clones of trophozoites of Trichomonas vaginalis was investigated. The isolates and clones were tested against human erythrocytes of groups A, B, AB, and O, and against erythrocytes of six adult animals of different species (rabbit, rat, chicken, horse, bovine, and sheep). Results showed that each of the isolates and clones tested lysed all human blood groups, as well as rabbit, rat, chicken, horse, bovine and sheep erythrocytes. No hemolysin...

  6. Delineation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, its subspecies, and its clinical and phylogenetic relationship to Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Kilian, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The close phylogenetic relationship of the important pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and several species of commensal streptococci, particularly Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and the recently demonstrated sharing of genes and phenotypic traits previously considered...

  7. Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaretti Marcia Cristina Zago

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-U is a rare red blood cell alloantibody that has been found exclusively in blacks. It can cause hemolytic disease of the newborn and hemolytic transfusion reactions. We describe the case of a female newborn presenting a strongly positive direct antiglobulin test due to an IgG antibody in cord blood. Anti-U was recovered from cord blood using acid eluate technique. Her mother presented positive screening of antibodies with anti-U identified at delivery. It was of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses and showed a titer of 32. Monocyte monolayer assay showed moderate interaction of Fc receptors with maternal serum with a positive result (3.1%. The newborn was treated only with 48 hours of phototherapy for mild hemolytic disease. She recovered well and was discharged on the 4th day of life. We conclude that whenever an antibody against a high frequency erythrocyte antigen is identified in brown and black pregnant women, anti-U must be investigated.

  8. Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Jens, Eduardo; Pagliarini, Thiago; Bonif cio, Silvia Le o; Dorlhiac-Llacer, Pedro Enrique; Chamone Dd, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2003-01-01

    Anti-U is a rare red blood cell alloantibody that has been found exclusively in blacks. It can cause hemolytic disease of the newborn and hemolytic transfusion reactions. We describe the case of a female newborn presenting a strongly positive direct antiglobulin test due to an IgG antibody in cord blood. Anti-U was recovered from cord blood using acid eluate technique. Her mother presented positive screening of antibodies with anti-U identified at delivery. It was of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses and showed a titer of 32. Monocyte monolayer assay showed moderate interaction of Fc receptors with maternal serum with a positive result (3.1%). The newborn was treated only with 48 hours of phototherapy for mild hemolytic disease. She recovered well and was discharged on the 4th day of life. We conclude that whenever an antibody against a high frequency erythrocyte antigen is identified in brown and black pregnant women, anti-U must be investigated. PMID:14762491

  9. Serratamolide is a hemolytic factor produced by Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

  10. Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1 D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2 typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3 atypical HUS (aHUS: Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4 recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5 familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS.

  11. Streptococcus mutans Out-competes Streptococcus gordonii in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tanzer, J M; Thompson, A; Sharma, K.; Vickerman, M M; Haase, E.M.; Scannapieco, F A

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans avidly colonize teeth. S. gordonii glucosyltransferase (GtfG) and amylase-binding proteins (AbpA/AbpB), and S. mutans glucosyltransferase (GtfB), affect their respective oral colonization abilities. We investigated their interrelationships and caries association in a rat model of human caries, examining the sequence of colonization and non- vs. high-sucrose diets, the latter being associated with aggressive decay in humans and rats. Virulence-ch...

  12. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-01-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant. PMID:6490816

  13. Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome Associated with Gemcitabine: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee PJ

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition compromising the clinical triad of acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Hemolytic uremic syndrome may be associated with a variety of etiologies, and chemotherapeutic agents have also been reported to be associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome, including mitomycin, cisplatin, bleomycin, and most recently gemcitabine. CASE REPORT: A 72-year-old Caucasian male treated with four cycles of gemcitabine at 1,000 mg/m2 developed clinical and laboratory findings compatible with hemolytic uremic syndrome. He developed microangiopathic hemolysis, rapidly declining renal function with proteinuria and hematuria, and renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy. Hemodialysis, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroid therapy were utilized but the process ultimately was irreversible. CONCLUSION: With multiple reports of hemolytic uremic syndrome complicating gemcitabine therapy, it is imperative that clinicians heighten their awareness of this potentially lethal complication.

  14. Intravenous Immunoglobulin G Treatment in ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn, is it Myth or Real?

    OpenAIRE

    Beken, Serdar; Hirfanoglu, Ibrahim; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Altuntas, Nilgun; Unal, Sezin; Turan, Ozden; Onal, Esra; Ergenekon, Ebru; Koc, Esin; Atalay, Yildiz

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been used as a component of the treatment of hemolytic disease of the newborn. There is still no consensus on its use in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn routinely. The aim of this study is to determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with ABO incompatibility is necessary. One hundred and seventeen patients with ABO hemolytic disease and positive Coombs test were enrolled into the study. The subjects were healthy except jaundice. ...

  15. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: Current trends and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Basu Sabita; Kaur Ravneet; Kaur Gagandeep

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of hemolytic disease of the newborn has changed over the last few decades. With the implementation of Rhesus D immunoprophylaxis, hemolytic disease due to ABO incompatibility and other alloantibodies has now emerged as major causes of this condition. Though in developing countries, anti D is still a common antibody in pregnant women, many Asian countries have identified alloantibodies other than anti D as a cause of moderate-severe hemolytic disease. The most concerned fact is th...

  16. Characteristics of hemolytic activity induced by skin secretions of the frog Kaloula pulchra hainana

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuangshuang; Chi, Tingting; Meng, Aiyun; Chen, Congwei; An, Tianchen; Wang, Manchuriga; Zhang, Yingxia

    2013-01-01

    Background The hemolytic activity of skin secretions obtained by stimulating the frog Kaloula pulchra hainana with diethyl ether was tested using human, cattle, rabbit, and chicken erythrocytes. The skin secretions had a significant concentration-dependent hemolytic effect on erythrocytes. The hemolytic activity of the skin secretions was studied in the presence of osmotic protectants (polyethylene glycols and carbohydrates), cations (Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, and K+), or antioxidants (ascorbic...

  17. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Putta; Yamini Devi

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. Thi...

  18. Colonization by Streptococcus agalactiae during pregnancy: maternal and perinatal prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia El Beitune

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed colonization by group B Streptococcus beta-haemolyticus of Lancefield (SGB, or Streptococcus agalactiae, in pregnant women, and the consequences of infection for the mother and newborn infant, including factors that influence the risk for anogenital colonization by SGB. We also examined the methods for diagnosis and prophylaxis of SGB to prevent early-onset invasive neonatal bacterial disease. At present, it is justifiable to adopt anal and vaginal SGB culture as part of differentiated obstetrical care in order to reduce early neonatal infection. The rates, risk factors of maternal and neonatal SGB colonization, as well as the incidence of neonatal disease, may vary in different communities and need to be thoroughly evaluated in each country to allow the most appropriate preventive strategy to be selected.

  19. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

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    Regianne Umeko Kamiya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing, classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis.

  20. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  1. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after dental care: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Zoppelletto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcus salivarius is a common commensal of the oral mucosa, associated with infections in different sites. Meningitis due to this species are described in a few occasions . In this study refer to a case recently diagnosed in our hospital for treatment of a subsequent dental caries. Case report. A man of 35 years, presents to the emergency room with fever, headache, confusion, marked nuchal rigor.Anamnesis is the treatment of dental caries on the previous day.The blood count showed 24.7x109 / L with WBC 22.9x109 / L (92.9% neutrophils. The lumbar puncture CSF noted cloudy with 15.0 x 109 / L WBC, glicorrachia 5 g / L, protidorrachia 6.5 g / L. Microscopic examination showed numerous granulocytes and prevalence of Gram-positive cocci.The pneumococcal antigen was negative.The blood cultures before starting antibiotic therapy, were negative. CSF was isolated from the culture of a Streptococcus salivarius. To antibiotic therapy started in the ED, after lumbar puncture is associated with the Ampicillin Ceftriaxone and continued for 15 days to improve the patient’s general condition, then resigned in the 17 th day. Materials and methods. From CSF inoculated in blood agar plates and chocolate agar alpha hemolytic colonies were isolated, catalysis negative, optochin resistant. The biochemical identification performed with Phoenix (BD and confirmed by PCR Pan bacterial (16S rDNA bacterial strain identified as Streptococcus salivarius.The antibiogram performed with Phoenix (BD according to the CLSI guidelines indicated sensitivity to penicillin, vancomycin, cefotaxime, cefepime, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions. Meningitis by Streptococcus salivarius was found in a few cases, mainly related to the transmission of health personnel from the oral cavity during lumbar punctures performed without the use of surgical masks. The following bacterial meningitis in dental treatment having a low incidence and often fatal course be suspected by

  2. Inheritance of the Bantu/Benin haplotype causes less severe hemolytic and oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxycarbamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Jéssika V; Silva, Danilo G H; Torres, Lidiane S; Belini-Junior, Edis; Barberino, Willian M; Oliveira, Renan G; Carrocini, Gisele C S; Gelaleti, Gabriela B; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-07-01

    Beta S-globin gene cluster haplotypes (β(S)-haplotypes) can modulate the response to hydroxycarbamide (HC) treatment in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. In Brazil, the most common haplotypes are Bantu and Benin, and both confer a poor prognosis for patients when untreated with HC. We evaluated oxidative and hemolytic biomarkers in 48 SCA patients undergoing HC treatment separated in three subgroups: Bantu/Bantu, Bantu/Benin and Benin/Benin haplotype. On the basis of reduced haptoglobin (HP) levels, patients with Bantu/Bantu haplotypes had 3.0% higher hemolysis degree when compared with those with Bantu/Benin haplotypes (P=0.01). The Benin/Benin patients had 53.6% greater lipid peroxidation index than the Bantu/Bantu patients (P=0.01) because of evaluated thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels. The Bantu/Benin subgroup had intermediate levels of hemolytic and oxidative stress markers compared with the homozygous subgroups. Through strict inclusion criteria adopted, as well as consolidated and well-described hemolytic and the oxidative parameters evaluated, we suggest a haplotype-interaction response to HC treatment mediated by a 'balance' between the genetic factors of each haplotype studied. PMID:26961071

  3. Etiopathogenesis of hemolytic reactions in total artificial heart recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasků, J; Urbánek, P

    1997-12-01

    Hemolysis in total artificial heart (TAH) recipients was analyzed. From a total of 66 long-term experiments lasting from 30-314 days performed in the Brno Research Center, in 53 animals, the total red blood cell (RBC) count, hematocrit, total hemoglobin, and free plasma hemoglobin were investigated. We could essentially divide the whole group of calves in 2 subgroups. The first subgroup was calves with hemolytic reactions, and the second subgroup was calves without any hemolytic reaction at all. In the first subgroup, hemolysis occurred in 47% of the overall number of animals during extracorporeal circulation (ECC), in 15% during ECC and later periodically during the experiment, in 8% during ECC and then continuously during the experiment, and finally in 10% not during ECC but repeatedly during the experiment. In 20% of the animals from the overall number, hemolysis did not occur at all (second subgroup). These results testify to the great individual differences within 1 breed (Bohemian with a substantial component of Holstein). These differences are further modified by exogenous and endogenous factors. First, the inborn resistance of the RBC membrane and also thrombi formation and the mineralization of the driving diaphragm are very important. The extreme situation of decreased RBC membrane resistance was proved using a calf from another breed, the slow growing Scottish Highland breed, which did not survive 22 days of pumping due to intractable lethal hemolysis. These factors are also indicated by the hemolytic action of some drugs (e.g., Dopegyt) used during the experiment for another reason. Also important are the mechanical forces of pumping, surface moieties of the biomaterial, mineralization of the driving diaphragms, thrombi formation, infection, etc. Essentially, the hemolytic reaction in the TAH recipient has a multifactorial character. Hemolysis is undoubtedly an important factor, which can have a profound impact on the length of survival. The

  4. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  5. Thrombotic microangiopathy: focus on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperati, C John; Moliterno, Alison R

    2015-06-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) have evolved from rare, fulminant childhood afflictions to uncommon diseases with acute and chronic phases involving both children and adults. Breakthroughs in complement and coagulation regulation have allowed redefinition of specific entities despite substantial phenotypic mimicry. Reconciliation of phenotypes and delivery of life saving therapies require a multidisciplinary team of experts. The purpose of this review is to describe advances in the molecular pathophysiology of aHUS and to share the 2014 experience of the multidisciplinary Johns Hopkins TMA Registry in applying diagnostic assays, reporting disease associations, and genetic testing. PMID:26043391

  6. Oligomerization process of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III purified from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiromiki; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Fujisawa, Tetsuro

    2002-05-01

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin purified from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein exhibits strong hemolytic activity as well as cytotoxicity toward some cultured cell lines. Hemolysis is caused by CEL-III oligomers formed in the cell membrane after binding to specific carbohydrate chains on the cell surface. We have found that the oligomerization of CEL-III is also induced by the binding of simple carbohydrates, such as lactose, in aqueous solution under high pH and high ionic strength conditions. From gel filtration analysis of the oligomerization of CEL-III, it was found that the formation of the CEL-III oligomer is effectively induced by the binding of lactose and lactulose, disaccharides containing a beta-galactoside structure. Electron micrographs of the resulting oligomers revealed them to exist as particles with a size of approximately 20-30 nm. The oligomerization process required more than 1 h, which is consistent with the increase in surface hydrophobicity as measured using a fluorescent probe, 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate. However, a change in the far-UV CD spectra as well as small-angle X-ray scattering occurred within a few minutes, suggesting that a structural change in the protein takes place rapidly, but the following growth of the oligomer is a much slower process. PMID:11983084

  7. Penicillin-induced lysis of Streptococcus mutans.

    OpenAIRE

    Kral, T A; Callaway, M D

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 cells with concentrations of penicillin G within a relatively narrow range resulted in substantial lysis. This penicillin-induced lysis was dependent upon cell density and pH of the lysis medium. Other oral streptococci (Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus rattus, and Streptococcus cricetus) also demonstrated substantial levels of penicillin-induced lysis under appropriate conditions. Lesser degrees of lysis were seen in a related organism, Streptococc...

  8. Listeria monocytogenes and hemolytic Listeria innocua in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, S R; Stout, J C; Hanning, I B; Clement, A; Fortes, E D; den Bakker, H C; Wiedmann, M; Ricke, S C

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, saprophytic, Gram-positive bacterium and occasional food-borne pathogen, often associated with ready-to-eat meat products. Because of the increased consumer interest in organic, all natural, and free range poultry products, it is important to understand L. monocytogenes in the context of such systems. Pasture-reared poultry were surveyed over the course of two 8-wk rearing periods. Cecal, soil, and grass samples were collected for Listeria isolation and characterization. Seven of 399 cecal samples (or 1.75%) were Listeria-positive. All positive cecal samples were obtained from broilers sampled at 2 wk of age. Grass and soil samples were collected from the pasture both before and after introduction of the poultry. Environmental samples collected after introduction of poultry were significantly more likely to contain Listeria (P Listeria, sigB allelic typing, and hlyA PCR tests found that both L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, including hemolytic L. innocua, were recovered from the cecal and environmental (grass/soil) samples. The sigB allelic typing also revealed that (1) positive samples could be composed of 2 or more allelic types; (2) allelic types found in cecal samples could also be found in the environment; and (3) allelic types could persist through the 2 rearing periods. Our data indicate that both pasture-reared poultry and their environment can be contaminated with L. monocytogenes and hemolytic L. innocua.

  9. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  10. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  11. Hemolytic mechanism of dioscin proposed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu; Wang, Renxiao

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are a class of compounds containing a triterpenoid or steroid core with some attached carbohydrate modules. Many saponins cause hemolysis. However, the hemolytic mechanism of saponins at the molecular level is not yet fully understood. In an attempt to explore this issue, we have studied dioscin-a saponin with high hemolytic activity-through extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, all-atom MD simulations of 8 ns duration were conducted to study the stability of the dioscin-cholesterol complex and the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in water and in decane, respectively. MM-GB/SA computations indicate that the dioscin-cholesterol complex is energetically more favorable than the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in a non-polar environment. Next, several coarse-grained MD simulations of 400 ns duration were conducted to directly observe the distribution of multiple dioscin molecules on a DPPC-POPC-PSM-CHOL lipid bilayer. Our results indicate that dioscin can penetrate into the lipid bilayer, accumulate in the lipid raft micro-domain, and then bind cholesterol. This leads to the destabilization of lipid raft and consequent membrane curvature, which may eventually result in the hemolysis of red cells. This possible mechanism of hemolysis can well explain some experimental observations on hemolysis. PMID:19513766

  12. Case reports: delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, S K; Sears, D A; Werch, J B; Udden, M M; Milam, J D

    1996-10-01

    This article reports the details of delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions in four patients with sickle cell disease. These cases demonstrate the characteristics of the reactions, the significant risks involved, and the principles useful in diagnosis and treatment. Patients with sickle cell disease are at particular risk for delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions because they may be transfused at intervals over many years; they frequently form alloantibodies because of antigenic differences from the donor population; and they may receive emergency care in different hospitals where transfusion records are not available. In addition, exchange transfusions, which are often used for patients with sickle cell disease and which were given in three of these cases, raise the risks through increased exposure to foreign erythrocyte antigens and through an increased volume of erythrocytes susceptible to hemolysis. It was concluded that the hazards of these transfusion reactions justify preventive measures, such as extended erythrocyte phenotyping of patients with sickle cell disease and extended phenotypic matching of transfused cells. PMID:8853066

  13. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  14. Hemolytic uremic syndrome in Argentina: An attack scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Troncoso

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Escherichia coli epidemic in Germany gave a lesson at an international level. There is no time to solve food security problems when an epidemic is on the way. The epidemic in Germany exposed the fissures in the control systems of the Federal Risk Evaluation Institute of this country, as well as showing the incompetency of health authorities, who had great difficulty in resolving the situation. To summarize, the possibility of prevention was confused with the utopian idea of non-occurrence. It was not less important the public’s recognition and the “awakening” of health ministers in the European Union as regards the proven fact that pathogenic and even lethal microorganisms may be present in the food we eat. Argentina has the highest incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome in the world, and the next epidemic is likely not to occur in Germany, but in any other country, such as Argentina. In order to avoid complicity, we do not wish to remain silent about the situation in Argentina. Therefore, this is the writer’s motive for writing this article, which describes the scientific advances and the ethical pitfalls related to a disease transmitted by food, particularly hemolytic uremic syndrome, in Argentina.

  15. Hemolytic uremic syndrome in Argentina:An attack scenario

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alcides Troncoso

    2013-01-01

    The recent Escherichia coli epidemic in Germany gave a lesson at an international level. There is no time to solve food security problems when an epidemic is on the way. The epidemic in Germany exposed the fissures in the control systems of the Federal Risk Evaluation Institute of this country, as well as showing the incompetency of health authorities, who had great difficulty in resolving the situation. To summarize, the possibility of prevention was confused with the utopian idea of non-occurrence. It was not less important the public’s recognition and the “awakening” of health ministers in the European Union as regards the proven fact that pathogenic and even lethal microorganisms may be present in the food we eat. Argentina has the highest incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome in the world, and the next epidemic is likely not to occur in Germany, but in any other country, such as Argentina. In order to avoid complicity, we do not wish to remain silent about the situation in Argentina. Therefore, this is the writer’s motive for writing this article, which describes the scientific advances and the ethical pitfalls related to a disease transmitted by food, particularly hemolytic uremic syndrome, in Argentina.

  16. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  17. Prevalence of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Groups A, C, and G in Patients with Acute Pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti B Naik

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Although rate of pharyngitis associated with GCS and GGS is marginally lower than GAS, their carriage rate among healthy and relative higher drug resistance emphasizes the need for periodic surveillance of infection by the different serogroups of BHS.

  18. Varicella Infection Complicated by Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Retropharyngeal Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine M; Huntley, Colin; Carr, Michele M

    2016-01-01

    An unimmunized 19-month-old child presented with a retropharyngeal abscess and coincident varicella infection. The abscess resolved with operative drainage. This is the first published report of this connection, although varicella is known to be associated with abscesses in general. Practitioners should be aware that cervical abscesses may complicate varicella infections. PMID:27651967

  19. Differential expression of the cytotoxic and hemolytic activities of the ApxIIA toxin from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, A H; Hausler, C; Young, R.; Struck, D K

    1994-01-01

    The ApxIIA protein secreted from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is both hemolytic and cytotoxic. However, when the cloned apxII operon is expressed in Escherichia coli, two forms of the ApxIIA protein can be recovered. Toxin which remains intracellular has hemolytic and cytotoxic activities, while toxin that is secreted is cytotoxic with little or no hemolytic activity. This indicates that the cytotoxicity of ApxIIA is independent of its hemolytic activity.

  20. Sensibilidad antibiótica y recomendaciones de tratamiento para Streptococcus pneumoniae Antibiotic sensitivity and treatment recommendations for Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gil-Setas

    2004-04-01

    , isolates from ear swabs were the most resistant to the antimicrobials tested, while those from blood culture were the most susceptible. Of the Streptococcus pneumoniae tested, 43% were resistant to penicillin, 6.1% to amoxicillin and 6.6% to cefotaxime. Of the 36.3% of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that were resistant to erythromycin, 85.45% exhibited the MLS B phenotype while the remaining 14.55% presented with the M phenotype. Multiple-resistance was detected in 32.3% of the strains. The antibiotic resistance rates to beta-lactams (specially penicillin, amoxicillin and cefotaxime/ceftrixone in Streptococcus pneumoniae don’t prevent its clinical use for the most of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in our area, except for pneumococcal meningitis.

  1. Development of primer sets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification that enables rapid and specific detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three ...

  2. Recommended conservation of the names Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus rattus, Streptococcus cricetus, and seven other names included in the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names. Request for an opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    With reference to the first Principle of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria, which emphasizes stability of names, it is proposed that the original names Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus rattus, Streptococcus cricetus, Erwinia ananas, Eubacterium tarantellus, Lactobacillus sake...

  3. The cell-bound fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius: the carboxyl terminus specifies attachment in a Streptococcus gordonii model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathsam, C; Giffard, P M; Jacques, N A

    1993-01-01

    The ftf gene, coding for the cell-bound beta-D-fructosyltransferase (FTF) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, has been analyzed, and its deduced amino acid sequence has been compared with that of the secreted FTF of Streptococcus mutans and the levansucrases (SacBs) of Bacillus species. A unique proline-rich region detected at the C terminus of the FTF of S. salivarius preceded a hydrophobic terminal domain. This proline-rich region was shown to possess strong homology to the product of the prgC gene from pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis, which encodes a pheromone-responsive protein of unknown function, as well as homology to the human proline-rich salivary protein PRP-4. A series of 3'-OH deletions of the S. salivarius ftf gene expressed in Streptococcus gordonii Challis LGR2 showed that the C terminus was required for cell surface attachment in this heterologous organism, as only the complete gene product was cell bound. This cell-bound activity was released in the presence of sucrose, suggesting that the mode of attachment and release of the S. salivarius FTF in S. gordonii was similar to that in its native host. PMID:8331080

  4. Hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathogenesis and update of interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Marina S; Exeni, Ramón A; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2009-08-01

    The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, accounting for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in Argentina. Despite extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in Argentinean contribution. The hope that a better understanding of transmission dynamics and pathogenesis of this disease will produce better therapies to prevent the acute mortality and the long-term morbidity of HUS is the driving force for intensified research.

  5. Use of Eculizumab in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Complicating Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermea, Rene S; Sharma, Niharika; Cohen, Kenneth; Liarski, Vladimir M

    2016-09-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by the presence of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and end-organ injury. In this report, we describe two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with findings compatible with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, complicated by acute kidney injury that was refractory to conventional therapies. Both patients exhibited a response to eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement protein C5, with stabilization of their platelet count. On 1-year follow-up from their initial presentation, their hematologic disease remained in remission without recurrence. PMID:27556240

  6. Hemolytic anemia as first presentation of Wilson's disease with uncommon ATP7B mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xing-Nong; Mao, Li-Ping; Lou, Yin-Jun; Tong, Hong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism and the main manifestations are liver and brain disorders. Hemolytic anemia is an unusual complication of WD. We describe a 15-year-old girl who developed hemolytic anemia as the first manifestation of Wilson's disease. An Arg952Lys mutation was found in exon 12 of the ATP7B gene, which is uncommon among Chinese Han individuals. From this case and reviews, we can achieve a better understanding of WD. Besides, we may conclude that the probable diagnosis of WD should be considered in young patients with unexplained hemolytic anemia, especially in patients with hepatic and/or neurologic disorder.

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Periodontal Streptococcus Constellatus and Streptococcus Intermedius Clinical Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius in subgingival dental plaque biofilms may contribute to forms of periodontitis that resist treatment with conventional mechanical root debridement/surgical procedures and may additionally participate in some extraoral infections. B

  8. Adhesion of streptococcus rattus and streptococcus mutans to metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branting, C.; Linder, L.E.; Sund, M.-L.; Oden, A.; Wiatr-Adamczak, E.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of Streptococcus rattus BHT and Streptococcus mutans IB to metal specimens of amalgam, silver, tin and copper was studied using (6-/sup 3/H) thymidine labeled cells. In the standard assay the metal specimens were suspended by a nylon thread in an adhesion solution containing a chemically defined bacterial growth medium (FMC), sucrose, and radiolabeled bacteria. Maximum amounts of adhering bacteria were obtained after about 100 min of incubation. Saturation of the metal specimens with bacteria was not observed. Both strains also adhered in the absence of sucrose, indicating that glucan formation was not necessary for adhesion. However, in the presence of glucose, adhesion was only 26-45% of that observed in the presence of equimolar sucrose. Sucrose-dependent stimulation of adhesion seemed to be due to increased cell-to-cell adhesion capacity. Isolated radiolabeled water-insoluble and water-soluble polysaccharides produced from sucrose by S. rattus BHT were not adsorbed to the metal surfaces.

  9. The enhanced pneumococcal LAMP assay: a clinical tool for the diagnosis of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease in developed and developing countries. We studied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP technique to assess its suitability for detecting S. pneumoniae nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an improved LAMP assay targeting the lytA gene (Streptococcus pneumoniae [Sp] LAMP. The analytical specificity of the primers was validated by using 32 reference strains (10 Streptococcus and seven non-Streptococcus species plus 25 clinical alpha-hemolytic streptococcal strains, including four S. pneumoniae strains and 21 other strains (3 S. oralis, 17 S. mitis, and one Streptococcus species harboring virulence factor-encoding genes (lytA or ply. Within 30 minutes, the assay could detect as few as 10 copies of both purified DNA and spiked CSF specimens with greater sensitivity than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The linear determination range for this assay is 10 to 1,000,000 microorganisms per reaction mixture using real-time turbidimetry. We evaluated the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the Sp LAMP assay using 106 randomly selected CSF specimens from children with suspected meningitis in Korea, China and Vietnam. For comparison, CSF specimens were also tested against conventional PCR and culture tests. The detection rate of the LAMP method was substantially higher than the rates of PCR and culture tests. In this small sample, relative to the LAMP assay, the clinical sensitivity of PCR and culture tests was 54.5% and 33.3%, respectively, while clinical specificity of the two tests was 100%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared to PCR, Sp LAMP detected S. pneumoniae with higher analytical and clinical sensitivity. This specific and sensitive LAMP method offers significant advantages for screening patients on a population basis and for diagnosis in clinical settings.

  10. Auto immune hemolytic anemia in a child precipitated by chicken pox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billoo, Samina Shamim; Jamalvi, Syed Waseem

    2008-05-01

    Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) is a rare entity in children. We report a case of an adolescent girl with AIHA, which was precipitated by chicken pox. Clinical course over 3 years, till remission is described. PMID:18541094

  11. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-03-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  12. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-01-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  13. Rapid tube CAMP test for identification of Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B).

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, E. A.; Tapsall, J W; Smith, D D

    1980-01-01

    A rapid CAMP test for the presumptive identification of Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B) is described. Sheep erythrocytes, sensitized by staphylococcal beta-lysin and suspended in phosphate-buffered saline, were used to determine the lytic capacity of the neutralized supernatant fluids of 4-h broth cultures of streptococci being tested. A total of 96.2% of 130 group B streptococci gave positive CAMP tests, that is, lysis of the sheep erythrocytes after 10 min of exposure of strep...

  14. The Cost Effectiveness of Rapid Test in the Diagnosis of Pharyngitis Caused By Group a Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Vahaboğlu, Haluk; Mülazımoğlu, Lütfiye; Dodanlı, Senay; Yıldırım, İpek; Avkan, Vildan; Taser, Banu; Peker, İsmail

    1993-01-01

    Group A beta haemolytic streptococcus GABHS is the leading etiology of bacterial pharyngitis which may cause acute rheumatic fever ARF unless being treated properly Accurately diagnosing streptococsic pharyngitis is very important in order to prevent the development of ARF Culture and rapid antigen detection tests are commonly used methods In this study 410 patients were simultaneously studied by culture and Test Pack Strep A a widespread used rapid antigen test when compared to culture TSA w...

  15. Commensal Streptococci Serve as a Reservoir for β-Lactam Resistance Genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Anders; Valdórsson, Oskar; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hollingshead, Susan; Kilian, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, septicemia, and middle ear infections. The incidence of S. pneumoniae isolates that are not susceptible to penicillin has risen worldwide and may be above 20% in some countries. Beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in pneumococci is associated with significant sequence polymorphism in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Commensal streptococci, especially S. mitis and S. oralis, have been identified as putative donors of mutate...

  16. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  17. Effects of Ca2+ on refolding of the recombinant hemolytic lectin CEL-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamatsu, Keigo; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2009-05-01

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from Cucumaria echinata. Although recombinant CEL-III (rCEL-III) expressed in Escherichia coli showed very weak hemolytic activity compared with native protein, it was considerably enhanced by refolding in the presence of Ca(2+). This suggests that Ca(2+) supported correct folding of the carbohydrate-binding domains of rCEL-III, leading to effective binding to the cell surface and subsequent self-oligomerization. PMID:19420692

  18. A Rare Case; Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-jkb

    OpenAIRE

    İlknur Tolunay; Meral Oruç; Orkun Tolunay

    2015-01-01

    Jka and Jkb antibodies (Kidd blood group system) can cause acute and delayed type transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn. Jka and Jkb antibodies are seen after events like blood transfusions, pregnancy, abortion and curettage. Hemolytic disease of newborn related to Kidd-Jkb incompatibility is rare and mostly has a good prognosis. The patient was consulted to our department because of 20 hours of jaundice after birth. He was treated with intensive phot...

  19. Hemolytic Anemia as a Presenting Feature of Wilson’s Disease: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sunita; Toppo, Anupa; B Rath; Harbhajanka, Aparna; P Lalita Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    Wilson’s disease is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism causing severe damage to vital organs. Liver and brain disorders are the main manifestations. Severe hemolytic anemia is an unusual complication of Wilson’s disease. We present a case who developed spherocytic acute hemolytic anemia (Coomb’s negative) as the initial manifestation of Wilson’s disease. On examination Kayser- Fleischer ring was found. Laboratory data supported a diagnosis of Wilson’s disease.

  20. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weidong; Zhang, Naisheng; Cui, Weimin; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2011-11-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world. The hemolytic substances produced by K. mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates. We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K. mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae ( Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K. mikimotoi. The hemolytic toxins from K. mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and 1 lipid. Waterborne clues from P. donghaiense and A. tamarense inhibited the growth of K. mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins. Conversely, K. mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P. donghaiense and A. tamarense. In addition, the ingestion of K. mikimotoi by M. mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K. mikimotoi. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances. K. mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity. The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability, but also on the risk of predation. Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K. mikimotoi.

  1. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Weidong; ZHANG Naisheng; CUI Weimin; XU Yanyan; LI Hongye; LIU Jiesheng

    2011-01-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world.The hemolytic substances produced by K.mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates.We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K.mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography.In addition,we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae (Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K.mikimotoi.The hemolytic toxins from K.mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and I lipid.Waterbome clues from P.donghaiense and A.tamarense inhibited the growth of K.mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins.Conversely,K.mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P.donghaiense and A.tamarense.In addition,the ingestion of K.mikimotoi by M.mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K.mikimotoi.Taken together,our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances.K.mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity.The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability,but also on the risk of predation.Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K.mikimotoi.

  2. Streptococcus suis infection: Clinical manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Dragojlović Julijana; Milošević Branko; Šašić Neda; Pelemiš Miomir; Šašić Milan

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus suis is a bacterium causing a disease in pigs and rarely in humans. This zoonosis is mostly found as a sporadic disease in individuals that were in contact with the affected or infected pigs: farmers, veterinarians and workers engaged in fresh pork processing. It is assumed that the bacterium enters the body through a cut abrasion in the skin. Initially, the condition resembles a flu, followed by signs of bacteriemia and sepsis. The most frequent clinical manifestat...

  3. Bacterial meningitis by streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal-Velásquez Tatiana Paola; Cortés-Daza César Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: bacterial meningitis is an infectious disease considered a medicalemergency. The timely management has an important impact on the evolution of thedisease. Streptococcus agalactiae, a major causative agent of severe infections innewborns can colonize different tissues, including the central nervous system.Case report: Male patient 47 years old from rural areas, with work activity as amilker of cattle, referred to tertiary care, with disorientation, neck stiffness, and grandmal se...

  4. Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis: a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Keefe, G P

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae continues to be a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle and a source of economic loss for the industry. Veterinarians are often asked to provide information on herd level control and eradication of S. agalactiae mastitis. This review collects and collates relevant publications on the subject. The literature search was conducted in 1993 on the Agricola database. Articles related to S. agalactiae epidemiology, pathogen identification techniques, milk quali...

  5. Cholesterol-dependent hemolytic activity of Passiflora quadrangularis leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Yuldasheva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants used in traditional medicine are rich sources of hemolysins and cytolysins, which are potential bactericidal and anticancer drugs. The present study demonstrates for the first time the presence of a hemolysin in the leaves of Passiflora quadrangularis L. This hemolysin is heat stable, resistant to trypsin treatment, has the capacity to froth, and acts very rapidly. The hemolysin activity is dose-dependent, with a slope greater than 1 in a double-logarithmic plot. Polyethylene glycols of high molecular weight were able to reduce the rate of hemolysis, while liposomes containing cholesterol completely inhibited it. In contrast, liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine were ineffective. The Passiflora hemolysin markedly increased the conductance of planar lipid bilayers containing cholesterol but was ineffective in cholesterol-free bilayers. Successive extraction of the crude hemolysin with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol resulted in a 10-fold purification, with the hemolytic activity being recovered in the n-butanol fraction. The data suggest that membrane cholesterol is the primary target for this hemolysin and that several hemolysin molecules form a large transmembrane water pore. The properties of the Passiflora hemolysin, such as its frothing ability, positive color reaction with vanillin, selective extraction with n-butanol, HPLC profile, cholesterol-dependent membrane susceptibility, formation of a stable complex with cholesterol, and rapid erythrocyte lysis kinetics indicate that it is probably a saponin.

  6. Neonatal Sulfhemoglobinemia and Hemolytic Anemia Associated With Intestinal Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kiera; Ryan, Clodagh; Dempsey, Eugene M; O'Toole, Paul W; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Sulfhemoglobinemia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood. It is typically drug-induced and may cause hypoxia, end-organ damage, and death through oxygen deprivation. We present here a case of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia in a 7-day-old preterm infant complicated by hemolytic anemia. Microbiota compositional analysis of fecal samples to investigate the origin of hydrogen sulphide revealed the presence of Morganella morganii at a relative abundance of 38% of the total fecal microbiota at the time of diagnosis. M morganii was not detected in the fecal samples of 40 age-matched control preterm infants. M morganii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause serious infection, particularly in immunocompromised hosts such as neonates. Strains of M morganii are capable of producing hydrogen sulphide, and virulence factors include the production of a diffusible α-hemolysin. The infant in this case survived intact through empirical oral and intravenous antibiotic therapy, probiotic administration, and red blood cell transfusions. This coincided with a reduction in the relative abundance of M morganii to 3%. Neonatologists should have a high index of suspicion for intestinal pathogens in cases of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia and consider empirical treatment of the intestinal microbiota in this potentially lethal condition.

  7. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Recurrence after Renal Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouatou, Yassine; Bacchi, Véronique Frémeaux; Villard, Jean; Moll, Solange; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Hadaya, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Risk for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) recurrence after renal transplantation is low with an isolated membrane cofactor protein mutation (MCP). We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a MCP who underwent kidney transplantation with a good evolution at 12 months. At 15 and 35 months, 2 episodes of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), after a miscarriage and a preeclampsia, were misinterpreted as triggered by tacrolimus. After each episode however serum creatinine returned to baseline. Five years after transplantation, she had a self-limited rhinosinusitis followed 3 weeks later by an oliguric renal failure. Her complement profile was normal. Graft biopsy showed C3 glomerulonephritis with no “humps” on electron microscopy. No significant renal function improvement followed methylprednisolone pulsing. A second biopsy showed severe acute TMA lesions with C3 glomerular deposits. Despite weekly eculizumab for 1 month, dialysis was resumed. A new workup identified the “at-risk” complement factor H haplotype. Thus, aHUS recurrence should be ruled out in aHUS patients considered at low recurrence risk when a TMA is found in graft biopsy. Prompt eculizumab therapy should be considered to avoid graft loss as aHUS recurrence can first present as a C3 glomerulonephritis. PMID:27500215

  8. Hemorrhagic retinopathy in an infant with hemolytic-uremic syndrome

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    João Caetano Ávila Geraissate

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 23-month-old female infant with a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and hemorrhagic retinopathy. The patient had a past history of abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and acute renal failure. On ophthalmologic examination, indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed extensive areas of flame-shaped hemorrhage, cotton wool spots, macular edema and optic nerve head neovascularization in both eyes. Fluorescein angiography showed severe bilateral retinal ischemia and neovascularization leakage in disk. The patient, who had the visual acuity of 20/1000 in the right eye (OD and 20/540 in the left eye (OS at the first examination, was treated with panretinal photocoagulation (PRP and presented at the end of the 6th month of follow-up improvement to 20/540 in OD and 20/270 in OS. There was also a regression of disc neovascularization, hemorrhages and macular edema. Despite intense retinal ischemia, there were no complications related to angiogenesis such as vitreous hemorrhage and/or neovascular glaucoma. We describe, in this report, the association between hemorrhagic retinopathy with features of Purtscher-like disease and HUS.

  9. Remodeling of the Streptococcus agalactiae transcriptome in response to growth temperature.

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    Laurent Mereghetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To act as a commensal bacterium and a pathogen in humans and animals, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus, GBS must be able to monitor and adapt to different environmental conditions. Temperature variation is a one of the most commonly encountered variables. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the extent to which GBS modify gene expression in response to temperatures encountered in the various hosts, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome analysis of organisms grown at 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C. We identified extensive transcriptome remodeling at various stages of growth, especially in the stationary phase (significant transcript changes occurred for 25% of the genes. A large proportion of genes involved in metabolism was up-regulated at 30 degrees C in stationary phase. Conversely, genes up-regulated at 40 degrees C relative to 30 degrees C include those encoding virulence factors such as hemolysins and extracellular secreted proteins with LPXTG motifs. Over-expression of hemolysins was linked to larger zones of hemolysis and enhanced hemolytic activity at 40 degrees C. A key theme identified by our study was that genes involved in purine metabolism and iron acquisition were significantly up-regulated at 40 degrees C. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Growth of GBS in vitro at different temperatures resulted in extensive remodeling of the transcriptome, including genes encoding proven and putative virulence genes. The data provide extensive new leads for molecular pathogenesis research.

  10. Streptococcus suis infection: Clinical manifestations

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    Dragojlović Julijana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Streptococcus suis is a bacterium causing a disease in pigs and rarely in humans. This zoonosis is mostly found as a sporadic disease in individuals that were in contact with the affected or infected pigs: farmers, veterinarians and workers engaged in fresh pork processing. It is assumed that the bacterium enters the body through a cut abrasion in the skin. Initially, the condition resembles a flu, followed by signs of bacteriemia and sepsis. The most frequent clinical manifestation of Streptococcus suis infection is meningitis, leading to hearing loss in over 75% of patients, and subsequent arthritis, endophtalmitis, endocarditis and pneumonia. Toxic shock syndrome with hemorhagic manifestations rarely develops. Material and methods This study included five male patients aged 22 to 63 years treated in the Intensive Care Unit of the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases in Belgrade, due to Streptococcus suis infection. The aim of this study was to point to the existence of this bacteria in our environment, to describe clinical manifestations of the disease and to point out the importance of its prevention. Results All patients had epidemiological evidence of being in contact with pork meat. There were no data about diseased pigs. The estimated incubation period was 4 to 8 days. All patients had meningeal signs. Clinical symptoms included shivering, fever, vomiting, headache, malaise, vertigo and tinitus. Three patients presented with alerterd level of awareness. Four patients developed very severe bilateral hearing impairemnt, whereas one endophtalmtis and one developed endocarditis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was opalescent in four patients, and only one patient presented with clear CSF. CSF examination showed typical changes characeteristic for bacterial meningitis. Streptoccocus suis was isolated in CSF in all patients, and in one patient the bacteria was isolated in blood as well. All patients underwent treatment with

  11. Méningo-encéphalite à Streptococcus agalactiae chez l'adulte non immunodéprimé

    OpenAIRE

    Rafai, Mostafa; Chouaib, Naoufal; Zidouh, Saad; Bakkali, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae est un Streptocoque beta-hémolytique du groupe B (SGB), c'est un germe commensal occasionnel de la peau, du tube digestif et des voies génito-urinaires. Nous rapportons un cas inhabituel d'une méningo-encéphalite due au Streptococcus agalactiae (SGB) multisensible à l'antibiogramme chez un sujet adulte immunocompétent admis au service des urgences pour prise en charge de troubles de conscience fébrile. L’évolution clinique et biologique à J10 était favorable et le pat...

  12. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  13. Group A Streptococcus endometritis following medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Poyart, Claire; Kernéis, Solen

    2014-07-01

    Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

  14. Streptococcus pyogenes toxic-shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, R.; M Diogo; Carvalho, A.; Pimentel, T.; J. Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been an exponential increase in invasive infections caused by Streptococcus ß hemolyticcus group A. In about one third of cases they are complicated by toxic shock syndrome, characterized by septic shock and multiorgan failure. The authors, by their rarity, report a case of bacteraemia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes complicated by toxic shock syndrome.

  15. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. PMID:27581854

  16. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  17. Structural preferences of beta-galactoside-reactive lectins on Actinomyces viscosus T14V and Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45.

    OpenAIRE

    McIntire, F. C.; Crosby, L. K.; Barlow, J J; Matta, K L

    1983-01-01

    Specificities of lectins on Actinomyces viscosus T14V and Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 were compared by measuring the abilities of D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, 14 beta-D-galacto-oligosaccharides, and 2 beta-D-fuco-oligosaccharides to inhibit coaggregation between Streptococcus sanguis 34 and each actinomycete. Inhibition profiles were similar, but WVU45 was significantly more sensitive to several inhibitors. D-Galactose-beta(1 leads to 3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine glycosides were mos...

  18. Genomic comparison between pathogenic Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from Nile tilapia in Thailand and fish-derived ST7 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayansamruaj, Pattanapon; Pirarat, Nopadon; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Rodkhum, Channarong

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, or Group B streptococcus (GBS), is a highly virulent pathogen in aquatic animals, causing huge mortalities worldwide. In Thailand, the serotype Ia, β-hemolytic GBS, belonging to sequence type (ST) 7 of clonal complex (CC) 7, was found to be the major cause of streptococcosis outbreaks in fish farms. In this study, we performed an in silico genomic comparison, aiming to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between the pathogenic fish strains of Thai ST7 and other ST7 from different hosts and geographical origins. In general, the genomes of Thai ST7 strains are closely related to other fish ST7s, as the core genome is shared by 92-95% of any individual fish ST7 genome. Among the fish ST7 genomes, we observed only small dissimilarities, based on the analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), surface protein markers, insertions sequence (IS) elements and putative virulence genes. The phylogenetic tree based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the core genome sequences clearly categorized the ST7 strains according to their geographical and host origins, with the human ST7 being genetically distant from other fish ST7 strains. A pan-genome analysis of ST7 strains detected a 48-kb gene island specifically in the Thai ST7 isolates. The orientations and predicted amino acid sequences of the genes in the island closely matched those of Tn5252, a streptococcal conjugative transposon, in GBS 2603V/R serotype V, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus suis. Thus, it was presumed that Thai ST7 acquired this Tn5252 homologue from related streptococci. The close phylogenetic relationship between the fish ST7 strains suggests that these strains were derived from a common ancestor and have diverged in different geographical regions and in different hosts. PMID:26455417

  19. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

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    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. This patient recovered with blood transfusion, antibiotics, steroids, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Sickle cell patients have a known predisposition to bacterial infection, particularly pneumococcal infection. The most si gnificant advance in the therapy of sickle cell anemia has been the introduction of hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea should be considered in patients experiencing repeated episodes of acute chest syndrome. But in this patient as this is first episode, hydroxyu rea was not given and he recovered well.

  20. Shigatoxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: current molecular mechanisms and future therapies

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    Keir LS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay S Keir,1 Stephen D Marks,2 Jon Jin Kim21Academic Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol; 2Department of Paediatric Nephrology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in childhood. Ninety percent of cases are secondary to gastrointestinal infection with shigatoxin-producing bacteria. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of shigatoxin leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome and the emerging role of the complement system and vascular endothelial growth factor in its pathogenesis. We also review the evidence for treatment options to date, in particular antibiotics, plasma exchange, and immunoadsorption, and link this to the molecular pathology. Finally, we discuss future avenues of treatment, including shigatoxin-binding agents and complement inhibitors, such as eculizumab.Keywords: hemolytic uremic syndrome, shigatoxin, diarrhea, Escherichia coli, complement, alternative pathway, eculizumab

  1. A case of severe preeclampsia diagnosed as post-partum hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-qing; WANG Jing; JIANG Yuan-hui; YE Rong-hua; ZHAO Yang-yu

    2012-01-01

    Post-partum hemolytic uremic syndrome (PHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia,renal dysfunction,and low platelets after birth with rapid progression and poor prognosis.Here,we reported a rare case of severe preeclampsia diagnosed as hemolytic uremic syndrome after birth.The patient was diagnosed with PHUS and underwent intermittent plasma exchange with supportive treatment including glucocorticoid injections and transfusion of suspended red blood cells.After these treatments,the patient experienced no apparent remission and chronic renal dysfunction occurred on her.PHUS is a severe emergency with acute onset,rapid progress,and poor prognosis.Early detection,diagnosis,and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis.

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

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    Rajesh Sonani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct were high. This patient′s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT, antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2 nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4 th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  3. Structure and molecular characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide 10F by carbohydrate engineering in Streptococcus oralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinghua; Shelat, Nirav Y; Bush, C Allen; Cisar, John O

    2010-07-30

    Although closely related at the molecular level, the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of serotype 10F Streptococcus pneumoniae and coaggregation receptor polysaccharide (RPS) of Streptococcus oralis C104 have distinct ecological roles. CPS prevents phagocytosis of pathogenic S. pneumoniae, whereas RPS of commensal S. oralis functions as a receptor for lectin-like adhesins on other members of the dental plaque biofilm community. Results from high resolution NMR identified the recognition region of S. oralis RPS (i.e. Galfbeta1-6GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha) in the hexasaccharide repeat of S. pneumoniae CPS10F. The failure of this polysaccharide to support fimbriae-mediated adhesion of Actinomyces naeslundii was explained by the position of Galf, which occurred as a branch in CPS10F rather than within the linear polysaccharide chain, as in RPS. Carbohydrate engineering of S. oralis RPS with wzy from S. pneumoniae attributed formation of the Galf branch in CPS10F to the linkage of adjacent repeating units through sub terminal GalNAc in Galfbeta1-6GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha rather than through terminal Galf, as in RPS. A gene (wcrD) from serotype 10A S. pneumoniae was then used to engineer a linear surface polysaccharide in S. oralis that was identical to RPS except for the presence of a beta1-3 linkage between Galf and GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha. This polysaccharide also failed to support adhesion of A. naeslundii, thereby establishing the essential role of beta1-6-linked Galf in recognition of adjacent GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha in wild-type RPS. These findings, which illustrate a molecular approach for relating bacterial polysaccharide structure to function, provide insight into the possible evolution of S. oralis RPS from S. pneumoniae CPS. PMID:20507989

  4. Intervention and Prevention of Hereditary Hemolytic Disorders in Two Ethnic Communities of Sundargarh District of Orissa, India: An Experience from KAP Studies

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    Balgir RS

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic disorders are important public health challenges in India. They cause a high degree of morbidity, mortality and fetal wastage in vulnerable communities. Tradition-bound-psychosocial influences are detrimental to the process of prevention. This study was designed to create awareness, motivate, and sensitize two major vulnerable tribal communities: Bhuyan and Kharia for hemoglobin and allied hemolytic disorders in addition to imparting prospective and retrospective genetic/marriage counseling. Bhuyan and Kharia tribal people in Orissa live in clusters practicing inter-village tribal endogamy and clan exogamy. For the present study, random sampling procedure for the selection of whole village was followed. Imparting of education, motivation and sensitization for carrier detection were carried out through IEC materials, holding interactive meetings and discussions at district, block and village levels. Both prospective and retrospective intervention and genetic/marriage counseling was done through the local PHC doctor. The pre- and post-intervention knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP studies were conducted. Tribal people were not knowing the signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease (2.1% and beta-thalassemia (1.0%, but after IEC, their knowledge was considerably improved (67.8%, 56.4%, respectively. Sickle cell patient needs treatment (37.6% like folic acid, blood transfusion, etc. Beta-thalassemia is disease causes bloodlessness and is a transfusion dependent (73.2%. All patients of thalassemia major or sickle cell disease have carrier parents and carriers do not suffer from any clinical ailments. After intervention, it was known that G-6-PD is an enzyme, which helps in glucose metabolism of red cells (76.4% and its hereditary deficiency causes hemolytic anemia, jaundice and black urination (73.8% in malaria cases when anti-malarials are administered. Methodical and prudent intervention and preventive strategies found

  5. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Punia; Kevin Lee; Edward He; Sumit Mukherjee; Andrew Mancuso; Probal Banerjee; Nan-Loh Yang

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structur...

  6. Anti Rh Hemolytic Disease due to Anti C Antibody: Is Testing for Anti D Antibodies Enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Negi, Gita; Singh, Gaur Dushyant

    2011-01-01

    Rh blood group system is a complex blood group system. Rh antibodies are produced in Rh negative individuals following exposure to foreign RBCs after transfusion or pregnancy. Anti C is a rare cause of hemolytic disease of newborn and is very scarcely reported in the literature. The aim of the present case report of Hemolytic disease caused by Anti C antibody is to bring out the fact that antibodies other than anti D should be considered in cases that give a suggestive history but no evidence...

  7. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    OpenAIRE

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman; Rapiaah Mustaffa; Noraida Ramli; Diggi, Sirajo A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother's red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting wit...

  8. Antibody binding to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis cell fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Katherine A.; Bowden, George H.; Richmond, Dorothy A.; Sheridan, Michael J.; Cole, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To determine which cell fraction(s) of Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 serve as the best source of antigens recognized by salivary SIgA antibodies in infants. Design Whole cells of 38 reference and wild-type isolates of Streptococcus mitis, S. oralis, S. gordonii, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and E. faecalis were fractionated into cell walls CW), protease-treated cell walls (PTCW), cell membranes (CM) and cell protein (CP). Whole cells and these fractions were tested for binding by rabbit anti-S. mitis SK145 and anti-S. oralis SK100 sera, and also by salivary SIgA antibodies from infants and adults. Results Anti-SK145 and anti-SK100 sera bound whole cells and fractions of all strains of S. mitis and S. oralis variably. Cluster analysis of antibody binding data placed the strains into S. mitis, S. oralis and ‘Non-S. mitis/non-S. oralis’ clusters. Antigens from CW and CM best discriminated S. mitis from S. oralis. CM bound the most infant salivary SIgA antibody and PTCW bound the least. In contrast, adult salivary SIgA antibody bound all of the cell fractions and at higher levels. Conclusions Presumably the relatively short period of immune stimulation and immunological immaturity in infants, in contrast to adults, result in low levels of salivary SIgA antibody that preferentially bind CM of S. mitis but not PTCW. By utilizing isolated cell walls and membranes as sources of antigens for proteomics it may be possible to identify antigens common to oral streptococci and dissect the fine specificity of salivary SIgA antibodies induced by oral colonization by S. mitis. PMID:17904095

  9. Sepsis neonatal por Estreptococos Pyogenes Neonatal Sepsis by Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Gilberto Rodríguez-Herrera

    2009-09-01

    mechanical ventilation for several days on different occasions. He had exudative pleural effusion and hypoxic ischemic seizures. Later on, his blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptococcus pyogenes or Streptococcus β- hemolytic group A infection, used to be a common entity in the beginning of the past century, it was commonly associated with puerperal infections and newborn infections, but its incidence declined and nowadays, is uncommon during the neonatal period. Its clinical manifestations could vary from chronic omphalitis up to a low grade septicemia or fulminant meningitis. Since its incidence has declined, at the present time; is an unusual infection of the neonatal period. Ampicillin and gentamicin are currently recommended as first-line antimicrobials, ampicillin replacing the previously recommended penicillin.

  10. A novel quantitative hemolytic assay coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphisms analysis enabled early diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and identified unique predisposing mutations in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yoshida

    Full Text Available For thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs, the diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is made by ruling out Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC-associated HUS and ADAMTS13 activity-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP, often using the exclusion criteria for secondary TMAs. Nowadays, assays for ADAMTS13 activity and evaluation for STEC infection can be performed within a few hours. However, a confident diagnosis of aHUS often requires comprehensive gene analysis of the alternative complement activation pathway, which usually takes at least several weeks. However, predisposing genetic abnormalities are only identified in approximately 70% of aHUS. To facilitate the diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS, we describe a quantitative hemolytic assay using sheep red blood cells (RBCs and human citrated plasma, spiked with or without a novel inhibitory anti-complement factor H (CFH monoclonal antibody. Among 45 aHUS patients in Japan, 24% (11/45 had moderate-to-severe (≥50% hemolysis, whereas the remaining 76% (34/45 patients had mild or no hemolysis (<50%. The former group is largely attributed to CFH-related abnormalities, and the latter group has C3-p.I1157T mutations (16/34, which were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis. Thus, a quantitative hemolytic assay coupled with RFLP analysis enabled the early diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS in 60% (27/45 of patients in Japan within a week of presentation. We hypothesize that this novel quantitative hemolytic assay would be more useful in a Caucasian population, who may have a higher proportion of CFH mutations than Japanese patients.

  11. Complete structure of the polysaccharide from Streptococcus sanguis J22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. (Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago (USA)); Cisar, J.O. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-09

    The cell wall polysaccharides of certain oral streptococci such as Streptococcus sanguis strains 34 and J22, although immunologically distinct, act as receptors for the fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus T14V. The authors report the complete covalent structure of the polysaccharide from S. sanguis J22 which is composed of a heptasaccharide subunit linked by phosphodiester bonds. The repeating subunit, which contains {alpha}-GalNAc, {alpha}-rhamnose, {beta}-rhamnose, {beta}-glucose, and {beta}-galactose all in the pyranoside form and {beta}-galactofuranose, is compared with the previously published structure of the polysaccharide from strain 34. The structure has been determined almost exclusively by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the polysaccharides from both strains 34 and J22 have been completely assigned. The stereochemistry of pyranosides was assigned from J{sub H-H} values determined from phase-sensitive COSY spectra, and acetamido sugars were assigned by correlation of the resonances of the amide {sup 1}H with the sugar ring protons. The {sup 13}C spectra were assigned by {sup 1}H-detected multiple-quantum correlation (HMQC) spectra, and the assignments were confirmed by {sup 1}H-detected multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectra. The positions of the glycosidic linkages were assigned by detection of three-bond {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C correlation across the glycosidic linkage in the HMBC spectra. The positions of the phosphodiester linkages were determined by splittings observed in the {sup 13}C resonances due to {sup 31}P coupling and also by {sup 1}H-detected {sup 31}P correlation spectroscopy.

  12. Infections Associated with Streptococcus intermedius in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Howard S

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a viridans Streptococcus belonging to the Anginosus group. In the past 7 years, it has been associated with abscesses in 48 children, 40% of whom had complicated and/or life-threatening illness. It was the sole pathogen in 35 cases. Seventy-five percent of the infections occurred in winter and spring. None occurred in infants younger than 1 year.

  13. Diverse Virulent Pneumophages Infect Streptococcus mitis

    OpenAIRE

    Siham Ouennane; Philippe Leprohon; Sylvain Moineau

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis has emerged as one of the leading causes of bacterial endocarditis and is related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic resistance has also increased among strains of S. mitis and S. pneumoniae. Phages are being reinvestigated as alternatives to antibiotics for managing infections. In this study, the two virulent phages Cp-1 (Podoviridae) and Dp-1 (Siphoviridae), previously isolated from S. pneumoniae, were found to also infect S. mitis. Microbiological assays showed tha...

  14. Cloning of Minor Autolysin of Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Mahboobi, R. (MSc); Fallah Mehrabadi, J. (PhD); MR Pourmand; R Mashhadi; Haddadi, A. (MD

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Increased antibiotic resistant strains and inadequacy of current vaccines against pneumococcal infections necessitate the study of novel protein antigens. It seems that minor autolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae may have antigenicity. Thus, we aimed at cloning its gene for the first time. Material and Methods: After DNA extraction of Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619), Specific primers were designed for amplifying minor autolysin gene fragment, using PCR. The pur...

  15. Cervicale spondylodiscitis veroorzaakt door Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Weynants, Luc; Weynants, Laurens; Rimbaut, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The medical history of a previously perfectly healthy 45-year-old male patient with acute cervical pain is presented. From cultures of the discus C5-C6, Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated. The patient was treated with penicillin and clindamycin, and recovered quickly. Streptococcus agalactiae is reported as a cause of invasive infections in neonati and pregnant women, but in recent years, an increasing number of infections have been reported in adults. One of the reasons may be that, nowad...

  16. The effect of mango and neem extract on four organisms causing dental caries: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivavius, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus sanguis: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Chewing twigs of the mango or neem tree is a common way of cleaning the teeth in the rural and semi-urban population. These twigs are also believed to possess medicinal properties. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of these chewing sticks on the microorganisms Streptococcus mutans , Streptococcus salivarius , Streptococcus mitis , and Streptococcus sanguis which are involved in the development of dental caries. An additional objective was to identify an inexpensive, simple, and effective method of preventing and controlling dental caries. Materials and Methods: The sticks were sun dried, ground into a coarse powder, and weighed into 5 gm, 10 gm, and 50 gm amounts. These were added to 100 ml of deionized distilled water. After soaking for 48 h at 4°C, the water was filtered. The filtrate was inoculated onto blood agar plates containing individual species of microorganisms and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Results: Mango extract, at 50% concentration, showed maximum zone of inhibition on Streptococcus mitis . Neem extract produced the maximum zone of inhibition on Streptococcus mutans at 50% concentration. Even at 5% concentration neem extract showed some inhibition of growth for all the four species of organisms. Interpretation and Conclusion: A combination of neem and mango chewing sticks may provide the maximum benefit. We recommend the use of both the chewing sticks.

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility in Neonatal Invasive Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae in a 2-Year Nationwide Surveillance Study in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Fluegge, Kirsten; Supper, Sven; Siedler, Anette; Berner, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 296 invasive neonatal group B streptococcus isolates from a nationwide 2-year surveillance study in Germany was investigated. All isolates were susceptible to beta-lactams, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and vancomycin. Erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was found in 10.1 and 5.7%, respectively. The ermB, ermTR, or mefA gene was detected in all but one of the erythromycin-resistant isolates.

  18. Influence of clavulanic acid on the activity of amoxicillin against an experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae-Staphylococcus aureus mixed respiratory infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G.M; Boon, R J; Beale, A S

    1990-01-01

    An experimental respiratory infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae was established in weanling rats by intrabronchial instillation. Treatment of this infection with amoxicillin rapidly eliminated the pneumococci from the lung tissue. A beta-lactamase-producing strain of Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in a similar manner, did not persist adequately in the lungs long enough to permit a reasonable assessment of the therapy, but staphylococcal survival was extended in the lungs of r...

  19. Pharmacokinetics and bacteriological efficacy of cefoperazone, ceftriaxone, and moxalactam in experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    McCracken, G H; Nelson, J.D.; Grimm, L

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bacteriological efficacy of cefoperazone, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and moxalactam were evaluated in the experimental rabbit meningitis model of Haemophilus influenzae type b or Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. The cerebrospinal fluid penetration of these beta-lactam antibiotics was from 3 to 14% and was greater in Haemophilus-infected that in pneumococcus-infected animals. With the exception of moxalactam, the antibacterial activity in cerebrospinal fluid and chang...

  20. Eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates need for dialysis in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohanian M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Maro Ohanian, Christian Cable, Kathleen HalkaDepartment of Hematology and Oncology, Scott and White Healthcare, The Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USAAbstract: This case report describes how eculizumab reversed neurologic impairment and improved renal damage in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. A 50-year-old female, after presenting with diarrhea and abdominal pain, developed pancolitis, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. The patient underwent total abdominal colectomy. Pathology confirmed ischemic colitis with scattered mesenteric microthrombi. Due to mental and respiratory decline, she remained intubated. Continuous venovenous hemodialysis was initiated. Renal failure, neurologic changes, hemolysis, thrombotic microangiopathy, and low complement levels all suggested atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab 900 mg was administered intravenously on hospital day 6 and continued weekly for four doses followed by maintenance therapy. She recovered neurologically and renally after the third dose, and hematologically by the sixth dose. Her recovery has been sustained on long-term eculizumab treatment. In severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates the need for dialysis. The optimal duration of treatment with eculizumab remains to be determined.Keywords: eculizumab, thrombotic microangiopathy, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

  1. A Rare Case; Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-jkb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlknur Tolunay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jka and Jkb antibodies (Kidd blood group system can cause acute and delayed type transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn. Jka and Jkb antibodies are seen after events like blood transfusions, pregnancy, abortion and curettage. Hemolytic disease of newborn related to Kidd-Jkb incompatibility is rare and mostly has a good prognosis. The patient was consulted to our department because of 20 hours of jaundice after birth. He was treated with intensive phototherapy due to the high level of total-value bilirubin (17,6 mg/dl. Mother and patient were both B Rh (+. After direct coombs IgG +++ and C3d ++ values, further investigations were performed and mother had indirect coombs ++ and kidd antigen+. So, the newborn was diagnosed with hemolytic disease of newborn due to kidd incompatibility and was discharged on the fourth day of the treatment without sequel. In the literature serious cases are mentioned, mortality and disabilities are also seen. It is appropriate that pediatricians investigate the subgroup incompatibilities of newborns with hemolytic diseases without ABO and Rh incompatibility in early period, or those of newborns which are having a long respond concerning medical treatment.

  2. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Christiansen, Ingelise; Harbo, T;

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...

  3. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfraz Saleemi

    2014-01-01

    Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

  4. A classification of hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besbas, N.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Loirat, C.; Proesmans, W.; Remuzzi, G.; Rizzoni, G.; Taylor, C.M.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Zimmerhackl, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnostic terms hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) are based on historical and overlapping clinical descriptions. Advances in understanding some of the causes of the syndrome now permit many patients to be classified according to etiology. The increase

  5. Detection of apoptosis in kidney biopsies of patients with D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Monnens, L.A.H.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Gubler, M.C.; Kockx, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the presence of apoptotic cells in renal biopsy material of seven patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) by using an improved and stringent terminal deoxynucleotidyl nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique. Renal biopsy material was taken in the second or third

  6. Synthesis, cytotoxicity, and hemolytic activity of 6'-O-substituted dioscin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Qiu, Zaozao; Wang, Yibing; Zhang, Yichun; Li, Ming; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Lihong; Zhu, Ziyan; Yu, Biao

    2007-12-28

    Dioscin derivatives (1-12) with a variety of substitutions at the 6'-OH of the chacotriosyl residue and the 3',6'-anhydrosaponin derivatives (26, 30, and 32) were synthesized. All these derivatives showed much lower cytotoxicity than that of the parent dioscin, while their hemolytic activities were partially retained depending on the various 6'-O-substitutions. PMID:17945208

  7. Histiocytic Sarcoma Associated with Coombs Negative Acute Hemolytic Anemia: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen C.; Nassiri, Mehdi; Qureshi, Amna; Markel, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) rarely involves extranodal sites, such as the spleen. We report a unique pediatric case of massive splenomegaly and refractory Coombs negative hemolytic anemia (CNHA) secondary to HS. The CNHA resolved completely after an emergent splenectomy. Next generation sequencing (NGS) revealed novel ASXL1, PTPN11, KIT, and TP53 mutations, unmasking a clonal heterogeneity within the same neoplasm. PMID:27429816

  8. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W;

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 withou...

  9. Biochemical characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies on skin mucus of fresh water spiny eel Mastacembelus armatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Venkatachalam Uthayakumar; Venkatachalam Ramasubramanian; Dhanabalan Senthilkumar; Ramasamy Harikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the biochemical, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of Mastacembalus armatus skin mucus. Methods: Antimicrobial and antifungal activities of mucus extractions against human and fish pathogens were tested along with ampicillin as control. Hemolytic activity of the extraction was evaluated against sheep and cow blood cells. Amino acid and fatty acid profiles were analyzed by HPLC and gas chromatography in the mucus of fish. SDS-PAGE analysis of mucus and muscle tissue was done. Oneway-ANOVA was performed against all extraction and pathogens, amino acids and fatty acids. Result: All the mucus extracts exhibited higher inhibitory activity than antibiotic ampicillin against bacterial and fungal pathogens. The hemolytic activity was increased with higher mucus concentrations in both sheep and cow blood cells. The protein content soluble and insoluble fractions of mucus were 63.22 μg/g and 55.79μg/g, respectively. Out of 17 amino acids leucine was higher (8.54 mole %) in soluble gel, and glutamic acid was higher (6.92 mole %) in the insoluble gel, Histidine was very low (i.e. 0.20 mole%) both in soluble and (0.30 mole %) insoluble gel. In SDS-PAGE analysis, 6 bands of mucus and 9 bands of muscle were observed. Conclusions: The soluble and insoluble proteins are responsible for antimicrobial and hemolytic activity, these results indicate that mucus gel was prospective applications in fish and human therapeutics.

  10. Functional variation of the antigen I/II surface protein in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, FC; Assev, S; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Scheie, AA

    2002-01-01

    Although Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus mutans are regarded as members of the commensal microflora of the body, S. intermedius is often associated with deep-seated purulent infections, whereas S. mutans is frequently associated with dental caries. In this study, we investigated the role

  11. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis.

  12. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. RESULTS Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  13. Real-time PCR for Detection and Differentiation of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Real-time PCR for Detection and Differentiation of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus SWEDEN (B?verud, V.) SWEDEN Received: 2006-10-03 Revised: 2007-03-27 Accepted: 2007-04-05

  14. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are...

  15. Anti-hemolytic, hemagglutination inhibition and bacterial membrane disruptive properties of selected herbal extracts attenuate virulence of Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Expression of a multitude of virulence factors by multi-drug resistant microbial strains, e.g., Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria), is responsible for resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. Hemolysin production and induction of hemagglutination by bacterial surface receptors inflicts direct cytotoxicity by destroying host phagocytic and epithelial cells. We have previously reported that Berberis aristata, Camellia sinensis, Cyperus rotundus Holarrhena antidysenterica and Andrographis paniculata are promising herbal leads for targeting Carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli. These herbal leads were analyzed for their anti-hemolytic potential by employing spectrophotometric assay of hemoglobin liberation. Anti-hemagglutination potential of the extracts was assessed by employing qualitative assay of visible RBC aggregate formation. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) exhibited anti-hemolytic potential of 73.97 ± 0.03%, followed by Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) i.e., 68.32 ± 0.05%, Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) i.e., 60.26 ± 0.05% and Cyperus rotundus (PTRC-31811-A) i.e., 53.76 ± 0.03%. Comprehensive, visual analysis of hemagglutination inhibition revealed that only Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) and Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) exhibited anti-hemagglutination activity. However, Andrographis paniculata (PTRC-11611-A) exhibited none of the inhibitory activities. Furthermore, the pair wise correlation analysis of the tested activities with quantitative phytochemical descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid; flavonoids; polyphenols, and decreased content of saponins supported both the activities. Additionally, flow cytometry revealed that cell membrane structures of CRE were damaged by extracts of Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) and Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) at their respective Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations, thereby confirming noteworthy antibacterial

  16. BETA-S, Multi-Group Beta-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: BETA-S calculates beta-decay source terms and energy spectra in multigroup format for time-dependent radionuclide inventories of actinides, fission products, and activation products. Multigroup spectra may be calculated in any arbitrary energy-group structure. The code also calculates the total beta energy release rate from the sum of the average beta-ray energies as determined from the spectral distributions. BETA-S also provides users with an option to determine principal beta-decaying radionuclides contributing to each energy group. The CCC-545/SCALE 4.3 (or SCALE4.2) code system must be installed on the computer before installing BETA-S, which requires the SCALE subroutine library and nuclide-inventory generation from the ORIGEN-S code. 2 - Methods:Well-established models for beta-energy distributions are used to explicitly represent allowed, and 1., 2. - and 3. -forbidden transition types. Forbidden non-unique transitions are assumed to have a spectral shape of allowed transitions. The multigroup energy spectra are calculated by numerically integrating the energy distribution functions using an adaptive Simpson's Rule algorithm. Nuclide inventories are obtained from a binary interface produced by the ORIGEN-S code. BETA-S calculates the spectra for all isotopes on the binary interface that have associated beta-decay transition data in the ENSDF-95 library, developed for the BETA-S code. This library was generated from ENSDF data and contains 715 materials, representing approximately 8500 individual beta transition branches. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The algorithms do not treat positron decay transitions or internal conversion electrons. The neglect of positron transitions in inconsequential for most applications involving aggregate fission products, since most of the decay modes are via electrons. The neglect of internal conversion electrons may impact on the accuracy of the spectrum in the low

  17. [Streptococcus pyogenes--much more than the aetiological agent of scarlet fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2009-11-01

    The grampositive bacterium S. pyogenes (beta-haemolytic group A Streptococcus) is a natural colonizer of the human oropharynx mucous membrane and one of the most common agents of infectious diseases in humans. S. pyogenes causes the widest range of disease in humans among all bacterial pathogens. It is responsible for various skin infections such as impetigo contagiosa and erysipelas, and localized mucous membrane infections of the oropharynx (e. g. tonsillitis and pharyngitis). Betahaemolytic group A Streptococcus causes also invasive diseases such as sepses including puerperal sepsis. Additionally, S. pyogenes induces toxin-mediated syndromes, i. e. scarlet fever, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF). STSS and NF are severe, frequently fatal diseases that have emerged in Europe and Northern America during the last two decades. Finally, some immunpathological diseases such as acute rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis also result from S. pyogenes infections. Most scientists recommend penicillins (benzylpenicillin, phenoxymethylpenicllin) as drugs of first choice for treatment of Streptococcus tonsillopharyngitis and scarlet fever. Erysipelas and some other skin infections should be treated with benzylpenicillin. Intensive care measurements are needed for treatment of severe toxin-mediated S. pyogenes diseases. These measurements include the elimination of internal bacterial foci, concomitant application of clindamycin and benzylpenicillin and suitable treatment of shock symptoms. Management of immunpathological diseases requires antiphlogistical therapy. Because of the wide distribution of S. pyogenes in the general population and the lack of an effective vaccine, possibilities for prevention allowing a suitable protection for diseases due to S. pyogenes are very limited.

  18. Intracellular α-Amylase of Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Christine L.; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding α-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of a...

  19. Fascitis necrotitzant i miositis per streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Casares, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Existeixen tres tipus d'infeccions greus causades per Streptococcus del grup A (GAS): la fascitis necrotitzant (FN), la miositis i la síndrome de xoc tòxic estreptocòccica (SST). Es tracta d'un estudi retrospectiu en el qual es van revisar les històries clíniques de cinc casos de FN per Streptococcus pyogenes. Es descriuen dades epidemiològiques, característiques clíniques del pacient i de la infecció, paràmetres de laboratori, mètodes diagnòstics, tractaments rebuts i curs evolutiu dels paci...

  20. Alcohol-induced severe acute pancreatitis followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome managed with continuous renal replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Peng; Yuan, Ai-hong; Wang, Chun-Hua; LI, XIN; Wu, Hai-yang

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury in patients with acute pancreatitis carries a poor prognosis. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney, and though rare in adults it is associated with high mortality and a high rate of chronic renal failure. Case presentation Herein, we report a case of alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis in a 38-year-old Chinese female com...

  1. Renal thrombotic microangiopathy caused by interferon beta-1a treatment for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahe J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Julien Mahe,1 Aurélie Meurette,2 Anne Moreau,3 Caroline Vercel,2 Pascale Jolliet1,4 1Clinical Pharmacology Department, Institute of Biology, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 2Clinical Nephrology and Immunology Department, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 3Laboratory of Pathology, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 4EA 4275 Biostatistics, Pharmacoepidemiology and Subjective Measures in Health Sciences, University of Nantes, Nantes, France Abstract: Interferon beta-1a is available as an immunomodulating agent for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Common side effects include flu-like symptoms, asthenia, anorexia, and administration site reaction. Kidney disorders are rarely reported. In this study we describe the case of a woman who has been undergoing treatment with interferon beta-1a for multiple sclerosis for 5 years. She developed a hemolytic-uremic syndrome with intravascular hemolysis in a context of severe hypertension. A kidney biopsy showed a thrombotic microangiopathy. This observation highlights an uncommon side effect of long-term interferon beta-1a therapy. Pathophysiological mechanisms leading to this complication might be explained by the antiangiogenic activity of interferon. Keywords: thrombotic microangiopathy, interferon beta, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, antiangiogenic activity

  2. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kara B.; Scrape, Scott R.; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse. PMID:26989567

  3. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  4. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Mamoune

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  5. Unusual manifestations of acute Q fever: autoimmune hemolytic anemia and tubulointerstitial nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz Serdal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection that caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strict intracellular bacterium. It may be manifested by some of the autoimmune events and is classified into acute and chronic forms. The most frequent clinical manifestation of acute form is a self-limited febrile illness which is associated with severe headache, muscle ache, arthralgia and cough. Meningoencephalitis, thyroiditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and nephritis are rare manifestations. Here we present a case of acute Q fever together with Coombs’ positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and tubulointerstitial nephritis treated with chlarithromycin, steroids and hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of such rare manifestations of the disease.

  6. Protective efficiency of an inactivated vaccine against Streptococcus iniae in olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Yong-Uk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus iniae is a causative agent of hemorrhagic septicemia in olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, in Korea, resulting in serious economic losses. As a preventive measure, M VAC INIAE (Mastuken, Japan was prepared from the S. iniae F2K strain and tested against the SI-36 strain prevalent on flounder fish farms on Jeju Island, Korea. F2K had a serotype of 38 (− and SI-36 38 (+. The vaccine recognized both serotypes. It showed a very high effective immune response against S. iniae; the challenge test using the S. iniae SI-36 strain resulted in a relative percent survival (RPS of 85.7-87.0% 2 weeks after vaccination and 71.0-80.0% 6 months after vaccination. Field vaccination and clinical challenge tests were performed at local Jeju aquafarms with S. iniae SI-36. These showed significantly reduced cumulative mortality when compared to the control group with RPS rates that ranged between 71-80%. Hence, the present study suggests that this vaccine showed a significant immune response against S. iniae and could be applied in commercial aquafarms as a therapeutic agent against β-hemolytic streptococcosis in cultured P. olivaceus.

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mahmood Jindal

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml. These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA, and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development.

  8. Antioxidant, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of Senecio species used in traditional medicine of northwestern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Emilio; Castro, Felipe; Fernández, Francisco; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalán, César A N

    2012-05-01

    Senecio nutans Sch. Bip., S. viridis var. viridis Phill. and S. spegazzinii Cabrera are native species used in traditional medicine of northwestern Argentina. The total phenolics, flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids contents, as well as radical scavenging, antioxidant, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of aqueous extracts (infusion and decoction) of all three species were determined. S. nutans was the most active. The extracts did not show antibacterial activity. Alkaloids were not detected in any of the aqueous extracts of the three studied species. PMID:22799087

  9. Pregnancy-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Revisited in the Era of Complement Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhouri, Fadi; Roumenina, Lubka; Provot, François; Sallée, Marion; Caillard, Sophie; Couzi, Lionel; Essig, Marie; Ribes, David; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Bridoux, Frank; Rondeau, Eric; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to pregnancy-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the pathogenesis and presentation of pregnancy-associated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (P-aHUS) remain ill-defined. We conducted a retrospective study to assess the presentation and outcomes of patients presenting with P-aHUS and the prevalence of alternative C3 convertase dysregulation. P-aHUS occurred in 21 of the 100 adult female patients with atypical HUS, with 79% presenting postpartum. We detected complement ...

  10. Reticuloendothelial cell function in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA): studies on the mechanism of peripheral monocyte activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Ota, Zensuke

    1985-01-01

    We examined the activity of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) using an in vitro assay of monocyte-macrophage interaction with erythrocytes and an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. The monocytes of AIHA patients in the hemolyzing period phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells and anti-D coated red cells more avidly than normal control monocytes. There was no significant relationship between phagocytic activity and ADCC...

  11. DIFFERENT DISPARITIES OF GENDER AND RACE AMONG THE THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA AND HEMOLYTIC-UREMIC SYNDROMES

    OpenAIRE

    Terrell, Deirdra R.; Vesely, Sara K.; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A.; Lämmle, Bernhard; George, James N.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) represent multiple disorders with diverse etiologies. We compared the gender and race of 335 patients enrolled in the Oklahoma TTP-HUS Registry across 21 years for their first episode of TTP or HUS to appropriate control groups. The relative frequency of women and white race among patients with TTP-HUS associated with a bloody diarrhea prodrome and the relative frequency of women with quinine-associated TTP-HUS were...

  12. Hemolytic and cytotoxic effects of saponin like compounds isolated from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocoma erinaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elaheh Amini; Mohammad Nabiuni; Javad Baharara; Kazem Parivar; Javad Asili

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and characterize the saponin from Persian Gulf brittle star (Ophiocomaerinaceus Methods: In an attempt to prepare saponin from brittle star, collected samples were minced and extracted with ethanol, dichloromethane, n-buthanol. Then, concentrated n-butanol extract were loaded on HP-20 resin and washed with dionized water, 80% ethanol and 100%ethanol respectively. Subsequently, detection of saponin was performed by foaming property, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hemolytic analysis on thin layer chromatography. The cytotoxic activity on HeLa cells was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay and under invert microscopy.Results:) and to evaluate its hemolytic and cytotoxic potential. method. The presence of C-H bond, C-O-C and OH in fourier transform infrared spectrum of fraction 80% ethanol is characteristic feature in the many of saponin compounds. Hemolytic assay revealed HD50 value was 500 µg/mL. MTT assay exhibited that saponin extracted in IC50 value of 25 µg/mL inducsd potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cells in 24 h and 12.5 µg/mL in 48 h, meanwhile in lower concentration did not have considerable effect against HeLa cells.Conclusions:The existence of saponin in Ophiocoma erinaceus were approved by phytochemical These findings showed that only 80% ethanol fraction Persian Gulf brittle star contained saponin like compounds with hemolytic activity which can be detected simply by phytochemical that can be appreciable for future anticancer research.

  13. Postoperative Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Complement C3 Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Eiji Matsukuma; Atsushi Imamura; Yusuke Iwata; Takamasa Takeuchi; Yoko Yoshida; Yoshihiro Fujimura; Xinping Fan; Toshiyuki Miyata; Takashi Kuwahara

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) can be distinguished from typical or Shiga-like toxin-induced HUS. The clinical outcome is unfavorable; up to 50% of affected patients progress to end-stage renal failure and 25% die during the acute phase. Multiple conditions have been associated with aHUS, including infections, drugs, autoimmune conditions, transplantation, pregnancy, and metabolic conditions. aHUS in the nontransplant postsurgical period, however, is rare. An 8-month-old boy underw...

  14. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-contai...

  15. Interventions for preventing diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Diana E; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) may follow infection with Shiga-toxin-producing organisms, principally E. coli O157: H7 (STEC), causing high morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify interventions to prevent diarrhea-associated HUS. Methods Systematic search of the literature for relevant systematic reviews (SRs), randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and public health guidelines. Results Of 1097 animal and 762 human studies, 18 animal studies (2 SRs, 2 reviews, plus 14 RCTs) ...

  16. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanavari, Suneel A.; Kristel Lourdault; Manjula Sritharan; Haake, David A.; James Matsunaga

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemo...

  17. Clinical features and outcomes of autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a retrospective analysis of 32 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Seung-Woo; Lee, Myung-Won; Ryu, Hae-Won; Lee, Kyu-Seop; SONG, IK-CHAN; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Yun, Hwan-Jung; Kim, Samyong; Jo, Deog-Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been no report on the clinical features or natural history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in the Korean adult population. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes of AIHA in the Korean adults. Methods Patients newly diagnosed with AIHA between January 1994 and December 2010 at Chungnam National University Hospital were enrolled. Patient characteristics at diagnosis, response to treatment, and the natural course of the ...

  18. In vitro hemolytic activity of Bothrops lanceolatus (fer-de-lance) venom

    OpenAIRE

    LJ Martins; PMF de Araújo; Bon, C.; S. HYSLOP; AL de Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Bothrops lanceolatus venom contains a variety of enzymatic and biological activities. The present work investigated the hemolytic activity of this venom and its phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Bothrops lanceolatus venom (6.7 µg/mL) caused indirect hemolysis of cow, horse, rat and sheep erythrocytes, with horse erythrocytes being the most sensitive; no direct hemolysis was observed. Hemolysis in sheep erythrocytes was concentration-dependent (5-11.7 µg/mL) and markedly attenuated by heating the venom...

  19. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3 years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3 months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level. PMID:26563723

  20. The simulation of multiphase flow field in implantable blood pump and analysis of hemolytic capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tie-yan; YE Liang; HONG Fang-wen; LIU Deng-cheng; FAN Hui-min; LIU Zhong-min

    2013-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the axial flow impeller blood pump NIVADIII is carried out by using a CFD multiphase flow model.The hydrodynamic performance of the pump and the flow field in the pump are analyzed,and the shear stress distribution is obtained.A hemolytic prediction model based on the shear stress is built based on the calculation results,and it can be used for quantitative predictions of the hemolytic behavior of a blood pump.Hemolysis tests in vitro were performed 6 times with fresh bovine blood.At each time,the flow of the pump NIVADIII is 5 L/min and the outflow tract pressure is 100 mmHg.According to the tests,the plasma free hemoglobin (FHB) content and the hematocrit (HCT) are measured after 0 s,0.5 s,1 s,1.5 s,...4 s.At the end of each experiment Normal Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of NIVADIII is calculated.The average of NIH is 0.0055 g/100L,almost identical with that obtained from the hemolytic prediction model.This method can be applied in the selection stage of a blood pump.

  1. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+) ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro. PMID:26831695

  2. Dangerous drug interactions leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome following lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissis Haralabos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report our experience of a rather uncommon drug interaction, resulting in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Methods Two consecutive cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome were diagnosed in our service. In both patients the use of macrolides in patients taking Tacrolimus, resulted in high levels of Tacrolimus. Results The first patient was a 48 years old female with Bilateral emphysema. She underwent Single Sequential Lung Transplantation. She developed reperfusion injury requiring prolonged stay. Tacrolimus introduced (Day 51. The patient remained well up till 5 months later; Erythromycin commenced for chest infection. High Tacrolimus levels and a clinical diagnosis of HUS were made. She was treated with plasmapheresis successfully. The second case was a 57 years old female with Emphysema & A1 Antithrypsin deficiency. She underwent Right Single Lung Transplantation. A2 rejection with mild Obliterative Bronchiolitis diagnosed 1 year later and she switched to Tacrolimus. She was admitted to her local Hospital two and a half years later with right middle lobe consolidation. The patient commenced on amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Worsening renal indices, high Tacrolimus levels, hemolytic anemia & low Platelets were detected. HUS diagnosed & treated with plasmapheresis. Conclusions There are 21 cases of HUS following lung transplantation in the literature that may have been induced by high tacrolimus levels. Macrolides in patients taking Cyclosporin or Tacrolimus lead to high levels. Mechanism of action could be glomeruloconstrictor effect with reduced GFR increased production of Endothelin-1 and increased Platelet aggregation.

  3. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting with severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, while the other had moderate anemia and unconjugated hyperbilrubinemia. Although both the neonates were treated by phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin, one of them received double volume exchange transfusion. Conclusion: There appeared to be an increase in the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by Rh antibodies other than anti-D. In this case report, both patients presented with anemia and hyperbilirubinemia but were successfully treated, with a favorable outcome.

  4. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  5. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  6. Antagonistic action of Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, C L; Hart, G D

    1976-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis were found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H11 agars, but not on the latter medium when antibacterial drugs were added. S. faecalis was found to be more inhibitory than S. salivarius to 15 strains of M. tuberculosis. S. salivarius produced little or no inhibition of growth of Runyon group III organisms but was very antagonistic to Runyon group I mycobacteria. Images PMID:824304

  7. Glucose Uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Actinomyces viscosus in the Presence of Human Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Germaine, Greg, R.; Tellefson, Lois M.

    1982-01-01

    Glucose uptake was examined by using whole-cell suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (strains BHT, Ingbritt, and GS-5), Streptococcus mitis (strains 9811 and 72×41), and Actinomyces viscosus (strains T6 and WVU626) incubated for up to 90 min in 0 to 82% (vol/vol) human whole salivary supernatant. Glucose uptake by the S. mutans strains was completely inhibited at all saliva concentrations. Dithiothreitol (DTT), present during saliva incubation, prevented saliva inhibition. Glucose uptake was a...

  8. Population diversity and dynamics of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis in the upper respiratory tracts of adults, determined by a nonculture strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Tettelin, H; Hance, I;

    2008-01-01

    We reinvestigated the clonal diversity and dynamics of Streptococcus mitis and two other abundant members of the commensal microbiota of the upper respiratory tract, Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus infantis, to obtain information about the origin of frequently emerging clones in this habitat...... with loss and acquisition from contacts. These findings provide a platform for understanding the mechanisms that govern the balance within the complex microbiota at mucosal sites and between the microbiota and the mucosal immune system of the host....

  9. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Deguo Wang; Yanhong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactia...

  10. Crystal structure of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata: implications of domain structure for its membrane pore-formation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Eto, Seiichiro; Sugawara, Hajime; Kurisu, Genji; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kusunoki, Masami; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-08-27

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent and galactose-specific lectin purified from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, which exhibits hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities. Six molecules of CEL-III are assumed to oligomerize to form an ion-permeable pore in the cell membrane. We have determined the crystal structure of CELIII by using single isomorphous replacement aided by anomalous scattering in lead at 1.7 A resolution. CEL-III consists of three distinct domains as follows: the N-terminal two carbohydrate-binding domains (1 and 2), which adopt beta-trefoil folds such as the B-chain of ricin and are members of the (QXW)(3) motif family; and domain 3, which is a novel fold composed of two alpha-helices and one beta-sandwich. CEL-III is the first Ca(2+)-dependent lectin structure with two beta-trefoil folds. Despite sharing the structure of the B-chain of ricin, CEL-III binds five Ca(2+) ions at five of the six subdomains in both domains 1 and 2. Considering the relatively high similarity among the five subdomains, they are putative binding sites for galactose-related carbohydrates, although it remains to be elucidated whether bound Ca(2+) is directly involved in interaction with carbohydrates. The paucity of hydrophobic interactions in the interfaces between the domains and biochemical data suggest that these domains rearrange upon carbohydrate binding in the erythrocyte membrane. This conformational change may be responsible for oligomerization of CEL-III molecules and hemolysis in the erythrocyte membranes. PMID:15194688

  11. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein. PMID:17977832

  12. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  13. Pathogenicity of Streptococcus ictaluri to Channel Catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The infectivity of a Streptococcus ictaluri isolate for fry (0.5 g), fingerling (15 g), and juvenile (55 g) channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was determined by bath immersion and injection infectivity experiments. Channel catfish exposed by immersion were exposed to baths containing 1012, 1011,...

  14. Dyrkningsnegativ Streptococcus pneumoniae endokarditis diagnosticeret med polymerasekaedereaktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Vedby; Kemp, Michael; Bangsborg, Jette Marie;

    2008-01-01

    A 60-year old man was admitted with sepsis and meningitis of unknown aetiology. Underlying aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed by echocardiography and severe insufficiency led to aortic valve replacement. Application of broad-range PCR to cusp tissue revealed a DNA product, and a diagnosis of...... Streptococcus pneumoniae endocarditis was obtained by DNA sequencing....

  15. STREPTOCOCCUS: A WORLDWIDE FISH HEALTH PROBLEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are important emergent pathogens that affect many fish species worldwide, especially in warm-water regions. In marine and freshwater systems, these Gram-positive bacteria cause significant economic losses, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars annually. ...

  16. Dual Functions of Streptococcus salivarius Urease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Burne, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A urease-deficient derivative of Streptococcus salivarius 57.I was constructed by allelic exchange at the ureC locus. The wild-type strain was protected against acid killing through hydrolysis of physiologically relevant concentrations of urea, whereas the mutant was not. Also, S. salivarius could use urea as a source of nitrogen for growth exclusively through a urease-dependent pathway.

  17. [Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS)--the characteristic of isolated strains from productive women's vagina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Katarzyna; Gołda-Matuszak, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of my research: to determine the frequency of colonisation Streptococcus agalactiae from productive women's vagina, an evaluation of usefulness microbiological diagnostic methods to detect GBS, to define serotype of analysed strains of S. agalactiae. After all, I tried to define fenotypic differential, biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility between GBS with and without hemolysis. All of strains S. agalactiae (n = 380) belong to bacteria Gram(+), they had B serologic group and didn't produce catalase. On the basis of TSA+5% sheep blood streptococcus with beta-hemolysis grew like a small, grey and shiny colonies with a narrow, bright ring. On the same base we had S. agalactiae without beta-hemolysis, in examine material--6% (n = 22). On the basis of Strepto B ID S. agalactiae grew like a small, round red colonies and on the base Granada agar like an orange, white colonies. The level of colonisation S. agalactiae was 22% (380GBS/1727women). Identification of analysed strains of S. agalactiae was made by test API 20 Strep. The susceptibility was examined to ampicilin, azithromycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, doxycyclin, cotrimoxasol, ciprofloxacin. Serotypes III (50%), Ia (18%) and V (14%) prevailed. PMID:20873487

  18. Isolation and properties of levanase from Streptococcus salivarius KTA-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N; Mizuno, F; Takamori, K

    1983-01-01

    Fructan-hydrolyzing enzyme from Streptococcus salivarius KTA-19 isolated from human dental plaque was investigated. The enzyme was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, acetone fractionation, and column chromatography on Bio-Gel and DEAE-cellulose. The purified enzyme showed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. Its molecular weight was 100,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme exhibited an optimum pH of 6.5 and decreased its activity from pH 6.0 and especially below pH 5.5. The optimum temperature was 40 to 50 degrees C, and enzyme activity was reduced by 90% at 55 degrees C. Enzyme activity was markedly inhibited by Hg2+, Ag+, Cu2+, and p-chloromercuribenzoate at a concentration of 10(-3) M, but not by other metal ions or chemical effectors. Fructose was the only by-product of the enzyme action on levan. These results indicated that the levanase of S. salivarius KTA-19 is an exo-beta-(2,6)-fructofuranosidase. PMID:6618666

  19. LacR mutations are frequently observed in Streptococcus intermedius and are responsible for increased intermedilysin production and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Imaki, Hidenori; Masuda, Sachiko; Okamoto, Ayumi; Kim, Hyejin; Waite, Richard D; Whiley, Robert A; Kikuchi, Ken; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Tabata, Atsushi; Nagamune, Hideaki

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus intermedius secretes a human-specific cytolysin, intermedilysin (ILY), which is considered to be the major virulence factor of this pathogen. We screened for a repressor of ily expression by using random gene disruption in a low-ILY-producing strain (PC574). Three independent high-ILY-producing colonies that had plasmid insertions within a gene that has high homology to lacR were isolated. Validation of these observations was achieved through disruption of lacR in strain PC574 with an erythromycin cassette, which also led to higher hemolytic activity, increased transcription of ily, and higher cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells, compared to the parental strain. The direct binding of LacR within the ily promoter region was shown by a biotinylated DNA probe pulldown assay, and the amount of ILY secreted into the culture supernatant by PC574 cells was increased by adding lactose or galactose to the medium as a carbon source. Furthermore, we examined lacR nucleotide sequences and the hemolytic activity of 50 strains isolated from clinical infections and 7 strains isolated from dental plaque. Of the 50 strains isolated from infections, 13 showed high ILY production, 11 of these 13 strains had one or more point mutations and/or an insertion mutation in LacR, and almost all mutations were associated with a marked decline in LacR function. These results strongly suggest that mutation in lacR is required for the overproduction of ILY, which is associated with an increase in pathogenicity of S. intermedius.

  20. Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D Deficiencies: An Unusual Cause of Fever, Severe Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vikas A.; Harbada, Rishit; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The array of diagnostic workup for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) generally revolves in searching for infections, inflammatory/autoimmune, and endocrine etiologies. A differential diagnosis of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia can have etiologies varying from infections like malaria, dengue, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein barr virus, Parvovirus, infective endocarditis, to autoimmune disorder (systemic lupus erythromatosis), vasculitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia/Evan's syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuri (PNH), or drugs. Nutritional deficiencies (especially vitamin B12 deficiency) as a cause of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia are very rare and therefore rarely thought of. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fever and if accompanied by concurrent hyper-homocysteinemia and hypophosphatemia can sometimes lead to severe hemolysis mimicking the above-mentioned conditions. We present a case that highlights vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiency as an easily treatable cause of PUO, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, which should be actively looked for and treated before proceeding with more complicated and expensive investigation or starting empiric treatments. PMID:25811010

  1. Klonierung, Sequenzierung und Charakterisierung der genetischen Determinante des CAMP-Faktors (=cbf-Gen) der Gruppe-B-Streptokokken (Streptococcus agalactiae)

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenstein, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The CAMP reaction, a synergistic lysis of sheep erythrocytes by Staphylococcus aureus (beta-toxin) and group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) was first described in 1944 by Christie et al.. This phenomenon is caused by the CAMP-factor, an extra-cellular protein which role pathogenicity and virulence is still unknown. The focus of this work is the molecular isolation and characterization of the CAMP-factor gene of group B streptococci (cbf-Gene). First cloning attempts were made using...

  2. Human Streptococcus agalactiae strains in aquatic mammals and fish

    OpenAIRE

    Delannoy Christian MJ; Crumlish Margaret; Fontaine Michael C; Pollock Jolinda; Foster Geoff; Dagleish Mark P; Turnbull James F; Zadoks Ruth N

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In humans, Streptococcus agalactiae or group B streptococcus (GBS) is a frequent coloniser of the rectovaginal tract, a major cause of neonatal infectious disease and an emerging cause of disease in non-pregnant adults. In addition, Streptococcus agalactiae causes invasive disease in fish, compromising food security and posing a zoonotic hazard. We studied the molecular epidemiology of S. agalactiae in fish and other aquatic species to assess potential for pathogen transmi...

  3. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis.

    OpenAIRE

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E J; Reddy, M. S.; LeVine, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium ...

  4. Levered and unlevered Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    We prove that in a world without leverage cost the relationship between the levered beta ( L) and the unlevered beta ( u) is the No-costs-of-leverage formula: L = u + ( u - d) D (1 - T) / E. We also analyze 6 alternative valuation theories proposed in the literature to estimate the relationship between the levered beta and the unlevered beta (Harris and Pringle (1985), Modigliani and Miller (1963), Damodaran (1994), Myers (1974), Miles and Ezzell (1980), and practitioners) and prove that all ...

  5. Zinc-induced hemolytic anemia caused by ingestion of pennies by a pup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 4-month-old Pomeranian pup was examined because of anorexia, salivation, and persistent vomiting. Initial laboratory testing revealed marked hemolytic anemia with spherocytosis. Survey abdominal radiography revealed 4 metal objects which, when removed by gastrotomy, were identified as pennies. Of 4 pennies, 3 were minted since 1983 and were heavily pitted over the surface and rim. Partially digested pennies were composed of a copper-plated high zinc concentration alloy. Further laboratory testing indicated a marked increase in serum zinc concentration in the pup (28.8 mg/L), confirming metal toxicosis. Serum zinc concentrations decreased during recovery

  6. Burkitt Lymphoma Preceded by Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia due to Anti-D Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yoshimi; Shimura, Yuji; Horiike, Shigeo; Takimoto, Tomoko; Maegawa, Saori; Tanba, Kazuna; Matsumura-Kimoto, Yayoi; Sumida, Yukari; Tatekawa, Shotaro; Tsukamoto, Taku; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Yamamoto-Sugitani, Mio; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Junya; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) preceded by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) caused by autoantibodies against D antigen. After a partial response to AIHA with prednisolone (PSL) treatment for 7 months, the patient developed BL with a t(8;22)(q24;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. Intensive immunochemotherapy, including rituximab, led to a complete response (CR) of BL; however, anti-D antibody remained detectable in the plasma and antibody-dissociated solution from erythrocytes, thus continuous therapy with PSL was necessary even after achievement of the CR. BL with AIHA is extremely rare, with only one previously reported case in the literature. PMID:27523004

  7. Molecular comparison of a nonhemolytic and a hemolytic phospholipase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Ostroff, R M; Vasil, A I; Vasil, M L

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces two secreted phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes. The expression of both PLCs is regulated by Pi. One of the PLCs is hemolytic, and one is nonhemolytic. Low-stringency hybridization studies suggested that the genes encoding these two PLCs shared DNA homology. This information was used to clone plcN, the gene encoding the 77-kilodalton nonhemolytic PLC, PLC-N. A fragment of plcN was used to mutate the chromosomal copy of plcN by the generation of a gene interruption m...

  8. Piperacillin-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia in an Adult with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Bandara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA in an adult female with cystic fibrosis (CF, complicating routine treatment of a pulmonary exacerbation with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam. Workup revealed a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT due to red blood cell (RBC-bound IgG and C3 and piperacillin antibodies detectable in the patient's serum. The potential influence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutations on the severity of DIIHA is discussed. This report illustrates the importance of early identification of DIIHA, a rare complication of a commonly utilized medication in CF.

  9. Developing oral probiotics from Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescombe, Philip A; Hale, John D F; Heng, Nicholas C K; Tagg, John R

    2012-12-01

    Considerable human illness can be linked to the development of oral microbiota disequilibria. The predominant oral cavity commensal, Streptococcus salivarius has emerged as an important source of safe and efficacious probiotics, capable of fostering more balanced, health-associated oral microbiota. Strain K12, the prototype S. salivarius probiotic, originally introduced to counter Streptococcus pyogenes infections, now has an expanded repertoire of health-promoting applications. K12 and several more recently proposed S. salivarius probiotics are now being applied to control diverse bacterial consortia infections including otitis media, halitosis and dental caries. Other potential applications include upregulation of immunological defenses against respiratory viral infections and treatment of oral candidosis. An overview of the key steps required for probiotic development is also presented. PMID:23231486

  10. Realized Beta GARCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger; Voev, Valeri Radkov

    2014-01-01

    as the beta. We apply the model to a large set of assets and find the conditional betas to be far more variable than usually found with rolling-window regressions based exclusively on daily returns. In the empirical part of the paper, we examine the cross-sectional as well as the time variation...... of the conditional beta series during the financial crises....

  11. Consideraciones sobre elaislamiento en exudados vaginales de Streptococcus morbillorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. F. Egido

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available De el estúdio de 195 exudados vaginales enviados por el Servicio de Ginecologia de este hospital, durante el período 1988-1990, hemos seleccionado aquellos en los que el cultivo fue positivo para estreptococos, 58 (30% de los cuales 26 (44.8% correspondia a Streptococcus morbillorum, 9 (15.5% a Gardnerella vaginalis, 5 (8.6% a Enterococcus faecalis-durans, y a Streptococcus agalactiae, 3 (5.1% a Streptococcus mitis y Streptococcus mitis, 2 (3-4% a Streptococcus bovis y Streptococcus cremoris y 1 (1.7% a Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus equinus y Strptococcus sanguis II respectivamente. En todos los casos se observo antecedentes de actuacción medico- quirurjica en el tracto genital, y en el 52.8% de los casos fuô concomitante con el diagnostico clinico-micologico de candidiasis vaginal. La ideittificaccion bacteriologica se realizo mediante el sistema API 20 STREP (sistema api bioMêríeux GmbH, Nütingen, Alemania dando un patron tipico ("excelente identificacción" para el Streptococcus morbillorum.

  12. Dual Functions of Streptococcus salivarius Urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Burne, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A urease-deficient derivative of Streptococcus salivarius 57.I was constructed by allelic exchange at the ureC locus. The wild-type strain was protected against acid killing through hydrolysis of physiologically relevant concentrations of urea, whereas the mutant was not. Also, S. salivarius could use urea as a source of nitrogen for growth exclusively through a urease-dependent pathway. PMID:10913107

  13. Recombinant production of Streptococcus equisimilis streptokinase by Streptomyces lividans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallín Carlos

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptokinase (SK is a potent plasminogen activator with widespread clinical use as a thrombolytic agent. It is naturally secreted by several strains of beta-haemolytic streptococci. The low yields obtained in SK production, lack of developed gene transfer methodology and the pathogenesis of its natural host have been the principal reasons to search for a recombinant source for this important therapeutic protein. We report here the expression and secretion of SK by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces lividans. The structural gene encoding SK was fused to the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi signal sequence or to the Streptomyces lividans xylanase C (xlnC signal sequence. The native Vsi protein is translocated via the Sec pathway while the native XlnC protein uses the twin-arginine translocation (Tat pathway. Results SK yield in the spent culture medium of S. lividans was higher when the Sec-dependent signal peptide mediates the SK translocation. Using a 1.5 L fermentor, the secretory production of the Vsi-SK fusion protein reached up to 15 mg SK/l. SK was partially purified from the culture supernatant by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. A 44-kDa degradation product co-eluted with the 47-kDa mature SK. The first amino acid residues of the S. lividans-produced SK were identical with those of the expected N-terminal sequence. The Vsi signal peptide was thus correctly cleaved off and the N-terminus of mature Vsi-SK fusion protein released by S. lividans remained intact. This result also implicates that the processing of the recombinant SK secreted by Streptomyces probably occurred at its C-terminal end, as in its native host Streptococcus equisimilis. The specific activity of the partially purified Streptomyces-derived SK was determined at 2661 IU/mg protein. Conclusion Heterologous expression of Streptococcus equisimilis ATCC9542 skc-2 in Streptomyces lividans was successfully achieved. SK can be

  14. Effect of hemolysis on nonesterified fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in bovine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokol, Tracy; Nydam, Daryl V

    2006-09-01

    Nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) assays are used for evaluating dairy herds for negative energy balance and subclinical ketosis, respectively. Hemolysis is a common artifact in samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories. The effect of hemolysis on NEFA and BHB in bovine serum was determined. Hemolysis was introduced into 26 serum samples by adding serial dilutions of a red cell hemolysate, prepared by repeated freeze-thawing of EDTA-anticoagulated bovine blood. NEFA, BHB, and degree of hemolysis (hemolytic index) were measured by an automated chemistry analyzer. Two endpoint assays that differed by inclusion of a sample blank were used for NEFA measurement. A kinetic enzymatic assay with 2 reagent sources was used for BHB measurement. The assessed methods yielded similar NEFA or BHB results in baseline, nonhemolyzed samples (median NEFA: 0.25 mEq/L, median BHB: 3 mg/dL, median hemolytic index: 8 units). NEFA results were adversely affected by hemolysis, with values increasing significantly with higher degrees of hemolysis. Median values increased above a critical medical decision limit (0.40 mEq/L) at a hemolytic index of 506 units (marked hemolysis). This increase was prevented by inclusion of a sample blank. Result interpretation was affected in individual animals when samples were moderately hemolyzed (median hemolytic index: 258 units). In contrast, BHB results were unaffected by hemolysis with either reagent source. Thus, assays for measuring NEFAs should include a sample blank and NEFA results should not be interpreted in moderately to markedly hemolyzed bovine samples, because result accuracy cannot be assured.

  15. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yousuf Rabeya; Abdul Aziz Suria; Yusof Nurasyikin; Leong Chooi-Fun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is most commonly caused by anti-D alloantibody. It is usually seen in Rhesus D (RhD)-negative mothers that have been previously sensitized. We report here a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in a newborn baby caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies, born to a mother who was RhD negative, but with no previous serological evidence of RhD alloimmunization. Case presentation A one-day-old Chinese baby boy was bor...

  16. A case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with anti-D specificity in a one-year-old

    OpenAIRE

    Bercovitz, Rachel S.; Macy, Margaret; Ambruso, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    While antibodies to antigens in the Rh group are common causes of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, specificity for only the D-antigen is rare in autoimmune hemolysis in pediatric patients. This case reports an anti-D associated with severe hemolytic anemia (Hb = 2.1 g/dL) in a previously healthy 14-month-old who presented with a three-day history of low-grade fevers and vomiting. Because of his severe anemia, on admission to the hospital he was found to have altered mental status, metabolic ...

  17. [Heme oxygenase induction in rat heart and vessels and peroxidative resistance of erythrocytes during hemolytic anemia development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A; Pavychenko, O V

    2005-01-01

    The hemolytic anemia development caused by phenylhydrazine injection (7 mg/100 g b.w.) was shown to be caused by the decreasing of both catalase activity and glutathione content in erythrocytes, and by the increasing of spontaneouse hemolysis level of these cells in blood stream. The increasing of heme oxygenase activity and TBA-active products in rat heart and vessels were revealed 24 hrs after phenylhydrazine injection. Possible mechanisms of heme oxygenase-1 induction under hypoxia as response to the hemolytic anemia development and it's role in defense of the cells from damage are discussed. PMID:16329389

  18. Postoperative Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Complement C3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Matsukuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS can be distinguished from typical or Shiga-like toxin-induced HUS. The clinical outcome is unfavorable; up to 50% of affected patients progress to end-stage renal failure and 25% die during the acute phase. Multiple conditions have been associated with aHUS, including infections, drugs, autoimmune conditions, transplantation, pregnancy, and metabolic conditions. aHUS in the nontransplant postsurgical period, however, is rare. An 8-month-old boy underwent surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Neurological disturbances, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia developed 25 days later, and aHUS was diagnosed. Further evaluation revealed that his complement factor H (CFH level was normal and that anti-FH antibodies were not detected in his plasma. Sequencing of his CFH, complement factor I, membrane cofactor protein, complement factor B, and thrombomodulin genes was normal. His ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin-1 repeats 13 activity was also normal. However, he had a potentially causative mutation (R425C in complement component C3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that his father and aunt also had this mutation; however, they had no symptoms of aHUS. We herein report a case of aHUS that developed after cardiovascular surgery and was caused by a complement C3 mutation.

  19. Ext The effect of littoralis leaf extract on Hemolytic Value (HC50 of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jiang WANG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Umbelliferae littoralis leaf extract on the Hemolytic Value (HC50 of mice, and to provide the basis for the development and utilization medicinal resources and edible resources. Methods: Prepare littoralis leaf water extract and alcohol extract, and set different dose treatment groups and blank control group, and continuously deliver American ginseng capsule for 15 days. Inject sRBC according to the weight on the tenth day. Take the blood serum from eyeball blood after 5 days. Put supernatant of 1ml and Dulbecco's reagent of 3ml in the test tube, and mix the 10% sRBC of 0.25ml and Dulbecco's reagent of 4ml together in another test tube, and measure absorbance at 540nm fine control (SA liquid tubing as blank, HC50 value were calculated. Results: Different extracts of stems and littoralis leaf were given to the mice for 15 days, and hemolytic value of the mice in water extract 4.68g/kg dose group, alcohol extract 4.68g/kg dose group and American ginseng capsule group significantly increased while comparing with the blank control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Littoralis Leaf plays an important role in regulating human immunity.

  20. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease.

  1. Phenolic compounds in drumstick peel for the evaluation of antibacterial, hemolytic and photocatalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, T V; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Sridharan, Makuteswaran

    2016-08-01

    Most of the wastes emitted from the food processing industries are not utilized for any further purpose. The economic value of the food waste is very less when compared to the collection or reuse or discard. To increase the economic value we have to design the food waste as useful product or applicable in most of the current field. Nothing is waste in this world with this concept we have investigated the phytochemical analysis of drumstick peel (Moringa oleifera). The result supports the presence of phenols, alkaloids, flavanoids, glycosides and tannins. Since various functional groups containing molecules are present in the extract; it has been further subjected to antibacterial and hemolytic activities. To analysis the antibacterial studies we have employed human pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium. The result of antibacterial activity clearly shows that it possesses significant activity on both bacterial cultures. The hemolytic activity was performed on red blood cells (RBCs). From this result we observed that drumstick peel extract has been considered as non-toxic on RBCs. Malachite green was selected to perform photocatalytic activity. The results stated that the drumstick peel extract possessed good behaviour towards photocatalytic investigation. The malachite green was degraded upto 99.7% using drumstick peel extract. PMID:27318603

  2. Postoperative atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with complement c3 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Eiji; Imamura, Atsushi; Iwata, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Fan, Xinping; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Kuwahara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) can be distinguished from typical or Shiga-like toxin-induced HUS. The clinical outcome is unfavorable; up to 50% of affected patients progress to end-stage renal failure and 25% die during the acute phase. Multiple conditions have been associated with aHUS, including infections, drugs, autoimmune conditions, transplantation, pregnancy, and metabolic conditions. aHUS in the nontransplant postsurgical period, however, is rare. An 8-month-old boy underwent surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Neurological disturbances, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia developed 25 days later, and aHUS was diagnosed. Further evaluation revealed that his complement factor H (CFH) level was normal and that anti-FH antibodies were not detected in his plasma. Sequencing of his CFH, complement factor I, membrane cofactor protein, complement factor B, and thrombomodulin genes was normal. His ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin-1 repeats 13) activity was also normal. However, he had a potentially causative mutation (R425C) in complement component C3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that his father and aunt also had this mutation; however, they had no symptoms of aHUS. We herein report a case of aHUS that developed after cardiovascular surgery and was caused by a complement C3 mutation. PMID:25431709

  3. Investigation into the hemolytic activity of tentacle venom from jellyfish Cyanea nozakii Kishinouye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-03-01

    Cyanea nozakii Kishinouy e ( C. nozakii), a giant cnidarian of the class Scyphomedusae, order Semaeostomeae and family Cyaneidae, is widely distributed in the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea, and is abundant from late summer to early autumn. Venom produced by C. nozakii during mass agglomerations can contaminate seawater resulting in death of the halobios and seriously damage commercial fisheries. Swimmers and fishermen commonly suff er painful stings from this jellyfish, resulting in local edema, tingling, breathing difficulties, depressed blood pressure and even death. Such effects arise from the complex mixture of biologically active molecules that make up jellyfish venom. In the present study, the hemolytic activity of venom from tentacles of C. nozakii and factors aff ecting its activity were assayed. The HU50 ( defined as the amount of protein required to lyse 50 % of erythrocytes) of the venom against dove and chicken erythrocytes was 34 and 59 μg/mL, respectively. Carboxylmethyl chitosan and glycerol could increase hemolytic activity at concentrations greater than 0.06% and 0.2 mol/L, respectively.

  4. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  5. In vitro hemolytic activity of Bothrops lanceolatus (fer-de-lance venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJ Martins

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bothrops lanceolatus venom contains a variety of enzymatic and biological activities. The present work investigated the hemolytic activity of this venom and its phospholipase A2 (PLA2. Bothrops lanceolatus venom (6.7 µg/mL caused indirect hemolysis of cow, horse, rat and sheep erythrocytes, with horse erythrocytes being the most sensitive; no direct hemolysis was observed. Hemolysis in sheep erythrocytes was concentration-dependent (5-11.7 µg/mL and markedly attenuated by heating the venom for 30 minutes at ≥ 40°C and by the PLA2 inhibitor p-bromophenacyl bromide. An acidic PLA2 (5 µg/mL purified from B. lanceolatus venom also caused hemolysis. This PLA2 showed immunoprecipitin lines with antivenom against B. lanceolatus, which suggests that the enzymatic and hemolytic activities of this enzyme may be neutralized during antivenom therapy. These results indicate that B. lanceolatus venom and its PLA2 can cause hemolysis in vitro.

  6. Direct antiglobulin ("Coombs") test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, George B; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2014-04-01

    We have reviewed the literature to identify and characterize reports of warm-antibody type, autoimmune hemolytic anemia in which the standard direct antiglobulin reaction was negative but a confirmatory test indicated that the red cells were opsonized with antibody. Three principal reasons account for the absence of a positive direct antiglobulin test in these cases: a) IgG sensitization below the threshold of detection by the commercial antiglobulin reagent, b) low affinity IgG, removed by preparatory washes not conducted at 4°C or at low ionic strength, and c) red cell sensitization by IgA alone, or rarely (monomeric) IgM alone, but not accompanied by complement fixation, and thus not detectable by a commercial antiglobulin reagent that contains anti-IgG and anti-C3. In cases in which the phenotype is compatible with warm-antibody type, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the direct antiglobulin test is negative, an alternative method to detect low levels of IgG sensitization, use of 4°C, low ionic strength washes to prepare the cells for the direct antiglobulin test reaction to permit retention and identification of low affinity IgG antibodies, and, if the latter are uninformative, testing for sensitization with an anti-IgA, and, if necessary, an anti-IgM reagent identifies cases of warm-antibody type, immune hemolysis not verified by a commercial reagent.

  7. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Secondary to Lupus Nephritis, Responsive to Eculizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufi, Alexander G.; Scott, Shruti; Darwish, Omar; Harley, Kevin; Kahlon, Kanwarpal; Desai, Sheetal; Lu, Yuxin; Tran, Minh-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS). Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) – a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage. Although plasma exchange is considered first-line therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura – a TMA classically associated with autoimmune depletion of ADAMTS-13 – aHUS demonstrates less reliable responsiveness to this modality. Instead, use of the late complement inhibitor Eculizumab has emerged as an effective modality for the management of such patients. Diagnosis of aHUS, however, is largely clinically based, relying heavily upon a multidisciplinary approach. Herein we present the case of a patient with atypical HUS successfully treated with Eculizumab in the setting of Class IV-G (A) lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia.

  8. Low levels of serum erythropoietin in children with endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, R; Donato, H; Rendo, P; Antonuccio, M; Rapetti, M C; Grimoldi, I; Exeni, A; de Galvagni, A; Trepacka, E; Amore, A

    1998-04-01

    Serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels were measured in ten previously non-transfused children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Complete blood cell count, serum EPO, and renal function tests were carried out upon admission and weekly thereafter. Blood samples were obtained: (1) prior to the first transfusion; (2) after the first transfusion but before recovery from renal failure; (3) during the recovery stage. All patients required transfusions (mean 1.8+/-0.8 per child). Absolute values of EPO correlated positively with the hematocrit during the three stages (r = 0.53, 0.36, and 0.12, respectively) which is opposite to expected results. The observed EPO logarithm/predicted EPO logarithm upon admission was low (0.70+/-0.08), falling further during stage 2 (0.57+/-0.03), but increasing thereafter (0.78+/-0.07) without reaching normal values. The reticulocyte production rate followed a parallel course (0.74+/-0.14, 0.54+/-0.11, and 0.60+/-0.10, respectively). On comparing the observed serum EPO levels with those expected, 9 of 11 pre-transfusion samples showed low values; in stage 2, all samples were below normal; in the recovery phase most (77.8%) were still low. Our results show an inadequate EPO synthesis in children with HUS, which could play an important pathogenic role, since it aggravates the severity of the existing hemolytic anemia; the secondary inhibitory effect of repeated transfusions exacerbates this inadequate synthesis.

  9. Induction of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Sabbione, Florencia; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Santiago, Adriana Patricia; Amaral, Maria Marta; Exeni, Ramon; Trevani, Analia Silvina; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a vascular disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure, is caused by enterohemorrhagic Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing bacteria, which mainly affect children. Besides Stx, the inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils (PMN) is essential to HUS evolution. PMN can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) composed of DNA, histones, and other proteins. Since NET are involved in infectious and inflammatory diseases, the aim of this work was to investigate the contribution of NET to HUS. Plasma from HUS patients contained increased levels of circulating free-DNA and nucleosomes in comparison to plasma from healthy children. Neutrophils from HUS patients exhibited a greater capacity to undergo spontaneous NETosis. NET activated human glomerular endothelial cells, stimulating secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Stx induced PMN activation as judged by its ability to trigger reactive oxygen species production, increase CD11b and CD66b expression, and induce NETosis in PMN from healthy donors. During HUS, NET can contribute to the inflammatory response and thrombosis in the microvasculature and thus to renal failure. Intervention strategies to inhibit inflammatory mechanisms mediated by PMN, such as NETosis, could have a potential therapeutic impact towards amelioration of the severity of HUS.

  10. Human Streptococcus agalactiae Isolate in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Joyce J.; Klesius, Phillip H.; Pasnik, David J.; Bohnsack, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B streptococcus (GBS) long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging concern with regard to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a clinical case of human neonatal meningitis caused disease and death in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae PR06

    OpenAIRE

    MZ, Irma Syakina; L. K. Teh; Salleh, M. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium that was first recognized as a causative agent of bovine mastitis. S. agalactiae has subsequently emerged as a significant cause of human diseases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of S. agalactiae PR06, which was isolated from a septicemic patient in a local hospital in Malaysia.

  12. Infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus tigurinus-like organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuchant, O; Wirth, G; Tixier, R; Dijos, M; Camou, F; Greib, C; Mégraud, F; Ménard, A

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus species are important causes of infective endocarditis but species identification remains challenging. We report two cases of infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus tigurinus-like organisms, which were first identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis and subsequently confirmed using phylogeny based on the analysis of the shetA gene encoding exfoliative toxin. PMID:27408744

  13. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging pathogen to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia, multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a human neonatal meningitis clinical case causes disease signs and mortality in N...

  14. Increase in invasive Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in England, December 2010 to January 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakikhany, K; Degail, M A; Lamagni, T; Waight, P; Guy, R; Zhao, H; Efstratiou, A; Pebody, R; George, R; Ramsay, M

    2011-01-01

    Increases in invasive Streptococcus pyogenes and S. pneumoniae above the seasonally expected levels are currently being seen in England. Preliminary analyses suggest that the high level of influenza activity seen this winter may be contributing to an increased risk of concurrent invasive bacterial and influenza infections in children and young adults. PMID:21315057

  15. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U.......S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  16. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically...... for US equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures. (2) A betting against beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low-beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns. (3) When funding constraints tighten......, the return of the BAB factor is low. (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one. (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....

  17. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross......-section of expected returns. Based on a novel highfrequency dataset of almost one-thousand individual stocks over two decades, we find that the two rough betas associated with intraday discontinuous and overnight returns entail significant risk premiums, while the intraday continuous beta is not priced in the cross......-section. An investment strategy that goes long stocks with high jump betas and short stocks with low jump betas produces significant average excess returns. These higher risk premiums for the discontinuous and overnight market betas remain significant after controlling for a long list of other firm characteristics...

  18. Kinetic Properties of a Phosphate-Bond-Driven Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; SMID, EJ; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    In Streptococcus lactis ML3 and Streptococcus cremoris Wg2 the uptake of glutamate and glutamine is mediated by the same transport system, which has a 30-fold higher affinity for glutamine than for glutamate at pH 6.0. The apparent affinity constant for transport (KT) of glutamine is 2.5 ± 0.3 μM, i

  19. Clinical behavior of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis Comportamiento clinico y terapéutico de la meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Raisa Bu-Coifiu Fanego; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bárbara Padilla-Docal; Martha O' Farril-Sanchez; Isabel Lopez-Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There was an increased number of cases of meningoencephalitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, after the successful vaccination campaigns against Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae. This paper aims at describing the clinical characteristics, the laboratory findings, the complications, and the therapeutic management of these patients, who have been suffering from this disease since 1993 to 2006. METHOD: Twelve children with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephali...

  20. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus' peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  1. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Punia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol (PEG side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus than Escherichia coli (E. coli suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus’ peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment.

  2. Portable microsystem integrates multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations and a surface stress biosensor to detect red blood cells for hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Feng, Qiliang; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Huiming; Ji, Jianlong; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia intensity has been suggested as a vital factor for the growth of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease. However, there is no effective and rapid diagnostic method. As a powerful platform for bio-particles testing, biosensors integrated with microfluidics offer great potential for a new generation of portable point of care systems. In this paper, we describe a novel portable microsystem consisting of a multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations (MDM) device and a surface stress biosensor to separate and detect red blood cells (RBCs) for diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The peripheral circuit to power the interdigitated electrode array of the MDM device and the surface stress biosensor test platform were integrated into a portable signal system. The MDM includes a preparing region, a focusing region, and a sorting region. Simulation and experimental results show the RBCs trajectories when they are subjected to the positive DEP force, allowing the successful sorting of living/dead RBCs. Separated RBCs are then transported to the biosensor and the capacitance values resulting from the variation of surface stress were measured. The diagnosis of hemolytic anemia can be realized by detecting RBCs and the portable microsystem provides the assessment to the hemolytic anemia patient. PMID:27647457

  3. [Non-toxigenic hemolytic Vibrio cholerae non-O1 non-O139 fatal septicemia. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño L, Isabel; Puebla A, Claudio; Guerra A, Francisco; Jensen F, Daniela; Núñez B, Harold; Ulloa F, María T; Osorio A, Carlos G

    2009-09-01

    We report a 70-year-old woman, who had recently consumed shellfish, that was admitted to the intensive care unit with septic shock and died 19 hours later due to a multi-organic failure. Microbiological, serological and molecular assays confirmed a hemolytic tdh+ Vibrio cholerae non-01, non 0139 as the etiologic agent. PMID:20011960

  4. Lack of evidence of a beneficial effect of azathioprine immune-mediated hemolytic anemia: a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Spil, Van W.E.; Junius, G.; Dekker, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Azathioprine is used as an immunosuppressant in canine immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA), but this potentially toxic and carcinogenic drug has not been proven to be beneficial. The aim of this study was to determine the difference in outcome and survival of dogs with idiopathic IMHA

  5. Complement factor H-associated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in monozygotic twins: Concordant presentation, discordant response to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Davin; K.H. Olie; R. Verlaak; F. Horuz; S. Florquin; J.J. Weening; J.W. Groothoff; L. Strain; T.H.J. Goodship

    2006-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome not associated with diarrhea (diarrhea negative, atypical) is less common than the diarrhea-positive typical form, but frequently results In end-stage renal failure. Although there are anecdotal cases of successful treatment with fresh frozen plasma alone, the value of this

  6. Concurrent presentation of hemolytic uremic syndrome in two adult siblings : effects of plasma therapy on hemolysis and renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Gameren, I I; Rensma, P L; Zijlstra, J G; de Wolf, J; de Jong, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We describe 2 sisters who presented with the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) almost simultaneously. In both patients an upper airway infection with Haemophilus influenzae immediately preceding HUS may have been the environmental trigger. Fresh plasma infusion had only minor therapeutic effects but p

  7. Streptococcus anginosus infections: crossing tissue planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Bernie Y; Miller, Wallace T

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus anginosus has long been recognized to cause invasive pyogenic infections. This holds true for thoracic infections where S. anginosus has a propensity for abscess and empyema formation. Early diagnosis is important given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with thoracic S. anginosus infections. Yet, distinguishing thoracic S. anginosus clinically is difficult. We present three cases of thoracic S. anginosus that demonstrated radiographic extension across tissue planes, including the interlobar fissure, diaphragm, and chest wall. Few infectious etiologies are known to cross tissue planes. Accordingly, we propose S. anginosus be considered among the differential diagnosis of potential infectious etiologies causing radiographic extension across tissue planes.

  8. Lactational mastitis caused by Streptococcus lactarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Daniel; Fernández, Cristina; López-Garrido, Beatriz; Pérez-Balsalobre, Mercedes; Losa, Cristina; Medina-Pascual, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Human infections caused by Streptococcus lactarius have not been previously reported. In the present report, we describe a lactational mastitis caused by this organism. The infection occurred in a 28-year-old breast-feeding female, with a 10-days history of moderate pain on the right breast. The patient was cured after antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin for 21 days. Our case shows that S. lactarius should be considered as a cause of lactational mastitis. The introduction of molecular microbiology techniques can be extremely useful for knowing the implication of streptococci in lactational mastitis. PMID:27220606

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  10. Ferrous iron transport in Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, S.L.; Arcenaeux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.; Martin, M.E.; Aranha, H.

    1986-12-01

    Radioiron uptake from /sup 59/FeCl/sub 3/ by Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 was increased by anaerobiosis, sodium ascorbate, and phenazine methosulfate (PMS), although there was a 10-min lag before PMS stimulation was evident. The reductant ascorbate may have provided ferrous iron. The PMS was reduced by the cells, and the reduced PMS then may have generated ferrous iron for transport; reduced PMS also may have depleted dissolved oxygen. It was concluded that S. mutans transports only ferrous iron, utilizing reductants furnished by glucose metabolism to reduce iron prior to its uptake.

  11. Lack of SOS repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild-type strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae were non-mutable by UV radiation and thymidine starvation. Moreover, UV-irradiated pneumococcal ω2 phages were not reactivated in an irradiated host. This suggests that, in pneumococcus, there is no efficient inducible repair process similar to the SOS repair described in detail for E. coli. We also report that mutations cannot be induced by a process thought to be linked to competence during transformation with isogenic wild-type DNA either on wild-type strains or in strains in which the hex function of excision and repair of mismatched bases is inactive. (orig.)

  12. Streptococcus agalactiae pyomyositis in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Deepa; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Panikkath, Ragesh; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-07-01

    Pyomyositis is an acute infectious disorder affecting the skeletal muscle. Although seen more commonly in the tropics, cases are being reported in temperate countries, including the United States. We report a case of nontropical pyomyositis in a 58-year-old diabetic man who presented with a vague chest wall swelling. His initial clinical presentation and imaging findings suggested an intramuscular hematoma. He later developed fever with increased swelling, and pyomyositis was diagnosed after an aspiration of the swelling yielded Streptococcus agalactiae. Aspiration of the abscess and the use of appropriate antibiotics led to complete resolution of the disease. We discuss possible factors in diabetics that might predispose them to pyomyositis. PMID:27365874

  13. GidA, a tRNA modification enzyme, contributes to the growth and virulence of Streptococcus suis serotype 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting eGao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA, is a tRNA modification enzyme functioning together with MnmE in the addition of a carboxymethylaminomethyl group to position 5 of the anticodon wobble uridine of tRNA. Here, we report a GidA homologue from a Chinese isolate SC-19 of the zoonotic Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2. gidA disruption led to a defective growth, increased capsule thickness, and reduced hemolytic activity. Moreover, the gidA deletion mutant (ΔgidA displayed reduced mortality and bacterial loads in mice, reduced ability of adhesion to and invasion in epithelial cells, and increased sensitivity to phagocytosis. The iTRAQ analysis identified 372 differentially expressed (182 up- and 190 down-regulated proteins in ΔgidA and SC-19. Numerous DNA replication, cell division and virulence associated proteins were downregulated, whereas many capsule synthesis enzymes were upregulated by gidA disruption. This is consistent with the phenotypes of the mutant. Thus, GidA is a translational regulator that plays an important role in the growth, cell division, capsule biosynthesis, and virulence of SS2. Our findings provide new insight into the regulatory function of GidA in bacterial pathogens.

  14. Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentrations in sickle cell disease are related to the hemolytic phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landburg, P. P.; Teerlink, T.; Biemond, B. J.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Muskiet, F. A. J.; Duits, A. J.; Schnog, J. B.; Grp, C. U. R. A. M. A. Study

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is associated with pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in sickle cell disease (SCD). We studied the relationship of ADMA to other SCD-related complications. Plasma ADMA and associated parameters were determined in 52 HbSS/HbS beta(0)-thalassemia and 24 HbSC/HbS beta(+)-th

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pyogenes collected in Austria and Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattringer, Rainer; Sauermann, Robert; Lagler, Heimo; Stich, Karin; Buxbaum, Astrid; Graninger, Wolfgang; Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2004-09-01

    A total of 341 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from Vienna, Austria and three Hungarian cities were tested for susceptibility to four macrolides and 12 other antibiotics. All isolates were fully susceptible to penicillin and the other beta-lactams tested. A high level of tetracycline resistance was found in Austria (26.7%) and in Hungary (30.5%). The rate of resistance to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin was 4.7% in Vienna and 3.7% in the Hungarian communities. In both countries, the MIC(90) values of erythromycin and clarithromycin were 0.12 mg/L and the MIC(90) of josamycin was 0.5mg/L. The M phenotype of resistance conferred by the mefA genes was predominant (n = 9) among the macrolide-resistant isolates (n = 14).

  16. Studies of hemolytical and antimicrobical action of Amanita virosa Secr. and Mycena pura /Fr./ Kumm. poisonous mushrooms lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danileuchenko V. V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study hemolytical and antimicrobical action of two new lectins, obtained from fruit bodies of poisonous basidial mushrooms of A. virosa Secr. and M. pura /Fr./ Kumm. Methods. Research on hemolytical action of lectins was conducted on the erythrocytes of human and animals. The experiments on osmotic protection of erythrocytes were performed in the presence of polyethylenglycols of different molecular mass (in a range from 400 to 4000 Da. Antimicrobical activity of lectins was studied by determination of area delay of growth of culture of different types of microorganisms on the Petri dish in an agaric media. Results. Both lectins hemolyse the erythrocytes of rabbit, human, rat and dog and do not hemolyse the erythrocytes of cow and ship in concentration of 1 mg/ml. The rabbit erythrocytes are most sensitive to hemolytical action of lectins, while hemolytic ability of A. virosa lectin is higher. Hemolysis was not observed in the presence of PEG of molecular mass over 1,350 Da. Action of lectins on 10 types of microorganisms was investigated. Lectins inhibited mainly growth of grammpositive microorganisms and protey. For most tested microorganisms antimicrobial action of Mycena lectin is stronger comparing with A. virosa lectin. Conclusions. Two new hemolytical lectins are found in the fruit bodies of mushrooms-basidiomycetes. The lectin formed ion-permeable pores in membrane of erythrocytes with the hydrodynamic diameter smaller than 2.3 nm and larger than 1.6 nm. These lectins displays also antimicrobial activity and by the sum of these features are similar to the cytolytic lectins of lower invertebrates.

  17. Characterization of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity of Synthetic Pandinin 2 Variants and Their Inhibition against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alexis; Villegas, Elba; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The contention and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacteria that cause infectious diseases require the use of new type of antibiotics. Pandinin 2 (Pin2) is a scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide highly hemolytic that has a central proline residue. This residue forms a structural “kink” linked to its pore-forming activity towards human erythrocytes. In this work, the residue Pro14 of Pin2 was both substituted and flanked using glycine residues (P14G and P14GPG) based on the low hemolytic activities of antimicrobial peptides with structural motifs Gly and GlyProGly such as magainin 2 and ponericin G1, respectively. The two Pin2 variants showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and M. tuberculosis. However, Pin2 [GPG] was less hemolytic (30%) than that of Pin2 [G] variant. In addition, based on the primary structure of Pin2 [G] and Pin2 [GPG], two short peptide variants were designed and chemically synthesized keeping attention to their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity and propensity to adopt alpha-helical conformations. The aim to design these two short antimicrobial peptides was to avoid the drawback cost associated to the synthesis of peptides with large sequences. The short Pin2 variants named Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] showed antibiotic activity against E. coli and M. tuberculosis. Besides, Pin2 [14] presented only 25% of hemolysis toward human erythrocytes at concentrations as high as 100 µM, while the peptide Pin2 [17] did not show any hemolytic effect at the same concentration. Furthermore, these short antimicrobial peptides had better activity at molar concentrations against multidrug resistance M. tuberculosis than that of the conventional antibiotics ethambutol, isoniazid and rifampicin. Therefore, Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] have the potential to be used as an alternative antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis agents with reduced hemolytic effects. PMID:25019413

  18. Ulcerative Colitis, Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Gilmour

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 15-month-old female who initially presented with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is described. She developed bloody stools and was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC. Investigations of persistent hepatomegaly revealed primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. The association of AIHA, UC and PSC has never been reported. All these conditions entail impaired immunoregulation. Patients with a clustering of autoimmune diseases may help to delineate the pathogenesis of UC. Autoimmune phenomena may be prominent in inflammatory bowel disease. UC, in particular, exhibits a high incidence of associated autoimmune diseases including hypothyroidism, PSC, vitiligo and alopecia areata. AIHA is well described in 0.5% to 1.0% of adult UC patients but has not been reported in children with UC.

  19. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  20. A rare case of concurrent signet-ring carcinoma of breast and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Kelly; Bae, Esther; Park, Hanna; Hussain, Farabi

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) can be an uncommon presentation of an underlying malignancy, most often due to signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC). Additionally, pure SRCC in a breast primary-tumor comprises anemia as the first manifestation of metastatic signet-ring cell carcinoma of unknown origin: a case report and review of literature. Kor J Lab Med 2011;31:157-61). To the best of our knowledge, the combination of these two entities, pure breast primary SRCC along with MAHA, has not been reported. Here, we present such a rare case. We also evaluate the current literature regarding this and similar disease processes, of which evidence is scarce and further research is needed. PMID:27587305

  1. Campylobacter-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Emily Elizabeth; Hangartner, Robert; Macdougall, Iain

    2016-03-01

    Common causes of pulmonary-renal syndrome include anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positive vasculitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We describe a case of life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage associated with Campylobacter hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which we believe is a new disease entity. We hypothesize that the cause of this pulmonary-renal syndrome was an immunological reaction to Campylobacter; and that the initiation of high-dose steroids was responsible for the rapid reversal of the patient's pulmonary and renal impairment. The aim of this article is to raise awareness of this unusual cause of a pulmonary-renal syndrome, guiding physicians to recognize it as a potential complication, and to consider high-dose steroids in managing the condition. PMID:26001543

  2. Incomplete hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Argentinean children with bloody diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, E L; Contrini, M M; Devoto, S; de Rosa, M F; Graña, M G; Aversa, L; Gómez, H F; Genero, M H; Cleary, T G

    1995-09-01

    Argentina has an exceptionally high frequency of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). We sought to define prospectively the role of verocytotoxins (Shiga-like toxins [SLTs]) in 254 Argentinean children with grossly bloody diarrhea during spring and summer. Free fecal SLTs (I/II) and/or DNA probe-positive isolates were found in 99 (39%) of the children. During the follow-up period, HUS developed in 6 patients (4 with evidence of recent SLT infection based on stool studies); another 14 patients had some, but not all, of the abnormalities seen in typical HUS. The development of HUS or incomplete HUS in these children was significantly associated with recent SLT-Escherichia coli infection (p = 0.024). The high incidence of SLT-associated bloody diarrhea in Argentina explains, at least partially, the unusually high frequency of HUS. Our data indicate that incomplete forms of HUS may be common in patients with SLT-associated bloody diarrhea.

  3. Modulation of Backbone Flexibility for Effective Dissociation of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity in Cyclic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Alberto; Thomsen, Thomas T; Britt, Hannah M; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Thulstrup, Peter W; Sanderson, John M; Hansen, Paul R

    2016-08-11

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapy is on the rise and threatens to evolve into a worldwide emergency: alternative solutions to current therapies are urgently needed. Cationic amphipathic peptides are potent membrane-active agents that hold promise as the next-generation therapy for multidrug-resistant infections. The peptides' behavior upon encountering the bacterial cell wall is crucial, and much effort has been dedicated to the investigation and optimization of this amphipathicity-driven interaction. In this study we examined the interaction of a novel series of nine-membered flexible cyclic AMPs with liposomes mimicking the characteristics of bacterial membranes. Employed techniques included circular dichroism and marker release assays, as well as microbiological experiments. Our analysis was aimed at correlating ring flexibility with their antimicrobial, hemolytic, and membrane activity. By doing so, we obtained useful insights to guide the optimization of cyclic antimicrobial peptides via modulation of their backbone flexibility without loss of activity. PMID:27563396

  4. Anti B cell targeted therapy for autoimmune hemolytic anemia in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshak Makadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is an immune mediated destruction of erythrocytes, which has a good prognosis in children. It is known to have chronic, remitting or relapsing course, especially in infants and adolescents. Treatment of refractory or relapsing AIHA is a challenge as the other aim of the treatment is to avoid prolonged exposure to steroids or other immunosuppressants in small children. Rituximab is used in patients who are non-responsive to conventional treatment such as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and transfusion therapy. It has varying therapeutic success rate. We report a case of AIHA in a 4-month-old infant who had ill-sustained response to conventional therapy, but responded to rituximab.

  5. Adrenal failure followed by status epilepticus and hemolytic anemia in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bures Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 14 year old boy who presented with the symptoms abdominal pain, fever and proteinuria. A hematoma in the region of the right pararenal space was diagnosed. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were positive and serum cortisol was normal. Ten days after admission the boy suddenly suffered generalized seizures due to low serum sodium. As well, the patient developed hemolytic anemia, acute elevated liver enzymes, hematuria and increased proteinuria. At this time a second hemorrhage of the left adrenal gland was documented. Adrenal function tests revealed adrenal insufficiency. We suspected microthromboses in the adrenals and secondary bleeding and treated the boy with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and phenprocoumon. Conclusion Adrenal failure is a rare complication of APS in children with only five cases reported to date. As shown in our patient, this syndrome can manifest in a diverse set of simultaneously occurring symptoms.

  6. Role of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes in the Pathophysiology of Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A. Exeni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx, through an interaction with its globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 receptor. Although, Stx is the main pathogenic factor and necessary for HUS development, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the inflammatory response is able to potentiate Stx toxicity. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS and neutrophils (PMN represent two central components of inflammation during a Gram-negative infection. In this regard, patients with high peripheral PMN counts at presentation have a poor prognosis. In the present review, we discuss the contribution of experimental models and patient's studies in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of HUS.

  7. Role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the pathophysiology of typical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A; Fernández, Gabriela C; Palermo, Marina S

    2007-08-10

    Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx), through an interaction with its globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor. Although, Stx is the main pathogenic factor and necessary for HUS development, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the inflammatory response is able to potentiate Stx toxicity. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and neutrophils (PMN) represent two central components of inflammation during a Gram-negative infection. In this regard, patients with high peripheral PMN counts at presentation have a poor prognosis. In the present review, we discuss the contribution of experimental models and patient's studies in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of HUS.

  8. Influence of clavulanic acid on the activity of amoxicillin against an experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae-Staphylococcus aureus mixed respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G M; Boon, R J; Beale, A S

    1990-01-01

    An experimental respiratory infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae was established in weanling rats by intrabronchial instillation. Treatment of this infection with amoxicillin rapidly eliminated the pneumococci from the lung tissue. A beta-lactamase-producing strain of Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in a similar manner, did not persist adequately in the lungs long enough to permit a reasonable assessment of the therapy, but staphylococcal survival was extended in the lungs of rats infected 24 h previously with S. pneumoniae. Amoxicillin therapy was relatively ineffective against the pneumococci in this polymicrobial infection and had no effect on the growth of S. aureus. In contrast, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid eliminated the pneumococci from the lung tissue and brought about a reduction in the numbers of staphylococci. The data illustrate the utility of this model for the study of polymicrobial lung infections and demonstrate the role of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid in the treatment of polymicrobial infections involving beta-lactamase-producing bacteria. PMID:2327767

  9. Venom from Opisthacanthus elatus scorpion of Colombia, could be more hemolytic and less neurotoxic than thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Gómez, Sebastián; Vargas Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica; Quintana Castillo, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We report the first biochemical, biological, pharmacological and partial proteomic characterization studies of the Opisthancanthus elatus venom (Gervais, 1844) from Colombia. The Reverse Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography venom profile showed 28 main well-defined peaks, most eluting between 20 and 45min (18-30% of acetonitrile, respectively). High-resolution mass analysis indicates the presence of 106 components ranging from 806.59742Da to 16849.4139Da. O. elatus venom showed hemolytic activity and hydrolyzed the specific substrate BapNa suggesting the presence of proteins with serine-protease activity. Collected RP-HPLC fractions eluting at 52.6, 55.5, 55.8, 56.2, and 63.9min (PLA2 region between 33 and 40% of acetonitrile), showed hemolytic activity and hydrolyzed the synthetic substrate 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxy-benzoic acid, indicating the presence of compounds with phospholipases A2 activity. These RP-HPLC fractions, showed molecular masses values up to 13978.19546Da, corroborating the possible presence of the mentioned enzymes. Tryptic digestion and MS/MS analysis showed the presence of a phospholipase like fragment, similar to on described in other Opisthacanthus genus studies. No coagulant activity was observed. No larvicidal or antimicrobial activity was observed at concentrations evaluated. Lethal and toxic activity is expected at doses above 100mg/kg, no neurotoxic effects were detected at lower doses. In conclusion, O. elatus exhibits a venom with a predominant phospholipase A2 activity than thought; mammal's neurotoxic activity is expected above the 100mg/kg, which is very high compared to the venom from other neurotoxic scorpions.

  10. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT, antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2 had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well.

  11. Phenotypic features and phylogenetic background of extraintestinal hemolytic Escherichia coli responsible of mortality in puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetto, Sara; Ustulin, Martina; Citterio, Carlo Vittorio; Zanardello, Claudia; Vascellari, Marta; Vio, Denis; Conedera, Gabriella; Milone, Nicola Maria Ferro; Cocchi, Monia

    2015-08-31

    A 10-day-old litter of five puppies of Bracco Italiano dog breed showed weakness and diarrhea and, 2 days later, four of them died. At the same time, the bitch showed high hyperthermia (40 °C) and endometritis. The necropsy of a puppy revealed a severe lobar pneumonia accompanied with a bilateral nephrosis. No gross lesions were detected in other organs. Histopathology of the lung revealed severe multifocal fibrino-suppurative necrotizing bronchiolar-alveolitis associated with rod-shaped bacterial aggregates and diffuse interstitial lymphocytic infiltration. The kidney showed severe multifocal necrosis of the tubular epithelium and diffuse severe congestion of the parenchyma. A pure culture of hemolytic Escherichia coli carrying the Cnf-1 gene was identified, from both the puppy organs and bitch's milk. Moreover, phylo-typing assigned them to the phylogroup B2. Two weeks later, fecal samples from the bitch and the survived puppy were collected for a second microbiological analysis, identifying two hemolytic E. coli strains, Cnf positive and Cdt negative and Cnf and Cdt negative, respectively. Some E. coli pathogenic strains may cause enteric or extraintestinal disease. In dogs and cats, strains of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) produce specific virulent factors such as hemolysis and cytotoxin necrotizing factors (Cnf). In this episode, we hypothesize that the bitch's milk could be the main source of ExPEC infection causing high puppies mortality. The role of the bitch as a carrier could not be excluded: stressful conditions, such as pregnancy and delivery, would change the host-pathogen dynamics possibly increasing the release of the infectious burden.

  12. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  13. Antioxidant, hemolytic, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activities of the tropical Atlantic marine zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum

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    DANIEL B. ALENCAR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates are capable of synthesizing bioactive compounds, which may be beneficial to human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant, hemolytic, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of crude extract (70% EtOH, and dichloromethane (DCM, ethyl acetate (EtOAc, and aqueous (Aq fractions of the marine zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum. The phenolic compound contents of the crude extract, DCM, EtOAc and Aq fractions were 12.33, 18.17, 10.53, and 3.18 mg GAE per gram, respectively. DPPH radical scavenging activity showed slight variation. IC50 of crude extract, DCM, EtOAc and Aq fractions were 11.13, 11.25, 11.74, and 11.28 µg mL-1, respectively. Among the sample, ferrous ion chelating was the highest in crude extract (IC50 302.90 µg mL-1, followed by EtOAc, Aq, and DCM fractions with 457.77, 547.91, and 641.82 µg mL-1, respectively. Ferric-reducing antioxidant power showed optical density at about 0.5. The samples tested exhibited low hemolytic activity under 10% up to a concentration of 50 μg mL-1. No antimicrobial activity was observed against any of the tested bacterial strains. For the cytotoxic activity, LC50 of DCM, crude extract, EtOAc, and Aq were 52.10, 83.06, 86.34, and 117.45 μg mL-1, showing high toxicity.

  14. Structural insight into the role of Streptococcus parasanguinis Fap1 within oral biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, James A.; Simpson, Peter J.; Taylor, Jonathan; Benjamin, Stefi V.; Tagliaferri, Camille; Cota, Ernesto [Department of Biological Sciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Chen, Yi-Ywan M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Research Center for Pathogenic Bacteria, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hui [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Dentistry, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Matthews, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.matthews@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Biological Sciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of Streptococcus parasanguinis Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} at pH 5.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pH-dependent conformational changes mediated through electrostatic potential of Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fap1 facilitates pH-dependent biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model inter-Fap1 biofilm interactions. -- Abstract: The fimbriae-associated protein 1 (Fap1) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus parasanguinis, a primary colonizer of the oral cavity that plays an important role in the formation of dental plaque. Fap1 is an extracellular adhesive surface fibre belonging to the serine-rich repeat protein (SRRP) family, which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of streptococci and staphylococci. The N-terminal adhesive region of Fap1 (Fap1-NR) is composed of two domains (Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} and Fap1-NR{sub {beta}}) and is projected away from the bacterial surface via the extensive serine-rich repeat region, for adhesion to the salivary pellicle. The adhesive properties of Fap1 are modulated through a pH switch in which a reduction in pH results in a rearrangement between the Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} and Fap1-NR{sub {beta}} domains, which assists in the survival of S. parasanguinis in acidic environments. We have solved the structure of Fap1-NR{sub {alpha}} at pH 5.0 at 3.0 A resolution and reveal how subtle rearrangements of the 3-helix bundle combined with a change in electrostatic potential mediates 'opening' and activation of the adhesive region. Further, we show that pH-dependent changes are critical for biofilm formation and present an atomic model for the inter-Fap1-NR interactions which have been assigned an important role in the biofilm formation.

  15. [Thousand faces of Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Bálint Gergely; Lénárt, Katalin Szidónia; Kádár, Béla; Gombos, Andrea; Dezsényi, Balázs; Szanka, Judit; Bobek, Ilona; Prinz, Gyula

    2015-11-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are high worldwide and in Hungary among paediatric as well as adult populations. Pneumococci account for 35-40% of community acquired adult pneumonias requiring hospitalization, while 25-30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias are accompanied by bacteraemia. 5-7% of all infections are fatal but this rate is exponentially higher in high risk patients and elderly people. Mortality could reach 20% among patients with severe invasive pneumococcal infections. Complications may develop despite administration of adequate antibiotics. The authors summarize the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, pathogenesis of non-invasive and invasive disease and present basic clinical aspects through demonstration of four cases. Early risk stratification, sampling of hemocultures, administration of antibiotics and wider application of active immunization could reduce the mortality of invasive disease. Anti-pneumococcal vaccination is advisable for adults of ≥50 years and high risk patients of ≥18 years who are susceptible to pneumococcal disease. PMID:26498896

  16. Diverse virulent pneumophages infect Streptococcus mitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Ouennane

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mitis has emerged as one of the leading causes of bacterial endocarditis and is related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic resistance has also increased among strains of S. mitis and S. pneumoniae. Phages are being reinvestigated as alternatives to antibiotics for managing infections. In this study, the two virulent phages Cp-1 (Podoviridae and Dp-1 (Siphoviridae, previously isolated from S. pneumoniae, were found to also infect S. mitis. Microbiological assays showed that both pneumophages could not only replicate in S. mitis but also produced more visible plaques on this host. However, the burst size and phage adsorption data were lower in S. mitis as compared to S. pneumoniae. A comparison of the genomes of each phage grown on both hosts produced identical nucleotide sequences, confirming that the same phages infect both bacterial species. We also discovered that the genomic sequence of podophage Cp-1 of the Félix d'Hérelle collection is different than the previously reported sequence and thus renamed SOCP.

  17. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    -looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  18. Evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its close commensal relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, Mogens; Poulsen, Knud; Blomqvist, Trinelise;

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a member of the Mitis group of streptococci which, according to 16S rRNA-sequence based phylogenetic reconstruction, includes 12 species. While other species of this group are considered prototypes of commensal bacteria, S. pneumoniae is among the most frequent microbial...... oralis and Streptococcus infantis. The remaining lineages of this distinct cluster are commensals previously collectively referred to as Streptococcus mitis and each represent separate species by traditional taxonomic standard. Virulence genes including the operon for capsule polysaccharide synthesis...

  19. Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius: clinical correlates of more accurate identification of isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, K L; Miller, S I; Garner, C V; Ferraro, M J; Calderwood, S B

    1989-01-01

    Two biotypes of Streptococcus bovis can be identified by laboratory testing and can be distinguished from the phenotypically similar organism Streptococcus salivarius. We assessed the clinical relevance of careful identification of these organisms in 68 patients with streptococcal bacteremia caused by these similar species. S. bovis was more likely to be clinically significant when isolated from blood (89%) than was S. salivarius (23%). There was a striking association between S. bovis I bacteremia and underlying endocarditis (94%) compared with that of S. bovis II bacteremia (18%). Bacteremia with S. bovis I was also highly correlated with an underlying colonic neoplasm (71% of patients overall, 100% of those with thorough colonic examinations) compared with bacteremia due to S. bovis II or S. salivarius (17% overall, 25% of patients with thorough colonic examinations). We conclude that careful identification of streptococcal bacteremic isolates as S. bovis biotype I provides clinically important information and should be more widely applied. PMID:2915024

  20. Isolation and Identification of Swine Streptococcus suis Pathogeny and Its Drug Sensitive Test%猪链球菌病病原的分离鉴定及药敏试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范国英; 杨雪峰; 刘俊伟; 陈俊杰

    2012-01-01

    Based on the clinical samples of suspected streptococcic pigs from a pig farm of Xinxiang, the pathogens were I-dentified after isolation and culture, and then were used to do biochemistry identification, animal test and drug sensitive test. The results showed that the isolated pathogens were a -hemolytic Streptococcus suis. And it was hypersensitive to Bawangjinzhen, rifampicin and saratiofur, and high sensitive to tilmicosin, cefazolin sodium, ampicillin sodium, zhu kang-II.%采集疑似猪链球菌病的病猪病料,经病原分离培养、生化鉴定、动物试验和药教试验,结果表明所分离的细菌为α溶血链球菌(α-hemolytic streptococci.),该菌对霸王金针、利福平、沙拉噻呋极敏,对替米考星、头孢唑啉钠、氨苄西林钠、猪康2号为高敏.

  1. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  2. Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae and the human host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, S.P. van

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, the pneumococcus, is an important human pathogen causing considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. This thesis addresses several interactions between pneumococcus and man. The first part of the thesis deals with the host immune response against pneumococci. We studied

  3. Quantification of bovine oxylipids during intramammary Streptococcus uberis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus uberis mastitis results in severe mammary tissue damage in dairy cows due to uncontrolled inflammation. Oxylipids are potent lipid mediators that orchestrate pathogen-induced inflammatory responses, however, changes in oxylipid biosynthesis during S. uberis mastitis are unknown. Thus, ...

  4. Novel metabolic activity indicator in Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Deng; M.A. Hoogenkamp; J.M. ten Cate; W. Crielaard

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of micro-organisms in biofilms requires novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries preventive agents in actual biofilms. Hence we investigated fluorescence intensity (FI) in Streptococcus mutans biofilms constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Upo

  5. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Erkus, O.; Boekhorst, J.; Goffau, M. de; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  6. Molecular typing of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic variability among Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recovered from fish was characterized using single-stranded conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) analysis of the intergenic spacer region (ISR), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting. A total of 49 S. agalactiae ...

  7. Streptococcus agalactiae infection in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suanyuk, N.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated from cultured tilapia in Surat Thani province. Isolates were Gram-positive cocci, catalase negative, alpha-haemolytic and serogroup B. Streptococcal-infected fish showed various swimming abnormalities such as swimming on their side, erratic surface or bottom swimming including serpentine movement, exophthalmia and opacity. Internally, splenomegaly, ascites as well as pale liver discoloration were observed. Fish experimentally infected by peritoneal injection using 101 -108 CFU/ fish showed 20-90% mortality within 10 days and the LD50 was 3.60x101 - 1.72x107 CFU. Haematocrit, haemoglobin, plasma protein and blood cell values of infected and moribund fish were significantly decreased. Histopathological findings included the occurrence of inflammation, cells necrosis, infiltration of lymphocytes and the formation of granulomas in the infected organs.

  8. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25461843

  9. DNA Microarray-Based Typing of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Nitschke, Heike; Slickers, Peter; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae frequently colonizes the urogenital tract, and it is a major cause of bacterial septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia in newborns. For typing purposes, a microarray targeting group B streptococcus (GBS) virulence-associated markers and resistance genes was designed and validated with reference strains, as well as clinical and veterinary isolates. Selected isolates were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing. It was observed that putative typing markers, such as ...

  10. Proteomic Biomarkers Associated with Streptococcus agalactiae Invasive Genogroups

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Lanotte; Marylise Perivier; Eve Haguenoer; Laurent Mereghetti; Christophe Burucoa; Stéphane Claverol; Christo Atanassov

    2013-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae) is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis in newborns and an etiological agent of meningitis, endocarditis, osteoarticular and soft tissue infections in adults. GBS isolates are routinely clustered in serotypes and in genotypes. At present one GBS sequence type (i.e. ST17) is considered to be closely associated with bacterial invasiveness and novel proteomic biomarkers could make a valuable contribution to currently available GBS typing ...

  11. Identification of Major Outer Surface Proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Martin J. G.; Moore, Joanne C.; Lane, Jonathan D.; Wilson, Rebecca; Pribul, Philippa K.; Younes, Zabin N.; Dobson, Richard J; Everest, Paul; Reason, Andrew J.; Redfern, Joanne M.; Greer, Fiona M.; Paxton, Thanai; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Feldman, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify the major outer surface proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), a proteomic analysis was undertaken. An extract of the outer surface proteins was separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The visualized spots were identified through a combination of peptide sequencing and reverse genetic methodologies. Of the 30 major spots identified as S. agalactiae specific, 27 have been identified. Six of these proteins, previously unidentified in S. agalactiae, were ...

  12. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Lianci; Kang, Shuai; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Li, Zhengwen; Zou, Yuanfeng; Liang, Xiaoxia; Li, Lixia; He, Changliang; Ye, Gang; Yin, Lizi; Shi, Fei; Lv, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, morphology and protein of the S. agalactiae cells treated with berberine. The antibacterial susceptibility test result indicated minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae was 78 μg/mL and the time-kill curves showed the correlation of concentration-time. After the bacteria was exposed to 78 μg/mL berberine, t...

  13. Characterization of the adherence properties of Streptococcus salivarius.

    OpenAIRE

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    The adherence and aggregation properties of 46 human oral Streptococcus salivarius isolates were examined. A total of 41% of the isolates aggregated with whole human saliva, 50% aggregated with human erythrocytes, and 85% adhered to human buccal epithelial cells. Strains that aggregated with saliva and erythrocytes usually reacted with Streptococcus group K typing serum whereas the non-hemagglutinating strains did not. K+ strains also adhered more strongly to human buccal epithelial cells tha...

  14. STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE KERATITIS FOLLOWING LASER IN SITU KERATOMILEUSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old man underwent bilateral laser in situ keratomileusis and developed Streptococcus pneumoniae keratitis after surgery.This complication occurred one day after the procedure in both eyes.Topical and systemic antibiotics were promptly administered.Bacterial culture was performed following corneal flap lift and scraping of the lesions.Afterwards,the therapeutic regimen was readjusted according to the culture results.Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified from the culture.Three months after the sur...

  15. Contralateral compartment syndrome inoculated by invasive group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiwen Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Compartment syndrome is a rare but a well-documented complication in patients with trauma-induced group A streptococcus infection. Here, we present a case of a male who developed compartment syndrome on the left lower extremity after an injury inoculated by group A streptococcus on the right lower extremity. The patient was resuscitated with antibiotics, urgent fasciotomy, and immunoglobulin. The patient was eventually transferred to a burn center for further care.

  16. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  17. Beta-carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemotherapy for a blood cancer called lymphoblastic leukemia. Mental performance. Some evidence suggests that taking beta-carotene ... One is water-based, and the other is oil-based. Studies show that the water-based version ...

  18. [High beta tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our activities on High Beta Tokamak Research during the past 20 months of the present grant period can be divided into six areas: reconstruction and modeling of high beta equilibria in HBT; measurement and analysis of MHD instabilities observed in HBT; measurements of impurity transport; diagnostic development on HBT; numerical parameterization of the second stability regime; and conceptual design and assembly of HBT-EP. Each of these is described in some detail in the sections of this progress report

  19. The effect of clofibrate with phototherapy in late pre-term newborns with non-hemolytic jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Sakha Sedigheh Hossein; Gharehbaghi Manizheh; Rahbani Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background : Despite an understanding of the enzymatic pathways leading to bilirubin production and degradation, very few pharmacologic interventions are utilized and the mainstay of treatment remains phototherapy. Aims : To evaluate the efficacy of clofibrate in reducing total serum bilirubin levels in late pre-term neonates with non-hemolytic jaundice. Design and Setting : Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial; tertiary level neonatal unit. Materials and Methods : A randomized...

  20. Hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn due to maternal red blood cell alloantibodies in the Malay population

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nazri Hassan; Noor Haslina Mohd Noor; Shah Reza Johan Noor; Salamah Ahmad Sukri; Rapiaah Mustafa; Hans Van Rostenberghe Luc Aster

    2014-01-01

    Background: Maternal red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization may lead to production of harmful antibodies that result in hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN). There is insufficient data on the prevalence of HDFN due to RBC alloantibodies in the Malay neonatal population. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HDFN in the Malay neonatal population due to clinically significant RBC alloantibodies. Subjects and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in Transf...

  1. An in vitro Comparative study upon the Hemolytic, Thrombogenic, Coagulation parameters and Stability properties of the Hemiscorpiuslepturus Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedian, R.,; Hoseiny, S.M.,; M. Kamyab; Mansury, R.,; Seyedian , N.,; Gharibi, S.,; Zare Mirakabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Hemiscorpius lepturus belonging to Hemiscorpiidae family is the most venomous of all types of scorpion existing in south west of Iran causing hemoglobinuria and dermal lesions by envenomation. We compare the hemolytic pattern upon time in different domestic animals upon time according to their different sphingomyelin contents. In addition other in vitro hematologic parameters, platelet lysis, coagulation changes and finally preservative factors (temperature, pH, protases) are discussed. The h...

  2. Strategies for Surveillance of Pediatric Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), 2000–2007

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Kanyin L.; Apostal, Mirasol; Comstock, Nicole; Hurd, Sharon; Webb, Tameka Hayes; Mickelson, Stephanie; Scheftel, Joni; Smith, Glenda; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Boothe, Effie; GOULD, L. HANNAH

    2012-01-01

    Background.  Postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute kidney failure among US children. The Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) conducts population-based surveillance of pediatric HUS to measure the incidence of disease and to validate surveillance trends in associated Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection. Methods.  We report the incidence of pediatric HUS, which is defined as HUS in children

  3. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  4. In Vitro Activities of Tigecycline against Erythromycin-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae: Mechanisms of Macrolide and Tetracycline Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Betriu, C.; Culebras, E.; Rodríguez-Avial, I.; Gómez, M.; Sánchez, B. A.; Picazo, J J

    2004-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline was tested against erythromycin-resistant streptococci (107 Streptococcus pyogenes and 98 Streptococcus agalactiae strains). The presence of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes was determined by PCR. Among S. pyogenes strains the most prevalent gene was mef(A) (91.6%). The erm(B) gene was the most prevalent (65.3%) among S. agalactiae strains. Tigecycline proved to be very active against all the isolates tested (MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested we...

  5. Extensive Adaptive Changes Occur in the Transcriptome of Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus) in Response to Incubation with Human Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Mereghetti; Izabela Sitkiewicz; Nicole M Green; Musser, James M.

    2008-01-01

    To enhance understanding of how Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus, GBS) adapts during invasive infection, we performed a whole-genome transcriptome analysis after incubation with whole human blood. Global changes occurred in the GBS transcriptome rapidly in response to blood contact following shift from growth in a rich laboratory medium. Most (83%) of the significantly altered transcripts were down-regulated after 30 minutes of incubation in blood, and all functional categories...

  6. Influence of time, toothpaste and saliva in the retention of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis on different toothbrushes

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Caroline SCHMIDT; Miriam BUX; Elisabeth FILIPUZZI-JENNY; Eva Maria KULIK; Waltimo, Tuomas; WEIGER, Roland; Walter, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The intraoral transmission of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic species seems to be facilitated by contaminated toothbrushes and other oral hygiene devices. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the in vitro retention and survival rate of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis on different toothbrushes. The impacts of human saliva and antimicrobial toothpaste on these parameters were further evaluated. Material and Methods: Part I: Four toothbrushes (Colgate 3...

  7. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia Barrientos; Herrera, Christian L.; Gloria Montenegro; Ximena Ortega; Jorge Veloz; Marysol Alvear; Alejandro Cuevas; Nicolás Saavedra; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from t...

  8. Development of Primer Sets for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification that Enables Rapid and Specific Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguo Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP for identification and differentiation of these three pathogens are not available. With the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as targets, four sets of LAMP primers were designed for identification and differentiation of S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and S. agalactiae. The detection limit of all four LAMP primer sets were 0.1 pg DNA template per reaction, the LAMP method with 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers as the targets can differentiate the three pathogens, which is potentially useful in epidemiological studies.

  9. Antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of seaweed extracts Ulva fasciata (Delile 1813) from Mandapam, Southeast coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Priyadharshini; S Bragadeeswaran; K Prabhu; S Sophia Rani

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the In vitro antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of marine macroalgaeUlva fasciata (U. fasciata) collected from Mandapam coastal waters, and to identify certain seaweed extracts that can act as an alternative of commonly used antibiotics. Methods:Seaweeds U. fasciata was collected from Gulf of Mannar, Southeast Coastal Region, Mandapam, Tamil Nadu and was screened for antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. Methanol, butanol and aqueous extracts were tested against selected fish pathogens, Aeromonas hydrophila,Pseudomonas fluorescens, Proteus sp. Vibrio alginolyticus (V. alginolyticus) and Enterobacter sp. and fungal pathogens Rhizopus sp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus sp., Aspergillus niger and Candida sp. The extract was subjected to TLC to determine the presences of peptides and amide groups. And the hemolytic activity was assayed. Results: Maximum of 16 mm inhibition zone was observed against V. alginolyticus and the minimum 12 mm against Enterobacter sp., respectively.U. fasciata showed poor activity against the fungal pathogens. The present results showed the use of seaweeds as an antimicrobial agents for pharmacology or as a health-promoting food for aquaculture. Conclusions: The screening result confirms that these seaweeds can be further studied and used as possible source of antimicrobial compounds.

  10. [Comparative study of the antimicrobial effect of various cavity liners used in conservative dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola Suñé, J; Espias Gómez, A; Canalda Sahli, C

    1989-01-01

    We have compared the microbiological activity of the following cavity liners: Life, Dycal II, Calcipulpe, Pure calcium hydroxide and Cavitec; against five different bacterial strains: Veillonella parvula, Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus s.p., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus beta hemolytic: The results demonstrate the higher antimicrobial activity of the manufactured cavity liners with calcium hydroxide base in comparison with the pure calcium hydroxide. PMID:2638022

  11. [Comparative study of the antimicrobial effect of various cavity liners used in conservative dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola Suñé, J; Espias Gómez, A; Canalda Sahli, C

    1989-01-01

    We have compared the microbiological activity of the following cavity liners: Life, Dycal II, Calcipulpe, Pure calcium hydroxide and Cavitec; against five different bacterial strains: Veillonella parvula, Bacteroides fragilis, Peptococcus s.p., Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus beta hemolytic: The results demonstrate the higher antimicrobial activity of the manufactured cavity liners with calcium hydroxide base in comparison with the pure calcium hydroxide.

  12. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  13. Antibiotic resistance of streptococcus pneumoniae and haemophilus influenzae isolated from respiratory tract specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Eda Aliskan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are two of the major pathogens in respiratory infections, treatment is usually started empirically. The aim of this study was to detect in vitro resistance rates of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae strains isolated from different lower respiratory clinical samples to the antibotics which are used for therapy of infections due to these pathogens. Material and Methods: Seventy seven S.pneumoniae and 117 H.influenzae strains, isolated from patients were included in the study. S.pneumoniae isolates which gave an inhibition zone diameter of >20 mm for oxacillin were considered susceptible for penicilin. For the isolates which had an oxacillin zone diameter of 2 mg/l and 31.1 % were intermediately resistant to parenteral penicillin. Resistance rates to antibiotics were as follows: erythromycin 40 %, trimethoprim/sulphametoxazole (TMP/SMX 54.5 % and ofloxacin 6.4%. beta-lactamases were detected in 15.6% of the H.influenzae isolates by nitrocefin positivity. Conclusion: H.influenzae strains (8.6% were identified as beta-lactamase negative ampicillin resistant (BLNAR strains. Resistance rates for other antibiotics were as follows: ampicillin 28.6%, cefaclor 36.5% , cefuroxime 30.1%, clarithromycin 9.6%, cloramphenicol 7% and TMP-SMX 43.9%. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 201-207

  14. Early-onset neutropenia induced by rituximab in a patient with lupus nephritis and hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Vilá, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 10(9)/L) after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m(2) weekly × 4) given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections. PMID:25767732

  15. Early-Onset Neutropenia Induced by Rituximab in a Patient with Lupus Nephritis and Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangelí Arroyo-Ávila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 109/L after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m2 weekly × 4 given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections.

  16. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-09-01

    Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients.

  17. Life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: successful seletive splenic artery embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    matteo molica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy.

  18. Case report: Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernman, Riina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Korhonen, Anu; Haimila, Katri; Sareneva, Inna; Sulin, Kati; Kuosmanen, Malla; Sainio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anti-G is commonly present with anti-D and/or anti-C and can confuse serological investigations. in general, anti-G is not considered a likely cause of severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), but it is important to differentiate it from anti-D in women who should be administered anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. We report one woman with three pregnancies severely affected by anti-C+G requiring intrauterine treatment and a review of the literature. In our case, the identification of the correct antibody was delayed because the differentiation of anti-C+G and anti-D+C was not considered important during pregnancy since the father was D-. In addition, anti-C+G and anti-G titer levels were not found to be reliable as is generally considered in Rh immunization. Severe HDFN occurred at a maternal anti-C+G antibody titer of S and anti-G titer of 1 in comparison with the critical titer level of 16 or more in our laboratory. close collaboration between the immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low. PMID:26829179

  19. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M

    2016-02-01

    Maternal-fetal red cell antigen incompatibility can lead to alloimmunization, maternal immunoglobulin transplacental transfer, and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). The use of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) has sharply decreased the incidence of and mortality from HDFN due to RhD allosensitization. The ability to identify pregnancies/fetuses at risk of HDFN has significantly improved due to paternal molecular RHD zygosity testing, and non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics for detecting putative antigen(s) (notably RhD) in fetuses utilizing cff-DNA in maternal plasma. Fetal RHD genotyping using cff-DNA has become increasingly accurate for fetal RHD detection, prompting some countries to implement targeted RAADP through mass screening programs of RhD-negative pregnant women. Along with middle cerebral artery Doppler ultrasonography for predicting fetal anemia, non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics have greatly decreased the need for invasive diagnostic procedures in pregnancies at risk for severe HDFN. This review highlights these molecular advancements in HDFN-related prenatal diagnostics. PMID:26589360

  20. Reticuloendothelial cell function in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA: studies on the mechanism of peripheral monocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the activity of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA using an in vitro assay of monocyte-macrophage interaction with erythrocytes and an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC assay. The monocytes of AIHA patients in the hemolyzing period phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells and anti-D coated red cells more avidly than normal control monocytes. There was no significant relationship between phagocytic activity and ADCC activity. The activated monocytes phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells, but had no ADCC activity in a short time 51Cr release assay. Phagocytic activity of the patients' monocytes against autologous erythrocytes rapidly decreased after treatment with prednisolone even though the red cell sensitization with antibody remained almost the same as during the hemolyzing period. We postulated that the activation of monocytes in AIHA was due to the "arming" effect of anti-erythrocyte antibody, but we think that other mechanisms may also be involved in the activation of monocytes.

  1. Efficacy of plasma therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with complement factor H mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Wagner, Eric; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aïcha; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Goodship, Timothy H J; Robitaille, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) frequently results in end-stage renal failure and can be lethal. Several studies have established an association between quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in complement factor H and aHUS. Although plasma infusion and exchange are often advocated, guidelines have yet to be established. Long-term outcome for patients under treatment is still unknown. We describe a patient who, at 7 months of age, presented with aHUS associated with combined de novo complement factor H mutations (S1191L and V1197A) on the same allele. Laboratory investigations showed normal levels of complements C4, C3 and factor H. Plasma exchanges and large-dose infusion therapy resulted in a resolution of hemolysis and recovery of renal function. Three recurrences were successfully treated by intensification of the plasma infusion treatment to intervals of 2 or 3 days. This patient showed good response to large doses of plasma infusions and her condition remained stable for 30 months with weekly plasma infusions (30 ml/kg). Long-term tolerance and efficacy of such intensive plasma therapy are still unknown. Reported secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency warrants the search for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:18425537

  2. Systemic neosporosis in a dog treated for immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Angie; Sánchez, Félix; Villa, Karina; Rivera, Liliana; Morales, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    A 4-year-old male Toy Poodle was presented to the Small Animal Veterinary Hospital of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the Autonomous University of Mexico (FMVZ, UNAM) because of depression, lethargy, and hemorrhages involving several areas of the skin and around the eyes. Hematology data and a bone marrow analysis suggested hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The dog was treated with prednisone, and after one month the hematology variables improved. However, the dog's clinical condition inexplicably worsened and it was euthanized. On necropsy, there were no relevant findings. However, in histology, multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis and necrosis, and a protozoan cyst in the cerebellum were identified. In addition, moderate multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and necrotizing pancreatitis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic enteritis were observed. Immunohistochemistry of the cerebellum, liver, pancreas, and intestine with a specific antibody against Neospora caninum confirmed the diagnosis of systemic neosporosis. The systemic neosporosis in this dog was most likely caused by reactivation of latent parasites due to prednisone administration during the one month of treatment. It should be kept in mind that in dogs being treated with immunosuppressants for immune-mediated conditions, opportunistic parasites, such as Toxoplasma gondii and N caninum, can be reactivated from a latent state, as it probably happened in the present case. PMID:26345698

  3. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  4. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  5. Rare Occurrence of 3 "H": Hypercalcemia, Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankur; Malhotra, Pankaj; Prakash, Gaurav; Varma, Subhash; Kumar, Narender; Das, Asim

    2016-06-01

    Clinicians in hematology practice commonly encounter anemia, hypercalcemia and renal failure, which when present in combination evoke a diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma. We report a 71-years old lady who presented to our hematology clinic with fever and easy fatiguability of 3 months duration and on investigations was found to have anemia and hypercalcemia. Direct Coomb's test characterized the anemia as complement mediated (anti-C3d) hemolysis. Biochemical investigations revealed normal 25(OH) Vitamin D3 and suppressed Parathormone levels and a negative workup for plasma cell dyscrasias, sarcoidosis and autoimmune disorders. CT scan revealed a paravertebral mass with cervical, supraclavicular and abdominal lymphadenopathy along with splenomegaly and left pleural effusion. Biopsy from the paravertebral mass confirmed the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease (nodular sclerosis) using immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow examination suggested infiltration by lymphoma. Hypercalcemia was managed with saline and zoledronic acid. Administration of prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) along with chemotherapy (ABVD regimen) led to normalization of calcium and hemoglobin levels. However, hemolysis recurred 2 weeks later and hence, Rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) was administered on a weekly schedule for 4 doses and ABVD (2 weekly) was continued, which brought hemolysis under control. Co-occurrence of two paraneoplastic manifestations (complement mediated hemolytic anemia and hypercalcemia) in Hodgkin's lymphoma is very unusual. Present report aims not only to highlight a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma but also focus on the role of Rituximab in controlling hemolysis associated with this disease. PMID:27408382

  6. Differential expression of function-related antigens on blood monocytes in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Ramos, María V; Gómez, Sonia A; Dran, Graciela I; Exeni, Ramón; Alduncín, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Vallejo, Graciela; Elías-Costa, Christian; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-10-01

    Monocytes (Mo) mediate central functions in inflammation and immunity. Different subpopulations of Mo with distinct phenotype and functional properties have been described. Here, we investigate the phenotype and function of peripheral Mo from children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). For this purpose, blood samples from patients in the acute period of HUS (HUS AP) were obtained on admission before dialysis and/or transfusion. The Mo phenotypic characterization was performed on whole blood by flow cytometry, and markers associated to biological functions were selected: CD14 accounting for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness, CD11b for adhesion, Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G type I (FcgammaRI)/CD64 for phagocytosis and cytotoxicity, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR for antigen presentation. Some of these functions were also determined. Moreover, the percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo was evaluated. We found that the entire HUS AP Mo population exhibited reduced CD14, CD64, and CD11b expression and decreased LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor production and Fcgamma-dependent cytotoxicity. HUS AP showed an increased percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo with higher CD16 and lower CD14 levels compared with the same subset from healthy children. Moreover, the CD14++ CD16- Mo subpopulation of HUS AP had a decreased HLA-DR expression, which correlated with severity. In conclusion, the Mo population from HUS AP patients presents phenotypic and functional alterations. The contribution to the pathogenesis and the possible scenarios that led to these changes are discussed.

  7. Involvement of the fractalkine pathway in the pathogenesis of childhood hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, María Victoria; Fernández, Gabriela C; Patey, Natasha; Schierloh, Pablo; Exeni, Ramón; Grimoldi, Irene; Vallejo, Graciela; Elías-Costa, Christian; Del Carmen Sasiain, Maria; Trachtman, Howard; Combadière, Christophe; Proulx, François; Palermo, Marina S

    2007-03-15

    Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx) through the interaction with its globotriaosyl ceramide receptor. However, inflammatory processes contribute to the pathogenesis of HUS by sensitizing cells to Stx fractalkine (FKN), a CX(3)C transmembrane chemokine expressed on epithelial and endothelial cells upon activation, is involved in the selective migration and adhesion of specific leukocyte subsets to tissues. Here, we demonstrated a selective depletion of circulating mononuclear leukocytes expressing the receptor for FKN (CX(3)CR1) in patients with HUS. We found a unique phenotype in children with HUS distinct from that seen in healthy, uremic, or infected controls, in which monocytes lost CX(3)CR1, down-modulated CD62L, and increased CD16. In addition, the CD56(dim) natural killer (NK) subpopulation was decreased, leading to an altered peripheral CD56(dim)/CD56(bright) ratio from 10.0 to 4.5. It is noteworthy that a negative correlation existed between the percentage of circulating CX(3)CR1(+) leukocytes and the severity of renal failure. Finally, CX(3)CR1(+) leukocytes were observed in renal biopsies from patients with HUS. We suggest that the interaction of CX(3)CR1(+) cells with FKN present on activated endothelial cells may contribute to renal injury in HUS.

  8. Impaired neutrophils in children with the typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Gómez, Sonia A; Rubel, Carolina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Barrionuevo, Paula; Alduncín, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Exeni, Ramón; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-09-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence suggest that activated neutrophils (PMN) could contribute to endothelial damage in Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (D+HUS). Additionally, while PMN-activating cytokines and PMN-derived products have been found in D+HUS sera, we have demonstrated phenotypic alterations in D+HUS PMN compatible with a deactivation state. Here, we investigated whether D+HUS PMN were actually hyporesponsive, and explored some of the mechanisms probably involved in their derangement. Twenty-two D+HUS children were bled in the acute period, and blood samples from healthy, acute uremic and neutrophilic children were obtained as controls. We evaluated degranulation markers in response to cytokines, intracellular granule content, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in circulating D+HUS and control PMN. The influence of D+HUS-derived plasma and the direct effects of Stx in vitro were evaluated on healthy donors' PMN. We found that D+HUS PMN presented reduced degranulatory capacity in response to cytokines and intracellular granule content, and decreased ROS generation. D+HUS plasma or Stx did not affect the phenotype and function of healthy donors' PMN. These results suggest that upon hospitalization D+HUS PMN are functionally impaired and show features of previous degranulation, indicating a preceding process of activation with release of ROS and proteases involved in endothelial damage.

  9. beta-D-Glucose 1-phosphate. A structural unit and an immunological determinant of a glycan from streptococcal cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazur, J H

    1982-01-25

    Glycose 1-phosphate moieties are emerging as important structural units of macromolecular substances imparting special biological functions to these molecules. In the present study, beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate moieties are shown to be structural units and immunological determinants of a bacterial glycan. The glycan is a tetraheteroglycan from the cell wall of Streptococcus faecalis, strain N and is composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose, N-acetylgalactosamine, and phosphate. Several lines of evidence have been obtained for the presence of beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate units in the glycan, including the liberation of glucose by mild acid hydrolysis, the inhibition of the precipitin reaction by beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate, and the formation of levoglucosan on treatment of the glycan with alkali. Work on the preparation of affinity adsorbents for isolating the new types of antibodies directed at the beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate moieties is in progress. PMID:6172422

  10. Nonblack patients with sickle cell disease have African. beta. sup s gene cluster haplotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Z.R.; Powars, D.R.; Williams, W.D. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA)); Kinney, T.R. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Schroeder, W.A. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA))

    1989-05-26

    Of 18 nonblack patients with sickle cell disease, 14 had sickle cell anemia, 2 had hemoglobin SC disease, and 2 had hemoglobin S-{beta}{sup o}-thalassemia. The {beta}{sup s} gene cluster haplotypes that were determined in 7 patients were of African origin and were identified as Central African Republic, Central African Republic minor II, Benin, and Senegal. The haplotype Central African Republic minor II was present on the {beta}{sup o}-thalassemia chromosome in 2 patients. None of 10 patients whose {alpha}-gene status was determined had {alpha}-thalassemia-2. These data strongly support the concept that the {beta}{sup s} gene on chromosome 11 of these individuals is of African origin and that the {alpha}-gene locus on chromosome 16 is of white or native American origin. The clinical severity of the disease in these nonblack patients is appropriate to their haplotype without {alpha}-thalassemia-2 and is comparable with that of black patients. All persons with congenital hemolytic anemia should be examined for the presence of sickle cell disease regardless of physical appearance or ethnic background.

  11. Identification of salivary mucin MUC7 binding proteins from Streptococcus gordonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton David J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The salivary mucin MUC7 (previously known as MG2 can adhere to various strains of streptococci that are primary colonizers and predominant microorganisms of the oral cavity. Although there is a growing interest in interaction between oral pathogens and salivary mucins, studies reporting the specific binding sites on the bacteria are rather limited. Identification and characterization of the specific interacting proteins on the bacterial cell surface, termed adhesins, are crucial to further understand host-pathogen interactions. Results We demonstrate here, using purified MUC7 to overlay blots of SDS-extracts of Streptococcus gordonii cell surface proteins, 4 MUC7-binding bands, with apparent molecular masses of 62, 78, 84 and 133 kDa from the Streptococcus gordonii strain, PK488. Putative adhesins were identified by in-gel digestion and subsequent nanoLC-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of resultant peptides. The 62 kDa and 84 kDa bands were identified as elongation factor (EF Tu and EF-G respectively. The 78 kDa band was a hppA gene product; the 74 kDa oligopeptide-binding lipoprotein. The 133 kDa band contained two proteins; alpha enolase and DNA-directed RNA polymerase, beta' subunit. Some of these proteins, for example alpha enolase are expected to be intracellular, however, flow cytometric analysis confirmed its location on the bacterial surface. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that S. gordonii expressed a number of putative MUC7 recognizing proteins and these contribute to MUC7 mucin binding of this streptococcal strain.

  12. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C; Federle, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways.

  13. Immunochemical Properties of Glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kazuhiro; Kokeguchi, Susumu; Kato, Keijiro; Miyake, Yoichiro; Nogami, Ryuzo; Moriyama, Takafumi

    1983-01-01

    Antiserum against purified mutansynthetase (EC 2.4.1.?) of Streptococcus mutans 6715 (serotype g), which is responsible for the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan (ISG) in the presence of both sucrose and water-soluble glucan, was prepared. The specificity of the antiserum was tested by using crude enzyme preparations (CEPs) of S. mutans strains of various serotypes. On immunodiffusion, the antiserum cross-reacted with CEPs from strains of serotypes a (HS-6 and AHT), d (OMZ176), and g (OMZ65 and KIR), but not with those from strains of serotypes b (BHT and FA-1) and c (GS-5 and Ingbritt). The antiserum inhibited the synthesis of ISG by crude or purified mutansynthetase of S. mutans 6715. The activities of ISG synthesis by CEPs from the strains antigenically related in the foregoing immunodiffusion were inhibited by the antiserum against strain 6715 mutansynthetase. The antiserum, however, also inhibited the enzyme activity of the strains of serotype b. The finding that the antiserum against purified dextransucrase of S. mutans HS-6 inhibited ISG synthesis by a CEP of strain HS-6 and also by CEPs of antigenically related strains suggested that dextransucrase activity is involved in ISG synthesis. Images PMID:6187685

  14. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.;

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions...... of differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears...

  15. Double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great sensitivity of double beta decay to neutrino mass and right handed currents has motivated many new and exciting attempts to observe this elusive nuclear phenomenon directly. Experiments in operation and other coming on line in the next one or two years are expected to result in order-of-magnitude improvements in detectable half lives for both the two-neutrino and no-neutrino modes. A brief history of double beta decay experiments is presented together with a discussion of current experimental efforts, including a gas filled time projection chamber being used to study selenium-82. (author)

  16. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Azizi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20. Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms.

  17. Biofilm formation enhances fomite survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Reddinger, Ryan M; Hakansson, Anders P

    2014-03-01

    Both Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are widely thought to rapidly die outside the human host, losing infectivity following desiccation in the environment. However, to date, all literature investigating the infectivity of desiccated streptococci has used broth-grown, planktonic populations. In this study, we examined the impact of biofilm formation on environmental survival of clinical and laboratory isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae as both organisms are thought to colonize the human host as biofilms. Results clearly demonstrate that while planktonic cells that are desiccated rapidly lose viability both on hands and abiotic surfaces, such as plastic, biofilm bacteria remain viable over extended periods of time outside the host and remain infectious in a murine colonization model. To explore the level and extent of streptococcal fomite contamination that children might be exposed to naturally, direct bacteriologic cultures of items in a day care center were conducted, which demonstrated high levels of viable streptococci of both species. These findings raise the possibility that streptococci may survive in the environment and be transferred from person to person via fomites contaminated with oropharyngeal secretions containing biofilm streptococci.

  18. Effect of immunization on susceptibility to experimental Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, D T; Gilliland, B C; Petersdorf, R G

    1978-01-01

    It has been asserted that humoral immunity is an important potentiating factor in pathogenesis of infective endocarditis, in that prior immunization to certain bacteria may predispose the host to endocarditis caused by those organisms. If so, possible future vaccination of humans with streptococcal antigens for the prevention of dental caries might increase the susceptibility of the population to streptococcal endocarditis. To examine this hypothesis further, we immunized rabbits with killed Streptococcus sanguis or Streptococcus mutans. After complement-fixing antibody had developed, the rabbits were tested for susceptibility to experimental infective endocarditis. Rabbits with high titers of complement-fixing antibody to the infecting organism developed streptococcal endocarditis less often (13%) than animals with lower titers (69%; P less than 0.0002). These findings do not support the hypothesis that pre-immunization predisposes to infective endocarditis and lend no credence to the concept that vaccination of human subjects against dental caries might increase their susceptibility to streptococcal endocarditis. On the contrary, the results of these experiments indicate that specific antibody can confer relative immunity to infective endocarditis. PMID:730349

  19. Conjugal mobilization of the mega element carrying mef(E) from Streptococcus salivarius to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagati, Maria; Lupo, Agnese; Scillato, Marina; Di Martino, Andrea; Stefani, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of an unusual strain of Streptococcus salivarius, 3C30, displaying both the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B and the tetracycline resistance phenotypes. It harbours the mef(E), erm(B), and tet(M) genes carried by different genetic elements. The genetic element carrying mef(E), named mega, was investigated by long PCR and sequencing, while the presence of the Tn3872-like element, carrying tet(M) and erm(B), was demonstrated by sequencing of both the int-xis-Tn and the fragment between the two resistance genes. In strain 3C30 the mega element is 5388 bp in size and its nucleotide sequence is identical to that of the element described previously in S. salivarius, with the exception of a 912 bp deletion at the left end. The composite Tn3872-like element appeared to be nonconjugative while the mega element was transferred by conjugation to Streptococcus pneumoniae. It was, however, impossible to transfer it again from these transconjugants to other strains. In addition, only in the 3C30 strain did mega form circular structures, as identified by real-time PCR. In conclusion, we found a clinical strain of S. salivarius carrying both mega and Tn3872-like genetic elements. Mega is transferable by conjugation to S. pneumoniae but it is not transferable again from the transconjugants, suggesting a possible mobilization by recombinases of the coresident Tn3872-like transposon. PMID:19025575

  20. Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tettelin, H; Masignani, [No Value; Cieslewicz, MJ; Eisen, JA; Peterson, S; Paulsen, IT; Nelson, KE; Margarit, [No Value; Read, TD; Madoff, LC; Beanan, MJ; Brinkac, LM; Daugherty, SC; DeBoy, RT; Durkin, AS; Kolonay, JF; Madupu, R; Lewis, MR; Radune, D; Fedorova, NB; Scanlan, D; Khouri, H; Mulligan, S; Carty, HA; Cline, RT; Van Aken, SE; Gill, J; Scarselli, M; Mora, M; Iacobini, ET; Brettoni, C; Galli, G; Mariani, M; Vegni, F; Maione, D; Rinaudo, D; Rappuoli, R; Telford, JL; Kasper, DL; Grandi, G; Fraser, CM

    2002-01-01

    The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the oth

  1. A Fishy Tale: a Man with Empyema Caused by Streptococcus halichoeri

    OpenAIRE

    Foo, Rui Min; Chan, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, veterinary laboratories in the United Kingdom reported a novel Lancefield group B streptococcus, Streptococcus halichoeri, in seals. We report a case of Streptococcus halichoeri causing postoperative empyema in a patient. A search of the literature revealed that this is the first case of S. halichoeri ever reported in humans.

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma with chronic B-type hepatitis complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A 57-year-old man consulted a local hospital because of a persistent slight fever. At the age of 37 years he was diagnosed having B-type hepatitis, but left the liver dysfunction untreated. Twenty years later, he was diagnosed having chronic hepatitis B, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and macrocytic anemia, and referred to our hospital for further investigation. A HCC with a maximum diameter of 5.2 cm was detected in segment 8. Results of blood tests included 1.8 mg/dL serum total bilirubin, 0.9 mg/dL bilirubin, less than 10 mg/dL haptoglobin, 7.9 g/dL hemoglobin, 130 fL MCV, and 14.5% reticulocytes. A bone marrow sample showed erythroid hyperplasia. The direct Coombs test gave a positive result. We diagnosed the anemia as autoimmmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), for which prednisolone could not be administered due to positivity for HBsAg and HBeAg. After preparation of washed blood cells for later transfusion, the patient underwent systematic resection of segment 8. The cut surface of the resected specimen demonstrated an encapsulated yellow-brownish tumor measuring 52 mm × 40 mmwhich was diagnosed pathologicaly as moderately differentiated HCC. On the 9th postoperative day, the patient's temperature rose to 38℃, and exacerbated hemolysis was observed. The maximum total bilirubin value was 5.8 mg/dL and minimum hemoglobin level was 4.6 g/dL. He tolerated this period without blood transfusion. Currently he is being followed up as an outpatient, and shows no signs of HCC recurrence or symptoms of anemia. AIHA associated with HBV infection has been described in only three previous cases, and the present case is the first in which surgery was performed for accompanying HCC.

  3. Clinical and serological characterization of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen; Wu Bangzhao; Zhou Youning; Wang Wenjuan; Chen Suning; Sun Aining; Wu Depei

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) which has only been reported in a few cases.We here aimed to explore its mechanism.Methods We retrospectively analyzed 296 patients who underwent allo-HSCT in our center from July 2010 to July 2012.Clinical manifestations were carefully reviewed and the response to currently available treatment approaches were evaluated.The survival and risk factors of AIHA patients after allo-HSCT were further analyzed.Results Twelve patients were diagnosed with AIHA at a median time of 100 days (15-720 days) after allo-HSCT.The incidence of AIHA after allo-HSCT was 4.1%.IgG antibody were detected in ten patients and IgM antibody in two patients.The two cold antibody AIHA patients had a better response to steroid corticoid only treatment and the ten warm antibody AIHA patients responded to corticosteroid treatment and adjustment of immunosuppressant therapy.Rituximab was shown to be effective for AIHA patients who failed conventional therapy.Survival analysis showed that the combination of AIHA in allo-HSCT patients hinted at poor survival.Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection,graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch seemed to increase the risk of developing AIHA.Conclusions Patients who develop AIHA after allo-HSCT have poor survival compared to non-AIHA patients.Possible risk factors of AIHA are CMV infection,GVHD,and HLA mismatch.Rituximab is likely to be the effective treatment choice for the refractory patients.

  4. Acceleration of epithelial cell syndecan-1 shedding by anthrax hemolytic virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandhoke Vikas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been recently reported that major pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accelerate a normal process of cell surface syndecan-1 (Synd1 ectodomain shedding as a mechanism of host damage due to the production of shedding-inducing virulence factors. We tested if acceleration of Synd1 shedding takes place in vitro upon treatment of epithelial cells with B. anthracis hemolysins, as well as in vivo during anthrax infection in mice. Results The isolated anthrax hemolytic proteins AnlB (sphingomyelinase and AnlO (cholesterol-binding pore-forming factor, as well as ClnA (B. cereus homolog of B. anthracis phosphatidyl choline-preferring phospholipase C cause accelerated shedding of Synd1 and E-cadherin from epithelial cells and compromise epithelial barrier integrity within a few hours. In comparison with hemolysins in a similar range of concentrations, anthrax lethal toxin (LT also accelerates shedding albeit at slower rate. Individual components of LT, lethal factor and protective antigen are inactive with regard to shedding. Inhibition experiments favor a hypothesis that activities of tested bacterial shedding inducers converge on the stimulation of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases of the Syk family, ultimately leading to activation of cellular sheddase. Both LT and AnlO modulate ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways, while JNK pathway seems to be irrelevant to accelerated shedding. Accelerated shedding of Synd1 also takes place in DBA/2 mice challenged with Bacillus anthracis (Sterne spores. Elevated levels of shed ectodomain are readily detectable in circulation after 24 h. Conclusion The concerted acceleration of shedding by several virulence factors could represent a new pathogenic mechanism contributing to disruption of epithelial or endothelial integrity, hemorrhage, edema and abnormal cell signaling during anthrax infection.

  5. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome post Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami eAlasfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1-2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (Infection-induced HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease (ESRD. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a (C5a and subsequent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence.

  6. Effect of diet, enalapril, or losartan in post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caletti, Maria Gracia; Missoni, Mabel; Vezzani, Clarisa; Grignoli, María; Piantanida, Juan Jose; Repetto, Horacio A; Exeni, Ramon; Rasse, Stella Maris

    2011-08-01

    Proteinuria is the main indicator of renal disease progression in many chronic conditions. There is currently little information available on the efficacy, safety, and individual tolerance of patients with post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) nephropathy to therapies involving diet, enalapril, or losartan. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trail was conducted to evaluate the effect of a normosodic-normoproteic diet (Phase I) and the effect of normosodic-normoproteic diet plus enalapril (0.18-0.27 mg/kg/day) or losartan (0.89-1.34 mg/kg/day) (Phase II) on children with D+ HUS, normal renal function, and persistent, mild (5.1-49.9 mg/kg/day) proteinuria. Dietary intervention reduced the mean protein intake from 3.4 to 2.2 mg/kg/day. Of 137 children, proteinuria normalized in 91 (66.4 %) within 23-45 days; the remaining 46 patients were randomized to diet plus placebo (group 1, n = 16), plus losartan (group 2, n = 16), or enalapril (group 3, n = 14). In groups 1, 2, and 3, proteinuria was reduced by 30.0, 82.0, and 66.3%, respectively, and normalized in six (37.5%), three (81.3%), and 11 (78.6%) patients, respectively (χ(2)= 8.9, p = 0.015). These results suggest that: (1) a normosodic-normoproteic diet can normalize proteinuria in the majority of children with D+ HUS with mild sequelae, (2) the addition of enalapril or losartan to such dietary restrictions of protein further reduces proteinuria, and (3) these therapeutic interventions are safe and well tolerated. Whether these short-term effects can be extended to the long-term remains to be demonstrated.

  7. The streptococcal inhibitor of complement (SIC) protects Streptococcus pyogenes from bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Masaaki; Ohmori, Daisuke; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isaka, Masanori; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Michio; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2009-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius inhibits the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes in vitro. Streptococcus pyogenes has various virulence factors, including the streptococcus inhibitor of complement (SIC). Although SIC inhibits the activity of the peptides LL-37 and NAP1, the relationship between SIC and the bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) has not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated whether S. salivarius BLIS affects S. pyogenes SIC. We created three deltasic mutant strains from three S. pyogenes strains and performed deferred antagonism assays. The test strains were BLIS-positive S. salivarius JCM5707 and BLIS-negative S. salivarius NCU12. Deferred antagonism assays with JCM5707 showed that the inhibitory zones in the three deltasic mutant strains were wider than those in the three wild-type strains. Streptococcus pyogenes was cultured in BLIS-containing broth and the change in SIC in the supernatant was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The 2-DE analysis of S. pyogenes exoproteins with the JCM5707 supernatant showed reduced SIC compared with those without the JCM5707 supernatant. Changes in sic mRNA levels affected by S. salivarius BLIS were evaluated by a reverse transcriptase-PCR. The sic mRNA level was affected more by the BLIS-positive S. salivarius than by the BLIS-negative strain. Our result indicates that SIC plays a role in the inhibition of S. salivarius BLIS. PMID:19594623

  8. Evaluation of neutrino masses from $m_{\\beta\\beta}$ values

    CERN Document Server

    Khrushchov, V V

    2008-01-01

    A neutrino mass matrix is considered under conditions of the CP invariance and the negligible reactor mixing $\\theta_{13}$ angle. Absolute mass values for three neutrinos are evaluated in normal and inverted hierarchy spectra on the ground of data for oscillation mixing neutrino parameters and effective neutrino mass entering into a probability of neutrinoless two beta decay $m_{\\beta\\beta}$ values.

  9. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yombi Jean cyr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted.

  10. [Streptococcus intermedius: a rare cause of brain abscess in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhadi, Z; Sadiki, H; Hafid, I; Najib, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, also known as the Streptococcus milleri group. Although this is a commensal agent of the mouth and upper airways, it has been recognized as an important pathogen in the formation of abscesses. However, it has rarely been involved in the formation of brain abscess in children. We report 4 pediatric cases of brain abscess caused by S. intermedius. Three boys and 1 girl, all aged over 2 years, were admitted for a febrile meningeal syndrome and seizures, caused by a S. intermedius brain abscess. Diagnosis was obtained by brain imaging combined with culture of cerebrospinal fluid. The outcome was favorable after antibiotic therapy and abscess puncture. S. intermedius should be considered a potential pathogen involved in the development of brain abscess in children.

  11. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  12. Transformation of Streptococcus zooepidemicus with Genes Responsible for Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小明; 高海军; 田格; 陈国强

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for transformation of intact Streptococcus zooepidemicus cells by electroporation was developed through a systematic examination of the effects of various parameters, including growth conditions, electric field strengths used for electroporation, and concentrations of plasmid used for transformation. Efficiencies higher than 104 cfu/μg(cfu, clone forming unit) plasmid DNA were obtained for Streptococcus zooepidemicus H2004 cells. Results demonstrate that the broad-host-range plasmid pDL276 can be replicated in Streptococcus zooepidemicus H2004 and foreign genes responsible for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthesis inserted into the pDL276 can be successfully expressed in the transformant, in which PHB is detected using the Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) method.

  13. Trichoderma .beta.-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-01-03

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements.

  15. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    We review the potential to probe new physics with neutrinoless double beta decay $(A,Z) \\to (A,Z+2) + 2 e^-$. Both the standard long-range light neutrino mechanism as well as short-range mechanisms mediated by heavy particles are discussed. We also stress aspects of the connection to lepton number violation at colliders and the implications for baryogenesis.

  16. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon beta-1b injection is used to reduce episodes of symptoms in patients with relapsing-remitting (course ... and problems with vision, speech, and bladder control). Interferon beta-1b is in a class of medications ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory: Your Genes Your Health Disease InfoSearch: Beta Thalassemia Genomics Education Programme (UK) MalaCards: dominant beta-thalassemia Merck Manual ...

  18. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beta emitters, such as 90Y, are increasingly being used for cancer treatment. However, beta emitters demand other precautions than gamma emitters during preparation and administration, especially concerning shielding. AIM. To discuss practical precautions for handling beta emitters...... on the outside of the primary shielding material. If suitable shielding is used and larger numbers of handlings are divided among several persons, then handling of beta emitters can be a safe procedure....

  19. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  20. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neemuchwala, Alefiya; Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  1. Status of research and development of vaccines for Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Dale, James B; Fraser, John D; Good, Michael F; Guilherme, Luiza; Moreland, Nicole J; Mulholland, E Kim; Schodel, Florian; Smeesters, Pierre R

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important global pathogen, causing considerable morbidity and mortality, especially in low and middle income countries where rheumatic heart disease and invasive infections are common. There is a number of promising vaccine candidates, most notably those based on the M protein, the key virulence factor for the bacterium. Vaccines against Streptococcus pyogenes are considered as impeded vaccines because of a number of crucial barriers to development. Considerable effort is needed by key players to bring current vaccine candidates through phase III clinical trials and there is a clear need to develop a roadmap for future development of current and new candidates. PMID:27032515

  2. Effect of irradiation on the streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Ki Dong; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To observe direct effect of irradiation on cariogenic Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans GS5 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Viability and changes in antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription of virulence factors, and protein profile of bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plate, disc diffusion method, Transmission electron microscopy. RT-PCR, and SDS-PAGE, respectively. After irradiation with 10 and 20 Gy, viability of S. mutans was reduced. Further increase in irradiation dose, however, did not affect the viability of the remaining cells of S. mutans. Irradiated S. mutans was found to have become sensitive to antibiotics. In particular, the bacterium irradiated with 40 Gy increased its susceptibility to cefotaxime, penicillin, and tetracycline. Under the transmission electron microscope, number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased as the irradiation dose was increased. S. mutans irradiated with 10 Gy revealed a change in the cell wall and cell membrane. As irradiation dose was increased. a higher number of cells showed thickened cell wall and cell membrane and lysis, and appearance of ghost cells was noticeable. In RT-PCR, no difference was detected in expression of gtfB and spaP between cells with and without irradiation of 40 Gy. In SDS-PAGE, proteins with higher molecular masses were gradually diminished as irradiation dose was increased. These results suggest that irradiation affects the cell integrity of S. mutans, as observed by SDS-PAGE, and as manifested by the change in cell morphology, antibiotic sensitivity, and eventually viability of the bacterium.

  3. Misleading Betas: An Educational Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, James; Halcoussis, Dennis; Phillips, G. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The dual-beta model is a generalization of the CAPM model. In the dual-beta model, separate beta estimates are provided for up-market and down-market days. This paper uses the historical "Anscombe quartet" results which illustrated how very different datasets can produce the same regression coefficients to motivate a discussion of the…

  4. TGF-beta and osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaney Davidson, E.N.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage damage is a major problem in osteoarthritis (OA). Growth factors like transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) have great potential in cartilage repair. In this review, we will focus on the potential therapeutic intervention in OA with TGF-beta, application of the growth facto

  5. Severe hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-D in a D+ patient with sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ipe, Tina S.; Wilkes, Jennifer J.; Hartung, Helge D.; Westhoff, Connie M.; Chou, Stella T.; Friedman, David F.

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year-old male with sickle cell disease presented with pain, dark urine, and fatigue 10 days after a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated severe anemia, blood type O+, and anti-D in the serum. Anti-D in a D+ patient led to RH genotyping which revealed homozygosity for RHD*DAU4 that encodes partial D antigen. Anti-D in this patient whose RBCs exclusively express partial D caused a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after exposure to D+ RBCs. The finding o...

  6. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1 with a novel mutation in the CDAN1 gene previously diagnosed as congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Hisanori; Doisaki, Sayoko; Park, Young-Dong; Hama, Asahito; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Sumimoto, Shinichi

    2013-05-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders of red cell production. They are characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and dyserythropoiesis. Here, we present the clinical description and mutation analysis of a Japanese female with CDA type 1. She has long been diagnosed with unclassified congenital hemolytic anemia from the neonatal period. However, bone marrow morphology and genetic testing of the CDAN1 gene at the age of 12 years confirmed the afore-mentioned diagnosis. Thus, we should be aware of the possibility of CDA if the etiology of congenital anemia or jaundice cannot be clearly elucidated.

  7. A case of aggravation of hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome after delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yuan-hui; WANG Yong-qing; WANG Jing; YE Rong-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is a severe obstetric complication which usually resolves in most patients after delivery.Methods We report a rare case of aggravation of HELLP syndrome after delivery.Results The patient underwent the treatment for HELLP syndrome,.including glucocorticoid therapy. The symptoms of HELLP syndrome reappeared and became more severe than before the termination of pregnancy. The patient also had severe and persistent hypoproteinemia, hyponatremia and hypocalcemia.Conclusions HELLP syndrome is an acute and critical obstetric syndrome which can have heterogeneous presentations and variable prognosis. We should be fully aware of the diverse clinical characteristics of this condition.

  8. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  9. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, XiaoJun; Liang, Yu-He

    2007-10-01

    The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni2+-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 A resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 A, beta = 98.82 degrees.

  10. Abnormal physiological properties and altered cell wall composition in Streptococcus pneumoniae grown in the presence of clavulanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, A; Severina, E; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    Subinhibitory concentrations of clavulanate caused premature induction of stationary-phase autolysis, sensitization to lysozyme, and reductions in the MICs of deoxycholate and penicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the range of clavulanate concentrations producing these effects, this beta-lactam compound was selectively bound to PBP 3. Cell walls isolated from pneumococci grown in the presence of clavulanate showed increased sensitivity to the hydrolytic action of purified pneumococcal autolysin in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the peptidoglycan isolated from the clavulanate-grown cells showed major qualitative and quantitative changes in stem peptide composition, the most striking feature of which was the accumulation of peptide species carrying intact D-alanyl-D-alanine residues at the carboxy termini. The altered biological and biochemical properties of the clavulanate-grown pneumococci appear to be the consequences of suppressed D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. PMID:9055983

  11. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Bao

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP. Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0 for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries.

  12. Antibacterial activity of Bixa orellana L. (achiote) against Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dyanne Medina-Flores; Gabriela Ulloa-Urizar; Rosella Camere-Colarossi; Stefany Caballero-Garca; Frank Mayta-Tovalino; Juana del Valle-Mendoza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cytotoxic and antibacterial effect of Bixa orellana L. (B. orellana) (achiote) methanol extract against Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) (S. mutans) and Streptococcus sanguinis (ATCC 10556) (S. sanguinis). Methods: Two methanol extracts of B. orellana were prepared in vitro, from the seeds and leaves. The antibacterial activity of extracts against S. mutans and S. sanguinis was evaluated using the cup-plate agar diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concen-tration (MIC) was determined using the microdilution method and the cytotoxic activity was determinated by using the cell line MDCK. Results: A stronger antibacterial effect was observed with the leaves methanolic extract with an inhibition zone of (19.97 ± 1.31) mm against S. mutans and (19.97 ± 1.26) mm against S. sanguinis. The methanolic extract of the seeds had an activity of (15.11 ± 1.03) mm and (16.15 ± 2.15) mm against S. mutans and S. sanguinis, respectively. The MIC of the leaf and the seed extracts against S. sanguinis was 62.5 and 125 mg/mL, respectively, and the MIC of the leaf extract against S. mutans was 62.5 mg/mL, and for the seed extract it was 31.25 mg/mL. The 50%cytotoxic concentration was 366.45 and 325.05 mg/mL for the leaves and seeds extracts, respectively. Conclusions: The experimental findings demonstrated the antibacterial effect of the methanolic extract of B. orellana (achiote) on S. mutans and S. sanguinis. The extract of this plant is cytotoxic at high concentrations.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Auxotrophs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabe, Silvia; Lopez, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis is essential for the maintenance of membrane structure and function in many groups of anaerobic bacteria. Like Escherichia coli, the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae produces straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids. In E. coli UFA synthesis requires the action of two gene products, the essential isomerase/dehydratase encoded by fabA and an elongation condensing enzyme encoded by fabB. S. pneumoniae lacks both genes and instead employs a single enzyme with only an isomerase function encoded by the fabM gene. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of an S. pneumoniae 708 fabM mutant. This mutant failed to grow in complex medium, and the defect was overcome by addition of UFAs to the growth medium. S. pneumoniae fabM mutants did not produce detectable levels of monounsaturated fatty acids as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analysis of the radiolabeled phospholipids. We also demonstrate that a fabM null mutant of the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutants is a UFA auxotroph, indicating that FabM is the only enzyme involved in the control of membrane fluidity in streptococci. Finally we report that the fabN gene of Enterococcus faecalis, coding for a dehydratase/isomerase, complements the growth of S. pneumoniae fabM mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that FabM is a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents against streptococci and that S. pneumoniae UFA auxotrophs could help identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis. PMID:17827283

  14. Beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanello, Renzo; Origa, Raffaella

    2010-05-21

    Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands), dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis). Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes), gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely, deletions in the beta

  15. Beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Origa Raffaella

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands, dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes, gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely

  16. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzy-Clara Cita

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters.Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group. Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time. Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, total bilirubin (BIL levels and reticulocyte (RET percentage to calculate a hemolytic index.Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01, LDH (p = 0.03, RET (p = 0.03 levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02. Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01 and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005 were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01 and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03 were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01 than controls.Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability.

  17. Coroutine Sequencing in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger;

    In object-oriented programming, a program execution is viewed as a physical model of some real or imaginary part of the world. A language supporting object-oriented programming must therefore contain comprehensive facilities for modeling phenomena and concepts form the application domain. Many ap...... applications in the real world consist of objects carrying out sequential processes. Coroutines may be used for modeling objects that alternate between a number of sequential processes. The authors describe coroutines in BETA...

  18. Beta decay for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry Jeannot

    1962-01-01

    The ""pedestrian approach"" was developed to describe some essentially simple experimental results and their theoretical implications in plain language. In this graduate-level text, Harry J. Lipkin presents simply, but without oversimplification, the aspects of beta decay that can be understood without reference to the formal theory; that is, the reactions that follow directly from conservation laws and elementary quantum mechanics.The pedestrian treatment is neither a substitute for a complete treatment nor a watered-down version.

  19. Integration of BETA with Eclipse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Enevoldsen, Mads Brøgger

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents language interoperability issues appearing in order to implement support for the BETA language in the Java-based Eclipse integrated development environment. One of the challenges is to implement plug-ins in BETA and be able to load them in Eclipse. In order to do this, some form...... of language interoperability between Java and BETA is required. The first approach is to use the Java Native Interface and use C to bridge between Java and BETA. This results in a workable, but complicated solution. The second approach is to let the BETA compiler generate Java class files. With this approach...... it is possible to implement plug-ins in BETA and even inherit from Java classes. In the paper the two approaches are described together with part of the mapping from BETA to Java class files. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/15710661...

  20. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  1. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades......, but the mechanisms involved are still not clarified. In this review the information obtained in previous studies is recapitulated together with some of the current attempts to resolve the controversy in the field: identification of the putative progenitor cells, identification of the factors involved...

  2. Reevaluating the Serotype II Capsular Locus of Streptococcus agalactiae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, E. R.; Melo-Cristino, J.; Ramirez, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report a novel sequence of the serotype II capsular locus of group B streptococcus that resolves inconsistencies among the results of various groups and the sequence in GenBank. This locus was found in diverse lineages and presents genes consistent with the complete synthesis of the type II polysaccharide.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Oral Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius JF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium and the predominant colonizer of the oral microbiota. It finds a wide application in the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections, also reducing the frequency of other main pathogens. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the oral probiotic S. salivarius JF. PMID:27660775

  4. Outbreak of Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Psychiatric Unit

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-02

    Dr. Katherine Fleming-Dutra, an epidemiologist at CDC, discusses her investigation of a Streptococcus pneumoniae outbreak in a pediatric psychiatric unit.  Created: 11/2/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/5/2012.

  5. In Vitro Activity of AR-709 against Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, W.T.M.; Verel, A.; Verhoef, J.; Milatovic, D.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro activity of AR-709, a novel diaminopyrimidine antibiotic currently in development for treatment of community-acquired upper and lower respiratory tract infections, against 151 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains from various European countries. AR-709 showed excellent activity against both drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant pneumococci.

  6. Anticariogenic activity of some tropical medicinal plants against Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Shim, Jae-Seok; Chung, Jae-Youn

    2004-09-01

    The methanol extracts of five tropical plants, Baeckea frutescens, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Kaempferia pandurata, Physalis angulata and Quercus infectoria, exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. In particular, G. glabra, K. pandurata and P. angulata conferred fast killing bactericidal effect against S. mutans in 2 min at 50 microg/ml of extract concentration. PMID:15351117

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Type Strain Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Hesselbjerg; Dargis, Rimtas; Christensen, Jens Jørgen Elmer;

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558T was isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis in 1946 and announced as a type strain in 1989. Here, we report the 2,154,510-bp draft genome sequence of S. gordonii ATCC 10558T. This sequence will contribute to knowledge about the pathogenesis of...

  8. Diagnostic detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae PpmA in urine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Suarez, M.M.; Cron, L.E.; Suarez-Alvarez, B.; Villaverde, R.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, I.; Vazquez, F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Mendez, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are often difficult to diagnose accurately, as it is not uncommon for clinical samples to be culture-negative, particularly after antibiotic administration. The rapid Binax NOW S. pneumoniae urinary antigen test lacks specificity in children, owing to pneumococcal

  9. Deletion of a Cation Transporter Promotes Lysis in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, Jolanda; Andisi, Vahid Farshchi; Kim, Kwang S.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.; Weiser, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen which causes respiratory and serious invasive diseases. Mg(2+) is essential for life, and its concentration varies throughout the human body. Magnesium uptake plays an important role in the virulence of many bacterial pathogens. To study the M

  10. The Ecology of Bacteriocin-producing Strains of Streptococcus salivarius

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins, G R; Tagg, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in bacteriocin-producing components of the human normal oral microbiota centres on their possible interference with colonisation by potentially pathogenic bacteria. Certain strains of Streptococcus salivarius produce bacteriocin-like agents displaying exceptional inhibitory activity toward Lancefield Group A streptococci. Four individuals were identified as naturally harbouring high proportions (> 90 per cent) of bacteriocin-producing strains of S. salivarius. Bacteriocinogenic is...

  11. Bullous impetigo caused by Streptococcus salivarius: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Brook, I

    1980-01-01

    A 19-month-old child presented with bullous impetigo around the perineal region, penis, and left foot. Streptococcus salivarius was the only isolate recovered from the lesions. The child was treated with parenteral penicillin, debridement of the bulli, and local application of silver sulphadiazine cream. This case of bullous impetigo illustrates another aspect of the pathogenicity of Strep. salivarius.

  12. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Li; M.A. Hoogenkamp; J. Ling; W. Crielaard; D.M. Deng

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine (CHX

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    OpenAIRE

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Lief

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy.

  14. A Study of Streptococcus Viridans in the Maxillofacial Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Refoua

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Streptococcus viridans is one of the most important microorganisms in the establishment of infections leading to dental caries and heart valve damages. Therefore the diagnosis and prevention of these infections is critical in health care.Purpose: The aim of this in-vivo study was to determine the prevalence of viridans streptococci in abscesses occurring in the maxillofacial region.Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 39 patients with maxillofacial abscesses, referred to the Department of Oral Surgery Faculty of Dentistry Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Dr. Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Extra-oral incision, drainage and pus collection followed by culture, staining and biochemical and sugar fermentation tests were carried out for all participants.Results: In the present study %53.84 and 46.16% of the patients had negative and positive culture results, respectively. In the positive culture group, %2.5 of the viridans streptococci were streptococcus salivarius, %4.6 streptococcus sanguis and %17.9 were streptococcus mutans.Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that viridans streptococci are an important factor in the development of metastatic and maxillofacial infections which can pose a significant threat to the patient’s life.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Oral Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius JF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium and the predominant colonizer of the oral microbiota. It finds a wide application in the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections, also reducing the frequency of other main pathogens. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the oral probiotic S. salivarius JF. PMID:27660775

  16. Mutacin II, a Bactericidal Lantibiotic from Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikindas, Michael L.; Novák, Jan; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus; Schilling, Kurt M.; Caufield, Page W.

    1995-01-01

    Mutacin II is a lantibiotic that is produced by group II Streptococcus mutans, it inhibits the growth of other streptococci as well as many other gram-positive microorganisms by a hitherto unknown mechanism, Mutacin LI possesses bactericidal activity against susceptible cells. It transiently depolar

  17. Verrucous endocarditis associated with Streptococcus bovis in mink (Mustela vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Jørgensen, J.C.; Dietz, Hans-Henrik;

    2003-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2001, mortalities due to verrucous endocarditis were experienced at several mink farms. Gram-positive cocci were isolated from the endocardium of all the animals examined but not always from other internal organs. Almost all the isolates were identified as Streptococcus bovis...

  18. Different bacteriocin activities of Streptococcus mutans reflect distinct phylogenetic lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balakrishnan, M; Simmonds, RS; Kilian, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriocins produced by mutans streptococci are known as mutacins. In this study 16 broadly active mutacin-producing Streptococcus mutans strains from New Zealand, North America and Europe were classified into four groups (A-D) on the basis of differences in their activity in deferred antagonism...

  19. Catabolic control of sugar metabolism in Streptococcus thermophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, van den P.T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is used in many industrial dairy fermentations that require processing of milk at elevated temperatures. Its primary function is the rapid conversion of lactose to lactate while it also contributes to important sensory qualities. S. thermophilus strain CNRZ302 is unable to

  20. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus agalactiae: Epidemiology and Mechanism of Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Wehbeh, Wehbeh; Rojas-Diaz, Roberto; Li, Xinying; Mariano, Noriel; Grenner, Louise; Segal-Maurer, Sorana; Tommasulo, Barbara; Drlica, Karl; Urban, Carl; Rahal, James J.

    2005-01-01

    Quinolone-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae bacteria were recovered from single-patient isolates and found to contain mutations in the gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated that four isolates from the same long-term care facility were closely related; in seven cases, quinolone-resistant Haemophilus influenzae and S. agalactiae bacteria were isolated from the same patient.

  1. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  2. PlcR1 and PlcR2 are putative calcium-binding proteins required for secretion of the hemolytic phospholipase C of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cota-Gomez, A; Vasil, A I; Kadurugamuwa, J; Beveridge, T J; Schweizer, H. P.; Vasil, M L

    1997-01-01

    The plcHR operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa includes the structural gene for the hemolytic phospholipase C,plcH (previously known as plcS), and two overlapping, in-phase, genes designated plcR1 and plcR2. Hemolytic and phospholipase C (PLC) activities produced by Escherichia coli and P. aeruginosa T7 expression systems were measured in strains carrying both plcH and plcR genes and in strains carrying each gene separately. When plcH was expressed by itself in the E. coli T7 system, the area of ...

  3. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous surveillance. PMID:27418844

  4. Correlation among Antioxidant, Antimicrobial, Hemolytic, and Antiproliferative Properties of Leiothrix spiralis Leaves Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Elena Sotomayor

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The biological activities of a plant extract depend on a complex sum of individual properties including the antioxidant activity. Several biological activities protect against the harmful action of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and here we focused our attention on the relationship between the biological activities tested and the antioxidant properties. In this study, the total flavonoid content as well as the antioxidant, antimicrobial, hemolytic and cytotoxicity activities of the methanolic extract of Leitothrix spiralis leaves were evaluated. The extract showed a total flavonoid content of 19.26% and the chemical characterization by HPLC-PAD confirmed the presence of flavonoids as the major secondary metabolite compounds. Significant antioxidant activity (IC50 = 1.743 µg/mL ± 0.063 was demonstrated and was effective against Gram-negative organisms and all Candida strains tested, and showed an ability to inhibit hyphal formation. Non-hemolytic and antiproliferative activity could be demonstrated.

  5. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Yoshida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50 of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions.

  6. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Shimada, Yohei; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Ghosh, Anil K; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Sinden, Robert E

    2007-12-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50) of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions. PMID:18159942

  7. EPO-dependent induction of erythroferrone drives hepcidin suppression and systematic iron absorption under phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingkang; Gao, Ming; Chen, Yue; Liu, Jing; Qi, Shiyong; Ma, Juan; Zhang, Zhihong; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a common form of anemia due to hemolysis, resulting in disordered iron homeostasis. In this study, a dose of 40mg/kg phenylhydrazine (PHZ) was injected into mice to successfully establish a pronounced anemia animal model, which resulted in stress erythropoiesis and iron absorption. We found that serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentration was dramatically elevated by nearly 5000-fold for the first 2days, and then drop to the basal level on day 6 after PHZ injection. Mirrored with serum EPO concentration, the mRNA expression of erythroferrone (ERFE) was rapidly increased in the bone marrow and spleen 3days after injection of PHZ, and then gradually decreased but was still higher than baseline on day 6. In addition, we also found that the hepcidin mRNA levels were gradually reduced almost up to 8-fold on day 5, and then was ameliorated compared to the untreated control. Mechanistic investigation manifested that the increase of serum EPO essentially determined the induction of ERFE expression particular at the first 3days after PHZ treatment. Lentiviral mediated ERFE knockdown significantly restrained hepcidin suppression under PHZ treatment. Thus, our data unearthed EPO-dependent ERFE expression acts as an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron metabolism under PHZ-induced hemolytic anemia. PMID:27067488

  8. "Back to the Future": A New Look at Hydroxypropyl Beta-Cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Milo; Szemán, Julianna; Fenyvesi, Éva; Puskás, István; Csabai, Katalin; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Szente, Lajos

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery about 30 years ago (2-hydroxypropyl) beta-cyclodextrin, a highly soluble derivative of beta-cyclodextrin, has become an approved excipient of drug formulations included both in the United States and European Pharmacopoeias. It is recommended to use as solubilizer and stabilizer for oral and parenteral formulations. Recently, its pharmacological activity has been recognized in various diseases. The increasing applications require a closer look to the structure-activity relationship. As (2-hydroxypropyl) beta-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) is always a mixture of isomers with various degrees and pattern of hydroxypropylation, no wonder that the products of different manufacturers are often different. Several HPBCDs were compared applying a battery of analytical tools including thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption MS. We studied how the average degree of substitution affects the aggregation behavior, the toxicity, and the solubilizing effect on poorly soluble drugs. We found that the products with low average degree of substitution are more prone to aggregation. The samples studied are nontoxic to Caco-2 cells and have low hemolytic activity. The solubility enhancement of poorly soluble drugs decreases or increases with increasing degree of substitution or shows a maximum curve depending on the properties of the guest. PMID:27317368

  9. Antibiotic innovation may contribute to slowing the dissemination of multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: the example of ketolides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulla Opatowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite increasingly frequent bacterial resistance to antibiotics, antibacterial innovation is rare. Ketolides constitute one of the very few new antibiotic classes active against Streptococcus pneumoniae developed during the last 25 years. Their mechanism of action resembles that of macrolides, but they are unaffected by common resistance mechanisms. However, cross-resistance to ketolides has been observed in some macrolide-resistant strains. We examined how new antibiotic exposure may affect overall pneumococcal resistance patterns in the population. The aims of this study were to assess the potential dissemination of newly emerged resistances and to control the selection of strains already multiresistant to existing antimicrobials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed an age-structured population model for S. pneumoniae transmission in a human community exposed to heptavalent vaccine, and beta-lactams, macrolides and ketolides. The dynamics of intra-individual selection of resistant strains under antibiotic exposure and interindividual transmission were simulated, with antibiotic-specific resistance mechanisms defining the path to co-resistances and cross-resistances, and parameters concerning the French situation. Results of this simulation study suggest that new antibiotic consumption could markedly slow the diffusion of multiresistant strains. Wider use was associated with slower progression of multiresistance. When ketolides were prescribed to all ages, resistance to them reached 10% after >15 years, while it took >40 years when they were prescribed only to adults. In the scenario according to which new antibiotics totally replaced former antimicrobials, the beta-lactam resistance rate was limited at 70%. CONCLUSIONS: In a context of widespread vaccination and rational use of antibiotics, innovative antibiotic, prescribed to all age groups, may have an added impact on multiresistant-strain dissemination in the

  10. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  11. Liposome-enhanced transformation of Streptococcus lactis and plasmid transfer by intergeneric protoplast fusion of Streptococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Kok, Jan; Lelie, Daniel van der; Venema, Gerhardus

    1988-01-01

    An efficient protoplast transformation system and a procedure of plasmid transfer by means of protoplast fusion is described for Streptococcus lactis. Protoplasts of S. lactis IL1403 and S. lactis MG1363 were transformed by pGK12 [2.9 MDa erythromycin resistance (Emr)] with an efficiency of 3 × 10^5

  12. Streptococcus salivarius promotes mucin putrefaction and malodor production by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterer, N; Rosenberg, M

    2006-10-01

    Although the contribution of the oral microbiota to oral malodor is well-documented, the potential role of Gram-positive micro-organisms is unclear. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that Gram-positive micro-organisms contribute to malodor production by deglycosylating oral glycoproteins, rendering them susceptible to subsequent proteolysis. To this end, we examined the effect of Streptococcus salivarius on Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated putrefaction of a model glycoprotein (pig gastric mucin). Malodor was scored by two odor judges, and volatile sulfides were determined with the use of a sulfide monitor. Mucin degradation was followed by electrophoresis on SDS-PAGE. Results showed that the addition of S. salivarius or beta-galactosidase promoted mucin degradation and concomitant malodor production. Addition of glycosidic inhibitors (p-APTG and glucose) inhibited this process. These results suggest that Gram-positive micro-organisms such as S. salivarius contribute to oral malodor production by deglycosylating salivary glycoproteins, thus exposing their protein core to further degradation by Gram-negative micro-organisms. PMID:16998130

  13. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  14. Use of partial budgeting to determine the economic benefits of antibiotic treatment of chronic subclinical mastitis caused by Streptococcus uberis or Streptococcus dysgalactiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, J.M.; Rooijendijk, J.G.A.; Zadoks, R.N.; Hogeveen, H.

    2005-01-01

    The economic effect of lactational antibiotic treatment of chronic subclinical intramammary infections due to Streptococcus uberis or Streptococcus dysgalactiae was explored by means of partial budgeting. Effects at cow level and herd level were modelled, including prevention of clinical mastitis ep

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae: sensibilidade a penicilina e moxifloxacina Streptococcus pneumoniae: susceptibility to penicillin and moxifloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Rossi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração inibitória mínima (CIM de penicilina parenteral e moxifloxacina contra cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae isoladas em um centro hospitalar. Métodos: Estudo in vitro prospectivo de 100 isolados de S. pneumoniae coletados de pacientes tratados entre outubro de 2008 e julho de 2010 no complexo do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, em São Paulo (SP. Os isolados foram obtidos de culturas do trato respiratório e de amostras de sangue não relacionadas a infecções meníngeas e foram testados quanto à suscetibilidade a penicilina e moxifloxacina por E test. As interpretações categóricas de CIM foram baseadas em padrões atualizados. RESULTADOS: Todos os isolados foram suscetíveis a penicilina parenteral (CIM OBJECTIVE: To determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of parenteral penicillin and moxifloxacin against Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated at a hospital center. METHODS: In-vitro, prospective study involving 100 S. pneumoniae isolates collected from patients who had been treated, between October of 2008 and July of 2010, at the Hospital das Clínicas complex of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine, located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The isolates were obtained from respiratory tract cultures or blood samples unrelated to meningeal infections, and they were tested for penicillin and moxifloxacin susceptibility by E-test. The MIC category interpretations were based on updated standards. RESULTS: All isolates were fully susceptible to parenteral penicillin (MIC < 2 µg/mL, and, consequently, they were also susceptible to amoxicillin, ampicillin, third/fourth generation cephalosporins, and ertapenem. Of the S. pneumoniae strains, 99% were also susceptible to moxifloxacin, and only one strain showed an MIC = 1.5 µg/mL (intermediate. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed high susceptibility rates to parenteral penicillin and

  16. Streptococcus salivarius urease: genetic and biochemical characterization and expression in a dental plaque streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y Y; Clancy, K A; Burne, R A

    1996-01-01

    The hydrolysis of urea by urease enzyme of oral bacteria is believed to have a major impact on oral microbial ecology and to be intimately involved in oral health and diseases. To begin to understand the biochemistry and genetics of oral ureolysis, a study of the urease of Streptococcus salivarius, a highly ureolytic organism which is present in large numbers on the soft tissues of the oral cavity, has been initiated. By using as a probe a 0.6-kpb internal fragment of the S. salivarius 57.I ureC gene, two clones from subgenomic libraries of S. salivarius 57.I in an Escherichia coli plasmid vector were identified. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of one partial and six complete open reading frames which were most homologous to ureIAB-CEFGD of other ureolytic bacteria. Plasmid clones were generated to construct a complete gene cluster and used to transform E. coli and Streptococcus gordonii DL1, a nonureolytic, dental plaque microorganism. The recombinant organisms expressed high levels of urease activity when the growth medium was supplemented with NiCl2. The urease enzyme was purified from E. coli, and its biochemical properties were compared with those of the urease produced by S. salivarius and those of the urease produced by S. gordonii carrying the plasmid-borne ure genes. In all cases, the enzyme had a Km of 3.5 to 4.1 mM, a pH optimum near 7.0, and a temperature optimum near 60 degrees C. S. gordonii carrying the urease genes was then demonstrated to have a significant capacity to temper glycolytic acidification in vitro in the presence of concentrations of urea commonly found in the oral cavity. The ability to genetically engineer plaque bacteria that can modulate environmental pH through ureolysis will open the way to using recombinant ureolytic organisms to test hypotheses regarding the role of oral ureolysis in dental caries, calculus formation, and periodontal diseases. Such recombinant organisms may eventually prove useful for

  17. Comparison of transmission dynamics between Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelahapongsathon, Kansuda; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Pinyopummintr, Tanu; Suriyasathaporn, Witaya

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of study were to determine the transmission parameters (β), durations of infection, and basic reproductive numbers (R0) of both Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus uberis as pathogens causing mastitis outbreaks in dairy herds. A 10-mo longitudinal study was performed using 2 smallholder dairy herds with mastitis outbreaks caused by Strep. agalactiae and Strep. uberis, respectively. Both herds had poor mastitis control management and did not change their milking management during the entire study period. Quarter milk samples were collected at monthly intervals from all lactating animals in each herd for bacteriological identification. The durations of infection for Strep. uberis intramammary infection (IMI) and Strep. agalactiae IMI were examined using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and the Kaplan-Meier survival functions for Strep. uberis IMI and Strep. agalactiae IMI were compared using log rank survival-test. The spread of Strep. uberis and Strep. agalactiae through the population was determined by transmission parameter, β, the probability per unit of time that one infectious quarter will infect another quarter, assuming that all other quarters are susceptible. For the Strep. uberis outbreak herd (31 cows), 56 new infections and 28 quarters with spontaneous cure were observed. For the Strep. agalactiae outbreak herd (19 cows), 26 new infections and 9 quarters with spontaneous cure were observed. The duration of infection for Strep. agalactiae (mean=270.84 d) was significantly longer than the duration of infection for Strep. uberis (mean=187.88 d). The transmission parameters (β) estimated (including 95% confidence interval) for Strep. uberis IMI and Strep. agalactiae IMI were 0.0155 (0.0035-0.0693) and 0.0068 (0.0008-0.0606), respectively. The R0 (including 95% confidence interval) during the study were 2.91 (0.63-13.47) and 1.86 (0.21-16.61) for Strep. uberis IMI and Strep. agalactiae IMI, respectively. In conclusion, the transmission

  18. Glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Actinomyces viscosus in the presence of human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1982-12-01

    Glucose uptake was examined by using whole-cell suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (strains BHT, Ingbritt, and GS-5), Streptococcus mitis (strains 9811 and 72x41), and Actinomyces viscosus (strains T6 and WVU626) incubated for up to 90 min in 0 to 82% (vol/vol) human whole salivary supernatant. Glucose uptake by the S. mutans strains was completely inhibited at all saliva concentrations. Dithiothreitol (DTT), present during saliva incubation, prevented saliva inhibition. Glucose uptake was also restored when saliva-inhibited cells were subsequently exposed to DTT. The inclusion of catalase in the saliva incubation mixtures resulted in protection equal to that obtained with DTT. The S. mitis strains were also inhibited by saliva but to a far lesser extent that S. mutans. DTT and catalase also protected S. mitis from saliva inhibition. Both A. viscosus strains were completely refractory to saliva inhibition of glucose uptake. Based on (i) the sensitivity of the catalase-negative streptococci and the resistance of catalase-positive actinomyces to saliva inhibition and (ii) the equal and complete protection to saliva inhibition afforded by DTT and catalase, we conclude that the lactoperoxidase-SCN(-)-H(2)O(2) system in saliva was the only antibacterial system expressed under our experimental conditions. The relative resistance of S. mitis 9811 (compared with S. mutans BHT) to saliva inhibition was shown not to result from poor H(2)O(2) production in either glucose-supplemented buffer or saliva solutions. S. mitis produced inhibitory quantities of H(2)O(2) that equaled or exceeded S. mutans H(2)O(2) accumulation. It is suggested that S. mitis might possess a greater ability to repair lactoperoxidase-mediated damage than does S. mutans. Every organism studied exhibited a saliva concentration-dependent, cell growth-independent stimulation of glucose uptake after 60 to 90 min of incubation. The A. viscosus and S. mitis strains showed saliva stimulation (or stabilization

  19. Xeroradiography in. beta. -thalassaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scutellari, P.N.; Orzincolo, C.; Tamarozzi, R.

    1985-01-01

    Xeroradiographic investigations of the skull, hand, and elbow were performed on 27 patients with homozygous ..beta..-thalassaemia. The results were compared with plain radiographic examinations. Xeroradiography, because of its technical properties (i.e. edge contrast enhancement and wide latitude), was shown to demonstrate cortical thinning of long bones, swelling of the diploic space in the skull, and reticulated patterns in the elbow better than standard radiography. Moreover, the use of 'positive' mode imaging was shown to have advantages in the study of the skull and extremities.

  20. Double beta decay: present status

    OpenAIRE

    Barabash, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments (including the search for $2\\beta^{+}$, EC$\\beta^{+}$ and ECEC processes) are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Average and recommended half-life values for two-neutrino double beta decay are presented. Conservative upper limits on effective Majorana neutrino mass and the coupling constant of the Majoron to the neutrino are established as $ < 0.75$ eV and $ < 1.9 \\cdot 10^{-4}$, respectively. Proposals fo...